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Sample records for bacterial reaction center

  1. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, T L; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2014-05-01

    This review presents a broad overview of the research that enabled the structure determination of the bacterial reaction centers from Blastochloris viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, with a focus on the contributions from Duysens, Clayton, and Feher. Early experiments performed in the laboratory of Duysens and others demonstrated the utility of spectroscopic techniques and the presence of photosynthetic complexes in both oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The laboratories of Clayton and Feher led efforts to isolate and characterize the bacterial reaction centers. The availability of well-characterized preparations of pure and stable reaction centers allowed the crystallization and subsequent determination of the structures using X-ray diffraction. The three-dimensional structures of reaction centers revealed an overall arrangement of two symmetrical branches of cofactors surrounded by transmembrane helices from the L and M subunits, which also are related by the same twofold symmetry axis. The structure has served as a framework to address several issues concerning bacterial photosynthesis, including the directionality of electron transfer, the properties of the reaction center-cytochrome c 2 complex, and the coupling of proton and electron transfer. Together, these research efforts laid the foundation for ongoing efforts to address an outstanding question in oxygenic photosynthesis, namely the molecular mechanism of water oxidation.

  2. Conformational regulation of charge recombination reactions in a photosynthetic bacterial reaction center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katona, Gergely; Snijder, Arjan; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel

    2005-01-01

    In bright light the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides stabilizes the P(+)(870).Q(-)(A) charge-separated state and thereby minimizes the potentially harmful effects of light saturation. Using X-ray diffraction we report a conformational change that occurs within the cy...... the cytoplasmic domain of this RC in response to prolonged illumination with bright light. Our observations suggest a novel structural mechanism for the regulation of electron transfer reactions in photosynthesis....

  3. Functional type 2 photosynthetic reaction centers found in the rare bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Yonghui; Feng, Fuying; Medová, Hana; Dean, Jason; Koblížek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most fundamental biological processes on Earth. To date, species capable of performing (bacterio)chlorophyll-based phototrophy have been reported in six bacterial phyla. Here we report a phototrophic bacterium belonging to the rare and understudied phylum Gemmatimonadetes. This strain, isolated from a freshwater lake in the Gobi Desert, contains fully functional photosynthetic reaction centers. Its photosynthesis genes appear to originate from an ancient horizonta...

  4. [On the influence of local molecular environment on the redox potential of electron transfer cofactors in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasil'nikov, P M; Noks, P P; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The addition of cryosolvents (glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide) to a water solution containing bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers changes the redox potential of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer, but does not affect the redox potential of the quinone primary acceptor. It has been shown that the change in redox potential can be produced by changes of the electrostatic interactions between cofactors and the local molecular environment modified by additives entered into the solution. The degree of influence of a solvent on the redox potential of various cofactors is determined by degree of availability of these cofactors for molecules of solvent, which depends on the arrangement of cofactors in the structure of reaction centers.

  5. Bacterial Reaction Centers Purified with Styrene Maleic Acid Copolymer Retain Native Membrane Functional Properties and Display Enhanced Stability**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainsbury, David J K; Scheidelaar, Stefan; van Grondelle, Rienk; Killian, J Antoinette; Jones, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins often present daunting challenges for biophysical characterization, a fundamental issue being how to select a surfactant that will optimally preserve the individual structure and functional properties of a given membrane protein. Bacterial reaction centers offer a rare opportunity to compare the properties of an integral membrane protein in different artificial lipid/surfactant environments with those in the native bilayer. Here, we demonstrate that reaction centers purified using a styrene maleic acid copolymer remain associated with a complement of native lipids and do not display the modified functional properties that typically result from detergent solubilization. Direct comparisons show that reaction centers are more stable in this copolymer/lipid environment than in a detergent micelle or even in the native membrane, suggesting a promising new route to exploitation of such photovoltaic integral membrane proteins in device applications. PMID:25212490

  6. Quinone reduction via secondary B-branch electron transfer in mutant bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Kirmaier, Christine; Udawatte, Chandani S M; Hofman, Samuel J; Holten, Dewey; Hanson, Deborah K

    2003-02-18

    Symmetry-related branches of electron-transfer cofactors-initiating with a primary electron donor (P) and terminating in quinone acceptors (Q)-are common features of photosynthetic reaction centers (RC). Experimental observations show activity of only one of them-the A branch-in wild-type bacterial RCs. In a mutant RC, we now demonstrate that electron transfer can occur along the entire, normally inactive B-branch pathway to reduce the terminal acceptor Q(B) on the time scale of nanoseconds. The transmembrane charge-separated state P(+)Q(B)(-) is created in this manner in a Rhodobacter capsulatus RC containing the F(L181)Y-Y(M208)F-L(M212)H-W(M250)V mutations (YFHV). The W(M250)V mutation quantitatively blocks binding of Q(A), thereby eliminating Q(B) reduction via the normal A-branch pathway. Full occupancy of the Q(B) site by the native UQ(10) is ensured (without the necessity of reconstitution by exogenous quinone) by purification of RCs with the mild detergent, Deriphat 160-C. The lifetime of P(+)Q(B)(-) in the YFHV mutant RC is >6 s (at pH 8.0, 298 K). This charge-separated state is not formed upon addition of competitive inhibitors of Q(B) binding (terbutryn or stigmatellin). Furthermore, this lifetime is much longer than the value of approximately 1-1.5 s found when P(+)Q(B)(-) is produced in the wild-type RC by A-side activity alone. Collectively, these results demonstrate that P(+)Q(B)(-) is formed solely by activity of the B-branch carriers in the YFHV RC. In comparison, P(+)Q(B)(-) can form by either the A or B branches in the YFH RC, as indicated by the biexponential lifetimes of approximately 1 and approximately 6-10 s. These findings suggest that P(+)Q(B)(-) states formed via the two branches are distinct and that P(+)Q(B)(-) formed by the B side does not decay via the normal (indirect) pathway that utilizes the A-side cofactors when present. These differences may report on structural and energetic factors that further distinguish the functional

  7. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  8. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  9. Fragment molecular orbital study on electron tunneling mechanisms in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji

    2012-11-01

    The tunneling mechanisms of electron transfers (ETs) in photosynthetic reaction center of Blastochloris viridis are studied by the ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method combined with the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) and the bridge Green function (GF) calculations of the electronic coupling T(DA) and the tunneling current method for the ET pathway analysis at the fragment-based resolution. For the ET from batctriopheophytin (H(L)) to menaquinone (MQ), a major tunneling current through Trp M250 and a minor back flow via Ala M215, Ala M216, and His M217 are quantified. For the ET from MQ to ubiquinone, the major tunneling pathway via the nonheme Fe(2+) and His L190 is identified as well as minor pathway via His M217 and small back flows involving His L230, Glu M232, and His M264. At the given molecular structure from X-ray experiment, the spin state of the Fe(2+) ion, its replacement by Zn(2+), or its removal are found to affect the T(DA) value by factors within 2.2. The calculated T(DA) values, together with experimentally estimated values of the driving force and the reorganization energy, give the ET rates in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  10. Comments on the optical lineshape function: Application to transient hole-burned spectra of bacterial reaction centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reppert, Mike; Kell, Adam; Pruitt, Thomas; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational spectral density is an important physical parameter needed to describe both linear and non-linear spectra of multi-chromophore systems such as photosynthetic complexes. Low-temperature techniques such as hole burning (HB) and fluorescence line narrowing are commonly used to extract the spectral density for a given electronic transition from experimental data. We report here that the lineshape function formula reported by Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)] in the mean-phonon approximation and frequently applied to analyzing HB data contains inconsistencies in notation, leading to essentially incorrect expressions in cases of moderate and strong electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling strengths. A corrected lineshape function L(ω) is given that retains the computational and intuitive advantages of the expression of Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)]. Although the corrected lineshape function could be used in modeling studies of various optical spectra, we suggest that it is better to calculate the lineshape function numerically, without introducing the mean-phonon approximation. New theoretical fits of the P870 and P960 absorption bands and frequency-dependent resonant HB spectra of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reaction centers are provided as examples to demonstrate the importance of correct lineshape expressions. Comparison with the previously determined el-ph coupling parameters [Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5849 (1990); Lyle et al., ibid. 97, 6924 (1993); Reddy et al., ibid. 97, 6934 (1993)] is also provided. The new fits lead to modified el-ph coupling strengths and different frequencies of the special pair marker mode, ω sp , for Rb. sphaeroides that could be used in the future for more advanced calculations of absorption and HB spectra obtained for various bacterial reaction centers

  11. Comments on the optical lineshape function: Application to transient hole-burned spectra of bacterial reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reppert, Mike; Kell, Adam; Pruitt, Thomas [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Jankowiak, Ryszard, E-mail: ryszard@ksu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    The vibrational spectral density is an important physical parameter needed to describe both linear and non-linear spectra of multi-chromophore systems such as photosynthetic complexes. Low-temperature techniques such as hole burning (HB) and fluorescence line narrowing are commonly used to extract the spectral density for a given electronic transition from experimental data. We report here that the lineshape function formula reported by Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)] in the mean-phonon approximation and frequently applied to analyzing HB data contains inconsistencies in notation, leading to essentially incorrect expressions in cases of moderate and strong electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling strengths. A corrected lineshape function L(ω) is given that retains the computational and intuitive advantages of the expression of Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)]. Although the corrected lineshape function could be used in modeling studies of various optical spectra, we suggest that it is better to calculate the lineshape function numerically, without introducing the mean-phonon approximation. New theoretical fits of the P870 and P960 absorption bands and frequency-dependent resonant HB spectra of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reaction centers are provided as examples to demonstrate the importance of correct lineshape expressions. Comparison with the previously determined el-ph coupling parameters [Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5849 (1990); Lyle et al., ibid. 97, 6924 (1993); Reddy et al., ibid. 97, 6934 (1993)] is also provided. The new fits lead to modified el-ph coupling strengths and different frequencies of the special pair marker mode, ω{sub sp}, for Rb. sphaeroides that could be used in the future for more advanced calculations of absorption and HB spectra obtained for various bacterial reaction centers.

  12. The evolutionary pathway from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis examined by comparison of the properties of photosystem II and bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J P; Williams, J C

    2011-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II.

  13. Purple-bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers and quantum-dot hybrid-assemblies in lecithin liposomes and thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashev, Eugeny P; Knox, Petr P; Gorokhov, Vladimir V; Grishanova, Nadezda P; Seifullina, Nuranija Kh; Krikunova, Maria; Lokstein, Heiko; Paschenko, Vladimir Z

    2016-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) absorb ultraviolet and long-wavelength visible light energy much more efficiently than natural bacterial light-harvesting proteins and can transfer the excitation energy to photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Inclusion of RCs combined with QDs as antennae into liposomes opens new opportunities for using such hybrid systems as a basis for artificial energy-transforming devices that potentially can operate with greater efficiency and stability than devices based only on biological components or inorganic components alone. RCs from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and QDs (CdSe/ZnS with hydrophilic covering) were embedded in lecithin liposomes by extrusion of a solution of multilayer lipid vesicles through a polycarbonate membrane or by dialysis of lipids and proteins dispersed with excess detergent. The efficiency of RC and QD interaction within the liposomes was estimated using fluorescence excitation spectra of the photoactive bacteriochlorophyll of the RCs and by measuring the fluorescence decay kinetics of the QDs. The functional activity of the RCs in hybrid complexes was fully maintained, and their stability was even increased. The efficiency of energy transfer between QDs and RCs and conditions of long-term stability of function of such hybrid complexes in film preparations were investigated as well. It was found that dry films containing RCs and QDs, maintained at atmospheric humidity, are capable of maintaining their functional activity for at least some months as judged by measurements of their spectral characteristics, efficiency of energy transfer from QDs to RCs and RC electron transport activity. Addition of trehalose to the films increases the stability further, especially for films maintained at low humidity. These stable hybrid film structures are promising for further studies towards developing new phototransformation devices for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  15. High-pressure modulation of the structure of the bacterial photochemical reaction center at physiological and cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpmann, Kõu; Kangur, Liina; Lõhmus, Ants; Freiberg, Arvi

    2017-07-01

    The optical absorption and fluorescence response to external high pressure of the reaction center membrane chromoprotein complex from the wild-type non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was investigated using the native pigment cofactors as local molecular probes of the reaction center structure at physiological (ambient) and cryogenic (79 K) temperatures. In detergent-purified complexes at ambient temperature, abrupt blue shift and accompanied broadening of the special pair band was observed at about 265 MPa. These reversible in pressure features were assigned to a pressure-induced rupture of a lone hydrogen bond that binds the photo-chemically active L-branch primary electron donor bacteriochlorophyll cofactor to the surrounding protein scaffold. In native membrane-protected complexes the hydrogen bond rupture appeared significantly restricted and occurred close to about 500 MPa. The free energy change associated with the rupture of the special pair hydrogen bond in isolate complexes was estimated to be equal to about 12 kJ mol-1. In frozen samples at cryogenic temperatures the hydrogen bond remained apparently intact up to the maximum utilized pressure of 600 MPa. In this case, however, heterogeneous spectral response of the cofactors from the L-and M-branches was observed due to anisotropic build-up of the protein structure. While in solid phase, the special pair fluorescence as a function of pressure exactly followed the respective absorption spectrum at a constant Stokes shift, at ambient temperature, the two paths began to deviate strongly from one other at the hydrogen bond rupture pressure. This effect was tentatively interpreted by different emission properties of hydrogen-bound and hydrogen-unbound special pair exciton states.

  16. B-side charge separation in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: nanosecond time scale electron transfer from HB- to QB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmaier, Christine; Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K; Holten, Dewey

    2003-02-25

    We report time-resolved optical measurements of the primary electron transfer reactions in Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction centers (RCs) having four mutations: Phe(L181) --> Tyr, Tyr(M208) --> Phe, Leu(M212) --> His, and Trp(M250) --> Val (denoted YFHV). Following direct excitation of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P) to its lowest excited singlet state P, electron transfer to the B-side bacteriopheophytin (H(B)) gives P(+)H(B)(-) in approximately 30% yield. When the secondary quinone (Q(B)) site is fully occupied, P(+)H(B)(-) decays with a time constant estimated to be in the range of 1.5-3 ns. In the presence of excess terbutryn, a competitive inhibitor of Q(B) binding, the observed lifetime of P(+)H(B)(-) is noticeably longer and is estimated to be in the range of 4-8 ns. On the basis of these values, the rate constant for P(+)H(B)(-) --> P(+)Q(B)(-) electron transfer is calculated to be between approximately (2 ns)(-)(1) and approximately (12 ns)(-)(1), making it at least an order of magnitude smaller than the rate constant of approximately (200 ps)(-)(1) for electron transfer between the corresponding A-side cofactors (P(+)H(A)(-) --> P(+)Q(A)(-)). Structural and energetic factors associated with electron transfer to Q(B) compared to Q(A) are discussed. Comparison of the P(+)H(B)(-) lifetimes in the presence and absence of terbutryn indicates that the ultimate (i.e., quantum) yield of P(+)Q(B)(-) formation relative to P is 10-25% in the YFHV RC.

  17. The importance of a hot-sequential mechanism in triplet-state formation by charge recombination in reaction centers of bacterial photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Mukai, K.; Sumi, H.

    2006-01-01

    In photosynthesis, pigment-excitation energies in the antenna system produced by light harvesting are transferred among antenna pigments toward the core antenna, where they are captured by the reaction center and initially fixed in the form of a charge separation. Primary charge separation between an oxidized special pair (P + ) and a reduced bacteriopheohytin (H - ) is occasionally intervened by recombination, and a spin-triplet state ( 3 P*) is formed on P in the bacterial reaction center. The 3 P* state is harmful to bio-organisms, inducing the formation of the highly damaging singlet oxygen species. Therefore, understanding the 3 P*-formation mechanism is important. The 3 P* formation is mediated by a state |m> of intermediate charge separation between P and the accessory chlorophyll, which is located between P and H. It will be shown theoretically in the present work that at room temperature, not only the mechanism of superexchange by quantum-mechanical virtual mediation at |m>, but also a hot-sequential mechanism contributes to the mediation. In the latter, although |m> is produced as a real state, the final state 3 P* is quickly formed during thermalization of phonons in the protein matrix in |m>. In the former, the final state is formed more quickly before dephasing-thermalization of phonons in |m>. 3 P* is unistep formed from the charge-separated state in the both mechanisms

  18. Electrostatics of the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center. Protonation of Glu L 212 and Asp L 213 - A new method of calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptushenko, Vasily V; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Krishtalik, Lev I

    2015-12-01

    Continuum electrostatic calculation of the transfer energies of anions from water into aprotic solvents gives the figures erroneous by order of magnitude. This is due to the hydrogen bond disruption that suggests the necessity to reconsider the traditional approach of the purely electrostatic calculation of the transfer energy from water into protein. In this paper, the method combining the experimental estimates of the transfer energies from water into aprotic solvent and the electrostatic calculation of the transfer energies from aprotic solvent into protein is proposed. Hydrogen bonds between aprotic solvent and solute are taken into account by introducing an imaginary aprotic medium incapable to form hydrogen bonds with the solute. Besides, a new treatment of the heterogeneous intraprotein dielectric permittivity based on the microscopic protein structure and electrometric measurements is elaborated. The method accounts semi-quantitatively for the electrostatic effect of diverse charged amino acid substitutions in the donor and acceptor parts of the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Analysis of the volatile secondary acceptor site QB revealed that in the conformation with a minimal distance between quinone QB and Glu L 212 the proton uptake upon the reduction of QB is prompted by Glu L 212 in alkaline and by Asp L 213 in slightly acidic regions. This agrees with the pH dependences of protonation degrees and the proton uptake. The method of pK calculation was applied successfully also for dissociation of Asp 26 in bacterial thioredoxin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrogen bonds in the vicinity of the special pair of the bacterial reaction center probed by hydrostatic high-pressure absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangur, Liina; Jones, Michael R; Freiberg, Arvi

    2017-12-01

    Using the native bacteriochlorophyll a pigment cofactors as local probes, we investigated the response to external hydrostatic high pressure of reaction center membrane protein complexes from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Wild-type and engineered complexes were used with a varied number (0, 1 or 2) of hydrogen bonds that bind the reaction center primary donor bacteriochlorophyll cofactors to the surrounding protein scaffold. A pressure-induced breakage of hydrogen bonds was established for both detergent-purified and membrane-embedded reaction centers, but at rather different pressures: between 0.2 and 0.3GPa and at about 0.55GPa, respectively. The free energy change associated with the rupture of the single hydrogen bond present in wild-type reaction centers was estimated to be equal to 13-14kJ/mol. In the mutant with two symmetrical hydrogen bonds (FM197H) a single cooperative rupture of the two bonds was observed corresponding to an about twice stronger bond, rather than a sequential rupture of two individual bonds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of calculated and experimental isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for purple bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers with different quinones incorporated into the QA binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eZhao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that ONIOM type (QM/MM calculations can be used to simulate isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for neutral ubiquinone in the QA binding site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centers. Here we considerably extend upon this previous work by calculating isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for reaction centers with a variety of unlabeled and 18O labeled foreign quinones incorporated into the QA binding site. Isotope edited spectra were calculated for reaction centers with 2,3-dimethoxy-5,6-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (MQ0, 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (duroquinone, DQ, and 2,3-dimethyl-l,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ incorporated, and compared to corresponding experimental spectra. The calculated and experimental spectra agree well, further demonstrating the utility and applicability of our ONIOM approach for calculating the vibrational properties of pigments in protein binding sites.The normal modes that contribute to the bands in the calculated spectra, their composition, frequency and intensity, and how these quantities are modified upon 18O labeling, are presented. This computed information leads to a new and more detailed understanding/interpretation of the experimental FTIR difference spectra. Hydrogen bonding to the carbonyl groups of the incorporated quinones is shown to be relatively weak. It is also shown that there is some asymmetry in hydrogen bonding, accounting for 10-13 cm-1 separation in the frequencies of the carbonyl vibrational modes of the incorporated quinones. The extent of asymmetry H-bonding could only be established by considering the spectra for various types of quinones incorporated into the QA binding site. The quinones listed above are tail-less. Spectra were also calculated for reaction centers with corresponding tail containing quinones incorporated, and it is found that replacement of the quinone methyl group by a phytyl or prenyl chain does not alter ONIOM calculated s

  1. Volume changes and electrostriction in the primary photoreactions of various photosynthetic systems: estimation of dielectric coefficient in bacterial reaction centers and of the observed volume changes with the Drude-Nernst equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzerall, David; Hou, Jian-Min; Boichenko, Vladimir A

    2002-01-01

    Photoacoustics (PA) allows the determination of enthalpy and volume changes of photoreactions in photosynthetic reaction centers on the 0.1-10 mus time scale. These include the bacterial centers from Rb. sphaeroides, PS I and PS II centers from Synechocystis and in whole cells. In vitro and in vivo PA data on PS I and PS II revealed that both the volume change (-26 A(3)) and reaction enthalpy (-0.4 eV) in PS I are the same as those in the bacterial centers. However the volume change in PS II is small and the enthalpy far larger, -1 eV. Assigning the volume changes to electrostriction allows a coherent explanation of these observations. One can explain the large volume decrease in the bacterial centers with an effective dielectric coefficient of approximately 4. This is a unique approach to this parameter so important in estimation of protein energetics. The value of the volume contraction for PS I can only be explained if the acceptor is the super- cluster (Fe(4)S(4))(Cys(4)) with charge change from -1 to -2. The small volume change in PS II is explained by sub-mus electron transfer from Y(Z) anion to P(680) cation, in which charge is only moved from the Y(Z) anion to the Q(A) with no charge separation or with rapid proton transfer from oxidized Y(Z) to a polar region and thus very little change in electrostriction. At more acid pH equally rapid proton transfer from a neighboring histidine to a polar region may be caused by the electric field of the P(680) cation.

  2. Conformational differences between the methoxy groups of QA and QB site ubisemiquinones in bacterial reaction centers: a key role for methoxy group orientation in modulating ubiquinone redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2013-07-09

    Ubiquinone is an almost universal, membrane-associated redox mediator. Its ability to accept either one or two electrons allows it to function in critical roles in biological electron transport. The redox properties of ubiquinone in vivo are determined by its environment in the binding sites of proteins and by the dihedral angle of each methoxy group relative to the ring plane. This is an attribute unique to ubiquinone among natural quinones and could account for its widespread function with many different redox complexes. In this work, we use the photosynthetic reaction center as a model system for understanding the role of methoxy conformations in determining the redox potential of the ubiquinone/semiquinone couple. Despite the abundance of X-ray crystal structures for the reaction center, quinone site resolution has thus far been too low to provide a reliable measure of the methoxy dihedral angles of the primary and secondary quinones, QA and QB. We performed 2D ESEEM (HYSCORE) on isolated reaction centers with ubiquinones (13)C-labeled at the headgroup methyl and methoxy substituents, and have measured the (13)C isotropic and anisotropic components of the hyperfine tensors. Hyperfine couplings were compared to those derived by DFT calculations as a function of methoxy torsional angle allowing estimation of the methoxy dihedral angles for the semiquinones in the QA and QB sites. Based on this analysis, the orientation of the 2-methoxy groups are distinct in the two sites, with QB more out of plane by 20-25°. This corresponds to an ≈50 meV larger electron affinity for the QB quinone, indicating a substantial contribution to the experimental difference in redox potentials (60-75 mV) of the two quinones. The methods developed here can be readily extended to ubiquinone-binding sites in other protein complexes.

  3. Correlation of paramagnetic states and molecular structure in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: The symmetry of the primary electron donor in Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.R.; Budil, D.E.; Gast, P.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The orientation of the principal axes of the primary electron donor triplet state measured in single crystals of photosynthetic reaction centers is compared to the x-ray structures of the bacteria Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides R-26 and Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) viridis. The primary donor of Rps. viridis is significantly different from that of Rb. sphaeroides. The measured directions of the axes indicate that triplet excitation is almost completely localized on the L-subunit half of the dimer in Rps. viridis but is more symmetrically distributed on the dimeric donor in Rb. sphaeroides R-26. The large reduction of the zero field splitting parameters relative to monomeric bacteriochlorophyll triplet in vitro suggests significant participation of asymmetrical charge transfer electronic configurations in the special pair triplet state of both organisms

  4. Modeling the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. VII. Full simulation of the intervalence hole-transfer absorption spectrum of the special-pair radical cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Hush, Noel S.

    2003-01-01

    reaction centers from photosystems I, II, etc., facilitating a deeper understanding of the role of the special pair in initiating primary charge separation during photosynthesis

  5. The rate of second electron transfer to QB(-) in bacterial reaction center of impaired proton delivery shows hydrogen-isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, Ágnes; Wraight, Colin A; Maróti, Péter

    2015-02-01

    The 2nd electron transfer in reaction center of photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a two step process in which protonation of QB(-) precedes interquinone electron transfer. The thermal activation and pH dependence of the overall rate constants of different RC variants were measured and compared in solvents of water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O). The electron transfer variants where the electron transfer is rate limiting (wild type and M17DN, L210DN and H173EQ mutants) do not show solvent isotope effect and the significant decrease of the rate constant of the second electron transfer in these mutants is due to lowering the operational pKa of QB(-)/QBH: 4.5 (native), 3.9 (L210DN), 3.7 (M17DN) and 3.1 (H173EQ) at pH7. On the other hand, the proton transfer variants where the proton transfer is rate limiting demonstrate solvent isotope effect of pH-independent moderate magnitude (2.11±0.26 (WT+Ni(2+)), 2.16±0.35 (WT+Cd(2+)) and 2.34±0.44 (L210DN/M17DN)) or pH-dependent large magnitude (5.7 at pH4 (L213DN)). Upon deuteration, the free energy and the enthalpy of activation increase in all proton transfer variants by about 1 kcal/mol and the entropy of activation becomes negligible in L210DN/M17DN mutant. The results are interpreted as manifestation of equilibrium and kinetic solvent isotope effects and the structural, energetic and kinetic possibility of alternate proton delivery pathways are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tuning cofactor redox potentials: the 2-methoxy dihedral angle generates a redox potential difference of >160 mV between the primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) quinones of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T; Mattis, Aidas J; O'Malley, Patrick J; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A

    2013-10-15

    Only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. (13)C hyperfine sublevel correlation measurements of the 2-methoxy in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with quantum mechanics calculations of the (13)C couplings as a function of the dihedral angle. X-ray structures support dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of ~180 mV. This is consistent with the failure of a ubiquinone analogue lacking the 2-methoxy to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm of ≈160-195 mV.

  7. Field reaction of cassava genotypes to anthracnose, bacterial blight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field reaction of cassava genotypes to anthracnose, bacterial blight, cassava mosaic disease and their effects on yield. ... The BYDV-PAV and BYDV-RPV serotypes were identified from 9 and 10 of the 11 surveyed fields, respectively, with the two serotypes co-infecting some plants. Of the nine wheat cultivars surveyed, four ...

  8. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  9. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  10. The effects of protein crowding in bacterial photosynthetic membranes on the flow of quinone redox species between the photochemical reaction center and the ubiquinol-cytochrome c2 oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Kamil; Sha, Daniel; Frese, Raoul N; Sturgis, James N; Nanda, Vikas; Niederman, Robert A

    2011-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the native architecture of the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) of a variety of species of purple photosynthetic bacteria, obtained at submolecular resolution, shows a tightly packed arrangement of light harvesting (LH) and reaction center (RC) complexes. Since there are no unattributed structures or gaps with space sufficient for the cytochrome bc(1) or ATPase complexes, they are localized in membrane domains distinct from the flat regions imaged by AFM. This has generated a renewed interest in possible long-range pathways for lateral diffusion of UQ redox species that functionally link the RC and the bc(1) complexes. Recent proposals to account for UQ flow in the membrane bilayer are reviewed, along with new experimental evidence provided from an analysis of intrinsic near-IR fluorescence emission that has served to test these hypotheses. The results suggest that different mechanism of UQ flow exist between species such as Rhodobacter sphaeroides, with a highly organized arrangement of LH and RC complexes and fast RC electron transfer turnover, and Phaeospirillum molischianum with a more random organization and slower RC turnover. It is concluded that packing density of the peripheral LH2 antenna in the Rba. sphaeroides ICM imposes constraints that significantly slow the diffusion of UQ redox species between the RC and cytochrome bc(1) complex, while in Phs. molischianum, the crowding of the ICM with LH3 has little effect upon UQ diffusion. This supports the proposal that in this type of ICM, a network of RC-LH1 core complexes observed in AFM provides a pathway for long-range quinone diffusion that is unaffected by differences in LH complex composition or organization.

  11. Enriched reaction center preparation from green photosynthetic bacteria. [Chlorobium limicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, J M; Giddings, Jr, T H; Shaw, E K

    1976-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a reaction-center complex I from Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum 6230 (Tassajara) was incubated in 2 M guanidine . HCl and then chromatographed on cross-linked dextran or agarose gel. Two principal components were separated: a larger component with photochemical activity (bacteriochlorophyll a reaction-center complex II) and a smaller component without activity (bacteriochlorophyll a protein). Complex II contains carotenoid, bacteriochlorophyll a, reaction center(s), and cytochromes b and c, but lacks the well characterized bacteriochlorophyll a protein contained in Complex I. Complex II carries out a light-induced reduction of cytochrome b along with an oxidation of cytochrome c.

  12. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shlyk, O.; Samish, I.; Matěnová, M.; Dulebo, A.; Poláková, H.; Kaftan, David; Scherz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAR 16 (2017), s. 1-13, č. článku 44580. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-00703S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BACTERIAL REACTION CENTERS * INDUCED STRUCTURAL-CHANGES * ATOMIC-FORCE MICROSCOPE Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  13. Mathematical Model of Synthesis Catalyst with Local Reaction Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Derevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a catalyst granule with a porous ceramic passive substrate and point active centers on which an exothermic synthesis reaction occurs. A rate of the chemical reaction depends on the temperature according to the Arrhenius law. Heat is removed from the pellet surface in products of synthesis due to heat transfer. In our work we first proposed a model for calculating the steady-state temperature of a catalyst pellet with local reaction centers. Calculation of active centers temperature is based on the idea of self-consistent field (mean-field theory. At first, it is considered that powers of the reaction heat release at the centers are known. On the basis of the found analytical solution, which describes temperature distribution inside the granule, the average temperature of the reaction centers is calculated, which then is inserted in the formula for heat release. The resulting system of transcendental algebraic equations is transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations of relaxation type and solved numerically to achieve a steady-state value. As a practical application, the article considers a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst granule with active cobalt metallic micro-particles. Cobalt micro-particles are the centers of the exothermic reaction of hydrocarbons macromolecular synthesis. Synthesis occurs as a result of absorption of the components of the synthesis gas on metallic cobalt. The temperature distribution inside the granule for a single local center and reaction centers located on the same granule diameter is found. It was found that there is a critical temperature of reactor exceeding of which leads to significant local overheating of the centers - thermal explosion. The temperature distribution with the local reaction centers is qualitatively different from the granule temperature, calculated in the homogeneous approximation. It is shown that, in contrast to the homogeneous approximation, the

  14. Implementation of secondary bacterial culture testing of platelets to mitigate residual risk of septic transfusion reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Evan M; Marshall, Christi E; Boyd, Joan S; Shifflett, Lisa; Tobian, Aaron A R; Gehrie, Eric A; Ness, Paul M

    2018-04-01

    Bacterial contamination of platelets remains a major transfusion-associated risk despite long-standing safety measures in the United States. We evaluated an approach using secondary bacterial culture (SBC) to contend with residual risk of bacterial contamination. Phased implementation of SBC was initiated in October 2016 for platelets (all apheresis collected) received at our institution from the blood donor center (Day 3 post collection). Platelet products were sampled aseptically (5 mL inoculated into an aerobic bottle [BacT/ALERT BPA, BioMerieux, Inc.]) by the blood bank staff upon receipt, using a sterile connection device and sampling kit. The platelet sample was inoculated into an aerobic blood culture bottle and incubated at 35°C for 3 days. The cost of SBC was calculated on the basis of consumables and labor costs at time of implementation. In the 13 months following implementation (October 6, 2016, to November 30, 2017), 23,044/24,653 (93.47%) platelet products underwent SBC. A total of eight positive cultures were detected (incidence 1 in 2881 platelet products), seven of which were positive within 24 hours of SBC. Coagulase negative Staphyloccus spp. were identified in four cases. Five of the eight cases were probable true positive (repeat reactive) and interdicted (cost per averted case was US$77,935). The remaining three cases were indeterminate. No septic transfusion reactions were reported during the observation period. We demonstrate the feasibility of SBC of apheresis platelets to mitigate bacterial risk. SBC is lower cost than alternative measures (e.g., pathogen reduction and point-of-release testing) and can be integrated into workflow at hospital transfusion services. © 2018 AABB.

  15. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  16. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosyntetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  17. REACTION OF Musa balbisiana TO BANANA BACTERIAL WILT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    2Makerere University, Department of Agricultural Production, P. O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda. Corresponding author: kumalfred@gmail.com. (Received 7 February, 2012; accepted 3 September, 2013). ABSTRACT. Banana bacterial wilt (Xanthomonas campestris) is an emerging disease of bananas in Uganda.

  18. Reaction of Musa balbisiana to Banana bacterial wilt infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The expression of NPR1, a marker gene of the systemic acquired resistance plant defence system provides preliminary evidence that this may be the major form of resistance in Musa balbisiana to bacterial wilt infection. Keywords: NPR1, PR proteins, Uganda, Xanthomonas campestris. African Crop Science Journal, Vol.

  19. Bio-Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells Incorporating Reaction Center and Reaction Center Plus Light Harvesting Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Houman

    Harvesting solar energy can potentially be a promising solution to the energy crisis now and in the future. However, material and processing costs continue to be the most important limitations for the commercial devices. A key solution to these problems might lie within the development of bio-hybrid solar cells that seeks to mimic photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and to take advantage of the low material costs, negative carbon footprint, and material abundance. The bio-photoelectrochemical cell technologies exploit biomimetic means of energy conversion by utilizing plant-derived photosystems which can be inexpensive and ultimately the most sustainable alternative. Plants and photosynthetic bacteria harvest light, through special proteins called reaction centers (RCs), with high efficiency and convert it into electrochemical energy. In theory, photosynthetic RCs can be used in a device to harvest solar energy and generate 1.1 V open circuit voltage and ~1 mA cm-2 short circuit photocurrent. Considering the nearly perfect quantum yield of photo-induced charge separation, efficiency of a protein-based solar cell might exceed 20%. In practice, the efficiency of fabricated devices has been limited mainly due to the challenges in the electron transfer between the protein complex and the device electrodes as well as limited light absorption. The overarching goal of this work is to increase the power conversion efficiency in protein-based solar cells by addressing those issues (i.e. electron transfer and light absorption). This work presents several approaches to increase the charge transfer rate between the photosynthetic RC and underlying electrode as well as increasing the light absorption to eventually enhance the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of bio-hybrid solar cells. The first approach is to decrease the electron transfer distance between one of the redox active sites in the RC and the underlying electrode by direct attachment of the of protein complex

  20. Quantum measurement corrections to CIDNP in photosynthetic reaction centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kominis, Iannis K

    2013-01-01

    Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization is a signature of spin order appearing in many photosynthetic reaction centers. Such polarization, significantly enhanced above thermal equilibrium, is known to result from the nuclear spin sorting inherent in the radical pair mechanism underlying long-lived charge-separated states in photosynthetic reaction centers. We will show here that the recently understood fundamental quantum dynamics of radical-ion-pair reactions open up a new and completely unexpected pathway toward obtaining chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization signals. The fundamental decoherence mechanism inherent in the recombination process of radical pairs is shown to produce nuclear spin polarizations of the order of 10 4 times (or more) higher than the thermal equilibrium value at the Earth's magnetic field relevant to natural photosynthesis. This opens up the possibility of a fundamentally new exploration of the biological significance of high nuclear polarizations in photosynthesis. (paper)

  1. Diversity of Bacterial Communities of Fitness Center Surfaces in a U.S. Metropolitan Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabanita Mukherjee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Public fitness centers and exercise facilities have been implicated as possible sources for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial community residing on the surfaces in these indoor environments is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the overall bacterial ecology of selected fitness centers in a metropolitan area (Memphis, TN, USA utilizing culture-independent pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were collected from the skin-contact surfaces (e.g., exercise instruments, floor mats, handrails, etc. within fitness centers. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Proteobacter and Actinobacteria, with a total of 17 bacterial families and 25 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human and environmental origin (including, air, dust, soil, and water. Additionally, we found the presence of some pathogenic or potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Klebsiella, and Micrococcus. Staphylococcus was found to be the most prevalent genus. Presence of viable forms of these pathogens elevates risk of exposure of any susceptible individuals. Several factors (including personal hygiene, surface cleaning and disinfection schedules of the facilities may be the reasons for the rich bacterial diversity found in this study. The current finding underscores the need to increase public awareness on the importance of personal hygiene and sanitation for public gym users.

  2. The Type 1 Homodimeric Reaction Center in Heliobacterium modesticaldum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golbeck, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2018-01-15

    In this funding period, we (i) found that strong illumination of Heliobacterium modesticaldum cells results in saturation of the electron acceptor pool, leading to reduction of the acceptor side and the creation of a back-reacting state that gives rise to delayed fluorescence; (ii) noted that when the FX cluster is reduced in purified reaction centers, no electron transfer occurs beyond A0, even though a quinone is present; (iii) observed by photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) studies of whole cells of Heliobacterium mobilis that primary charge separation is retained even after conversion of the majority of BChl g to Chl aF. ; and (iv) purified a homogeneous preparation of reaction center cores, which led to promising crystallization trials to obtain a three-dimensional structure.

  3. "Bacterial infections in visceral leishmaniasis in Children’s Medical Center 1966-2000 "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Tabatabaei P "

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial infections are seen in patients with visceral leishmaniasis. This study was conducted to determine the incidence of such infections and the more common infections agents. Materials and Methods: During the 15-years period in a prospective study from 1986 to 2000, 123 patients with visceral leishmaniasis were studied in the Children Medical Center. Results: From all the cases, 41 (33 percent patients had Also bacterial infections. Respiratory tract, urinary system, Middle ear were the most common sites of infection. Conclusion: When bacterial Infection is suspected in these patients, empiric antibiotic therapy should be started immediately after appropriate diagnostic procedures are taken.

  4. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  5. Chemical proprieties of the iron-quinone complex in mutated reaction centers of Rb. sphaeroides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hałas, Agnieszka; Derrien, Valerie; Sebban, Pierre; Matlak, Krzysztof; Korecki, Józef; Kruk, Jerzy; Burda, Kvĕtoslava

    2012-01-01

    We investigated type II bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers, which contain a quinone - iron complex (Q A -Fe-Q B ) on their acceptor side. Under physiological conditions it was observed mainly in a reduced high spin state but its low spin ferrous states were also observed. Therefore, it was suggested that it might regulate the dynamical properties of the iron–quinone complex and the protonation and deprotonation events in its neighbourhood. In order to get insight into the molecular mechanism of the NHFe low spin state formation, we preformed Mössbauer studies of a wild type of Rb. sphaeroides and its two mutated forms. Our Mössbauer measurements show that the hydrophobicity of the Q A binding site can be crucial for stabilization of the high spin ferrous state of NHFe.

  6. Regulation of Germinal Center Reactions by B and T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonseok Chung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Break of B cell tolerance to self-antigens results in the development of autoantibodies and, thus, leads to autoimmunity. How B cell tolerance is maintained during active germinal center (GC reactions is yet to be fully understood. Recent advances revealed several subsets of T cells and B cells that can positively or negatively regulate GC B cell responses in vivo. IL-21-producing CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells comprise a distinct lineage of helper T cells—termed follicular helper T cells (TFH—that can provide help for the development of GC reactions where somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation take place. Although the function of TFH cells is beneficial in generating high affinity antibodies against infectious agents, aberrant activation of TFH cell or B cell to self-antigens results in autoimmunity. At least three subsets of immune cells have been proposed as regulatory cells that can limit such antibody-mediated autoimmunity, including follicular regulatory T cells (TFR, Qa-1 restricted CD8+ regulatory T cells (CD8+TREG, and regulatory B cells (BREG. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of GC B cell regulation with specific emphasis on the newly identified immune cell subsets involved in this process.

  7. Platelet transfusion therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: bacterial contamination, recipient characteristics and acute transfusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Heather A.; Ddungu, Henry; Angom, Racheal; Baluku, Hannington; Kajumbula, Henry; Kyeyune-Byabazaire, Dorothy; Orem, Jackson; Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra; Tobian, Aaron A.R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Little data are available on bacterial contamination (BC) of platelet units or acute transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions (PT) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods This prospective observational study evaluated the rate of BC of whole blood derived platelet units (WB-PU), the utility of performing Gram stains (GS) to prevent septic reactions, characteristics of patients receiving PT and the rate of acute reactions associated with PT at the Uganda Cancer Institute in Kampala, Uganda. An aliquot of each WB-PU studied was taken to perform GS and culture using the Bactec™ 9120 instrument. Study participants were monitored for reactions. Results 337 WB-PU were evaluated for BC, of which 323 units were transfused in 151 transfusion episodes to 50 patients. The frequency of BC ranged from 0.3%–2.1% (according to criteria used to define BC). The GS had high specificity (99.1%), but low sensitivity to detect units with BC. The median platelet count prior to PT was 10,900 (IQR 6,000–18,900) cells/μL. 78% of PT were given to patients with no bleeding. Acute reactions occurred in 11 transfusion episodes, involving 13 WB-PU, for a rate of 7.3% (95%CI=3.7–12.7%) per transfusion episode. All recipients of units with positive bacterial cultures were receiving antibiotics at the time of transfusion; none experienced a reaction. Conclusions The rate of BC observed in this study is lower than previously reported in SSA, but still remains a safety issue. As GS appears to be an ineffective screening tool, alternate methods should be explored to prevent transfusing bacterially-contaminated platelets in SSA. PMID:27079627

  8. Early bacteriopheophytin reduction in charge separation in reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingyi; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Paparelli, Laura; Jones, Michael R; Groot, Marie Louise

    2013-06-04

    A question at the forefront of biophysical sciences is, to what extent do quantum effects and protein conformational changes play a role in processes such as biological sensing and energy conversion? At the heart of photosynthetic energy transduction lie processes involving ultrafast energy and electron transfers among a small number of tetrapyrrole pigments embedded in the interior of a protein. In the purple bacterial reaction center (RC), a highly efficient ultrafast charge separation takes place between a pair of bacteriochlorophylls: an accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B) and bacteriopheophytin (H). In this work, we applied ultrafast spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral region to Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs to accurately track the timing of the electron on BA and HA via the appearance of the BA and HA anion bands. We observed an unexpectedly early rise of the HA⁻ band that challenges the accepted simple picture of stepwise electron transfer with 3 ps and 1 ps time constants. The implications for the mechanism of initial charge separation in bacterial RCs are discussed in terms of a possible adiabatic electron transfer step between BA and HA, and the effect of protein conformation on the electron transfer rate. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial discrimination by means of a universal array approach mediated by LDR (ligase detection reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consolandi Clarissa

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PCR amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes provides the most comprehensive and flexible means of sampling bacterial communities. Sequence analysis of these cloned fragments can provide a qualitative and quantitative insight of the microbial population under scrutiny although this approach is not suited to large-scale screenings. Other methods, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, heteroduplex or terminal restriction fragment analysis are rapid and therefore amenable to field-scale experiments. A very recent addition to these analytical tools is represented by microarray technology. Results Here we present our results using a Universal DNA Microarray approach as an analytical tool for bacterial discrimination. The proposed procedure is based on the properties of the DNA ligation reaction and requires the design of two probes specific for each target sequence. One oligo carries a fluorescent label and the other a unique sequence (cZipCode or complementary ZipCode which identifies a ligation product. Ligated fragments, obtained in presence of a proper template (a PCR amplified fragment of the 16s rRNA gene contain either the fluorescent label or the unique sequence and therefore are addressed to the location on the microarray where the ZipCode sequence has been spotted. Such an array is therefore "Universal" being unrelated to a specific molecular analysis. Here we present the design of probes specific for some groups of bacteria and their application to bacterial diagnostics. Conclusions The combined use of selective probes, ligation reaction and the Universal Array approach yielded an analytical procedure with a good power of discrimination among bacteria.

  10. Moessbauer spectroscopy on the reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, E.; Goldanskii, V.I.; Birk, A.; Parak, F.; Fritzsch, G.; Sinning, I.; Michel, H.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins called 'reaction centers' (RC) can be isolated from many photosynthetic bacteria. They have one non-heme iron in a quinone acceptor region. The RC of Rhodopseudomonas viridis contains an additional tightly bound tetra-heme cytochrome c subunit. The electronic configuration of both cytochrome and the non-heme iron has been studied in the crystallized protein by Moessbauer spectroscopy at different redox potentials, pH-values, and with an addition of o-phenanthroline. At high potentials (E h =+500 mV) all heme irons are in the low spin Fe 3+ -state, and at low potential (E h = 1 50 mV) they are low spin Fe 2+ with the same Moessbauer parameters for all hemes independent of pH. Redox titrations change the relative area of the reduced and oxidized states in agreement with other methods. The non-heme iron shows a high spin Fe 2+ configuration independent of E h and pH with parameters comparable to those of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Surprisingly, there is strong evidence for another non-heme iron species in part of the molecules with a Fe 2+ low spin configuration. Incubation with o-phenanthroline decreases the relative Fe 2+ hs-area and increases the contribution of Fe 2+ ls-area. Above 210 K the mean square displacement, 2 >, of the RC-crystals increases more than linearly with temperature. This may be correlated with the increase of the electron transfer rate and indicates that intramolecular mobility influences the functional activity of a protein. (orig.)

  11. The Evaluation of Bacterial Contamination of Active Radiography Apparatus in Dental Centers of Hamadan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Eskandarloo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: During the most dental procedures, contamination of devices with blood, saliva and other body fluids, which is the most important factor for transmission of infectious diseases, is inevitable. Therefore principles of infection control should be carefully considered in the dentistry. The purpose of this study was the evaluation of bacterial contamination of active radiographic apparatus in dental centers of Hamadan city in year 2003. Materials & Methods : In this cross-sectional study 37 radiographic apparatus in dental centers of Hamadan were evaluated. Samples were collected from four area (25 cm2 each that are frequently touched by dentists, personnel, etc. using a swab. The swab was inserted into the carrier media containing thioglycolate, a smear was obtained from the solution and remaining solution was cultured in blood agar. Smear and blood agar cultures were transferred to microbiology lab to determine bacterial contamination level as well as bacterial typing. According to WHO criteria the area which has more than 10 microorganism/cm2 is considered as contaminated. Results: It was found that 13 of radiographic apparatus(35% were contaminated, the most frequent bacterial type detected in this study was micrococcus (75.7% and the least were enterobacter and nocardia (2.7% each. Antiseptic materials used for decontamination of the devices were as follow : Alcohol (43.2% , Deconex (32.4% , Micro10 (18.9% , Savlon (10.8% , Hypochlorid (5.4% , Glutaraldehyde (2.7%. Conclusion: Based on the results (35% bacterial contamination it can be concluded that careful performance of infection control principles, daily decontamination of devices and offering periodic instructions for dental personnel are essential.

  12. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 16S rDNA for bacterial identification in empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajniti; Kumari, Chhaya; Das, B K; Nath, Gopal

    2014-05-01

    Empyema in children causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, identification of organisms is a major concern. To detect bacterial pathogens in pus specimens of children with empyema by 16S rDNA nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and correlate it with culture and sensitivity. Sixty-six children admitted to the paediatric ward with a diagnosis of empyema were enrolled prospectively. Aspirated pus was subjected to cytochemical examination, culture and sensitivity, and nested PCR targeting 16S rDNA using a universal eubacterial primer. Mean (SD) age was 5·8 (1·8) years (range 1-13). Analysis of aspirated pus demonstrated total leucocyte count >1000×10(6)/L, elevated protein (≧20 g/L) and decreased glucose (≤2·2 mmol/L) in 80·3%, 98·5% and 100%, respectively. Gram-positive cocci were detected in 29 (43·9%) and Gram-negative bacilli in two patients. Nested PCR for the presence of bacterial pathogens was positive in 50·0%, compared with 36·3% for culture. 16S rDNA PCR improves rates of detection of bacteria in pleural fluid, and can detect bacterial species in a single assay as well as identifying unusual and unexpected causal agents.

  13. Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains: examples from photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M. R.; Madeo, Jennifer; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Quinones such as ubiquinone are the lipid soluble electron and proton carriers in the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and oxygenic bacteria. Quinones undergo controlled redox reactions bound to specific sites in integral membrane proteins such as the cytochrome bc1 oxidoreductase. The quinone reactions in bacterial photosynthesis are amongst the best characterized, presenting a model to understand how proteins modulate cofactor chemistry. The free energy of ubiquinone redox reactions in aqueous solution and in the QA and QB sites of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) are compared. In the primary QA site ubiquinone is reduced only to the anionic semiquinone (Q•−) while in the secondary QB site the product is the doubly reduced, doubly protonated quinol (QH2). The ways in which the protein modifies the relative energy of each reduced and protonated intermediate are described. For example, the protein stabilizes Q•− while destabilizing Q= relative to aqueous solution through electrostatic interactions. In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms for stabilizing the intermediate semiquinones are compared. Evidence for the protein sequestering anionic compounds by slowing both on and off rates as well as by binding the anion more tightly is reviewed. PMID:18979192

  14. Utilizing the dynamic stark shift as a probe for dielectric relaxation in photosynthetic reaction centers during charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2013-09-26

    In photosynthetic reaction centers, the electric field generated by light-induced charge separation produces electrochromic shifts in the transitions of reaction center pigments. The extent of this Stark shift indirectly reflects the effective field strength at a particular cofactor in the complex. The dynamics of the effective field strength near the two monomeric bacteriochlorophylls (BA and BB) in purple photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers has been explored near physiological temperature by monitoring the time-dependent Stark shift during charge separation (dynamic Stark shift). This dynamic Stark shift was determined through analysis of femtosecond time-resolved absorbance change spectra recorded in wild type reaction centers and in four mutants at position M210. In both wild type and the mutants, the kinetics of the dynamic Stark shift differ from those of electron transfer, though not in the same way. In wild type, the initial electron transfer and the increase in the effective field strength near the active-side monomer bacteriochlorophyll (BA) occur in synchrony, but the two signals diverge on the time scale of electron transfer to the quinone. In contrast, when tyrosine is replaced by aspartic acid at M210, the kinetics of the BA Stark shift and the initial electron transfer differ, but transfer to the quinone coincides with the decay of the Stark shift. This is interpreted in terms of differences in the dynamics of the local dielectric environment between the mutants and the wild type. In wild type, comparison of the Stark shifts associated with BA and BB on the two quasi-symmetric halves of the reaction center structure confirm that the effective dielectric constants near these cofactors are quite different when the reaction center is in the state P(+)QA(-), as previously determined by Steffen et al. at 1.5 K (Steffen, M. A.; et al. Science 1994, 264, 810-816). However, it is not possible to determine from static, low-temperature measurments if the

  15. Nuclear Reaction Data File for Astrophysics (NRDF/A) in Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Masaaki; Furutachi, Naoya; Makinaga, Ayano; Togashi, Tomoaki; Otuka, Naohiko

    2010-01-01

    The activities of the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre is explained. The main task of the centre is data compilation of Japanese nuclear reaction data in collaboration of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres. As one of recent activities, preparation of a new database (NRDF/A) and evaluation of astronuclear reaction data are reported. Collaboration in the nuclear data activities among Asian countries is proposed.

  16. Sensitive Detection of Thirteen Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Agents Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Malaguti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV is characterized by a polymicrobial proliferation of anaerobic bacteria and depletion of lactobacilli, which are components of natural vaginal microbiota. Currently, there are limited conventional methods for BV diagnosis, and these methods are time-consuming, expensive, and rarely allow for the detection of more than one agent simultaneously. Therefore, we conceived and validated a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR assay for the simultaneous screening of thirteen bacterial vaginosis-associated agents (BV-AAs related to symptomatic BV: Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus curtisii, Mobiluncus mulieris, Bacteroides fragilis, Mycoplasma hominis, Atopobium vaginae, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Megasphaera type I, Clostridia-like bacteria vaginosis-associated bacteria (BVABs 1, 2, and 3, Sneathia sanguinegens, and Mycoplasma genitalium. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR compared to single PCR (sPCR were extremely high, including agreement of 99.1% and sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of 100.0%, negative predictive value of 97.0%, accuracy of 99.3%, and agreement with Nugent results of 100.0%. The prevalence of BV-AAs was very high (72.6%, and simultaneous agents were detected in 53.0%, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the M-PCR assay. Therefore, the M-PCR assay has great potential to impact BV diagnostic methods in vaginal samples and diminish associated complications in the near future.

  17. Chalcogenide metal centers for oxygen reduction reaction: Activity and tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yongjun; Gago, Aldo; Timperman, Laure; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes materials design methods, oxygen reduction kinetics, tolerance to small organic molecules and fuel cell performance of chalcogenide metal catalysts, particularly, ruthenium (Ru x Se y ) and non-precious transition metals (M x X y : M = Co, Fe and Ni; X = Se and S). These non-platinum catalysts are potential alternatives to Pt-based catalysts because of their comparable catalytic activity (Ru x Se y ), low cost, high abundance and, in particular, a high tolerance to small organic molecules. Developing trends of synthesis methods, mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction and applications in direct alcohol fuel cells as well as the substrate effect are highlighted.

  18. Purification of antibodies to bacterial antigens by an immunoadsorbent and a method to quantify their reaction with insoluble bacterial targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, H.L.; Minden, P.

    1979-01-01

    A combination of procedures was employed to develop a radioimmunoassay which quantified the binding of antibodies to antigens of either intact Propionibacterium acnes or to antigens of insoluble extracts derived from the bacteria. Reactive antibody populations were purified by use of bacterial immunoadsorbents which were prepared by coupling P. acnes to diethylaminoethyl cellulose. Binding of antibodies was detected with [ 125 I]staphylococcal protein A ([ 125 I]SpA) and optimal conditions for the assay defined by varying the amounts of antibodies, bacterial antigenic targets and [ 125 I]SpA. In antibody excess, 100% of available [ 125 I]SpA was bound by the target-antibody complexes. However, when antibody concentration was limiting, a linear relationship was demonstrated between per cent specific binding of[ 125 I]SpA and antibodies bound to bacterial targets. These results were achieved only with immunoadsorbent-purified antibody populations and not with hyperimmune sera or IgG. The radioimmunoassay detected subtle antigenic differences and similarities between P. acnes, P. acnes extracts and a variety of unrelated microorganisms. (Auth.)

  19. 11. IAEA consultants' meeting of the nuclear reaction data centers. Obninsk, 7-11 October 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 co-ordination meeting in Obninsk, Russia, of the national and regional nuclear reaction data centers, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation; the exchanged and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ENDF format, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials

  20. Photosynthetic antennas and reaction centers: Current understanding and prospects for improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, R.E. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-09-01

    A brief introduction to the principles, structures and kinetic processes that take place in natural photosynthetic reaction center complexes is presented. Energy is first collected by an antenna system, and is transferred to a reaction center complex where primary electron transfer takes place. Secondary reactions lead to oxidation of water and reduction of CO{sub 2} in some classes of organisms. Antenna systems are highly regulated to maximize energy collection efficiency while avoiding photodamage. Some areas that are presently not well understood are listed.

  1. Co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the 1996 co-ordination meeting in Brookhaven, U.S.A., of the national and regional nuclear reaction data center, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ''ENDF'' format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  2. Co-ordination of the nuclear reactions data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.; Schwerer, O.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the 1998 co-ordination meeting at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna of the regional, national and specialized nuclear reaction data centers, concerned by the IAEA at two-year intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ''ENDF'' format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author)

  3. Co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O; Lemmel, H D [eds.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the 1996 co-ordination meeting in Brookhaven, U.S.A., of the national and regional nuclear reaction data center, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ``EXFOR`` system, and the further development of this system; the ``CINDA`` system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ``ENDF`` format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author). Refs, figs, tabs.

  4. Co-ordination of the nuclear reactions data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G; Schwerer, O [eds.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the 1998 co-ordination meeting at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna of the regional, national and specialized nuclear reaction data centers, concerned by the IAEA at two-year intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ``EXFOR`` system, and the further development of this system; the ``CINDA`` system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ``ENDF`` format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author) Refs, figs, tabs

  5. The breakdown of vinyl ethers as a two-center synchronous reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokidova, T. S.; Shestakov, A. F.

    2009-11-01

    The experimental data on the molecular decomposition of vinyl ethers of various structures to alkanes and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones in the gas phase were analyzed using the method of intersecting parabolas. The enthalpies and kinetic parameters of decomposition were calculated for 17 reactions. The breakdown of ethers is a two-center concerted reaction characterized by a very high classical potential barrier to the thermally neutral reaction (180-190 kJ/mol). The kinetic parameters (activation energies and rate constants) of back reactions of the formation of vinyl ethers in the addition of aldehydes or ketones to alkanes were calculated using the method of intersecting parabolas. The factors that influenced the activation energy of the decomposition and formation of ethers were discussed. Quantum-chemical calculations of several vinyl ether decomposition reactions were performed. Ether formation reactions were compared with the formation of unsaturated alcohols as competitive reactions, which can occur in the interaction of carbonyl compounds with alkenes.

  6. Improvements to PATRIC, the all-bacterial Bioinformatics Database and Analysis Resource Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattam, Alice R.; Davis, James J.; Assaf, Rida; Boisvert, Sébastien; Brettin, Thomas; Bun, Christopher; Conrad, Neal; Dietrich, Emily M.; Disz, Terry; Gabbard, Joseph L.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Henry, Christopher S.; Kenyon, Ronald W.; Machi, Dustin; Mao, Chunhong; Nordberg, Eric K.; Olsen, Gary J.; Murphy-Olson, Daniel E.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Vonstein, Veronika; Warren, Andrew; Xia, Fangfang; Yoo, Hyunseung; Stevens, Rick L.

    2017-01-01

    The Pathosystems Resource Integration Center (PATRIC) is the bacterial Bioinformatics Resource Center (https://www.patricbrc.org). Recent changes to PATRIC include a redesign of the web interface and some new services that provide users with a platform that takes them from raw reads to an integrated analysis experience. The redesigned interface allows researchers direct access to tools and data, and the emphasis has changed to user-created genome-groups, with detailed summaries and views of the data that researchers have selected. Perhaps the biggest change has been the enhanced capability for researchers to analyze their private data and compare it to the available public data. Researchers can assemble their raw sequence reads and annotate the contigs using RASTtk. PATRIC also provides services for RNA-Seq, variation, model reconstruction and differential expression analysis, all delivered through an updated private workspace. Private data can be compared by ‘virtual integration’ to any of PATRIC's public data. The number of genomes available for comparison in PATRIC has expanded to over 80 000, with a special emphasis on genomes with antimicrobial resistance data. PATRIC uses this data to improve both subsystem annotation and k-mer classification, and tags new genomes as having signatures that indicate susceptibility or resistance to specific antibiotics. PMID:27899627

  7. Molecular electronics of a single photosystem I reaction center: Studies with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Allison, D.P.; Greenbaum, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Thylakoids and photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy. The thylakoids were isolated from spinach chloroplasts, and PSI reaction centers were extracted from thylakoid membranes. Because thylakoids are relatively thick nonconductors, they were sputter-coated with Pd/Au before imaging. PSI photosynthetic centers and chemically platinized PSI were investigated without sputter-coating. They were mounted on flat gold substrates that had been treated with mercaptoacetic acid to help bind the proteins. With tunneling spectroscopy, the PSI centers displayed a semiconductor-like response with a band gap of 1.8 eV. Lightly platinized (platinized for 1 hr) centers displayed diode-like conduction that resulted in dramatic contrast changes between images taken with opposite bias voltages. The electronic properties of this system were stable under long-term storage. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Resident Reactions to Person-Centered Communication by Long-Term Care Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Sibalija, Jovana; Scotchmer, Emma

    2016-09-01

    Long-term care staff caregivers who are person centered incorporate the life history, preferences, and feelings of residents with dementia during care interactions. Communication is essential for person-centered care. However, little is known about residents' verbal reactions when staff use person-centered communication. Accordingly, this study investigated the impact of person-centered communication and missed opportunities for such communication by staff on resident reactions. Conversations (N = 46) between staff-resident dyads were audio-recorded during routine care tasks over 12 weeks. Staff utterances were coded for person-centered communication and missed opportunities. Resident utterances were coded for positive reactions, such as cooperation, and negative reactions, such as distress. Linear regression analyses revealed that the more staff used person-centered communication, the more likely that residents reacted positively. Additionally, the more missed opportunities in a conversation, the more likely that the residents reacted negatively. Conversation illustrations elaborate on the quantitative findings and implications for staff training are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Reductions in bacterial microorganisms by filtration and ozonation of the surface water supply at the USFWS Northeast Fishery Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    A water filtration and ozonation system was recently installed to treat creek water used to culture species of concern at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Northeast Fishery Center, Lamar National Fish Hatchery (NFH). Past experience with fish culture indicates that the following bacterial pathog...

  10. Vasovagal reactions in whole blood donors at three REDS-II blood centers in Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalez, TT; Sabino, EC; Schlumpf, KS; Wright, DJ; Leao, S; Sampaio, D; Takecian, PL; Proietti, AB; Murphy, E; Busch, M; Custer, B; NHLBI Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II REDS-II, International Component,

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil little is known about adverse reactions during donation and the donor characteristics that may be associated with such events. Donors are offered snacks and fluids before donating and are required to consume a light meal after donation. For these reasons the frequency of reactions may be different than those observed in other countries.A cross-sectional study was conducted of eligible whole blood donors at three large blood centers located in Brazil between July 2007 and December 20...

  11. Simultaneous Detection of Three Bacterial Seed-Borne Diseases in Rice Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, In Jeong; Kang, Mi-Hyung; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Shim, Hyeong Kwon; Shin, Dong Bum; Heu, Suggi

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae (bacterial grain rot), Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (bacterial leaf blight), and Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae (bacterial brown stripe) are major seedborne pathogens of rice. Based on the 16S and 23S rDNA sequences for A. avenae subsp. avenae and B. glumae, and transposase A gene sequence for X. oryzae pv. oryzae, three sets of primers had been designed to produce 402 bp for B. glumae, 490 bp for X. oryzae, and 290 bp for A. avenae subsp. avenae with the 63°C as an opti...

  12. Parallel reaction monitoring on a Q Exactive mass spectrometer increases reproducibility of phosphopeptide detection in bacterial phosphoproteomics measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taumer, Christoph; Griesbaum, Lena; Kovacevic, Alen; Soufi, Boumediene; Nalpas, Nicolas C; Macek, Boris

    2018-03-29

    Increasing number of studies report the relevance of protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in bacterial physiology, yet the analysis of this type of modification in bacteria still presents a considerable challenge. Unlike in eukaryotes, where tens of thousands of phosphorylation events likely occupy more than two thirds of the proteome, the abundance of protein phosphorylation is much lower in bacteria. Even the state-of-the-art phosphopeptide enrichment protocols fail to remove the high background of abundant unmodified peptides, leading to low signal intensity and undersampling of phosphopeptide precursor ions in consecutive data-dependent MS runs. Consequently, large-scale bacterial phosphoproteomic datasets often suffer from poor reproducibility and a high number of missing values. Here we explore the application of parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) on a Q Exactive mass spectrometer in bacterial phosphoproteome analysis, focusing especially on run-to-run sampling reproducibility. In multiple measurements of identical phosphopeptide-enriched samples, we show that PRM outperforms data-dependent acquisition (DDA) in terms of detection frequency, reaching almost complete sampling efficiency, compared to 20% in DDA. We observe a similar trend over multiple heterogeneous phosphopeptide-enriched samples and conclude that PRM shows a great promise in bacterial phosphoproteomics analyses where reproducible detection and quantification of a relatively small set of phosphopeptides is desired. Bacterial phosphorylated peptides occur in low abundance compared to their unmodified counterparts, and are therefore rarely reproducibly detected in shotgun (DDA) proteomics measurements. Here we show that parallel reaction monitoring complements DDA analyses and makes detection of known, targeted phosphopeptides more reproducible. This will be of significance in replicated MS measurements that have a goal to reproducibly detect and quantify phosphopeptides of interest. Copyright

  13. Vasovagal reactions in whole blood donors at 3 REDS-II blood centers in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalez, T. T.; Sabino, E. C.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Wright, D.J.; Leao, S.; Sampaio, D.; Takecian, P. L.; Carneiro-Proietti, AB; Murphy, E.; Busch, M.; Custer, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background In Brazil little is known about adverse reactions during donation and the donor characteristics that may be associated with such events. Donors are offered snacks and fluids prior to donating and are required to consume a light meal after donation. For these reasons the frequency of reactions may be different than those observed in other countries. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted of eligible whole blood donors at three large blood centers located in Brazil between July 2007 and December 2009. Vasovagal reactions (VVRs) along with donor demographic and biometric data were collected. Reactions were defined as any presyncopal or syncopal event during the donation process. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of VVRs. Results Of 724,861 donor presentations, 16,129 (2.2%) VVRs were recorded. Rates varied substantially between the three centers: 53, 290 and 381 per 10,000 donations in Recife, São Paulo and Belo Horizonte, respectively. Although the reaction rates varied, the donor characteristics associated with VVRs were similar [younger age (18–29), replacement donors, first time donors, low estimated blood volume (EBV)]. In multivariable analysis controlling for differences between the donor populations in each city younger age, first-time donor status and lower EBV were the factors most associated with reactions. Conclusion Factors associated with VVRs in other locations are also evident in Brazil. The difference in VVR rates between the three centers might be due to different procedures for identifying and reporting the reactions. Potential interventions to reduce the risk of reactions in Brazil should be considered. PMID:22073941

  14. Biological diversity of photosynthetic reaction centers and the solid-state photo-CIDNP effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Esha

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from plants, heliobacteria and green sulphur bacteria has been investigated with photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) MAS NMR. In photosystem (PS) I of spinach, all signals appear negative which is proposed by a predominance of the

  15. The effects of light-induced reduction of the photosystem II reaction center

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutý, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 15 (2009), s. 923-933 ISSN 1610-2940 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Photosystem II * Reaction center * Pheophytin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.336, year: 2009

  16. [Risk factors for bacterial vaginosis - a 3-year study in four medical centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergova, R; Tosheva, K; Shtereva, M; Iordanova, Tz; Konsulova, V; Petrova-Jerova, A; Mitov, I; Ilieva, T; Strateva, T

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common infection of the lower genital tract among women of reproductive age. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of BV and the important etiological agent Gardnerella vaginalis in Bulgarian patients of different age groups, as well as, the risk factors forBV METHODS: One thousand five hundred and twenty-three (1523) women aged 16 to 45 years without previous antimicrobial therapy were included in this study. The methods used were: scoring of Gram staining of vaginal smear and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for G. vaginalis. Positive for BV according to the microscopic examination criteria were 47.80% from the 1523 tested women. In 88.87% from the positive samples G. vaginalis was detected using PCR, thus demonstrating high comparability of the both methods and the leading role of G. vaginalis. The most affected with BV is the age group of 21-25 years (33.21% of all subjects with BV). The most important detected risk factors were: smoking (more than 55% with BV), single marital status (only 15% with BV are married), more than I sexual partner (more than 36% had changed the sexual partner), early onset of sexual activity (75% of B V asocciated subjects started their sexual activity by the age 15-18 years). The established early age for aquiring BV among Bulgarian women is very important and alarming sign. This is the first study on the etiological role of G. vaginalis and on the risk factors for BV in Bulgaria.

  17. Reactions of carbon radicals generated by 1,5-transposition of reactive centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZIVORAD CEKOVIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Radical intermediates can undergo specific reactions, such as intramolecular rearrangements, i.e., the transpositions of radical centers, which are not known in classical ionic organic reactions. 1,5-Transposition of a radical center to a non-activated carbon atom are of great synthetic importance. It can be successfully applied for the introduction of different functional groups (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, halogens onto a carbon atom remote from the present functional group. In addition to functionalization of a remote non-activated carbon atom, the formation of new C-C bonds on the d-carbon atom have also been achieved. 1,5-Transposition of the radical centers takes place from alkoxyl, aminyl and carbon radicals to a remote carbon atom. Relocation of the radical centers preferentially involves 1,5-transfer of a hydrogen atom, although migrations of some other groups are known. The reactions of the carbon radical generated by 1,5-relocation of the radical center are presented and their synthetic applications are reviewed.

  18. Molar extinction coefficients and other properties of an improved reaction center preparation from Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, R.K.; Clayton, B.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reaction centers have been purified from chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas viridis by treatment with lauryl dimethyl amine oxide followed by hydroxyapatite chromatography and precipitation with ammonium sulfate. The absorption spectrum at low temperature shows bands at 531 and 543 nm, assigned to two molecules of bacteriopheophytin b. The 600 nm band of bacteriochlorophyll b is resolved at low temperature into components at 601 and 606.5 nm. At room temperature the light-induced difference spectrum shows a negative band centered at 615 nm, where the absorption spectrum shows only a week shoulder adjacent to the 600 nm band. The fluorescence spectrum shows a band at 1000 nm and no fluorescence corresponding to the 830 nm absorption band. Two molecules of cytochrome 558 and three of cytochrome 552 accompany each reaction center. The differential extinction coefficient (reduced minus oxidized) of cytochrome 558 nm was estimated as 20 +- 2 mM/sup -1/.cm/sup -1/ through a coupled reaction with equine cytochrome c. The extinction coefficient of reaction centers at 960 nm was determined to be 123 +- 25 mM/sup -1/.cm/sup -1/ by measuring the light-induced bleaching of P-960 and the coupled oxidation of cytochrome 558. The corresponding extinction coefficient at 830 nm is 300 +- 65 mM/sup -1/.cm/sup -1/. The absorbance ratio ..cap alpha../sub 280nm/..cap alpha../sub 830nm/ in our preparations was 2.1, and there was 190 kg protein per mol of reaction centers. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed three major components of apparent molecular weights 31,000, 37,000, and 41,000.

  19. Specific inflammatory response of Anemonia sulcata (Cnidaria) after bacterial injection causes tissue reaction and enzymatic activity alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, M R; Parisi, M G; Parrinello, D; Sanfratello, M A; Benenati, G; Palla, F; Cammarata, M

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms was marked by adaptations to protect against pathogens. The mechanisms for discriminating the ''self'' from ''non-self" have evolved into a long history of cellular and molecular strategies, from damage repair to the co-evolution of host-pathogen interactions. We investigated the inflammatory response in Anemonia sulcata (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) following injection of substances that varied in type and dimension, and observed clear, strong and specific reactions, especially after injection of Escherichia coli and Vibrio alginolyticus. Moreover, we analyzed enzymatic activity of protease, phosphatase and esterase, showing how the injection of different bacterial strains alters the expression of these enzymes and suggesting a correlation between the appearance of the inflammatory reaction and the modification of enzymatic activities. Our study shows for the first time, a specific reaction and enzymatic responses following injection of bacteria in a cnidarian. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reactions of human dental pulp cells to capping agents in the presence or absence of bacterial exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shiwei; Zhang, Wenjian; Tribble, Gena; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    An ideal pulp-capping agent needs to have good biocompatibility and promote reparative dentinogenesis. Although the effects of capping agents on healthy pulp are known, limited data regarding their effects on bacterial contaminated pulp are available. This study aimed to evaluate the reaction of contaminated pulps to various capping agents to assist clinicians in making informed decisions. Human dental pulp (HDP) cell cultures were developed from extracted human molars. The cells were exposed to a bacterial cocktail comprising Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Streptococcus gordonii before being cocultured with capping agents such as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) Portland cement (PC), and Dycal. HDP cell proliferation was assayed by MTS colorimetric cell proliferation assay, and its differentiation was evaluated by real-time PCR for detecting alkaline phosphatase, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and osteocalcin expressions. MTA and PC had no apparent effect, whereas Dycal inhibited HDP cell proliferation. PC stimulated HDP cell differentiation, particularly when they were exposed to bacteria. MTA and Dycal inhibited differentiation, regardless of bacterial infection. In conclusion, PC was the most favorable agent, followed by MTA, and Dycal was the least favorable agent for supporting the functions of bacterial compromised pulp cells.

  1. Diagnosis of ventricular drainage-related bacterial meningitis by broad-range real-time polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutch, Susanna; Dahlberg, Daniel; Hedegaard, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a broad-range real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic strategy with culture to evaluate additional effects on the etiological diagnosis and the quantification of the bacterial load during the course of ventricular drainage-related bacterial meningitis (VR......-BM). METHODS: We applied a PCR that targeted conserved regions of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with external ventricular drainage or a ventriculoperitoneal shunt during the course of VR-BM. We compared the PCR results with CSF cultures. A total...... of 350 routine CSF samples were consecutively collected from 86 patients. The CSF deoxyribonucleic acid was automatically purified and subjected to PCR. Amplicons from the PCR samples that were positive for VR-BM were subsequently deoxyribonucleic acid sequenced for final identification. Clinical data...

  2. Simultaneous Detection of Three Bacterial Seed-Borne Diseases in Rice Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Jeong Kang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae (bacterial grain rot, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (bacterial leaf blight, and Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae (bacterial brown stripe are major seedborne pathogens of rice. Based on the 16S and 23S rDNA sequences for A. avenae subsp. avenae and B. glumae, and transposase A gene sequence for X. oryzae pv. oryzae, three sets of primers had been designed to produce 402 bp for B. glumae, 490 bp for X. oryzae, and 290 bp for A. avenae subsp. avenae with the 63°C as an optimum annealing temperature. Samples collected from naturally infected fields were detected with two bacteria, B. glumae and A. avenae subsp. avenae but X. oryzae pv. oryzae was not detected. This assay can be used to identify pathogens directly from infected seeds, and will be an effective tool for the identification of the three pathogens in rice plants.

  3. Simultaneous Detection of Three Bacterial Seed-Borne Diseases in Rice Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, In Jeong; Kang, Mi-Hyung; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Shim, Hyeong Kwon; Shin, Dong Bum; Heu, Suggi

    2016-12-01

    Burkholderia glumae (bacterial grain rot), Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (bacterial leaf blight), and Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae (bacterial brown stripe) are major seedborne pathogens of rice. Based on the 16S and 23S rDNA sequences for A. avenae subsp. avenae and B. glumae , and transposase A gene sequence for X. oryzae pv. oryzae , three sets of primers had been designed to produce 402 bp for B. glumae , 490 bp for X. oryzae , and 290 bp for A. avenae subsp. avenae with the 63°C as an optimum annealing temperature. Samples collected from naturally infected fields were detected with two bacteria, B. glumae and A. avenae subsp. avenae but X. oryzae pv. oryzae was not detected. This assay can be used to identify pathogens directly from infected seeds, and will be an effective tool for the identification of the three pathogens in rice plants.

  4. Geometric phase and quantum interference in photosynthetic reaction center: Regulation of electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yuming, E-mail: ymsun@ytu.edu.cn; Su, Yuehua; Dai, Zhenhong; Wang, WeiTian

    2016-10-20

    Photosynthesis is driven by electron transfer in reaction centers in which the functional unit is composed of several simple molecules C{sub 2}-symmetrically arranged into two branches. In view of quantum mechanism, both branches are possible pathways traversed by the transferred electron. Due to different evolution of spin state along two pathways in transmembrane electric potential (TEP), quantum state of the transferred electron at the bridged site acquires a geometric phase difference dependent on TEP, the most efficient electron transport takes place in a specific range of TEP beyond which electron transfer is dramatically suppressed. What’s more, reaction center acts like elaborately designed quantum device preparing polarized spin dependent on TEP for the transferred electron to regulate the reduction potential at bridged site. In brief, electron transfer generates the TEP, reversely, TEP modulates the efficiency of electron transfer. This may be an important approach to maintaining an appreciable pH environment in photosynthesis.

  5. Functional type 2 photosynthetic reaction centers found in the rare bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeng, Y.; Feng, F.; Medová, Hana; Dean, Jason; Koblížek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 21 (2014), s. 7795-7800 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR P501/10/0221; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0059 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : anoxygenic photosynthesis * pigments * horizontal gene transfer Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.674, year: 2014

  6. Nuclear Reaction and Structure Databases of the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritychenko, B.; Arcilla, R.; Herman, M. W.; Oblozinsky, P.; Rochman, D.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Tuli, J. K.; Winchell, D. F.

    2006-01-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) collects, evaluates, and disseminates nuclear physics data for basic research and applied nuclear technologies. In 2004, the NNDC migrated all databases into modern relational database software, installed new generation of Linux servers and developed new Java-based Web service. This nuclear database development means much faster, more flexible and more convenient service to all users in the United States. These nuclear reaction and structure database developments as well as related Web services are briefly described

  7. Electrostatic dominoes: long distance propagation of mutational effects in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebban, P; Maróti, P; Schiffer, M; Hanson, D K

    1995-07-04

    Two point mutants from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, both modified in the M protein of the photosynthetic reaction center, have been studied by flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy. These strains carry either the M231Arg --> Leu or M43ASN --> Asp mutations, which are located 9 and 15 A, respectively, from the terminal electron acceptor QB. In the wild-type Rb. sphaeroides structure, M231Arg is involved in a conserved salt bridge with H125Glu and H232Glu and M43Asn is located among several polar residues that form or surround the QB binding site. These substitutions were originally uncovered in phenotypic revertants isolated from the photosynthetically incompetent L212Glu-L213Asp --> Ala-Ala site-specific double mutant. As second-site suppressor mutations, they have been shown to restore the proton transfer function that is interrupted in the L212Ala-L213Ala double mutant. The electrostatic effects that are induced in reaction centers by the M231Arg --> Leu and M43Asn --> Asp substitutions are roughly the same in either the double-mutant or wild-type backgrounds. In a reaction center that is otherwise wild type in sequence, they decrease the free energy gap between the QA- and QB- states by 24 +/- 5 and 45 +/- 5 meV, respectively. The pH dependences of K2, the QA-QB QAQB- equilibrium constant, are altered in reaction centers that carry either of these substitutions, revealing differences in the pKas of titratable groups compared to the wild type.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Model of deep centers formation and reactions in electron irradiated InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.; Suski, J.; Gilleron, M.

    1986-01-01

    We present a model of the production of deep centers and their reactions following electron irradiations in InP. We propose that the dominant hole traps in p-InP and electron traps in p + n InP junctions are complexes between shallow acceptors and a common intrinsic entity, the phosphorus interstitial or vacancy. The reactions observed below and above room temperature are then due to a local mobility of this entity, which can be obtained as well by thermal as by electronic stimulation of the reactions. This model implies the long-range migration (at least down to 16 K) of this entity, and explains the strongly different behavior of n-InP compared to p-InP samples

  9. Bacterial analysis of combined periodontal-endodontic lesions by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Minghui; Qi, Qingguo

    2013-01-01

    We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to compare bacterial profiles in periodontium and root canals of teeth with combined periodontal-endodontic lesions. Samples of dental plaque and necrotic pulp were collected from thirteen extracted teeth with advanced periodontitis. Genomic DNA was extracted for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using universal bacterial primers. The PCR products were then loaded onto DGGE gels to obtain fractionated bands. Characteristic DGGE bands were excised and DNA was cloned and sequenced. The number of bands, which indicates the number of bacterial species, was compared between dental plaques and necrotic pulp tissues from the same tooth. Although the difference was statistically significant (P bacteria species were present in both the periodontal pockets and root canals of the same tooth; however, periodontal bacteria did not always invade the root canals, and some bacteria in root canals were not present in periodontal pockets of the same tooth. In some teeth, unique bacteria in root canals had not passed from periodontal pockets. A basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) sequence search in Genbank indicated that new bacteria species were present in periodontal pockets and root canals. Their characteristics must thus be further analyzed.

  10. Incidence of transfusion reactions: a multi-center study utilizing systematic active surveillance and expert adjudication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Roubinian, Nareg H.; Chowdhury, Dhuly; Brambilla, Don; Murphy, Edward L.; Wu, Yanyun; Ness, Paul M.; Gehrie, Eric A.; Snyder, Edward L.; Hauser, R. George; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Kleinman, Steve; Kakaiya, Ram; Strauss, Ronald G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevalence estimates of serious hazards of transfusion vary widely. We hypothesized that the current reporting infrastructure in the United States fails to capture many transfusion reactions, and undertook a multi-center study utilizing active surveillance, data review, and adjudication to test this hypothesis. Study Design and Methods A retrospective record review was completed for a random sample of 17% of all inpatient transfusion episodes over 6 months at 4 academic tertiary care hospitals, with an episode defined as all blood products released to a patient in 6 hours. Data were recorded by trained clinical research nurses, and serious reactions were adjudicated by a panel of transfusion medicine experts. Results Of 4857 transfusion episodes investigated, 1.1% were associated with a serious reaction. Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) was the most frequent serious reaction noted, being identified in 1% of transfusion episodes. Despite clinical notes describing a potential transfusion association in 59% of these cases, only 5.1% were reported to the transfusion service. Suspected transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI/possible TRALI), anaphylactic, and hypotensive reactions were noted in 0.08%, 0.02%, and 0.02% of transfusion episodes. Minor reactions, including febrile non-hemolytic and allergic, were noted in 0.62% and 0.29% of transfusion episodes, with 30–50% reported to the transfusion service. Conclusion Underreporting of cardiopulmonary transfusion reactions is striking among academic, tertiary care hospitals. Complete and accurate reporting is essential to identify, define, establish pathogenesis, and mitigate/treat transfusion reactions. A better understanding of the failure to report may improve the accuracy of passive reporting systems. PMID:27460200

  11. Defense reactions of bean genotypes to bacterial pathogens in controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, B.; Bastas, K. K.

    2018-03-01

    This study was focused on the role of antioxidant enzymes and total protein in imparting resistance against common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap) and halo blight caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Psp) in bean. Activities of Ascorbate peroxidase (APX), Catalase (CAT) and total protein were studied in resistant and susceptible bean genotypes. Five-day-old seedlings were inoculated with a bacterial suspension (108 CFU ml-1) and harvested at different time intervals (0, 12, 24 and 36 up to 72 h) under controlled growing conditions and assayed for antioxidant enzymes and total protein. Temporal increase of CAT, APX enzymes activities showed maximum activity at 12 h after both pathogens inoculation (hpi) in resistant cultivar, whereas in susceptible it increased at 72 h after both pathogens inoculation for CAT and 12, 24 h for APX enzymes. Maximum total protein activities were observed at 12 h and 24 h respectively after Xap, Psp inoculation (hpi) in resistant and maximum activities were observed at 24 h and 72 h respectively after Xap, Psp inoculation (hpi) in susceptible. Increase of antioxidant enzyme and total protein activities might be an important component in the defense strategy of resistance and susceptible bean genotypes against the bacterial infection. These findings suggest that disease protection is proportional to the amount of enhanced CAT, APX enzyme and total protein activity.

  12. The formation of illite from nontronite by mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang; Kim, Jinwook

    2011-01-01

    The formation of illite through the smectite-to-illite (S-I) reaction is considered to be one of the most important mineral reactions occurring during diagenesis. In biologically catalyzed systems, however, this transformation has been suggested to be rapid and to bypass the high temperature and long time requirements. To understand the factors that promote the S-I reaction, the present study focused on the effects of pH, temperature, solution chemistry, and aging on the S-I reaction in microbially mediated systems. Fe(III)-reduction experiments were performed in both growth and non-growth media with two types of bacteria: mesophilic (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32) and thermophilic (Thermus scotoductus SA-01). Reductive dissolution of NAu-2 was observed and the formation of illite in treatment with thermophilic SA-01 was indicated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A basic pH (8.4) and high temperature (65°C) were the most favorable conditions for the formation of illite. A long incubation time was also found to enhance the formation of illite. K-nontronite (non-permanent fixation of K) was also detected and differentiated from the discrete illite in the XRD profiles. These results collectively suggested that the formation of illite associated with the biologically catalyzed smectite-to-illite reaction pathway may bypass the prolonged time and high temperature required for the S-I reaction in the absence of microbial activity.

  13. Adult bacterial myositis: report of a single-center series of 26 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gallucci

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections involving muscle are quite uncommon and generally require specific predisposing factors. Bacterial myositis is more rarely described in the typical kind of patients observed in Internal Medicine (presence of multiple co-morbidities, partial/limited immune-deficiency, advanced age. Twenty-six patients suffering from bacterial myositis (8 women and 18 men; mean age 58.5 years, range 27-82 observed in a single Internal Medicine Unit were reported. Muscles involved were ileopsoas, thigh, paravertebral, gluteus, calf, forearm and rectus abdomen. Simultaneous presence of arthritis was registered in 17 patients and all patients presented relevant comorbidity. Main cultured bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, other Gram-negative bacteria, Streptococcus spp. Multi-drug-resistance was observed in 14 out 26 (53.8%. Computed tomography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging were utilized for diagnostic purposes. Antibiotic treatment was administered to all patients. Surgical debridement and drainage were performed in 12 patients; 7 patients were treated with percutaneous aspiration and drainage. At discharge, relevant functional impairment was present in 17 patients (65.3%. Four patients died (in-hospital mortality 7.6%, global mortality at three months 15.3%. Management of bacterial myositis is difficult and its prognosis is poor. In the near future, this demanding infection will be more frequently observed in Internal Medicine setting as comorbidity, which is very often the main characteristic of these patients.

  14. Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG), Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Steering Committee progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    The Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG) was approved as an organisation of Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University and established on April 1, 2007. In addition to nuclear data activities carried out by JCPRG (Japan-Charged Particle Nuclear Reaction Data Group), the centre is concerned with the evaluation of nuclear reaction data in nucleosynthesis in the universe. In order efficiently to compile reaction data obtained by using radioactive ion beam, the centre signed a research contract with RIKEN Nishina Center. We are scanning 16 journals for Japanese charged-particle and photo-nuclear nuclear reaction data compilation. From April 2006 to March 2007, CPND and PhND in 45 references (453 records, 1.83 MB) have been newly compiled for NRDF. Usually new data are released at the JCPRG web site several months prior to EXFOR. Since the 2006 NRDC meeting, we have made 104 new entries and have revised or deleted 142 old entries. Intensive numerical data compilations have been done. These data were shown in tabular form in dissertations which are (partially) published in Journals. About 30 new entries were compiled from these data. We have prepared CINDA batches for CPND published in Japan every half year. Each batch covers 6 issues of each of 4 Japanese journals JPJ, PTP, NST and JNRS. Bibliographies for neutron induced reaction data have been compiled by JAEA Nuclear Data Center as before. A new web-based NRDF search and plot system on MySQL was released in July, 2007. New compilation, which has been finalized for NRDF, but not for EXFOR, can be obtained from this site. DARPE (another NRDF search and plot system written in Perl) is also available at http://www.jcprg.org/darpe/. EXFOR/ENDF (http://www.jcprg.org/exfor/) search and plot system is available. We have also developed following utilities: PENDL (http://www.jcprg.org/endf/) and RENORM (http://www.jcprg.org/renorm). We are developing a new search system of CINDA. This is an extension of EXFOR/ENDF search

  15. Spectroscopic properties of reaction center pigments in photosystem II core complexes: revision of the multimer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Grzegorz; Diner, Bruce A; Schlodder, Eberhard; Renger, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Absorbance difference spectra associated with the light-induced formation of functional states in photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (e.g., P(+)Pheo(-),P(+)Q(A)(-),(3)P) are described quantitatively in the framework of exciton theory. In addition, effects are analyzed of site-directed mutations of D1-His(198), the axial ligand of the special-pair chlorophyll P(D1), and D1-Thr(179), an amino-acid residue nearest to the accessory chlorophyll Chl(D1), on the spectral properties of the reaction center pigments. Using pigment transition energies (site energies) determined previously from independent experiments on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes, good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra is obtained. The only difference in site energies of the reaction center pigments in D1-D2-cytb559 and photosystem II core complexes concerns Chl(D1). Compared to isolated reaction centers, the site energy of Chl(D1) is red-shifted by 4 nm and less inhomogeneously distributed in core complexes. The site energies cause primary electron transfer at cryogenic temperatures to be initiated by an excited state that is strongly localized on Chl(D1) rather than from a delocalized state as assumed in the previously described multimer model. This result is consistent with earlier experimental data on special-pair mutants and with our previous calculations on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes. The calculations show that at 5 K the lowest excited state of the reaction center is lower by approximately 10 nm than the low-energy exciton state of the two special-pair chlorophylls P(D1) and P(D2) which form an excitonic dimer. The experimental temperature dependence of the wild-type difference spectra can only be understood in this model if temperature-dependent site energies are assumed for Chl(D1) and P(D1), reducing the above energy gap from 10 to 6 nm upon increasing the temperature from 5 to 300 K. At physiological temperature, there are

  16. Proton conduction within the reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus: the electrostatic role of the protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Maróti, P; Hanson, D K; Baciou, L; Schiffer, M; Sebban, P

    1994-01-01

    Light-induced charge separation in the photosynthetic reaction center results in delivery of two electrons and two protons to the terminal quinone acceptor QB. In this paper, we have used flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy to study three strains that share identical amino acid sequences in the QB binding site, all of which lack the protonatable amino acids Glu-L212 and Asp-L213. These strains are the photosynthetically incompetent site-specific mutant Glu-L212/Asp-L213-->Ala-L212/Ala-L213 ...

  17. An efficient synthesis of α-amino-δ-valerolactones by the ugi five-center three-component reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Bae; Lee, Duck Hyung; Park, Soo Jung; Keum, Gyo Chang; Jang, Min Seok; Kang, Soon Bang; Kim, You Seung

    2002-01-01

    A novel approach to α-amino-δ-valerolactones derivatives 8 by the intramolecular Ugi five-center three-component reaction (U-5C-3CR) using the multifunctional starting material, L-pentahomoserine 5 is described

  18. Engineered Photosystem II reaction centers optimize photochemistry versus photoprotection at different solar intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2014-03-12

    The D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII) provides most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn4CaO5 water-oxidizing complex (WOC) and half of the reaction center cofactors, and it is present as two isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. These isoforms, D1:1 and D1:2, confer functional advantages for photosynthetic growth at low and high light intensities, respectively. D1:1, D1:2, and seven point mutations in the D1:2 background that are native to D1:1 were expressed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We used these nine strains to show that those strains that confer a higher yield of PSII charge separation under light-limiting conditions (where charge recombination is significant) have less efficient photochemical turnover, measured in terms of both a lower WOC turnover probability and a longer WOC cycle period. Conversely, these same strains under light saturation (where charge recombination does not compete) confer a correspondingly faster O2 evolution rate and greater protection against photoinhibition. Taken together, the data clearly establish that PSII primary charge separation is a trade-off between photochemical productivity (water oxidation and plastoquinone reduction) and charge recombination (photoprotection). These trade-offs add up to a significant growth advantage for the two natural isoforms. These insights provide fundamental design principles for engineering of PSII reaction centers with optimal photochemical efficiencies for growth at low versus high light intensities.

  19. Isolated photosystem I reaction centers on a functionalized gated high electron mobility transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliza, Sazia A; Lee, Ida; Tulip, Fahmida S; Mostafa, Salwa; Greenbaum, Elias; Ericson, M Nance; Islam, Syed K

    2011-09-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale (~6 nm) reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs. © 2011 IEEE

  20. Isolated Photosystem I Reaction Centers on a Functionalized Gated High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliza, Sazia A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lee, Ida [ORNL; Tulip, Fahmida S [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mostafa, Salwa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale nm reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs.

  1. Lung cell reactions in guinea pigs exposed to tobacco smoke and silica dust or bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoestrand, M; Rylander, R

    1984-02-01

    In order to investigate the possibility of the synergistic effects of tobacco smoke and/or silica dust (SiO2) or bacterial endotoxins (LPS), guinea pigs were exposed to combinations of these agents. A 15-day exposure to SiO2 alone caused a decrease in intracellular lysosomal enzymes of alveolar macrophages (AM) and an increase of lysosomal enzymes detected in lung lavage fluid which was present 16 weeks after exposure. The effect was the same in animals which received SiO2 in combination with tobacco smoke. Exposure to LPS caused an increase in the number of neutrophils recovered in lavage fluid. The increase in neutrophils was less in animals previously exposed to tobacco smoke alone or in combination with LPS. Acute exposure to LPS also caused an increase in lactate dehydrogenase, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase and acid phosphatase activity detectable in lung lavage fluid. The increase was less pronounced in animals previously exposed to smoke. Cathepsin D was increased in AM after tobacco smoke exposure alone and was decreased to below control values of the animals which received an acute LPS exposure.

  2. Lactic Acid Yield Using Different Bacterial Strains, Its Purification, and Polymerization through Ring-Opening Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Orozco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale anaerobic fermentation was performed to obtain lactic acid from lactose, using five lactic acid bacteria: Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. delbrueckii, L. plantarum, and L. delbrueckii lactis. A yield of 0.99 g lactic acid/g lactose was obtained with L. delbrueckii, from which a final concentration of 80.95 g/L aqueous solution was obtained through microfiltration, nanofiltration, and inverse osmosis membranes. The lactic acid was polymerized by means of ring-opening reactions (ROP to obtain poly-DL-lactic acid (PDLLA, with a viscosity average molecular weight (Mv of 19,264 g/mol.

  3. Pigment organization and their interactions in reaction centers of photosystem II: optical spectroscopy at 6 K of reaction centers with modified pheophytin composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, M; Shkuropatov, A Y; Permentier, H; de Wijn, R; Hoff, A J; Shuvalov, V A; van Gorkom, H J

    2001-09-25

    Photosystem II reaction centers (RC) with selectively exchanged pheophytin (Pheo) molecules as described in [Germano, M., Shkuropatov, A. Ya., Permentier, H., Khatypov, R. A., Shuvalov, V. A., Hoff, A. J., and van Gorkom, H. J. (2000) Photosynth. Res. 64, 189-198] were studied by low-temperature absorption, linear and circular dichroism, and triplet-minus-singlet absorption-difference spectroscopy. The ratio of extinction coefficients epsilon(Pheo)/epsilon(Chl) for Q(Y) absorption in the RC is approximately 0.40 at 6 K and approximately 0.45 at room temperature. The presence of 2 beta-carotenes, one parallel and one perpendicular to the membrane plane, is confirmed. Absorption at 670 nm is due to the perpendicular Q(Y) transitions of the two peripheral chlorophylls (Chl) and not to either Pheo. The "core" pigments, two Pheo and four Chl absorb in the 676-685 nm range. Delocalized excited states as predicted by the "multimer model" are seen in the active branch. The inactive Pheo and the nearby Chl, however, mainly contribute localized transitions at 676 and 680 nm, respectively, although large CD changes indicate that exciton interactions are present on both branches. Replacement of the active Pheo prevents triplet formation, causes an LD increase at 676 and 681 nm, a blue-shift of 680 nm absorbance, and a bleach of the 685 nm exciton band. The triplet state is mainly localized on the Chl corresponding to B(A) in purple bacteria. Both Pheo Q(Y) transitions are oriented out of the membrane plane. Their Q(X) transitions are parallel to that plane, so that the Pheos in PSII are structurally similar to their homologues in purple bacteria.

  4. N-Doped Carbon Nanofibrous Network Derived from Bacterial Cellulose for the Loading of Pt Nanoparticles for Methanol Oxidation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fanshu; Huang, Yang; Fan, Mengmeng; Chen, Chuntao; Qian, Jieshu; Hao, Qingli; Yang, Jiazhi; Sun, Dongping

    2018-02-06

    The large-scale, low-cost preparation of Pt-based catalysts with high activity and durability for the methanol oxidation reaction is still challenging. The key to achieving this aim is finding suitable supporting materials. In this paper, N-doped carbon nanofibrous networks are prepared by annealing a gel containing two inexpensive and ecofriendly precursors, that is, bacterial cellulose and urea, for the loading of Pt nanoparticles. An undoped analogue is also prepared for comparison. Meanwhile, the effect of the annealing temperature on the performance of the catalysts is evaluated. The results show that the N doping and higher annealing temperature can improve the electron conductivity of the catalyst and provide more active sites for the loading of ultrafine Pt nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution. The best catalyst exhibits a remarkably high electrocatalytic activity (627 mA mg -1 ), excellent poison tolerance, and high durability. This work demonstrates an ideal Pt supporting material for the methanol oxidation reaction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Photosynthesis Is Widely Distributed among Proteobacteria as Demonstrated by the Phylogeny of PufLM Reaction Center Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes F. Imhoff

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different photosystems for performing bacteriochlorophyll-mediated photosynthetic energy conversion are employed in different bacterial phyla. Those bacteria employing a photosystem II type of photosynthetic apparatus include the phototrophic purple bacteria (Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonas and Chloroflexus with their photosynthetic relatives. The proteins of the photosynthetic reaction center PufL and PufM are essential components and are common to all bacteria with a type-II photosynthetic apparatus, including the anaerobic as well as the aerobic phototrophic Proteobacteria. Therefore, PufL and PufM proteins and their genes are perfect tools to evaluate the phylogeny of the photosynthetic apparatus and to study the diversity of the bacteria employing this photosystem in nature. Almost complete pufLM gene sequences and the derived protein sequences from 152 type strains and 45 additional strains of phototrophic Proteobacteria employing photosystem II were compared. The results give interesting and comprehensive insights into the phylogeny of the photosynthetic apparatus and clearly define Chromatiales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales as major groups distinct from other Alphaproteobacteria, from Betaproteobacteria and from Caulobacterales (Brevundimonas subvibrioides. A special relationship exists between the PufLM sequences of those bacteria employing bacteriochlorophyll b instead of bacteriochlorophyll a. A clear phylogenetic association of aerobic phototrophic purple bacteria to anaerobic purple bacteria according to their PufLM sequences is demonstrated indicating multiple evolutionary lines from anaerobic to aerobic phototrophic purple bacteria. The impact of pufLM gene sequences for studies on the environmental diversity of phototrophic bacteria is discussed and the possibility of their identification on the species level in environmental samples is pointed out.

  6. Identification of protein W, the elusive sixth subunit of the Rhodopseudomonas palustris reaction center-light harvesting 1 core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Philip J; Hitchcock, Andrew; Swainsbury, David J K; Qian, Pu; Martin, Elizabeth C; Farmer, David A; Dickman, Mark J; Canniffe, Daniel P; Hunter, C Neil

    2018-02-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) palustris reaction center-light harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) core complex revealed the presence of a sixth protein component, variably referred to in the literature as helix W, subunit W or protein W. The position of this protein prevents closure of the LH1 ring, possibly to allow diffusion of ubiquinone/ubiquinol between the RC and the cytochrome bc 1 complex in analogous fashion to the well-studied PufX protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The identity and function of helix W have remained unknown for over 13years; here we use a combination of biochemistry, mass spectrometry, molecular genetics and electron microscopy to identify this protein as RPA4402 in Rps. palustris CGA009. Protein W shares key conserved sequence features with PufX homologs, and although a deletion mutant was able to grow under photosynthetic conditions with no discernible phenotype, we show that a tagged version of protein W pulls down the RC-LH1 complex. Protein W is not encoded in the photosynthesis gene cluster and our data indicate that only approximately 10% of wild-type Rps. palustris core complexes contain this non-essential subunit; functional and evolutionary consequences of this observation are discussed. The ability to purify uniform RC-LH1 and RC-LH1-protein W preparations will also be beneficial for future structural studies of these bacterial core complexes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. How exciton-vibrational coherences control charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Romero, Elisabet; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-12-14

    In photosynthesis absorbed sun light produces collective excitations (excitons) that form a coherent superposition of electronic and vibrational states of the individual pigments. Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy allows a visualization of how these coherences are involved in the primary processes of energy and charge transfer. Based on quantitative modeling we identify the exciton-vibrational coherences observed in 2D photon echo of the photosystem II reaction center (PSII-RC). We find that the vibrations resonant with the exciton splittings can modify the delocalization of the exciton states and produce additional states, thus promoting directed energy transfer and allowing a switch between the two charge separation pathways. We conclude that the coincidence of the frequencies of the most intense vibrations with the splittings within the manifold of exciton and charge-transfer states in the PSII-RC is not occurring by chance, but reflects a fundamental principle of how energy conversion in photosynthesis was optimized.

  8. Alumina plate containing photosystem I reaction center complex oriented inside plate-penetrating silica nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamidaki, Chihiro; Kondo, Toru; Noji, Tomoyasu; Itoh, Tetsuji; Yamaguchi, Akira; Itoh, Shigeru

    2013-08-22

    The photosynthetic photosystem I reaction center complex (PSI-RC), which has a molecular diameter of 21 nm with 100 pigments, was incorporated into silica nanopores with a 100-nm diameter that penetrates an alumina plate of 60-μm thickness to make up an inorganic-biological hybrid photocell. PSI-RCs, purified from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, were stable inside the nanopores and rapidly photoreduced a mediator dye methyl viologen. The reduced dye was more stable inside nanopores suggesting the decrease of dissolved oxygen. The analysis by a cryogenic electron spin paramagnetic resonance indicated the oriented arrangement of RCs inside the 100-nm nanopores, with their surface parallel to the silica wall and perpendicular to the plane of the alumina plate. PSI RC complex in the semicrystalline orientation inside silica nanopores can be a new type of light energy conversion unit to supply strong reducing power selectively to other molecules inside or outside nanopores.

  9. The bacterial catabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Characterization of three hydratase-aldolase-catalyzed reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake A. LeVieux

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are highly toxic, pervasive environmental pollutants with mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic properties. There is interest in exploiting the nutritional capabilities of microbes to remove PAHs from various environments including those impacted by improper disposal or spills. Although there is a considerable body of literature on PAH degradation, the substrates and products for many of the enzymes have never been identified and many proposed activities have never been confirmed. This is particularly true for high molecular weight PAHs (e.g., phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. As a result, pathways for the degradation of these compounds are proposed to follow one elucidated for naphthalene with limited experimental verification. In this pathway, ring fission produces a species that can undergo a non-enzymatic cyclization reaction. An isomerase opens the ring and catalyzes a cis to trans double bond isomerization. The resulting product is the substrate for a hydratase-aldolase, which catalyzes the addition of water to the double bond of an α,β-unsaturated ketone, followed by a retro-aldol cleavage. Initial kinetic and mechanistic studies of the hydratase-aldolase in the naphthalene pathway (designated NahE and two hydratase-aldolases in the phenanthrene pathway (PhdG and PhdJ have been completed. Crystallographic work on two of the enzymes (NahE and PhdJ provides a rudimentary picture of the mechanism and a platform for future work to identify the structural basis for catalysis and the individual specificities of these hydratase-aldolases.

  10. Hydration of swelling clay and bacteria interaction. An experimental in situ reaction study; Hydratation des argiles gonflantes et influence des bacteries. Etude experimentale de reaction in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, J

    2008-01-15

    -aggregates and bio-films. In confined volume conditions, the presence of bacteria in Na-smectite clay was seen to enhance both the uptake of interlayer water and the amount of externally stored surface and pore water. In this type of compacted smectite, an increase in the total thickness of water layer structures occurs due to bacterial enhancement of sample porosity as seen by combined X-ray diffraction study and CALCMIX profile calculations. In the case of nontronite, additional water was stored as external water indicating a similar enhancement of porosity, but here, the rate of water inflow into the reaction cell decreased, most likely due to clogging of the pores by biofilm. With respect to the application of bentonites as a suitable backfill material in underground waste disposal sites, this study demonstrates that bacterial activity can modify both chemically and physically the properties of the smectite. Even if bacteria are not likely to survive in a hydrated bentonite seal, their effects are considered to be long-term, especially due to bacterially produced substances such as EPS and organic ligands. (author)

  11. Kinetics of several oxygenated carbon-centered free radical reactions with NO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Matti P; Arppe, Suula L; Timonen, Raimo S

    2013-05-16

    Five oxygenated carbon-centered free radical reactions with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have been studied in direct time-resolved measurements. Experiments were conducted in a temperature-controlled flow tube reactor coupled to a 193 nm exciplex laser photolysis and a resonance gas lamp photoionization mass spectrometer. Reactions were investigated under pseudofirst-order conditions, with the NO2 concentrations of the experiments in great excess over the initial radical concentrations ([R]0 CH3CO radical reactions with NO2 and, hence, includes the three smallest hydroxyalkyl radical species (CH2OH, CH2CH2OH, and CH3CHOH). The obtained rate coefficients are high with the temperature-dependent rate coefficients given by a formula k(T) = k300K × (T/300 K)(-n) as (in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(CH2OH + NO2) = (8.95 ± 2.70) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-0.54±0.27) (T = 298-363 K), k(CH2CH2OH + NO2) = (5.99 ± 1.80) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-1.49±0.45)(T = 241-363 K), k(CH3CHOH + NO2) = (7.48 ± 2.24) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-1.36±0.41) (T = 266-363 K), k(CH3OCH2 + NO2) = (7.85 ± 2.36) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-0.93±0.28) (T = 243-363 K), and k(CH3CO + NO2) = (2.87 ± 0.57) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-2.45±0.49) (T = 241-363 K), where the uncertainties refer to the estimated overall uncertainties of the values obtained. The determined rate coefficients show negative temperature dependence with no apparent bath gas pressure dependence under the current experimental conditions (241-363 K and about 1-3 Torr helium). This behavior is typical for a radical-radical addition mechanism with no potential energy barrier above the energy of the separated reactants in the entrance channel of the reaction. Unfortunately the absence of detected product signals prevented gaining deeper insight into the reaction mechanism.

  12. Interplay between excitation kinetics and reaction-center dynamics in purple bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; RodrIguez, Ferney J; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthesis is arguably the fundamental process of life, since it enables energy from the Sun to enter the food chain on the Earth. It is a remarkable non-equilibrium process in which photons are converted to many-body excitations, which traverse a complex biomolecular membrane, where they are captured and fuel chemical reactions within a reaction center (RC) in order to produce nutrients. The precise nature of these dynamical processes-which lie at the interface between quantum and classical behavior and involve both noise and coordination-is still being explored. Here, we focus on a striking recent empirical finding concerning an illumination-driven transition in the biomolecular membrane architecture of the purple bacteria Rsp. photometricum. Using stochastic realizations to describe a hopping rate model for excitation transfer, we show numerically and analytically that this surprising shift in preferred architectures can be traced to the interplay between the excitation kinetics and the RC dynamics. The net effect is that the bacteria profit from efficient metabolism at low illumination intensities while using dissipation to avoid an oversupply of energy at high illumination intensities.

  13. Center of gravity estimation using a reaction board instrumented with fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui; Roriz, Paulo; Marques, Manuel B.; Frazão, Orlando

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the present work is to construct a reaction board based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) that could be used for estimation of the 2D coordinates of the projection of center of gravity (CG) of an object. The apparatus is consisted of a rigid equilateral triangular board mounted on three supports at the vertices, two of which have cantilevers instrumented with FBGs. When an object of known weight is placed on the board, the bending strain of the cantilevers is measured by a proportional wavelength shift of the FBGs. Applying the equilibrium conditions of a rigid body and proper calibration procedures, the wavelength shift is used to estimate the vertical reaction forces and moments of force at the supports and the coordinates of the object's CG projection on the board. This method can be used on a regular basis to estimate the CG of the human body or objects with complex geometry and density distribution. An example is provided for the estimation of the CG projection coordinates of two orthopaedic femur bone models, one intact, and the other with a hip stem implant encased. The clinical implications of changing the normal CG location by means of a prosthesis have been discussed.

  14. Magnitude and direction of the change in dipole moment associated with excitation of the primary electron donor in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockhart, D.J.; Boxer, S.G.

    1987-02-10

    The magnitude and direction of the change in dipole moment, ..delta mu.., associated with the Q/sub y/ transition of the dimeric primary electron donor (special pair or P870) in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides reaction centers have been measured by Stark spectroscopy at 20 /sup 0/C. The magnitude of ..delta mu.. is found to be f/sup -1/ (10.3 +/- 0.7) D, where f is a correction factor for the local dielectric properties of the protein matrix. With the spherical cavity approximation and an effective local dielectric constant of 2, f = 1.2, and absolute value of ..delta mu.. is 8.6 +/- 0.6 D. Absolute value of ..delta mu.. for the Q/sub y/ transition of the special pair is approximately a factor of 3.4 and 2 greater than for the monomeric bacteriochlorophylls and bacteriopheophytins, respectively, in the reaction center. The angle between ..delta mu.. and the transition dipole moment for excitation of the first singlet electron state of the special pair was found to be 24 +/- 2/sup 0/. The measured values are combined to suggest a physical model in which the lowest excited singlet state of the special pair has substantial charge-transfer character and where charge is separated between the two monomers comprising the dimeric special pair. This leads to the hypothesis that the first charge-separated state in bacterial photosynthesis is formed directly upon photoexcitation. These data provide stringent values for comparison with theoretical calculations of the electronic structure of the chromophores in the reaction center.

  15. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, J. T.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  16. Enhanced Bacterial α(2,6-Sialyltransferase Reaction through an Inhibition of Its Inherent Sialidase Activity by Dephosphorylation of Cytidine-5'-Monophosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yeon Kang

    Full Text Available Bacterial α(2,6-sialyltransferases (STs from Photobacterium damsela, Photobacterium sp. JT-ISH-224, and P. leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and their ST activities were compared directly using a galactosylated bi-antennary N-glycan as an acceptor substrate. In all ST reactions, there was an increase of sialylated glycans at shorter reaction times and later a decrease in prolonged reactions, which is related with the inherent sialidase activities of bacterial STs. These sialidase activities are greatly increased by free cytidine monophosphate (CMP generated from a donor substrate CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac during the ST reactions. The decrease of sialylated glycans in prolonged ST reaction was prevented through an inhibition of sialidase activity by simple treatment of alkaline phosphatase (AP, which dephosphorylates CMP to cytidine. Through supplemental additions of AP and CMP-Neu5Ac to the reaction using the recombinant α(2,6-ST from P. leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 (P145-ST, the content of bi-sialylated N-glycan increased up to ~98% without any decrease in prolonged reactions. This optimized P145-ST reaction was applied successfully for α(2,6-sialylation of asialofetuin, and this resulted in a large increase in the populations of multi-sialylated N-glycans compared with the reaction without addition of AP and CMP-Neu5Ac. These results suggest that the optimized reaction using the recombinant P145-ST readily expressed from E. coli has a promise for economic glycan synthesis and glyco-conjugate remodeling.

  17. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  18. Proton conduction within the reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus: the electrostatic role of the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, P; Hanson, D K; Baciou, L; Schiffer, M; Sebban, P

    1994-06-07

    Light-induced charge separation in the photosynthetic reaction center results in delivery of two electrons and two protons to the terminal quinone acceptor QB. In this paper, we have used flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy to study three strains that share identical amino acid sequences in the QB binding site, all of which lack the protonatable amino acids Glu-L212 and Asp-L213. These strains are the photosynthetically incompetent site-specific mutant Glu-L212/Asp-L213-->Ala-L212/Ala-L213 and two different photocompetent derivatives that carry both alanine substitutions and an intergenic suppressor mutation located far from QB (class 3 strain, Ala-Ala + Arg-M231-->Leu; class 4 strain, Ala-Ala + Asn-M43-->Asp). At pH 8 in the double mutant, we observe a concomitant decrease of nearly 4 orders of magnitude in the rate constants of second electron and proton transfer to QB compared to the wild type. Surprisingly, these rates are increased to about the same extent in both types of suppressor strains but remain > 2 orders of magnitude smaller than those of the wild type. In the double mutant, at pH 8, the loss of Asp-L213 and Glu-L212 leads to a substantial stabilization (> or = 60 meV) of the semiquinone energy level. Both types of compensatory mutations partially restore, to nearly the same level, the original free energy difference for electron transfer from primary quinone QA to QB. The pH dependence of the electron and proton transfer processes in the double-mutant and the suppressor strains suggests that when reaction centers of the double mutant are shifted to lower pH (1.5-2 units), they function like those of the suppressor strains at physiological pH. Our data suggest that the main effect of the compensatory mutations is to partially restore the negative electrostatic environment of QB and to increase an apparent "functional" pK of the system for efficient proton transfer to the active site. This emphasizes the role of the protein in tuning the

  19. Kinetics of Several Oxygen-Containing Carbon-Centered Free Radical Reactions with Nitric Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Matti P; Ihlenborg, Marvin; Pekkanen, Timo T; Timonen, Raimo S

    2015-07-16

    Kinetics of four carbon-centered, oxygen-containing free radical reactions with nitric oxide (NO) were investigated as a function of temperature at a few Torr pressure of helium, employing flow tube reactors coupled to a laser-photolysis/resonance-gas-discharge-lamp photoionization mass spectrometer (LP-RPIMS). Rate coefficients were directly determined from radical (R) decay signals under pseudo-first-order conditions ([R]0 ≪ [NO]). The obtained rate coefficients showed negative temperature dependences, typical for a radical-radical association process, and can be represented by the following parametrizations (all in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(CH2OH + NO) = (4.76 × 10(-21)) × (T/300 K)(15.92) × exp[50700/(RT)] (T = 266-363 K, p = 0.79-3.44 Torr); k(CH3CHOH + NO) = (1.27 × 10(-16)) × (T/300 K)(6.81) × exp[28700/(RT)] (T = 241-363 K, p = 0.52-3.43 Torr); k(CH3OCH2 + NO) = (3.58 ± 0.12) × 10(-12) × (T/300 K)(-3.17±0.14) (T = 221-363 K, p = 0.50-0.80 Torr); k(T)3 = 9.62 × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-5.99) × exp[-7100/(RT)] (T = 221-473 K, p = 1.41-2.95 Torr), with the uncertainties given as standard errors of the fits and the overall uncertainties estimated as ±20%. The rate of CH3OCH2 + NO reaction was measured in two density ranges due to its observed considerable pressure dependence, which was not found in the studied hydroxyalkyl reactions. In addition, the CH3CO + NO rate coefficient was determined at two temperatures resulting in k298K(CH3CO + NO) = (5.6 ± 2.8) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). No products were found during these experiments, reasons for which are briefly discussed.

  20. Assembly of photosynthetic reaction center with ABA tri-block polymersomes: highlights on the protein localization.

    KAUST Repository

    Tangorra, Roberto Rocco

    2015-07-07

    The reconstitution of the integral membrane protein photosynthetic reaction center (RC) in polymersomes, i. e. artificial closed vesicles, was achieved by the micelle-to-vesicle transition technique, a very mild protocol based on size exclusion chromatography often used to drive the incorporation of proteins contemporarily to liposomes formation. An optimized protocol was used to successfully reconstitute the protein in a fully active state in polymersomes formed by the tri-block copolymers PMOXA22-PDMS61-PMOXA22. The RC is very sensitive to its solubilizing environment and was used to probe the positioning of the protein in the vesicles. According to charge-recombination experiments and to the enzymatic activity assay, the RC is found to accommodate in the PMOXA22 region of the polymersome, facing the water bulk solution, rather than in the PDMS61 transmembrane-like region. Furthermore, polymersomes were found to preserve protein integrity efficiently as the biomimetic lipid bilayers but show a much longer temporal stability than lipid based vesicles.

  1. Assembly of photosynthetic reaction center with ABA tri-block polymersomes: highlights on the protein localization.

    KAUST Repository

    Tangorra, Roberto Rocco; Operamolla, Alessandra; Milano, Francesco; Hassan Omar, Omar; Henrard, John; Comparelli, Roberto; Italiano, Francesca; Agostiano, Angela; De Leo, Vincenzo; Marotta, Roberto; Falqui, Andrea; Farinola, Gianluca; Trotta, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of the integral membrane protein photosynthetic reaction center (RC) in polymersomes, i. e. artificial closed vesicles, was achieved by the micelle-to-vesicle transition technique, a very mild protocol based on size exclusion chromatography often used to drive the incorporation of proteins contemporarily to liposomes formation. An optimized protocol was used to successfully reconstitute the protein in a fully active state in polymersomes formed by the tri-block copolymers PMOXA22-PDMS61-PMOXA22. The RC is very sensitive to its solubilizing environment and was used to probe the positioning of the protein in the vesicles. According to charge-recombination experiments and to the enzymatic activity assay, the RC is found to accommodate in the PMOXA22 region of the polymersome, facing the water bulk solution, rather than in the PDMS61 transmembrane-like region. Furthermore, polymersomes were found to preserve protein integrity efficiently as the biomimetic lipid bilayers but show a much longer temporal stability than lipid based vesicles.

  2. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaas, Josh V; Taguchi, Alexander T; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-03-31

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, we have investigated and characterized the interactions of the protein with the quinones in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the Q(B) site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the Q(A) and Q(B) sites. Disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the Q(A)⁻Q(B)⁻ biradical and competitive binding assays.

  3. Purification and spectroscopic characterization of photosystem II reaction center complexes isolated with or without Triton X-100.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijckelhoff, C.; van Roon, H.; Groot, M.L.; van Grondelle, R.; Dekker, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The pigment composition of the isolated photosystem II reaction center complex in its most stable and pure form currently is a matter of considerable debate. In this contribution, we present a new method based on a combination of gel filtration chromatography and diode array detection to analyze the

  4. Report on the consultants` meeting on technical aspects of the co-operation of nuclear reaction data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmel, H D; Schwerer, O; Wienke, H [eds.

    1995-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convenes in annual intervals coordination meetings of the Network of the Nuclear Reaction Data Center. The present meeting dealt with technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Refs, figs and tabs.

  5. Report on the consultants' meeting on technical aspects of the co-operation of nuclear reaction data centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.; Schwerer, O.; Wienke, H.

    1995-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convenes in annual intervals coordination meetings of the Network of the Nuclear Reaction Data Center. The present meeting dealt with technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Comparison of Ground Reaction Forces, Center of Pressure and Body Center of Mass Changes in the Voluntary, Semi-Voluntary and Involuntary Gait Termination in Healthy Young Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    behrooz teymourian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was comparing the ground reaction forces, center of pressure and body center of mass changes in voluntary, semi-voluntary and involuntary gait termination in healthy young men. Methods: In this study, 12 young men performed termination of gait in three different patterns. The variable of peak antero-posterior and vertical forces in two directions at both limbs, the time to reach peak and average forces in every limb in both directions, the center of pressure displacement of medio-lateral and antero-posterior direction for each limb and the net center of pressure and the displacement of the center of mass motion in all three motion plates were recorded using motion analysis system and force plate.The repeated measurements test was used to compare three patterns of gait termination at significance level of p&le0.5. Results: The results showed a significant difference in variables of peak antero-posterior force, the time to reach peak antero-posterior force and mean antero-posterior forces of the leading limb, the peak antero-posterior force of the trialing limbs, the depth force of leading limbs, medio-lateral cop of leading limbs displacement and vertical displacement of the center of mass, among different patterns of gait termination. Conclusion: While walking, the probability of a fall or collision damage, when a sudden or unexpected stop is required, increases. Therefore, more coordination between neuromuscular systems is required.

  7. Report compiled by Research Center for Carbonaceous Resources, Institute for Chemical Reaction Science, Tohoku University; Tohoku Daigaku Hanno Kagaku Kenkyusho tanso shigen hanno kenkyu center hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The Research Center for Carbonaceous Resources was established in April 1991 for the purpose of developing a comprehensive process for converting carbonaceous resources into clean fuels or into materials equipped with advanced functions. In this report, the track records etc. of the center are introduced. Under study in the conversion process research department is the organization of a comprehensive coal conversion process which will be a combination of solvent extraction, catalytic decomposition, and catalytic gasification, whose goal is to convert coal in a clean way at high efficiency. Under study in the conversion catalyst research department are the development of a coal denitrogenation method, development of a low-temperature gasification method by use of inexpensive catalysts, synthesis of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons in a methane/carbon dioxide reaction, etc. Other endeavors under way involve the designing and development of new organic materials such as new carbon materials and a study of the foundation on which such efforts stand, that is, the study of the control of reactions between solids. Furthermore, in the study of interfacial reaction control, the contact gasification of coal, brown coal ion exchange capacity and surface conditions, carbonization of cation exchanged brown coal, etc., are being developed. (NEDO)

  8. Photochemistry and reactions of OH- defects and F centers in alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morato, S.P.; Luety, F.

    1978-01-01

    Aditively colored KCl:OH - crystals showed under a combined UV and VIS irradiation, a nearly complete and irreversible destruction of all F centers and visible absorption in the crystal. Only upon heating the crystal above 650 0 C the F center coloration becomes partially restored. The photodissociation of the OH - (under UV light) together with the photoionization of the F center (under VIS light) produces a not effects where all the F centers are converted into U centers. These photoreactions produces high contrast visible images that are completely stable under light at RT. Besides the optical information storage aspect of this effect these photoreaction s can also be used for controlled production of Usub(A) centers if the crystal also contains a foreign metallic impurity such a Na + ion [pt

  9. On the nature of organic and inorganic centers that bifurcate electrons, coupling exergonic and endergonic oxidation-reduction reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, John W; Beratan, David N; Schut, Gerrit J; Adams, Michael W W

    2018-04-19

    Bifurcating electrons to couple endergonic and exergonic electron-transfer reactions has been shown to have a key role in energy conserving redox enzymes. Bifurcating enzymes require a redox center that is capable of directing electron transport along two spatially separate pathways. Research into the nature of electron bifurcating sites indicates that one of the keys is the formation of a low potential oxidation state to satisfy the energetics required of the endergonic half reaction, indicating that any redox center (organic or inorganic) that can exist in multiple oxidation states with sufficiently separated redox potentials should be capable of electron bifurcation. In this Feature Article, we explore a paradigm for bifurcating electrons down independent high and low potential pathways, and describe redox cofactors that have been demonstrated or implicated in driving this unique biochemistry.

  10. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  11. Glial reaction in visual centers upon whole-body combined irradiation with microwaves and x-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logvinov, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    A single whole-body preirradiation with thermogenous microwaves modifies the dynamics of the glial reactions of visual centers of ginea pigs induced by median lethal X-radiation doses. A combination of the two factors products the synergistic effect, estimated by the degree of alteration of astrocytes and oligodendroglyocytes at early times after exposure, leads to early activation of microglia, and reduces radiation-induced alterations in glia at later times (25-60 days)

  12. Final Scientific Report: Bacterial Nanowires and Extracellular Electron Transfer to Heavy Metals and Radionuclides by Bacterial Isolates from DOE Field Research Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealson, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This proposal involved the study of bacteria capable of transferring electrons from the bacterial cells to electron acceptors located outside the cell. These could be either insoluble minerals that were transformed into soluble products upon the addition of electrons, or they could be soluble salts like uranium or chromium, that become insoluble upon the addition of electrons. This process is called extracellular electron transport or EET, and can be done directly by cellular contact, or via conductive appendages called bacterial nanowires. In this work we examined a number of different bacteria for their ability to perform EET, and also looked at their ability to produce conductive nanowires that can be used for EET at a distance away from the EET-capable cells. In the work, new bacteria were isolated, new abilities of EET were examined, and many new methods were developed, and carefully described in the literature. These studies set the stage for future work dealing with the bioremediation of toxic metals like uranium and chromium. They also point out that EET (and conductive nanowires) are far more common that had been appreciated, and may be involved with energy transfer not only in sediments, but in symbioses between different bacteria, and in symbiosis/pathogenesis between bacteria and higher organisms.

  13. Final Scientific Report: Bacterial Nanowires and Extracellular Electron Transfer to Heavy Metals and Radionuclides by Bacterial Isolates from DOE Field Research Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nealson, Kenneth [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-12-20

    This proposal involved the study of bacteria capable of transferring electrons from the bacterial cells to electron acceptors located outside the cell. These could be either insoluble minerals that were transformed into soluble products upon the addition of electrons, or they could be soluble salts like uranium or chromium, that become insoluble upon the addition of electrons. This process is called extracellular electron transport or EET, and can be done directly by cellular contact, or via conductive appendages called bacterial nanowires. In this work we examined a number of different bacteria for their ability to perform EET, and also looked at their ability to produce conductive nanowires that can be used for EET at a distance away from the EET-capable cells. In the work, new bacteria were isolated, new abilities of EET were examined, and many new methods were developed, and carefully described in the literature. These studies set the stage for future work dealing with the bioremediation of toxic metals like uranium and chromium. They also point out that EET (and conductive nanowires) are far more common that had been appreciated, and may be involved with energy transfer not only in sediments, but in symbioses between different bacteria, and in symbiosis/pathogenesis between bacteria and higher organisms.

  14. Langmuir-Blodgett and X-ray diffraction studies of isolated photosystem II reaction centers in monolayers and multilayers: physical dimensions of the complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphaus, R A; Fang, J Y; Picorel, R; Chumanov, G; Wang, J Y; Cotton, T M; Seibert, M

    1997-04-01

    The photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) is a hydrophobic intrinsic protein complex that drives the water-oxidation process of photosynthesis. Unlike the bacterial RC complex, an X-ray crystal structure of the PSII RC is not available. In order to determine the physical dimensions of the isolated PSII RC complex, we applied Langmuir techniques to determine the cross-sectional area of an isolated RC in a condensed monolayer film. Low-angle X-ray diffraction results obtained by examining Langmuir-Blodgett multilayer films of alternating PSII RC/Cd stearate monolayers were used to determine the length (or height; z-direction, perpendicular to the plane of the original membrane) of the complex. The values obtained for a PSII RC monomer were 26 nm2 and 4.8 nm, respectively, and the structural integrity of the RC in the multilayer film was confirmed by several approaches. Assuming a cylindrical-type RC structure, the above dimensions lead to a predicted volume of about 125 nm3. This value is very close to the expected volume of 118 nm3, calculated from the known molecular weight and partial specific volume of the PSII RC proteins. This same type of comparison was also made with the Rhodobacter sphaeroides RC based on published data, and we conclude that the PSII RC is much shorter in length and has a more regular solid geometric structure than the bacterial RC. Furthermore, the above dimensions of the PSII RC and those of PSII core (RC plus proximal antenna) proteins protruding outside the plane of the PSII membrane into the lumenal space as imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy (Seibert, Aust. J. Pl. Physiol. 22, 161-166, 1995) fit easily into the known dimensions of the PSII core complex visualized by others as electron-density projection maps. From this we conclude that the in situ PSII core complex is a dimeric structure containing two copies of the PSII RC.

  15. Prevalence and epidemiological correlates of bacterial vaginosis among nonpregnant females at a tertiary care center in Assam, India

    OpenAIRE

    Frincy Khandelwal Baruah; Ajanta Sharma; Chanakya Das; Naba Kumar Hazarika; Rashmi Agarwalla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Bacterial vaginosis is the most common type of vaginal infection among women of reproductive age and accounted for at least one-third of all vulvovaginal infections. The main aim of this prospective study was to determine the risk factors that may be associated with the occurrence of bacterial vaginosis among the reproductive age group females in Assam. Materials and Methods: A total of two hundred married, nonpregnant females in the reproductive age group who complained of one or mo...

  16. [In vitro activity of ertapenem against clinical bacterial isolates in 69 Spanish medical centers (E-test study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobernado, M; Sanz-Rodríguez, C; Villanueva, R; Torroba, L; Redondo, E; González-Esteban, J

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess the in vitro activity of ertapenem against clinical bacterial isolates from patients with community-acquired intra-abdominal and lower tract respiratory infections in Spain in 2003. As the study was conducted before the marketing of ertapenem, it was also useful to define a baseline susceptibility pattern for ertapenem in each of the participating hospitals for later surveillance studies. Each partipating site identified a variable number of aerobic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with community-acquired intra-abdominal infection or pneumonia using standard procedures. E-test strips were used for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ertapenem, while for other antimicrobials either quantitative dilution techniques or qualitative diffusion procedures were used according to each microbiology laboratory's routine practice. MIC breakpoints for categorization of susceptibility provided by the CLSI were used for interpreting MIC values. A total of 2,901 recent clinical isolates from patients with community-acquired intra-abdominal infection or pneumonia hospitalized in 69 Spanish medical centers were tested. These isolates included 2,039 Gram-negative bacteria (1,646 Enterobacteriaceae, 216 Haemophilus, 123 non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria [NFGNB] and 54 others) and 862 Gram-positive bacteria (556 pneumococci, 159 staphylococci, 96 streptococci other than S. pneumoniae, 44 enterococci and 7 others). Ertapenem was very active in vitro against Enterobacteriaceae (99.8% susceptible), Haemophilus (96.3% susceptible), pneumococci (99.6% susceptible, of which 31% were penicillin non-susceptible strains), streptococci other than S. pneumoniae (99.0% susceptible) and methicillin-susceptible staphylococci (94.8% susceptible). For other Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens for which ertapenem susceptible breakpoints have not been defined, MIC(90) values were 0.38 and 0.064 mg/l, respectively. As

  17. Development of a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry assay for the bacterial transglycosylation reaction through measurement of Lipid II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanchaert, Bart; Wyseure, Tine; Breukink, Eefjan; Adams, Erwin; Declerck, Paul; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Transglycosylation is the second to last step in the production of bacterial peptidoglycan. It is catalyzed by a transglycosylation site in class A penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) or monofunctional glycosyl transferases. Several potential inhibitors have been suggested and need to be tested for

  18. The binding of quinone to the photosynthetic reaction centers: kinetics and thermodynamics of reactions occurring at the QB-site in zwitterionic and anionic liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavelli, Fabio; Trotta, Massimo; Ciriaco, Fulvio; Agostiano, Angela; Giotta, Livia; Italiano, Francesca; Milano, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    Liposomes represent a versatile biomimetic environment for studying the interaction between integral membrane proteins and hydrophobic ligands. In this paper, the quinone binding to the QB-site of the photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been investigated in liposomes prepared with either the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) or the negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) to highlight the role of the different phospholipid polar heads. Quinone binding (K Q) and interquinone electron transfer (L AB) equilibrium constants in the two type of liposomes were obtained by charge recombination reaction of QB-depleted RC in the presence of increasing amounts of ubiquinone-10 over the temperature interval 6-35 °C. The kinetic of the charge recombination reactions has been fitted by numerically solving the ordinary differential equations set associated with a detailed kinetic scheme involving electron transfer reactions coupled with quinone release and uptake. The entire set of traces at each temperature was accurately fitted using the sole quinone release constants (both in a neutral and a charge separated state) as adjustable parameters. The temperature dependence of the quinone exchange rate at the QB-site was, hence, obtained. It was found that the quinone exchange regime was always fast for PC while it switched from slow to fast in PG as the temperature rose above 20 °C. A new method was introduced in this paper for the evaluation of constant K Q using the area underneath the charge recombination traces as the indicator of the amount of quinone bound to the QB-site.

  19. Modifications in bacterial groups and short chain fatty acid production in the gut of healthy adult rats after long-term consumption of dietary Maillard reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Andrade, Cristina; Pastoriza de la Cueva, Silvia; Peinado, M Jesús; Rufián-Henares, José Ángel; Navarro, M Pilar; Rubio, Luis A

    2017-10-01

    Bread crust (BC) is one of the major sources of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) in the Western diet. This work was designed to analyze the impact of diets containing important levels of MRPs from BC on intestinal bacterial growth and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production in adult rats. Additionally, the pools of compounds excreted in feces attending to their molecular weights were analyzed. Rats were fed for 88days a control diet or diets containing BC or its soluble high molecular weight (HMW), soluble low molecular weight (LMW) or insoluble fractions, respectively. Intestinal (cecum) microbiota composition was determined by qPCR analysis. Consumption of the BC diet lowered (PMaillard reaction products are in vivo fermented by the gut microbiota, thereby changing both the pattern of SCFAs production and the microbiota composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A two primers random amplified polymorphic DNA procedure to obtain polymerase chain reaction fingerprints of bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, R; Velázquez, E; Valverde, A; Mateos, P F; Martínez-Molina, E

    2001-04-01

    Polymerase chain reation (PCR) fingerprints are used to characterize and recognize bacteria and are generally obtained using universal primers that generate an array of DNA amplicons, which can be separated by electrophoresis. Universal primers 8F and 1491 R have been used to amplify specifically 16S rDNA. We have used these primers at an annealing temperature of 50 degrees C. Agarose gel electrophoresis of PCR products revealed several bands. The band pattern of each bacterial species was different and the strains belonging to the same species shared an identical pattern. The patterns obtained did not show variations with plasmid DNA content or the growth stage of the bacteria. The peculiarity of the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) described in this work lies in the use of two large primers (proximately 20 nt) to obtain the pattern, since normally a only smaller primer is used, and in the new application for the primers used to amplify 16S rDNA. This new procedure, called two primers (TP)-RAPD fingerprinting, is thus rapid, sensitive, reliable, highly reproducible and suitable for experiments with a large number of microorganisms, and can be applied to bacterial taxonomy, ecological studies and for the detection of new bacterial species.

  1. Tight-binding model of the photosystem II reaction center: application to two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas; Abramavicius, Darius; Fuller, Franklin D; Ogilvie, Jennifer P; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optimized tight-binding electron–hole model of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC). Our model incorporates two charge separation pathways and spatial correlations of both static disorder and fast fluctuations of energy levels. It captures the main experimental features observed in time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) optical spectra at 77 K: peak pattern, lineshapes and time traces. Analysis of 2D spectra kinetics reveals that specific regions of the 2D spectra of the PSII RC are sensitive to the charge transfer states. We find that the energy disorder of two peripheral chlorophylls is four times larger than the other RC pigments. (paper)

  2. Tight-binding model of the photosystem II reaction center: application to two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas; Fuller, Franklin D.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.; Mukamel, Shaul; Abramavicius, Darius

    2013-07-01

    We propose an optimized tight-binding electron-hole model of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC). Our model incorporates two charge separation pathways and spatial correlations of both static disorder and fast fluctuations of energy levels. It captures the main experimental features observed in time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) optical spectra at 77 K: peak pattern, lineshapes and time traces. Analysis of 2D spectra kinetics reveals that specific regions of the 2D spectra of the PSII RC are sensitive to the charge transfer states. We find that the energy disorder of two peripheral chlorophylls is four times larger than the other RC pigments.

  3. Parameterization of the prosthetic redox centers of the bacterial cytochrome bc(1) complex for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaszuba, K.; Postila, P. A.; Cramariuc, O.

    2013-01-01

    studied in large-scale classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In part, this is due to lack of suitable force field parameters, centered atomic point charges in particular, for the complex's prosthetic redox centers. Accurate redox center charges are needed to depict realistically the inter-molecular...... interactions at different redox stages of the cyt bc(1) complex. Accordingly, here we present high-precision atomic point charges for the metal centers of the cyt bc(1) complex of Rhodobacter capsulatus derived from extensive density functional theory calculations, fitted using the restrained electrostatic...

  4. Reduction reactions of water soluble cyano-cobalt(III)-porphyrins: Metal versus ligand centered processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosseri, S.; Neta, P.; Harriman, A.; Hambright, P.

    1990-01-01

    Reduction reactions of dicyano-cobalt(III)-porphyrins [potential in vivo cyanide scavenger drugs] were studied by radiolytic and electrochemical methods using the water soluble tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS) and tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TMPyP). For [(CN)2CoIIITPPS]-, reduction occurs stepwise to the CoII, CoI, and finally to the phlorin anion. This behavior is similar to that of the cobalt porphyrins in the absence of cyanide, except that the cyanide ligand shifts the reduction potentials to much more negative values. On the other hand, under radiolytic conditions, [(CN)2CoIIITMPyP]- is reduced on the porphyrin macrocycle by one electron to give the CoIII pi-radical anion, which disproportionates into the initial complex and the two-electron ring reduced CoIII phlorin. The radical anion is also formed by intramolecular electron transfer subsequent to the reaction of CoIITMPyP and cyanide. The results are compared with the chemistry of Vitamin B-12

  5. [Acute bacterial parotitis in infants under 3 months of age: a retrospective study in a pediatric tertiary care center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, J; Lorrot, M; Teissier, N; Delacroix, G; Doit, C; Bingen, E; Faye, A

    2011-12-01

    Acute bacterial parotitis is a rare infectious disease in infants under 3 months of age. To describe the clinical characteristics and the course of acute bacterial parotitis in infants less than 3 months old. Infants under 3 months of age, hospitalized at Robert Debré university hospital, Paris, France, between January 2005 and December 2009 for acute bacterial parotitis, were included in a retrospective study. Five infants less than 3 months of age were included in this study, for a frequency of 2.5/1000 hospitalizations in this age group. All were born at term, 4 of 5 were male. Three of the 5 patients had specific clinical signs of parotitis on admission. One patient had septic shock on admission. The ultrasound confirmed the parotitis in all cases. No parotid abscess was demonstrated on imaging. All patients had at least one abnormal inflammatory biological test (WBC, CRP, PCT). Bacteria were identified in 4 of 5 cases: Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in the pus culture of the Stenon duct in 2 patients and a group B Streptococcus was isolated from blood culture of 2 other patients. The duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy varied from 4 to 13 days, and the total duration of antibiotic therapy was between 10 and 16 days. No surgical procedures were needed. Acute bacterial parotitis in infants under 3 months of age might be associated with localized infections due to S. aureus, but also with a more severe clinical presentation due to group B streptococcus infection. Early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic therapy might prevent the progression to serious complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Density functional theoretical study on the C-F and C-O oxidative addition reaction at an AI center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Seong [Dept. of Science Education, Kyungnam University, Masan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun; Hwang, Sungu [Dept. of Nanomechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Miryang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, B3LYP/LACVP** level calculations were chosen because the level of theory was applied successfully to calculations of the thermodynamic and kinetic features of the oxidative addition reactions of alkyl and aryl halides to pincer-type complexes. This study examined the effects of the substituents on the phenyl rings of the Al(I) center. Isopropyl side chains in the phenyl rings attached to N atoms of the pincer ligand were replaced with a methyl (Me) (2) or tertiary butyl ( t Bu) group. The oxidative addition of C[BOND]F and C[BOND]O bonds to an Al (I) center was investigated computationally by DFT calculations. The geometries, thermodynamic, and kinetic features were in good agreement with the experimental data, as in previous studies on the transition metal complexes. The computational results showed that the DFT calculations could provide qualitative insight into the reactivity and thermodynamics of the oxidative addition reactions of C[BOND]F bonds.

  7. Field comparison of real-time polymerase chain reaction and bacterial culture for identification of bovine mastitis bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, M T; Wellenberg, G J; Sampimon, O C; Holopainen, J; Rothkamp, A; Salmikivi, L; van Haeringen, W A; Lam, T J G M; Pyörälä, S

    2010-12-01

    Fast and reliable identification of the microorganisms causing mastitis is important for management of the disease and for targeting antimicrobial treatment. Methods based on PCR are being used increasingly in mastitis diagnostics. Comprehensive field comparisons of PCR and traditional milk bacteriology have not been available. The results of a PCR kit capable of detecting 11 important etiological agents of mastitis directly from milk in 4h were compared with those of conventional bacterial culture (48h). In total, 1,000 quarter milk samples were taken from cows with clinical or subclinical mastitis, or from clinically healthy quarters with low somatic cell count (SCC). Bacterial culture identified udder pathogens in 600/780 (77%) of the clinical samples, whereas PCR identified bacteria in 691/780 (89%) of the clinical samples. The PCR analysis detected major pathogens in a large number of clinical samples that were negative for the species in culture. These included 53 samples positive for Staphylococcus aureus by PCR, but negative by culture. A total of 137 samples from clinical mastitis, 5 samples from subclinical mastitis, and 1 sample from a healthy quarter were positive for 3 or more bacterial species in PCR, whereas culture identified 3 or more species in 60 samples from clinical mastitis. Culture identified a species not targeted by the PCR test in 44 samples from clinical mastitis and in 9 samples from subclinical mastitis. Low SCC samples provided a small number of positive results both in culture (4/93; 4.3%) and by PCR (7/93; 7.5%). In conclusion, the PCR kit provided several benefits over conventional culture, including speed, automated interpretation of results, and increased sensitivity. This kit holds much promise as a tool to complement traditional methods in identification of pathogens. In conventional mastitis bacteriology, a sample with 3 or more species is considered contaminated, and resampling of the cow is recommended. Further study is

  8. Stereoselective synthesis of organosulfur compounds incorporating N-aromatic heterocyclic motifs and quaternary carbon centers via a sulfa-Michael triggered tandem reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tianyou; Cheng, Lu; Zhang, Sean Xiao-An; Liao, Weiwei

    2015-06-14

    A novel sulfa-Michael addition (SMA)-triggered tandem reaction was developed by combining a SMA reaction with a simultaneous rearomatization process utilizing a less reactive carbonyl group as an intramolecular electrophile partner, which provided a unique synthetic route to access various organosulfur compounds incorporating an N-aromatic heterocyclic motif and quaternary carbon centers.

  9. Molecular modeling and computational simulation of the photosystem-II reaction center to address isoproturon resistance in Phalaris minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Durg Vijay; Agarwal, Shikha; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna

    2012-08-01

    Isoproturon is the only herbicide that can control Phalaris minor, a competitive weed of wheat that developed resistance in 1992. Resistance against isoproturon was reported to be due to a mutation in the psbA gene that encodes the isoproturon-binding D1 protein. Previously in our laboratory, a triazole derivative of isoproturon (TDI) was synthesized and found to be active against both susceptible and resistant biotypes at 0.5 kg/ha but has shown poor specificity. In the present study, both susceptible D1((S)), resistant D1((R)) and D2 proteins of the PS-II reaction center of P. minor have been modeled and simulated, selecting the crystal structure of PS-II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus (2AXT.pdb) as template. Loop regions were refined, and the complete reaction center D1/D2 was simulated with GROMACS in lipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphoglycerol, POPG) environment along with ligands and cofactor. Both S and R models were energy minimized using steepest decent equilibrated with isotropic pressure coupling and temperature coupling using a Berendsen protocol, and subjected to 1,000 ps of MD simulation. As a result of MD simulation, the best model obtained in lipid environment had five chlorophylls, two plastoquinones, two phenophytins and a bicarbonate ion along with cofactor Fe and oxygen evolving center (OEC). The triazole derivative of isoproturon was used as lead molecule for docking. The best worked out conformation of TDI was chosen for receptor-based de novo ligand design. In silico designed molecules were screened and, as a result, only those molecules that show higher docking and binding energies in comparison to isoproturon and its triazole derivative were proposed for synthesis in order to get more potent, non-resistant and more selective TDI analogs.

  10. Multipulse spectroscopy on the wild-type and YM210W Bacterial Reaction Centre uncovers a new intermediate state in the special pair excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Stuart, T. A.; van Grondelle, R.

    2009-06-01

    The Bacterial Reaction Centre (BRC) has a complex electronic excited state, P ∗, that evolves into subsequent charge separated product states P +H - and P +B -. Pump-dump-probe spectroscopy on the wild-type BRC and on YM210W, a mutant with a stabilized, long-lived P ∗ excited state, has uncovered a new charge-separated state in both BRC's. When P ∗ is dumped, a fraction of its population is transferred to this state that has a strong Stark shift in the accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B M) region which serves as a signature for P + and a lifetime highly comparable to the slow phase of P ∗ decay. This lead us propose this intermediate to be P +/P -.

  11. Manipulating the Energetics and Rates of Electron Transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus Reaction Centers with Asymmetric Pigment Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faries, Kaitlyn M. [Department; Dylla, Nicholas P. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Hanson, Deborah K. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Holten, Dewey [Department; Laible, Philip D. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Kirmaier, Christine [Department

    2017-07-17

    Seemingly redundant parallel pathways for electron transfer (ET), composed of identical sets of cofactors, are a cornerstone feature of photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) involved in light-energy conversion. In native bacterial RCs, both A and B branches house one bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and one bacteriopheophytin (BPh), but the A branch is used exclusively. Described herein are the results-obtained for two Rhodobacter capsulatus RCs with an unnaturally high degree of cofactor asymmetry, two BPh on the RC's B side and two BChl on the A side. These pigment changes derive, respectively, from the His(M180)Leu mutation [a BPh ((Phi(B)) replaces the B-side BChl (BB)], and the Leu(M212)His mutation [a BChl (beta(A))) replaces the A-side BPh (H-A)]. Additionally, Tyr(M208)Phe was employed to disfavor ET to the A branch; in one mutant, Val(M131)Glu creates a hydrogen bond to H-B to enhance ET to H-B. In both Phi(B) mutants, the decay kinetics of the excited primary ET donor (P*) resolve three populations with lifetimes of similar to 9 ps (50-60%), similar to 40 ps (10-20%), and similar to 200 ps (20-30%), with P+Phi(-)(B) formed predominantly from the 9 ps fraction. The 50-60% yield of P+Phi(B)- is the highest yet observed for a Phi(B)-containing RC. The results provide insight into factors needed for efficient multistep ET.

  12. The Role of Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction in Detecting Etiological Causes of Bacterial Prostatitis Associated Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramastha Rosadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH has been correlated with chronic prostatitis according recent study. Chronic pelvic pain is the chief complain of BPH followed by prostatitis. The gold standard of the etiological diagnosis is urine culture, but the negativity rate is still high. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR as a diagnostic tool in search of etiological causes could identify microorganism on DNA level. This research aims to find out the role of multiplex polymerase chain reaction as diagnostic tools on prostatitis patients. Material and Method: A total of 12 samples collected during the TURP procedure in Sanglah General Hospital Denpasar – Bali from February until May 2015. All of the samples has been diagnosed prostatitis clinically and perform urine culture test. The prostate specimen taken was sent to the Pathological anatomy for histopathology diagnostic and underwent multiplex PCR for etiologic diagnostic. Result: 12 samples have been declared as prostatitis based on histopathology examination, and then were analyzed using multiplex PCR. 10 samples were positive (6 were E. coli, 2 were C. trachomatis, the rest were N. gonorrhea and P. aeruginosa. The urine culture revealed 9 positive, within the result 6 were E. coli, and the others were P. aeruginosa, M. morganii and A. haemolyticus. Conclusion: In prostatitis patient, the etiological diagnostic was important. Multiplex PCR as diagnostic tools could detect the microorganism on a negative urine culture. The combination of the urine culture test and multiplex PCR revealed a better result on etiologic diagnosis which leads to a better management of the disease. 

  13. Using the rate of bacterial clearance determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction as a timely surrogate marker to evaluate the appropriateness of antibiotic usage in critical patients with Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yu-Chung; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2012-08-01

    Bacteremia caused by Acinetobacter baumannii is becoming more frequent among critically ill patients, and has been associated with high mortality and prolonged hospital stay. Multidrug resistance and delay in blood culture have been shown to be significant barriers to appropriate antibiotic treatment. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were recently used to monitor bacterial loads; we hypothesized that the rate of bacterial clearance determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction can be used as a timely surrogate marker to evaluate the appropriateness of antibiotic usage. Prospective observational study. University hospital and research laboratory. Patients with culture-proven A. baumannii bacteremia in the intensive care units were prospectively enrolled from April 2008 to February 2009. Plasmid Oxa-51/pCRII-TOPO, which contained a 431-bp fragment of the A. baumannii-specific Oxa-51 gene in a pCRII-TOPO vector, was used as the standard. Sequential bacterial DNA loads in the blood were measured by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. We enrolled 51 patients with A. baumannii bacteremia, and examined 318 sequential whole blood samples. The initial mean bacterial load was 2.15 log copies/mL, and the rate of bacterial clearance was 0.088 log copies/mL/day. Multivariate linear regression using the generalized estimation equation approach revealed that the use of immunosuppressants was an independent predictor for slower bacterial clearance (coefficient, 1.116; pcritical patients. These findings highlight the importance of appropriate antibiotic usage and development of effective antibiotics against A. baumannii in an era of emerging antibiotic resistance. The rate of bacterial clearance could serve as a timely surrogate marker for evaluating the appropriateness of antibiotics.

  14. Electron transfer. 93. Further reactions of transition-metal-center oxidants with vitamin B12s (Cob(I)alamin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, G.C.; Ghosh, S.K.; Gould, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    Vitamin B 12s (cob(I)alamin) reduces europium(III), titanium(IV) (TiO(C 2 O 4 ) 2 2- ), and uranium(VI) in aqueous solution. These oxidants undergo one-electron changes, leading in each case to the cobalt product cob(II)alamin (B 12r ). The reduction of Eu 3+ , which is inhibited by TES buffer, but not by glycine, is outer sphere. Its limiting specific rate (1 x 10 2 M -1 s -1 ), incorporated in the Marcus treatment, yields a B 12s ,B 12r self-exchange rate of 10 4.8±0.5 M -1 s -1 . Reductions of TiO(C 2 O 4 ) 2 2- are accelerated by H + and by acetic acid. Kinetic patterns suggest three competing reaction paths involving varying degrees of protonation of the Ti(IV) center or its association with acetic acid. The very rapid reduction of U(VI) (k = 4 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 ) yields U(V) in several buffering media, even when B 12s is taken in excess. The much slower conversion of U(V) to U(IV), although thermodynamically favored, appears to be retarded by the extensive reorganization of the coordination sphere of oxo-bound U(V) that must accompany its acceptance of an additional electron. The observed specific rate for the B 12s -U(VI) reaction is in reasonable agreement, in the framework of the Marcus formalism, with reported values of the formal potential and the self-exchange rate for U(V,VI). 37 references, 4 tables

  15. Spectral properties of chlorines and electron transfer with their participation in the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchupak, E. E.; Ivashin, N. V.

    2014-02-01

    Structural factors that provide localization of excited states and determine the properties of primary donor and acceptor of electron in the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII RC) are studied. The results of calculations using stationary and time-dependent density functional theory indicate an important role of protein environments of chlorophylls PA, PB, BA, and BB and pheophytins HA and HB in the area with a radius of no greater than ≤10 Å in the formation of excitonic states of PSII RC. When the neighboring elements are taken into account, the wavelength of long-wavelength Q y transition of chlorophyll molecules is varied by about 10 nm. The effect is less developed for pheophytin molecules (Δλ ≅ 2 nm). The following elements strongly affect energy of the transition: HisA198 and HisD197 amino-acid residues that serve as ligands of magnesium atoms affect PA and PB, respectively; MetA183 affects PA; MetA172 and MetD198 affect BA; water molecules that are located above the planes of the BA and BB macrocycles form H bonds with carbonyl groups; and phytol chains of PA and PB affect BA, BB, HA, and HB. The analysis of excitonic states, mutual positions of molecular orbitals of electron donors and acceptors, and matrix elements of electron transfer reaction shows that (i) charge separation between BA and HA and PB and BA is possible in the active A branch of cofactors of PSII RC and (ii) electron transfer is blocked at the BB - HB fragment in inactive B branch of PSII RC.

  16. Electronically stimulated deep-center reactions in electron-irradiated InP: Comparison between experiment and recombination-enhancement theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.

    1987-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the recombination enhancement of several defect reactions involving the main deep centers in low-temperature electron-irradiated InP. A fairly good agreement is obtained with the Weeks-Tully-Kimerling theory for the activation energies of the enhanced process. On the other hand, a thorough investigation of a thermally and electronically stimulated defect transformation shows evidence that one major approximation (local vibrational equilibrium) fails, and that the recently proposed [H. Sumi, Phys. Rev. B 29, 4616 (1984)] mechanism of coherent recombination on deep centers is responsible for altered reaction rates at high injection levels

  17. Menaquinone-7 in the reaction center complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme functions as the electron acceptor A1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, B; Frigaard, N-U; Yang, F

    1998-01-01

    Photosynthetically active reaction center complexes were prepared from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIMB 8327, and the content of quinones was determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The analysis showed a stoichiometry of 1.7 molecules of menaqui......Photosynthetically active reaction center complexes were prepared from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIMB 8327, and the content of quinones was determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The analysis showed a stoichiometry of 1.7 molecules...

  18. Equilibration kinetics in isolated and membrane-bound photosynthetic reaction centers upon illumination: a method to determine the photoexcitation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Anthony J; Goushcha, Alexander O; Barabash, Yuri M; Kharkyanen, Valery N; Scott, Gary W

    2009-07-01

    Kinetics of electron transfer, following variation of actinic light intensity, for photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) of purple bacteria (isolated and membrane-bound) were analyzed by measuring absorbance changes in the primary photoelectron donor absorption band at 865 nm. The bleaching of the primary photoelectron donor absorption band in RCs, following a sudden increase of illumination from the dark to an actinic light intensity of I(exp), obeys a simple exponential law with the rate constant alphaI(exp) + k(rec), in which alpha is a parameter relating the light intensity, measured in mW/cm(2), to a corresponding theoretical rate in units of reciprocal seconds, and k(rec) is the effective rate constant of the charge recombination in the photosynthetic RCs. In this work, a method for determining the alpha parameter value is developed and experimentally verified for isolated and membrane-bound RCs, allowing for rigorous modeling of RC macromolecule dynamics under varied photoexcitation conditions. Such modeling is necessary for RCs due to alterations of the forward photoexcitation rates and relaxation rates caused by illumination history and intramolecular structural dynamics effects. It is demonstrated that the classical Bouguer-Lambert-Beer formalism can be applied for the samples with relatively low scattering, which is not necessarily the case with strongly scattering media or high light intensity excitation.

  19. Reaction Control System Thruster Cracking Consultation: NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The shuttle orbiter s reaction control system (RCS) primary thruster serial number 120 was found to contain cracks in the counter bores and relief radius after a chamber repair and rejuvenation was performed in April 2004. Relief radius cracking had been observed in the 1970s and 1980s in seven thrusters prior to flight; however, counter bore cracking had never been seen previously in RCS thrusters. Members of the Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conducted a detailed review of the relevant literature and of the documentation from the previous RCS thruster failure analyses. It was concluded that the previous failure analyses lacked sufficient documentation to support the conclusions that stress corrosion cracking or hot-salt cracking was the root cause of the thruster cracking and lacked reliable inspection controls to prevent cracked thrusters from entering the fleet. The NESC team identified and performed new materials characterization and mechanical tests. It was determined that the thruster intergranular cracking was due to hydrogen embrittlement and that the cracking was produced during manufacturing as a result of processing the thrusters with fluoride-containing acids. Testing and characterization demonstrated that appreciable environmental crack propagation does not occur after manufacturing.

  20. Energetic change of the primary quinone in photosynthetic reaction center. Mutation, delayed fluorescence and model calculations (Theses of the Ph.D. dissertation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinyu, L.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Photosynthesis is one of the basic metabolic processes of living organisms. Photosynthesizing species (bacteria, algae and higher class plants) convert the energy of light into other forms of free energy (redox potential, electro- chemical potential of ions and protons and phosphate-potential) which are directly suit- able either to cover the energy need of the vital processes of the cell or to storage. In reaction center (RC) protein of photo- synthetic bacteria, electron transfer is initiated upon light excitation from the excited bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P) to the secondary quinone (Q B ) via bacteriopheophytine (Bph) and the primary quinone (Q A ). In Rhodobacter sphaeroides purple bacteria, both quinones are ubiquinone-10, but due to the different protein environment, their electrochemical properties is highly different. Whereas Q A makes one-electron chemistry, Q B can be doubly reduced to form hydroquinone, Q B H 2 by uptake of two protons. Q B H 2 subsequently leaves the RC and is replaced by an oxidized quinone from to membrane pool. The semiquinones are important intermediates in the quinone reduction cycle of the RC. The redox midpoint potentials of the Q/Q - redox pairs (E m ) are also different: the Q A /Q A - has 60 mV more negative potential than the Q B /Q B - couple (pH 8) to make the (interquinone) electron transfer favorable. For fine tuning of the midpoint redox potentials of the quinones, the protein assures appropriate steric and electrostatic environment. The most important aim of this study was the design and production of reaction center mutants in the binding pocket of the primary quinone to investigate the effect of the amino acids of the protein and lipids of the membrane on the thermodynamics of the primary quinone. The first priority was the determination of the absolute free energy gap between the P* and the P + Q A - states in wild type and mutant reaction centers by comparison of the

  1. Pathways and timescales of primary charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center as revealed by a simultaneous fit of time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Andrizhiyevskaya, E.G.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2005-01-01

    We model the dynamics of energy transfer and primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers. Different exciton models with specific site energies of the six core pigments and two peripheral chlorophylls (Chls) in combination with different charge transfer schemes have

  2. Notable light-free catalytic activity for pollutant destruction over flower-like BiOI microspheres by a dual-reaction-center Fenton-like process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Yan, Dengbiao; Lyu, Lai; Hu, Chun; Jiang, Ning; Zhang, Lili

    2018-10-01

    BiOI is widely used as photocatalysts for pollutant removal, water splitting, CO 2 reduction and organic transformation due to its excellent photoelectric properties. Here, we report for the first time that a light-free catalyst consisting of the flower-like BiOI microspheres (f-BiOI MSs) exposing (1 0 1) and (1 1 0) crystal planes prepared by a hydrothermal method in ethylene glycol environment can rapidly eliminate the refractory BPA within only ∼3 min through a Fenton-like process. The reaction activity is ∼190 times higher than that of the conventional Fenton catalyst Fe 2 O 3 . A series of characterizations and experiments reveal the formation of the dual reaction centers on f-BiOI MSs. The electron-rich O centers efficiently reduce H 2 O 2 to OH, while the electron-poor oxygen vacancies capture electrons from the adsorbed pollutants and divert them to the electron-rich area during the Fenton-like reactions. By these processes, pollutants are degraded and mineralized quickly in a wide pH range. Our findings address the problems of the classical Fenton reaction and are useful for the development of efficient Fenton-like catalysts through constructing dual reaction centers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reactive scattering from oriented molecules: The three-center reaction K+ICl --> KI+Cl, KCl+I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, H. J.; Möller, J.

    1992-12-01

    In a crossed molecular beam experiment, we have measured the angular and time-of-flight (TOF) distributions of the products KCl and KI formed in the reaction K+ICl→KI+Cl, KCl+I at an elevated collision energy of Etr=1.64 eV. Employing the brute force method, we have prepared an oriented ICl beam and studied in addition also the orientation dependence of these distributions. The results are (i) KCl is the dominant product, but also KI is substantially formed with a branching ratio of 4:1; (ii) the double differential reaction cross section in the center-of-mass frame (contour maps) indicates that all products are preferentially forward scattered and constrained to the forward hemisphere; (iii) the KCl flux consists of two distinct components which differ markedly in kinetic energy and dependence on the ICl orientation; there are also indications of the existence of two components of KI; (iv) 65%, 84%, and 64% of the available energy is vested into the internal degrees of freedom for the fast, slow component of KCl and KI, respectively; (v) the existence of two components can be rationalized on the basis of the harpooning mechanism where the jumping electron accesses the ground state or one of the low excited states of the ICl- ion and triggers the subsequent explosion of the ion with more or less kinetic energy of the fragments depending on the initially populated state; (vi) the energies released during dissociation of ICl- in the 2Σ ground state and the first 2Π state are ≤0.19 and ≤1.2 eV, respectively; (vii) the fast KCl component features a negative steric effect suggesting favorable product formation for attacks of K to the I end of ICl, the steric effect of the slow KI component is positive, i.e., attacks to the Cl end form products favorably; the other components exhibit no significant steric effect; (viii) the steric effects can be quantitatively rationalized using the same model as mentioned above; (ix) the magnitude of the steric effect suggests a

  4. Frequency of Pathogenic Paediatric Bacterial Meningitis in Mozambique: The Critical Role of Multiplex Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction to Estimate the Burden of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhantumbo, Aquino Albino; Cantarelli, Vlademir Vicente; Caireão, Juliana; Munguambe, Alcides Moniz; Comé, Charlotte Elizabeth; Pinto, Gabriela do Carmo; Zimba, Tomás Francisco; Mandomando, Inácio; Semá, Cynthia Baltazar; Dias, Cícero; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Gudo, Eduardo Samo

    2015-01-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, including Mozambique, acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) represents a main cause of childhood mortality. The burden of ABM is seriously underestimated because of the poor performance of culture sampling, the primary method of ABM surveillance in the region. Low quality cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and frequent consumption of antibiotics prior to sample collection lead to a high rate of false-negative results. To our knowledge, this study is the first to determine the frequency of ABM in Mozambique using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and to compare results to those of culture sampling. Between March 2013 and March 2014, CSF samples were collected at 3 regional hospitals from patients under 5 years of age, who met World Health Organization case definition criteria for ABM. Macroscopic examination, cytochemical study, culture, and qPCR were performed on all samples. A total of 369 CSF samples were collected from children clinically suspected of ABM. qPCR showed a significantly higher detection rate of ABM-causing pathogens when compared to culture (52.3% [193/369] versus 7.3% [27/369], p = 0.000). The frequency of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, group B Streptococci, and Neisseria meningitidis were 32.8% (121⁄369), 12.2%, (45⁄369), 3.0% (16⁄369) and 4.3% (11⁄369), respectively, significantly higher compared to that obtained on culture (p < 0.001 for each). Our findings demonstrate that culture is less effective for the diagnosis of ABM than qPCR. The common use of culture rather than qPCR to identify ABM results in serious underestimation of the burden of the disease, and our findings strongly suggest that qPCR should be incorporated into surveillance activities for ABM. In addition, our data showed that S. pneumoniae represents the most common cause of ABM in children under 5 years of age.

  5. [Prevalence of reactions secundary to mosquito bites Aedes aegypti at en el Regional Center of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, de Monterrey, Nuevo Leon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Diaz, Sandra Nora; Cruz, Alfredo Arias; Sedó Mejía, Giovanni A; Rojas Lozano, Antonio A; Valenzuela, Enrique Avitia; Vidaurri Ojeda, Alma C

    2010-01-01

    although systemic reactions resulting from hymenoptera stings have been studied extensively, the prevalence of allergic reactions to mosquitoes is unknown. to investigate the prevalence of allergic reactions to Aedes aegypti bites in patients seeking treatment at the Allergy and Clinical Immunology Regional Center of Jose E Gonzalez University Hospital in Monterrey, Mexico. we carried out a cross-sectional, descriptive study that included patients receiving skin tests for aeroallergens; skin sensitivity to mosquito bites was also tested. A questionnaire was used to obtain information about previous allergic reactions to mosquito bites. a total of 482 patients between 2 and 60 years of age were included; 53% were female, 407 (84.4%) had a history of local reactions to mosquito bites. Twelve patients (2.4%) stated a history of large local reaction; three (0.6%) of them with a positive skin prick test, one (0.2%) of those had systemic reaction history to mosquito. Eighty five (17.6%) patients had a positive mosquito skin test and 307 (63.6%) had a positive skin test for at least one aeroallergen. Seventy-eight (91.7%) of the 85 patients with a positive mosquito skin test had a history of local skin reactions to mosquito bite (odds ratio: 2.303 [confidence interval (CI) 1.037-5.10]. There was no statistically significance association between allergic diseases and mosquito allergy. adverse reactions and allergic reactions to mosquito bites occur frequently. However mosquito allergy is low. Further studies are required to determine the prevalence of mosquito allergy in the general population.

  6. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  7. Evolution of direct mechanisms with incident energy from the Coulomb-barrier to relativistic energies. - Two-center effects in nucleon transfer between nuclei. - Signatures of nucleon promotion in heavy ion reactions at barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertzen, W. von; Voit, H.; Imanishi, B.

    1988-10-01

    This report contains a review article considering the evolution of direct mechanisms with incident energy in heavy ion reactions and two theoretical articles concerning two-center effects in transfer reactions between heavy ions and the nucleon promotion in heavy ion reactions. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  8. Nuclear Data Center (NDC) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Progress Report to the IAEA Technical Meeting of Nuclear Reaction Data Centers (NRDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Ouk

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Data Center (NDC, former Nuclear Data Evaluation Lab.) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a director, 10 permanent staffs (2 in evaluation, 1 in measurement, 2 in atomic and molecular data, 2 in processing and validation, 3 in applications), one PhD student and one secretary. KAERI/NDC recently expanded its scope of work into the atomic and molecular data where two permanent staffs are involved. Mission of KAERI/NDC is disseminating outcomes of international network as well as promoting domestic nuclear data activities and related applications.

  9. Etiologia e evolução das meningites bacterianas em centro de pediatria Etiology and evolution of bacterial meningitis in a pediatric center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta M.C. Romanelli

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: determinar a prevalência dos agentes etiológicos das meningites bacterianas em serviço de referência, no atendimento de doenças infecciosas para o estado de Minas Gerais, e verificar a resposta ao tratamento utilizado.Métodos: estudo descritivo em que foram incluídas todas as crianças com diagnóstico provável de meningite, admitidas na instituição no período de junho a novembro/99.Resultados: obteve-se 210 casos de meningite, sendo 111 casos de etiologia bacteriana (52,9%. Destes, 52 casos foram diagnósticos prováveis (por alteração do liquor rotina e 59 com diagnósticos de certeza (por cultura e/ou isolamento de antígeno. Os principais agentes isolados foram, em ordem decrescente, H. influenzae, N. meningitidis e S. pneumoniae. O tratamento inicial para a faixa etária de três meses a cinco anos foi ampicilina e cloranfenicol, sendo posteriormente restrito para penicilina em casos de meningococo e pneumococo, e para cloranfenicol nos casos de H. influenzae. A mudança para antimicrobiano de maior espectro foi realizada com base em dados clínicos ou laboratoriais, não havendo isolamento de microorganismo resistente.Conclusões: o acompanhamento do perfil epidemiológico das meningites deve ser contínuo, e cada serviço deve se basear em dados locais para direcionar a terapia antimicrobiana. A monitorização contínua dos agentes prevalentes em cada instituição e de sua resistência é fundamental para a escolha antimicrobiana, atuando com menor interferência na colonização individual, sem contribuir para a crescente resistência dos agentes responsáveis pelas infecções meníngeas.Objective: to establish the prevalence of the etiological agents of bacterial meningitis in a reference center for the treatment of infectious diseases in the state of Minas Gerais. Methods: descriptive study including all children with probable diagnosis of meningitis between June/1999 and November/1999.Results: there were 210

  10. Characterization of hypersensitivity reactions reported among Andrographis paniculata users in Thailand using Health Product Vigilance Center (HPVC) database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwankesawong, Wimon; Saokaew, Surasak; Permsuwan, Unchalee; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2014-12-24

    Andrographis paniculata (andrographis) is one of the herbal products that are widely used for various indications. Hypersensitivity reactions have been reported among subjects receiving Andrographis paniculata in Thailand. Understanding of characteristics of patients, adverse events, and clinical outcomes is essential for ensuring population safety.This study aimed to describe the characteristics of hypersensitivity reactions reported in patients receiving andrographis containing products in Thailand using national pharmacovigilance database. Thai Vigibase data from February 2001 to December 2012 involving andrographis products were used. This database includes the reports submitted through the spontaneous reporting system and intensive monitoring programmes. The database contained patient characteristic, adverse events associated with andrographis products, and details on seriousness, causality, and clinical outcomes. Case reports were included for final analysis if they met the inclusion criteria; 1) reports with andrographis being the only suspected cause, 2) reports with terms consistent with the constellation of hypersensitivity reactions, and 3) reports with terms considered critical terms according to WHO criteria. Descriptive statistics were used. A total of 248 case reports of andrographis-associated adverse events were identified. Only 106 case reports specified andrographis herbal product as the only suspected drug and reported at least one term consistent with constellation of hypersensitivity reactions. Most case reports (89%) came from spontaneous reporting system with no previously documented history of drug allergy (88%). Of these, 18 case reports were classified as serious with 16 cases requiring hospitalization. For final assessment, the case reports with terms consistent with constellation of hypersensitivity reactions and critical terms were included. Thirteen case reports met such criteria including anaphylactic shock (n = 5), anaphylactic

  11. Adverse reactions of Methylphenidate in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder: Report from a referral center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehpiri, Zahra; Mahmoudi-Gharaei, Javad; Faghihi, Toktam; Karimzadeh, Iman; Khalili, Hossein; Mohammadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to determine various aspects of methylphenidate adverse reactions in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Iran. Methods: During the 6 months period, all children under methylphenidate treatment alone or along with other agents attending a university-affiliated psychology clinic were screened regarding all subjective and objective adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of methylphenidate. Causality and seriousness of detected ADRs were assessed by relevant World Health Organization definitions. The Schumock and Thornton questionnaire was used to determine preventability of ADRs. Findings: Seventy-one patients including 25 girls and 46 boys with ADHD under methylphenidate treatment were enrolled within the study period. All (100%) ADHD children under methylphenidate treatment developed at least one ADR. Anorexia (74.3%), irritability (57.1%), and insomnia (47.2%) were the most frequent methylphenidate-related adverse reactions. Except for one, all other detected ADRs were determined to be mild. In addition, no ADR was considered to be preventable and serious. Conclusion: Our data suggested that although methylphenidate related adverse reactions were common in children with ADHD, but they were mainly mild and nonserious. PMID:25535621

  12. Probing the Energy Transfer Dynamics of Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complexes Through Hole-Burning and Single-Complex Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Kerry Joseph [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy is used to drive reactions that generate sugars to supply energy for cellular processes. It is one of the most important fundamental biological reactions and occurs in both prokaryotic (e.g. bacteria) and eukaryotic (e.g. plants and algae) organisms. Photosynthesis is also remarkably intricate, requiring the coordination of many different steps and reactions in order to successfully transform absorbed solar energy into a biochemical usable form of energy. However, the net reaction for all photosynthetic organisms can be reduced to the following, deceptively general, equation developed by Van Niel[1] H2 - D + Aimplieshv A - H2 + D where H2-D is the electron donor, e.g. H2O, H2S. A is the electron acceptor, e.g. CO2, and A-H2 is the synthesized sugar. Amazingly, this simple net equation is responsible for creating the oxidizing atmosphere of Earth and the recycling of CO2, both of which are necessary for the sustainment of the global ecosystem.

  13. Femtosecond spectroscopy of bacterial photosynthesis--towards an understanding of the most important energy conversion process on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinth, W.; Hamm, P.; Arlt, T.; Wachtveitl, J.

    1996-01-01

    Reaction centers of bacterial photosynthesis are ideal systems to study photosynthetic energy conversion. Femtosecond spectroscopy has delivered extensive information on the molecular mechanisms of the primary electron transfer. The data show, that primary electron transfer is an ultrafast stepwise reaction, where the electron is transferred via closely spaced pigments with reaction times as fast as 0.9 ps and 3.5 ps. Experiments on mutated and modified reaction centers allow to determine the energetics of the various intermediates in the reaction center. Recently, femtosecond experiments with light pulses in the mid infrared have shown, that an additional fast process occurs on the 200 fs timescale in the initially excited special pair. Only afterwards the well established electron transfer reactions take place. This fast process may be of importance for the optimization of the primary reaction

  14. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  15. Mastitis diagnosis in dairy cows using PathoProof real-time polymerase chain reaction assay in comparison with conventional bacterial culture in a Northern German field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spittel, Susanne; Hoedemaker, Martina

    2012-01-01

    In the following field study, the commercial PathoProof Mastitis PCR Assay, a real-time PCR for identifying eleven mastitis pathogens and the staphylococcal beta-lactamase gene, was compared with conventional bacterial culture. For this purpose, 681 udder quarter samples from 173 clinically healthy cows with varying somatic cell count from four dairy herds in the region of Osnabrück, Lower Saxony, Germany, were collected between July 2010 and February 2011 and subjected to PCR and bacterial culture. The frequency of positive pathogen signals was markedly higher with PCR compared with culture (70.6% vs. 32.2%). This was accompanied by a substantial higher percentage of multiple pathogen identifications and a lower percentage of single identifications in the PCR compared with bacterial culture. Using bacterial culture as gold standard, moderate to high sensitivities (76.9-100%) and specificities (63.3-98.7%) were calculated for six out of seven pathogens with sufficient detection numbers. For Enterococcus spp, the sensitivity was only 9.1%. When the PCR results of pooled udder quarter samples of the 173 cows were compared with the single udder quarter samples, in 72% of the cases, major pathogen DNA was either not found in both types of samples, or in the case of a positive pool sample, the respective pathogens were found in at least one udder quarter sample. With both methods, the most frequently detected mastitis pathogens were coryneform bacteria (PCR: Corynebacterium bovis), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) and Staphylococcus (S.) aureus, followed by Arcanobacterium pyogenes/Peptoniphilus indolicus with PCR, and then with both methods, Streptococcus uberis. The staphylococcal beta-lactamase gene was found in 27.7% of the S. aureus and in 37.0% of the CNS identifications.

  16. Report on the consultants` meeting on co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers (technical aspects)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O; Wienke, H [eds.

    1997-10-01

    The report summarizes the co-ordination meeting of the network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres organized by the IAEA in 1997. The meeting was attended by technical staff from ten member centres of the network (representing USA, Russia, China, Japan, Hungary, OECD-NEA and IAEA) to discuss technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Observers from Belgium and Ukraine also attended the meeting. The document includes status reports of all centres and selected working papers. Refs, figs, tabs.

  17. Report on the consultants' meeting on co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers (technical aspects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Wienke, H.

    1997-10-01

    The report summarizes the co-ordination meeting of the network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres organized by the IAEA in 1997. The meeting was attended by technical staff from ten member centres of the network (representing USA, Russia, China, Japan, Hungary, OECD-NEA and IAEA) to discuss technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Observers from Belgium and Ukraine also attended the meeting. The document includes status reports of all centres and selected working papers

  18. Study of the Mn-binding sites in photosystem II using antibodies raised against lumenal regions of the D1 and D2 reaction center proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmasso, Enrique Agustin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The experiments discussed in this thesis focus on identifying the protein segments or specific amino acids which provide ligands to the Mn cluster of photosystem II (PS II). This Mn cluster plays a central role in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PS II. The Mn cluster is thought to be bound by lumenal regions of the PS II reaction center proteins known as D1 and D2. First, several peptides were synthesized which correspond to specific lumenal segments of the D1 and D2 proteins. Next, polyclonal antibodies were successfully elicited using three of these peptides. The peptides recognized by these antibodies correspond to protein segments of the spinach reaction center proteins: Ile-321 to Ala-344 of D1 (D1-a), Asp-319 to Arg-334 of D1 (D1-b), and Val-300 to Asn-319 of D2 (D2-a). These antibodies were then used in assays which were developed to structurally or functionally probe the potential Mn-binding regions of the D1 and D2 proteins.

  19. Some experiments on the primary electron acceptor in reaction centres from Rhodopseudomanas sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wraight, C A; Cogdell, R J; Clayton, R K

    1975-01-01

    The bacterial reaction center absorbance change at 450 nm (A-450), assigned to an anionic semiquinone, has been suggested as a candidate for the reduced form of the primary electron acceptor in bacterial photosynthesis. In reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides we have found kinetic discrepancies between the decay of A-450 and the recovery of photochemical competence. In addition, no proton uptake is measurable on the first turnover, although subsequent ones elicit one proton bound per electron. These results are taken to indicate that the acceptor reaction after a long dark period may be different for the first turnover than for subsequent ones. It is suggested that A-450 is still a likely candidate for the acceptor function but that in reaction centers, additional quinone may act as an adventitious primary acceptor when the ''true'' primary acceptor is reduced. Alternatively, the primary acceptor may act in a ''ping-pong'' fashion with respect to subsequent photoelectrons.

  20. Separate photosensitizers mediate degradation of the 32-kDa photosystem II reaction center protein in the visible and UV spectral regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Gaba, V.; Canaani, O.; Malkin, S.; Mattoo, A.K.; Edelman, M.

    1989-01-01

    A component of the photosystem II reaction center, the 32-kDa protein, is rapidly turned over in the light. The mechanism of its light-dependent metabolism is largely unknown. We quantified the rate of 32-kDa protein degradation over a broad spectral range (UV, visible, and far red). The quantum yield for degradation was highest in the UVB (280-320 nm) region. Spectral evidence demonstrates two distinctly different photosensitizers for 32-kDa protein degradation. The data implicate the bulk photosynthetic pigments (primarily chlorophyll) in the visible and far red regions, and plastoquinone (in one or more of its redox states) in the UV region. A significant portion of 32-kDa protein degradation in sunlight is attributed to UVB irradiance

  1. Aborted germinal center reactions and B cell memory by follicular T cells specific for a B cell receptor V region peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Ryan A; Snyder, Christopher M; St Clair, James; Wysocki, Lawrence J

    2011-07-01

    A fundamental problem in immunoregulation is how CD4(+) T cells react to immunogenic peptides derived from the V region of the BCR that are created by somatic mechanisms, presented in MHC II, and amplified to abundance by B cell clonal expansion during immunity. BCR neo Ags open a potentially dangerous avenue of T cell help in violation of the principle of linked Ag recognition. To analyze this issue, we developed a murine adoptive transfer model using paired donor B cells and CD4 T cells specific for a BCR-derived peptide. BCR peptide-specific T cells aborted ongoing germinal center reactions and impeded the secondary immune response. Instead, they induced the B cells to differentiate into short-lived extrafollicular plasmablasts that secreted modest quantities of Ig. These results uncover an immunoregulatory process that restricts the memory pathway to B cells that communicate with CD4 T cells via exogenous foreign Ag.

  2. How carotenoids protect bacterial photosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cogdell, R J; Howard, T D; Bittl, R; Schlodder, E; Geisenheimer, I; Lubitz, W

    2000-01-01

    The essential function of carotenoids in photosynthesis is to act as photoprotective agents, preventing chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls from sensitizing harmful photodestructive reactions in the presence of oxygen. Based upon recent structural studies on reaction centres and antenna complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria, the detailed organization of the carotenoids is described. Then with specific reference to bacterial antenna complexes the details of the photoprotective role, ...

  3. Orientations of Iron-Sulfur Clusters FA and FB in the Homodimeric Type-I Photosynthetic Reaction Center of Heliobacterium modesticaldum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toru; Matsuoka, Masahiro; Azai, Chihiro; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-Oka, Hirozo

    2016-05-12

    Orientations of the FA and FB iron-sulfur (FeS) clusters in a structure-unknown type-I homodimeric heriobacterial reaction center (hRC) were studied in oriented membranes of the thermophilic anaerobic photosynthetic bacterium Heliobacterium modesticaldum by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and compared with those in heterodimeric photosystem I (PS I). The Rieske-type FeS center in the cytochrome b/c complex showed a well-oriented EPR signal. Illumination at 14 K induced an FB(-) signal with g-axes of gz = 2.066, gy = 1.937, and gx = 1.890, tilted at angles of 60°, 60°, and 45°, respectively, with respect to the membrane normal. Chemical reduction with dithionite produced an additional signal of FA(-), which magnetically interacted with FB(-), with gz = 2.046, gy = 1.942, and gx = 1.911 at 30°, 60°, and 90°, respectively. The angles and redox properties of FA(-) and FB(-) in hRC resemble those of FB(-) and FA(-), respectively, in PS I. Therefore, FA and FB in hRC, named after their g-value similarities, seem to be located like FB and FA, not like FA and FB, respectively, in PS I. The reducing side of hRC could resemble those in PS I, if the names of FA and FB are interchanged with each other.

  4. Unifying principles in homodimeric type I photosynthetic reaction centers: properties of PscB and the FA, FB and FX iron-sulfur clusters in green sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H

    2008-12-01

    The photosynthetic reaction center from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum (CbRC) was solubilized from membranes using Triton X-100 and isolated by sucrose density ultra-centrifugation. The CbRC complexes were subsequently treated with 0.5 M NaCl and ultrafiltered over a 100 kDa cutoff membrane. The resulting CbRC cores did not exhibit the low-temperature EPR resonances from FA- and FB- and were unable to reduce NADP+. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometric analysis showed that the PscB subunit, which harbors the FA and FB clusters, had become dissociated, and was now present in the filtrate. Attempts to rebind PscB onto CbRC cores were unsuccessful. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that recombinant PscB contains a heterogeneous mixture of [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and other types of Fe/S clusters tentatively identified as [2Fe-2S]2+,1+ clusters and rubredoxin-like Fe3+,2+ centers, and that the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ clusters which were present were degraded at high ionic strength. Quantitative analysis confirmed that the amount of iron and sulfide in the recombinant protein was sub-stoichiometric. A heme-staining assay indicated that cytochrome c551 remained firmly attached to the CbRC cores. Low-temperature EPR spectroscopy of photoaccumulated CbRC complexes and CbRC cores showed resonances between g=5.4 and 4.4 assigned to a S=3/2 ground spin state [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster and at g=1.77 assigned to a S=1/2 ground spin state [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster, both from FX-. These results unify the properties of the acceptor side of the Type I homodimeric reaction centers found in green sulfur bacteria and heliobacteria: in both, the FA and FB iron-sulfur clusters are present on a salt-dissociable subunit, and FX is present as an interpolypeptide [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster with a significant population in a S=3/2 ground spin state.

  5. Hydrogen bonding between the QB site ubisemiquinone and Ser-L223 in the bacterial reaction centre – a combined spectroscopic and computational perspective^

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Erik; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Lin, Tzu-Jen; Samoilova, Rimma I.; Wraight, Colin A.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; O’Malley, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    In the QB site of the Rba. sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centre the donation of a hydrogen bond from the hydroxyl group of Ser-L223 to the ubisemiquinone formed after the first flash is debatable. In this study we use a combination of spectroscopy and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to comprehensively explore this topic. We show that ENDOR, ESEEM and HYSCORE spectroscopic differences between the mutant L223SA and the wild type sample (WT) are negligible, indic...

  6. Bacterial prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Bradley C; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    The review provides the infectious disease community with a urologic perspective on bacterial prostatitis. Specifically, the article briefly reviews the categorization of prostatitis by type and provides a distillation of new findings published on bacterial prostatitis over the past year. It also highlights key points from the established literature. Cross-sectional prostate imaging is becoming more common and may lead to more incidental diagnoses of acute bacterial prostatitis. As drug resistance remains problematic in this condition, the reemergence of older antibiotics such as fosfomycin, has proven beneficial. With regard to chronic bacterial prostatitis, no clear clinical risk factors emerged in a large epidemiological study. However, bacterial biofilm formation has been associated with more severe cases. Surgery has a limited role in bacterial prostatitis and should be reserved for draining of a prostatic abscess or the removal of infected prostatic stones. Prostatitis remains a common and bothersome clinical condition. Antibiotic therapy remains the basis of treatment for both acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Further research into improving prostatitis treatment is indicated.

  7. A structural basis for electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.R.; DiMagno, T.J.; Angerhofer, A.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

    1989-01-01

    Triplet data for the primary donor in single crystals of bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis are interpreted in terms of the corresponding x-ray structures. The analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance data from single crystals (triplet zero field splitting and cation and triplet linewidth of the primary special pair donor of bacterial reaction centers) is extended to systems of a non-crystalline nature. A unified interpretation based on frontier molecular orbitals concludes that the special pair behaves like a supermolecule in all wild-type bacteria investigated here. However, in heterodimers of Rb. capsulatus (His M200 changed to Leu or Phe with the result that the M-half of the special pair is converted to bacteriopheophytin) the special pair possesses the EPR properties more appropriately described in terms of a monomer. In all cases the triplet state and cation EPR properties appear to be dominated by the highest occupied molecular orbitals. These conclusions derived from EPR experiments are supplemented by data from Stark spectroscopy of reaction centers from Rb. capsulatus. 41 refs., 3 tabs

  8. Confirmed Transmission of Bacterial or Fungal Infection to Kidney Transplant Recipients from Donated After Cardiac Death (DCD) Donors in China: A Single-Center Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qiquan; Liu, Huanmiao; Ye, Shaojun; Ye, Qifa

    2017-08-03

    BACKGROUND We aimed to investigate blood and urine cultures of donated after cardiac death (DCD) donors and report the cases of confirmed (proven/probable) transmission of bacterial or fungal infection from donors to kidney recipients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy-eight DCD donors between 2010 and 2016 were included. Sixty-one DCD donors underwent blood cultures and 22 episodes of bacteremias developed in 18 donors. Forty-three donors underwent urine cultures and 14 donors experienced 17 episodes of urinary infections. RESULTS Seven of 154 (4.5%) kidney recipients developed confirmed donor-derived bacterial or fungal infections. Inappropriate use of antibiotics in donor was a risk factor for donor-derived infection (p=0.048). The use of FK506 was more frequent in recipients without donor-derived infection than those with donor-derived infection (p=0.033). Recipients with donor-derived infection were associated with higher mortality and graft loss (42.9% and 28.6%, respectively), when compared with those without donor-derived infection (4.8% each). Three kidney recipients with donor-derived infection died; one death was due to multi-organ failure caused by Candida albicans, and two were related to rupture of the renal artery; two of them did not receive appropriate antimicrobial therapy after infection. CONCLUSIONS Our kidney recipients showed high occurrence rates of donor-derived infection. Recipients with donor-derived infection were associated with higher mortality and graft loss than those without donor-derived infection. The majority of recipients with donor-derived infection who died did not receive appropriate antimicrobial therapy after infection.

  9. Retrospective analysis of multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based molecular diagnostics (SES in 70 patients with suspected central nervous system infections: A single-center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Krishnan Tiruppur Chinnappan Ramalingam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central nervous system (CNS infections present a grave health care challenge due to high morbidity and mortality. Clinical findings and conventional laboratory assessments are not sufficiently distinct for specific etiologic diagnosis. Identification of pathogens is a key to appropriate therapy. Aim: In this retrospective observational study, we evaluated the efficacy and clinical utility of syndrome evaluation system (SES for diagnosing clinically suspected CNS infections. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis included inpatients in our tertiary level neurointensive care unit (NICU and ward from February 2010 to December 2013. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples of 70 patients, clinically suspected of having CNS infections, were subjected to routine laboratory tests, culture, imaging, and SES. We analyzed the efficacy of SES in the diagnosis of CNS infections and its utility in therapeutic decision-making. Results: SES had a clinical sensitivity of 57.4% and clinical specificity of 95.6%. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the top two bacterial pathogens, whereas Herpes simplex virus (HSV was the most common viral pathogen. Polymicrobial infections were detected in 32.14% of SES-positive cases. SES elicited a change in the management in 30% of the patients from initial empiric therapy. At discharge, 51 patients recovered fully while 11 patients had partial recovery. Three-month follow-up showed only six patients to have neurological deficits. Conclusion: In a tertiary care center, etiological microbial diagnosis is central to appropriate therapy and outcomes. Sensitive and accurate multiplex molecular diagnostics play a critical role in not only identifying the causative pathogen but also in helping clinicians to institute appropriate therapy, reduce overuse of antimicrobials, and ensure superior clinical outcomes.

  10. Retrospective analysis of multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based molecular diagnostics (SES) in 70 patients with suspected central nervous system infections: A single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Rama Krishnan Tiruppur Chinnappan; Chakraborty, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections present a grave health care challenge due to high morbidity and mortality. Clinical findings and conventional laboratory assessments are not sufficiently distinct for specific etiologic diagnosis. Identification of pathogens is a key to appropriate therapy. In this retrospective observational study, we evaluated the efficacy and clinical utility of syndrome evaluation system (SES) for diagnosing clinically suspected CNS infections. This retrospective analysis included inpatients in our tertiary level neurointensive care unit (NICU) and ward from February 2010 to December 2013. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of 70 patients, clinically suspected of having CNS infections, were subjected to routine laboratory tests, culture, imaging, and SES. We analyzed the efficacy of SES in the diagnosis of CNS infections and its utility in therapeutic decision-making. SES had a clinical sensitivity of 57.4% and clinical specificity of 95.6%. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the top two bacterial pathogens, whereas Herpes simplex virus (HSV) was the most common viral pathogen. Polymicrobial infections were detected in 32.14% of SES-positive cases. SES elicited a change in the management in 30% of the patients from initial empiric therapy. At discharge, 51 patients recovered fully while 11 patients had partial recovery. Three-month follow-up showed only six patients to have neurological deficits. In a tertiary care center, etiological microbial diagnosis is central to appropriate therapy and outcomes. Sensitive and accurate multiplex molecular diagnostics play a critical role in not only identifying the causative pathogen but also in helping clinicians to institute appropriate therapy, reduce overuse of antimicrobials, and ensure superior clinical outcomes.

  11. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive STDs Home Page Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ( ... of getting other STDs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea . These bacteria can sometimes cause pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  12. Structure of the bacterial deacetylase LpxC bound to the nucleotide reaction product reveals mechanisms of oxyanion stabilization and proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Gina M; Klein, Daniel J; Rickert, Keith W; Patel, Sangita B; Kornienko, Maria; Zugay-Murphy, Joan; Reid, John C; Tummala, Srivanya; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Sheo B; Miesel, Lynn; Lumb, Kevin J; Soisson, Stephen M

    2013-11-22

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria is an increasing threat to global health that underscores an urgent need for an expanded antibacterial armamentarium. Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, have become increasingly important clinical pathogens with limited treatment options. This is due in part to their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer membrane components, which dually serve as endotoxins while also protecting Gram-negative bacteria from antibiotic entry. The LpxC enzyme catalyzes the committed step of LPS biosynthesis, making LpxC a promising target for new antibacterials. Here, we present the first structure of an LpxC enzyme in complex with the deacetylation reaction product, UDP-(3-O-(R-3-hydroxymyristoyl))-glucosamine. These studies provide valuable insight into recognition of substrates and products by LpxC and a platform for structure-guided drug discovery of broad spectrum Gram-negative antibiotics.

  13. Aromatic residues located close to the active center are essential for the catalytic reaction of flap endonuclease-1 from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Eriko; Abe, Junko; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-04-16

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN-1) possessing 5'-flap endonuclease and 5'-->3' exonuclease activity plays important roles in DNA replication and repair. In this study, the kinetic parameters of mutants at highly conserved aromatic residues, Tyr33, Phe35, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279, in the vicinity of the catalytic centers of FEN-1 were examined. The substitution of these aromatic residues with alanine led to a large reduction in kcat values, although these mutants retained Km values similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. Notably, the kcat of Y33A and F79A decreased 333-fold and 71-fold, respectively, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. The aromatic residues Tyr33 and Phe79, and the aromatic cluster Phe278-Phe279 mainly contributed to the recognition of the substrates without the 3' projection of the upstream strand (the nick, 5'-recess-end, single-flap, and pseudo-Y substrates) for the both exo- and endo-activities, but played minor roles in recognizing the substrates with the 3' projection (the double flap substrate and the nick substrate with the 3' projection). The replacement of Tyr33, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279, with non-charged aromatic residues, but not with aliphatic hydrophobic residues, recovered the kcat values almost fully for the substrates without the 3' projection of the upstream strand, suggesting that the aromatic groups of Tyr33, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279 might be involved in the catalytic reaction, probably via multiple stacking interactions with nucleotide bases. The stacking interactions of Tyr33 and Phe79 might play important roles in fixing the template strand and the downstream strand, respectively, in close proximity to the active center to achieve the productive transient state leading to the hydrolysis.

  14. Role of Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction center residue M214 in the composition, absorbance properties, and conformations of H(A) and B(A) cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saer, Rafael G; Hardjasa, Amelia; Rosell, Federico I; Mauk, A Grant; Murphy, Michael E P; Beatty, J Thomas

    2013-04-02

    In the native reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the side chain of (M)L214 projects orthogonally toward the plane and into the center of the A branch bacteriopheophytin (BPhe) macrocycle. The possibility that this side chain is responsible for the dechelation of the central Mg(2+) of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) was investigated by replacement of (M)214 with residues possessing small, nonpolar side chains that can neither coordinate nor block access to the central metal ion. The (M)L214 side chain was also replaced with Cys, Gln, and Asn to evaluate further the requirements for assembly of the RC with BChl in the HA pocket. Photoheterotrophic growth studies showed no difference in growth rates of the (M)214 nonpolar mutants at a low light intensity, but the growth of the amide-containing mutants was impaired. The absorbance spectra of purified RCs indicated that although absorbance changes are associated with the nonpolar mutations, the nonpolar mutant RC pigment compositions are the same as in the wild-type protein. Crystal structures of the (M)L214G, (M)L214A, and (M)L214N mutants were determined (determined to 2.2-2.85 Å resolution), confirming the presence of BPhe in the HA pocket and revealing alternative conformations of the phytyl tail of the accessory BChl in the BA site of these nonpolar mutants. Our results demonstrate that (i) BChl is converted to BPhe in a manner independent of the aliphatic side chain length of nonpolar residues replacing (M)214, (ii) BChl replaces BPhe if residue (M)214 has an amide-bearing side chain, (iii) (M)214 side chains containing sulfur are not sufficient to bind BChl in the HA pocket, and (iv) the (M)214 side chain influences the conformation of the phytyl tail of the BA BChl.

  15. Pattern of Adverse Drug Reactions in Children Attending the Department of Pediatrics in a Tertiary Care Center: A Prospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishour Kumar Digra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM To study the pattern of various adverse drug reactions (ADRs occurring in children attending the Department of Pediatrics, SMGS Hospital, Jammu over 1 year. Subjects and Methods This was a prospective study, with study population of patients attending Department of Pediatrics over a period of 1 year. A structured format was used to enroll the participants. A pilot study was conducted to test the suitability of the format and feasibility of the study. The study was carried out to review various pattern of ADRs by using the Naranjo probability scale, and severity was assessed by using the Hartwig severity scale. ADRs were classified according to the classification used by the Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring Center, Central Drugs Standard Control Organization, New Delhi, India. Results In the present study, 104 patients were found to have developed acute drug reactions. Among these, 83.6% were type B, 14.42% type A, and 1.92% were type U. Furthermore, 25.96% ADRs were due to anticonvulsants, followed by antibiotics (22.11%, antipyretics (11.53%, vaccination (8.65%, steroids (6.73%, decongestants (5.67%, snake antivenom and antiemetics (3.84%, and fluids, insulin, and antacids (1.92%. The patients’ dermatological system was involved in 67.30%, followed by the central nervous system (CNS in 11.53% patients. Renal system was involved in 6.73% patients. Cardiac, musculoskeletal, metabolic, and other systems were involved in 4.80%, 3.84%, 2.88%, and 0.96%, respectively. According to the Hartwig severity scale of ADRs, 64.4% patients had moderate ADRs, 29.8% patients had severe ADRs, and 5.76% had mild ADRs. In the present study, 64.4% patients expressed moderate severity, whereas 29.8% expressed high severity and 5.76% expressed mild ADRs. Conclusion ADRs were seen in 71% of the patients between 1 and 5 years of age, 26% in the age group of 5–10 years, and 3% were more than 10 years old. Anticonvulsants (25.96% and antibiotics (22.11% were

  16. Two-step bacterial broad-range polymerase chain reaction analysis of heart valve tissue improves bacteriological diagnosis of infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussier, Rémi; Rogez, Sylvie; François, Bruno; Denes, Eric; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Garnier, Fabien

    2013-03-01

    Positive heart valve (HV) culture is a major Duke's criterion for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis but is poorly sensitive. Two broad-range 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods were applied to 31 HV samples: first, a real-time method, then conventional end-point PCR was applied to HV samples on which the first PCR was negative. Five specific real-time PCR procedures were also used in order to identify Bartonella spp., Tropheryma whipplei, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumonia, and Coxiella burnetii. A strategy combining the 2-step broad-range PCR methods improved the sensitivity of the molecular method from 38.7% to 58%. Specific PCR identified 1 T. whipplei, which was also identified by conventional end-point PCR. These results confirm that blood culture is the gold standard for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis, shows that molecular methods applied to HV can be useful when blood culture is negative, and that 2-step broad-range PCR approach seems to be more sensitive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Charge stabilization by reaction center protein immobilized to carbon nanotubes functionalized by amine groups and poly(3-thiophene acetic acid) conducting polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, T.; Magyar, M.; Nagy, L. [Department of Medical Physics and Informatics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Nemeth, Z.; Hernadi, K. [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Endrodi, B.; Bencsik, G.; Visy, Cs. [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Horvath, E.; Magrez, A.; Forro, L. [Institute of Physics of Complex Matter, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    A large number of studies have indicated recently that photosynthetic reaction center proteins (RC) bind successfully to nanostructures and their functional activity is largely retained. The major goal of current research is to find the most efficient systems and conditions for the photoelectric energy conversion and for the stability of this bio-nanocomposite. In our studies, we immobilized the RC protein on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) through specific chemical binding to amine functional groups and through conducting polymer (poly(3-thiophene acetic acid), PTAA). Both structural (TEM, AFM) and functional (absorption change and conductivity) measurements has shown that RCs could be bound effectively to functionalized CNTs. The kinetics of the light induced absorption change indicated that RCs were still active in the composite and there was an interaction between the protein cofactors and the CNTs. The light generated photocurrent was measured in an electrochemical cell with transparent CNT electrode designed specially for this experiment. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  19. Viral etiology and incidence of acute gastroenteritis in young children attending day-care centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Vesikari, Timo; Pang, Xiao-Li

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to investigate the frequency, morbidity and cause of acute gastroenteritis in children attending day-care centers in Denmark. METHODS: Children with acute diarrhea (> or =2 consecutive loose stools in 24 hours, with duration of ... 19 day-care centers, were included. Gastroenteritis viruses, group A rotavirus, sapoviruses, noroviruses and astroviruses were detected with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays. In addition, stool specimens were cultured for bacterial pathogens. Children who were brought...

  20. Energetics of bacterial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebard, David N; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2009-09-10

    We report the results of extensive numerical simulations and theoretical calculations of electronic transitions in the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic bacterium. The energetics and kinetics of five electronic transitions related to the kinetic scheme of primary charge separation have been analyzed and compared to experimental observations. Nonergodic formulation of the reaction kinetics is required for the calculation of the rates due to a severe breakdown of the system ergodicity on the time scale of primary charge separation, with the consequent inapplicability of the standard canonical prescription to calculate the activation barrier. Common to all reactions studied is a significant excess of the charge-transfer reorganization energy from the width of the energy gap fluctuations over that from the Stokes shift of the transition. This property of the hydrated proteins, breaking the linear response of the thermal bath, allows the reaction center to significantly reduce the reaction free energy of near-activationless electron hops and thus raise the overall energetic efficiency of the biological charge-transfer chain. The increase of the rate of primary charge separation with cooling is explained in terms of the temperature variation of induction solvation, which dominates the average donor-acceptor energy gap for all electronic transitions in the reaction center. It is also suggested that the experimentally observed break in the Arrhenius slope of the primary recombination rate, occurring near the temperature of the dynamical transition in proteins, can be traced back to a significant drop of the solvent reorganization energy close to that temperature.

  1. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    , which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters...

  2. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained,

  3. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation,

  4. Bacterial stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Bacterial stress. Physicochemical and chemical parameters: temperature, pressure, pH, salt concentration, oxygen, irradiation. Nutritional depravation: nutrient starvation, water shortage. Toxic compounds: Antibiotics, heavy metals, toxins, mutagens. Interactions with other cells: ...

  5. Calculation of Transactinide Homolog Isotope Production Reactions Possible with the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, K.J.; Shaughnessy, D.A.; Gostic, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The LLNL heavy element group has been investigating the chemical properties of the heaviest elements over the past several years. The properties of the transactinides (elements with Z > 103) are often unknown due to their low production rates and short half-lives, which require lengthy cyclotron irradiations in order to make enough atoms for statistically significant evaluations of their chemistry. In addition, automated chemical methods are often required to perform consistent and rapid chemical separations on the order of minutes for the duration of the experiment, which can last from weeks to months. Separation methods can include extraction chromatography, liquid-liquid extraction, or gas-phase chromatography. Before a lengthy transactinide experiment can be performed at an accelerator, a large amount of preparatory work must be done both to ensure the successful application of the chosen chemical system to the transactinide chemistry problem being addressed, and to evaluate the behavior of the lighter elemental homologs in the same chemical system. Since transactinide chemistry is literally performed on one single atom, its chemical properties cannot be determined from bulk chemical matrices, but instead must be inferred from the behavior of the lighter elements that occur in its chemical group and in those of its neighboring elements. By first studying the lighter group homologs in a particular chemical system, when the same system is applied to the transactinide element under investigation, its decay properties can be directly compared to those of the homologues, thereby allowing an inference of its own chemistry. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes a 1 MV Tandem accelerator, capable of accelerating light ions such as protons to energies of roughly 15 MeV. By using the CAMS beamline, tracers of transactinide homolog elements can be produced both for development of chemical systems and

  6. Calculation of Transactinide Homolog Isotope Production Reactions Possible with the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, K J; Shaughnessy, D A; Gostic, J M

    2011-11-29

    The LLNL heavy element group has been investigating the chemical properties of the heaviest elements over the past several years. The properties of the transactinides (elements with Z > 103) are often unknown due to their low production rates and short half-lives, which require lengthy cyclotron irradiations in order to make enough atoms for statistically significant evaluations of their chemistry. In addition, automated chemical methods are often required to perform consistent and rapid chemical separations on the order of minutes for the duration of the experiment, which can last from weeks to months. Separation methods can include extraction chromatography, liquid-liquid extraction, or gas-phase chromatography. Before a lengthy transactinide experiment can be performed at an accelerator, a large amount of preparatory work must be done both to ensure the successful application of the chosen chemical system to the transactinide chemistry problem being addressed, and to evaluate the behavior of the lighter elemental homologs in the same chemical system. Since transactinide chemistry is literally performed on one single atom, its chemical properties cannot be determined from bulk chemical matrices, but instead must be inferred from the behavior of the lighter elements that occur in its chemical group and in those of its neighboring elements. By first studying the lighter group homologs in a particular chemical system, when the same system is applied to the transactinide element under investigation, its decay properties can be directly compared to those of the homologues, thereby allowing an inference of its own chemistry. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes a 1 MV Tandem accelerator, capable of accelerating light ions such as protons to energies of roughly 15 MeV. By using the CAMS beamline, tracers of transactinide homolog elements can be produced both for development of chemical systems and

  7. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure and function of cytochrome c2 in electron transfer complexes with the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: optical linear dichroism and EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drepper, F; Mathis, P

    1997-02-11

    The photosynthetic reaction center (RC) and its secondary electron donor the water-soluble cytochrome (cyt) c2 from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been used in cross-linked and non-cross-linked complexes, oriented in compressed gels or partially dried multilayers, to study the respective orientation of the primary donor P (BChl dimer) and of cyt c2. Three methods were used: (i) Polarized optical absorption spectra at 295 and 10 K were measured and the linear dichroism of the two individual transitions (Qx, Qy), which are nearly degenerate within the alpha-band of reduced cyt c2, was determined. Attribution of the polarization directions to the molecular axes within the heme plane yielded the average cyt orientation in the complexes. (ii) Time-resolved flash absorption measurements using polarized light allowed determination of the orientation of cyt c2 in complexes which differ in their kinetics of electron transfer. (iii) EPR spectroscopy of ferricyt c2 in cross-linked RC-cyt c2 complexes was used to determine the angle between the heme and the membrane plane. The results suggest the following structural properties for the docking of cyt c2 to the RC: (i) In cross-linked complexes, the two cytochromes displaying half-lives of 0.7 and 60 micros for electron transfer to P+ are similarly oriented (difference plane is parallel to the symmetry axis of the RC (0 degrees +/- 10 degrees). Moreover, the Qy transition, which is assumed to be polarized within the ring III-ring I direction of the heme plane, makes an angle of 56 degrees +/- 1 degree with the symmetry axis. (iii) The dichroism spectrum for the fast phase (0.7 micros) for the non-cross-linked cyt c2-RC complex suggests an orientation similar to that of cross-linked cyt c2, but the heme plane is tilted about 20 degrees closer to the membrane. An alternative model is that two or more bound states of cyt c2 with heme plane tilt angles between 0 degrees and 30 degrees allow the fast electron

  9. Conformational heterogeneity of the bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor HA in reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas viridis revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, J; Bibikova, M; Oesterhelt, D; Nabedryk, E

    1999-08-31

    The light-induced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectra corresponding to the photoreduction of either the HA bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor (HA-/HA spectrum) or the QA primary quinone (QA-/QA spectrum) in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) of Rhodopseudomonas viridis are reported. These spectra have been compared for wild-type (WT) RCs and for two site-directed mutants in which the proposed interactions between the carbonyls on ring V of HA and the RC protein have been altered. In the mutant EQ(L104), the putative hydrogen bond between the protein and the 9-keto C=O of HA should be affected by changing Glu L104 to a Gln. In the mutant WF(M250), the van der Waals interactions between Trp M250 and the 10a-ester C=O of HA should be modified. The characteristic effects of both mutations on the FTIR spectra support the proposed interactions and allow the IR modes of the 9-keto and 10a-ester C=O of HA and HA- to be assigned. Comparison of the HA-/HA and QA-/QA spectra leads us to conclude that the QA-/QA IR signals in the spectral range above 1700 cm-1 are largely dominated by contributions from the electrostatic response of the 10a-ester C=O mode of HA upon QA photoreduction. A heterogeneity in the conformation of the 10a-ester C=O mode of HA in WT RCs, leading to three distinct populations of HA, appears to be related to differences in the hydrogen-bonding interactions between the carbonyls of ring V of HA and the RC protein. The possibility that this structural heterogeneity is related to the observed multiexponential kinetics of electron transfer and the implications for primary processes are discussed. The effect of 1H/2H exchange on the QA-/QA spectra of the WT and mutant RCs shows that neither Glu L104 nor any other exchangeable carboxylic residue changes appreciably its protonation state upon QA reduction.

  10. Report on the second consultants' meeting of nuclear reaction data centers Kiev, USSR, 11-16 April 1977. Including the thirteenth four-center meeting and the third meeting on charged particle nuclear data compilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1977-10-01

    This second ''NRDC meeting'' combined the 13th ''four centers meeting'' (consultants' meeting of the four neutron nuclear data centers) with the third ''CPND meeting'' (consultants' meeting on charged particle nuclear data compilation). In Part I of the meeting, the neutron data centers held a special session on neutron data matters, in particular on the jointly operated neutron data index CINDA, whereas all items of more general interest, in particular the data exchange system EXFOR, were treated in Part II of the meeting

  11. Bacterial flora of sturgeon fingerling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arani, A.S.; Mosahab, R.

    2008-01-01

    The study on microbial populations is a suitable tool to understand and apply control methods to improve the sanitary level of production in fish breeding and rearing centers, ensure health of sturgeon fingerlings at the time of their release into the rivers and also in the conversation and restoration of these valuable stocks in the Caspian Sea, Iran. A laboratory research based on Austin methods (Austin, B., Austin, D.A. 1993) was conducted for bacterial study on 3 sturgeon species naming A. persicus, A. stellatus and A. nudiventris during different growth stages. Bacterial flora of Acinetobacter, Moraxella, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Edwardsiella, Staphylococcus, Proteus, Yersinia, Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas were determined. The factors which may induce changes in bacterial populations during different stages of fife are the followings: quality of water in rearing ponds, different conditions for growth stages, suitable time for colonization of bacterial flora in rearing pond, water temperature increase in fingerlings size and feeding condition. (author)

  12. Enabling fast electron transfer through both bacterial outer-membrane redox centers and endogenous electron mediators by polyaniline hybridized large-mesoporous carbon anode for high-performance microbial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Long; Qiao, Yan; Zhong, Canyu; Li, Chang Ming

    2017-01-01

    Both physical structure and chemical property of an electrode play critical roles in extracellular electron transfer from microbes to electrodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Herein a novel polyaniline hybridized large mesoporous carbon (PANI-LMC) anode is fabricated from natural biomass by nanostructured CaCO 3 template-assisted carbonization followed by in situ chemical polymerizing PANI to enable fast extracellular electron transfer, in which the LMC with rich disorder-interconnected large mesopores (∼20−50 nm) and large surface area facilitates a fast mediated electron transfer through electron mediators, while the decorated PANI on LMC surface enables the direct electron transfer via bacterial outer-membrane redox centers. Owing to the unique synergistic effect from both excellent electron transfer paths, the PANI-LMC hybrid anode harvests high power electricity with a maximum output power density of 1280 mW m −2 in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 MFCs, 10-fold higher than that of conventional carbon cloth. The findings from this work suggest a new insight on design of high-efficient anode according to the multiple and flexible electrochemical process for practical MFC applications.

  13. Molecular analysis of bacterial pathogens in otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J C; Preston, R A; Aul, J J; Larkins-Pettigrew, M; Rydquist-White, J; Anderson, K W; Wadowsky, R M; Reagan, D R; Walker, E S; Kingsley, L A; Magit, A E; Ehrlich, G D

    To determine if the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can detect bacterial DNA in pediatric middle ear effusions that are sterile by standard cultural methods. Single-center, blinded, comparative study of diagnostic assays. The PCR-based detection systems for Moraxella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were designed and validated using a battery of DNAs obtained from cultured bacteria. Chronic middle ear effusion specimens were collected and comparatively analyzed by culture and the PCR. Tertiary care pediatric hospital. A total of 97 middle ear effusions were collected from pediatric outpatients at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (Pa) during myringotomy and tube placement for chronic otitis media with effusion (duration > 3 months). All patients had failed multiple courses of antimicrobial therapy and were diagnosed by a combination of validated otoscopy and tympanograms. Differences in the percentage of positive test results between PCR-based assays and culture for M catarrhalis, H influenzae, and S pneumoniae. Of the 97 specimens of otitis media with effusion, 28 (28.9%) tested positive by both culture and PCR for M catarrhalis, H influenzae, or S pneumoniae. An additional 47 specimens (48%) were PCR positive/culture negative for these three bacterial species. Thus, 75 (77.3%) of the 97 specimens tested PCR positive for one or more of the three test organisms. The minimum number of bacterial genomic equivalents present in the average culture-negative ear was estimated to be greater than 10(4) based on dilutional experiments. The PCR-based assay systems can detect the presence of bacterial DNA in a significant percentage of culturally sterile middle ear effusions. While this finding is not proof of an active bacterial infectious process, the large number of bacterial genomic equivalents present in the ears is suggestive of an active process.

  14. Bacterial mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...... act together to generate the force required for plasmid movement during segregation. ParR protein binds cooperatively to the centromeric parC DNA region, thereby forming a complex that interacts with the filament-forming actin-like ParM protein in an ATP-dependent manner, suggesting that plasmid...

  15. Factors associated with acute oral mucosal reaction induced by radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A retrospective single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhenchao; Gao, Jin; Qian, Liting; Huang, Yifan; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Liping; He, Jian; Yang, Jing; Wang, Ru; Zhang, Yangyang

    2017-12-01

    To investigate risk factors for acute oral mucosal reaction during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma radiotherapy.A retrospective study of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who underwent radiotherapy from November 2013 to May 2016 in Anhui Provincial Cancer Hospital was conducted. Data on the occurrence and severity of acute oral mucositis were extracted from clinical records. Based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading of acute radiation mucosal injury, the patients were assigned into acute reaction (grades 2-4) and minimum reaction (grades 0-1) groups. Preradiotherapy characteristics and treatment factors were compared between the 2 groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to detect the independent factors associated with acute oral mucosal reactions.Eighty patients completed radiotherapy during the study period. Oral mucosal reactions were recorded as 25, 31, and 24 cases of grades 1, 2, and 3 injuries, respectively. Significant differences between acute reaction and minimum reaction groups were detected in cancer lymph node (N) staging, smoking and diabetes history, pretreatment platelet count and T-Helper/T-Suppressor lymphocyte (Th/Ts) ratio, concurrent chemotherapy, and total and single irradiation doses.Multivariate analysis showed that N stage, smoking history, single dose parapharyngeal irradiation, and pretreatment platelet count were independent risk factors for acute radiation induced oral mucosal reaction. Smoking history, higher grading of N stage, higher single dose irradiation, and lower preirradiation platelet count may increase the risk and severity of acute radiation oral mucosal reaction in radiotherapy of head and neck cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quick-Reaction Report on the Audit of Defense Base Realignment and Closure Budget Data for Naval Training Center Great Lakes, Illinois

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1994-01-01

    .... The Hull Technician School will share building 520 with the Advanced Hull Technician School, which is being realigned from the Naval Training Center San Diego, California, under project P-608T...

  17. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    compounds these must first be undergo extracellular hydrolysis. Bacteria have a great diversity with respect to types of metabolism that far exceeds the metabolic repertoire of eukaryotic organisms. Bacteria play a fundamental role in the biosphere and certain key processes such as, for example......, the production and oxidation of methane, nitrate reduction and fixation of atmospheric nitrogen are exclusively carried out by different groups of bacteria. Some bacterial species – ‘extremophiles’ – thrive in extreme environments in which no eukaryotic organisms can survive with respect to temperature, salinity...... biogeochemical processes are carried exclusively by bacteria. * Bacteria play an important role in all types of habitats including some that cannot support eukaryotic life....

  18. Bacterial Actins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izoré, Thierry; van den Ent, Fusinita

    2017-01-01

    A diverse set of protein polymers, structurally related to actin filaments contributes to the organization of bacterial cells as cytomotive or cytoskeletal filaments. This chapter describes actin homologs encoded by bacterial chromosomes. MamK filaments, unique to magnetotactic bacteria, help establishing magnetic biological compasses by interacting with magnetosomes. Magnetosomes are intracellular membrane invaginations containing biomineralized crystals of iron oxide that are positioned by MamK along the long-axis of the cell. FtsA is widespread across bacteria and it is one of the earliest components of the divisome to arrive at midcell, where it anchors the cell division machinery to the membrane. FtsA binds directly to FtsZ filaments and to the membrane through its C-terminus. FtsA shows altered domain architecture when compared to the canonical actin fold. FtsA's subdomain 1C replaces subdomain 1B of other members of the actin family and is located on the opposite side of the molecule. Nevertheless, when FtsA assembles into protofilaments, the protofilament structure is preserved, as subdomain 1C replaces subdomain IB of the following subunit in a canonical actin filament. MreB has an essential role in shape-maintenance of most rod-shaped bacteria. Unusually, MreB filaments assemble from two protofilaments in a flat and antiparallel arrangement. This non-polar architecture implies that both MreB filament ends are structurally identical. MreB filaments bind directly to membranes where they interact with both cytosolic and membrane proteins, thereby forming a key component of the elongasome. MreB filaments in cells are short and dynamic, moving around the long axis of rod-shaped cells, sensing curvature of the membrane and being implicated in peptidoglycan synthesis.

  19. Spatial variation of bacterial community composition near the Luzon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatial variation of bacterial community composition near the Luzon strait assessed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis ... chain reaction (PCR)-amplified bacterial 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) gene fragments and interpreted the results; its relationship with physical and ...

  20. Petasis/Diels-Alder/Cyclization Cascade Reactions for the Generation of Scaffolds with Multiple Stereogenic Centers and Orthogonal Handles for Library Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flagstad, Thomas; Azevedo, Carlos M. G.; Min, Geanna

    2018-01-01

    A new effective strategy for the synthesis of sp3‐rich small molecules for library production is presented. The key steps to generate complexity highlight Petasis 3‐component reaction followed by an intramolecular Diels‐Alder and cyclization to generate a densely enriched tricyclic or tetracyclic...

  1. Kinetic studies on the reaction of cob(II)alamin with hypochlorous acid: Evidence for one electron oxidation of the metal center and corrin ring destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Rohan S; Farhath, Mohamed M; Shelley, Jacob T; Basu, Soumitra; Brasch, Nicola E

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic and mechanistic studies on the reaction of a major intracellular vitamin B 12 form, cob(II)alamin (Cbl(II)), with hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite (HOCl/OCl - ) have been carried out. Cbl(II) (Co(II)) is rapidly oxidized by HOCl to predominately aquacobalamin/hydroxycobalamin (Cbl(III), Co(III)) with a second-order rate constant of 2.4×10 7 M -1 s -1 (25.0°C). The stoichiometry of the reaction is 1:1. UHPLC/HRMS analysis of the product mixture of the reaction of Cbl(II) with 0.9mol equiv. HOCl provides support for HOCl being initially reduced to Cl and subsequent H atom abstraction from the corrin macrocycle occurring, resulting in small amounts of corrinoid species with two or four H atoms fewer than the parent cobalamin. Upon the addition of excess (H)OCl further slower reactions are observed. Finally, SDS-PAGE experiments show that HOCl-induced damage to bovine serum albumin does not occur in the presence of Cbl(II), providing support for Cbl(II) being an efficient HOCl trapping agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quick-Reaction Report on the Audit of Defense Base Realignment and Closure Budget Data for Naval Training Center Great Lakes, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-19

    the audit of project P-608T, Building Modifications, as they relate to project P-557S. Because...project P-608T was addressed in Report No. 94-108, Quick-Reaction Report on the Audit of Defense Base Realignment and Closure Budget Data for Naval Station Treasure Island, California, May 19,

  3. Selected ion flow tube (SIFT) studies of the reactions of H3O+, NO+ and O-2(+center dot) with six volatile phytogenic esters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sovová, K.; Dryahina, Kseniya; Španěl, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 300, č. 1 (2011), s. 31-38 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0800; GA ČR GA203/09/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : SIFT-MS * ion-molecule reactions * plant esters Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.549, year: 2011

  4. Efficient Destruction of Pollutants in Water by a Dual-Reaction-Center Fenton-like Process over Carbon Nitride Compounds-Complexed Cu(II)-CuAlO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Lai; Yan, Dengbiao; Yu, Guangfei; Cao, Wenrui; Hu, Chun

    2018-04-03

    Carbon nitride compounds (CN) complexed with the in-situ-produced Cu(II) on the surface of CuAlO 2 substrate (CN-Cu(II)-CuAlO 2 ) is prepared via a surface growth process for the first time and exhibits exceptionally high activity and efficiency for the degradation of the refractory pollutants in water through a Fenton-like process in a wide pH range. The reaction rate for bisphenol A removal is ∼25 times higher than that of the CuAlO 2 . According to the characterization, Cu(II) generation on the surface of CuAlO 2 during the surface growth process results in the marked decrease of the surface oxygen vacancies and the formation of the C-O-Cu bridges between CN and Cu(II)-CuAlO 2 in the catalyst. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis and density functional theory (DFT) calculations demonstrate that the dual reaction centers are produced around the Cu and C sites due to the cation-π interactions through the C-O-Cu bridges in CN-Cu(II)-CuAlO 2 . During the Fenton-like reactions, the electron-rich center around Cu is responsible for the efficient reduction of H 2 O 2 to • OH, and the electron-poor center around C captures electrons from H 2 O 2 or pollutants and diverts them to the electron-rich area via the C-O-Cu bridge. Thus, the catalyst exhibits excellent catalytic performance for the refractory pollutant degradation. This study can deepen our understanding on the enhanced Fenton reactivity for water purification through functionalizing with organic solid-phase ligands on the catalyst surface.

  5. Workgroup Report by the Joint Task Force Involving American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); Food Allergy, Anaphylaxis, Dermatology and Drug Allergy (FADDA) (Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee and Adverse Reactions to Drugs, Biologicals, and Latex Committee); and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Botulism Clinical Treatment Guidelines Workgroup-Allergic Reactions to Botulinum Antitoxin: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussler, Edith; Sobel, Jeremy; Hsu, Joy; Yu, Patricia; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Grammer, Leslie C; Nowak-Wegrzyn, Anna

    2017-12-27

    Naturally occurring botulism is rare, but a large number of cases could result from unintentional or intentional contamination of a commercial food. Despeciated, equine-derived, heptavalent botulinum antitoxin (HBAT) is licensed in the United States. Timely treatment reduces morbidity and mortality, but concerns that botulinum antitoxin can induce anaphylaxis exist. We sought to quantify the allergy risk of botulinum antitoxin treatment and the usefulness of skin testing to assess this risk. We conducted a systematic review of (1) allergic reactions to botulinum antitoxin and (2) the predictive value of skin testing (ST) before botulinum antitoxin administration. We searched 5 scientific literature databases, reviewed articles' references, and obtained data from the HBAT manufacturer and from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Anaphylaxis incidence was determined for HBAT and previously employed botulinum antitoxins. We calculated the positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of ST for anaphylaxis related to HBAT and other botulinum antitoxins. Seven articles were included. Anaphylaxis incidence was 1.64% (5/305 patients) for HBAT and 1.16% (8/687 patients) for all other botulinum antitoxins (relative risk, 1.41 [95% confidence interval, .47-4.27]; P = .5). Observed values for both PPV and NPV for HBAT-ST (33 patients) were 100%. Observed PPVs and NPVs of ST for other botulinum antitoxins (302 patients) were 0-56% and 50%-100%, respectively. There were no reports of fatal anaphylaxis. Considering the <2 % rate of anaphylaxis, fatal outcomes, modest predictive value of ST, resource requirements for ST, and the benefits of early treatment, data do not support delaying HBAT administration to perform ST in a mass botulinum toxin exposure. Anaphylactic reactions may occur among 1%-2% of botulinum antitoxin recipients and will require epinephrine and antihistamine treatment and, possibly, intensive care. Published by Oxford

  6. Identifying the public's concerns and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's reactions during a health crisis: An analysis of a Zika live Twitter chat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Lazard, Allison J; Wilcox, Gary B; Mackert, Michael; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2016-12-01

    The arrival of the Zika virus in the United States caused much concern among the public because of its ease of transmission and serious consequences for pregnant women and their newborns. We conducted a text analysis to examine original tweets from the public and responses from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during a live Twitter chat hosted by the CDC. Both the public and the CDC expressed concern about the spread of Zika virus, but the public showed more concern about the consequences it had for women and babies, whereas the CDC focused more on symptoms and education. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Retrospective analysis of non-laboratory-based adverse drug reactions induced by intravenous radiocontrast agents in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen QL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Qin-lan Chen,1 Xiao-ying Zhao,2 Xiao-mi Wang,1 Na Lv,2 Ling-ling Zhu,3 Hui-min Xu,4 Quan Zhou4 1Radiology Nursing Unit, Division of Nursing, 2Department of Quality Management, 3Geriatric VIP Care Ward, Division of Nursing, 4Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The authors retrospectively analyzed the pattern and characteristics of non-laboratory-based adverse drug reactions (ADRs induced by intravenous radiocontrast agents in a large-scale hospital in China during 2014–2015. There were 314 ADR cases among 118,208 patients receiving enhanced CT or MRI examinations. The frequency of moderate/severe ADRs defined by Chinese Society of Radiology (ie, severe vomiting, systematic urticaria, facial swelling, dyspnea, vasovagal reaction, laryngeal edema, seizure, trembling, convulsions, unconsciousness, shock, death, and other unexpected adverse reactions was rare (0.0431%, whereas the mild ADRs were uncommon (0.2225% and accounted for 83.76% of ADRs. Frequency of ADRs induced by iodinated contrast agents was related with examination site, sex, and type of patient settings (P<0.01 and was higher compared with gadolinium contrast agents (0.3676% vs 0.0504%, P<0.01. From 2014 to 2015, frequencies of total and moderate/severe ADRs induced by iodinated contrast agents decreased significantly (0.4410% vs 0.2947%, P<0.01; 0.0960% vs 0.0282%, P<0.01, respectively. Frequency of ADRs differed among different iodinated contrast and gadolinium contrast (P<0.05 agents. Iopromide’s ADR frequency in 2014 was significantly higher compared with iopamidol, ioversol, or iohexol (P<0.01. Frequency of moderate/severe ADRs induced by iodixanol was 4.1–5.4 times that of iohexol, iopromide, or iopamidol. Rash was the predominant ADR subtype (84.39% and occurred more frequently with iodixanol compared with iohexol, iopamidol, or ioversol (P<0

  8. Reaction dynamics of the four-centered elimination CH2OH + --> CHO + +H2: Measurement of kinetic energy release distribution and classical trajectory calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Geol; Park, Seung C.; Kim, Myung Soo

    1996-03-01

    Mass-analyzed ion kinetic energy (MIKE) spectrum of CHO+ generated in the unimolecular dissociation of CH2OH+ was measured. Kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) was evaluated by analyzing the spectrum according to the algorithm developed previously. The average kinetic energy release evaluated from the distribution was extraordinarily large, 1.63 eV, corresponding to 75% of the reverse barrier of the reaction. A global analytical potential energy surface was constructed such that the experimental energetics was represented and that various features in the ab initio potential energy surface were closely reproduced. Classical trajectory calculation was carried out with the global analytical potential energy surface to investigate the causes for the extraordinarily large kinetic energy release. Based on the detailed dynamical calculations, it was found that the strained bending forces at the transition state and strengthening of the CO bond from double to triple bond character were mainly responsible for such a significant kinetic energy release. In addition, the dissociation products H2 and CHO+ ion were found to be rotationally excited in the trajectory calculations. This was attributed to the asymmetry of the transition state and the release of asymmetric bending forces. Also, the bending vibrational modes of CHO+ and the H2 stretching mode, which are coupled with the bending coordinates, were found to be moderately excited.

  9. Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, W.D.

    2009-09-02

    This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled “Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center”, which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. William Burgos (The Pennsylvania State University) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Brian Dempsey (Penn State), Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh (Central Florida University), and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The project focused on development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. The work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and was directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. ORNL FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  10. Structural studies on reaction centers from thermophilic photosynthetic bacteria and its functional utilizations. Tainetsusei kogosei saikin ni yuraisuru kogosei hanno chushin no kozo kaimei to kino kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, T; Morishita, Y; Kobayashi, M; Kanno, S [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1992-10-31

    This paper describes the results of the experiment in which crystallization of protein of reactive center purified from the photosynthetic film of thermophilic purple sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium tepidum whose hyrogen donor in photosynthesis is H2S instead of H2O was attempted. Crystallization was carried out by the vapor diffusion method and particularly by using ethylene glycol as precipitator at 4[degree]C after various investigations on the conditions of crystallization. By X-ray diffraction, this crystal was found to belong to the rhombic system, and it was estimated that the lattice constants, a, b, c equal to 140[angstrom], 190[angstrom] and 80[angstrom] respectively. This bacterium is a thermophilic bacterium having the optimum growth temperature of 48-50 [degree]C and utilizes CO2 or H2CO3 as corbon source, ammonium, urea etc. as nitrogen source and thiosulfate as sulfur source. Moreover, another purpose of this investigation was to determine the thermophilic location by elucidating its configuration (although, as a result, the analysis of configuration had no sufficient resolution). It was confirmed that the enzyme system of photosynthetic film and its cytoplasm obtained by ultrasonic spallation of this cell have CO2 fixing activity utilizing light energy. 23 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Concurrent validity and reliability of using ground reaction force and center of pressure parameters in the determination of leg movement initiation during single leg lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabe, Daniela; de Castro, Marcelo Peduzzi; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Bussey, Melanie Dawn

    2016-09-01

    Postural adjustment evaluations during single leg lift requires the initiation of heel lift (T1) identification. T1 measured by means of motion analyses system is the most reliable approach. However, this method involves considerable workspace, expensive cameras, and time processing data and setting up laboratory. The use of ground reaction forces (GRF) and centre of pressure (COP) data is an alternative method as its data processing and setting up is less time consuming. Further, kinetic data is normally collected using frequency samples higher than 1000Hz whereas kinematic data are commonly captured using 50-200Hz. This study describes the concurrent-validity and reliability of GRF and COP measurements in determining T1, using a motion analysis system as reference standard. Kinematic and kinetic data during single leg lift were collected from ten participants. GRF and COP data were collected using one and two force plates. Displacement of a single heel marker was captured by means of ten Vicon(©) cameras. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected using a sample frequency of 1000Hz. Data were analysed in two stages: identification of key events in the kinetic data, and assessing concurrent validity of T1 based on the chosen key events with T1 provided by the kinematic data. The key event presenting the least systematic bias, along with a narrow 95% CI and limits of agreement against the reference standard T1, was the Baseline COPy event. Baseline COPy event was obtained using one force plate and presented excellent between-tester reliability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence from the structure and function of cytochromes c(2) that nonsulfur purple bacterial photosynthesis followed the evolution of oxygen respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Terry; Van Driessche, Gonzalez; Ambler, Richard; Kyndt, John; Devreese, Bart; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Cusanovich, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Cytochromes c(2) are the nearest bacterial homologs of mitochondrial cytochrome c. The sequences of the known cytochromes c(2) can be placed in two subfamilies based upon insertions and deletions, one subfamily is most like mitochondrial cytochrome c (the small C2s, without significant insertions and deletions), and the other, designated large C2, shares 3- and 8-residue insertions as well as a single-residue deletion. C2s generally function between cytochrome bc(1) and cytochrome oxidase in respiration (ca 80 examples known to date) and between cytochrome bc(1) and the reaction center in nonsulfur purple bacterial photosynthesis (ca 21 examples). However, members of the large C2 subfamily are almost always involved in photosynthesis (12 of 14 examples). In addition, the gene for the large C2 (cycA) is associated with those for the photosynthetic reaction center (pufBALM). We hypothesize that the insertions in the large C2s, which were already functioning in photosynthesis, allowed them to replace the membrane-bound tetraheme cytochrome, PufC, that otherwise mediates between the small C2 or other redox proteins and photosynthetic reaction centers. Based upon our analysis, we propose that the involvement of C2 in nonsulfur purple bacterial photosynthesis was a metabolic feature subsequent to the evolution of oxygen respiration.

  13. Two-center three-electron bonding in ClNH{sub 3} revealed via helium droplet infrared laser Stark spectroscopy: Entrance channel complex along the Cl + NH{sub 3} → ClNH{sub 2} + H reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Christopher P.; Douberly, Gary E., E-mail: douberly@uga.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2556 (United States); Xie, Changjian; Guo, Hua [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Kaufmann, Matin [Department of Physical Chemistry II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-04-28

    Pyrolytic dissociation of Cl{sub 2} is employed to dope helium droplets with single Cl atoms. Sequential addition of NH{sub 3} to Cl-doped droplets leads to the formation of a complex residing in the entry valley to the substitution reaction Cl + NH{sub 3} → ClNH{sub 2} + H. Infrared Stark spectroscopy in the NH stretching region reveals symmetric and antisymmetric vibrations of a C{sub 3v} symmetric top. Frequency shifts from NH{sub 3} and dipole moment measurements are consistent with a ClNH{sub 3} complex containing a relatively strong two-center three-electron (2c–3e) bond. The nature of the 2c–3e bonding in ClNH{sub 3} is explored computationally and found to be consistent with the complexation-induced blue shifts observed experimentally. Computations of interconversion pathways reveal nearly barrierless routes to the formation of this complex, consistent with the absence in experimental spectra of two other complexes, NH{sub 3}Cl and Cl–HNH{sub 2}, which are predicted in the entry valley to the hydrogen abstraction reaction Cl + NH{sub 3} → HCl + NH{sub 2}.

  14. Influence of technological treatments on bacterial communities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of technological treatments on bacterial communities in tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus ) as determined by 16S rDNA fingerprinting using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE)

  15. Molecular Characterization and Potential of Bacterial Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 16S rRNA gene of total bacteria community and bacterial isolates were amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using 16S rRNA primers. Total microbial community DNA amplicons were spliced into the PCR-TRAP Cloning Vector, used to transform competent cells of Escherichia coli and sequenced.

  16. Identification of the Bacterial Community Responsible for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of bacteria community responsible for decontaminating Eleme petrochemical industrial effluent using 16S PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was determined. Gene profiles were determined by extracting DNA from bacterial isolates and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using ...

  17. The bacterial corrosion of concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tache, G.

    1998-01-01

    Concrete is a material very sensitive to aging effects and to permanent aggressions. It is an evolutive material in which internal hydration reactions and exchange reactions with the external medium are produced. Moreover, its characteristics tightly depends on factors which are bound to its formulation, to the appropriate choice of materials in which it is constituted, to their qualities and to the conditions of its use. Its aging depends then in a large extent of these different factors and of the adequation between its final characteristics and the solicitations in which it is submitted: physical, mechanical, thermal.. or environmental. This chapter deals particularly with the influence of the bacterial phenomena on concrete. Some recalls are at first given on the principles which govern the concrete durability. Then are approached the phenomena mechanisms. (O.M.)

  18. Bacterial Biofilms in Jones Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eric S; Hauck, Matthew J; Kirk Harris, Jonathan; Robertson, Charles E; Dailey, Roger A

    To investigate the presence and microbiology of bacterial biofilms on Jones tubes (JTs) by direct visualization with scanning electron microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of representative JTs, and to correlate these findings with inflammation and/or infection related to the JT. In this study, prospective case series were performed. JTs were recovered from consecutive patients presenting to clinic for routine cleaning or recurrent irritation/infection. Four tubes were processed for scanning electron microscopy alone to visualize evidence of biofilms. Two tubes underwent PCR alone for bacterial quantification. One tube was divided in half and sent for scanning electron microscopy and PCR. Symptoms related to the JTs were recorded at the time of recovery. Seven tubes were obtained. Five underwent SEM, and 3 out of 5 showed evidence of biofilms (60%). Two of the 3 biofilms demonstrated cocci and the third revealed rods. Three tubes underwent PCR. The predominant bacteria identified were Pseudomonadales (39%), Pseudomonas (16%), and Staphylococcus (14%). Three of the 7 patients (43%) reported irritation and discharge at presentation. Two symptomatic patients, whose tubes were imaged only, revealed biofilms. The third symptomatic patient's tube underwent PCR only, showing predominantly Staphylococcus (56%) and Haemophilus (36%) species. Two of the 4 asymptomatic patients also showed biofilms. All symptomatic patients improved rapidly after tube exchange and steroid antibiotic drops. Bacterial biofilms were variably present on JTs, and did not always correlate with patients' symptoms. Nevertheless, routine JT cleaning is recommended to treat and possibly prevent inflammation caused by biofilms.

  19. Bacterial Diversity across Individual Lichens▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushegian, Alexandra A.; Peterson, Celeste N.; Baker, Christopher C. M.; Pringle, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Symbioses are unique habitats for bacteria. We surveyed the spatial diversity of bacterial communities across multiple individuals of closely related lichens using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and pyrosequencing. Centers of lichens house richer, more consistent assemblages than species-poor and compositionally disparate lichen edges, suggesting that ecological succession plays a role in structuring these communities. PMID:21531831

  20. Bacterial and fungal microflora in surgically removed lung cancer samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toloudi Maria

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical and experimental data suggest an association between the presence of bacterial and/or fungal infection and the development of different types of cancer, independently of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia. This has also been postulated for the development of lung cancer, however the prevalence and the exact species of the bacteria and fungi implicated, have not yet been described. Aim To determine the presence of bacterial and fungal microflora in surgically extracted samples of patients with lung cancer. Materials and methods In this single-center prospective, observational study, tissue samples were surgically extracted from 32 consecutive patients with lung cancer, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used to identify the presence of bacteria and fungi strains. Results The analysis of the electrophoresis data pointed out diversity between the samples and the strains that were identified. Mycoplasma strains were identified in all samples. Strains that appeared more often were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mitis and Bacillus strains, followed in descending frequency by Chlamydia, Candida, Listeria, and Haemophilus influenza. In individual patients Legionella pneumophila and Candida tropicalis were detected. Conclusions A diversity of pathogens could be identified in surgically extracted tissue samples of patients with lung cancer, with mycoplasma strains being present in all samples. These results point to an etiologic role for chronic infection in lung carcinogenesis. Confirmation of these observations and additional studies are needed to further characterize the etiologic role of inflammation in lung carcinogenesis.

  1. Epidemiology of bacterial endocarditis in The Netherlands. I. Patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J. T.; Thompson, J.; Valkenburg, H. A.; Michel, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of the epidemiology of bacterial endocarditis are usually based on a retrospective review of medical records from referral centers serving diverse patient populations. These studies are therefore likely to suffer from selection bias. We conducted a nationwide prospective

  2. Gain and loss of phototrophic genes revealed by comparison of two Citromicrobium bacterial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zheng

    Full Text Available Proteobacteria are thought to have diverged from a phototrophic ancestor, according to the scattered distribution of phototrophy throughout the proteobacterial clade, and so the occurrence of numerous closely related phototrophic and chemotrophic microorganisms may be the result of the loss of genes for phototrophy. A widespread form of bacterial phototrophy is based on the photochemical reaction center, encoded by puf and puh operons that typically are in a 'photosynthesis gene cluster' (abbreviated as the PGC with pigment biosynthesis genes. Comparison of two closely related Citromicrobial genomes (98.1% sequence identity of complete 16S rRNA genes, Citromicrobium sp. JL354, which contains two copies of reaction center genes, and Citromicrobium strain JLT1363, which is chemotrophic, revealed evidence for the loss of phototrophic genes. However, evidence of horizontal gene transfer was found in these two bacterial genomes. An incomplete PGC (pufLMC-puhCBA in strain JL354 was located within an integrating conjugative element, which indicates a potential mechanism for the horizontal transfer of genes for phototrophy.

  3. Bacterial lung abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groskin, S.A.; Panicek, D.M.; Ewing, D.K.; Rivera, F.; Math, K.; Teixeira, J.; Heitzman, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective review of patients with bacterial lung abscess was carried out. Demographic, clinical, and radiographical features of this patient group are compared with similar data from patients with empyema and/or cavitated lung carcinoma; differential diagnostic points are stressed. The entity of radiographically occult lung abscess is discussed. Complications associated with bacterial lung abscess are discussed. Current therapeutic options and treatment philosophy for patients with bacterial lung abscess are noted

  4. Peritonitis - spontaneous bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP); Ascites - peritonitis; Cirrhosis - peritonitis ... who are on peritoneal dialysis for kidney failure. Peritonitis may have other causes . These include infection from ...

  5. Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center, Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled 'Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center', which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. William Burgos (The Pennsylvania State University) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Brian Dempsey (Penn State), Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh (Central Florida University), and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The project focused on development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. The work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and was directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. ORNL FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  6. Impact differences in ground reaction force and center of mass between the first and second landing phases of a drop vertical jump and their implications for injury risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2013-04-26

    The drop vertical jump (DVJ) task is commonly used to assess biomechanical performance measures that are associated with ACL injury risk in athletes. Previous investigations have solely assessed the first landing phase. We examined the first and second landings of a DVJ for differences in the magnitude of vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) and position of center of mass (CoM). A cohort of 239 adolescent female basketball athletes completed a series of DVJ tasks from an initial box height of 31 cm. Dual force platforms and a three dimensional motion capture system recorded force and positional data for each trial. There was no difference in peak vGRF between landings (p=0.445), but side-to-side differences increased from the first to second landing (p=0.007). Participants demonstrated a lower minimum CoM during stance in the first landing than the second landing (p<0.001). The results have important implications for the future assessment of ACL injury risk behaviors in adolescent female athletes. Greater side-to-side asymmetry in vGRF and higher CoM during impact indicate the second landing of a DVJ may exhibit greater perturbation and better represent in-game mechanics associated with ACL injury risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Sadie A; Koci, Remzie A; Qehaja-Buçaj, Emine; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Mehmeti, Murat

    2014-07-14

    The purpose of this study was to present the epidemiologic features of bacterial meningitis in the developing country of Kosovo. Data were collected from active surveillance of bacterial meningitis cases treated at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo in the years 2000 (first post-war year) and 2010. Meningitis cases in 2000 compared with 2010 showed a 35.5% decline in incidence (from 4.8 to 3.1 cases per 100,000 population) and a decrease in the case fatality rate from 10% to 5%. In children, there was a lower mortality rate (5% versus 2%) and a lower incidence of neurological complications (13% versus 16%) as compared to adults (32% versus 10% and 16% versus 35%, respectively). Neisseria meningitidis was the most common pathogen of bacterial meningitis in both study periods. Bacterial meningitis was most prevalent in the pediatric population, and showed an increase in the median age, from three years in 2000 to seven years in 2010. A steady number of bacterial meningitis cases in adults throughout last decade (around 20 cases per year) was recorded. During the last decade, gradual changes have been observed in the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis that are unrelated to the introduction of new vaccines, but are partly due to the improvement of living conditions.

  8. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    . As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  9. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  10. Isolation and Identification of Active Compound Cause Light Emmitting of Bacterial Photobacterium phosphoreum Isolated from the Indonesia Jepara Marine Squid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idam Arif

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This research carried out to study the bioluminescence process of bacterial Photobacterium phosphoreum isolated from Indonesia marine squid. The method used in the present study involved isolation, purification, electrophoresis, and the absorbance and light intensity measurement. This result show that the luciferace enzyme of bacterial Photobacterium phosphoreum or called LBPP catalyzes the emission of visible light from the reaction of reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2, molecular oxygen (O2, and an aldehyde (RCOH. The electrophoresis data show that LBPP comprised of two different subunits α and βwith 41kD and 38 kD molecular weights. The absorb pattern showed that the bioluminescence process centered around 516 nm and are consistent with the fluorescence data. This result concluded that the excitation state formed after LBPP bind subtracts and the ground state formed after LBPP releases product and visible light.

  11. Postviral Complications: Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasso, Jason E; Deng, Jane C

    2017-03-01

    Secondary bacterial pneumonia after viral respiratory infection remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Susceptibility is mediated by a variety of viral and bacterial factors, and complex interactions with the host immune system. Prevention and treatment strategies are limited to influenza vaccination and antibiotics/antivirals respectively. Novel approaches to identifying the individuals with influenza who are at increased risk for secondary bacterial pneumonias are urgently needed. Given the threat of further pandemics and the heightened prevalence of these viruses, more research into the immunologic mechanisms of this disease is warranted with the hope of discovering new potential therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Selective binding of carotenoids with a shorter conjugated chain to the LH2 antenna complex and those with a longer conjugated chain to the reaction center from Rubrivivax gelatinosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakitani, Yoshinori; Fujii, Ritsuko; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Kurahashi, Masahiro; Koyama, Yasushi; Harada, Jiro; Shimada, Keizo

    2007-06-19

    Rubrivivax gelatinosus having both the spheroidene and spirilloxanthin biosynthetic pathways produces carotenoids (Cars) with a variety of conjugated chains, which consist of different numbers of conjugated double bonds (n), including the C=C (m) and C=O (o) bonds. When grown under anaerobic conditions, the wild type produces Cars for which n = m = 9-13, whereas under semiaerobic conditions, it additionally produces Cars for which n = m + o = 10 + 1, 13 + 1, and 13 + 2. On the other hand, a mutant, in which the latter pathway is genetically blocked, produces only Cars for which n = 9 and 10 under anaerobic conditions and n = 9, 10, and 10 + 1 under semianaerobic conditions. Those Cars that were extracted from the LH2 complex (LH2) and the reaction center (RC), isolated from the wild-type and the mutant Rvi. gelatinosus, were analyzed by HPLC, and their structures were determined by mass spectrometry and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The selective binding of Cars to those pigment-protein complexes has been characterized as follows. (1) Cars with a shorter conjugated chain are selectively bound to LH2 whereas Cars with a longer conjugated chain to the RC. (2) Shorter chain Cars with a hydroxyl group are bound to LH2 almost exclusively. This rule holds either in the absence or in the presence of the keto group. The natural selection of shorter chain Cars by LH2 and longer chain Cars by the RC is discussed, on the basis of the results now available, in relation to the light-harvesting and photoprotective functions of Cars.

  13. Comparison of Path Length and Ranges of Movement of the Center of Pressure and Reaction Time and Between Paired-Play and Solo-Play of a Virtual Reality Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, Sigal; Hersch, Ayelet; Sofer, Tal; Tresser, Sarit

    2017-06-01

    To test whether paired-play will induce longer path length and ranges of movement of the center of pressure (COP), which reflects on balance performance and stability, compared to solo-play and to test the difference in the path length and ranges of movement of the COP while playing the virtual reality (VR) game with the dominant hand compared to playing it with the nondominant hand. In this cross-sectional study 20 children (age 6.1 ± 0.7 years old) played an arm movement controlled VR game alone and with a peer while each of them stood on a pressure measuring pad to track the path length and ranges of movement of the COP. The total COP path was significantly higher during the paired-play (median 295.8 cm) compared to the COP path during the solo-play (median 189.2 cm). No significant differences were found in the reaction time and the mediolateral and anterior-posterior COP ranges between solo-play and paired-play. No significant differences were found between the parameters extracted during paired-play with the dominant or nondominant hand. Our findings imply that the paired-play is advantageous compared to solo-play since it induces a greater movement for the child, during which, higher COP velocities are reached that may contribute to improving the balance control of the child. Apart from the positive social benefits of paired-play, this positive effect on the COP path length is a noteworthy added value in the clinical setting when treating children with balance disorder.

  14. Diazotrophic Bacterial Community of Degraded Pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Tiago Correia Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pasture degradation can cause changes in diazotrophic bacterial communities. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the culturable and total diazotrophic bacterial community, associated with regions of the rhizosphere and roots of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf. pastures in different stages of degradation. Samples of roots and rhizospheric soil were collected from slightly, partially, and highly degraded pastures. McCrady’s table was used to obtain the Most Probable Number (MPN of bacteria per gram of sample, in order to determine population density and calculate the Shannon-Weaver diversity index. The diversity of total diazotrophic bacterial community was determined by the technique of Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE of the nifH gene, while the diversity of the culturable diazotrophic bacteria was determined by the Polymerase Chain Reaction (BOX-PCR technique. The increase in the degradation stage of the B. decumbens Stapf. pasture did not reduce the population density of the cultivated diazotrophic bacterial community, suggesting that the degradation at any degree of severity was highly harmful to the bacteria. The structure of the total diazotrophic bacterial community associated with B. decumbens Stapf. was altered by the pasture degradation stage, suggesting a high adaptive capacity of the bacteria to altered environments.

  15. Bacterial vaginosis - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a type of vaginal infection. The vagina normally contains both healthy bacteria and unhealthy bacteria. BV occurs when more unhealthy bacteria grow than healthy bacteria. No one knows ...

  16. Bacterial surface adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  17. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  18. Diagnosis of bacterial infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    direct or indirect evidence of a compatible bacterial pathogen. Inflammation may be .... cardinal features (fever, confusion, headache and neck stiffness). .... specificity, inappropriate indications or poor sampling technique may diminish this ...

  19. Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER) exploits radiation chemistry techniques to study chemical reactions (and other phenomena) by subjecting samples to...

  20. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic reaction studies, because of their capability to microscopically probe nuclear structure, are still of considerable interest in heavy-ion reactions. The recent progress in understanding various aspects of the reaction mechanism make this aim appear closer. The relation between microscopic and macroscopic behavior, as suggested, for example, by the single proton transfer data to individual final states or averaged excitation energy intervals, needs to be explored. It seems particularly useful to extend measurements to higher incident energies, to explore and understand nuclear structure aspects up to the limit of the energy range where they are important

  1. cycloaddition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Molecular Modeling Group, Organic Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology,. Hyderabad ... thus obtained are helpful to model the regioselectivity ... compromise to model Diels–Alder reactions involving ...... acceptance.

  2. STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION OF BACTERIAL UREASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak YuV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This brief review concerns the basic principles of structural organization of multi-subunit bacterial ureases and formation of their quaternary structure. Urease is a nickel-containing enzyme (urea amidohydrolase, ЕС 3.5.1.5 that catalyses the hydrolysis of urea to get ammonia and carbamate which then decomposes with water to get ammonia and carbon dioxide. Urease is produced by bacteria, fungi, yeast and plants. On the basis of similarities in amino acid sequences, ureases assumed to have a similar structure and conservative catalytic mechanism. Within past two decades bacterial ureases have gained much attention in research field as a virulence factor in human and animal infections. The first crystal structure of urease has been determined for that from Klebsiella aerogenes. The native enzyme consists of three subunits, UreA (α-chain, UreB (β-chain and UreC (γ-chain, and contains four structural domains: two in α-chain (α-domain 1 and α-domain-2, one in β- and one in γ-chain. These three chains form a T-shaped heterotrimer αβγ. Three αβγ heterotrimers form quaternary complex (αβγ3. In case of Helicobacter pilori, the analogous trimers of corresponding dimeric subunits (αβ3 form tetrameric structure ((αβ34 in which four trimers are situated at the vertexes of the regular triangle pyramid. Active center is located in α-domain 1 and contains two atoms of nickel coordinated by residues His134, His136, carboxylated Lys217, His 246, His272 and Asp360, as well as residues involved in binding (His219 and catalysis (His320. Active site is capped by a flap that controls substrate ingress to and product egress from the dinickel center. Urease requires accessory proteins (UreD, UreF, UreG and UreE for the correct assembly of their Ni-containing metallocenters. The accessory proteins UreD, UreF, and UreG sequentially bind to the apoprotein (UreABC3 to finally form (UreABC-UreDFG3 activation complex. UreE metallochaperone delivers

  3. Role of charge-transfer states in bacterial photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meech, S.R.; Hoff, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Photon echo, photon-echo excitation, and "hole-burning" data recorded in the 800-990 nm region of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 and Rhodopseudomonas viridis reaction centers are reported. The primary process in these reaction centers, following excitation, was found to occur in ≈25 fsec; the

  4. Bacterial Cell Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, George K; Weibel, Douglas B

    2017-07-25

    Cellular mechanical properties play an integral role in bacterial survival and adaptation. Historically, the bacterial cell wall and, in particular, the layer of polymeric material called the peptidoglycan were the elements to which cell mechanics could be primarily attributed. Disrupting the biochemical machinery that assembles the peptidoglycan (e.g., using the β-lactam family of antibiotics) alters the structure of this material, leads to mechanical defects, and results in cell lysis. Decades after the discovery of peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes, the mechanisms that underlie their positioning and regulation are still not entirely understood. In addition, recent evidence suggests a diverse group of other biochemical elements influence bacterial cell mechanics, may be regulated by new cellular mechanisms, and may be triggered in different environmental contexts to enable cell adaptation and survival. This review summarizes the contributions that different biomolecular components of the cell wall (e.g., lipopolysaccharides, wall and lipoteichoic acids, lipid bilayers, peptidoglycan, and proteins) make to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cell mechanics. We discuss the contribution of individual proteins and macromolecular complexes in cell mechanics and the tools that make it possible to quantitatively decipher the biochemical machinery that contributes to bacterial cell mechanics. Advances in this area may provide insight into new biology and influence the development of antibacterial chemotherapies.

  5. Biodegradability of bacterial surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Tânia M S; Procópio, Lorena C; Brandão, Felipe D; Carvalho, André M X; Tótola, Marcos R; Borges, Arnaldo C

    2011-06-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the biodegradability of different bacterial surfactants in liquid medium and in soil microcosms. The biodegradability of biosurfactants by pure and mixed bacterial cultures was evaluated through CO(2) evolution. Three bacterial strains, Acinetobacter baumanni LBBMA ES11, Acinetobacter haemolyticus LBBMA 53 and Pseudomonas sp. LBBMA 101B, used the biosurfactants produced by Bacillus sp. LBBMA 111A (mixed lipopeptide), Bacillus subtilis LBBMA 155 (lipopeptide), Flavobacterium sp. LBBMA 168 (mixture of flavolipids), Dietzia Maris LBBMA 191(glycolipid) and Arthrobacter oxydans LBBMA 201(lipopeptide) as carbon sources in minimal medium. The synthetic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was also mineralized by these microorganisms, but at a lower rate. CO(2) emitted by a mixed bacterial culture in soil microcosms with biosurfactants was higher than in the microcosm containing SDS. Biosurfactant mineralization in soil was confirmed by the increase in surface tension of the soil aqueous extracts after incubation with the mixed bacterial culture. It can be concluded that, in terms of biodegradability and environmental security, these compounds are more suitable for applications in remediation technologies in comparison to synthetic surfactants. However, more information is needed on structure of biosurfactants, their interaction with soil and contaminants and scale up and cost for biosurfactant production.

  6. Role of the PufX protein in photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. 2. PufX is required for efficient ubiquinone/ubiquinol exchange between the reaction center QB site and the cytochrome bc1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, W P; Verméglio, A; Francia, F; Venturoli, G; Melandri, B A; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-11-21

    The PufX membrane protein is essential for photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides because it is required for multiple-turnover electron transfer under anaerobic conditions [see accompanying article; Barz, W. P., Francia, F., Venturoli, G., Melandri, B. A., Verméglio, A., & Oesterhelt, D. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 15235-15247]. In order to understand the molecular role of PufX, light-induced absorption spectroscopy was performed using a pufX- mutant, a pufX+ strain, and two suppressor mutants. We show that the reaction center (RC) requires PufX for its functionality under different redox conditions than the cytochrome bc1 complex: When the kinetics of flash-induced reduction of cytochrome b561 were monitored in chromatophores, we observed a requirement of PufX for turnover of the cytochrome bc1 complex only at high redox potential (Eh > 140 mV), suggesting a function of PufX in lateral ubiquinol transfer from the RC. In contrast, PufX is required for multiple turnover of the RC only under reducing conditions: When the Q pool was partially oxidized in vivo using oxygen or electron acceptors like dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine N-oxide, the deletion of PufX had no effect on light-driven electron flow through the RC. Flash train experiments under anaerobic in vivo conditions revealed that RC photochemistry does not depend on PufX for the first two flash excitations. Following the third and subsequent flashes, however, efficient charge separation requires PufX, indicating an important role of PufX for fast Q/QH2 exchange at the QB site of the RC. We show that the Q/QH2 exchange rate is reduced approximately 500-fold by the deletion of PufX when the Q pool is nearly completely reduced, demonstrating an essential role of PufX for the access of ubiquinone to the QB site. The fast ubiquinone/ubiquinol exchange is partially restored by suppressor mutations altering the macromolecular antenna structure. These results suggest an indirect role of PufX in

  7. The unusually strong hydrogen bond between the carbonyl of Q(A) and His M219 in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center is not essential for efficient electron transfer from Q(A)(-) to Q(B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Jacques; Lavergne, Jérôme; Wakeham, Marion C; Nabedryk, Eliane; Jones, Michael R

    2007-06-05

    In native reaction centers (RCs) from photosynthetic purple bacteria the primary quinone (QA) and the secondary quinone (QB) are interconnected via a specific His-Fe-His bridge. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs the C4=O carbonyl of QA forms a very strong hydrogen bond with the protonated Npi of His M219, and the Ntau of this residue is in turn coordinated to the non-heme iron atom. The second carbonyl of QA is engaged in a much weaker hydrogen bond with the backbone N-H of Ala M260. In previous work, a Trp side chain was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at the M260 position in the RC of Rb. sphaeroides, resulting in a complex that is completely devoid of QA and therefore nonfunctional. A photochemically competent derivative of the AM260W mutant was isolated that contains a Cys side chain at the M260 position (denoted AM260(W-->C)). In the present work, the interactions between the carbonyl groups of QA and the protein in the AM260(W-->C) suppressor mutant have been characterized by light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy of the photoreduction of QA. The QA-/QA difference spectrum demonstrates that the strong interaction between the C4=O carbonyl of QA and His M219 is lost in the mutant, and the coupled CO and CC modes of the QA- semiquinone are also strongly perturbed. In parallel, a band assigned to the perturbation of the C5-Ntau mode of His M219 upon QA- formation in the native RC is lacking in the spectrum of the mutant. Furthermore, a positive band between 2900 and 2400 cm-1 that is related to protons fluctuating within a network of highly polarizable hydrogen bonds in the native RC is reduced in amplitude in the mutant. On the other hand, the QB-/QB FTIR difference spectrum is essentially the same as for the native RC. The kinetics of electron transfer from QA- to QB were measured by the flash-induced absorption changes at 780 nm. Compared to native RCs the absorption transients are slowed by a factor of about 2 for both the slow phase (in the

  8. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marji, S.

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  9. Concomitant Bacterial Meningitis in Infants With Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Joanna; Cruz, Andrea T; Nigrovic, Lise E; Freedman, Stephen B; Garro, Aris C; Ishimine, Paul T; Kulik, Dina M; Uspal, Neil G; Grether-Jones, Kendra L; Miller, Aaron S; Schnadower, David; Shah, Samir S; Aronson, Paul L; Balamuth, Fran

    2017-09-01

    To determine age-stratified prevalence of concomitant bacterial meningitis in infants ≤60 days with a urinary tract infection, we performed a 23-center, retrospective study of 1737 infants with urinary tract infection. Concomitant bacterial meningitis was rare, but more common in infants 0-28 days of age [0.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4%-1.9%) compared with infants 29-60 days of age (0.2%; 95% CI: 0%-0.8%).

  10. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...

  11. Direct Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austern, N. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1963-01-15

    In order to give a unified presentation of one point of view, these lectures are devoted only to a detailed development of the standard theories of direct reactions, starting from basic principles. Discussion is given of the present status of the theories, of the techniques used for practical calculation, and of possible future developments. The direct interaction (DI) aspects of a reaction are those which involve only a few of the many degrees of freedom of a nucleus. In fact the minimum number of degrees of freedom which must be involved in a reaction are those required to describe the initial and final channels, and DI studies typically consider these degrees of freedom and no others. Because of this simplicity DI theories may be worked out in painstaking detail. DI processes concern only part of the wave function for a problem. The other part involves complicated excitations of many degrees of freedom, and gives the compound nucleus (CN) effects. While it is extremely interesting to learn how to separate DI and CN effects in an orderly manner, if they are both present in a reaction, no suitable method has yet been found. Instead, current work stresses the kinds of reactions and the kinds of final states in which DI effects dominate and in which CN effects may almost be forgotten. The DI cross-sections which are studied are often extremely large, comparable to elastic scattering cross-sections. (author)

  12. Bacterial fatty acid metabolism in modern antibiotic discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial fatty acid synthesis is essential for many pathogens and different from the mammalian counterpart. These features make bacterial fatty acid synthesis a desirable target for antibiotic discovery. The structural divergence of the conserved enzymes and the presence of different isozymes catalyzing the same reactions in the pathway make bacterial fatty acid synthesis a narrow spectrum target rather than the traditional broad spectrum target. Furthermore, bacterial fatty acid synthesis inhibitors are single-targeting, rather than multi-targeting like traditional monotherapeutic, broad-spectrum antibiotics. The single-targeting nature of bacterial fatty acid synthesis inhibitors makes overcoming fast-developing, target-based resistance a necessary consideration for antibiotic development. Target-based resistance can be overcome through multi-targeting inhibitors, a cocktail of single-targeting inhibitors, or by making the single targeting inhibitor sufficiently high affinity through a pathogen selective approach such that target-based mutants are still susceptible to therapeutic concentrations of drug. Many of the pathogens requiring new antibiotic treatment options encode for essential bacterial fatty acid synthesis enzymes. This review will evaluate the most promising targets in bacterial fatty acid metabolism for antibiotic therapeutics development and review the potential and challenges in advancing each of these targets to the clinic and circumventing target-based resistance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Viral-bacterial associations in acute apical abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Dennis C; Rôças, Isabela N; Paiva, Simone S M; Carmo, Flávia L; Cavalcante, Fernanda S; Rosado, Alexandre S; Santos, Kátia R N; Siqueira, José F

    2011-08-01

    Viral-bacterial and bacterial synergism have been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of several human diseases. This study sought to investigate the possible associations between 9 candidate endodontic bacterial pathogens and 9 human viruses in samples from acute apical abscesses. DNA extracts from purulent exudate aspirates of 33 cases of acute apical abscess were surveyed for the presence of 9 selected bacterial species using a 16S ribosomal RNA gene-based nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach. Single or nested PCR assays were used for detection of the human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpesviruses types 1 to 8. Two-thirds of the abscess samples were positive for at least one of the target viruses. Specifically, the most frequently detected viruses were HHV-8 (54.5%); HPV (9%); and varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and HHV-6 (6%). Bacterial DNA was present in all cases and the most prevalent bacterial species were Treponema denticola (70%), Tannerella forsythia (67%), Porphyromonas endodontalis (67%), Dialister invisus (61%), and Dialister pneumosintes (57.5%). HHV-8 was positively associated with 7 of the target bacterial species and HPV with 4, but all these associations were weak. Several bacterial pairs showed a moderate positive association. Viral coinfection was found in 6 abscess cases, but no significant viral association could be determined. Findings demonstrated that bacterial and viral DNA occurred concomitantly in two-thirds of the samples from endodontic abscesses. Although this may suggest a role for viruses in the etiology of apical abscesses, the possibility also exists that the presence of viruses in abscess samples is merely a consequence of the bacterially induced disease process. Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of these viral-bacterial interactions, if any, in the pathogenesis of acute apical abscesses. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial Acclimation Inside an Aqueous Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dexian; Chen, Baoling; Chen, P

    2015-01-01

    Specific environmental stresses may lead to induced genomic instability in bacteria, generating beneficial mutants and potentially accelerating the breeding of industrial microorganisms. The environmental stresses inside the aqueous battery may be derived from such conditions as ion shuttle, pH gradient, free radical reaction and electric field. In most industrial and medical applications, electric fields and direct currents are used to kill bacteria and yeast. However, the present study focused on increasing bacterial survival inside an operating battery. Using a bacterial acclimation strategy, both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were acclimated for 10 battery operation cycles and survived in the battery for over 3 days. The acclimated bacteria changed in cell shape, growth rate and colony color. Further analysis indicated that electrolyte concentration could be one of the major factors determining bacterial survival inside an aqueous battery. The acclimation process significantly improved the viability of both bacteria E. coli and B. subtilis. The viability of acclimated strains was not affected under battery cycle conditions of 0.18-0.80 mA cm(-2) and 1.4-2.1 V. Bacterial addition within 1.0×10(10) cells mL(-1) did not significantly affect battery performance. Because the environmental stress inside the aqueous battery is specific, the use of this battery acclimation strategy may be of great potential for the breeding of industrial microorganisms.

  15. Engineering nanoparticles to silence bacterial communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Publicover Miller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The alarming spread of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has warranted the study of alternative antimicrobial agents. Quorum sensing is a chemical cell-to-cell communication mechanism utilized by bacteria to coordinate group behaviors and establish infections. Quorum sensing is integral to bacterial survival, and therefore provides a unique target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, silicon dioxide nanoparticles (Si-NP were engineered to target the signaling molecules (i.e. acylhomoserine lactones (HSL used for quorum sensing in order to halt bacterial communication. Specifically, when Si-NP were surface functionalized with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD, then added to cultures of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, whose luminous output depends upon HSL-mediated quorum sensing, the cell-to-cell communication was dramatically reduced. Reductions in luminescence were further verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR analyses of luminescence genes. Binding of AHLs to Si-NPs was examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The results indicated that by delivering high concentrations of engineered NPs with associated quenching compounds, the chemical signals were removed from the immediate bacterial environment. In actively-metabolizing cultures, this treatment blocked the ability of bacteria to communicate and regulate quorum sensing, effectively silencing and isolating the cells. Si-NPs provide a scaffold and critical stepping-stone for more pointed developments in antimicrobial therapy, especially with regard to quorum sensing – a target that will reduce resistance pressures imposed by traditional antibiotics.

  16. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  17. [Bacterial biofilms and infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, I; Del Pozo, J L; Penadés, J R; Leiva, J

    2005-01-01

    In developed countries we tend to think of heart disease and the numerous forms of cancer as the main causes of mortality, but on a global scale infectious diseases come close, or may even be ahead: 14.9 million deaths in 2002 compared to cardiovascular diseases (16.9 million deaths) and cancer (7.1 million deaths) (WHO report 2004). The infectious agents responsible for human mortality have evolved as medical techniques and hygienic measures have changed. Modern-day acute infectious diseases caused by specialized bacterial pathogens such as diphtheria, tetanus, cholera, plague, which represented the main causes of death at the beginning of XX century, have been effectively controlled with antibiotics and vaccines. In their place, more than half of the infectious diseases that affect mildly immunocompromised patients involve bacterial species that are commensal with the human body; these can produce chronic infections, are resistant to antimicrobial agents and there is no effective vaccine against them. Examples of these infections are the otitis media, native valve endocarditis, chronic urinary infections, bacterial prostatitis, osteomyelitis and all the infections related to medical devices. Direct analysis of the surface of medical devices or of tissues that have been foci of chronic infections shows the presence of large numbers of bacteria surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix, which has been named the "biofilm". Inside the biofilm, bacteria grow protected from the action of the antibodies, phagocytic cells and antimicrobial treatments. In this article, we describe the role of bacterial biofilms in human persistent infections.

  18. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation...

  19. Bacterial fingerprints across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasner, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE), impose major threats to human health worldwide. Both have a ‘Jekyll & Hyde’ character, since they can be present as human commensals, but can also become harmful invasive pathogens especially

  20. Bacterial membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetsch, Ansgar; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    About one quarter to one third of all bacterial genes encode proteins of the inner or outer bacterial membrane. These proteins perform essential physiological functions, such as the import or export of metabolites, the homeostasis of metal ions, the extrusion of toxic substances or antibiotics, and the generation or conversion of energy. The last years have witnessed completion of a plethora of whole-genome sequences of bacteria important for biotechnology or medicine, which is the foundation for proteome and other functional genome analyses. In this review, we discuss the challenges in membrane proteome analysis, starting from sample preparation and leading to MS-data analysis and quantification. The current state of available proteomics technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages will be described with a focus on shotgun proteomics. Then, we will briefly introduce the most abundant proteins and protein families present in bacterial membranes before bacterial membrane proteomics studies of the last years will be presented. It will be shown how these works enlarged our knowledge about the physiological adaptations that take place in bacteria during fine chemical production, bioremediation, protein overexpression, and during infections. Furthermore, several examples from literature demonstrate the suitability of membrane proteomics for the identification of antigens and different pathogenic strains, as well as the elucidation of membrane protein structure and function.

  1. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velkey, Bálint; Vitális, Eszter; Vitális, Zsuzsanna

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis occurs most commonly in cirrhotic patients with ascites. Pathogens get into the circulation by intestinal translocation and colonize in peritoneal fluid. Diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is based on elevated polymorphonuclear leukocyte count in the ascites (>0,25 G/L). Ascites culture is often negative but aids to get information about antibiotic sensitivity in positive cases. Treatment in stable patient can be intravenous then orally administrated ciprofloxacin or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, while in severe cases intravenous III. generation cephalosporin. Nosocomial spontaneous bacterial peritonitis often caused by Gram-positive bacteria and multi-resistant pathogens can also be expected thus carbapenem should be the choice of the empiric treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered. Norfloxacin is used most commonly, but changes are expected due to increase in quinolone resistance. As a primary prophylaxis, a short-term antibiotic treatment is recommended after gastrointestinal bleeding for 5 days, while long-term prophylaxis is for patients with low ascites protein, and advanced disease (400 mg/day). Secondary prophylaxis is recommended for all patients recovered from spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Due to increasing antibiotic use of antibiotics prophylaxis is debated to some degree. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(2), 50-57.

  2. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneuf, Christopher R; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D Curtis; Holst, Gregory L; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R

    2015-07-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously-each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel.

  3. Corticosteroids for Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Glidden, David V.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Hong, Kevin C.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Lee, Salena M.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is a benefit in clinical outcomes with the use of topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Methods Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, multicenter clinical trial comparing prednisolone sodium phosphate, 1.0%, to placebo as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Eligible patients had a culture-positive bacterial corneal ulcer and received topical moxifloxacin for at least 48 hours before randomization. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) at 3 months from enrollment. Secondary outcomes included infiltrate/scar size, reepithelialization, and corneal perforation. Results Between September 1, 2006, and February 22, 2010, 1769 patients were screened for the trial and 500 patients were enrolled. No significant difference was observed in the 3-month BSCVA (−0.009 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]; 95% CI, −0.085 to 0.068; P = .82), infiltrate/scar size (P = .40), time to reepithelialization (P = .44), or corneal perforation (P > .99). A significant effect of corticosteroids was observed in subgroups of baseline BSCVA (P = .03) and ulcer location (P = .04). At 3 months, patients with vision of counting fingers or worse at baseline had 0.17 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (95% CI, −0.31 to −0.02; P = .03) compared with placebo, and patients with ulcers that were completely central at baseline had 0.20 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (−0.37 to −0.04; P = .02). Conclusions We found no overall difference in 3-month BSCVA and no safety concerns with adjunctive corticosteroid therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. Application to Clinical Practice Adjunctive topical corticosteroid use does not improve 3-month vision in patients with bacterial corneal ulcers. PMID:21987582

  4. Microsecond reaction kinetics and catalytic mechanism of bacterial cytochrome oxidases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulus, A.

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental biochemical research is of crucial importance for a complete and detailed
    understanding of what drives enzyme activity and how enzyme kinetic properties are
    optimized towards survival of the host organism. When cells fail to produce a fully functional
    enzyme, the organism’s

  5. Reaction of Musa balbisiana to Banana bacterial wilt infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Crop Science Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 4 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Allergic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that don't bother most people (such as venom from bee stings and certain foods, medicines, and pollens) can ... person. If the allergic reaction is from a bee sting, scrape the ... more venom. If the person has emergency allergy medicine on ...

  7. Bacterial infec tions in travellers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    namely bacterial causes of travellers' diarrhoea and skin infections, as well as .... Vaccination: protective efficacy against typhoid may be overcome by ingesting a high bacterial load. Vaccine ..... preparation such as cream sauce. Only after ...

  8. Long range excitonic transport in a biomimetic system inspired by the bacterial light-harvesting apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harel, Elad [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2012-05-07

    Photosynthesis, the process by which energy from sunlight drives cellular metabolism, relies on a unique organization of light-harvesting and reaction center complexes. Recently, the organization of light-harvesting LH2 complexes and dimeric reaction center-light-harvesting I-PufX core complexes in membranes of purple non-sulfur bacteria was revealed by atomic force microscopy [S. Bahatyrova et al., Nature (London) 430, 1058 (2004)]. Here, we discuss optimal exciton transfer in a biomimetic system closely modeled on the structure of LH2 and its organization within the membrane using a Markovian quantum model with dissipation and trapping added phenomenologically. In a deliberate manner, we neglect the high level detail of the bacterial light-harvesting complex and its interaction with the phonon bath in order to elucidate a set of design principles that may be incorporated in artificial pigment-scaffold constructs in a supramolecular assembly. We show that our scheme reproduces many of the most salient features found in their natural counterpart and may be largely explained by simple electrostatic considerations. Most importantly, we show that quantum effects act primarily to enforce robustness with respect to spatial and spectral disorder between and within complexes. The implications of such an arrangement are discussed in the context of biomimetic photosynthetic analogs capable of transferring energy efficiently across tens to hundreds of nanometers.

  9. Long range excitonic transport in a biomimetic system inspired by the bacterial light-harvesting apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harel, Elad

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the process by which energy from sunlight drives cellular metabolism, relies on a unique organization of light-harvesting and reaction center complexes. Recently, the organization of light-harvesting LH2 complexes and dimeric reaction center-light-harvesting I-PufX core complexes in membranes of purple non-sulfur bacteria was revealed by atomic force microscopy [S. Bahatyrova et al., Nature (London) 430, 1058 (2004)]. Here, we discuss optimal exciton transfer in a biomimetic system closely modeled on the structure of LH2 and its organization within the membrane using a Markovian quantum model with dissipation and trapping added phenomenologically. In a deliberate manner, we neglect the high level detail of the bacterial light-harvesting complex and its interaction with the phonon bath in order to elucidate a set of design principles that may be incorporated in artificial pigment-scaffold constructs in a supramolecular assembly. We show that our scheme reproduces many of the most salient features found in their natural counterpart and may be largely explained by simple electrostatic considerations. Most importantly, we show that quantum effects act primarily to enforce robustness with respect to spatial and spectral disorder between and within complexes. The implications of such an arrangement are discussed in the context of biomimetic photosynthetic analogs capable of transferring energy efficiently across tens to hundreds of nanometers.

  10. Structure of bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroff, Martine; Karibian, Doris

    2003-11-14

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides are the major components of the outer surface of Gram-negative bacteria They are often of interest in medicine for their immunomodulatory properties. In small amounts they can be beneficial, but in larger amounts they may cause endotoxic shock. Although they share a common architecture, their structural details exert a strong influence on their activity. These molecules comprise: a lipid moiety, called lipid A, which is considered to be the endotoxic component, a glycosidic part consisting of a core of approximately 10 monosaccharides and, in "smooth-type" lipopolysaccharides, a third region, named O-chain, consisting of repetitive subunits of one to eight monosaccharides responsible for much of the immunospecificity of the bacterial cell.

  11. Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a novel optimization algorithm based on the social foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. This paper presents a variation on the original BFO algorithm, namely, the Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization (CBFO, which significantly improve the original BFO in solving complex optimization problems. This significant improvement is achieved by applying two cooperative approaches to the original BFO, namely, the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the implicit space decomposition level and the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the hybrid space decomposition level. The experiments compare the performance of two CBFO variants with the original BFO, the standard PSO and a real-coded GA on four widely used benchmark functions. The new method shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  12. Usage Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael; Plewa, Carolin; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance extant theorizing around resourceintegration by conceptualizing and delineating the notion of a usage center. Ausage center consists of a combination of interdependent actors that draw onresources across their individual usage processes to create v...

  13. Induced mutation for disease resistance in rice with special reference to blast, bacterial blight and tungro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    Rice varieties Ratna, Pusa 2-21, Vijaya and Pankaj have been treated with gamma rays, EMS or sodium azide to improve their resistance against blast, bacterial leaf blight or tungro virus. For blast and tungro, mutants with improved resistance were selected. Variation in reaction to bacterial leaf blight has been used in crossbreeding to accumulate genes for resistance. (author)

  14. Bacterial control of cyanobacteria

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndlela, Luyanda L

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available of biological control appears to be direct contact. • Ndlela, L. L. et al. (2016) ‘An overview of cyanobacterial bloom occurrences and research in Africa over the last decade’, Harmful Algae, 60 • Gumbo, J.R. et al. (2010) The Isolation and identification... of Predatory Bacteria from a Microcystis algal Bloom.. African Journal of Biotechnology, 9. *Special acknowledgement goes to the National Research foundation for funding this presentation Bacterial control of cyanobacteria Luyanda...

  15. Modeling base excision repair in Escherichia coli bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.

    2011-01-01

    A model describing the key processes in Escherichia coli bacterial cells during base excision repair is developed. The mechanism is modeled of damaged base elimination involving formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (the Fpg protein), which possesses several types of activities. The modeling of the transitions between DNA states is based on a stochastic approach to the chemical reaction description

  16. Comparison of bacterial communities of tilapia fish from Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of bacterial communities of tilapia fish from Cameroon and Vietnam using PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) ... The different PCR-DGGE 16S rDNA banding profiles obtained were analysed and results showed that there were specific bands for each geographical ...

  17. Bacterial growth kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonkitticharoen, V.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Kirchner, P.T.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of bacterial growth may be made using a radioassay technique. This method measures, by scintillation counting, the 14 CO 2 derived from the bacterial metabolism of a 14 C-labeled substrate. Mathematical growth models may serve as reliable tools for estimation of the generation rate constant (or slope of the growth curve) and provide a basis for evaluating assay performance. Two models, i.e., exponential and logistic, are proposed. Both models yielded an accurate fit to the data from radioactive measurement of bacterial growth. The exponential model yielded high precision values of the generation rate constant, with an average relative standard deviation of 1.2%. Under most conditions the assay demonstrated no changes in the slopes of growth curves when the number of bacteria per inoculation was changed. However, the radiometric assay by scintillation method had a growth-inhibiting effect on a few strains of bacteria. The source of this problem was thought to be hypersensitivity to trace amounts of toluene remaining on the detector

  18. Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a recently developed nature-inspired optimization algorithm, which is based on the foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. Up to now, BFO has been applied successfully to some engineering problems due to its simplicity and ease of implementation. However, BFO possesses a poor convergence behavior over complex optimization problems as compared to other nature-inspired optimization techniques. This paper first analyzes how the run-length unit parameter of BFO controls the exploration of the whole search space and the exploitation of the promising areas. Then it presents a variation on the original BFO, called the adaptive bacterial foraging optimization (ABFO, employing the adaptive foraging strategies to improve the performance of the original BFO. This improvement is achieved by enabling the bacterial foraging algorithm to adjust the run-length unit parameter dynamically during algorithm execution in order to balance the exploration/exploitation tradeoff. The experiments compare the performance of two versions of ABFO with the original BFO, the standard particle swarm optimization (PSO and a real-coded genetic algorithm (GA on four widely-used benchmark functions. The proposed ABFO shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  19. High level bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõljalg, Siiri; Mändar, Rando; Sõber, Tiina; Rööp, Tiiu; Mändar, Reet

    2017-06-01

    While contamination of mobile phones in the hospital has been found to be common in several studies, little information about bacterial abundance on phones used in the community is available. Our aim was to quantitatively determine the bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones. Altogether 27 mobile phones were studied. The contact plate method and microbial identification using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer were used for culture studies. Quantitative PCR reaction for detection of universal 16S rRNA, Enterococcus faecalis 16S rRNA and Escherichia coli allantoin permease were performed, and the presence of tetracycline ( tet A, tet B, tet M), erythromycin ( erm B) and sulphonamide ( sul 1) resistance genes was assessed. We found a high median bacterial count on secondary school students' mobile phones (10.5 CFU/cm 2 ) and a median of 17,032 bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies per phone. Potentially pathogenic microbes ( Staphylococcus aureus , Acinetobacter spp. , Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus cereus and Neisseria flavescens ) were found among dominant microbes more often on phones with higher percentage of E. faecalis in total bacterial 16S rRNA. No differences in contamination level or dominating bacterial species between phone owner's gender and between phone types (touch screen/keypad) were found. No antibiotic resistance genes were detected on mobile phone surfaces. Quantitative study methods revealed high level bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones.

  20. A selected ion flow tube study of the reactions of H3O+, NO+ and O-2(+center dot) with seven isomers of hexanol in support of SIFT-MS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Sovová, Kristýna; Španěl, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 319, MAY 1 2012 (2012), s. 25-30 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0256 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry * proton transfer * ion molecule reaction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.142, year: 2012

  1. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the experimental and theoretical situation regarding transfer reactions and inelastic scattering. In the first category there is little (very little) precision data for heavy projectiles and consequently almost no experience with quantitative theoretical analysis. For the inelastic scattering the rather extensive data strongly supports the coupled channels models with collective formfactors. At the most back angles, at intensities about 10 -5 of Rutherford scattering, a second, compound-like mechanism becomes dominant. The description of the interplay of these two opposite mechanisms provides a new challenge for our understanding

  2. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corner, J.; Richardson, K.; Fenton, N.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear reactions' marks a new development in the study of television as an agency of public policy debate. During the Eighties, nuclear energy became a major international issue. The disasters at Three-mile Island and Chernobyl created a global anxiety about its risks and a new sensitivity to it among politicians and journalists. This book is a case-study into documentary depictions of nuclear energy in television and video programmes and into the interpretations and responses of viewers drawn from many different occupational groupings. How are the complex and specialist arguments about benefit, risk and proof conveyed through the different conventions of commentary, interview and film sequence? What symbolic associations does the visual language of television bring to portrayals of the issue? And how do viewers make sense of various and conflicting accounts, connecting what they see and hear on the screen with their pre-existing knowledge, experience and 'civic' expectations. The authors examine some of the contrasting forms and themes which have been used by programme makers to explain and persuade, and then give a sustained analysis of the nature and sources of viewers' own accounts. 'Nuclear Reactions' inquires into the public meanings surrounding energy and the environment, spelling out in its conclusion some of the implications for future media treatments of this issue. It is also a key contribution to the international literature on 'television knowledge' and the processes of active viewing. (author)

  3. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar, Jose; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings

  4. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar, Jose E-mail: vilar_jlu@gva.es; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings.

  5. Evaluation of enset clones against enset bacterial wilt | Welde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A large number of enset clones collected from the Sidama, Gurage, Kembata Tembaro and Hadyia zones were assessed for resistance/tolerance to enset bacterial wilt, Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm) at the Awassa Agricultural Research Center, Awassa in Ethiopia, during the period 1994 to 2000.

  6. Mechanical transmission and survival of bacterial wilt on enset ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transmission of enset bacterial wilt with contaminated knives and the survival of the causal agent in soil and enset plant debris was studied at the Awassa Agricultural Research Center, Awassa, Ethiopia. Contaminated knives were found to transmit the pathogen from infected to healthy plants. Disease symptoms were ...

  7. Spallation reactions; Reactions de spallation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugon, J.

    1996-12-31

    Spallation reactions dominate the interactions of hadrons with nuclei in the GeV range (from {approx} 0.1 to {approx} 10 GeV). They correspond to a sometimes important ejection of light particles leaving most of the time a residue of mass commensurate with the target mass. The main features of the experimental data are briefly reviewed. The most successful theoretical model, namely the intranuclear cascade + evaporation model, is presented. Its physical content, results and possible improvements are critically discussed. Alternative approaches are shortly reviewed. (author). 84 refs.

  8. Kinematical coincidence method in transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, L.; Amorini, F. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Berceanu, I. [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Cardella, G., E-mail: cardella@ct.infn.it [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Chatterjiee, M.B. [Saha Institute for Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); De Filippo, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Francalanza, L.; Gianì, R. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Grassi, L. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Grzeszczuk, A. [Institut of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); La Guidara, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Facoltà di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università Kore, Enna (Italy); Lombardo, I. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II and INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Loria, D.; Minniti, T. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Pagano, E.V. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); and others

    2013-07-01

    A new method to extract high resolution angular distributions from kinematical coincidence measurements in binary reactions is presented. Kinematics is used to extract the center of mass angular distribution from the measured energy spectrum of light particles. Results obtained in the case of {sup 10}Be+p→{sup 9}Be+d reaction measured with the CHIMERA detector are shown. An angular resolution of few degrees in the center of mass is obtained. The range of applicability of the method is discussed.

  9. Bacteriophages for detection of bacterial pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutateladze, M.

    2009-01-01

    The G. Eliava Institute of Bacteriophages, Microbiology and Virology (Tbilisi, Georgia) is one of the most famous institutions focused on bacteriophage research for the elaboration of appropriate phage methodologies for human and animal protection. The main direction of the institute is the study and production of bacteriophages against intestinal disorders (dysentery, typhoid, intesti) and purulent-septic infections (staphylococcus, streptococcus, pyophage, etc.). These preparations were successfully introduced during the Soviet era, and for decades were used throughout the former Soviet Union and in other Socialist countries for the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of various infectious diseases, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteriophages were widely used for identifying and detecting infections caused by the most dangerous pathogens and causative agents of epidemiological outbreaks. The specific topic of this presentation is the phage typing of bacterial species, which can be an important method for epidemiological diagnostics. Together with different genetic methodologies - such as PCR-based methods, PFGE, plasmid fingerprinting, and ribosomal typing - phage typing is one method for identifying bacterial pathogens. The method has a high percentage of determination of phage types, high specificity of reaction, and is easy for interpretation and use by health workers. Phage typing was applied for inter-species differentiation of different species of Salmonella, S. typhi, Brucella spp, Staphylococcus aureus, E. col,i Clostridium deficile, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia pestis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Lysteria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium tetani, plant pathogens, and other bacterial pathogens. In addition to addressing the utility and efficacy of phage typing, the paper will discuss the isolation and selection of diagnostic typing phages for interspecies differentiation of pathogens that is necessary

  10. Explorations into Chemical Reactions and Biochemical Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-12-01

    A brief overview of the work in the research group of the present author on extracting knowledge from chemical reaction data is presented. Methods have been developed to calculate physicochemical effects at the reaction site. It is shown that these physicochemical effects can quite favourably be used to derive equations for the calculation of data on gas phase reactions and on reactions in solution such as aqueous acidity of alcohols or carboxylic acids or the hydrolysis of amides. Furthermore, it is shown that these physicochemical effects are quite effective for assigning reactions into reaction classes that correspond to chemical knowledge. Biochemical reactions constitute a particularly interesting and challenging task for increasing our understanding of living species. The BioPath.Database is a rich source of information on biochemical reactions and has been used for a variety of applications of chemical, biological, or medicinal interests. Thus, it was shown that biochemical reactions can be assigned by the physicochemical effects into classes that correspond to the classification of enzymes by the EC numbers. Furthermore, 3D models of reaction intermediates can be used for searching for novel enzyme inhibitors. It was shown in a combined application of chemoinformatics and bioinformatics that essential pathways of diseases can be uncovered. Furthermore, a study showed that bacterial flavor-forming pathways can be discovered. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, Brian.

    1991-01-01

    Chain Reaction is a work of recent American political history. It seeks to explain how and why America came to depend so heavily on its experts after World War II, how those experts translated that authority into political clout, and why that authority and political discretion declined in the 1970s. The author's research into the internal memoranda of the Atomic Energy Commission substantiates his argument in historical detail. It was not the ravages of American anti-intellectualism, as so many scholars have argued, that brought the experts back down to earth. Rather, their decline can be traced to the very roots of their success after World War II. The need to over-state anticipated results in order to garner public support, incessant professional and bureaucratic specialization, and the sheer proliferation of expertise pushed arcane and insulated debates between experts into public forums at the same time that a broad cross section of political participants found it easier to gain access to their own expertise. These tendencies ultimately undermined the political influence of all experts. (author)

  12. Osmotic pressure in a bacterial swarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Liyan; Wu, Yilin; Hosu, Basarab G; Tang, Jay X; Berg, Howard C

    2014-08-19

    Using Escherichia coli as a model organism, we studied how water is recruited by a bacterial swarm. A previous analysis of trajectories of small air bubbles revealed a stream of fluid flowing in a clockwise direction ahead of the swarm. A companion study suggested that water moves out of the agar into the swarm in a narrow region centered ∼ 30 μm from the leading edge of the swarm and then back into the agar (at a smaller rate) in a region centered ∼ 120 μm back from the leading edge. Presumably, these flows are driven by changes in osmolarity. Here, we utilized green/red fluorescent liposomes as reporters of osmolarity to verify this hypothesis. The stream of fluid that flows in front of the swarm contains osmolytes. Two distinct regions are observed inside the swarm near its leading edge: an outer high-osmolarity band (∼ 30 mOsm higher than the agar baseline) and an inner low-osmolarity band (isotonic or slightly hypotonic to the agar baseline). This profile supports the fluid-flow model derived from the drift of air bubbles and provides new (to our knowledge) insights into water maintenance in bacterial swarms. High osmotic pressure at the leading edge of the swarm extracts water from the underlying agar and promotes motility. The osmolyte is of high molecular weight and probably is lipopolysaccharide. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates: Still fabulous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Możejko-Ciesielska, Justyna; Kiewisz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are polyesters accumulated as carbon and energy storage materials under limited growth conditions in the presence of excess carbon sources. They have been developed as biomaterials with unique properties for the past many years being considered as a potential substitute for conventional non-degradable plastics. Due to the increasing concern towards global climate change, depleting petroleum resource and problems with an utilization of a growing number of synthetic plastics, PHAs have gained much more attention from industry and research. These environmentally friendly microbial polymers have great potential in biomedical, agricultural, and industrial applications. However, their production on a large scale is still limited. This paper describes the backgrounds of PHAs and discussed the current state of knowledge on the polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ability of bacteria to convert different carbon sources to PHAs, the opportunities and challenges of their introduction to global market as valuable renewable products have been also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Energetics of bacterial adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loosdrecht, M.C.M. van; Zehnder, A.J.B.

    1990-01-01

    For the description of bacterial adhesion phenomena two different physico-chemical approaches are available. The first one, based on a surface Gibbs energy balance, assumes intimate contact between the interacting surfaces. The second approach, based on colloid chemical theories (DLVO theory), allows for two types of adhesion: 1) secondary minimum adhesion, which is often weak and reversible, and 2) irreversible primary minimum adhesion. In the secondary minimum adhesion a thin water film remains present between the interacting surface. The merits of both approaches are discussed in this paper. In addition, the methods available to measure the physico-chemical surface characteristics of bacteria and the influence of adsorbing (in)organic compounds, extracellular polymers and cell surface appendages on adhesion are summarized. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 50 refs

  15. Biosensors of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S; Tillmann, Joshua

    2017-07-01

    Biosensors are devices which utilize both an electrical component (transducer) and a biological component to study an environment. They are typically used to examine biological structures, organisms and processes. The field of biosensors has now become so large and varied that the technology can often seem impenetrable. Yet the principles which underlie the technology are uncomplicated, even if the details of the mechanisms are elusive. In this review we confine our analysis to relatively current advancements in biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells. This includes biosensors which rely on an added labeled component and biosensors which do not have a labeled component and instead detect the binding event or bound structure on the transducer. Methods to concentrate the bacteria prior to biosensor analysis are also described. The variety of biosensor types and their actual and potential uses are described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome.......Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the Par...

  17. Exploring bacterial lignin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Margaret E; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-04-01

    Plant biomass represents a renewable carbon feedstock that could potentially be used to replace a significant level of petroleum-derived chemicals. One major challenge in its utilization is that the majority of this carbon is trapped in the recalcitrant structural polymers of the plant cell wall. Deconstruction of lignin is a key step in the processing of biomass to useful monomers but remains challenging. Microbial systems can provide molecular information on lignin depolymerization as they have evolved to break lignin down using metalloenzyme-dependent radical pathways. Both fungi and bacteria have been observed to metabolize lignin; however, their differential reactivity with this substrate indicates that they may utilize different chemical strategies for its breakdown. This review will discuss recent advances in studying bacterial lignin degradation as an approach to exploring greater diversity in the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...... the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the benefits...... and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial communities...

  19. Anaerobes in bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Four hundred high vaginal swabs were taken from patients attending gynaecology and obstetrics department of Govt. medical college, Amritsar. The patients were divided into four groups i.e. women in pregnancy (Group I, in labour/post partum (Group II, with abnormal vaginal discharge or bacterial vaginosis (Group III and asymptomatic women as control (Group IV. Anaerobic culture of vaginal swabs revealed that out of 400 cases, 212(53% were culture positive. Maximum isolation of anaerobes was in group III (84% followed by group II (56%, group I (36% and control group (15%. Gram positive anaerobes (69.2% out numbered gram negatives (30.8%. Among various isolates Peptostreptococcus spp. and Bacteroides spp. were predominant.

  20. A Multi-center, Double-blind, Randomized Study, Comparing Clindamycin Phosphate Vaginal Cream 2% (Watson Laboratories, Inc.) to Clindesse® (Ther-Rx™, Clindamyin Phosphate Vaginal Cream 2%) and Both Active Treatments to a Placebo Control in the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis in Non-pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-18

    BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS; Signs and Symptoms to be Evaluated and Recorded Include:; Vaginal Discharge: Color, Odor, and Consistency;; Vulvovaginal Itching and Irritation (Subjective): Absent, Mild, Moderate, or Severe; Vulvovaginal Inflammation (Objective): Absent, Mild, Moderate, or Severe.

  1. Gene calling and bacterial genome annotation with BG7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobes, Raquel; Pareja-Tobes, Pablo; Manrique, Marina; Pareja-Tobes, Eduardo; Kovach, Evdokim; Alekhin, Alexey; Pareja, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    New massive sequencing technologies are providing many bacterial genome sequences from diverse taxa but a refined annotation of these genomes is crucial for obtaining scientific findings and new knowledge. Thus, bacterial genome annotation has emerged as a key point to investigate in bacteria. Any efficient tool designed specifically to annotate bacterial genomes sequenced with massively parallel technologies has to consider the specific features of bacterial genomes (absence of introns and scarcity of nonprotein-coding sequence) and of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies (presence of errors and not perfectly assembled genomes). These features make it convenient to focus on coding regions and, hence, on protein sequences that are the elements directly related with biological functions. In this chapter we describe how to annotate bacterial genomes with BG7, an open-source tool based on a protein-centered gene calling/annotation paradigm. BG7 is specifically designed for the annotation of bacterial genomes sequenced with NGS. This tool is sequence error tolerant maintaining their capabilities for the annotation of highly fragmented genomes or for annotating mixed sequences coming from several genomes (as those obtained through metagenomics samples). BG7 has been designed with scalability as a requirement, with a computing infrastructure completely based on cloud computing (Amazon Web Services).

  2. Bacterial meningitis in immunocompromised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, K.E.B.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an acute infection of the meninges, in The Netherlands most commonly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitides. Risk factors for acquiring bacterial meningitis include a decreased function of the immune system. The aim of this thesis was to study

  3. Bacteriële meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M. C.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a severe disease which affects 35.000 Europeans each year and has a mortality rate of about 20%. During the past 25 years the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed significantly due to the implementation of vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria

  4. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... and highlighted their importance in bacterial physiology. Having no orthologues in Eukarya, BY-kinases are receiving a growing attention from the biomedical field, since they represent a particularly promising target for anti-bacterial drug design....

  5. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  6. Novel acsF Gene Primers Revealed a Diverse Phototrophic Bacterial Population, Including Gemmatimonadetes, in Lake Taihu (China)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yili; Zeng, Yanhua; Lu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Seq sequencing of the 16S rRNA, pufM, and bchY genes was carried out to assess the diversity of local phototrophic communities. In addition, we designed new degenerate primers of aerobic cyclase gene acsF, which serves as a convenient marker for both phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes and phototrophic Proteobacteria...... a diverse community of phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes forming 30 operational taxonomic units. These species represented 10.5 and 17.3% of the acsF reads in the upper semiaerobic sediment and anoxic sediment, whereas their abundance in the water column was ... fundamental biological processes on Earth. Recently, the presence of photosynthetic reaction centers has been reported from a rarely studied bacterial phylum, Gemmatimonadetes, but almost nothing is known about the diversity and environmental distribution of these organisms. The newly designed acsF primers...

  7. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO and ISEE, and Maui Community College, runs education and internship programs in / Jacobs Retina Center Department of Psychology University of California, San Francisco Department of University School of Optometry Maui Community College Maui Community College Space Grant Program Montana

  8. Microbial activity and bacterial community structure during degradation of microcystins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, K.; Lyck, Susanne; Winding, A.

    2002-01-01

    experiments were analysed by polymerase chain reaction-density gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) of 16S rDNA, which showed that the indigenous bacterial community responded quickly to the addition of lysates. Our study confirms that bacteria can efficiently degrade microcystins in natural waters....... It was hypothesised that the bacterial community from a lake with frequent occurrence of toxic cyanobacteria can degrade microcystin along with other organic compounds. The initial dissolved microcystin concentrations ranged between 10 and 136 mug 1(-1) (microcystin-LR equivalents) in the laboratory experiment, using...... experiment to evaluate the effects of organic lysates on bacterial proliferation in the absence of microcystin. An exponential decline of the dissolved toxins was observed in all cases with toxins present, and the degradation rates ranged between 0.5 and 1.0 d(-1). No lag phases were observed but slow...

  9. TRIMOLECULAR REACTIONS OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, M.; Becnel, J.; Garrison, S.

    2010-02-25

    The hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) is a key step in the synthesis of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) powder for nuclear fuels. Mechanisms for the hydrolysis reactions are studied here with density functional theory and the Stuttgart small-core scalar relativistic pseudopotential and associated basis set for uranium. The reaction of a single UF{sub 6} molecule with a water molecule in the gas phase has been previously predicted to proceed over a relatively sizeable barrier of 78.2 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, indicating this reaction is only feasible at elevated temperatures. Given the observed formation of a second morphology for the UO{sub 2} product coupled with the observations of rapid, spontaneous hydrolysis at ambient conditions, an alternate reaction pathway must exist. In the present work, two trimolecular hydrolysis mechanisms are studied with density functional theory: (1) the reaction between two UF{sub 6} molecules and one water molecule, and (2) the reaction of two water molecules with a single UF{sub 6} molecule. The predicted reaction of two UF{sub 6} molecules with one water molecule displays an interesting 'fluorine-shuttle' mechanism, a significant energy barrier of 69.0 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} to the formation of UF{sub 5}OH, and an enthalpy of reaction ({Delta}H{sub 298}) of +17.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. The reaction of a single UF{sub 6} molecule with two water molecules displays a 'proton-shuttle' mechanism, and is more favorable, having a slightly lower computed energy barrier of 58.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and an exothermic enthalpy of reaction ({Delta}H{sub 298}) of -13.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. The exothermic nature of the overall UF{sub 6} + 2 {center_dot} H{sub 2}O trimolecular reaction and the lowering of the barrier height with respect to the bimolecular reaction are encouraging; however, the sizable energy barrier indicates further study of the UF{sub 6} hydrolysis reaction

  10. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  12. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  13. Probing the influence of the center atom coordination structure in iron phthalocyanine multi-walled carbon nanotube-based oxygen reduction reaction catalysts by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingxiang; Li, Zhipan; Xia, Dingguo; Zheng, Lirong; Liao, Yi; Li, Kai; Zuo, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Three different pentacoordinate iron phthalocyanine (FePc) electrocatalysts with an axial ligand (pyridyl group, Py) anchored to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are prepared by a microwave method as high performance composite electrocatalysts (FePc-Py/MWCNTs) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For comparison, tetracoordinate FePc electrocatalysts without an axial ligand anchored to MWCNTs (FePc/MWCNTs) are assembled in the same way. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), Raman spectroscopy (RS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are used to characterize the obtained electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples is measured by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), and the onset potential of all of the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts is found to be more positive than that of their FePc/MWCNTs counterparts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are employed to elucidate the relationship between molecular structure and electrocatalytic activity. XPS indicates that higher concentrations of Fe3+ and pyridine-type nitrogen play critical roles in determining the electrocatalytic ORR activity of the samples. XAFS spectroscopy reveals that the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts have a coordination geometry around Fe that is closer to the square pyramidal structure, a higher concentration of Fe3+, and a smaller phthalocyanine ring radius compared with those of FePc/MWCNTs.

  14. Bacterial growth on macrophyte leachate and fate of bacterial production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, S.; Carlough, L.; Crocker, M.T.; Gill, H.K.; Meyer, J.L.; Smith, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The role bacteria play in transferring organic carbon to other trophic levels in aquatic ecosystems depends on the efficiency with which they convert dissolved organic [ 14 C]-labelled carbon into bacterial biomass and on the ability of consumers to graze bacteria. The authors have measured the conversion efficiency for bacteria growing on macrophyte-derived dissolved organic carbon and estimated the amount of bacterial production removed by grazing. Bacteria converted this DOC into new tissue with an efficiency of 53%, substantially higher than the apparent conversion efficiency of macrophyte-derived particulate organic carbon or other types of DOC. Two estimates of grazing indicate that the decline in bacterial numbers after the bloom was probably due to grazing by flagellates. These results show the significance of the bacterial link between DOC and other trophic levels

  15. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  16. Molecular detection of human bacterial pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Dongyou

    2011-01-01

    .... Molecular Detection of Human Bacterial Pathogens addresses this issue, with international scientists in respective bacterial pathogen research and diagnosis providing expert summaries on current...

  17. Vaginal toxic shock reaction triggering desquamative inflammatory vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Nigel; Edlind, Thomas D; Schlievert, Patrick M; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to report 2 cases of desquamative inflammatory vaginitis associated with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains. Case report of 2 patients, 1 with an acute and 1 with a chronic presentation, diagnosed with desquamative inflammatory vaginitis on the basis of clinical findings and wet mount microscopy. Pretreatment and posttreatment vaginal bacterial and yeast cultures were obtained. Pretreatment vaginal bacterial cultures from both patients grew TSST-1-producing S. aureus. Subsequent vaginal bacterial culture results after oral antibiotic therapy were negative. Desquamative inflammatory vaginitis may be triggered through TSST-1-mediated vaginal toxic shock reaction.

  18. Bacterial diversity characterization in petroleum samples from Brazilian reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Valéria Maia; Sette, Lara Durães; Simioni, Karen Christina Marques; dos Santos Neto, Eugênio Vaz

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating potential differences among the bacterial communities from formation water and oil samples originated from biodegraded and non-biodegraded Brazilian petroleum reservoirs by using a PCR-DGGE based approach. Environmental DNA was isolated and used in PCR reactions with bacterial primers, followed by separation of 16S rDNA fragments in the DGGE. PCR products were also cloned and sequenced, aiming at the taxonomic affiliation of the community members. The fingerprints obtained allowed the direct comparison among the bacterial communities from oil samples presenting distinct degrees of biodegradation, as well as between the communities of formation water and oil sample from the non-biodegraded reservoir. Very similar DGGE band profiles were observed for all samples, and the diversity of the predominant bacterial phylotypes was shown to be low. Cloning and sequencing results revealed major differences between formation water and oil samples from the non-biodegraded reservoir. Bacillus sp. and Halanaerobium sp. were shown to be the predominant components of the bacterial community from the formation water sample, whereas the oil sample also included Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Rhodococcus sp., Streptomyces sp. and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The PCR-DGGE technique, combined with cloning and sequencing of PCR products, revealed the presence of taxonomic groups not found previously in these samples when using cultivation-based methods and 16S rRNA gene library assembly, confirming the need of a polyphasic study in order to improve the knowledge of the extent of microbial diversity in such extreme environments. PMID:24031244

  19. Neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, Marjolein J.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    We reported on occurrence and impact of neurological sequelae after bacterial meningitis. We reviewed occurrence of neurological sequelae in children and adults after pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive

  20. Bacterial tracheitis in Down's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Cant, A J; Gibson, P J; West, R J

    1987-01-01

    Four children with Down's syndrome and bacterial tracheitis are described. In three the infection was due to Haemophilus influenza. In patients with Down's syndrome presenting with stridor tracheitis should be considered and appropriate treatment started.

  1. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed M. Stubbendieck

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities.

  2. Bacterial translocation: impact of probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppsson, Bengt; Mangell, Peter; Adawi, Diya; Molin, Göran

    2004-01-01

    There is a considerable amount of data in humans showing that patients who cannot take in nutrients enterally have more organ failure in the intensive care unit, a less favourable prognosis, and a higher frequency of septicaemia, in particular involving bacterial species from the intestinal tract. However, there is little evidence that this is connected with translocation of bacterial species in humans. Animal data more uniformly imply the existence of such a connection. The main focus of thi...

  3. Bacterial cellulose/boehmite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvi, Denise T.B. de; Barud, Hernane S.; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L.; Caiut, Jose Mauricio A.

    2011-01-01

    Composites based on bacterial cellulose membranes and boehmite were obtained. SEM results indicate that the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes are totally covered by boehmite and obtained XRD patterns suggest structural changes due to this boehmite addition. Thermal stability is accessed through TG curves and is dependent on boehmite content. Transparency is high comparing to pure BC as can be seen through UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  4. Bilateral endogenous Candida albicans subretinal abscess with suspected mixed bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai Y

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yusuke Arai,1 Yukihiro Sato,1 Atsushi Yoshida,1 Hidetoshi Kawashima,1 Toshikatsu Kaburaki,2 Harumi Gomi3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 3Center for Clinical Infectious Diseases, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan Purpose: Candida albicans subretinal abscess is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only one unilateral case has been reported. Herein, we report one bilateral case. Mixed bacterial infection was also suspected based on broad-range real-time polymerase chain reaction.Methods: A 64-year-old man being treated with oral corticosteroids for interstitial pneumonia visited us for visual loss in the left eye. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was 20/20 in the right eye and 8/200 in the left eye. Funduscopy revealed round yellowish-white subretinal lesions with retinal hemorrhage in both eyes.Results: Broad-range polymerase chain reaction of the vitreous fluid from the left eye showed a high copy count of bacterial 16s ribosome RNA. Despite large doses of antibiotics, the abscess expanded and vision decreased to light perception in the left eye. Exenteration of the left eye was performed followed by microscopic examination showing Gram-negative bacilli, and C. albicans was also cultured. Antibiotics and the maximum doses of antifungal drugs were administered. However, the abscess in the right eye expanded, and BCVA decreased to 2/200. Vitrectomy and silicone oil tamponade were performed. Vitreous fluid culture revealed C. albicans. At 16 months follow-up, BCVA was stable at 4/200 with healing of the subretinal abscess under silicone oil.Conclusion: Since C. albicans subretinal abscess is extremely rare and there was a concurrent mixed bacterial infection, diagnostic procedures in our bilateral case were more complicated than usual. C. albicans infection should be included in the differential diagnosis

  5. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03 Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  6. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew G.; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Xray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  7. Characterization of Bioaerosol Bacterial Communities During Hazy and Foggy Weather in Qingdao, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jianhua; Li, Mengzhe; Zhen, Yu; Wu, Lijing

    2018-06-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the impact of hazy and foggy weather on the bacterial communities in bioaerosols, for which samples were collected from the Qingdao coastal region on sunny, foggy, and hazy days in January and March 2013. Bacterial community compositions were determined using polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCRDGGE). The bacterial community diversity was found to be high on foggy and hazy days, and the dominant species differed during hazy weather. The Shannon-Wiener index revealed that the bacterial community diversity of coarse particles was higher than that of fine particles in the bioaerosols. The bacterial community diversity of fine particles significantly correlated with relative humidity (RH; r 2 = 0.986). The cluster analysis results indicated that the bacterial communities on sunny days differed from those on hazy and foggy days. Compared with sunny days, the bacterial communities in the fine particles during hazy weather exhibited greater changes than those in the coarse particles. Most of the sequenced bacteria were found to be closely affiliated with uncultured bacteria. During hazy weather, members of the classes Bacilli and Gammaproteobacteria ( Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter) were dominant. The DGGE analysis revealed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the predominant phyla, and their relative percentages to all the measured species changed significantly on hazy days, particularly in the fine particles. Haze and fog had a significant impact on the bacterial communities in bioaerosols, and the bacterial community diversity varied on different hazy days.

  8. Bacterial diversity in different regions of gastrointestinal tract of Giant African snail (Achatina fulica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Kiran D; Banskar, Sunil; Rane, Shailendra D; Charan, Shakti S; Kulkarni, Girish J; Sawant, Shailesh S; Ghate, Hemant V; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2012-12-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of invasive land snail Achatina fulica is known to harbor metabolically active bacterial communities. In this study, we assessed the bacterial diversity in the different regions of GI tract of Giant African snail, A. fulica by culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. Five 16S rRNA gene libraries from different regions of GI tract of active snails indicated that sequences affiliated to phylum γ-Proteobacteria dominated the esophagus, crop, intestine, and rectum libraries, whereas sequences affiliated to Tenericutes dominated the stomach library. On phylogenetic analysis, 30, 27, 9, 27, and 25 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from esophagus, crop, stomach, intestine, and rectum libraries were identified, respectively. Estimations of the total bacterial diversity covered along with environmental cluster analysis showed highest bacterial diversity in the esophagus and lowest in the stomach. Thirty-three distinct bacterial isolates were obtained, which belonged to 12 genera of two major bacterial phyla namely γ-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Among these, Lactococcus lactis and Kurthia gibsonii were the dominant bacteria present in all GI tract regions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis indicated significant differences in bacterial load in different GI tract regions of active and estivating snails. The difference in the bacterial load between the intestines of active and estivating snail was maximum. Principal component analysis (PCA) of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism suggested that bacterial community structure changes only in intestine when snail enters estivation state. © 2012 The Authors. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Nuclear data services of the Nuclear Data Centers Network available at the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Data Centers Network provides low and medium energy nuclear reaction data to users around the world. Online retrievals are available through the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center, the Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, and the IAEA Nuclear Data Section from these extensive bibliographic, experimental data, and evaluated data files. In addition to nuclear reaction data, the various databases also provide nuclear structure and decay data, and other information of interest to users. The WorldWideWeb sites at the National Nuclear Data Center and the NEA Data Bank provide access to some of the Centers' files. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of Behavioral Evolution in Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Robert

    2013-03-01

    A curious aspect of bacterial behavior under stress is the induction of filamentation: the anomalous growth of certain bacteria in which cells continue to elongate but do not divide into progeny. We show that E.coli under the influence of the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin have robust filamentous growth, which provides individual bacteria a mesoscopic niche for evolution until resistant progeny can bud off and propagate. Hence, filamentation is a form of genomic amplification where even a single, isolated bacteria can have access to multiple genomes. We propose a model that predicts that the first arrival time of the normal sized progeny should follow a Gompertz distribution with the mean first arrival time proportional to the elongation rate of filament. These predictions agree with our experimental measurements. Finally, we suggest bacterial filament growth and budding has many similarities to tumor growth and metastasis and can serve as a simpler model to study those complicated processes. Sponsored by the NCI/NIH Physical Sciences Oncology Centers

  11. Bacterial Prostatitis: Bacterial Virulence, Clinical Outcomes, and New Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, John N; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2016-02-01

    Four prostatitis syndromes are recognized clinically: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and asymptomatic prostatitis. Because Escherichia coli represents the most common cause of bacterial prostatitis, we investigated the importance of bacterial virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in E. coli strains causing prostatitis and the potential association of these characteristics with clinical outcomes. A structured literature review revealed that we have limited understanding of the virulence-associated characteristics of E. coli causing acute prostatitis. Therefore, we completed a comprehensive microbiological and molecular investigation of a unique strain collection isolated from healthy young men. We also considered new data from an animal model system suggesting certain E. coli might prove important in the etiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Our human data suggest that E. coli needs multiple pathogenicity-associated traits to overcome anatomic and immune responses in healthy young men without urological risk factors. The phylogenetic background and accumulation of an exceptional repertoire of extraintestinal pathogenic virulence-associated genes indicate that these E. coli strains belong to a highly virulent subset of uropathogenic variants. In contrast, antibiotic resistance confers little added advantage to E. coli strains in these healthy outpatients. Our animal model data also suggest that certain pathogenic E. coli may be important in the etiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome through mechanisms that are dependent on the host genetic background and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

  12. Evaluation of different lactic acid bacterial strains for probiotic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    B. Srinu,; T. Madhava Rao,; P. V. Mallikarjuna Reddy; K. Kondal Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to collect different Lactic acid bacterial strains from culture collection centers and screen their functional probiotic characteristics such as acid tolerance, bile tolerance, antibacterial activity and antibiotic sensitivity for their commercial use. Materials and Methods: Acid and bile tolerence of selected LAB(Lactic acid bacteria) was determined. The antibiotic resistance of Lactobacillus species was assessed using different antibiotic di...

  13. Incidence and Predictors of Bacterial infection in Febrile Children with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Benita J; Bycroft, Thomas P; Almossawi, Ofran; Wilkey, Olufunke B; Daniels, Justin G

    2015-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease are at increased risk of developing bacteremia and other serious bacterial infections. Fever is a common symptom in sickle cell disease and can also occur with sickle cell crises and viral infections. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and predictors of bacteremia and bacterial infection in children with sickle cell disease presenting with fever to a district hospital and sickle cell center in London. A retrospective analysis was performed on all attendances of children (aged under 16 years) with sickle cell disease presenting with a fever of 38.5 °C or higher over a 1-year period. Confirmed bacterial infection was defined as bacteremia, bacterial meningitis, urinary tract infection (UTI), pneumonia, osteomyelitis or other bacterial infection with positive identification of organism. Children were defined as having a suspected bacterial infection if a bacterial infection was suspected clinically, but no organism was identified. Over a 1-year period there were 88 episodes analyzed in 59 children. Bacteremia occurred in 3.4% of episodes and confirmed bacterial infection in 7.0%. Suspected bacterial infection occurred in 33.0%. One death occurred from Salmonella typhirium septicemia. C-reactive protein (CRP) level and white blood cell (WBC) count were both significantly associated with bacterial infection (p = 0.004 and 0.02, respectively.) In conclusion, bacterial infections continue to be a significant problem in children with sickle cell disease. C-reactive protein was significantly associated with bacterial infections, and could be included in clinical risk criteria for febrile children with sickle cell disease.

  14. Method for predicting enzyme-catalyzed reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavacek, William S.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Mu, Fangping; Unkefer, Pat J.

    2013-03-19

    The reactivity of given metabolites is assessed using selected empirical atomic properties in the potential reaction center. Metabolic reactions are represented as biotransformation rules. These rules are generalized from the patterns in reactions. These patterns are not unique to reactants but are widely distributed among metabolites. Using a metabolite database, potential substructures are identified in the metabolites for a given biotransformation. These substructures are divided into reactants or non-reactants, depending on whether they participate in the biotransformation or not. Each potential substructure is then modeled using descriptors of the topological and electronic properties of atoms in the potential reaction center; molecular properties can also be used. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) or classifier is trained to classify a potential reactant as a true or false reactant using these properties.

  15. Bacterial contribution to iodine volatilization in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amachi, S; Kasahara, M; Fujii, T [Chiba Univ., Dept. of Bioresources Chemistry, Matsudo, Chiba (Japan); Muramatsu, Y [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2003-09-01

    The roles of microorganisms in iodine volatilization from the environment were studied. More than 100 bacterial strains were isolated from various environments such as soils, seawater and marine sediments, and were examined their capacities for volatilizing iodine. Approximately 40% of these bacteria showed significant capacities for volatilizing iodine. Gas chromatographic determinations revealed that the chemical species of gaseous iodine is methyl iodide (CH{sub 3}I). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S ribosomal DNA showed that these 'iodine-volatilizing bacteria' are widely distributed through the bacterial domain. The iodide-methylating reaction was mediated by an enzyme protein with S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) as the methyl donor. We then estimated bacterial contribution to iodine volatilization from soils. Iodine in soils was volatilized mainly as CH{sub 3}I. CH{sub 3}I emission was enhanced in the presence of glucose or yeast extract, but was inhibited by autoclaving of soils. Little CH{sub 3}I was produced under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, the addition of streptomycin and tetracycline, antibiotics which inhibit bacterial growth, strongly inhibited CH{sub 3}I emission, while a fungal inhibitor cycloheximide caused little effect. These results suggest that iodine in soils is volatilized as CH{sub 3}I mainly by the action of aerobic soil bacteria. Similar experiment was carried out by using sea water samples. The emission of iodine from sea waters occurred biologically, and bacterial (and also other microbial) contribution was confirmed. Our results suggest that iodine is methylated and volatilized into the atmosphere as a result of bacterial activities. Since bacteria are so abundant and widespread in the environments, they may significantly contribute to global iodine volatilization. This indicates that if {sup 129}I would be released from nuclear facilities, weapons testing or ground storage of nuclear wastes, the pathway of volatilization by

  16. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa

  17. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  18. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.

    2010-01-01

    A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and DNA. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and disinfectant chemicals as well as resisting phagocytosis...... and other components of the body's defence system. The persistence of, for example, staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation. Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains....... Characteristically, gradients of nutrients and oxygen exist from the top to the bottom of biofilms and these gradients are associated with decreased bacterial metabolic activity and increased doubling times of the bacterial cells; it is these more or less dormant cells that are responsible for some of the tolerance...

  19. [Bacterial etiology of acute otitis media in Spain in the post-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumarola, Felix; Salamanca de la Cueva, Ignacio; Sistiaga-Hernando, Alessandra; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Moraga-Llop, Fernando A; Cardelús, Sara; McCoig, Cynthia; Gómez Martínez, Justo Ramón; Rosell Ferrer, Rosa; Iniesta Turpin, Jesús; Devadiga, Raghavendra

    2016-11-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is common in children aged <3 years. A pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) (PCV7; Prevenar, Pfizer/Wyeth, USA) has been available in Spain since 2001, which has a coverage rate of 50-60% in children aged <5 years. Children aged ≥3 to 36 months with AOM confirmed by an ear-nose-throat specialist were enrolled at seven centers in Spain (February 2009-May 2012) (GSK study identifier: 111425). Middle-ear-fluid samples were collected by tympanocentesis or spontaneous otorrhea and cultured for bacterial identification. Culture-negative samples were further analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 125 confirmed AOM episodes in 124 children, 117 were analyzed (median age: 17 months (range: 3-35); eight AOM episodes were excluded from analyses. Overall, 69% (81/117) episodes were combined culture- and PCR-positive for ≥1 bacterial pathogen; 44% (52/117) and 39% (46/117) were positive for Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn), respectively. 77 of 117 episodes were cultured for ≥1 bacteria, of which 63 were culture-positive; most commonly Spn (24/77; 31%) and Hi (32/77; 42%). PCR on culture-negative episodes identified 48% Hi- and 55% Spn-positive episodes. The most common Spn serotype was 19F (4/24; 17%) followed by 19A (3/24; 13%); all Hi-positive episodes were non-typeable (NTHi). 81/117 AOM episodes (69%) occurred in children who had received ≥1 pneumococcal vaccine dose. NTHi and Spn were the main etiological agents for AOM in Spain. Impact of pneumococcal vaccination on AOM requires further evaluation in Spain, after higher vaccination coverage rate is reached. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacterial computing with engineered populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Martyn; Axmann, Ilka Maria; Blüthgen, Nils; de la Cruz, Fernando; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Paton, Alfonso; Simmel, Friedrich

    2015-07-28

    We describe strategies for the construction of bacterial computing platforms by describing a number of results from the recently completed bacterial computing with engineered populations project. In general, the implementation of such systems requires a framework containing various components such as intracellular circuits, single cell input/output and cell-cell interfacing, as well as extensive analysis. In this overview paper, we describe our approach to each of these, and suggest possible areas for future research. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Respiratory hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowska, J S; Burney, P; Jarvis, D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most prevalent drugs inducing hypersensitivity reactions. The aim of this analysis was to estimate the prevalence of NSAID-induced respiratory symptoms in population across Europe and to assess its association with upper...... and lower respiratory tract disorders. METHODS: The GA(2) LEN survey was conducted in 22 centers in 15 European countries. Each of 19 centers selected random samples of 5000 adults aged 15-74 from their general population, and in three centers (Athens, Munich, Oslo), a younger population was sampled...... prevalence of NSAID-induced dyspnea was 1.9% and was highest in the three Polish centers [Katowice (4.9%), Krakow (4.8%), and Lodz (4.4%)] and lowest in Skopje, (0.9%), Amsterdam (1.1%), and Umea (1.2%). In multivariate analysis, the prevalence of respiratory reactions to NSAIDs was higher in participants...

  2. Chronic bacterial prostatitis in men with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Jörg; Bartel, Peter; Pannek, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) are a major problem affecting spinal cord injury (SCI) patients and may stem from chronic bacterial prostatitis. We have therefore investigated the presence of chronic bacterial prostatitis and its role in the development of recurrent symptomatic UTI in SCI men. This study is a prospective cross-sectional investigation of bacterial prostatitis in SCI men in a single SCI rehabilitation center. In 50 men with chronic SCI presenting for a routine urologic examination, urine samples before and after prostate massage were taken for microbiologic investigation and white blood cell counting. Furthermore, patient characteristics, bladder diary details, and the annual rate of symptomatic UTI were collected retrospectively. No participant reported current symptoms of UTI or prostatitis. In most men (39/50, 78 %), the microbiologic analysis of the post-massage urine sample revealed growth of pathogenic bacteria. The majority of these men (32/39, 82 %) also presented with mostly (27/39, 69 %) the same pathogenic bacteria in the pre-massage sample. There was no significant (p = 0.48) difference in the number of symptomatic UTI in men with a positive post-massage culture compared with those with a negative culture. No significant (p = 0.67) difference in the frequency distribution of positive versus negative post-massage cultures was detected between men with recurrent and sporadic UTI. Most SCI men are affected by asymptomatic bacterial prostatitis; however, bacterial prostatitis does not play a major role in the development of recurrent UTI. The indication for antibiotic treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis in asymptomatic SCI men with recurrent UTI is questionable.

  3. [Congenital skull base defect causing recurrent bacterial meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berliner, Elihay; Bar Meir, Maskit; Megged, Orli

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life threatening disease. Most patients will experience only one episode throughout life. Children who experience bacterial meningitis more than once, require further immunologic or anatomic evaluation. We report a 9 year old child with five episodes of bacterial meningitis due to a congenital defect of the skull base. A two and a half year old boy first presented to our medical center with pneumococcal meningitis. He was treated with antibiotics and fully recovered. Two months later he presented again with a similar clinical picture. Streptococcus pneumoniae grew in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture. CT scan and later MRI of the brain revealed a defect in the anterior middle fossa floor, with protrusion of brain tissue into the sphenoidal sinus. Corrective surgery was recommended but the parents refused. Three months later, a third episode of pneumococcal meningitis occurred. The child again recovered with antibiotics and this time corrective surgery was performed. Five years later, the boy presented once again with clinical signs and symptoms consistent with bacterial meningitis. CSF culture was positive, but the final identification of the bacteria was conducted by broad spectrum 16S ribosomal RNA PCR (16S rRNA PCR) which revealed a sequence of Neisseria lactamica. CT and MRI showed recurrence of the skull base defect with encephalocele in the sphenoid sinus. The parents again refused neurosurgical intervention. A year later the patient presented with bacterial meningitis. CSF culture obtained after initiation of antibiotics was negative, but actinobacillus was identified in the CSF by 16S rRNA PCR. The patient is scheduled for neurosurgical intervention. In patients with recurrent bacterial meningitis caused by organisms colonizing the oropharynx or nasopharynx, an anatomical defect should be carefully sought and surgically repaired.

  4. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Vázquez-Otero; Danila Khikhlukha; J. M. Solano-Altamirano; Raquel Dormido; Natividad Duro

    2016-01-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presente...

  5. In myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, increased autoimmune activity against 5-HT is associated with immuno-inflammatory pathways and bacterial translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael; Ringel, Karl; Kubera, Marta; Anderson, George; Morris, Gerwyn; Galecki, Piotr; Geffard, Michel

    2013-09-05

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is accompanied by activation of immuno-inflammatory pathways, increased bacterial translocation and autoimmune responses to serotonin (5-HT). Inflammation is known to damage 5-HT neurons while bacterial translocation may drive autoimmune responses. This study has been carried out to examine the autoimmune responses to 5-HT in ME/CFS in relation to inflammation and bacterial translocation. We examined 5-HT antibodies in 117 patients with ME/CFS (diagnosed according to the centers for disease control and prevention criteria, CDC) as compared with 43 patients suffering from chronic fatigue (CF) but not fulfilling the CDC criteria and 35 normal controls. Plasma interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, neopterin and the IgA responses to Gram-negative bacteria were measured. Severity of physio-somatic symptoms was measured using the fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome rating scale (FF scale). The incidence of positive autoimmune activity against 5-HT was significantly higher (pfatigue, neurocognitive and autonomic symptoms, sadness and a flu-like malaise. The results show that, in ME/CFS, increased 5-HT autoimmune activity is associated with activation of immuno-inflammatory pathways and increased bacterial translocation, factors which are known to play a role in the onset of autoimmune reactions. 5-HT autoimmune activity could play a role in the pathophysiology of ME/CFS and the onset of physio-somatic symptoms. These results provide mechanistic support for the notion that ME/CFS is a neuro-immune disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  7. Food irradiation and bacterial toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranter, H.S.; Modi, N.K.; Hambleton, P.; Melling, J.; Rose, S.; Stringer, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors' findings indicate that irradiation confers no advantage over heat processing in respect of bacterial toxins (clostridium botulinum, neurotoxin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin A). It follows that irradiation at doses less than the ACINF recommended upper limit of 10 kGy could not be used to improve the ambient temperature shelf life on non-acid foods. (author)

  8. Biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menéndez, E.; García-Fraile, Paula; Rivas, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2015), s. 163-182 ISSN 2306-5354 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biotechnological applications * Bacterial cellulases * Cellulose degradation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  9. bacterial flora and antibiotic sensitivity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purulent pelvic collections are common pathologies observed in contemporary gynaecological practice. They may originate from chronic pelvic inflammatory disease, from abortions or following normal deliveries. This study was designed to compare the bacterial flora in purulent pelvic collections obtained from HIV infected ...

  10. Reaction rates for neutrino processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalitin, D.

    1978-01-01

    Some integrals involved in neutrino processes are evaluated by transformation to a special system of reference - usually to the center of mass system (CM). Rather simple analytic expressions are obtained for reaction rates and, though less simple, for moments. An interesting result thus obtained is for an isotropic interaction (in CM) of a neutrino with a monoenergetic isotropic gas of extreme relativistic electrons: it is found that the probability of the scattered neutrino to have energy in a certain range is independent of this energy. (Auth.)

  11. A New Phylogenetic Approach to Investigate the Intestinal Bacterial Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise; Mølbak, Lars

    literature, meaning their use had already been verified. DNA from reference bacteria and DNA from faecal samples were used to check specificity and sensitivity of the assay when analysing bacterial communities. The heat map showed nice dilution colour series consistent with the diluted sample concentrations...... reactions in a few hours. Subsequently the 16S rDNA amplicons can be harvested and used for next generation sequencing. The experimental setup was designed so that the primers represented a phylogenetic overview of the biggest groups of intestinal bacteria. Primers were mainly chosen from published...... ranging from 50 to 0.005 ng/μl and in agreement to the expected results. This implies that the AA48.48 is a useful tool when examining the bacterial composition of faeces and maybe superior to competitive methods, as it gives a quantitative measurement of the bacteria in the sample and afterwards...

  12. Prostatitis-bacterial - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000395.htm Prostatitis - bacterial - self-care To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. You have been diagnosed with bacterial prostatitis . This is an infection of the prostate gland. ...

  13. Adjunctive Corticosteroids in Adults with Bacterial Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; de Gans, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a complex disorder in which neurologic injury is caused, in part, by the causative organism and, in part, by the host's own inflammatory response. In studies of experimental bacterial meningitis, adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids, specifically dexamethasone, has

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility in community-acquired bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, two bacterial pathogens commonly associated with communityacquired pneumonia. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Bacterial isolates were obtained from adults suspected to have ...

  15. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, Marjolein J.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with

  16. Bacterial cells with improved tolerance to polyamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Provided are bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as polyamines, and methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyamines and other compounds.......Provided are bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as polyamines, and methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyamines and other compounds....

  17. Bacterial cells with improved tolerance to polyols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as diols and other polyols, and to methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyols and other compounds.......The present invention relates to bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as diols and other polyols, and to methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyols and other compounds....

  18. Desulfovibrio bacterial species are increased in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowan, Fiachra

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Debate persists regarding the role of Desulfovibrio subspecies in ulcerative colitis. Combined microscopic and molecular techniques enable this issue to be investigated by allowing precise enumeration of specific bacterial species within the colonic mucous gel. The aim of this study was to combine laser capture microdissection and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to determine Desulfovibrio copy number in crypt-associated mucous gel in health and in acute and chronic ulcerative colitis. METHODS: Colonic mucosal biopsies were harvested from healthy controls (n = 19) and patients with acute (n = 10) or chronic (n = 10) ulcerative colitis. Crypt-associated mucous gel was obtained by laser capture microdissection throughout the colon. Pan-bacterial 16S rRNA and Desulfovibrio copy number\\/mm were obtained by polymerase chain reaction at each locus. Bacterial copy numbers were interrogated for correlation with location and disease activity. Data were evaluated using a combination of ordinary linear methods and linear mixed-effects models to cater for multiple interactions. RESULTS: Desulfovibrio positivity was significantly increased in acute and chronic ulcerative colitis at multiple levels within the colon, and after normalization with total bacterial signal, the relative Desulfovibrio load was increased in acute colitis compared with controls. Desulfovibrio counts did not significantly correlate with age, disease duration, or disease activity but interlevel correlations were found in adjacent colonic segments in the healthy control and chronic ulcerative colitis groups. CONCLUSION: The presence of Desulfovibrio subspecies is increased in ulcerative colitis and the data presented suggest that these bacteria represent an increased percentage of the colonic microbiome in acute ulcerative colitis.

  19. Treatment and Managing Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of reactions. Learn more here. Milk Egg Peanut Tree Nuts Soy Wheat Fish Shellfish Sesame Other Food ... a severe reaction. Consider wearing an emergency medical identification (e.g., bracelet, other jewelry). What to Read ...

  20. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  1. Preequilibrium Nuclear Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1988-01-01

    After a survey on existing experimental data on precompound reactions and a description of preequilibrium reactions, theoretical models and quantum mechanical theories of preequilibrium emission are presented. The 25 papers of this meeting are analyzed separately

  2. Managing Your Emotional Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Managing Your Emotional Reactions KidsHealth / For Teens / Managing Your Emotional Reactions ... Think about what you might do next time. Emotions 101 The skills we use to manage our ...

  3. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    array (CLARA), extensive investigations of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics have been carried out. In the present paper aspects of these studies will be presented, focussing more closely on the reaction mechanism, in particular on the ...

  4. The Bacterial Sequential Markov Coalescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Nicola; Wilson, Daniel J

    2017-05-01

    Bacteria can exchange and acquire new genetic material from other organisms directly and via the environment. This process, known as bacterial recombination, has a strong impact on the evolution of bacteria, for example, leading to the spread of antibiotic resistance across clades and species, and to the avoidance of clonal interference. Recombination hinders phylogenetic and transmission inference because it creates patterns of substitutions (homoplasies) inconsistent with the hypothesis of a single evolutionary tree. Bacterial recombination is typically modeled as statistically akin to gene conversion in eukaryotes, i.e. , using the coalescent with gene conversion (CGC). However, this model can be very computationally demanding as it needs to account for the correlations of evolutionary histories of even distant loci. So, with the increasing popularity of whole genome sequencing, the need has emerged for a faster approach to model and simulate bacterial genome evolution. We present a new model that approximates the coalescent with gene conversion: the bacterial sequential Markov coalescent (BSMC). Our approach is based on a similar idea to the sequential Markov coalescent (SMC)-an approximation of the coalescent with crossover recombination. However, bacterial recombination poses hurdles to a sequential Markov approximation, as it leads to strong correlations and linkage disequilibrium across very distant sites in the genome. Our BSMC overcomes these difficulties, and shows a considerable reduction in computational demand compared to the exact CGC, and very similar patterns in simulated data. We implemented our BSMC model within new simulation software FastSimBac. In addition to the decreased computational demand compared to previous bacterial genome evolution simulators, FastSimBac provides more general options for evolutionary scenarios, allowing population structure with migration, speciation, population size changes, and recombination hotspots. FastSimBac is

  5. Bacterial reproductive pathogens of cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Elizabeth M; Taylor, David J

    2012-05-01

    With the notable exception of Brucella canis, exogenous bacterial pathogens are uncommon causes of reproductive disease in cats and dogs. Most bacterial reproductive infections are endogenous, and predisposing factors for infection are important. This article reviews the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and public health significance of bacterial reproductive pathogens in cats and dogs.

  6. 76 FR 6486 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ...: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; RFA Panel: Topics in Bacterial Pathogenesis. Date... Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Neurodegeneration, Trauma, Immunology and Imaging. Date: March 7-8... 6487

  7. 75 FR 27794 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... Committee: Immunology Integrated Review Group; Transplantation, Tolerance, and Tumor Immunology Study...: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Special Topics: Bacterial Pathogenesis. Date: [email protected] . Name of Committee: Immunology Integrated Review Group; Cellular and Molecular Immunology...

  8. Chemical transport reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  9. Bacterial diversity in two Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krissi M Hewitt

    Full Text Available Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs are particularly susceptible to opportunistic infection. Infected infants have high mortality rates, and survivors often suffer life-long neurological disorders. The causes of many NICU infections go undiagnosed, and there is debate as to the importance of inanimate hospital environments (IHEs in the spread of infections. We used culture-independent next-generation sequencing to survey bacterial diversity in two San Diego NICUs and to track the sources of microbes in these environments. Thirty IHE samples were collected from two Level-Three NICU facilities. We extracted DNA from these samples and amplified the bacterial small subunit (16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence using 'universal' barcoded primers. The purified PCR products were pooled into a single reaction for pyrosequencing, and the data were analyzed using QIIME. On average, we detected 93+/-39 (mean +/- standard deviation bacterial genera per sample in NICU IHEs. Many of the bacterial genera included known opportunistic pathogens, and many were skin-associated (e.g., Propionibacterium. In one NICU, we also detected fecal coliform bacteria (Enterobacteriales in a high proportion of the surface samples. Comparison of these NICU-derived sequences to previously published high-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon studies of other indoor environments (offices, restrooms and healthcare facilities, as well as human- and soil-associated environments, found the majority of the NICU samples to be similar to typical building surface and air samples, with the notable exception of the IHEs which were dominated by Enterobacteriaceae. Our findings provide evidence that NICU IHEs harbor a high diversity of human-associated bacteria and demonstrate the potential utility of molecular methods for identifying and tracking bacterial diversity in NICUs.

  10. Thermonuclear reaction rates. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Fowler, W.A.; Caughlan, G.R.; Zimmerman, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Stellar thermonuclear reaction rates are revised and updated, adding a number of new important reaction rates. Several reactions with large negative Q-values are included, and examples of them are discussed. The importance of the decay rates for Mg-26(p,n) exp 26 Al and Al-26(n,p) exp 26 Mg for stellar studies is emphasized. 19 references

  11. Maillard Reaction: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia d'Almeida Francisquini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is an important subject of study in food science and technology and different areas of knowledge are involved such as chemistry, food engineering, nutrition and food technology. The objective of this paper is to present the basic concepts of the Maillard reaction, such as the reaction stages, the main compounds producced and some technological consequences for dairy products.

  12. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  13. Iowa Water Center | Iowa Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Iowa State University Extension Iowa Water Center Submitted by mollyd on April 24, 2012 - 09 :42 Advancing the state of water knowledge and management The Iowa Water Center is a part of a nationwide network of university-based water centers created to encourage interdisciplinary water research

  14. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  15. Bacterial streamers in curved microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Biofilms, generally identified as microbial communities embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, are involved in a wide variety of health-related problems ranging from implant-associated infections to disease transmissions and dental plaque. The usual picture of these bacterial films is that they grow and develop on surfaces. However, suspended biofilm structures, or streamers, have been found in natural environments (e.g., rivers, acid mines, hydrothermal hot springs) and are always suggested to stem from a turbulent flow. We report the formation of bacterial streamers in curved microfluidic channels. By using confocal laser microscopy we are able to directly image and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of these filamentous structures. Such streamers, which always connect the inner corners of opposite sides of the channel, are always located in the middle plane. Numerical simulations of the flow provide evidences for an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism behind the formation of the streamers.

  16. Collective Functionality through Bacterial Individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Martin

    According to the conventional view, the properties of an organism are a product of nature and nurture - of its genes and the environment it lives in. Recent experiments with unicellular organisms have challenged this view: several molecular mechanisms generate phenotypic variation independently of environmental signals, leading to variation in clonal groups. My presentation will focus on the causes and consequences of this microbial individuality. Using examples from bacterial genetic model systems, I will first discuss different molecular and cellular mechanisms that give rise to bacterial individuality. Then, I will discuss the consequences of individuality, and focus on how phenotypic variation in clonal populations of bacteria can promote interactions between individuals, lead to the division of labor, and allow clonal groups of bacteria to cope with environmental uncertainty. Variation between individuals thus provides clonal groups with collective functionality.

  17. The bacterial sequential Markov coalescent

    OpenAIRE

    De Maio, N; Wilson, DJ

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria can exchange and acquire new genetic material from other organisms directly and via the environment. This process, known as bacterial recombination, has a strong impact on the evolution of bacteria, for example leading to the spread of antibiotic resistance across clades and species, and to the avoidance of clonal interference. Recombination hinders phylogenetic and transmission inference because it creates patterns of substitutions that are not consistent with the hypothesis of a si...

  18. Autotrophic potential in mesophilic heterotrophic bacterial isolates from Sino-Pacific marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Cao, W.; Das, A.; Saren, G.; Jiang, M.; Zhang, H.; Yu, X.

    concentrations of reduced iron (10–6 to 10–5 fmol/(cell·h) and sulfide (10–5 fmol/(cell·h) decreased the uptake potential significantly at p<0.1. Bacterial tolerance to formaldehyde suggested propensities of anaplerotic chemical reactions that form metabolic...

  19. Bacterial sex in dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Ingar; Tribble, Gena D; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it affects a number of the major genera present. It has been estimated that new sequences in genomes established through horizontal gene transfer can constitute up to 30% of bacterial genomes. Gene transfer can be both inter- and intrageneric, and it can also affect transient organisms. The transferred DNA can be integrated or recombined in the recipient's chromosome or remain as an extrachromosomal inheritable element. This can make dental plaque a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. The ability to transfer DNA is important for bacteria, making them better adapted to the harsh environment of the human mouth, and promoting their survival, virulence, and pathogenicity.

  20. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it affects a number of the major genera present. It has been estimated that new sequences in genomes established through horizontal gene transfer can constitute up to 30% of bacterial genomes. Gene transfer can be both inter- and intrageneric, and it can also affect transient organisms. The transferred DNA can be integrated or recombined in the recipient's chromosome or remain as an extrachromosomal inheritable element. This can make dental plaque a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. The ability to transfer DNA is important for bacteria, making them better adapted to the harsh environment of the human mouth, and promoting their survival, virulence, and pathogenicity.

  1. Polymorphism in Bacterial Flagella Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, Walter J.

    Bacterial flagella are a type of biological polymer studied for its role in bacterial motility and the polymorphic transitions undertaken to facilitate the run and tumble behavior. The naturally rigid, helical shape of flagella gives rise to novel colloidal dynamics and material properties. This thesis studies methods in which the shape of bacterial flagella can be controlled using in vitro methods and the changes the shape of the flagella have on both single particle dynamics and bulk material properties. We observe individual flagellum in both the dilute and semidilute regimes to observe the effects of solvent condition on the shape of the filament as well as the effect the filament morphology has on reptation through a network of flagella. In addition, we present rheological measurements showing how the shape of filaments effects the bulk material properties of flagellar suspensions. We find that the individual particle dynamics in suspensions of flagella can vary with geometry from needing to reptate linearly via rotation for helical filaments to the prevention of long range diffusion for block copolymer filaments. Similarly, for bulk material properties of flagella suspensions, helical geometries show a dramatic enhancement in elasticity over straight filaments while block copolymers form an elastic gel without the aid of crosslinking agents.

  2. Bacterial biofilm and associated infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhsin Jamal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic entities, microorganisms that drastically affect human health need to be thoroughly investigated. A biofilm is an architectural colony of microorganisms, within a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance that they produce. Biofilm contains microbial cells adherent to one-another and to a static surface (living or non-living. Bacterial biofilms are usually pathogenic in nature and can cause nosocomial infections. The National Institutes of Health (NIH revealed that among all microbial and chronic infections, 65% and 80%, respectively, are associated with biofilm formation. The process of biofilm formation consists of many steps, starting with attachment to a living or non-living surface that will lead to formation of micro-colony, giving rise to three-dimensional structures and ending up, after maturation, with detachment. During formation of biofilm several species of bacteria communicate with one another, employing quorum sensing. In general, bacterial biofilms show resistance against human immune system, as well as against antibiotics. Health related concerns speak loud due to the biofilm potential to cause diseases, utilizing both device-related and non-device-related infections. In summary, the understanding of bacterial biofilm is important to manage and/or to eradicate biofilm-related diseases. The current review is, therefore, an effort to encompass the current concepts in biofilm formation and its implications in human health and disease.

  3. Bacterial Carriers for Glioblastoma Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Mehta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of aggressive glioblastoma brain tumors is challenging, largely due to diffusion barriers preventing efficient drug dosing to tumors. To overcome these barriers, bacterial carriers that are actively motile and programmed to migrate and localize to tumor zones were designed. These carriers can induce apoptosis via hypoxia-controlled expression of a tumor suppressor protein p53 and a pro-apoptotic drug, Azurin. In a xenograft model of human glioblastoma in rats, bacterial carrier therapy conferred a significant survival benefit with 19% overall long-term survival of >100 days in treated animals relative to a median survival of 26 days in control untreated animals. Histological and proteomic analyses were performed to elucidate the safety and efficacy of these carriers, showing an absence of systemic toxicity and a restored neural environment in treated responders. In the treated non-responders, proteomic analysis revealed competing mechanisms of pro-apoptotic and drug-resistant activity. This bacterial carrier opens a versatile avenue to overcome diffusion barriers in glioblastoma by virtue of its active motility in extracellular space and can lead to tailored therapies via tumor-specific expression of tumoricidal proteins.

  4. Detergent-compatible bacterial amylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2014-10-01

    Proteases, lipases, amylases, and cellulases are enzymes used in detergent formulation to improve the detergency. The amylases are specifically supplemented to the detergent to digest starchy stains. Most of the solid and liquid detergents that are currently manufactured contain alkaline enzymes. The advantages of using alkaline enzymes in the detergent formulation are that they aid in removing tough stains and the process is environmentally friendly since they reduce the use of toxic detergent ingredients. Amylases active at low temperature are preferred as the energy consumption gets reduced, and the whole process becomes cost-effective. Most microbial alkaline amylases are used as detergent ingredients. Various reviews report on the production, purification, characterization, and application of amylases in different industry sectors, but there is no specific review on bacterial or fungal alkaline amylases or detergent-compatible amylases. In this mini-review, an overview on the production and property studies of the detergent bacterial amylases is given, and the stability and compatibility of the alkaline bacterial amylases in the presence of the detergents and the detergent components are highlighted.

  5. Production of extremophilic bacterial cellulase enzymes in aspergillus niger.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, John Michael

    2013-09-01

    Enzymes can be used to catalyze a myriad of chemical reactions and are a cornerstone in the biotechnology industry. Enzymes have a wide range of uses, ranging from medicine with the production of pharmaceuticals to energy were they are applied to biofuel production. However, it is difficult to produce large quantities of enzymes, especially if they are non-native to the production host. Fortunately, filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, are broadly used in industry and show great potential for use a heterologous enzyme production hosts. Here, we present work outlining an effort to engineer A. niger to produce thermophilic bacterial cellulases relevant to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  6. Effects of remediation on the bacterial community of an acid mine drainage impacted stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Suchismita; Moitra, Moumita; Woolverton, Christopher J; Leff, Laura G

    2012-11-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) represents a global threat to water resources, and as such, remediation of AMD-impacted streams is a common practice. During this study, we examined bacterial community structure and environmental conditions in a low-order AMD-impacted stream before, during, and after remediation. Bacterial community structure was examined via polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Also, bacterial abundance and physicochemical data (including metal concentrations) were collected and relationships to bacterial community structure were determined using BIO-ENV analysis. Remediation of the study stream altered environmental conditions, including pH and concentrations of some metals, and consequently, the bacterial community changed. However, remediation did not necessarily restore the stream to conditions found in the unimpacted reference stream; for example, bacterial abundances and concentrations of some elements, such as sulfur, magnesium, and manganese, were different in the remediated stream than in the reference stream. BIO-ENV analysis revealed that changes in pH and iron concentration, associated with remediation, primarily explained temporal alterations in bacterial community structure. Although the sites sampled in the remediated stream were in relatively close proximity to each other, spatial variation in community composition suggests that differences in local environmental conditions may have large impacts on the microbial assemblage.

  7. Insights into the mechanisms on chemical reactions: reaction paths for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Rosen, E.; Eades, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report reaction paths for two prototypical chemical reactions: Li + HF, an electron transfer reaction, and OH + H 2 , an abstraction reaction. In the first reaction we consider the connection between the energetic terms in the reaction path Hamiltonian and the electronic changes which occur upon reaction. In the second reaction we consider the treatment of vibrational effects in chemical reactions in the reaction path formalism. 30 refs., 9 figs

  8. Metatranscriptomics reveals overall active bacterial composition in caries lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea Simón-Soro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying the microbial species in caries lesions is instrumental to determine the etiology of dental caries. However, a significant proportion of bacteria in carious lesions have not been cultured, and the use of molecular methods has been limited to DNA-based approaches, which detect both active and inactive or dead microorganisms. Objective: To identify the RNA-based, metabolically active bacterial composition of caries lesions at different stages of disease progression in order to provide a list of potential etiological agents of tooth decay. Design: Non-cavitated enamel caries lesions (n=15 and dentin caries lesions samples (n=12 were collected from 13 individuals. RNA was extracted and cDNA was constructed, which was used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene. The resulting 780 bp polymerase chain reaction products were pyrosequenced using Titanium-plus chemistry, and the sequences obtained were used to determine the bacterial composition. Results: A mean of 4,900 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene with an average read length of 661 bp was obtained per sample, giving a comprehensive view of the active bacterial communities in caries lesions. Estimates of bacterial diversity indicate that the microbiota of cavities is highly complex, each sample containing between 70 and 400 metabolically active species. The composition of these bacterial consortia varied among individuals and between caries lesions of the same individuals. In addition, enamel and dentin lesions had a different bacterial makeup. Lactobacilli were found almost exclusively in dentin cavities. Streptococci accounted for 40% of the total active community in enamel caries, and 20% in dentin caries. However, Streptococcus mutans represented only 0.02–0.73% of the total bacterial community. Conclusions: The data indicate that the etiology of dental caries is tissue dependent and that the disease has a clear polymicrobial origin. The low proportion of mutans streptococci

  9. Mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardal, Flynn William [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Nine bacteria were tested for the ability to dehalogenate tetrachloromethane (CT), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) under anaerobic conditions. Three bacteria were able to reductively dehalogenate CT. Dehalogenation ability was not readily linked to a common metabolism or changes in culture redox potential. None of the bacteria tested were able to dehalogenate PCE or TCA. One of the bacteria capable of dehalogenating CT, Shewanella putrefaciens, was chosen as a model organism to study mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation. The effect of a variety of alternate electron acceptors on CT dehalogenation ability by S. putrefaciens was determined. oxygen and nitrogen oxides were inhibitory but Fe (III), trimethylamine oxide, and fumarate were not. A model of the electron transport chain of S. putrefaciens was developed to explain inhibition patterns. A period of microaerobic growth prior to CT exposure increased the ability of S. putrefaciens to dehalogenate CT. A microaerobic growth period also increased cytochrome concentrations. A relationship between cytochrome content and dehalogenation ability was developed from studies in which cytochrome concentrations in S. putrefaciens were manipulated by changing growth conditions. Stoichiometry studies using 14C-CT suggested that CT was first reduced to form a trichloromethyl radical. Reduction of the radical to produce chloroform and reaction of the radical with cellular biochemicals explained observed product distributions. Carbon dioxide or other fully dehalogenated products were not found.

  10. Stephenson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City is an NCI-designated cancer center at the forefront of NCI-supported cancer research. Learn more about the Stephenson Cancer Center's mission.

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the " ...

  13. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid lactate level as a diagnostic biomarker for bacterial meningitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekitarian Filho, Eduardo; Horita, Sérgio Massaru; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2014-02-27

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate is a potential biomarker for bacterial meningitis in children. To this end, we performed a single-center retrospective cohort study of children from Sao Paulo, Brazil, with CSF pleocytosis to evaluate the ability of CSF lactate to distinguish between children with bacterial and aseptic meningitis. We determined the optimum cutoff point for CSF lactate using receiver-operator curve (ROC) analysis. We identified 451 children of whom 40 (9%) had bacterial meningitis. Children with bacterial meningitis had a higher median CSF lactate level [9.6 mmol/l, interquartile range (IQR) 3.2-38.5 mmol/l bacterial meningitis vs. 2.0 mmol/l, IQR 1.2-2.8 mmol/l aseptic meningitis]. A CSF lactate cutoff point of 3.0 mmol/l had a sensitivity of 95% [95% confidence interval (CI) 83-99%), specificity of 94% (95% CI 90-96%) and negative predictive value of 99.3% (95% CI 97.7-99.9%) for bacterial meningitis. In combination with a validated meningitis clinical prediction rule, the CSF lactate level can be used to distinguish between bacterial and aseptic meningitis in children with CSF pleocytosis.

  15. Nuclear reaction studies using inverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapira, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reaction studies with reversed kinematics refer to studies of nuclear reactions induced by a heavy projectile colliding with lighter target nuclei. The technique of using reversed kinematics is costly in terms of the available center-of-mass energy. Most of the projectile's energy goes into forward motion of the reaction products in the laboratory system. Examples are presented where the use of reversed kinematics techniques has provided new information on certain reaction processes. A list of kinematic properties and advantages they may afford is shown. Clearly the possible studies listed can be done without using reversed kinematics but because of the difficulty associated with some of these studies they were never performed until more energetic heavier beams have become available and the reversed kinematics technique was utilized

  16. [Bacterial identification methods in the microbiology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou, Germán; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García, Celia; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio; Valdezate, Sylvia

    2011-10-01

    In order to identify the agent responsible of the infectious process and understanding the pathogenic/pathological implications, clinical course, and to implement an effective antimicrobial therapy, a mainstay in the practice of clinical microbiology is the allocation of species to a microbial isolation. In daily routine practice microbiology laboratory phenotypic techniques are applied to achieve this goal. However, they have some limitations that are seen more clearly for some kinds of microorganism. Molecular methods can circumvent some of these limitations, although its implementation is not universal. This is due to higher costs and the level of expertise required for thei implementation, so molecular methods are often centralized in reference laboratories and centers. Recently, proteomics-based methods made an important breakthrough in the field of diagnostic microbiology and will undoubtedly have a major impact on the future organization of the microbiology services. This paper is a short review of the most noteworthy aspects of the three bacterial identification methods described above used in microbiology laboratories. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative study of endophytic and endophytic diazotrophic bacterial communities across rice landraces grown in the highlands of northern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Rangjaroen, C.; Rerkasem, B.; Teaumroong, N.; Sungthong, R.; Lumyong, S.

    2014-01-01

    Communities of bacterial endophytes within the rice landraces cultivated in the highlands of northern Thailand were studied using fingerprinting data of 16S rRNA and nifH genes profiling by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The bacterial communities' richness, diversity index, evenness, and stability were varied depending on the plant tissues, stages of growth, and rice cultivars. These indices for the endophytic diazotrophic bacteria within the landrace rice ...

  18. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sobrado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  19. A computer investigation of chemically mediated detachment in bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Stephen M; Hamilton, Martin A; Sears, John T; Harkin, Gary; Reno, Jason

    2003-05-01

    A three-dimensional computer model was used to evaluate the effect of chemically mediated detachment on biofilm development in a negligible-shear environment. The model, BacLAB, combines conventional diffusion-reaction equations for chemicals with a cellular automata algorithm to simulate bacterial growth, movement and detachment. BacLAB simulates the life cycle of a bacterial biofilm from its initial colonization of a surface to the development of a mature biofilm with cell areal densities comparable to those in the laboratory. A base model founded on well established transport equations that are easily adaptable to investigate conjectures at the biological level has been created. In this study, the conjecture of a detachment mechanism involving a bacterially produced chemical detachment factor in which high local concentrations of this detachment factor cause the bacteria to detach from the biofilm was examined. The results show that the often observed 'mushroom'-shaped structure can occur if detachment events create voids so that the remaining attached cells look like mushrooms.

  20. Modeling and analysis of liquid deuterium-water reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    This Presentation highlights the following: Overview of LD 2 -water reactions their connections to research reactors with cold sources; some key features and ingredients of vapor explosions in general; Examination of results of 1970 experiment at Grenoble Nuclear Research Center; Thermodynamic evaluations of energetics of explosive LD 2 -D 2 O reactions. This presentation concentrates only on the technical aspects of LD 2 /LH 2 - water reactions; it is not intended to draw/imply safety-related conclusions for research reactors

  1. Influence of long-term land application of class B biosolids on soil bacterial diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated the influence of annual land applications of Class B biosolids on soil bacterial diversity monitored over a 20 year period. Each annual land application was followed by a cotton crop. The study was initiated in 1986 at the University of Arizona Marana Agricultural Center, 21 m...

  2. Microarray-based identification of clinically relevant vaginal bacteria in relation to bacterial vaginosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dols, J.A.M.; Smit, P.W.; Kort, R.; Reid, G.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Tempelman, H.; Bontekoe, T.R.; Korporaal, H.; Boon, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to examine the use of a tailor-made DNA microarray containing probes representing the vaginal microbiota to examine bacterial vaginosis. Study Design: One hundred one women attending a health center for HIV testing in South Africa were enrolled. Stained, liquid-based

  3. Microarray-based identification of clinically relevant vaginal bacteria in relation to bacterial vaginosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dols, Joke A M; Smit, Pieter W; Kort, Remco; Reid, Gregor; Schuren, Frank H J; Tempelman, Hugo; Bontekoe, Tj Romke; Korporaal, Hans; Boon, Mathilde E

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the use of a tailor-made DNA microarray containing probes representing the vaginal microbiota to examine bacterial vaginosis. STUDY DESIGN: One hundred one women attending a health center for HIV testing in South Africa were enrolled. Stained, liquid-based

  4. Nuclear reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ''hot'' nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ''flow'' measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study 40 Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs

  5. Knock-out reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Forest, T. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    It is pointed out that the primary motivation for performing high energy single nucleon knock-out reactions is based on the concept of quasi-elastic scattering. The validity of and corrections to the partial wave impulse approximation and kinematical invariance of knock-out reactions and tests of the reaction mechanism are treated. The effect of distortions on the momentum distribution in the effective momentum approximation for given parameters are plotted. 12 references

  6. Functional microdomains in bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Daniel; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-09-01

    The membranes of eukaryotic cells harbor microdomains known as lipid rafts that contain a variety of signaling and transport proteins. Here we show that bacterial membranes contain microdomains functionally similar to those of eukaryotic cells. These membrane microdomains from diverse bacteria harbor homologs of Flotillin-1, a eukaryotic protein found exclusively in lipid rafts, along with proteins involved in signaling and transport. Inhibition of lipid raft formation through the action of zaragozic acid--a known inhibitor of squalene synthases--impaired biofilm formation and protein secretion but not cell viability. The orchestration of physiological processes in microdomains may be a more widespread feature of membranes than previously appreciated.

  7. Reaction kinetics of polybutylene terephthalate polycondensation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darda, P. J.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.; Souren, F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the forward polycondensation reaction of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PBT - prepolymer with an initial degree of polymerization of 5.5 was used as starting material. The PBT prepolymer was prepared from dimethyl

  8. Thermonuclear reaction listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukai, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    The following 10 elements, including T, are well known as nuclear fusion fuels: p, D, T, 3 He, 4 He, 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, 10 B, 11 B, ( 12 C, 13 C), where 12 C and 13 C are considered only in the calculation of Q value. Accordingly the number of the thermonuclear reactions is 55, and 78, if including carbon elements. The reactions have some branches. For the branches having two and three reaction products, the reaction products, Q value and threshold energy are calculated by using a computer. We have investigated those of the branches having more than three products from the papers of Ajzenberg-Selove and so on. And also, by the same papers, we check whether the above mentioned branch has been observed or not. The results are as follows: (I) the number of reactions which have Q 0 branches only with γ ray production, and Q 0 and neutron production is 36(17), and (IV) that of reactions whose branch with Q > 0 does not produce neutrons is 9(3). The value in the parentheses shows the number of the case of the carbon elements. For 55 thermonuclear reactions induced by lighter nuclides than 11 B, the reaction products, the values of Q and threshold energy, and the papers with reaction cross section data are presented in the tables. (author)

  9. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M Allen [Berkeley, CA; Beeman, Barton V [San Mateo, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Hadley, Dean R [Manteca, CA; Landre, Phoebe [Livermore, CA; Lehew, Stacy L [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter A [Pleasanton, CA

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  10. Tattoo reaction: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tattoo is going to be a very common practice especially among young people and we are witnessing a gradual increase of numerous potential complications to tattoo placement which are often seen by physicians, but generally unknown to the public. The most common skin reactions to tattoo include a transient acute inflammatory reaction due to trauma of the skin with needles and medical complications such as superficial and deep local infections, systemic infections, allergic contact dermatitis, photodermatitis, granulomatous and lichenoid reactions, and skin diseases localized on tattooed area (eczema, psoriasis, lichen, and morphea. In this series we present three cases of tattoo reaction.

  11. Manganese oxidation and bacterial diversity on different filter media coatings during the start-up of drinking water biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breda, I. L.; Ramsay, L.; Roslev, P.

    2017-01-01

    Manganese removal is a typical concern in drinking water production. Biofiltration may be used when treating groundwater sources but the onset of manganese removal in virgin biofilters can vary considerably. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different filter media on manganese...... by manganese oxide, while 48, 57 and 72 days were required by virgin quartz, calcium carbonate and polystyrene, respectively. The bacterial community was investigated using DAPI staining, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, and bacterial enrichments. Bacterial abundance...

  12. STUDIES ON ENDOTHELIAL REACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Nathan Chandler

    1923-01-01

    If the spleen be removed from rabbits and tubercle bacilli be injected intravenously, it is found that the lesions produced differ materially from those observed in control animals; the lungs present the most marked contrast, the liver also shows a definite difference in the distribution of the tubercles, and the kidney lesions also differ in the two instances. In discussing these facts we must answer, if possible, the four questions formulated above. It appears that the pulmonary lesions in Group S are small and discrete because of some inhibitory factor that prevents the diffusion of the products of dead tubercle bacilli. The organisms, far from being killed, are more numerous and better preserved in this group, but their destructive action is localized. This seems to be connected with the presence of polymorphonuclear leucocytes, for these cells are more numerous in the lesions and more plentiful in the lumina of the pulmonary capillaries of Group S than they are in the controls. The conclusion to be drawn from this covers the answer to the second question. It is not the tubercle bacillus itself that produces the destructive changes, but the toxins liberated by the breaking down of its substance. The well known experiments of Hodenpyl and Armand-Delille, already referred to in this series of papers, show this to be true; dead tubercle bacilli, or even extracts of these organisms, will produce typical tubercles. Removing the spleen stimulates the production of polymorphonuclear leucocytes, as shown by Johnstone (1922). These cells may prevent the diffusion of split products from the bacilli by removing or neutralizing them. The third question, as to why the liver is more affected after splenectomy than in normal controls, is more readily answered. Probably the spleen acts as a catch-basin for the bacteria; once removed it can no longer withhold them from the portal circulation and the liver receives a larger number than it would were this bacterial filter still

  13. Nuclear information services at the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.W.; Tuli, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    The numeric and bibliographic nuclear data bases maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center and access to these data bases will be described. The U.S. Nuclear Data and Reaction Data Networks will also be briefly described

  14. Pre-steady-state kinetic studies of redox reactions catalysed by Bacillus subtilis ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase with NADP(+)/NADPH and ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Daisuke; Soeta, Takahiro; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Sétif, Pierre; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase ([EC1.18.1.2], FNR) from Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) is a homodimeric flavoprotein sharing structural homology with bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. Pre-steady-state kinetics of the reactions of BsFNR with NADP(+), NADPH, NADPD (deuterated form) and B. subtilis ferredoxin (BsFd) using stopped-flow spectrophotometry were studied. Mixing BsFNR with NADP(+) and NADPH yielded two types of charge-transfer (CT) complexes, oxidized FNR (FNR(ox))-NADPH and reduced FNR (FNR(red))-NADP(+), both having CT absorption bands centered at approximately 600n m. After mixing BsFNR(ox) with about a 10-fold molar excess of NADPH (forward reaction), BsFNR was almost completely reduced at equilibrium. When BsFNR(red) was mixed with NADP(+), the amount of BsFNR(ox) increased with increasing NADP(+) concentration, but BsFNR(red) remained as the major species at equilibrium even with about 50-fold molar excess NADP(+). In both directions, the hydride-transfer was the rate-determining step, where the forward direction rate constant (~500 s(-1)) was much higher than the reverse one (reaction. The characteristics of the BsFNR reactions with NADP(+)/NADPH were compared with those of other types of FNRs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Glycoside hydrolase activities of thermophilic bacterial consortia adapted to switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, John M; Allgaier, Martin; Miller, Christopher S; Hazen, Terry C; VanderGheynst, Jean S; Hugenholtz, Philip; Simmons, Blake A; Singer, Steven W

    2011-08-15

    Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60°C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineage of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80°C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions.

  16. Treatment for symptomatic bacterial vaginosis: a randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, N.; Basharat, A.; Fahim, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of multiple doses of vaginal clindamycin with a single oral dose of secnidazole for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Study Design: Double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa Foundation Community Health Center, from March 2012 till February 2015. Methodology: After obtaining written informed consent, a pelvic examination was performed for the confirmation of symptoms of milky white vaginal discharge on speculum examination, positive Amine test and presence of clue cells on microscopy. Pregnant women, known diabetes or any immunocompromised condition, were excluded. Blinding of the patient, doctor, and the pharmacist was done. Study cohort was then divided into two groups, Group A received medicine pack A which contained active clindamycin and placebo oral preparation, whereas group B was given pack B which contained active 2-gm secnidazole with placebo vaginal cream. Primary outcome and therapeutic success were defined by correction of two out of three (normal Nugent score, negative Amine test, and no milky white discharge) on day 15. Results: At 15th day of treatment, 96.6% participants in vaginal clindamycin group (Group A), recovered from the bacterial vaginosis; whereas, (group B) 23% patients were cured in oral secnidazole group. Conclusion: Multiple doses of vaginal clindamycin are superior to single dose of oral secnidazole for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. (author)

  17. Radiological aspects of bacterial lung abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groskin, S.A.; Panicek, D.; Ewing, D.; Rivera, F.; Math, K.; Teixeira, J.; Heitzman, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical, radiological, and pathological data derived from an analysis of over 70 cases of bacterial lung abscess are presented. Etiologic agents and risk factors are presented. Key radiographic findings are discussed, and those that are most useful in differentiating bacterial lung abscess from cavitated carcinoma, infected cyst, and emphysema are emphasized. Radiographic aspects of the complications of bacterial lung abscess are illustrated, and radiological approaches to their therapy are discussed

  18. Bacterial, Fungal, Parasitic, and Viral Myositis

    OpenAIRE

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.

    2008-01-01

    Infectious myositis may be caused by a broad range of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral agents. Infectious myositis is overall uncommon given the relative resistance of the musculature to infection. For example, inciting events, including trauma, surgery, or the presence of foreign bodies or devitalized tissue, are often present in cases of bacterial myositis. Bacterial causes are categorized by clinical presentation, anatomic location, and causative organisms into the categories of pyo...

  19. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-Shirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kwon, Y. K. [Institute for Basic Science, 70, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Binh, D. N. [30 MeV Cyclotron Center, Tran Hung Dao Hospital, Hoan Kiem District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hong Quoc Viet, Nghia do, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  20. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-01-01

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7 Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the 7 Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in 11 C

  1. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  2. Precompound Reactions: Basic Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Because of the non-zero nuclear equilibration time, the compound-nucleus scattering model fails when the incident energy exceeds 10 or 20 MeV, and precompound reactions become important. Basic ideas used in the quantum-statistical approaches to these reactions are described

  3. Fluorogenic organocatalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeisolsadati Oskouei, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, we introduce fluorescence spectroscopy as a new tool to gain insight into the interactions between the substrates and catalyst during organocatalytic reactions. The ultimate goal is to resolve the kinetics of the binding and reaction steps and obtain detailed understanding of the

  4. Applications of Reaction Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  5. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ... leave the person alone and watch carefully for reactions affecting the entire body. Note: If a chemical gets into the eyes, the eyes should be ...

  6. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  7. Balance of bacterial species in the gut

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Balance of bacterial species in the gut. Protective. Lactobacillus species. Bifidobacterium species. Selected E. coli. Saccharomyces boulardii. Clostridium butyricum.

  8. EXFOR Manual. Center-to-Center Exchange Format. Version 89-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1989-09-01

    EXFOR is the agreed exchange format for the transmission of nuclear reaction data between national and international nuclear data centers for the benefit of nuclear data users in all countries. EXFOR is a database with several million data records containing the world's experimental nuclear reaction data induced by neutrons, photons or charged particles. Data retrievals can be obtained from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) or from one of the co-operating data centers whose names and addresses can be found inside the manual. Their contributions and co-operative efforts are gratefully acknowledged. (author). Refs

  9. Characterization and optimization of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains for polyhydroxyalkanoates (phas) production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S. U.; Jamil, N.; Hussain, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this investigation, sugarcane soil, sewage water and soil containing long chain hydrocarbons was screened to obtain bacterial strains that were able to synthesize poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA). The potential to synthesize PHA was tested qualitatively by Sudan Black staining of colonies growing in glucose and sucrose. Sixteen bacterial strains were isolated, purified and characterized for Gram reaction, biochemical analysis and PHA production. Isolates showed a wide range of tolerance to different commonly used antibiotics. PHA extraction was done by solvent extraction and hypochlorite digestion method. PHA production was optimized for different nitrogen concentrations. (author)

  10. Modeling of the Bacillus subtilis Bacterial Biofilm Growing on an Agar Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Mudong

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are organized communities composed of millions of microorganisms that accumulate on almost any kinds of surfaces. In this paper, a biofilm growth model on an agar substrate is developed based on mass conservation principles, Fick's first law, and Monod's kinetic reaction, by considering nutrient diffusion between biofilm and agar substrate. Our results show biofilm growth evolution characteristics such as biofilm thickness, active biomass, and nutrient concentration in the agar substrate. We quantitatively obtain biofilm growth dependence on different parameters. We provide an alternative mathematical method to describe other kinds of biofilm growth such as multiple bacterial species biofilm and also biofilm growth on various complex substrates.

  11. New biphasic monocomponent composite material obtained by the partial oxypropylation of bacterial cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Joyce Rover; Silva, Ingrid S.V. da; Pasquini, Daniel; Santos, Daniele B. dos; Barud, Hernane S.; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to partial oxypropylation of bacterial cellulose (CB), as well as the characterization of pure CB, oxypropylated CB (CBO) and oxypropylated CB after Soxhlet extraction with hexane (CBOE). The oxypropylation reaction was carried out by propylene oxide polymerization, catalyzed by KOH, in the presence of CB The CB samples, before and after modification, were subjected to analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It was possible verify that the partial transformation of bacterial cellulose by inserting a layer of thermoplastic polymer on its surface occurred efficiently, obtaining a biphasic monocomponent composite material. (author)

  12. Bacterial chemoautotrophy in coastal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasquez Cardenas, D.

    2016-01-01

    A key process in the biogeochemistry of coastal sediments is the reoxidation of reduced intermediates formed during anaerobic mineralization which in part is performed by chemoautotrophic bacteria. These bacteria fix inorganic carbon using the energy derived from reoxidation reactions. However the

  13. Assessing the impact of fungicide enostroburin application on bacterial community in wheat phyllosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Likun; Bai, Zhihui; Jin, Bo; Hu, Qing; Wang, Huili; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Hongxun

    2010-01-01

    Fungicides have been used extensively for controlling fungal pathogens of plants. However, little is known regarding the effects that fungicides upon the indigenous bacterial communities within the plant phyllosphere. The aims of this study were to assess the impact of fungicide enostroburin upon bacterial communities in wheat phyllosphere. Culture-independent methodologies of 16S rDNA clone library and 16S rDNA directed polymerase chain reaction with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) were used for monitoring the change of bacterial community. The 16S rDNA clone library and PCR-DGGE analysis both confirmed the microbial community of wheat plant phyllosphere were predominantly of the gamma-Proteobacteria phyla. Results from PCR-DGGE analysis indicated a significant change in bacterial community structure within the phyllosphere following fungicide enostroburin application. Bands sequenced within control cultures were predominantly of Pseudomonas genus, but those bands sequenced in the treated samples were predominantly strains of Pantoea genus and Pseudomonas genus. Of interest was the appearance of two DGGE bands following fungicide treatment, one of which had sequence similarities (98%) to Pantoea sp. which might be a competitor of plant pathogens. This study revealed the wheat phyllosphere bacterial community composition and a shift in the bacterial community following fungicide enostroburin application.

  14. Bacterial genome engineering and synthetic biology: combating pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Malathy; Moore, Richard T; Rajamani, Sathish; Panchal, Rekha G

    2016-11-04

    The emergence and prevalence of multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogenic bacteria poses a serious threat to human and animal health globally. Nosocomial infections and common ailments such as pneumonia, wound, urinary tract, and bloodstream infections are becoming more challenging to treat due to the rapid spread of MDR pathogenic bacteria. According to recent reports by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there is an unprecedented increase in the occurrence of MDR infections worldwide. The rise in these infections has generated an economic strain worldwide, prompting the WHO to endorse a global action plan to improve awareness and understanding of antimicrobial resistance. This health crisis necessitates an immediate action to target the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance in bacteria. The advent of new bacterial genome engineering and synthetic biology (SB) tools is providing promising diagnostic and treatment plans to monitor and treat widespread recalcitrant bacterial infections. Key advances in genetic engineering approaches can successfully aid in targeting and editing pathogenic bacterial genomes for understanding and mitigating drug resistance mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the application of specific genome engineering and SB methods such as recombineering, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and bacterial cell-cell signaling mechanisms for pathogen targeting. The utility of these tools in developing antibacterial strategies such as novel antibiotic production, phage therapy, diagnostics and vaccine production to name a few, are also highlighted. The prevalent use of antibiotics and the spread of MDR bacteria raise the prospect of a post-antibiotic era, which underscores the need for developing novel therapeutics to target MDR pathogens. The development of enabling SB technologies offers promising solutions to deliver safe and effective antibacterial therapies.

  15. Exchange of rotor components in functioning bacterial flagellar motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Hajime; Inoue, Yuichi; Terasawa, Shun; Takahashi, Hiroto; Ishijima, Akihiko

    2010-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a rotary motor driven by the electrochemical potential of a coupling ion. The interaction between a rotor and stator units is thought to generate torque. The overall structure of flagellar motor has been thought to be static, however, it was recently proved that stators are exchanged in a rotating motor. Understanding the dynamics of rotor components in functioning motor is important for the clarifying of working mechanism of bacterial flagellar motor. In this study, we focused on the dynamics and the turnover of rotor components in a functioning flagellar motor. Expression systems for GFP-FliN, FliM-GFP, and GFP-FliG were constructed, and each GFP-fusion was functionally incorporated into the flagellar motor. To investigate whether the rotor components are exchanged in a rotating motor, we performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. After photobleaching, in a tethered cell producing GFP-FliN or FliM-GFP, the recovery of fluorescence at the rotational center was observed. However, in a cell producing GFP-FliG, no recovery of fluorescence was observed. The transition phase of fluorescence intensity after full or partially photobleaching allowed the turnover of FliN subunits to be calculated as 0.0007 s -1 , meaning that FliN would be exchanged in tens of minutes. These novel findings indicate that a bacterial flagellar motor is not a static structure even in functioning state. This is the first report for the exchange of rotor components in a functioning bacterial flagellar motor.

  16. Bacterial Gibberellins Induce Systemic Resistance of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. FEKLISTOVA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed today that some rhizosphere bacteria can ensure induced systemic resistance to pathogens. In this paper we tested the ability of gibberellins produced by rhizosphere non-pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aurantiaca to induce systemic resistance to alternariosis agent – Alternaria brassicicola – in oilseed rape plants.Oilseed rape (Brássica nápus is one of the most promising oil-bearing croppers. It allows improving the supply of population with vegetable oil, animal and poultry industries with high quality vegetable protein. It is used for biofuel production as well.Gibberellin preparation was isolated from liquid culture of strain Pseudomonas aurantiaca grown in 250 mL of M9 medium (48 h, 28 °C under darkroom conditions. Gibberellins were extracted according procedure described by Tien et al. (1979. Gibberellins concentration in the medium was determined by fluorometric method.Elicitor activity of bacterial metabolites – gibberellins – was analyzed in model system of artificial inoculation of oilseed rape germs with phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria brassicicola. The elicitor action efficiency was evaluated on the 15th day of oilseed rape cultivation based on the percentage of leaf surface covered by necrotic lesions.Gibberellins were shown to induce systemic resistance resulted in decreasing of oil seed plants   vulnerability by 52.7%.It is known that under the unfavorable conditions plants synthesis the reactive oxygen intermediates   which activate destructive processes. One of the first organism reactions to stress action is the change of the lipid peroxidation level. It was shown that treatment of the soil with gibberellins resulted in decreasing of the lipid peroxidation level twofold.Gibberellins were shown to have a similar effect on permeability of cell membranes for free nucleotides. The permeability of cell membranes in leaves decreased 2.8-fold at room temperature. We suggest that gibberellins

  17. Bacterial mycophagy: definition and diagnosis of a unique bacterial-fungal interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leveau, J.H.J.; Preston, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    This review analyses the phenomenon of bacterial mycophagy, which we define as a set of phenotypic behaviours that enable bacteria to obtain nutrients from living fungi and thus allow the conversion of fungal into bacterial biomass. We recognize three types of bacterial strategies to derive

  18. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisser, D.C.

    1977-06-01

    To complement discussions on the role of γ rays in heavy ion induced reactions, the author discusses the role played by particle detection. Transfer reactions are part of this subject and are among those in which one infers the properties of the residual nucleus in a reaction by observing the emerging light nucleus. Inelastic scattering ought not be excluded from this subject, although no particles are transferred, because of the role it plays in multistep reactions and in fixing O.M. parameters describing the entrance channel of the reaction. Heavy ion transfer reaction studies have been under study for some years and yet this research is still in its infancy. The experimental techniques are difficult and the demands on theory rigorous. One of the main products of heavy ion research has been the thrust to re-examine the assumptions of reaction theory and now include many effects neglected for light ion analysis. This research has spurred the addition of multistep processes to simple direct processes and coupled channel calculations. (J.R.)

  19. Enhancing chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  20. Microconductometric Detection of Bacterial Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarra EL ICHI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several approaches can be used for the electrochemical detection of bacterial contamination. Their performance can be assessed by the ability to detect bacteria at very low concentrations within a short-time response. We have already demonstrated that a conductometric biosensor based on interdigitated thin-film electrodes is adapted to detect bacteria in clinical samples like serum and compatible with microfluidic fabrication. The type of interdigitated microelectrodes influences the performance of the biosensor. This was shown by the results obtained in this work. A magnetic-nanoparticles based immunosensor was designed using gold screen-printed electrodes. The immunosensor was able to specifically detect E. coli in the range of 1-103 CFU mL-1. The new transducer offered a larger active sensing surface with a lower cost and a robust material. Accuracy of the conductance value was enhanced by differential measurements. The immunosensor is compatible with a microfluidic system.

  1. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6, which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  2. Instability of expanding bacterial droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Rubio, Leonardo Dominguez; Brady, John F; Aranson, Igor S

    2018-04-03

    Suspensions of motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, termed active matter, manifest a remarkable propensity for self-organization, and formation of large-scale coherent structures. Most active matter research deals with almost homogeneous in space systems and little is known about the dynamics of strongly heterogeneous active matter. Here we report on experimental and theoretical studies on the expansion of highly concentrated bacterial droplets into an ambient bacteria-free fluid. The droplet is formed beneath a rapidly rotating solid macroscopic particle inserted in the suspension. We observe vigorous instability of the droplet reminiscent of a violent explosion. The phenomenon is explained in terms of continuum first-principle theory based on the swim pressure concept. Our findings provide insights into the dynamics of active matter with strong density gradients and significantly expand the scope of experimental and analytic tools for control and manipulation of active systems.

  3. Bacterial Actins? An Evolutionary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Russell F.; York, Amanda L.

    2003-01-01

    According to the conventional wisdom, the existence of a cytoskeleton in eukaryotes and its absence in prokaryotes constitute a fundamental divide between the two domains of life. An integral part of the dogma is that a cytoskeleton enabled an early eukaryote to feed upon prokaryotes, a consequence of which was the occasional endosymbiosis and the eventual evolution of organelles. Two recent papers present compelling evidence that actin, one of the principal components of a cytoskeleton, has a homolog in Bacteria that behaves in many ways like eukaryotic actin. Sequence comparisons reveml that eukaryotic actin and the bacterial homolog (mreB protein), unlike many other proteins common to eukaryotes and Bacteria, have very different and more highly extended evolutionary histories.

  4. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  5. Bacterial biofilms and antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Caldas-Arias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms give to bacteria micro-environmental benefits; confers protection against antimicrobials. Bacteria have antibiotic resistance by conventional and unusual mechanisms leading to delayed wound healing, to increase recurrent chronic infections and nosocomial contamination of medical devices. Objective: This narrative review aims to introduce the characteristics of Bacteria-biofilms, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and potential alternatives for prevention and control of its formation. Methods: Search strategy was performed on records: PubMed / Medline, Lilacs, Redalyc; with suppliers such as EBSCO and thesaurus MeSH and DeCS. Conclusions: Knowledge and research performance of biofilm bacteria are relevant in the search of technology for detection and measuring sensitivity to antibiotics. The identification of Bacterial-biofilms needs no-traditional microbiological diagnosis.

  6. Musculoskeletal manifestations of bacterial endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Bevilaqua Rangel

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The incidence of staphylococcal infection has been increasing during the last 20 years. OBJECTIVE: Report a case of staphylococcal endocarditis preceded by musculoskeletal manifestations, which is a rare form of clinical presentation. DESIGN: Case report. CASE REPORT: A 45-year-old-man, without addictions and without known previous cardiopathy, was diagnosed as having definitive acute bacterial endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus. Its etiology was community-acquired, arising from a non-apparent primary focus. In addition, the musculoskeletal symptoms preceded the infective endocarditis (IE by about 1 month, which occurred together with other symptoms, e.g. mycotic aneurysms and petechiae. Later, the patient showed perforation of the mitral valve and moderate mitral insufficiency with clinical control.

  7. Studies in the reaction dynamics of beam-gas chemiluminescent reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prisant, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis develops techniques for the analysis and interpretation of data obtained from beam-gas chemiluminescence experiments. These techniques are applied to experimental studies of atom transfer reactions of the type A + BC → AB + C. A procedure is developed for determining the product rotational alignment in the center-of-mass frame from polarization measurements of chemiluminescent atom-diatom exchange reactions under beam-gas conditions. Knowledge of a vector property of a reaction, such as product alignment, provides information on the disposition of angular momentum by a chemical reaction. Fluorescence polarization and hence product alignment are measured for two prototype reactions. The reaction of metastable calcium atoms with hydrogen-chloride gas yields highly aligned calcium-chloride product which exhibits little variation of alignment with vibrational state. The reaction of ground-state calcium with fluorine gas yields moderately aligned product which shows strong variation of alignment with vibration. A multi-surface direct-interaction model is developed to interpret product alignment and population data. The predictions of this model for the reaction of calcium with fluorine show reasonable agreement with experiment

  8. The effect of iatrogenic Staphylococcus epidermidis intercellar adhesion operon on the formation of bacterial biofilm on polyvinyl chloride surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lianhua, Ye; Yunchao, Huang; Guangqiang, Zhao; Kun, Yang; Xing, Liu; Fengli, Guo

    2014-12-01

    The intercellular adhesion gene (ica) of Staphylococcus epidermidis is a key factor for bacterial aggregation. This study explored the effect of ica on the formation of bacterial biofilm on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces. Genes related to bacterial biofilm formation, including 16S rRNA, autolysin (atlE), fibrinogen binding protein gene (fbe), and ica were identified and sequenced from 112 clinical isolates of iatrogenic S. epidermidis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. Based on the sequencing result, ica operon-positive (icaADB+/atlE+/fbe+) and ica operon-negative (icaADB-/atlE+/fbe+) strains were separated and co-cultivated with PVC material. After 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 h of co-culture, the thickness of the bacterial biofilm and quantity of bacterial colony on the PVC surface were measured under the confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope. The positive rate of S. epidermidis-specific 16SrRNA in 112 iatrogenic strains was 100% (112/112). The genotype of ica-positive (icaADB+/atlE+/fbe+) strains accounted for 57.1% (64/112), and genotype of ica-negative (icaADB-/atlE+/fbe+) strains accounted for 37.5% (42/112). During 30 h of co-culture, no obvious bacterial biofilm formed on the surface of PVC in the ica-positive group, however, mature bacterial biofilm structure formed after 24 h. For all time points, thickness of bacterial biofilm and quantity of bacterial colony on PVC surfaces in the ica operon-positive group were significantly higher than those in ica operon-negative group (poperon-negative and ica operon-positive strains. The ica operon plays an important role in bacterial biofilm formation and bacterial multiplication on PVC material.

  9. The Reaction Wheel Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Block, Daniel J; Spong, Mark W

    2007-01-01

    This monograph describes the Reaction Wheel Pendulum, the newest inverted-pendulum-like device for control education and research. We discuss the history and background of the reaction wheel pendulum and other similar experimental devices. We develop mathematical models of the reaction wheel pendulum in depth, including linear and nonlinear models, and models of the sensors and actuators that are used for feedback control. We treat various aspects of the control problem, from linear control of themotor, to stabilization of the pendulum about an equilibrium configuration using linear control, t

  10. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  11. Firefighter Nozzle Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Selena K.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    to anchor forces, the hose becomes straight. The nozzle reaction is found to equal the jet momentum flow rate, and it does not change when an elbow connects the hose to the nozzle. A forward force must be exerted by a firefighter or another anchor that matches the forward force that the jet would exert...... on a perpendicular wall. Three reaction expressions are derived, allowing it to be determined in terms of hose diameter, jet diameter, flow rate, and static pressure upstream of the nozzle. The nozzle reaction predictions used by the fire service are 56% to 90% of those obtained here for typical firefighting hand...

  12. Diagnostic value of polymerase chain reaction analysis of skin biopsies in purpura fulminans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, Caroline; Vlassova, Natalia; Sarlangue, Jean; Brissaud, Olivier; Léauté-Labrèze, Christine; Boralevi, Franck

    2013-01-01

    Even though prompt diagnosis and treatment of purpura fulminans (PF) is essential to reduce mortality, early administration of antibiotics may preclude identification of the causative agent by standard bacterial cultures and thus render definitive diagnosis impossible. Here we present a case of an infant with PF and negative bacterial cultures for whom polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of a cutaneous biopsy specimen obtained 4 days after initiation of antibiotics identified the genomic sequence of Neisseria meningitidis genogroup C. When bacterial cultures fail to provide useful information, PCR of skin biopsy specimens can be a valuable diagnostic tool in PF. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The bacterial contamination rate of glucose meter test strips in the hospital setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.; Saeb, Amr T. M.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra M.; AlQumaidi, Hamed M.; AlMogbel, Turki A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the rate of bacterial contamination of the multi-use vial and single-use packed glucose meter strips, and to identify the type and frequency of various bacterial contamination in different hospital wards. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted by a team from the Strategic Center for Diabetes Research in 7 general hospitals in the Central region of Saudi Arabia during the period from August to September 2014 to assess the bacterial contamination rate of the unused strips. A total of 10,447 strips were cultured using proper agar media and incubated both aerobically and anaerobically. Results: The total bacterial contamination rate for the multi-use vials glucose strips was 31.7%, while single-use packed strips were not contaminated at all. Ministry of Health hospitals had the highest contamination rates compared with other hospitals. Critical, obstetric, and surgical wards had the highest bacterial isolates number, where most were in the risk group 3 according to the National Institute of Health guidelines. Staphylococcus species were the most common bacteria found. Conclusion: Glucose meter strips should be recognized as a source of bacterial contamination that could be behind serious hospital acquired infections. The hospital infection control team should adopt proper measures to implement protocols for glucose meter cleaning and glucose strips handling. PMID:27570855

  14. Chemical tailoring of teicoplanin with site-selective reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Tejas P; Miller, Scott J

    2013-06-05

    Semisynthesis of natural product derivatives combines the power of fermentation with orthogonal chemical reactions. Yet, chemical modification of complex structures represents an unmet challenge, as poor selectivity often undermines efficiency. The complex antibiotic teicoplanin eradicates bacterial infections. However, as resistance emerges, the demand for improved analogues grows. We have discovered chemical reactions that achieve site-selective alteration of teicoplanin. Utilizing peptide-based additives that alter reaction selectivities, certain bromo-teicoplanins are accessible. These new compounds are also scaffolds for selective cross-coupling reactions, enabling further molecular diversification. These studies enable two-step access to glycopeptide analogues not available through either biosynthesis or rapid total chemical synthesis alone. The new compounds exhibit a spectrum of activities, revealing that selective chemical alteration of teicoplanin may lead to analogues with attenuated or enhanced antibacterial properties, in particular against vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant strains.

  15. Semen Bacterial Concentrations and HIV-1 RNA Shedding Among HIV-1–Seropositive Kenyan Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Huang, Dandi; Ko, Daisy L.; Sanders, Eduard J.; Peshu, Norbert M.; Krieger, John N.; Muller, Charles H.; Coombs, Robert W.; Fredricks, David N.; Graham, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: HIV-1 is transmitted through semen from men to their sexual partners. Genital infections can increase HIV-1 RNA shedding in semen, but shedding also occurs in the absence of typical pathogens. We hypothesized that higher bacterial concentrations in semen would be associated with higher HIV-1 RNA levels. Methods: We analyzed semen samples from 42 HIV-1–seropositive Kenyan men using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess bacterial concentrations and real-time PCR to measure HIV-1 RNA levels. Generalized estimation equations were used to evaluate associations between these 2 measures. Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing was performed on a subset of 13 samples to assess bacterial community composition. Results: Bacteria were detected in 96.6% of 88 samples by quantitative PCR. Semen bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA levels were correlated 0.30 (P = 0.01). The association between bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA detection was not significant after adjustment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) (adjusted odds ratio: 1.27, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.91). Factors associated with semen bacterial concentration included insertive anal sex (adjusted beta 0.92, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.73) and ART use (adjusted beta: −0.77, 95% CI: −1.50 to 0.04). Among 13 samples with pyrosequencing data, Corynebacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. were most frequently detected. Conclusion: Most of these HIV-1–infected men had bacteria in their semen. ART use was associated with undetectable semen HIV-1 RNA and lower semen bacterial concentrations, whereas insertive anal sex was associated with higher bacterial concentrations. Additional studies evaluating the relationship between semen bacteria, inflammation, mucosal immunity, and HIV-1 shedding are needed to understand implications for HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27861240

  16. Semen Bacterial Concentrations and HIV-1 RNA Shedding Among HIV-1-Seropositive Kenyan Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Christine J; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Huang, Dandi; Ko, Daisy L; Sanders, Eduard J; Peshu, Norbert M; Krieger, John N; Muller, Charles H; Coombs, Robert W; Fredricks, David N; Graham, Susan M

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted through semen from men to their sexual partners. Genital infections can increase HIV-1 RNA shedding in semen, but shedding also occurs in the absence of typical pathogens. We hypothesized that higher bacterial concentrations in semen would be associated with higher HIV-1 RNA levels. We analyzed semen samples from 42 HIV-1-seropositive Kenyan men using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess bacterial concentrations and real-time PCR to measure HIV-1 RNA levels. Generalized estimation equations were used to evaluate associations between these 2 measures. Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing was performed on a subset of 13 samples to assess bacterial community composition. Bacteria were detected in 96.6% of 88 samples by quantitative PCR. Semen bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA levels were correlated 0.30 (P = 0.01). The association between bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA detection was not significant after adjustment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) (adjusted odds ratio: 1.27, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.91). Factors associated with semen bacterial concentration included insertive anal sex (adjusted beta 0.92, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.73) and ART use (adjusted beta: -0.77, 95% CI: -1.50 to 0.04). Among 13 samples with pyrosequencing data, Corynebacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. were most frequently detected. Most of these HIV-1-infected men had bacteria in their semen. ART use was associated with undetectable semen HIV-1 RNA and lower semen bacterial concentrations, whereas insertive anal sex was associated with higher bacterial concentrations. Additional studies evaluating the relationship between semen bacteria, inflammation, mucosal immunity, and HIV-1 shedding are needed to understand implications for HIV-1 transmission.

  17. Bacterial colonization of colonic crypt mucous gel and disease activity in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowan, Fiachra

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To optimize total bacterial 16S rRNA quantification in microdissected colonic crypts in healthy controls and patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and to characterize the findings with disease activity. BACKGROUND: Microscopic and molecular techniques have recently converged to allow bacterial enumeration in remote anatomic locations [eg, crypt-associated mucous gel (CAMG)]. The aims of this study were to combine laser capture microdissection (LCM) and 16S rRNA-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine total bacterial copy number in CAMG both in health and in UC and to characterize the findings with disease activity. METHODS: LCM was used to microdissect CAMG from colonic mucosal biopsies from controls (n = 20) and patients with acute (n = 10) or subacute (n = 10) UC. Pan-bacterial 16S rRNA copy number per millimeter square in samples from 6 locations across the large bowel was obtained by qPCR using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans as a reference strain. Copy numbers were correlated with the UC disease activity index (UCDAI) and the simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI). RESULTS: Bacterial colonization of CAMG was detectable in all groups. Copy numbers were significantly reduced in acute UC. In subacute colitis, there was a positive correlation between copy number and UCDAI and SCCAI in the ascending, transverse and sigmoid colon. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes a sensitive method of quantitatively assessing bacterial colonization of the colonic CAMG. A positive correlation was found between CAMG bacterial load and subacute disease activity in UC, whereas detectable bacterial load was reduced in acute UC.

  18. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  19. Tehran Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Tehran Nuclear Research Center was formerly managed by the University of Tehran. This Center, after its transformation to the AEOI, has now become a focal point for basic research in the area of Nuclear Energy in Iran

  20. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  2. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety Blog Safety Education Centers Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster ... Sitemap RSS E-mail Inside CPSC Accessibility Privacy Policy Budget, Performances & Finance Open Government Freedom of Information ( ...

  4. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  5. Find a Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if you have no health insurance – you pay what you can afford based on your income. Health centers provide services that...

  6. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  7. Genetic Science Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Science Learning Center Making science and health easy for everyone to understand Home News Our Team What We Do ... Collaboration Conferences Current Projects Publications Contact The Genetic Science Learning Center at The University of Utah is a ...

  8. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  9. Bacterial successions in the Broiler Gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjitkar, Samir; Lawley, Blair; Tannock, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    diversity, data were pooled for downstream analysis. With increasing age, a clear succession of bacterial communities and an increased bacterial diversity was observed. Lactobacillaceae (mainly Lactobacillus) represented most of the Firmicutes at all ages and in all segments of the gut except the ceca...

  10. Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis And Dexamethasone Adjunctive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: Babies admitted from1992 to 1995 in the Special Care Baby Unit of the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maduguri, Nigeria, with bacterial meningitis were studied prospectively. Neonatal bacterial meningitis was confirmed if the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microbiological, chemical, immunological and ...

  11. Benthic bacterial diversity in submerged sinkhole ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, Stephen C; Pangborn, Joseph B; Zajack, Heidi A; Kendall, Scott T; Rediske, Richard R; Biddanda, Bopaiah A

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) community profiling, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches were used to study bacterial communities inhabiting submerged Lake Huron sinkholes inundated with hypoxic, sulfate-rich groundwater. Photosynthetic cyanobacterial mats on the sediment surface were dominated by Phormidium autumnale, while deeper, organically rich sediments contained diverse and active bacterial communities.

  12. Bacterial biofilms: prokaryotic adventures in multicellularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kjelleberg, S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms includes both the initial social behavior of undifferentiated cells, as well as cell death and differentiation in the mature biofilm, and displays several striking similarities with higher organisms. Recent advances in the field provide new insight...... into differentiation and cell death events in bacterial biofilm development and propose that biofilms have an unexpected level of multicellularity....

  13. neonatal bacterial meningitis in Cape Town children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neonatal bacterial meningitis in Cape Town children. Bacterial meningitis is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in South Africa. However, comprehensive regional or national epidemiological data, essential for rational public health interventions, are lacking. The purpose of this 1-year prospective study, from.

  14. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs

  15. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunford, C L

    1994-11-27

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs.

  16. Reaction paths based on mean first-passage times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sanghyun; Sener, Melih K.; Lu Deyu; Schulten, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Finding representative reaction pathways is important for understanding the mechanism of molecular processes. We propose a new approach for constructing reaction paths based on mean first-passage times. This approach incorporates information about all possible reaction events as well as the effect of temperature. As an application of this method, we study representative pathways of excitation migration in a photosynthetic light-harvesting complex, photosystem I. The paths thus computed provide a complete, yet distilled, representation of the kinetic flow of excitation toward the reaction center, thereby succinctly characterizing the function of the system

  17. C-reactive protein and bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Jørgensen, P E; Nexø, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review published articles on the diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests with cerebrospinal fluid and serum in diagnosing bacterial meningitis. The literature from 1980 and onwards was searched using the electronic databases of MEDLINE, and we used summary...... measured in serum, and 4 in which it had been measured in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum. The odds ratio for bacterial meningitis versus aseptic meningitis for a positive CRP test with cerebrospinal fluid was estimated at 241 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 59-980), and the central tendencies.......06-0.08, respectively, the post-test probability of not having bacterial meningitis given a negative test is very high (> or = 97%), in the range of a pre-test probability (prevalence of bacterial meningitis) from 10 to 30%, whereas the post-test probability of bacterial meningitis given a positive test is considerably...

  18. Nucleon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuca, S.; Antalik, R.; Kristiak, J.

    1988-01-01

    The collection contains full texts of 37 contributions; all fall within the INIS Subject Scope. The topics treated include some unsolved problems of nuclear reactions and relevant problems of nuclear structure at low and intermediate energies. (Z.S.)

  19. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  20. Statistical nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilaire, S.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the statistical model of nuclear reactions is presented. The main relations are described, together with the ingredients necessary to perform practical calculations. In addition, a substantial overview of the width fluctuation correction factor is given. (author)