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Sample records for bacterial populations involved

  1. Identity and functional analysis of bacterial populations involved in reductive acetogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    as metagenomic (fosmid) libraries. Results from the 16S rDNA analyses identified several bacteria of interest in the methanogen inhibited cultures (Actinomyces ruminicola, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Ruminobacillus xylanolyticum, Succiniclasticum ruminis Treponema bryantii, Ruminococcus productus and Enerococcus avium). FTHFS sequence analysis from fermentations and cattle rumen samples supplemented with bromochloromethane (BCM) show clustering of sequences with the known homoacetogens. Putative CODH and ACS sequences were also generated from DNA obtained from a mixed enrichment culture of homoacetogens, from the rumen of cattle. An extensive set of primers has been developed from the numerous phylogenetic and functional gene databases. These primers and probes are being used in targeting key enzymatic steps in hydrogen sequestering pathways for use in probing the metagenomic fosmid libraries and monitoring populations of hydrogen-utilising microorganisms in the rumen. (author)

  2. Population dynamics of bacterial persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Patra, Pintu

    2014-01-01

    The life of microorganisms is characterized by two main tasks, rapid growth under conditions permitting growth and survival under stressful conditions. The environments, in which microorganisms dwell, vary in space and time. The microorganisms innovate diverse strategies to readily adapt to the regularly fluctuating environments. Phenotypic heterogeneity is one such strategy, where an isogenic population splits into subpopulations that respond differently under identical environments. Bacteri...

  3. Bacterial population genetics, evolution and epidemiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Spratt, B. G.; Maiden, M C

    1999-01-01

    Asexual bacterial populations inevitably consist of an assemblage of distinct clonal lineages. However, bacterial populations are not entirely asexual since recombinational exchanges occur, mobilizing small genome segments among lineages and species. The relative contribution of recombination, as opposed to de novo mutation, in the generation of new bacterial genotypes varies among bacterial populations and, as this contribution increases, the clonality of a given population decreases. In con...

  4. Insights from Genomics into Bacterial Pathogen Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, DJ

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens impose a heavy burden of disease on human populations worldwide. The gravest threats are posed by highly virulent respiratory pathogens, enteric pathogens, and HIV-associated infections. Tuberculosis alone is responsible for the deaths of 1.5 million people annually. Treatment options for bacterial pathogens are being steadily eroded by the evolution and spread of drug resistance. However, population-level whole genome sequencing offers new hope in the fight against pathog...

  5. Population Dynamics of Bacterial Persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Patra, Pintu; Klumpp, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Persistence is a prime example of phenotypic heterogeneity, where a microbial population splits into two distinct subpopulations with different growth and survival properties as a result of reversible phenotype switching. Specifically, persister cells grow more slowly than normal cells under unstressed growth conditions, but survive longer under stress conditions such as the treatment with bactericidal antibiotics. We analyze the population dynamics of such a population for several typical ex...

  6. Phosphoproteins involved in bacterial signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells adjust their behavior continuously in response to changing environmental conditions. A number of specific stimulus-response systems have been investigated in bacteria. These include the chemotaxis system (Che), the nitrogen regulatory system (Ntr), the phosphorus system (Pho), the system that controls expression of outer membrane proteins (Omp) in response to changes in osmotic pressure, the sporulation system (SpoO), and the virulence system (Vir) that mediates bacterial infectivity of damaged plant tissues. Surprisingly, all of these systems show a common set of components. In each case, the signal transduction proteins include members of two homologous families, which appear to comprise a cascade: Sensory information feeds into the first component, which activates the second component that, in turn, modulates a target activity within the cell. In this paper, the authors present evidence that the communication between the two components involves a phospho-transfer mechanism that is common to all of these regulatory systems

  7. Population dynamics of bacterial persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintu Patra

    Full Text Available Persistence is a prime example of phenotypic heterogeneity, where a microbial population splits into two distinct subpopulations with different growth and survival properties as a result of reversible phenotype switching. Specifically, persister cells grow more slowly than normal cells under unstressed growth conditions, but survive longer under stress conditions such as the treatment with bactericidal antibiotics. We analyze the population dynamics of such a population for several typical experimental scenarios, namely a constant environment, shifts between growth and stress conditions, and periodically switching environments. We use an approximation scheme that allows us to map the dynamics to a logistic equation for the subpopulation ratio and derive explicit analytical expressions for observable quantities that can be used to extract underlying dynamic parameters from experimental data. Our results provide a theoretical underpinning for the study of phenotypic switching, in particular for organisms where detailed mechanistic knowledge is scarce.

  8. Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, S P

    2009-11-02

    This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations

  9. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  10. Model for Mutation in Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donangelo, R.; Fort, H.

    2002-07-01

    We describe the evolution of E. coli populations through a Bak-Sneppen-type model which incorporates random mutations. We show that, for a value of the mutation level which coincides with the one estimated from experiments, this model reproduces the measures of mean fitness relative to that of a common ancestor, performed for over 10 000 bacterial generations.

  11. A model for mutation in bacterial populations

    OpenAIRE

    Donangelo, R.; Fort, H.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the evolution of $E.coli$ populations through a Bak-Sneppen type model which incorporates random mutations. We show that, for a value of the mutation level which coincides with the one estimated from experiments, this model reproduces the measures of mean fitness relative to that of a common ancestor, performed for over 10,000 bacterial generations.

  12. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges...... was found. Leukocyte infiltration of the sac occurred prior to bacterial invasion. During meningitis, bacteria do not invade the endolymphatic sac through the dura, but solely through the endolymphatic duct, following the invasion of the vestibular system. Leukocyte infiltration of the sac occurs prior to...

  13. Population Genomics and the Bacterial Species Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, Margaret A.; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in bacterial evolution has been elevated to such a degree that many bacteriologists now question the very existence of bacterial species. If gene transfer is as rampant as comparative genomic studies have suggested, how could bacterial species survive such genomic fluidity? And yet, most bacteriologists recognize, and name, as species, clusters of bacterial isolates that share complex phenotypic properties. The Core Genome Hypo...

  14. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare Magne Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research.

  15. Kinetics of Suicide of Bacterial Populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a number of assumptions, formulas are presented for the survival of hypothetical bacterial cultures under self-irradiation by incorporated tritium in the chromosomal material. The formulas average over different classes of cells in the balanced growing populations taking into account the increased rate of inactivation of cells with more DNA, and that nuclear division causes the number of independent chromosomes to increase. The partial multinuclearity tends to make the logarithmic survival curves concave downward, but heterogeneity in amount of DNA in the chromosomes does the opposite. Details of how the resultant effects compensate for various patterns of DNA replication and how the target numbers and final slope are given. If DNA synthesis takes only a small fraction of the total cycle, the survival curves are the well-known one or two target curves and intermediate forms depending on the point in the cell cycle that the synthesis takes place. If synthesis takes almost all of the cell cycle as is the case for enteric bacteria growing in glucose minimal medium, the apparent target numbers are lower and are, in fact, unity if nuclear division is midway in the cell cycle. This is consistent with the experimental results in studies of survival, and in cytological and other studies of the nuclear replication cycle. The effect of gaps in DNA synthesis at various parts of the cell cycle are given and their relevance to various biological systems is discussed. The apparent target number is lowest if synthesis takes place at the end of the cell cycle than if it takes place earlier. Means are provided so that the sensitivity of the resting genome can be calculated from the results of measurements of balanced growing populations. (author)

  16. Optimal control methods for controlling bacterial populations with persister dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, N. G.

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial tolerance to antibiotics is a well-known phenomena; however, only recent studies of bacterial biofilms have shown how multifaceted tolerance really is. By joining into a structured community and offering shared protection and gene transfer, bacterial populations can protect themselves genotypically, phenotypically and physically. In this study, we collect a line of research that focuses on phenotypic (or plastic) tolerance. The dynamics of persister formation are becoming better understood, even though there are major questions that remain. The thrust of our results indicate that even without detailed description of the biological mechanisms, theoretical studies can offer strategies that can eradicate bacterial populations with existing drugs.

  17. Investigation of bacterial populations in a biological nutrient removal system

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanaugh, Rathi G.

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial populations proliferating in a pilot scale biological nutrient removal system (BNR) were studied. The objective of the research was to develop media and methods to identify bacterial populations in BNR systems. Samples were obtained from the last aerobic zone of a University of Cape Town (UCT)-type system. The most probable numbers (MPN) of bacteria in the samples were analyzed in liquid media containing volatile fatty acids as sole sources of carbon. Samples...

  18. Punctuated equilibrium in an evolving bacterial population

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhuri, Indranath; Bose, Indrani

    1999-01-01

    Recently, Lenski et al have carried out an experiment on bacterial evolution. Their findings support the theory of punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution. We show that the M=2 Bak-Sneppen model can explain some of the experimental results in a qualitative manner.

  19. Measurement of Behavioral Evolution in Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Robert

    2013-03-01

    A curious aspect of bacterial behavior under stress is the induction of filamentation: the anomalous growth of certain bacteria in which cells continue to elongate but do not divide into progeny. We show that E.coli under the influence of the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin have robust filamentous growth, which provides individual bacteria a mesoscopic niche for evolution until resistant progeny can bud off and propagate. Hence, filamentation is a form of genomic amplification where even a single, isolated bacteria can have access to multiple genomes. We propose a model that predicts that the first arrival time of the normal sized progeny should follow a Gompertz distribution with the mean first arrival time proportional to the elongation rate of filament. These predictions agree with our experimental measurements. Finally, we suggest bacterial filament growth and budding has many similarities to tumor growth and metastasis and can serve as a simpler model to study those complicated processes. Sponsored by the NCI/NIH Physical Sciences Oncology Centers

  20. Community structure of actively growing bacterial populations in plant pathogen suppressive soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjort, K.; Lembke, A.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Smalla, K.; Jansson, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial community in soil was screened by using various molecular approaches for bacterial populations that were activated upon addition of different supplements. Plasmodiophora brassicae spores, chitin, sodium acetate, and cabbage plants were added to activate specific bacterial populations a

  1. Dynamics of Sequence -Discrete Bacterial Populations Inferred Using Metagenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Sarah; Bendall, Matthew; Kang, Dongwan; Froula, Jeff; Egan, Rob; Chan, Leong-Keat; Tringe, Susannah; McMahon, Katherine; Malmstrom, Rex

    2014-03-14

    From a multi-year metagenomic time series of two dissimilar Wisconsin lakes we have assembled dozens of genomes using a novel approach that bins contigs into distinct genome based on sequence composition, e.g. kmer frequencies, and contig coverage patterns at various times points. Next, we investigated how these genomes, which represent sequence-discrete bacterial populations, evolved over time and used the time series to discover the population dynamics. For example, we explored changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies as well as patterns of gene gain and loss in multiple populations. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in some populations during the course of this study, suggesting these populations may have experienced genome-wide selective sweeps. This represents the first direct, time-resolved observations of periodic selection in natural populations, a key process predicted by the ecotype model of bacterial diversification.

  2. Raw Cow Milk Bacterial Population Shifts Attributable to Refrigeration

    OpenAIRE

    Lafarge, Véronique; Ogier, Jean-Claude; Girard, Victoria; Maladen, Véronique; Leveau, Jean-Yves; Gruss, Alexandra; Delacroix-Buchet, Agnès

    2004-01-01

    We monitored the dynamic changes in the bacterial population in milk associated with refrigeration. Direct analyses of DNA by using temporal temperature gel electrophoresis (TTGE) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) allowed us to make accurate species assignments for bacteria with low-GC-content (low-GC%) (55%) genomes, respectively. We examined raw milk samples before and after 24-h conservation at 4°C. Bacterial identification was facilitated by comparison with an extensive b...

  3. Which games are growing bacterial populations playing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yi; Pietschke, Cleo; Fraune, Sebastian; Altrock, Philipp M; Bosch, Thomas C G; Traulsen, Arne

    2015-07-01

    Microbial communities display complex population dynamics, both in frequency and absolute density. Evolutionary game theory provides a natural approach to analyse and model this complexity by studying the detailed interactions among players, including competition and conflict, cooperation and coexistence. Classic evolutionary game theory models typically assume constant population size, which often does not hold for microbial populations. Here, we explicitly take into account population growth with frequency-dependent growth parameters, as observed in our experimental system. We study the in vitro population dynamics of the two commensal bacteria (Curvibacter sp. (AEP1.3) and Duganella sp. (C1.2)) that synergistically protect the metazoan host Hydra vulgaris (AEP) from fungal infection. The frequency-dependent, nonlinear growth rates observed in our experiments indicate that the interactions among bacteria in co-culture are beyond the simple case of direct competition or, equivalently, pairwise games. This is in agreement with the synergistic effect of anti-fungal activity observed in vivo. Our analysis provides new insight into the minimal degree of complexity needed to appropriately understand and predict coexistence or extinction events in this kind of microbial community dynamics. Our approach extends the understanding of microbial communities and points to novel experiments. PMID:26236827

  4. Daily changes in bacterial-feeding nematode populations oscillate with similar periods as bacterial populations after a nutrient impulse in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelenev, V.V.; Berkelmans, R.A.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Bongers, A.M.T.; Semenov, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we showed that bacterial populations oscillated in a regular manner in response to a nutrient impulse in soil. For this paper we investigated if the wave-like fluctuations in bacterial populations could be explained by their interactions with populations of bacterial-feeding nematodes (B

  5. Nonlinear Stochastic Modelling of Antimicrobial resistance in Bacterial Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber

    This thesis applies mathematical modelling and statistical methods to investigate the dynamics and mechanisms of bacterial evolution. More specifically it is concerned with the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria populations, which is an increasing problem for the treatment of infections...... in humans and animals. To prevent the evolution and spread of resistance, there is a need for further understanding of its dynamics. A grey-box modelling approach based on stochastic differential equations is the main and innovative method applied to study bacterial systems in this thesis. Through...... for bacterial growth in an environment with multiple substrates. Models based on stochastic differential equations are also used in studies of mutation and conjugation. Mutation and conjugation are important mechanisms for the development of resistance. Earlier models for conjugation have described...

  6. Patterned progression of bacterial populations in the premature infant gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Patricio S; Warner, Barbara B; Zhou, Yanjiao; Weinstock, George M; Sodergren, Erica; Hall-Moore, Carla M; Stevens, Harold J; Bennett, William E; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Linneman, Laura A; Hoffmann, Julie A; Hamvas, Aaron; Deych, Elena; Shands, Berkley A; Shannon, William D; Tarr, Phillip I

    2014-08-26

    In the weeks after birth, the gut acquires a nascent microbiome, and starts its transition to bacterial population equilibrium. This early-in-life microbial population quite likely influences later-in-life host biology. However, we know little about the governance of community development: does the gut serve as a passive incubator where the first organisms randomly encountered gain entry and predominate, or is there an orderly progression of members joining the community of bacteria? We used fine interval enumeration of microbes in stools from multiple subjects to answer this question. We demonstrate via 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of 922 specimens from 58 subjects that the gut microbiota of premature infants residing in a tightly controlled microbial environment progresses through a choreographed succession of bacterial classes from Bacilli to Gammaproteobacteria to Clostridia, interrupted by abrupt population changes. As infants approach 33-36 wk postconceptional age (corresponding to the third to the twelfth weeks of life depending on gestational age at birth), the gut is well colonized by anaerobes. Antibiotics, vaginal vs. Caesarian birth, diet, and age of the infants when sampled influence the pace, but not the sequence, of progression. Our results suggest that in infants in a microbiologically constrained ecosphere of a neonatal intensive care unit, gut bacterial communities have an overall nonrandom assembly that is punctuated by microbial population abruptions. The possibility that the pace of this assembly depends more on host biology (chiefly gestational age at birth) than identifiable exogenous factors warrants further consideration. PMID:25114261

  7. Dynamics of adaptive immunity against phage in bacterial populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bradde, Serena; Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) mechanism allows bacteria to adaptively defend against phages by acquiring short genomic sequences (spacers) that target specific sequences in the viral genome. We propose a population dynamical model where immunity can be both acquired and lost. The model predicts regimes where bacterial and phage populations can co-exist, others where the populations oscillate, and still others where one population is driven to extinction. Our model considers two key parameters: (1) ease of acquisition and (2) spacer effectiveness in conferring immunity. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations show that if spacers differ mainly in ease of acquisition, or if the probability of acquiring them is sufficiently high, bacteria develop a diverse population of spacers. On the other hand, if spacers differ mainly in their effectiveness, their final distribution will be highly peaked, akin to a "winner-take-all" scenario, leading to a specialized spacer ...

  8. Nonlinearity in bacterial population dynamics: Proposal for experiments for the observation of abrupt transitions in patches

    OpenAIRE

    Kenkre, V. M.; Kumar, Niraj

    2008-01-01

    An explicit proposal for experiments leading to abrupt transitions in spatially extended bacterial populations in a Petri dish is presented on the basis of an exact formula obtained through an analytic theory. The theory provides accurately the transition expressions in spite of the fact that the actual solutions, which involve strong nonlinearity, are inaccessible to it. The analytic expressions are verified through numerical solutions of the relevant nonlinear equation. The experimental set...

  9. Effect of isolate of ruminal fibrolytic bacterial culture supplementation on fibrolytic bacterial population and survivability of inoculated bacterial strain in lactating Murrah buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brishketu Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of bacterial culture supplementation on ruminal fibrolytic bacterial population as well as on survivability of inoculated bacterial strain in lactating Murrah buffaloes kept on high fibre diet. Materials and Methods: Fibrolytic bacterial strains were isolated from rumen liquor of fistulated Murrah buffaloes and live bacterial culture were supplemented orally in treatment group of lactating Murrah buffaloes fed on high fibre diet to see it's effect on ruminal fibrolytic bacterial population as well as to see the effect of survivability of the inoculated bacterial strain at three different time interval in comparison to control group. Results: It has been shown by real time quantification study that supplementation of bacterial culture orally increases the population of major fibre degrading bacteria i.e. Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Ruminococcus albus as well as Fibrobacter succinogenes whereas there was decrease in secondary fibre degrading bacterial population i.e. Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens over the different time periods. However, the inoculated strain of Ruminococcus flavefaciens survived significantly over the period of time, which was shown in stability of increased inoculated bacterial population. Conclusion: The isolates of fibrolytic bacterial strains are found to be useful in increasing the number of major ruminal fibre degrading bacteria in lactating buffaloes and may act as probiotic in large ruminants on fibre-based diets. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 14-17

  10. Influence of acid precipitation on bacterial populations in lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, S.S.; Dutka, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    Relative abundance of total, respiring, aerobic heterotrophic, nitrogen cycle and sulfur cycle bacteria was measured in acid stressed and non-acid stressed hardwater lakes. Data indicated that bacterial populations and densities were nearly an order of magnitude less in acid stressed waters than in non-acid stressed waters. Nitrifying bacteria and some sulfur cycle bacteria (Thiobacillus sp.) were very low or absent in acid stressed waters. Surface sediments of acid stressed lakes contained 3 to 4 times more organic matter than the amount found in the relatively more enriched lake. Methodology and data are presented. 20 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  11. Determination of Plasmid Segregational Stability in a Growing Bacterial Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively used as cloning vectors for a number of genes for academic and commercial purposes. Moreover, attenuated bacteria carrying recombinant plasmids expressing genes with anti-tumor activity have shown promising therapeutic results in animal models of cancer. Equitable plasmid distribution between daughter cells during cell division, i.e., plasmid segregational stability, depends on many factors, including the plasmid copy number, its replication mechanism, the levels of recombinant gene expression, the type of bacterial host, and the metabolic burden associated with all these factors. Plasmid vectors usually code for antibiotic-resistant functions, and, in order to enrich the culture with bacteria containing plasmids, antibiotic selective pressure is commonly used to eliminate plasmid-free segregants from the growing population. However, administration of antibiotics can be inconvenient for many industrial and therapeutic applications. Extensive ongoing research is being carried out to develop stably-inherited plasmid vectors. Here, I present an easy and precise method for determining the kinetics of plasmid loss or maintenance for every ten generations of bacterial growth in culture. PMID:26846807

  12. Dynamics of adaptive immunity against phage in bacterial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradde, Serena; Vucelja, Marija; Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) mechanism allows bacteria to adaptively defend against phages by acquiring short genomic sequences (spacers) that target specific sequences in the viral genome. We propose a population dynamical model where immunity can be both acquired and lost. The model predicts regimes where bacterial and phage populations can co-exist, others where the populations oscillate, and still others where one population is driven to extinction. Our model considers two key parameters: (1) ease of acquisition and (2) spacer effectiveness in conferring immunity. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations show that if spacers differ mainly in ease of acquisition, or if the probability of acquiring them is sufficiently high, bacteria develop a diverse population of spacers. On the other hand, if spacers differ mainly in their effectiveness, their final distribution will be highly peaked, akin to a ``winner-take-all'' scenario, leading to a specialized spacer distribution. Bacteria can interpolate between these limiting behaviors by actively tuning their overall acquisition rate.

  13. Metagenomic reconstructions of bacterial CRISPR loci constrain population histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christine L; Thomas, Brian C; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial CRISPR-Cas systems provide insight into recent population history because they rapidly incorporate, in a unidirectional manner, short fragments (spacers) from coexisting infective virus populations into host chromosomes. Immunity is achieved by sequence identity between transcripts of spacers and their targets. Here, we used metagenomics to study the stability and dynamics of the type I-E CRISPR-Cas locus of Leptospirillum group II bacteria in biofilms sampled over 5 years from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system. Despite recovery of 452,686 spacers from CRISPR amplicons and metagenomic data, rarefaction curves of spacers show no saturation. The vast repertoire of spacers is attributed to phage/plasmid population diversity and retention of old spacers, despite rapid evolution of the targeted phage/plasmid genome regions (proto-spacers). The oldest spacers (spacers found at the trailer end) are conserved for at least 5 years, and 12% of these retain perfect or near-perfect matches to proto-spacer targets. The majority of proto-spacer regions contain an AAG proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM). Spacers throughout the locus target the same phage population (AMDV1), but there are blocks of consecutive spacers without AMDV1 target sequences. Results suggest long-term coexistence of Leptospirillum with AMDV1 and periods when AMDV1 was less dominant. Metagenomics can be applied to millions of cells in a single sample to provide an extremely large spacer inventory, allow identification of phage/plasmids and enable analysis of previous phage/plasmid exposure. Thus, this approach can provide insights into prior bacterial environment and genetic interplay between hosts and their viruses. PMID:26394009

  14. Lysozyme as a recognition element for monitoring of bacterial population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Laibao; Wan, Yi; Yu, Liangmin; Zhang, Dun

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain a significant challenge in biomedicine and environment safety. Increasing worldwide demand for point-of-care techniques and increasing concern on their safe development and use, require a simple and sensitive bioanalysis for pathogen detection. However, this goal is not yet achieved. A design for fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lysozyme (FITC-LYZ), which provides quantitative binding information for gram-positive bacteria, Micrococcus luteus, and detects pathogen concentration, is presented. The functional lysozyme is used not only as the pathogenic detection platform, but also as a tracking reagent for microbial population in antibacterial tests. A nonlinear relationship between the system response and the logarithm of the bacterial concentration was observed in the range of 1.2×10(2)-1.2×10(5) cfu mL(-1). The system has a potential for further applications and provides a facile and simple method for detection of pathogenic bacteria. Meanwhile, the fluorescein isothiocyanate -labeled lysozyme is also employed as the tracking agent for antibacterial dynamic assay, which show a similar dynamic curve compared with UV-vis test. PMID:26695267

  15. The Niches of Bacterial Populations in Productive Waters : Examples from Coastal Waters and Four Eutrophic Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Eiler, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Recent research in microbial ecology has focused on how aquatic bacterial communities are assembled. Only a few of these studies follow a “Gleasonian” approach where the roles of single bacterial populations are in focus. In this thesis, novel molecular tools were used to describe the distribution and evolutionary relationships of microbes in productive aquatic environments. Many new phylogenetic groups of bacteria were identified, likely representing bacterial populations restricted to produ...

  16. Bacterial population structure and dynamics during the development of almond drupes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To describe the bacterial populations and their dynamics during the development of almond drupes. Methods and Results: We examined 16S rRNA gene libraries derived from the bacterial populations on almond drupes at three stages of development: 1) when the drupes were full sized, but before embr...

  17. Bacterial profile of dentine caries and the impact of pH on bacterial population diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kianoush

    Full Text Available Dental caries is caused by the release of organic acids from fermentative bacteria, which results in the dissolution of hydroxyapatite matrices of enamel and dentine. While low environmental pH is proposed to cause a shift in the consortium of oral bacteria, favouring the development of caries, the impact of this variable has been overlooked in microbial population studies. This study aimed to detail the zonal composition of the microbiota associated with carious dentine lesions with reference to pH. We used 454 sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V3-V4 region to compare microbial communities in layers ranging in pH from 4.5-7.8 from 25 teeth with advanced dentine caries. Pyrosequencing of the amplicons yielded 449,762 sequences. Nine phyla, 97 genera and 409 species were identified from the quality-filtered, de-noised and chimera-free sequences. Among the microbiota associated with dentinal caries, the most abundant taxa included Lactobacillus sp., Prevotella sp., Atopobium sp., Olsenella sp. and Actinomyces sp. We found a disparity between microbial communities localised at acidic versus neutral pH strata. Acidic conditions were associated with low diversity microbial populations, with Lactobacillus species including L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. crispatus, being prominent. In comparison, the distinctive species of a more diverse flora associated with neutral pH regions of carious lesions included Alloprevotella tanerrae, Leptothrix sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Streptococcus anginosus. While certain bacteria were affected by the pH gradient, we also found that ∼ 60% of the taxa associated with caries were present across the investigated pH range, representing a substantial core. We demonstrated that some bacterial species implicated in caries progression show selective clustering with respect to pH gradient, providing a basis for specific therapeutic strategies.

  18. Compositional stability of a salivary bacterial population against supragingival microbiota shift following periodontal therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Supragingival plaque is permanently in contact with saliva. However, the extent to which the microbiota contributes to the salivary bacterial population remains unclear. We compared the compositional shift in the salivary bacterial population with that in supragingival plaque following periodontal therapy. Samples were collected from 19 patients with periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy (mean sample collection interval, 25.8 ± 2.6 months, and their bacterial composition was investigated using barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic community analysis using the UniFrac distance metric revealed that the overall bacterial community composition of saliva is distinct from that of supragingival plaque, both pre- and post-therapy. Temporal variation following therapy in the salivary bacterial population was significantly smaller than in the plaque microbiota, and the post-therapy saliva sample was significantly more similar to that pre-therapy from the same individual than to those from other subjects. Following periodontal therapy, microbial richness and biodiversity were significantly decreased in the plaque microbiota, but not in the salivary bacterial population. The operational taxonomic units whose relative abundances changed significantly after therapy were not common to the two microbiotae. These results reveal the compositional stability of salivary bacterial populations against shifts in the supragingival microbiota, suggesting that the effect of the supragingival plaque microbiota on salivary bacterial population composition is limited.

  19. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Groundwater Reveals an Active Anammox Bacterial Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a major natural resource, yet little is known about the contribution of microbial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity to subsurface nitrogen cycling. During anammox, energy is generated as ammonium is oxidized under anaerobic conditions to dinitrogen gas, using nitrite as the final electron acceptor. This process is a global sink for fixed nitrogen. Only a narrow range of monophyletic bacteria within the Planctomycetes carries out anammox, and the full extent of their metabolism, and subsequent impact on nitrogen cycling and microbial community structure, is still unknown. Here, we employ a metatranscriptomic analysis on enriched mRNA to identify the abundance and activity of a population of anammox bacteria within an aquifer at Rifle, CO. Planktonic biomass was collected over a two-month period after injection of up to 1.5 mM nitrate. Illumina-generated sequences were mapped to a phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome database. We identified transcripts for genes with high protein sequence identities (81-98%) to those of anammox strain KSU-1 and to two of the five anammox bacteria genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia, suggesting an active, if not diverse, anammox population. Many of the most abundant anammox transcripts mapped to a single scaffold, indicative of a single dominant anammox species. Transcripts of the genes necessary for the anammox pathway were present, including an ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrite/formate transporter, nitrite reductase (nirK), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzoB). The form of nitrite reductase encoded by anammox is species-dependent, and we only identified nirK, with no evidence of anammox nirS. In addition to the anammox pathway we saw evidence of the anammox bacterial dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium pathway (narH, putative nrfA, and nrfB), which provides an alternate means of generating substrates for anammox from nitrate, rather than relying on an external pool. Transcripts for hydroxylamine

  20. Mathematical Modelling of Bacterial Populations in Bio-remediation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliadou, Ioanna A.; Vayenas, Dimitris V.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2011-09-01

    An understanding of bacterial behaviour concerns many field applications, such as the enhancement of water, wastewater and subsurface bio-remediation, the prevention of environmental pollution and the protection of human health. Numerous microorganisms have been identified to be able to degrade chemical pollutants, thus, a variety of bacteria are known that can be used in bio-remediation processes. In this study the development of mathematical models capable of describing bacterial behaviour considered in bio-augmentation plans, such as bacterial growth, consumption of nutrients, removal of pollutants, bacterial transport and attachment in porous media, is presented. The mathematical models may be used as a guide in designing and assessing the conditions under which areas contaminated with pollutants can be better remediated.

  1. Involvement of bacterial migration in the development of complex multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Mikkel; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren;

    2003-01-01

    development, we have performed an investigation with time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms formed by various combinations of colour-coded P. aeruginosa wild type and motility mutants. We show that mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms can form in a sequential...... process involving a non-motile bacterial subpopulation and a migrating bacterial subpopulation. The non-motile bacteria form the mushroom stalks by growth in certain foci of the biofilm. The migrating bacteria form the mushroom caps by climbing the stalks and aggregating on the tops in a process which...

  2. Grazing activity and ruminal bacterial population associated with frothy bloat in steers grazing winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two grazing experiments were designed to elucidate the shifts in rumen bacterial populations (Exp. 1) and grazing activities (Exp. 2) in wheat forage diets between bloated and non-bloated steers. In Exp. 1, the bacterial DNA density was greatest for Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Streptococcus bovis, a...

  3. Involvement of bacterial migration in the development of complex multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Mikkel; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the developmental process from single cells scattered on a surface to complex multicellular biofilm structures is essential in order to create strategies to control biofilm development. In order to study bacterial migration patterns during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm...... development, we have performed an investigation with time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms formed by various combinations of colour-coded P. aeruginosa wild type and motility mutants. We show that mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms can form in a sequential...... process involving a non-motile bacterial subpopulation and a migrating bacterial subpopulation. The non-motile bacteria form the mushroom stalks by growth in certain foci of the biofilm. The migrating bacteria form the mushroom caps by climbing the stalks and aggregating on the tops in a process which is...

  4. A host defense mechanism involving CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion in bacterial prostatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostatitis is associated with a characteristic increase in prostatic fluid pH; however, the underlying mechanism and its physiological significance have not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study a primary culture of rat prostatic epithelial cells and a rat prostatitis model were used. Here we reported the involvement of CFTR, a cAMP-activated anion channel conducting both Cl(- and HCO(3(-, in mediating prostate HCO(3(- secretion and its possible role in bacterial killing. Upon Escherichia coli (E. coli-LPS challenge, the expression of CFTR and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II, along with several pro-inflammatory cytokines was up-regulated in the primary culture of rat prostate epithelial cells. Inhibiting CFTR function in vitro or in vivo resulted in reduced bacterial killing by prostate epithelial cells or the prostate. High HCO(3(- content (>50 mM, rather than alkaline pH, was found to be responsible for bacterial killing. The direct action of HCO(3(- on bacterial killing was confirmed by its ability to increase cAMP production and suppress bacterial initiation factors in E. coli. The relevance of the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- secretion in humans was demonstrated by the upregulated expression of CFTR and CAII in human prostatitis tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CFTR and its mediated HCO(3(- secretion may be up-regulated in prostatitis as a host defense mechanism.

  5. Adherent bacterial populations on the bovine rumen wall: distribution patterns of adherent bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    McCowan, R P; Cheng, K J; Costerton, J W

    1980-01-01

    Fourteen tissue sites from the bovine reticulo-rumen were examined by scanning electron microscopy to determine the distribution patterns of bacterial populations adhering to the epithelium. Although diet variations did not appear to influence the total number of tissue-adherent bacteria present in adult Herefords, diet affected their distribution. It appeared that the distribution of the bacterial populations may be directly affected by the physical state of the digesta. The digesta may be m...

  6. Bacterial incorporation of tritiated thymidine and populations of bacteriophagous fauna in the rhizosphere of wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik; Griffiths, Bryan; Christensen, Søren

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial and microfaunal populations, and bacterial productivity measured by tritiated thymidine (3HTdr) incorporation, in the rhizosphere of wheat seedlings were measured. Soil from planted pots was fractionated into rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere (bulk) soil, while unplanted soil was taken from...... pots without plants. Total bacterial counts and biovolume did not differ between fractions but viable (plate) counts were 8 times higher in the rhizosphere compared to bulk and unplanted soil. 3HTdr was incorporated at a constant rate with low variability in bulk or unplanted soil. In rhizosphere soil...... 3HTdr incorporation was lower than in bulk or unplanted soils and showed high variability. The populations of bacterial-feeding protozoa and nematodes indicated that rhizosphere bacterial activity was actually 3–4 times greater in rhizosphere than bulk soil in accordance with the results of the...

  7. Population expansions shared among coexisting bacterial lineages are revealed by genetic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitia, Morena; Escalante, Ana E; Rebollar, Eria A; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Comparative population studies can help elucidate the influence of historical events upon current patterns of biodiversity among taxa that coexist in a given geographic area. In particular, comparative assessments derived from population genetics and coalescent theory have been used to investigate population dynamics of bacterial pathogens in order to understand disease epidemics. In contrast, and despite the ecological relevance of non-host associated and naturally occurring bacteria, there is little understanding of the processes determining their diversity. Here we analyzed the patterns of genetic diversity in coexisting populations of three genera of bacteria (Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Pseudomonas) that are abundant in the aquatic systems of the Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Mexico. We tested the hypothesis that a common habitat leaves a signature upon the genetic variation present in bacterial populations, independent of phylogenetic relationships. We used multilocus markers to assess genetic diversity and (1) performed comparative phylogenetic analyses, (2) described the genetic structure of bacterial populations, (3) calculated descriptive parameters of genetic diversity, (4) performed neutrality tests, and (5) conducted coalescent-based historical reconstructions. Our results show a trend of synchronic expansions across most populations independent of both lineage and sampling site. Thus, we provide empirical evidence supporting the analysis of coexisting bacterial lineages in natural environments to advance our understanding of bacterial evolution beyond medical or health-related microbes. PMID:25548732

  8. Population expansions shared among coexisting bacterial lineages are revealed by genetic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morena Avitia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparative population studies can help elucidate the influence of historical events upon current patterns of biodiversity among taxa that coexist in a given geographic area. In particular, comparative assessments derived from population genetics and coalescent theory have been used to investigate population dynamics of bacterial pathogens in order to understand disease epidemics. In contrast, and despite the ecological relevance of non-host associated and naturally occurring bacteria, there is little understanding of the processes determining their diversity. Here we analyzed the patterns of genetic diversity in coexisting populations of three genera of bacteria (Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Pseudomonas that are abundant in the aquatic systems of the Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Mexico. We tested the hypothesis that a common habitat leaves a signature upon the genetic variation present in bacterial populations, independent of phylogenetic relationships. We used multilocus markers to assess genetic diversity and (1 performed comparative phylogenetic analyses, (2 described the genetic structure of bacterial populations, (3 calculated descriptive parameters of genetic diversity, (4 performed neutrality tests, and (5 conducted coalescent-based historical reconstructions. Our results show a trend of synchronic expansions across most populations independent of both lineage and sampling site. Thus, we provide empirical evidence supporting the analysis of coexisting bacterial lineages in natural environments to advance our understanding of bacterial evolution beyond medical or health-related microbes.

  9. Bacterial population structure of the jute-retting environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Tulika K; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2008-08-01

    Jute is one of the most versatile bast fibers obtained through the process of retting, which is a result of decomposition of stalks by the indigenous microflora. However, bacterial communities associated with the retting of jute are not well characterized. To investigate the presence of microorganisms during the process of jute retting, full-cycle rRNA approach was followed, and two 16S rRNA gene libraries, from jute-retting locations of Krishnanagar and Barrackpore, were constructed. Phylotypes affiliating to seven bacterial divisions were identified in both libraries. The bulk of clones came from Proteobacteria ( approximately 37, 41%) and a comparatively smaller proportion of clones from the divisions-Firmicutes ( approximately 11, 12%), Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroidetes group (CFB; approximately 9, 7%), Verrucomicrobia ( approximately 6, 5%), Acidobacteria ( approximately 4, 5%), Chlorobiales ( approximately 5, 5%), and Actinobacteria ( approximately 4, 2%) were identified. Percent coverage value and diversity estimations of phylotype richness, Shannon-Weiner index, and evenness confirmed the diverse nature of both the libraries. Evaluation of the retting waters by whole cell rRNA-targeted flourescent in situ hybridization, as detected by domain- and group-specific probes, we observed a considerable dominance of the beta-Proteobacteria (25.9%) along with the CFB group (24.4%). In addition, 32 bacterial species were isolated on culture media from the two retting environments and identified by 16S rDNA analysis, confirming the presence of phyla, Proteobacteria ( approximately 47%), Firmicutes ( approximately 22%), CFB group ( approximately 19%), and Actinobacteria ( approximately 13%) in the retting niche. Thus, our study presents the first quantification of the dominant and diverse bacterial phylotypes in the retting ponds, which will further help in improving the retting efficiency, and hence the fiber quality. PMID:18097714

  10. Populations of Stored Product Mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae Differ in Their Bacterial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erban, Tomas; Klimov, Pavel B.; Smrz, Jaroslav; Phillips, Thomas W.; Nesvorna, Marta; Kopecky, Jan; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tyrophagus putrescentiae colonizes different human-related habitats and feeds on various post-harvest foods. The microbiota acquired by these mites can influence the nutritional plasticity in different populations. We compared the bacterial communities of five populations of T. putrescentiae and one mixed population of T. putrescentiae and T. fanetzhangorum collected from different habitats. Material: The bacterial communities of the six mite populations from different habitats and diets were compared by Sanger sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA obtained from amplification with universal eubacterial primers and using bacterial taxon-specific primers on the samples of adults/juveniles or eggs. Microscopic techniques were used to localize bacteria in food boli and mite bodies. The morphological determination of the mite populations was confirmed by analyses of CO1 and ITS fragment genes. Results: The following symbiotic bacteria were found in compared mite populations: Wolbachia (two populations), Cardinium (five populations), Bartonella-like (five populations), Blattabacterium-like symbiont (three populations), and Solitalea-like (six populations). From 35 identified OTUs97, only Solitalea was identified in all populations. The next most frequent and abundant sequences were Bacillus, Moraxella, Staphylococcus, Kocuria, and Microbacterium. We suggest that some bacterial species may occasionally be ingested with food. The bacteriocytes were observed in some individuals in all mite populations. Bacteria were not visualized in food boli by staining, but bacteria were found by histological means in ovaria of Wolbachia-infested populations. Conclusion: The presence of Blattabacterium-like, Cardinium, Wolbachia, and Solitalea-like in the eggs of T. putrescentiae indicates mother to offspring (vertical) transmission. Results of this study indicate that diet and habitats influence not only the ingested bacteria but also the symbiotic bacteria of T. putrescentiae. PMID

  11. Lvserpin3 is involved in shrimp innate immunity via the inhibition of bacterial proteases and proteases involved in prophenoloxidase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjie; Liu, Tao; Hou, Fujun; Wang, Xianzong; Liu, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitor, represented by serpin, plays an important inhibitory role on proteases involved in the immune responses. To clarify the immune characterizations of serpin, a novel serpin (Lvserpin3) encoding for 410 amino acids with a 23-amino acid signal peptide and a serpin domain was identified from the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. Lvserpin3 expressed strongest in hepatopancreas, and was significantly up-regulated in the early stage upon Vibrio anguillarum, Micrococcus lysodeikticus or White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) infection. Suppression of Lvserpin3 by dsRNA led to a significant increase in the transcripts of LvPPAF, LvproPO and phenoloxidase (PO) activity, and also led to the high cumulative mortality. The recombinant Lvserpin3 protein (rLvserpin3) inhibited the proteases secreted by M. lysodeikticus and Bacillus subtilis, and further exhibited inhibitory role on the growth of B. subtilis and M. lysodeikticu. Moreover, rLvserpin3 was found to be able to block the activation of prophenoloxidase system. Taken together, the results imply that Lvserpin3 may be involved in shrimp innate immunity via the inhibition of bacterial proteases and proteases involved in prophenoloxidase system. PMID:26432049

  12. Contamination of Soil by Copper Affects the Dynamics, Diversity, and Activity of Soil Bacterial Communities Involved in Wheat Decomposition and Carbon Storage▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, L.; Maron, P. A.; Mougel, C.; Nowak, V.; Lévêque, J.; Marol, C.; Balesdent, J.; Gibiat, F.; Ranjard, L.

    2009-01-01

    A soil microcosm experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of copper contamination on the dynamics and diversity of bacterial communities actively involved in wheat residue decomposition. In the presence of copper, a higher level of CO2 release was observed, which did not arise from greater wheat decomposition but from a higher level of stimulation of soil organic matter mineralization (known as the priming effect). Such functional modifications may be related to significant modifications in the diversity of active bacterial populations characterized using the DNA stable-isotope probing approach. PMID:19801474

  13. Evaluation of a routine antiseptic and two disinfectants for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof

    OpenAIRE

    Moosa Javdani,; Seifollah Dehghani,; Ali Ghashghaii; Zahra Nikousefat

    2011-01-01

    A routine antiseptic and two disinfectant agents were used separately for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof: 1) 7.5% povidone–iodine scrub mixed with 10% povidone–iodine solution, 2) 10% copper sulfate, and 3) 8% formaldehyde. Swabbing for microbial colony counts were used to evaluate pre and post–scrub of hooves of eight cows. The results revealed no significant differences in reduction of bacterial colony count between post–scrubs of povidone–iodine and formaldehyde. B...

  14. Humpback Whale Populations Share a Core Skin Bacterial Community: Towards a Health Index for Marine Mammals?

    OpenAIRE

    Apprill, Amy; Robbins, Jooke; Eren, A. Murat; Pack, Adam A.; Reveillaud, Julie; Mattila, David; Moore, Michael; Niemeyer, Misty; Kathleen M T Moore; Mincer, Tracy J.

    2014-01-01

    Microbes are now well regarded for their important role in mammalian health. The microbiology of skin – a unique interface between the host and environment - is a major research focus in human health and skin disorders, but is less explored in other mammals. Here, we report on a cross-population study of the skin-associated bacterial community of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), and examine the potential for a core bacterial community and its variability with host (endogenous) or geo...

  15. Bacterial recombination promotes the evolution of multi-drug-resistance in functionally diverse populations

    OpenAIRE

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Lee, Alexander E. G.; Wang, Yun; Huang, Wei E.; Barraclough, Timothy G.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial recombination is believed to be a major factor explaining the prevalence of multi-drug-resistance (MDR) among pathogenic bacteria. Despite extensive evidence for exchange of resistance genes from retrospective sequence analyses, experimental evidence for the evolutionary benefits of bacterial recombination is scarce. We compared the evolution of MDR between populations of Acinetobacter baylyi in which we manipulated both the recombination rate and the initial diversity of strains wi...

  16. Population expansions shared among coexisting bacterial lineages are revealed by genetic evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Morena Avitia; Escalante, Ana E.; Rebollar, Eria A.; Alejandra Moreno-Letelier; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Valeria Souza

    2014-01-01

    Comparative population studies can help elucidate the influence of historical events upon current patterns of biodiversity among taxa that coexist in a given geographic area. In particular, comparative assessments derived from population genetics and coalescent theory have been used to investigate population dynamics of bacterial pathogens in order to understand disease epidemics. In contrast, and despite the ecological relevance of non-host associated and naturally occurring bacteria, there ...

  17. Bacterial species involved in the conversion of dietary flavonoids in the human gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, Annett; Blaut, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the conversion of dietary flavonoids and thereby affects their health-promoting effects in the human host. The identification of the bacteria involved in intestinal flavonoid conversion has gained increasing interest. This review summarizes available information on the so far identified human intestinal flavonoid-converting bacterial species and strains as well as their enzymes catalyzing the underlying reactions. The majority of described species involved in flavonoid transformation are capable of carrying out the O-deglycosylation of flavonoids. Other bacteria cleave the less common flavonoid-C-glucosides and/or further degrade the aglycones of flavonols, flavanonols, flavones, flavanones, dihydrochalcones, isoflavones and monomeric flavan-3-ols. To increase the currently limited knowledge in this field, identification of flavonoid-converting bacteria should be continued using culture-dependent screening or isolation procedures and molecular approaches based on sequence information of the involved enzymes. PMID:26963713

  18. Bacterial population in traditional sourdough evaluated by molecular methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randazzo, C.L.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Restuccia, C.; Giudici, P.; Caggia, C.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To study the microbial communities in artisanal sourdoughs, manufactured by traditional procedure in different areas of Sicily, and to evaluate the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) population by classical and culture-independent approaches. Methods and Results: Forty-five LAB isolates were identifie

  19. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Leilei Qu; Qiuhui Pan; Xubin Gao; Mingfeng He

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1) have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospit...

  20. The diversity of a distributed genome in bacterial populations

    CERN Document Server

    Baumdicker, F; Pfaffelhuber, P

    2009-01-01

    The distributed genome hypothesis states that the set of genes in a population of bacteria is distributed over all individuals that belong to the specific taxon. It implies that certain genes can be gained and lost from generation to generation. We use the random genealogy given by a Kingman coalescent in order to superimpose events of gene gain and loss along ancestral lines. Gene gains occur at constant rate along ancestral lines. We assume that gained genes have never been present in the population before. Gene losses occur at a rate proportional to the number of genes present along the ancestral line. In this "infinitely many genes model" we derive moments for several statistics within a sample: the average number of genes per individual, the average number of genes differing between individuals, the number of incongruent pairs of genes, the total number of different genes in the sample and the gene frequency spectrum. We demonstrate that the model gives a reasonable fit with gene frequency data from mari...

  1. Influence of copper on Euplotes sp. and associated bacterial population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Oliveira Andrade da Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of copper on the ciliate Euplotes sp. and associated bacteria isolated from sediment samples of Guanabara Bay were investigated in bioassays. This region is highly affected by heavy metals such as copper, from solid waste constantly dumped in the bay and other sources such as industrial effluents, antifouling paints, atmospheric deposition and urban drainage, and even today there are few data on the metal toxicity to the ecosystem of the Bay of Guanabara. Bioassays were conducted to estimate the LC50-24 h of copper, in order to determine the concentration of metal bearing 50% of the population mortality. The results indicated that the concentrations of 0.05 and 0.009 mg L-1 presented no toxicity to Euplotes sp. The associated bacteria are tolerant to copper concentrations used in bioassays, and suggest that they could be used as a potential agent in the bioremediation of areas affected by copper.

  2. A Quantitative Test of Population Genetics Using Spatio-Genetic Patterns in Bacterial Colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Korolev, Kirill; Xavier, Joao; Foster, Kevin; Nelson, David R.

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that population-genetics theory is the cornerstone of evolutionary analyses. Empirical tests of the theory, however, are challenging because of the complex relationships between space, dispersal, and evolution. Critically, we lack quantitative validation of the spatial models of population genetics. Here we combine analytics, on- and off-lattice simulations, and experiments with bacteria to perform quantitative tests of the theory. We study two bacterial species, the gut...

  3. Humpback whale populations share a core skin bacterial community: towards a health index for marine mammals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apprill, Amy; Robbins, Jooke; Eren, A Murat; Pack, Adam A; Reveillaud, Julie; Mattila, David; Moore, Michael; Niemeyer, Misty; Moore, Kathleen M T; Mincer, Tracy J

    2014-01-01

    Microbes are now well regarded for their important role in mammalian health. The microbiology of skin--a unique interface between the host and environment--is a major research focus in human health and skin disorders, but is less explored in other mammals. Here, we report on a cross-population study of the skin-associated bacterial community of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), and examine the potential for a core bacterial community and its variability with host (endogenous) or geographic/environmental (exogenous) specific factors. Skin biopsies or freshly sloughed skin from 56 individuals were sampled from populations in the North Atlantic, North Pacific and South Pacific oceans and bacteria were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes. Phylogenetic and statistical analyses revealed the ubiquity and abundance of bacteria belonging to the Flavobacteria genus Tenacibaculum and the Gammaproteobacteria genus Psychrobacter across the whale populations. Scanning electron microscopy of skin indicated that microbial cells colonize the skin surface. Despite the ubiquity of Tenacibaculum and Psychrobater spp., the relative composition of the skin-bacterial community differed significantly by geographic area as well as metabolic state of the animals (feeding versus starving during migration and breeding), suggesting that both exogenous and endogenous factors may play a role in influencing the skin-bacteria. Further, characteristics of the skin bacterial community from these free-swimming individuals were assembled and compared to two entangled and three dead individuals, revealing a decrease in the central or core bacterial community members (Tenacibaculum and Psychrobater spp.), as well as the emergence of potential pathogens in the latter cases. This is the first discovery of a cross-population, shared skin bacterial community. This research suggests that the skin bacteria may be connected to humpback health and immunity and could possibly serve

  4. Humpback whale populations share a core skin bacterial community: towards a health index for marine mammals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Apprill

    Full Text Available Microbes are now well regarded for their important role in mammalian health. The microbiology of skin--a unique interface between the host and environment--is a major research focus in human health and skin disorders, but is less explored in other mammals. Here, we report on a cross-population study of the skin-associated bacterial community of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae, and examine the potential for a core bacterial community and its variability with host (endogenous or geographic/environmental (exogenous specific factors. Skin biopsies or freshly sloughed skin from 56 individuals were sampled from populations in the North Atlantic, North Pacific and South Pacific oceans and bacteria were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes. Phylogenetic and statistical analyses revealed the ubiquity and abundance of bacteria belonging to the Flavobacteria genus Tenacibaculum and the Gammaproteobacteria genus Psychrobacter across the whale populations. Scanning electron microscopy of skin indicated that microbial cells colonize the skin surface. Despite the ubiquity of Tenacibaculum and Psychrobater spp., the relative composition of the skin-bacterial community differed significantly by geographic area as well as metabolic state of the animals (feeding versus starving during migration and breeding, suggesting that both exogenous and endogenous factors may play a role in influencing the skin-bacteria. Further, characteristics of the skin bacterial community from these free-swimming individuals were assembled and compared to two entangled and three dead individuals, revealing a decrease in the central or core bacterial community members (Tenacibaculum and Psychrobater spp., as well as the emergence of potential pathogens in the latter cases. This is the first discovery of a cross-population, shared skin bacterial community. This research suggests that the skin bacteria may be connected to humpback health and immunity and could

  5. Effect of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zylenicum) supplementation on the intestinal selected bacterial population in Japanese quail

    OpenAIRE

    A. Baraa Mohamed,; F. A. Huseen; O. T. Jawad

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of adding graded levels (0, 1.0 and 1.5%) of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zylenicum) in the basal diet on the intestinal bacterial population of the Japanese quail. Sixty Japanese quail were randomly distributed into 3 groups. Each treatment contained four replicates (5 birds/replicate). The results showed significant (P

  6. BSim: an agent-based tool for modeling bacterial populations in systems and synthetic biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Gorochowski

    Full Text Available Large-scale collective behaviors such as synchronization and coordination spontaneously arise in many bacterial populations. With systems biology attempting to understand these phenomena, and synthetic biology opening up the possibility of engineering them for our own benefit, there is growing interest in how bacterial populations are best modeled. Here we introduce BSim, a highly flexible agent-based computational tool for analyzing the relationships between single-cell dynamics and population level features. BSim includes reference implementations of many bacterial traits to enable the quick development of new models partially built from existing ones. Unlike existing modeling tools, BSim fully considers spatial aspects of a model allowing for the description of intricate micro-scale structures, enabling the modeling of bacterial behavior in more realistic three-dimensional, complex environments. The new opportunities that BSim opens are illustrated through several diverse examples covering: spatial multicellular computing, modeling complex environments, population dynamics of the lac operon, and the synchronization of genetic oscillators. BSim is open source software that is freely available from http://bsim-bccs.sf.net and distributed under the Open Source Initiative (OSI recognized MIT license. Developer documentation and a wide range of example simulations are also available from the website. BSim requires Java version 1.6 or higher.

  7. An Observation of Bacterial Population Changes in Fields Treated with Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) has proven to be effective for pathogen and nematode control as an alternative to fumigation. It has been hypothesized that various bacterial populations could play key roles in the disinfestation process through the production of secondary metabolites. In this st...

  8. BSim: an agent-based tool for modeling bacterial populations in systems and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorochowski, Thomas E; Matyjaszkiewicz, Antoni; Todd, Thomas; Oak, Neeraj; Kowalska, Kira; Reid, Stephen; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira T; Savery, Nigel J; Grierson, Claire S; di Bernardo, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale collective behaviors such as synchronization and coordination spontaneously arise in many bacterial populations. With systems biology attempting to understand these phenomena, and synthetic biology opening up the possibility of engineering them for our own benefit, there is growing interest in how bacterial populations are best modeled. Here we introduce BSim, a highly flexible agent-based computational tool for analyzing the relationships between single-cell dynamics and population level features. BSim includes reference implementations of many bacterial traits to enable the quick development of new models partially built from existing ones. Unlike existing modeling tools, BSim fully considers spatial aspects of a model allowing for the description of intricate micro-scale structures, enabling the modeling of bacterial behavior in more realistic three-dimensional, complex environments. The new opportunities that BSim opens are illustrated through several diverse examples covering: spatial multicellular computing, modeling complex environments, population dynamics of the lac operon, and the synchronization of genetic oscillators. BSim is open source software that is freely available from http://bsim-bccs.sf.net and distributed under the Open Source Initiative (OSI) recognized MIT license. Developer documentation and a wide range of example simulations are also available from the website. BSim requires Java version 1.6 or higher. PMID:22936991

  9. A network-based approach for resistance transmission in bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Ronette; Schumm, Phillip; Youssef, Mina; Scoglio, Caterina

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements (conjugation) is an important mechanism whereby resistance is spread through bacterial populations. The aim of our work is to develop a mathematical model that quantitatively describes this process, and to use this model to optimize antimicrobial dosage regimens to minimize resistance development. The bacterial population is conceptualized as a compartmental mathematical model to describe changes in susceptible, resistant, and transconjugant bacteria over time. This model is combined with a compartmental pharmacokinetic model to explore the effect of different plasma drug concentration profiles. An agent-based simulation tool is used to account for resistance transfer occurring when two bacteria are adjacent or in close proximity. In addition, a non-linear programming optimal control problem is introduced to minimize bacterial populations as well as the drug dose. Simulation and optimization results suggest that the rapid death of susceptible individuals in the population is pivotal in minimizing the number of transconjugants in a population. This supports the use of potent antimicrobials that rapidly kill susceptible individuals and development of dosage regimens that maintain effective antimicrobial drug concentrations for as long as needed to kill off the susceptible population. Suggestions are made for experiments to test the hypotheses generated by these simulations. PMID:19747924

  10. Metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa involved in competition with respiratory bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eBeaume

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic airway infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa considerably contributes to lung tissue destruction and impairment of pulmonary function in cystic-fibrosis (CF patients. Complex interplays between P. aeruginosa and other co-colonizing pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia spp and Klebsiella pneumoniae may be crucial for pathogenesis and disease progression.Methods: We generated a library of PA14 transposon insertion mutants to identify P. aeruginosa genes required for exploitative and direct competitions with S. aureus, B. cenocepacia, and K. pneumoniae. Results: Whereas wild type PA14 inhibited S. aureus growth, two transposon insertions located in pqsC and carB, resulted in reduced growth inhibition. PqsC is involved in the synthesis of 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs, a family of molecules having antibacterial properties, while carB is a key gene in pyrimidine biosynthesis. The carB mutant was also unable to grow in the presence of B. cepacia and K. pneumoniae but not E. coli and S. epidermidis. We further identified a transposon insertion in purF, encoding a key enzyme of purine metabolism. This mutant displayed a severe growth deficiency in the presence of Gram-negative but not of Gram-positive bacteria. We identified a beneficial interaction in a bioA transposon mutant, unable to grow on rich medium. This growth defect could be restored either by addition of biotin or by co-culturing the mutant in the presence of K. pneumoniae or E. coli.Conclusions: Complex interactions take place between the various bacterial species colonizing CF-lungs. This work identified both detrimental and beneficial interactions occurring between P. aeruginosa and three other respiratory pathogens involving several major metabolic pathways. Manipulating these pathways could be used to interfere with bacterial interactions and influence the colonization by respiratory pathogens.

  11. Novel, deep-branching heterotrophic bacterial populations recovered from thermal spring metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Colman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal spring ecosystems are a valuable resource for the discovery of novel hyperthermophilic Bacteria and Archaea, and harbor deeply-branching lineages that provide insight regarding the nature of early microbial life. We characterized bacterial populations in two circumneutral (pH ~ 8 Yellowstone National Park thermal (T ~ 80 oC spring filamentous ‘streamer’ communities using random metagenomic DNA sequence to investigate the metabolic potential of these novel populations. Four de novo assemblies representing three abundant, deeply-branching bacterial phylotypes were recovered. Analysis of conserved phylogenetic marker genes indicated that two of the phylotypes represent separate groups of an uncharacterized phylum (for which we propose the candidate phylum name ‘Pyropristinus’. The third new phylotype falls within the proposed Calescamantes phylum. Metabolic reconstructions of the 'Pyropristinus' and Calescamantes populations showed that these organisms appear to be chemoorganoheterotrophs, and have the genomic potential for aerobic respiration and oxidative phosphorylation via archaeal-like V-type, and bacterial F-type ATPases, respectively. A survey of similar phylotypes (> 97% nt identity within 16S rRNA gene datasets suggest that the newly described organisms are restricted to terrestrial thermal springs ranging from 70 - 90 oC and pH values of ~ 7 - 9. The characterization of these lineages is important for understanding the diversity of deeply-branching bacterial phyla, and their functional role in high-temperature circumneutral ‘streamer’ communities.

  12. Positive epistasis between co-infecting plasmids promotes plasmid survival in bacterial populations

    OpenAIRE

    San Millan, Alvaro; Heilbron, Karl; MacLean, R. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Plasmids have a key role in the horizontal transfer of genes among bacteria. Although plasmids are catalysts for bacterial evolution, it is challenging to understand how they can persist in bacterial populations over the long term because of the burden they impose on their hosts (the ‘plasmid paradox'). This paradox is especially perplexing in the case of ‘small' plasmids, which are unable to self-transfer by conjugation. Here, for the first time, we investigate how interactions between co-in...

  13. Evaluation of a routine antiseptic and two disinfectants for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Javdani,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A routine antiseptic and two disinfectant agents were used separately for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof: 1 7.5% povidone–iodine scrub mixed with 10% povidone–iodine solution, 2 10% copper sulfate, and 3 8% formaldehyde. Swabbing for microbial colony counts were used to evaluate pre and post–scrub of hooves of eight cows. The results revealed no significant differences in reduction of bacterial colony count between post–scrubs of povidone–iodine and formaldehyde. Bacterial colony counts after the povidone–iodine scrub solution and formaldehyde scrub were significantly different from those obtained after the copper sulfate scrub. Significant reduction in number of microbial colony in post–scrub by povidone–iodine, formaldehyde, and copper sulfate were observed which were different from the control (warm tap water.

  14. Genome-wide selective sweeps and gene-specific sweeps in natural bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendall, Matthew L; Stevens, Sarah Lr; Chan, Leong-Keat; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Froula, Jeff; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary A; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J; McMahon, Katherine D; Malmstrom, Rex R

    2016-07-01

    Multiple models describe the formation and evolution of distinct microbial phylogenetic groups. These evolutionary models make different predictions regarding how adaptive alleles spread through populations and how genetic diversity is maintained. Processes predicted by competing evolutionary models, for example, genome-wide selective sweeps vs gene-specific sweeps, could be captured in natural populations using time-series metagenomics if the approach were applied over a sufficiently long time frame. Direct observations of either process would help resolve how distinct microbial groups evolve. Here, from a 9-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake (2005-2013), we explore changes in single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in 30 bacterial populations. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied by >1000-fold among populations. SNP allele frequencies also changed dramatically over time within some populations. Interestingly, nearly all SNP variants were slowly purged over several years from one population of green sulfur bacteria, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were lost from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep in progress, a process predicted by the 'ecotype model' of speciation but not previously observed in nature. In contrast, other populations contained large, SNP-free genomic regions that appear to have swept independently through the populations prior to the study without purging diversity elsewhere in the genome. Evidence for both genome-wide and gene-specific sweeps suggests that different models of bacterial speciation may apply to different populations coexisting in the same environment. PMID:26744812

  15. Bacterial populations and adaptations in the mucus layers on living corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducklow, H.W.; Mitchell, R.

    1979-07-01

    The external mucus layers of the stony coral Porites astreoides and the soft corals Palythoa sp. and Heteroxenia fuscesens are inhabited by communities of marine heterotrophic bacteria. Population levels of bacteria in coral mucus may be regulated by the self-cleaning behavior of the host. Bacterial populations in coral mucus respond to stresses applied to the host coral by growing to higher population levels in the mucus, indicating that these are populations of viable organisms closely attuned to host metabolism. Members of these microbial populations utilize the mucus compounds and may play a role in processing coral mucus for reef detritus feeders. One such species, Vibrio alginolyticus, grows rapidly on Heteroxenia mucus, is attracted to dissolved mucus, and possesses a mechanism to maintain itself on the coral surface.

  16. Effect of manure and NPK to increase soil bacterial population of Azotobacter and Azospirillus in chili (Capsicum annum) cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    SUPRIYADI; MUJIYATI

    2009-01-01

    Mujiyati, Supriyadi. 2009. Effect of manure and NPK to increase soil bacterial population of Azotobacter and Azospirillum in chili (Capsicum annum) cultivation. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 59-64. The objectives of this research were to find out the increase number of two bacterials populations, Azotobacter and Azospirillum, due to the use of manure fertilizer. The exsperiment was conducted using group randomly designed with two treatments. The plant populations were treated (i) whithout fertilize...

  17. Effect of particulate organic carbon on heterotrophic bacterial populations and nitrification efficiency in biological filters

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, Luigi; Blancheton, Jean-paul; V. Bruni; Piedrahita, Raul

    2006-01-01

    Competition between heterotrophic and nitrifying bacteria is of major practical importance in aquaculture biofilter design and operation. This competition must be understood to minimize the negative impact of heterotrophic bacteria on an aquaculture system. On the other hand, the heterotrophic population is suspected of having a positive effect against pathogenic bacteria. Little information is available on the bacterial communities present within aquaculture systems, except for nitrifying ba...

  18. A novel approach for estimating growth phases and parameters of bacterial population in batch culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using mathematical analysis, a new method has been developed for studying the growth kinetics of bacterial populations in batch culture. First, sampling data were smoothed with the spline interpolation method. Second, the instantaneous rates were derived by numerical differential techniques and finally, the derived data were fitted with the Gaussian function to obtain growth parameters. We named this the Spline-Numerical-Gaussian or SNG method. This method yielded more accurate estimates of the growth rates of bacterial populations and new parameters. It was possible to divide the growth curve into four different but continuous phases based on changes in the instantaneous rates. The four phases are the accelerating growth phase, the constant growth phase, the decelerating growth phase and the declining phase. Total DNA content was measured by flow cytometry and varied depending on the growth phase. The SNG system provides a very powerful tool for describing the kinetics of bacterial population growth. The SNG method avoids the unrealistic assumptions generally used in the traditional growth equations.

  19. Chromosome Painting In Silico in a Bacterial Species Reveals Fine Population Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahara, Koji; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi; Hattori, Masahira; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2013-01-01

    Identifying population structure forms an important basis for genetic and evolutionary studies. Most current methods to identify population structure have limitations in analyzing haplotypes and recombination across the genome. Recently, a method of chromosome painting in silico has been developed to overcome these shortcomings and has been applied to multiple human genome sequences. This method detects the genome-wide transfer of DNA sequence chunks through homologous recombination. Here, we apply it to the frequently recombining bacterial species Helicobacter pylori that has infected Homo sapiens since their birth in Africa and shows wide phylogeographic divergence. Multiple complete genome sequences were analyzed including sequences from Okinawa, Japan, that we recently sequenced. The newer method revealed a finer population structure than revealed by a previous method that examines only MLST housekeeping genes or a phylogenetic network analysis of the core genome. Novel subgroups were found in Europe, Amerind, and East Asia groups. Examination of genetic flux showed some singleton strains to be hybrids of subgroups and revealed evident signs of population admixture in Africa, Europe, and parts of Asia. We expect this approach to further our understanding of intraspecific bacterial evolution by revealing population structure at a finer scale. PMID:23505045

  20. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMcahon, Katherine D.; Mamlstrom, Rex R.

    2014-05-12

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ecotype model? of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  1. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2014-06-18

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  2. Plant-associated bacterial populations on native and invasive plant species: comparisons between 2 freshwater environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olapade, Ola A; Pung, Kayleigh

    2012-06-01

    Plant-microbial interactions have been well studied because of the ecological importance of such relationships in aquatic systems. However, general knowledge regarding the composition of these biofilm communities is still evolving, partly as a result of several confounding factors that are attributable to plant host properties and to hydrodynamic conditions in aquatic environments. In this study, the occurrences of various bacterial phylogenetic taxa on 2 native plants, i.e., mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum L.) and cow parsnip (Heracleum maximum Bartram), and on an invasive species, i.e., garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb.) Cavara & Grande), were quantitatively examined using nucleic acid staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The plants were incubated in triplicates for about a week within the Kalamazoo River and Pierce Cedar Creek as well as in microcosms. The bacterial groups targeted for enumeration are known to globally occur in relatively high abundance and are also ubiquitously distributed in freshwater environments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of the bacterioplankton assemblages revealed that the majority of bacterial cells that hybridized with the different probes were similar between the 2 sites. In contrast, the plant-associated populations while similar on the 3 plants incubated in Kalamazoo River, their representations were highest on the 2 native plants relative to the invasive species in Pierce Cedar Creek. Overall, our results further suggested that epiphytic bacterial assemblages are probably under the influences of and probably subsequently respond to multiple variables and conditions in aquatic milieus. PMID:22625420

  3. Involvement of the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult in bacterial defense response of sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Konstantin V; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kurilenko, Valeria V

    2013-03-26

    Bacterial infections are one of the most important problems in mass aquaculture, causing the loss of millions of juvenile organisms. We isolated 22 bacterial strains from the cavity fluid of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus pallidus and used phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences to separate the bacterial strains into 9 genera (Aliivibrio, Bizionia, Colwellia, Olleya, Paenibacillus, Photobacterium, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, and Vibrio). Incubating Strongylocentrotus intermedius larvae with a strain from each of the 9 bacterial genera, we investigated the viability of the larvae, the amount of pigment cells, and the level of polyketide synthase (pks) and sulfotransferase (sult) gene expression. Results of the assay on sea urchin development showed that all bacterial strains, except Pseudoalteromonas and Bizionia, suppressed sea urchin development (resulting in retardation of the embryos' development with cellular disorders) and reduced cell viability. We found that pks expression in the sea urchin larvae after incubation with the bacteria of 9 tested genera was significantly increased, while the sult expression was increased only after the treatment with Pseudoalteromonas and Shewanella. Shikimic acid, which is known to activate the biosynthesis of naphthoquinone pigments, increased the tolerance of the sea urchin embryos to the bacteria. In conclusion, we show that the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult are involved in the bacterial defense response of sea urchins. PMID:23548362

  4. Hydrogeochemistry and coal-associated bacterial populations from a methanogenic coal bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Elliott P.; Weeks, Edwin P.; Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Ritter, Daniel J.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Clark, Arthur C.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Vinson, David S.; Orem, William H.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic coalbed methane (CBM), a microbially-generated source of natural gas trapped within coal beds, is an important energy resource in many countries. Specific bacterial populations and enzymes involved in coal degradation, the potential rate-limiting step of CBM formation, are relatively unknown. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has established a field site, (Birney test site), in an undeveloped area of the Powder River Basin (PRB), with four wells completed in the Flowers-Goodale coal bed, one in the overlying sandstone formation, and four in overlying and underlying coal beds (Knoblach, Nance, and Terret). The nine wells were positioned to characterize the hydraulic conductivity of the Flowers-Goodale coal bed and were selectively cored to investigate the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology associated with CBM production at the Birney test site. Aquifer-test results indicated the Flowers-Goodale coal bed, in a zone from about 112 to 120 m below land surface at the test site, had very low hydraulic conductivity (0.005 m/d) compared to other PRB coal beds examined. Consistent with microbial methanogenesis, groundwater in the coal bed and overlying sandstone contain dissolved methane (46 mg/L average) with low δ13C values (−67‰ average), high alkalinity values (22 meq/kg average), relatively positive δ13C-DIC values (4‰ average), and no detectable higher chain hydrocarbons, NO3−, or SO42−. Bioassay methane production was greatest at the upper interface of the Flowers-Goodale coal bed near the overlying sandstone. Pyrotag analysis identified Aeribacillus as a dominant in situbacterial community member in the coal near the sandstone and statistical analysis indicated Actinobacteria predominated coal core samples compared to claystone or sandstone cores. These bacteria, which previously have been correlated with hydrocarbon-containing environments such as oil reservoirs, have demonstrated the ability to produce biosurfactants to break down

  5. Effect of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zylenicum supplementation on the intestinal selected bacterial population in Japanese quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baraa Mohamed,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of adding graded levels (0, 1.0 and 1.5% of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zylenicum in the basal diet on the intestinal bacterial population of the Japanese quail. Sixty Japanese quail were randomly distributed into 3 groups. Each treatment contained four replicates (5 birds/replicate. The results showed significant (P<0.05 improvement in lactobacillus of birds fed 1.5% cinnamon. Total bacterial count, coli form and fungi count was significantly (P<0.05 lower compared to the control. In conclusion, 1.5% level of cinnamon may be used for antimicrobial balance in gut for Japanese quail.

  6. Bacterial population in intestines of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon under different growth stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanilada Rungrassamee

    Full Text Available Intestinal bacterial communities in aquaculture have been drawn to attention due to potential benefit to their hosts. To identify core intestinal bacteria in the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon, bacterial populations of disease-free shrimp were characterized from intestines of four developmental stages (15-day-old post larvae (PL15, 1- (J1, 2- (J2, and 3-month-old (J3 juveniles using pyrosequencing, real-time PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE approaches. A total of 25,121 pyrosequencing reads (reading length = 442±24 bases were obtained, which were categorized by barcode for PL15 (7,045 sequences, J1 (3,055 sequences, J2 (13,130 sequences and J3 (1,890 sequences. Bacteria in the phyla Bacteroides, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were found in intestines at all four growth stages. There were 88, 14, 27, and 20 bacterial genera associated with the intestinal tract of PL15, J1, J2 and J3, respectively. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Proteobacteria (class Gammaproteobacteria was a dominant bacteria group with a relative abundance of 89% for PL15 and 99% for J1, J2 and J3. Real-time PCR assay also confirmed that Gammaproteobacteria had the highest relative abundance in intestines from all growth stages. Intestinal bacterial communities from the three juvenile stages were more similar to each other than that of the PL shrimp based on PCA analyses of pyrosequencing results and their DGGE profiles. This study provides descriptive bacterial communities associated to the black tiger shrimp intestines during these growth development stages in rearing facilities.

  7. BIGSdb: Scalable analysis of bacterial genome variation at the population level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiden Martin CJ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The opportunities for bacterial population genomics that are being realised by the application of parallel nucleotide sequencing require novel bioinformatics platforms. These must be capable of the storage, retrieval, and analysis of linked phenotypic and genotypic information in an accessible, scalable and computationally efficient manner. Results The Bacterial Isolate Genome Sequence Database (BIGSDB is a scalable, open source, web-accessible database system that meets these needs, enabling phenotype and sequence data, which can range from a single sequence read to whole genome data, to be efficiently linked for a limitless number of bacterial specimens. The system builds on the widely used mlstdbNet software, developed for the storage and distribution of multilocus sequence typing (MLST data, and incorporates the capacity to define and identify any number of loci and genetic variants at those loci within the stored nucleotide sequences. These loci can be further organised into 'schemes' for isolate characterisation or for evolutionary or functional analyses. Isolates and loci can be indexed by multiple names and any number of alternative schemes can be accommodated, enabling cross-referencing of different studies and approaches. LIMS functionality of the software enables linkage to and organisation of laboratory samples. The data are easily linked to external databases and fine-grained authentication of access permits multiple users to participate in community annotation by setting up or contributing to different schemes within the database. Some of the applications of BIGSDB are illustrated with the genera Neisseria and Streptococcus. The BIGSDB source code and documentation are available at http://pubmlst.org/software/database/bigsdb/. Conclusions Genomic data can be used to characterise bacterial isolates in many different ways but it can also be efficiently exploited for evolutionary or functional studies. BIGSDB

  8. Acidic Conditions in the NHE2-/- Mouse Intestine Result in an Altered Mucosa-Associated Bacterial Population with Changes in Mucus Oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Engevik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms bacteria use to proliferate and alter the normal bacterial composition remain unknown. The ability to link changes in the intestinal micro-environment, such as ion composition and pH, to bacterial proliferation is clinically advantageous for diseases that involve an altered gut microbiota, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease, obesity and diabetes. In human and mouse intestine, the apical Na+/H+ exchangers NHE2 and NHE3 affect luminal Na+, water, and pH. Loss of NHE2 results in acidic luminal pH. Since acid resistance systems in gram-positive bacteria are well documented, we hypothesize that gram-positive bacteria would increase in representation in the acidic NHE2-/- intestine. Methods: Intestinal ion composition was measured by fame photometry and chloridometry and pH measured electrochemically. DNA extracted from intestinal flushes or from mucosal scrapings was analyzed by qRT-PCR to examine luminal and mucosa-associated bacterial populations. Epithelial mucus oligosaccharide patterns were examined by histology with FIT-C labeled lectins. Results: Although total luminal and mucosa-associated bacteria were unchanged in NHE2-/- intestine, gram-positive bacterial phyla were increased in the mucosa-associated bacterial population in a region-specific manner. The genera Clostridium and Lactobacillus were increased in the cecum and colon which corresponded to changes in NHE2-/- mucus oligosaccharide composition of mannose, N-acetyglucosamine, N-acetygalactosamine and galactose. Conclusions: Together these data indicate that changes in ion transport induce region-specific bacterial changes, which alter host mucus oligosaccharide patterns. These host-bacterial interactions provide a possible mechanism of niche-development and shed insight on how certain groups proliferate in changing environments and maintain their proliferation by altering the host.

  9. Imaging the Population Dynamics of Bacterial Communities in the Zebrafish Gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael; Burns, Adam; Zac Stephens, W.; Hampton, Jennifer; Guillemin, Karen; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-03-01

    The vertebrate gut is home to a diverse microbial ecosystem whose composition has a strong influence on the development and health of the host organism. While researchers are increasingly able to identify the constituent members of the microbiome, very little is known about the spatial and temporal dynamics of commensal microbial communities, including the mechanisms by which communities nucleate, grow, and interact. We address these issues using a model organism: the larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) prepared microbe-free and inoculated with controlled compositions of fluorophore-expressing bacteria. Live imaging with light sheet fluorescence microscopy enables visualization of individual bacterial cells as well as growing colonies over the entire volume of the gut over periods up to 24 hours. We analyze the structure and dynamics of imaged bacterial communities, uncovering correlations between population size, growth rates, and the timing of inoculations that suggest the existence of active changes in the host environment induced by early bacterial exposure. Our data provide the first visualizations of gut microbiota development over an extended period of time in a vertebrate.

  10. BACTERIAL POPULATION DYNAMICS IN WASTE OILY EMULSIONS FROM THE METAL-PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kaszycki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oil-containing wastewaters are regarded as main industrial pollutants of soil and water environments. They can occur as free-floating oil, unstable or stable oil-in-water (O/W emulsions, and in the case of extreme organic load, as water-in-oil (W/O emulsions. In this study two types of oily effluents, a typical O/W emulsion marked as E1 and a W/O emulsion E2, both discharged by local metal processing plants were examined to test their toxicity to microbial communities and the ability to serve as nutrient sources for bacterial growth. The organic contaminant load of the samples was evaluated on the basis of chemical oxygen demand (COD parameter values and was equal to 48 200 mg O2·dm-3 and >300 000 mg O2·dm-3 for E1 and E2, respectively.Both emulsions proved to be non toxic to bacterial communities and were shown to contain biodiverse autochthonous microflora consisting of several bacterial strains adapted to the presence of xenobiotics (the total of 1.36 · 106 CFU·cm-3 and 1.72 · 105 CFU·cm-3 was determined for E1 and E2, respectively. These indigenous bacteria as well as exogenously inoculated specialized allochthonous microorganisms were biostimulated so as to proliferate within the wastewater environment whose organic content served as the only source of carbon. The most favorable cultivation conditions were determined as fully aerobic growth at the temperature of 25 ºC. In 9 to 18 day-tests, autochthonous as well as bioaugmented allochthonous bacterial population dynamics were monitored. For both emulsions tested there was a dramatic increase (up to three orders of magnitude in bacterial frequency, as compared to the respective initial values. The resultant high biomass densities suggest that the effluents are susceptible to bioremediation. A preliminary xenobiotic biodegradation test confirmed that mixed auto- and allochthonous bacterial consortia obtained upon inoculation of the samples with microbiocenoses preselected for efficient

  11. A type VI secretion system is involved in Pseudomonas fluorescens bacterial competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoin, Victorien; Barbey, Corinne; Bergeau, Dorian; Latour, Xavier; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Orange, Nicole; Merieau, Annabelle

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion systems are crucial mediators of bacterial interactions with other organisms. Among them, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and appears to inject toxins into competitor bacteria and/or eukaryotic cells. Major human pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, express T6SSs. Bacteria prevent self-intoxication by their own T6SS toxins by producing immunity proteins, which interact with the cognate toxins. We describe here an environmental P. fluorescens strain, MFE01, displaying an uncommon oversecretion of Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) and VgrG (valine-glycine repeat protein G) into the culture medium. These proteins are characteristic components of a functional T6SS. The aim of this study was to attribute a role to this energy-consuming overexpression of the T6SS. The genome of MFE01 contains at least two hcp genes (hcp1 and hcp2), suggesting that there may be two putative T6SS clusters. Phenotypic studies have shown that MFE01 is avirulent against various eukaryotic cell models (amebas, plant or animal cell models), but has antibacterial activity against a wide range of competitor bacteria, including rhizobacteria and clinical bacteria. Depending on the prey cell, mutagenesis of the hcp2 gene in MFE01 abolishes or reduces this antibacterial killing activity. Moreover, the introduction of T6SS immunity proteins from S. marcescens, which is not killed by MFE01, protects E. coli against MFE01 killing. These findings suggest that the protein encoded by hcp2 is involved in the killing activity of MFE01 mediated by effectors of the T6SS targeting the peptidoglycan of Gram-negative bacteria. Our results indicate that MFE01 can protect potato tubers against Pectobacterium atrosepticum, which causes tuber soft rot. Pseudomonas fluorescens is often described as a major PGPR (plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium), and our results suggest that there may be a connection between

  12. Active Marine Subsurface Bacterial Population Composition in Low Organic Carbon Environments from IODP Expedition 320

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, A.; Reese, B. K.; Mills, H. J.; IODP Expedition 320 Shipboard Science Party

    2011-12-01

    The marine subsurface environment contains abundant and active microorganisms. These microbial populations are considered integral players in the marine subsurface biogeochemical system with significance in global geochemical cycles and reservoirs. However, variations in microbial community structure, activity and function associated with the wide-ranging sedimentary and geochemical environments found globally have not been fully resolved. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 320 recovered sediments from site U1332. Two sampling depths were selected for analysis that spanned differing lithological units in the sediment core. Sediments were composed of mostly clay with zeolite minerals at 8 meters below sea floor (mbsf). At 27 mbsf, sediments were composed of alternating clayey radiolarian ooze and nannofossil ooze. The concentration of SO42- had little variability throughout the core and the concentration of Fe2+ remained close to, or below, detection limits (0.4 μM). Total organic carbon content ranged from a low of 0.03 wt% to a high of 0.07 wt% between 6 and 30 mbsf providing an opportunity to evaluate marine subsurface microbial communities under extreme electron donor limiting conditions. The metabolically active fraction of the bacterial population was isolated by the extraction and amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA transcripts and subsequent bioinformatic analyses provided a robust data set (15,931 total classified sequences) to characterize the community at a high resolution. As observed in other subsurface environments, the overall diversity of active bacterial populations decreased with depth. The population shifted from a diverse but evenly distributed community at approximately 8 mbsf to a Firmicutes dominated population at 27 mbsf (80% of sequences). A total of 95% of the sequences at 27 mbsf were grouped into three genera: Lactobacillus (phylum Firmicutes) at 80% of the total sequences, Marinobacter (phylum

  13. An individual-based approach to explain plasmid invasion in bacterial populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seoane, Jose Miguel; Yankelevich, Tatiana; Dechesne, Arnaud;

    2011-01-01

    We present an individual-based experimental framework to identify and estimate the main parameters governing bacterial conjugation at the individual cell scale. From this analysis, we have established that transient periods of unregulated plasmid transfer within newly formed transconjugant cells......, together with contact mechanics arising from cellular growth and division, are the two main processes determining the emergent inability of the pWW0 TOL plasmid to fully invade spatially structured Pseudomonas putida populations. We have also shown that pWW0 conjugation occurs mainly at advanced stages...... observe, however, that transient periods of elevated plasmid transfer in newly formed transconjugant cells are offset by unfavorable cell-to-cell contact mechanics, which ultimately precludes the pWWO TOL plasmid from fully invading tightly packed multicellular P. putida populations such as microcolonies...

  14. Impact of bioremediation treatments on the biodegradation of buried oil and predominant bacterial populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of using mineral fertilizers as a bioremediation treatment for oil buried in fine sediments was tested in field trials at a site in the south-west of England. The plots were divided into three blocks of four treatments including untreated, fertilized, oiled unfertilized and oiled fertilized plots. The changes in residual hydrocarbons were monitored to study the biodegradation of Arabian Light Crude Oil which is known to have a high portion of biodegradable components. Samples were extracted at random points at intervals of 0, 42 and 101 days. The analysis process identified a range of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as a range of geochemical biomarkers. The final results suggested that the oil in the fertilized plots was more degraded than in the oiled, unfertilized control plots. Three way, factorial analysis of variance was used to analyse the data from the oiled fertilized and oiled unfertilized plots. No significant effect of treatment on the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons was observed. The results also showed that oil treatment and treatment with oil and fertilizer increased the abundance of hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial population. One significant observation was that different bacterial populations were stimulated in response to oil alone and a bioremediation treatment. It was concluded that the addition of inorganic fertilizers to the oiled oxic fine sediment substantially enhanced the level of biodegradation compared to untreated oiled sediment. Bioremediation is a feasible treatment for oil spills where the oil is buried in fine sediment. 14 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  15. EFFECT OF REFINED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS CONTAMINATION ON BACTERIAL POPULATION AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CULTIVATED AGRICULTURAL SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale Sogo Olalemi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the effect of refined petroleum products contamination on bacterial population and physicochemical characteristics of cultivated agricultural soil was carried out. The soil samples obtained from the Teaching and Research Farm, Obakekere, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State were contaminated with varying volumes of petrol, diesel and kerosene. The results revealed higher bacterial populations in uncontaminated soils than contaminated soils. The counts of bacteria ranged from 3.0 × 105 to 5.0 × 105 cfu/g in uncontaminated soils and 1.0 × 105 to 3.0 × 105 cfu/g in contaminated soils. The isolated bacteria were identified as Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, Corynebacterium variabilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens. The contamination had no significant effect on pH, potassium, sodium, organic carbon and nitrogen content of the soils, while the moisture, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium content of the contaminated soils were significantly different (P < 0.05 compared with the uncontaminated soils. The ability of Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, and Pseudomonas fluorescens to utilize the refined petroleum products suggest that these bacteria had potential to bioremediate petroleum contaminated soils.

  16. Critical dynamics of self-gravitating Langevin particles and bacterial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sire, Clément; Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2008-12-01

    We study the critical dynamics of the generalized Smoluchowski-Poisson system (for self-gravitating Langevin particles) or generalized Keller-Segel model (for the chemotaxis of bacterial populations). These models [P. H. Chavanis and C. Sire, Phys. Rev. E 69, 016116 (2004)] are based on generalized stochastic processes leading to the Tsallis statistics. The equilibrium states correspond to polytropic configurations with index n similar to polytropic stars in astrophysics. At the critical index n3=d/(d-2) (where d⩾2 is the dimension of space), there exists a critical temperature Θc (for a given mass) or a critical mass Mc (for a given temperature). For Θ>Θc or MMc the system collapses and forms, in a finite time, a Dirac peak containing a finite fraction Mc of the total mass surrounded by a halo. We study these regimes numerically and, when possible, analytically by looking for self-similar or pseudo-self-similar solutions. This study extends the critical dynamics of the ordinary Smoluchowski-Poisson system and Keller-Segel model in d=2 corresponding to isothermal configurations with n3→+∞ . We also stress the analogy between the limiting mass of white dwarf stars (Chandrasekhar’s limit) and the critical mass of bacterial populations in the generalized Keller-Segel model of chemotaxis.

  17. Viability of Micro-Organisms Involved in Outbreaks of Bacterial Food Borne Diseases in Dry Extruded Pet Food

    OpenAIRE

    C. Adelantado; Lopez, S.(Instituto de F ısica Corpuscular (IFIC) and Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear and Departamento de Ingeniería Electrónica and Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM), University of Valencia and CSIC, Valencia, Spain); R. Inglada; L. Vilaseca; M.A. Calvo

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzed the viability of the main micro-organisms involved in outbreaks of bacterial food borne diseases together with two fungal strains experimentally inoculated into six different commercial dry extruded pet foods during six months. Growth of all micro-organisms analyzed decreased along the experimental period, indicating that dry extruded pet food is not an adequate substrate for microbial development and it is safe as pet food since most pathogenic micro-organisms did not ada...

  18. Population-Dynamic Modeling of Bacterial Horizontal Gene Transfer by Natural Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junwen; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Natural transformation is a major mechanism of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and plays an essential role in bacterial adaptation, evolution, and speciation. Although its molecular underpinnings have been increasingly revealed, natural transformation is not well characterized in terms of its quantitative ecological roles. Here, by using Neisseria gonorrhoeae as an example, we developed a population-dynamic model for natural transformation and analyzed its dynamic characteristics with nonlinear tools and simulations. Our study showed that bacteria capable of natural transformation can display distinct population behaviors ranging from extinction to coexistence and to bistability, depending on their HGT rate and selection coefficient. With the model, we also illustrated the roles of environmental DNA sources-active secretion and passive release-in impacting population dynamics. Additionally, by constructing and utilizing a stochastic version of the model, we examined how noise shapes the steady and dynamic behaviors of the system. Notably, we found that distinct waiting time statistics for HGT events, namely a power-law distribution, an exponential distribution, and a mix of the both, are associated with the dynamics in the regimes of extinction, coexistence, and bistability accordingly. This work offers a quantitative illustration of natural transformation by revealing its complex population dynamics and associated characteristics, therefore advancing our ecological understanding of natural transformation as well as HGT in general. PMID:26745428

  19. Bacterial populations in samples of bioleached copper ore as revealed by analysis of DNA obtained before and after cultivation.

    OpenAIRE

    Pizarro, J.; Jedlicki, E; Orellana, O; J. Romero; Espejo, R T

    1996-01-01

    The composition of bacterial populations in copper bioleaching systems was investigated by analysis of DNA obtained either directly from ores or leaching solutions or after laboratory cultures. This analysis consisted of the characterization of the spacer regions between the 16 and 23S genes in the bacterial rRNA genetic loci after PCR amplification. The sizes of the spacer regions, amplified from DNAs obtained from samples, were compared with the sizes of those obtained from cultures of the ...

  20. Impact of Bioreactor Environment and Recovery Method on the Profile of Bacterial Populations from Water Distribution Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Xia; Jellison, Kristen L.; Huynh, Kevin; Widmer, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Multiple rotating annular reactors were seeded with biofilms flushed from water distribution systems to assess (1) whether biofilms grown in bioreactors are representative of biofilms flushed from the water distribution system in terms of bacterial composition and diversity, and (2) whether the biofilm sampling method affects the population profile of the attached bacterial community. Biofilms were grown in bioreactors until thickness stabilized (9 to 11 weeks) and harvested from reactor coup...

  1. Design and Evaluation of PCR Primers for Analysis of Bacterial Populations in Wine by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Isabel; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda; Cocolin, Luca; Orr, Erica; Phister, Trevor; Marshall, Megan; VanderGheynst, Jean; Mills, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is routinely used to compare levels of diversity of microbial communities and to monitor population dynamics. While using PCR-DGGE to examine the bacteria in wine fermentations, we noted that several commonly used PCR primers for amplifying bacterial 16S rDNA also coamplified yeast, fungal, or plant DNA present in samples. Unfortunately, amplification of nonbacterial DNA can result in a masking of bacterial p...

  2. Involvement of a Bacterial Microcompartment in the Metabolism of Fucose and Rhamnose by Clostridium phytofermentans

    OpenAIRE

    Elsa Petit; W Greg LaTouf; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Warnick, Thomas A.; Devin Currie; Igor Romashko; Supriya Deshpande; Kelly Haas; Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G.; Colin Wardman; Schnell, Danny J.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium phytofermentans, an anaerobic soil bacterium, can directly convert plant biomass into biofuels. The genome of C. phytofermentans contains three loci with genes encoding shell proteins of bacterial microcompartments (BMC), organelles composed entirely of proteins. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One of the BMC loci has homology to a BMC-encoding locus implicated in the conversion of fucose to propanol and propionate in a human gut commensal, Roseburia inulinivorans....

  3. A Type VI Secretion System Is Involved in Pseudomonas fluorescens Bacterial Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Victorien Decoin; Corinne Barbey; Dorian Bergeau; Xavier Latour; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Nicole Orange; Annabelle Merieau

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion systems are crucial mediators of bacterial interactions with other organisms. Among them, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and appears to inject toxins into competitor bacteria and/or eukaryotic cells. Major human pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, express T6SSs. Bacteria prevent self-intoxication by their own T6SS toxins by producing immunity proteins, which interact with the cognate toxins...

  4. Involvement of a Bacterial Microcompartment in the Metabolism of Fucose and Rhamnose by Clostridium phytofermentans

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, Elsa; LaTouf, W. Greg; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Warnick, Thomas A; Currie, Devin; Romashko, Igor; Deshpande, Supriya; Haas, Kelly; Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G; Wardman, Colin; Schnell, Danny J.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium phytofermentans, an anaerobic soil bacterium, can directly convert plant biomass into biofuels. The genome of C. phytofermentans contains three loci with genes encoding shell proteins of bacterial microcompartments (BMC), organelles composed entirely of proteins. Methodology and Principal Findings One of the BMC loci has homology to a BMC-encoding locus implicated in the conversion of fucose to propanol and propionate in a human gut commensal, Roseburia inulinivorans. W...

  5. An obligatory bacterial mutualism in a multi-drug environment exhibits strong oscillatory population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwill, Arolyn; Yurtsev, Eugene; Gore, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    A common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria involves the production of an enzyme that inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can protect other cells in the population that would otherwise be sensitive to the drug. In a multidrug environment, an obligatory mutualism arises because populations of different strains rely on each other to breakdown antibiotics in the environment. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics: ampicillin and chloramphenicol. Together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either one of the strains alone. Although mutualisms are often thought to stabilize population dynamics, we observe strong oscillatory dynamics even when there is long-term coexistence between the two strains. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and, more generally, the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity, cooperation, and ecological stability.

  6. Red Sea Acropora hemprichii Bacterial Population Dynamics under Adverse Anthropogenic Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Lizcano, Javier

    2012-08-01

    Reef-building corals are cornerstones of life in the oceans. Understanding their interactions with microorganisms and their surrounding physicochemical conditions is important to comprehend reef functioning and ultimately protect coral reef ecosystems. Corals associate with a complex and specific array of microorganisms that supposedly affect their physiology and therefore can significantly determine the condition of a coral ecosystem. As environmental conditions may shape bacterial diversity and ecology in the coral symbiosis, ecosystem changes might have unfavorable consequences for the holobiont, to date poorly understood. Here, we were studying microbial community changes in A. hemprichii as a consequence of simulated eutrophication and overfishing over a period of 16 weeks by using in situ caging and slow release fertilizer treatments in an undisturbed Red Sea reef (22.18ºN, 38.57ºW). We used 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing to evaluate the individual and combined effects of overnutrification and fishing pressure, two of the most common local threats to coral reefs. With our data we hope to better understand bacterial population dynamics under anthropogenic influences and its role in coral resilience. Projecting further, this data will be useful to better predict the consequences of human activity on reef ecosystems.

  7. Live cell imaging of SOS and prophage dynamics in isogenic bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Stefan; Pfeifer, Eugen; Krämer, Christina; Sachs, Christian Carsten; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Nöh, Katharina; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Almost all bacterial genomes contain DNA of viral origin, including functional prophages or degenerated phage elements. A frequent but often unnoted phenomenon is the spontaneous induction of prophage elements (SPI) even in the absence of an external stimulus. In this study, we have analyzed SPI of the large, degenerated prophage CGP3 (187 kbp), which is integrated into the genome of the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fluorescent reporter strains grown in microfluidic chips revealed the sporadic induction of the SOS response as a prominent trigger of CGP3 SPI but also displayed a considerable fraction (∼30%) of RecA-independent SPI. Whereas approx. 20% of SOS-induced cells recovered from this stress and resumed growth, the spontaneous induction of CGP3 always led to a stop of growth and likely cell death. A carbon source starvation experiment clearly emphasized that SPI only occurs in actively proliferating cells, whereas sporadic SOS induction was still observed in resting cells. These data highlight the impact of sporadic DNA damage on the activity of prophage elements and provide a time-resolved, quantitative description of SPI as general phenomenon of bacterial populations. PMID:26235130

  8. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang;

    2016-01-01

    acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a 'last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm...... subpopulations, with colistin-tolerant cells using type IV pili to migrate onto the top of the colistin-killed biofilm. The colistin-tolerant cells employ quorum sensing (QS) to initiate the formation of new colistin-tolerant subpopulations, highlighting multicellular behaviour in antibiotic tolerance...... development. The macrolide erythromycin, which has been previously shown to inhibit the motility and QS of P. aeruginosa, boosts biofilm eradication by colistin. Our work provides insights on the mechanisms underlying the formation of antibiotic-tolerant populations in bacterial biofilms and indicates...

  9. Differences in bacterial diversity of host-associated populations of Phylloxera notabilis Pergande (Hemiptera: Phylloxeridae) in pecan and water hickory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, R F; Nachappa, P; Tamborindeguy, C

    2011-04-01

    Host-associated differentiation (HAD) is the presence of genetically divergent, host-associated populations. It has been suggested that microbial symbionts of insect herbivores may play a role in HAD by allowing their insect hosts to use different plant species. The objective of this study was to document if host-associated populations of Phylloxera notabilis Pergande (Hemiptera: Phylloxeridae) in pecan and water hickory corresponded with differences in the composition of their associated bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we characterized the symbionts present in P. notabilis associated with these two tree species through metagenomic analyses using 454 sequencing. Differences in bacterial diversity were found between P. notabilis populations associated with pecan and water hickory. The bacteria, Pantoea agglomerans and Serratia marcescens, were absent in the P. notabilis water hickory population, whereas both species accounted for more than 69.72% of bacterial abundance in the pecan population. PMID:21261774

  10. Dandruff is associated with disequilibrium in the proportion of the major bacterial and fungal populations colonizing the scalp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Clavaud

    Full Text Available The bacterial and fungal communities associated with dandruff were investigated using culture-independent methodologies in the French subjects. The major bacterial and fungal species inhabiting the scalp subject's were identified by cloning and sequencing of the conserved ribosomal unit regions (16S for bacterial and 28S-ITS for fungal and were further quantified by quantitative PCR. The two main bacterial species found on the scalp surface were Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis, while Malassezia restricta was the main fungal inhabitant. Dandruff was correlated with a higher incidence of M. restricta and S. epidermidis and a lower incidence of P. acnes compared to the control population (p<0.05. These results suggested for the first time using molecular methods, that dandruff is linked to the balance between bacteria and fungi of the host scalp surface.

  11. The influence of light and water mass on bacterial population dynamics in the Amundsen Sea Polynya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Richert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite being perpetually cold, seasonally ice-covered and dark, the coastal Southern Ocean is highly productive and harbors a diverse microbiota. During the austral summer, ice-free coastal patches (or polynyas form, exposing pelagic organisms to sunlight, triggering intense phytoplankton blooms. This strong seasonality is likely to influence bacterioplankton community composition (BCC. For the most part, we do not fully understand the environmental drivers controlling high-latitude BCC and the biogeochemical cycles they mediate. In this study, the Amundsen Sea Polynya was used as a model system to investigate important environmental factors that shape the coastal Southern Ocean microbiota. Population dynamics in terms of occurrence and activity of abundant taxa was studied in both environmental samples and microcosm experiments by using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. We found that the BCC in the photic epipelagic zone had low richness, with dominant bacterial populations being related to taxa known to benefit from high organic carbon and nutrient loads (copiotrophs. In contrast, the BCC in deeper mesopelagic water masses had higher richness, featuring taxa known to benefit from low organic carbon and nutrient loads (oligotrophs. Incubation experiments indicated that direct impacts of light and competition for organic nutrients are two important factors shaping BCC in the Amundsen Sea Polynya.

  12. Non-Culture-Based Analysis of Bacterial Populations from Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    Power, Daniel A.; Burton, Jeremy P.; Chilcott, Chris N.; Tagg, John R.; Dawes, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    Middle meatus aspirates from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were analyzed by bacterial culture, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and antibiotic sensitivity techniques. DGGE detected a greater bacterial diversity than culture methods. Although resistance to antibiotics was low, there was evidence of changes in the composition of the bacterial microbiota over time, and the presence of noncultured bacteria was demonstrated.

  13. Development of polyvinyl chloride biofilms for succession of selected marine bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, V; Palanichamy, S; Subramanian, G; Rajaram, R

    2012-01-01

    Present investigation was made to bring out the pattern of biofilm formation by heterotrophic bacteria on nontoxic material, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) sheet fitted wooden rack that was immersed in seawater and the study was conducted in Tuticorin coast. Samplings were made over a period of 7 days with the following time period intervals: 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 and 144 hr. Bacterial enumeration was made by spread plate method on nutrient agar medium and characterization of bacterial isolates up to generic level was done. Gram-negative bacteria like Pseudomonas sp., Enterobacter sp., Aeromonas sp., Cytophaga sp. and Flavobacterium sp. were found to be the pioneer in colonizing the surface within 30 min and seven genera were represented in the biofilm. Among them two genera were found belonging to Gram-positive groups which included Micrococcus and Bacillus sp. The early stage biofilm i.e. up to 24th hr was wholly constituted by Gram-negative groups. However, the population density of Pseudomonas sp. was found to be higher (315 CFU) when compared to other Gram-negative forms. Occurrence of Gram-positive group was noted only at 48th hr old biofilm (28 to 150 CFU). The period between 48 and 96th hr was the transition where both the Gram-negative and Gram-positive groups co- existed. After 96th hr, the biofilm was found constituted only by Gram-positive groups. The isolates of early stage biofilm were found to produce allelopathic substance like bacteriocin. PMID:23033644

  14. Population Dynamics of a Salmonella Lytic Phage and Its Host: Implications of the Host Bacterial Growth Rate in Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Sílvio Roberto Branco; Carvalho, Carla A. O. C. M.; Azeredo, Joana; Ferreira, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of bacteriophages in the ecology of bacterial communities coupled with their ability to control pathogens turn essential to understand and predict the dynamics between phage and bacteria populations. To achieve this knowledge it is essential to develop mathematical models able to explain and simulate the population dynamics of phage and bacteria. We have developed an unstructured mathematical model using delay-differential equations to predict the interactions betwee...

  15. Prophage-mediated dynamics of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' populations, the destructive bacterial pathogens of citrus huanglongbing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB, a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by screening clone libraries of infected citrus, periwinkle and psyllids. Among them, Types A and B share highly conserved sequences and localize within the two prophages, FP1 and FP2, respectively. Although Types B and C were abundant in all three libraries, Type A was much more abundant in the libraries from the Las-infected psyllids than from the Las-infected plants, and Type D was only identified in libraries from the infected host plants but not from the infected psyllids. Sequence analysis of these variants revealed that the variations may result from recombination and rearrangement events. Conventional PCR results using type-specific molecular markers indicated that A, B, C and D are the four most abundant types in Las-infected citrus and periwinkle. However, only three types, A, B and C are abundant in Las-infected psyllids. Typing results for Las-infected citrus field samples indicated that mixed populations of Las bacteria present in Floridian isolates, but only the Type D population was correlated with the blotchy mottle symptom. Extended cloning and sequencing of the Type D region revealed a third prophage/phage in the Las genome, which may derive from the recombination of FP1 and FP2. Dramatic variations in these prophage regions were also found among the global Las isolates. These results are the first to demonstrate the prophage/phage-mediated dynamics of Las populations in plant and insect hosts, and their correlation with insect transmission and

  16. Emergence of Competitive Dominant Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Populations in a Full-Scale Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, Alice C.; Dionisi, Hebe; Kuo, H.-W.; Robinson, Kevin G.; Garrett, Victoria M.; Meyers, Arthur; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial populations in an industrial wastewater treatment plant were investigated with amoA and 16S rRNA gene real-time PCR assays. Nitrosomonas nitrosa initially dominated, but over time RI-27-type ammonia oxidizers, also within the Nitrosomonas communis lineage, increased from below detection to codominance. This shift occurred even though nitrification remained constant.

  17. Association between Toll-like receptor 9 gene polymorphisms and risk of bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X H; Shi, H P; Li, F J

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Toll-like receptor 9 gene (TLR9) (TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836) influenced susceptibility to bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population. The study comprised 126 patients with bacterial meningitis and 252 control subjects, all of whom were recruited from the Tuberculosis Hospital of Shanxi Province. Genotyping of TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836 was performed by polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that individuals with the AA genotype were associated with an increased risk of bacterial meningitis compared with those with the GG genotype (OR = 0.43, 95%CI = 0.19-0.95; P = 0.03). In a recessive model, the AA genotype was correlated with an elevated risk of bacterial meningitis compared with the GG+GA genotype (OR = 0.49, 95%CI = 0.22-0.99; P = 0.04). However, no significant differences were observed in the association between the TLR9-1237 rs5743836 polymorphism and the risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant, dominant, or recessive models. In conclusion, the results of our study suggest an association between the TLR9+2848 polymorphism and a reduced risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant and recessive models. PMID:27525854

  18. Detection of bacterial species involved in perimplantitis concerned with cultural and RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Gatti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants offer new treatment options for edentulous either partially or completely, now represent a viable alternative to conventional fixed protheses. Dental implants are colonized by a flora dominated by Gram-positive facultative aerobic, while in patients with bone loss and formation of pockets peri-implant diseases was found a significant difference in the composition of microflora, bacteria, Gram-negative anaerobes in particular Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola (Spirochetes, Tannerella forsythensis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia as interim black-pigmented bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, often in high concentrations. Aims. The purpose of this study was to identify those at risk of perimplantitis using 2 techniques: RT-PCR examination of trade and culture. The results were compared taking into consideration the advantages and disadvantages of both methods. Materials and methods.We studied 24 patients (14 women and 10 men, aged, women between 43 and 76 years, with an average of 63.8 + / - 10.9 years, men between 45 and 88 years with a average of 64.3 years + / - 12.5 years. Was performed a double levy of sub-gingival plaque at multiple sites that had an implant CAL (clinical attachment level> 4mm in order to assess the microbiological identification with the two techniques: Examining culture and Real-Time PCR of Commerce ( Gum-Sunstar that identifies 4 bacterial species: A. actinomycetemcomitans (A.a., P.gingivalis (P.g., T.forsythensis (T.f., and T.denticola (T.d.. Results. All patients studied were positive to both tests with charger high: the consideration of tenure, with CFU / ml > 105, was positive in 66.6% of samples by:T.f., and P.g., in 12.5% for A.a., while T.d. not been sought by examining culture, the RT-PCR was positive, with high loads, in 95.8% of samples for T.f., in 79.1% for P.g., in 12.5% for A.a. and 20.8% for T.d.The test crop showed the presence of even P.intermedia in 91

  19. Involvement of a bacterial microcompartment in the metabolism of fucose and rhamnose by Clostridium phytofermentans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Petit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium phytofermentans, an anaerobic soil bacterium, can directly convert plant biomass into biofuels. The genome of C. phytofermentans contains three loci with genes encoding shell proteins of bacterial microcompartments (BMC, organelles composed entirely of proteins. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One of the BMC loci has homology to a BMC-encoding locus implicated in the conversion of fucose to propanol and propionate in a human gut commensal, Roseburia inulinivorans. We hypothesized that it had a similar role in C. phytofermentans. When C. phytofermentans was grown on fucose, the major products identified were ethanol, propanol and propionate. Transmission electron microscopy of fucose- and rhamnose-grown cultures revealed polyhedral structures, presumably BMCs. Microarray analysis indicated that during growth on fucose, operons coding for the BMC locus, fucose dissimilatory enzymes, and an ATP-binding cassette transporter became the dominant transcripts. These data are consistent with fucose fermentation producing a 1,2-propanediol intermediate that is further metabolized in the microcompartment encoded in the BMC locus. Growth on another deoxyhexose sugar, rhamnose, resulted in the expression of the same BMC locus and similar fermentation products. However, a different set of dissimilatory enzymes and transport system genes were induced. Quite surprisingly, growth on fucose or rhamnose also led to the expression of a diverse array of complex plant polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on physiological, genomic, and microarray analyses, we propose a model for the fermentation of fucose and rhamnose in C. phytofermentans that includes enzymes encoded in the same BMC locus. Comparative genomic analysis suggests that this BMC may be present in other clostridial species.

  20. Airborne bacterial populations above desert soils of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottos, Eric M; Woo, Anthony C; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Pointing, Stephen B; Cary, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria are assumed to disperse widely via aerosolized transport due to their small size and resilience. The question of microbial endemicity in isolated populations is directly related to the level of airborne exogenous inputs, yet this has proven hard to identify. The ice-free terrestrial ecosystem of Antarctica, a geographically and climatically isolated continent, was used to interrogate microbial bio-aerosols in relation to the surrounding ecology and climate. High-throughput sequencing of bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes was combined with analyses of climate patterns during an austral summer. In general terms, the aerosols were dominated by Firmicutes, whereas surrounding soils supported Actinobacteria-dominated communities. The most abundant taxa were also common to aerosols from other continents, suggesting that a distinct bio-aerosol community is widely dispersed. No evidence for significant marine input to bioaerosols was found at this maritime valley site, instead local influence was largely from nearby volcanic sources. Back trajectory analysis revealed transport of incoming regional air masses across the Antarctic Plateau, and this is envisaged as a strong selective force. It is postulated that local soil microbial dispersal occurs largely via stochastic mobilization of mineral soil particulates. PMID:24121801

  1. The effects of a probiotic yeast on the bacterial diversity and population structure in the rumen of cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Pinloche; Neil McEwan; Jean-Philippe Marden; Corinne Bayourthe; Eric Auclair; C Jamie Newbold

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the ability of live yeast to improve milk yield and weight gain in cattle is because the yeast stimulates bacterial activity within the rumen. However it remains unclear if this is a general stimulation of all species or a specific stimulation of certain species. Here we characterised the change in the bacterial population within the rumen of cattle fed supplemental live yeast. Three cannulated lactating cows received a daily ration (24 kg/d) of corn silage (61% of ...

  2. Impact of Spontaneous Prophage Induction on the Fitness of Bacterial Populations and Host-Microbe Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Nanda, Arun M.; Thormann, Kai; Frunzke, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages and genetic elements, such as prophage-like elements, pathogenicity islands, and phage morons, make up a considerable amount of bacterial genomes. Their transfer and subsequent activity within the host's genetic circuitry have had a significant impact on bacterial evolution. In this review, we consider what underlying mechanisms might cause the spontaneous activity of lysogenic phages in single bacterial cells and how the spontaneous induction of prophages can lead to competiti...

  3. Silkworm ferritin 1 heavy chain homolog is involved in defense against bacterial infection through regulation of haemolymph iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otho, Sohail Ahmed; Chen, Kangkang; Zhang, Yongdong; Wang, Peng; Lu, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    Iron functions as a nutrient and a potential toxin in all organisms. It plays a key role in the interaction between microbes and their hosts as well. Microbial infection disrupts iron homeostasis in the host; meanwhile the host endeavors to keep the homeostasis through iron transport and storage. Transferrins and ferritins are the major iron-binding proteins that affect iron distribution in insects. In this study, we investigated a possible involvement of Bombyx mori ferritin 1 (BmFer1) heavy chain homolog in the defense against bacterial infection in the silkworm larvae. The BmFer1 mRNA abundance was up-regulated in hemocytes, but not in fat body, after Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus infection. The infection resulted in elevated iron levels in the hemolymph. Injection of recombinant BmFer1 protein into hemocoel reduced the plasma iron level after infection, limited the bacterial growth in the hemolymph, and resulted in a lower mortality caused by infection. Our study indicated that B. mori ferritin-1 may restrict iron access of the invading bacteria to block their growth as a defense strategy. PMID:26522340

  4. Bacterial communities potentially involved in iron-cycling in Baltic Sea and North Sea sediments revealed by pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Carolina; Dellwig, Olaf; Dähnke, Kirstin; Gehre, Matthias; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz E; Böttcher, Michael E; Meister, Patrick; Friedrich, Michael W

    2016-04-01

    To gain insight into the bacterial communities involved in iron-(Fe) cycling under marine conditions, we analysed sediments with Fe-contents (0.5-1.5 wt %) from the suboxic zone at a marine site in the Skagerrak (SK) and a brackish site in the Bothnian Bay (BB) using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Several bacterial families, including Desulfobulbaceae, Desulfuromonadaceae and Pelobacteraceae and genera, includingDesulfobacterandGeobacter, known to reduce Fe were detected and showed highest abundance near the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox boundary. Additional genera with microorganisms capable of coupling fermentation to Fe-reduction, includingClostridiumandBacillus, were observed. Also, the Fe-oxidizing families Mariprofundaceae and Gallionellaceae occurred at the SK and BB sites, respectively, supporting Fe-cycling. In contrast, the sulphate (SO4 (2-)) reducing bacteriaDesulfococcusandDesulfobacteriumwere more abundant at greater depths concurring with a decrease in Fe-reducing activity. The communities revealed by pyrosequencing, thus, match the redox stratification indicated by the geochemistry, with the known Fe-reducers coinciding with the zone of Fe-reduction. Not the intensely studied model organisms, such asGeobacterspp., but rather versatile microorganisms, including sulphate reducers and possibly unknown groups appear to be important for Fe-reduction in these marine suboxic sediments. PMID:26960392

  5. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Bargiela, Rafael

    2015-06-29

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  6. Involvement with child protective services: is this a useful question in population-based surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Hayley A; Boak, Angela; Mann, Robert E

    2013-09-01

    Direct questions on child maltreatment in population-based surveys are often limited by ethical and methodological issues. This restricts the ability of researchers to examine an important aspect of early adversity and its relationship to health and behavior. An alternative to excluding issues of maltreatment entirely in population-based surveys is to include questions on child and family involvement with child protective services (CPS). A school-based adolescent survey that included a question on child and family involvement with CPS yielded results that were generally consistent with other studies relating child maltreatment to health and behavioral outcomes such as psychological distress symptoms, delinquency, aspects of bullying, and health service utilization. Such findings suggest that questions on involvement with CPS may be a reasonable proxy for child maltreatment. Despite the lack of information on the reason for involvement or specific categories of maltreatment, CPS involvement questions highlight the shared familial experience that surrounds CPS involvement and serves as a general reflection of an adverse experience that can be utilized by researchers interested in early experiences. PMID:23838213

  7. Divergent evolution peaks under intermediate population bottlenecks during bacterial experimental evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogwill, Tom; Phillips, Robyn L; Gifford, Danna R; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-07-27

    There is growing evidence that parallel molecular evolution is common, but its causes remain poorly understood. Demographic parameters such as population bottlenecks are predicted to be major determinants of parallelism. Here, we test the hypothesis that bottleneck intensity shapes parallel evolution by elucidating the genomic basis of adaptation to antibiotic-supplemented media in hundreds of populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. As expected, bottlenecking decreased the rate of phenotypic and molecular adaptation. Surprisingly, bottlenecking had no impact on the likelihood of parallel adaptive molecular evolution at a genome-wide scale. However, bottlenecking had a profound impact on the genes involved in antibiotic resistance. Specifically, under either intense or weak bottlenecking, resistance predominantly evolved by strongly beneficial mutations which provide high levels of antibiotic resistance. In contrast with intermediate bottlenecking regimes, resistance evolved by a greater diversity of genetic mechanisms, significantly reducing the observed levels of parallel genetic evolution. Our results demonstrate that population bottlenecking can be a major predictor of parallel evolution, but precisely how may be more complex than many simple theoretical predictions. PMID:27466449

  8. Life history correlates of fecal bacterial species richness in a wild population of the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benskin, Clare McW H; Rhodes, Glenn; Pickup, Roger W; Mainwaring, Mark C; Wilson, Kenneth; Hartley, Ian R

    2015-02-01

    Very little is known about the normal gastrointestinal flora of wild birds, or how it might affect or reflect the host's life-history traits. The aim of this study was to survey the species richness of bacteria in the feces of a wild population of blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus and to explore the relationships between bacterial species richness and various life-history traits, such as age, sex, and reproductive success. Using PCR-TGGE, 55 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified in blue tit feces. DNA sequencing revealed that the 16S rRNA gene was amplified from a diverse range of bacteria, including those that shared closest homology with Bacillus licheniformis, Campylobacter lari, Pseudomonas spp., and Salmonella spp. For adults, there was a significant negative relationship between bacterial species richness and the likelihood of being detected alive the following breeding season; bacterial richness was consistent across years but declined through the breeding season; and breeding pairs had significantly more similar bacterial richness than expected by chance alone. Reduced adult survival was correlated with the presence of an OTU most closely resembling C. lari; enhanced adult survival was associated with an OTU most similar to Arthrobacter spp. For nestlings, there was no significant change in bacterial species richness between the first and second week after hatching, and nestlings sharing the same nest had significantly more similar bacterial richness. Collectively, these results provide compelling evidence that bacterial species richness was associated with several aspects of the life history of their hosts. PMID:25750710

  9. Influence of zinc on bacterial populations and their proteolytic enzyme activities in freshwater environments: a cross-site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lauren; Olapade, Ola A

    2016-04-01

    Temporal responses of indigenous bacterial populations and proteolytic enzyme (i.e., aminopeptidase) activities in the bacterioplankton assemblages from 3 separate freshwater environments were examined after exposure to various zinc (Zn) concentrations under controlled microcosm conditions. Zn concentrations (ranging from 0 to 10 μmol/L) were added to water samples collected from the Kalamazoo River, Rice Creek, and Huron River and examined for bacterial abundance and aminopeptidase activities at various time intervals over a 48 h incubation period in the dark. The results showed that the Zn concentrations did not significantly influence total bacterial counts directly; however, aminopeptidase activities varied significantly to increasing zinc treatments over time. Also, analysis of variance and linear regression analyses revealed significant positive relationships between bacterial numbers and their hydrolytic enzyme activities, suggesting that both probably co-vary with increasing Zn concentrations in aquatic systems. The results from this study serve as additional evidence of the ecological role of Zn as an extracellular peptidase cofactor on the dynamics of bacterial assemblages in aquatic environments. PMID:26877164

  10. Characterization of bacterial pectinolytic strains involved in the water retting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Elena; León, Alicia Gordillo; Perito, Brunella; Mastromei, Giorgio

    2003-09-01

    Pectinolytic microorganisms involved in the water retting process were characterized. Cultivable mesophilic anaerobic and aerobic bacteria were isolated from unretted and water-retted material. A total of 104 anaerobic and 23 aerobic pectinolytic strains were identified. Polygalacturonase activity was measured in the supernatant of cell cultures; 24 anaerobic and nine aerobic isolates showed an enzymatic activity higher than the reference strains Clostridium felsineum and Bacillus subtilis respectively. We performed the first genotypic characterization of the retting microflora by a 16S amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). Anaerobic isolates were divided into five different groups, and the aerobic isolates were clustered into three groups. 84.6% of the anaerobic and 82.6% of the aerobic isolates consisted of two main haplotypes. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for 12 strains, representative of each haplotype. All anaerobic strains were assigned to the Clostridium genus, whereas the aerobic isolates were assigned to either the Bacillus or the Paenibacillus genus. Anaerobic isolates with high polygalacturonase (PG) activity belong to two clearly distinct phylogenetic clusters related to C. acetobutylicum-C. felsineum and C. saccharobutylicum species. Aerobic isolates with high PG activity belong to two clearly distinct phylogenetic clusters related to B. subtilisT and B. pumilusT. PMID:12919408

  11. Transcriptome analysis reveals novel genes involved in nonhost response to bacterial infection in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurelio, Lucas Damián; Petrocelli, Silvana; Blanco, Francisca; Holuigue, Loreto; Ottado, Jorgelina; Orellano, Elena Graciela

    2011-03-01

    Plants are continuously exposed to pathogen challenge. The most common defense response to pathogenic microorganisms is the nonhost response, which is usually accompanied by transcriptional changes. In order to identify genes involved in nonhost resistance, we evaluated the tobacco transcriptome profile after infection with Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), a nonhost phytopathogenic bacterium. cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism was used to identify differentially expressed transcripts in tobacco leaves infected with Xac at 2, 8 and 24h post-inoculation. From a total of 2087 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) screened (approximately 20% of the tobacco transcriptome), 316 TDFs showed differential expression. Based on sequence similarities, 82 differential TDFs were identified and assigned to different functional categories: 56 displayed homology to genes with known functions, 12 to proteins with unknown functions and 14 did not have a match. Real-time PCR was carried out with selected transcripts to confirm the expression pattern obtained. The results reveal novel genes associated with nonhost resistance in plant-pathogen interaction in tobacco. These novel genes could be included in future strategies of molecular breeding for nonhost disease resistance. PMID:20828873

  12. Bacterial enteropathogens associated with diarrhea in a rural population of Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson JC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available John C Jackson, Anthony L Farone, Mary B Farone Biology Department, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, USA Purpose: Diarrheal disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity in developing countries. To further understand the epidemiology of diarrheal disease among a rural population surrounding Robillard, Haiti, fecal swabs from patients with diarrhea were screened for the presence of enteropathogenic bacteria. Patients and methods: Fecal swabs were collected from 34 patients with signs and symptoms of diarrhea and stored in BBLTM Cary-Blair transport medium (Becton, Dickinson and Company, Sparks, MD until transit to the USA. Swab material was inoculated on to different enrichment and selective agars for incubation. Fermenting and nonfermenting bacteria that grew on the enteric selection media were identified by the BBLTM CrystalTM Enteric/Nonferementing Identification system (Becton, Dickinson and Company. Organisms identified as Escherichia coli were further screened for the presence of virulence factors by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: Of 34 patients, no Campylobacter, Shigella, Salmonella, or Vibrio spp. were isolated from swabs transported to the USA for culture. Of 73 E. coli isolates cultured from the swabs, one enteropathogenic strain of E. coli was identified by multiplex PCR. Escherichia fergusonii and Cronobacter sakazakii, both potential gastrointestinal pathogens, were also isolated from patient stools. Conclusion: This study was undertaken to determine if bacterial enteropathogens could be detected in the stools of patients suffering from diarrhea or dysentery and, in the absence of sufficient facilities, rectal swabs could be transported to the USA for culture. Although several genera of overt enteropathogens were not detected, one enteropathogenic E. coli and other pathogenic enterobacteriaceae were successfully cultured and identified. Keywords: Escherichia, Cronobacter, diarrheagenic, stool

  13. Critical mass of bacterial populations and critical temperature of self-gravitating Brownian particles in two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2007-01-01

    We show that the critical mass M_c=8\\pi of bacterial populations in two dimensions in the chemotactic problem is the counterpart of the critical temperature T_c=GMm/4k_B of self-gravitating Brownian particles in two-dimensional gravity. We obtain these critical values by using the Virial theorem or by considering stationary solutions of the Keller-Segel model and Smoluchowski-Poisson system. We also consider the case of one dimensional systems and develop the connection with the Burgers equation. Finally, we discuss the evolution of the system as a function of M or T in bounded and unbounded domains in dimensions d=1, 2 and 3 and show the specificities of each dimension. This paper aims to point out the numerous analogies between bacterial populations, self-gravitating Brownian particles and, occasionally, two-dimensional vortices.

  14. Virial theorem and dynamical evolution of self-gravitating Brownian particles and bacterial populations in an unbounded domain

    OpenAIRE

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clement

    2005-01-01

    We derive the Virial theorem appropriate to the generalized Smoluchowski-Poisson system describing self-gravitating Brownian particles and bacterial populations (chemotaxis). We extend previous works by considering the case of an unbounded domain and an arbitrary equation of state. We use the Virial theorem to study the diffusion (evaporation) of an isothermal Brownian gas above the critical temperature T_c in dimension d=2 and show how the effective diffusion coefficient and the Einstein rel...

  15. Population dynamics of a Salmonella lytic phage and its host: implications of the host bacterial growth rate in modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sílvio B; Carvalho, Carla; Azeredo, Joana; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of bacteriophages in the ecology of bacterial communities coupled with their ability to control pathogens turn essential to understand and predict the dynamics between phage and bacteria populations. To achieve this knowledge it is essential to develop mathematical models able to explain and simulate the population dynamics of phage and bacteria. We have developed an unstructured mathematical model using delay-differential equations to predict the interactions between a broad-host-range Salmonella phage and its pathogenic host. The model takes into consideration the main biological parameters that rule phage-bacteria interactions likewise the adsorption rate, latent period, burst size, bacterial growth rate, and substrate uptake rate, among others. The experimental validation of the model was performed with data from phage-interaction studies in a 5 L bioreactor. The key and innovative aspect of the model was the introduction of variations in the latent period and adsorption rate values that are considered as constants in previous developed models. By modelling the latent period as a normal distribution of values and the adsorption rate as a function of the bacterial growth rate it was possible to accurately predict the behaviour of the phage-bacteria population. The model was shown to predict simulated data with a good agreement with the experimental observations and explains how a lytic phage and its host bacteria are able to coexist. PMID:25051248

  16. Population dynamics of a Salmonella lytic phage and its host: implications of the host bacterial growth rate in modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvio B Santos

    Full Text Available The prevalence and impact of bacteriophages in the ecology of bacterial communities coupled with their ability to control pathogens turn essential to understand and predict the dynamics between phage and bacteria populations. To achieve this knowledge it is essential to develop mathematical models able to explain and simulate the population dynamics of phage and bacteria. We have developed an unstructured mathematical model using delay-differential equations to predict the interactions between a broad-host-range Salmonella phage and its pathogenic host. The model takes into consideration the main biological parameters that rule phage-bacteria interactions likewise the adsorption rate, latent period, burst size, bacterial growth rate, and substrate uptake rate, among others. The experimental validation of the model was performed with data from phage-interaction studies in a 5 L bioreactor. The key and innovative aspect of the model was the introduction of variations in the latent period and adsorption rate values that are considered as constants in previous developed models. By modelling the latent period as a normal distribution of values and the adsorption rate as a function of the bacterial growth rate it was possible to accurately predict the behaviour of the phage-bacteria population. The model was shown to predict simulated data with a good agreement with the experimental observations and explains how a lytic phage and its host bacteria are able to coexist.

  17. Cj1411c GENE OF CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI 11168 ENCODES FOR A CYTOCHROME P450 INVOLVED IN BACTERIAL CAPSULE SUGAR METABOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CORCIONIVOSCHI N.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available After isolation in 1970s, Campylobacter jejuni become the most commonlyrecognized cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in man. In animals is frequently foundin bovines on ovines. Publishing of the genome sequence of Campylobacter jejuni11168 (Parkhill, 2000 revealed the presence of only one cytochrome P450 in anoperon involved in sugar and cell surface biosynthesis. The gene name is Cj1411c, is1359 bp long and encodes 453 aa. The sequence is strictly conserved inCampylobacter jejuni RM221. Similarities with two cytochrome P450s, one formSilicobacter sp. and one form Poloromonas sp., were identified. These two enzymesare known to be involved in ascorbate and aldarate metabolism. The recombinantconstruct allowed the expression of active P450 enzyme with a 450 nm peak whenbinds CO. The protein was purified in proportion of ~ 70 %. By deleting the P450gene from the Campylobacter jejuni 11168 genome clear changes in cellmorphology were identified cells becoming wider and shorter. The capsular sugarprofile of the NCI strain reveals the presence of arabinose which was not found inthe wild type strain. The arabinose was identified by both High Performance LiquidChromatography (HPLC and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR.

  18. Effect of manure and NPK to increase soil bacterial population of Azotobacter and Azospirillus in chili (Capsicum annum cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUPRIYADI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mujiyati, Supriyadi. 2009. Effect of manure and NPK to increase soil bacterial population of Azotobacter and Azospirillum in chili (Capsicum annum cultivation. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 59-64. The objectives of this research were to find out the increase number of two bacterials populations, Azotobacter and Azospirillum, due to the use of manure fertilizer. The exsperiment was conducted using group randomly designed with two treatments. The plant populations were treated (i whithout fertilizer as the control, (ii with manure fertilizer, and (iii with NPK fertilizer. Data was experimentally collected by planting chili in several plots treated by manure, with three replications. The field experiment was conducted in Gathak Village, Karangnongko Sub-district, Klaten District, Central Java. The data collected consist of the total population of Azotobacter and Azospirillum, nitrogen content in soil and the chili yield. The primary data of research were analyzed using ANOVA test and followed by LSD test, with the degree of significance by 95% .The results showed that the manure fertilizer can increase the population of bacteria as many as 0.02% (Azotobacter and 0.46% (Azospirillum when they were compared to the control one. So that it can increase the soil fertility when they were used in long time. Therefore increasing the nutrient availability in the soil was occurred. Application of manure fertilizer could increase the total nitrogen content in the soil and it is very useful for the fertilizing of plants.

  19. Risk factors for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: a population-based study on Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Poul; Vogel, Ida; Molsted, Kirsten;

    2006-01-01

    .5, homogenous discharge, clue cells, and positive amine test). Data were collected from three questionnaires completed during the second and third trimesters and correlated with the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. Crude and adjusted relative risks (reproductive, medical, behavioral, sexual, and...

  20. Bacterial populations on brewery filling hall surfaces as revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priha, Outi; Raulio, Mari; Maukonen, Johanna; Vehviläinen, Anna-Kaisa; Storgårds, Erna

    2016-01-01

    Due to the presence of moisture and nutrients, brewery filling line surfaces are susceptible to unwanted microbial attachment. Knowledge of the attaching microbes will aid in designing hygienic control of the process. In this study the bacterial diversity present on brewery filling line surfaces was revealed by next generation sequencing. The two filling lines studied maintained their characteristic bacterial community throughout three sampling times (13-163 days). On the glass bottle line, γ-proteobacteria dominated (35-82% of all OTUs), whereas on the canning line α-, β- and γ-proteobacteria and actinobacteria were most common. The most frequently detected genera were Acinetobacter, Propinobacterium and Pseudomonas. The halophilic genus Halomonas was commonly detected, which might be due to its tolerance to alkaline foam cleaners. This study has revealed a detailed overall picture of the bacterial groups present on filling line surfaces. Further effort should be given to determine the efficacy of washing procedures on different bacterial groups. PMID:27064426

  1. DEGRADATION OF PROPANIL BY BACTERIAL ISOLATES AND MIXED POPULATIONS FROM A PRISTINE LAKE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The microbial transformation rates of propanil, a commonly used herbicide, were investigated using water from a pristine lake in northeast Georgia. Microbial degradation rates were measured using natural water microflora amended with five bacterial species (Aerobacter aerogenes, ...

  2. Isolation, Characterization and Application of Bacterial Population From Agricultural Soil at Sohag Province, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahig, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty soil samples of agriculture soil were collected from two different sites in Sohag province, Egypt, during hot and cold seasons. Twenty samples were from soil irrigated with canal water (site A and twenty samples were from soil irrigated with wastewater (site B. This study aimed to compare the incidence of plasmids in bacteria isolated from soil and to investigate the occurrence of metal and antibiotic resistance bacteria, and consequently to select the potential application of these bacteria in bioremediation. The total bacterial count (CFU/gm in site (B was higher than that in site (A. Moreover, the CFU values in summer were higher than those values in winter at both sites. A total of 771 bacterial isolates were characterized as Bacillus, Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Eschershia, Shigella, Xanthomonas, Acetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Moraxella and Methylococcus. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of Pb+2, Cu+2, Zn+2, Hg+2, Co+2, Cd+2, Cr+3, Te+2, As+2 and Ni+2 for plasmid-possessed bacteria were determined and the highest MICs were 1200 µg/mL for lead, 800 µg/mL for both Cobalt and Arsenate, 1200 µg/mL for Nickel, 1000 µg/ml for Copper and less than 600 µg/mL for other metals. Bacterial isolates from both sites A and B showed multiple heavy metal resistance. A total of 337 bacterial isolates contained plasmids and the incidence of plasmids was approximately 25-50% higher in bacteria isolated from site (B than that from site (A. These isolates were resistance to different antibiotics. Approximately, 61% of the bacterial isolates were able to assimilate insecticide, carbaryl, as a sole source of carbon and energy. However, the Citrobacter AA101 showed the best growth on carbaryl.

  3. Characterization of methanotrophic bacterial populations in natural and agricultural aerobic soils of the European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Kizilova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric methane contributes to about 20% of the total radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases, and microbial methane oxidation in upland soils is the only biological sink of methane. Microbial methane oxidation in aerated upland soils is estimated as 15 - 45 Tg yr-1 or 3-9% of the annual sink. Therefore there is need of extensive research to characterize methanotrophic activity in various ecosystems for possible application to reduce atmospheric methane fluxes and to minimize global climate change. The vast majority of known aerobic methanotrophs belongs to the Proteobacteria and placed in the families Methylococcaceae in the Gammaproteobacteria, and Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae in the Alphaproteobacteria. Known exceptions include the phylum Verrucomicrobia and uncultured methanotrophs such as Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' affiliated with the 'NC10' phylum. Plenty of studies of aerobic methane oxidation and key players of the process have been performed on various types of soils, and it was found that Methylocystis spp and uncultivated methanotrophs are abundant in upland soils. Two of the uncultured groups are upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCa) and gammaproteobacteria (USCg), as revealed by cultivation-independent surveys of pmoA diversity. Russia is extremely rich in soil types due to its vast territories, and most of these soils have never been investigated from the aspect of methanotrophy. This study addresses methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight types of natural aerobic soils, four of which also had been under agricultural use. Methane fluxes have been measured by in situ static chamber method and methane oxidation rates in soil samples - by radioisotope tracer (14CH4) technique. Changes in methanotroph diversity and abundance were assessed by cloning and Sanger sequencing, and quantitative real-time PCR of pmoA genes. Methanotrophic population of unmanaged soils turned

  4. Effect of dietary probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic supplementation on performance, immune responses, intestinal morphology and bacterial populations in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehimanesh, A; Mohammadi, M; Roostaei-Ali Mehr, M

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of probiotic (Primalac), prebiotic (TechnoMos) and synbiotic (Primalac + TechnoMos) supplementation on performance, immune responses, intestinal morphology and bacterial populations of ileum in broilers. A total of 240 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into four treatment groups which included 60 birds. Control group did not receive any treatment. The chicks in the second, third and fourth groups were fed probiotic (0.9 g/kg), prebiotic (0.9 g/kg) and probiotic (0.9 g/kg) plus probiotic (0.9 g/kg; synbiotic), respectively, at entire period. Daily feed intake, daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio were evaluated. The birds were immunized by sheep red blood cell (SRBC) on days 12 and 29 of age and serum antibody titres were measured on days 28, 35 and 42. Newcastle vaccines administered on days 9, 18 and 27 to chicks and blood samples were collected on day 42. Intestinal morphometric assessment and enumeration of intestinal bacterial populations were performed on day 42. The results indicated that consumption of probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic had no significant effect on daily feed intake, daily body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, carcass traits, intestinal morphology and bacterial populations of ileum (p > 0.05). Consumption of prebiotic increased total and IgM anti-SRBC titres on days 28 and 42 and antibody titre against Newcastle virus disease on day 42 (p < 0.05). Synbiotic increased only total anti-SRBC on day 28 (p < 0.05). It is concluded that consumption of prebiotic increased humoral immunity in broilers. Therefore, supplementation of diet with prebiotic for improvement of humoral immune responses is superior to synbiotic supplementation. PMID:26847817

  5. Bacterial adhesion and biofilms on surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trevor Roger Garrett; Manmohan Bhakoo; Zhibing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion has become a significant problem in industry and in the domicile,and much research has been done for deeper understanding of the processes involved.A generic biological model of bacterial adhesion and population growth called the bacterial biofilm growth cycle,has been described and modified many times.The biofilm growth cycle encompasses bacterial adhesion at all levels,starting with the initial physical attraction of bacteria to a substrate,and ending with the eventual liberation of cell dusters from the biofilm matrix.When describing bacterial adhesion one is simply describing one or more stages of biofilm development,neglecting the fact that the population may not reach maturity.This article provides an overview of bacterial adhesion.cites examples of how bac-terial adhesion affects industry and summarises methods and instrumentation used to improve our understanding of the adhesive prop-erties of bacteria.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission and risk for Parkinson's disease in a Japanese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura Nobutoshi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized by alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Genetic polymorphisms involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission may influence susceptibility to PD. Methods We investigated the relationship of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, monoamine oxidase B (MAOB, dopamine receptor (DR D2 and DRD4 polymorphisms and PD risk with special attention to the interaction with cigarette smoking among 238 patients with PD and 369 controls in a Japanese population. Results Subjects with the AA genotype of MAOB rs1799836 showed a significantly increased risk of PD (odds ratio (OR = 1.70, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.12 - 2.58 compared with the AG and GG genotypes combined. The AA genotype of COMT rs4680 was marginally associated with an increased risk of PD (OR = 1.86, 95% CI = 0.98 - 3.50 compared with the GG genotype. The DRD2 rs1800497 and DRD4 rs1800955 polymorphisms showed no association with PD. A COMT -smoking interaction was suggested, with the combined GA and AA genotypes of rs4680 and non-smoking conferring significantly higher risk (OR = 3.97, 95% CI = 2.13 - 7.41 than the AA genotype and a history of smoking (P for interaction = 0.061. No interactions of smoking with other polymorphisms were observed. Conclusions The COMT rs4680 and MAOB rs1799836 polymorphisms may increase susceptibility to PD risk among Japanese. Future studies involving larger control and case populations and better pesticide exposure histories will undoubtedly lead to a more thorough understanding of the role of the polymorphisms involved in the dopamine pathway in PD.

  7. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Rojo, David; Chouaia, Bessem; Tornés, Jesús; Borin, Sara; Richter, Michael; Del Pozo, Mercedes V.; Cappello, Simone; Gertler, Christoph; Genovese, María; Denaro, Renata; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Amer, Ranya A.; Bigazzi, David; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Golyshina, Olga V.; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Jaouanil, Atef; Benzha, Fatima; Magagnini, Mirko; Hussein, Emad; Al-Horani, Fuad; Cherif, Ameur; Blaghen, Mohamed; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R.; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Barbas, Coral; Malkawi, Hanan I.; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakimov, Michail M.; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills. PMID:26119183

  8. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lixandru, Brînduşa-Elena; Drăcea, Nicoleta Olguţa; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Drăgulescu, Elena Carmina; Coldea, Ileana Luminiţa; Anton, Liliana; Dobre, Elena; Rovinaru, Camelia; Codiţă, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The currative properties of aromatic and medicinal plants have been recognized since ancient times and, more recently, the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils has been used in several applications, including food preservation. The purpose of this study was to create directly comparable, quantitative data on the antimicrobial activity of some plant essential oils prepared in the National Institute of Research-Development for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Bucharest to be used for the further development of food packaging technology, based on their antibacterial and antifungal activity. The essential oils extracted from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and carraway (Carum carvi L.) were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against eleven different bacterial and three fungal strains belonging to species reported to be involved in food poisoning and/or food decay: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 6538, S. aureus ATCC 25913, E. coli ATCC 25922, E. coli ATCC 35218, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Cantacuzino Institute Culture Collection (CICC) 10878, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112, Bacillus cereus CIP 5127, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Penicillium spp. CICC 251 and two E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis clinical isolates. The majority of the tested essential oils exibited considerable inhibitory capacity against all the organisms tested, as supported by growth inhibition zone diameters, MICs and MBC's. Thyme, coriander and basil oils proved the best antibacterial activity, while thyme and spearmint oils better inhibited the fungal species. PMID:21462837

  9. Comparison of Diversities and Compositions of Bacterial Populations Inhabiting Natural Forest Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Evelyn; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Bodrossy, Levente; Sessitsch, Angela

    2004-01-01

    The diversity and composition of soil bacterial communities were compared among six Austrian natural forests, including oak-hornbeam, spruce-fir-beech, and Austrian pine forests, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP, or TRF) analysis and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The forests studied differ greatly in soil chemical characteristics, microbial biomass, and nutrient turnover rates. The aim of this study was to relate these differences to the composition of th...

  10. Haemophilus influenzae Type b Carriage and Novel Bacterial Population Structure among Children in Urban Kathmandu, Nepal▿

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, E. J.; Lewis, J.; John, T.; Hoe, J. C.; Yu, L.; Dongol, S.; Kelly, D. F.; Griffiths, D. T.; Shah, A; Limbu, B.; Pradhan, R.; Mawas, F.; Shrestha, S.; Thorson, S.; Werno, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is a major cause of invasive bacterial infection in children that can be prevented by a vaccine, but there is still uncertainty about its relative importance in Asia. This study investigated the age-specific prevalence of Hib carriage and its molecular epidemiology in carriage and disease in Nepal. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from children in Kathmandu, Nepal, from 3 different settings: a hospital outpatient department (OPD), schools, and children's ...

  11. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A.; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days o...

  12. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF BACTERIAL AGENTS OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT IN SOUTH INDIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kousalya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at determining bacterial agents of the upper respiratory tract and the susceptibility patterns of isolates to antibiotics. The throat swab samples from 250 patients suspected of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI were obtained from the General Medicine outpatient department of a Rural Health Centre of Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital (RMMC and H, Annamalai University, Chidambaram, Tamilnadu, India and inoculated in the culture medium. The bacterial infection was confirmed only in 228 patients. The organisms isolated on medium were identified by their cultural, morphological and biochemical characteristics. Staphylococcus aureus was identified as the most prevalent bacterial isolate (45.61% followed by β hemolytic streptococci (22.81%. Thirty four strains (14.91% were identified as Klebsiella penumoniae, 19 (8.33% as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the rest belonged to α hemolytic streptococci, Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. All Staphylococcus spp. were resistant to penicillin, ampicillin and co-trimoxazole. All the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The overall resistance rates were generally low for gentamicin, cefixime and ceftazidime respectively.

  13. Improved Statistical Analysis of Low Abundance Phenomena in Bimodal Bacterial Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich Reinhard; Jan Roelof van der Meer

    2013-01-01

    Accurate detection of subpopulation size determinations in bimodal populations remains problematic yet it represents a powerful way by which cellular heterogeneity under different environmental conditions can be compared. So far, most studies have relied on qualitative descriptions of population distribution patterns, on population-independent descriptors, or on arbitrary placement of thresholds distinguishing biological ON from OFF states. We found that all these methods fall short of accura...

  14. Bacterial Genetic Signatures of Human Social Phenomena among M. tuberculosis from an Aboriginal Canadian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Pepperell, Caitlin; Hoeppner, Vernon H.; Lipatov, Mikhail; Wobeser, Wendy; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite a widespread global distribution and highly variable disease phenotype, there is little DNA sequence diversity among isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, many regional population genetic surveys have revealed a stereotypical structure in which a single clone, lineage, or clade makes up the majority of the population. It is often assumed that dominant clones are highly adapted, that is, the overall structure of M. tuberculosis populations is the result of positive selec...

  15. Sampling bacterial biodiversity from a highly contaminated stream flowing through a densely populated urban area in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few studies have attempted to understand the complexity of microbial populations in Pakistan where infectious diseases are prevalent. This study was undertaken to assess bacterial biodiversity in Nehr-e-Khayyam a heavily polluted stream connected to the Arabian Gulf, which runs through a densely populated urban area in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods: Employing a universal pair of oligonucleotides capable of amplifying species-specific segments of 16S rRNA gene from all Eubacteria, we generated a library of PCR products using total DNA purified from the collected sample, cloned the amplifers into pGEM-T-Easy and sequenced each recombinant clone. The obtained DNA sequences were subjected to bio-informatic analyses. Results: A total of 71 recombinant clones were obtained from the amplified 16S rDNA products and sequenced. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that 54 (out of 71) were unique sequences from which 42 shared >97% and 12 shared <97% homology to their database counterparts. One sequence originated from the plastid DNA of eukaryote Pyramimonas disomata. From the remaining 53 sequences, 45 were Proteo-bacteria and 8 Fermicute in origin. Among 71 sequences, Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria species constituted 86% of Proteo-bacteria identified in the sample while only 13% were Fermicutes. Conclusions: The microbial niche in Nehr-e-Khayyam is occupied predominantly by heterotrophic Proteo-bacterial and Firmicute strains, some of which are known human pathogens. (author)

  16. Evolution in an Afternoon: Rapid Natural Selection and Adaptation of Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, Roger

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, rapid and low-cost technique for growing bacteria (or other microbes) in an environmental gradient, in order to determine the tolerance of the microbial population to varying concentrations of sodium chloride ions, and suggests how the evolutionary response of a microbial population to the selection pressure of the…

  17. Differential stress resistance and metabolic traits underlie coexistence in a sympatrically evolved bacterial population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puentes Tellez, Pilar; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Following intermittent batch growth in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth for about 1000 generations, differentially evolved forms were found in a population of Escherichia coli cells. Studies on this population revealed the emergence of key polymorphisms, as evidenced by analysis of both whole genome sequenc

  18. Analytical solution of population balance equation involving aggregation and breakage in terms of auxiliary equation method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zehra Pinar; Abhishek Dutta; Guido Bény; Turgut Öziş

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an effective analytical simulation to solve population balance equation (PBE), involving particulate aggregation and breakage, by making use of appropriate solution(s) of associated complementary equation via auxiliary equation method (AEM). Travelling wave solutions of the complementary equation of a nonlinear PBE with appropriately chosen parameters is taken to be analogous to the description of the dynamic behaviour of the particulate processes. For an initial proof-of-concept, a general case when the number of particles varies with respect to time is chosen. Three cases, i.e. (1) balanced aggregation and breakage, (2) when aggregation can dominate and (3) breakage can dominate, are selected and solved for their corresponding analytical solutions. The results are then compared with the available analytical solution, based on Laplace transform obtained from literature. In this communication, it is shown that the solution approach proposed via AEM is flexible and therefore more efficient than the analytical approach used in the literature.

  19. Simplified Model for the Population Dynamics Involved in a Malaria Crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We adapt a simple model of predator-prey to the population involved in a crisis of malaria. The study is made only in the stream blood inside the human body except for the liver. Particularly we look at the dynamics of the malaria parasites 'merozoites' and their interaction with the blood components, more specifically the red blood cells (RBC) and the immune response grouped under the white blood cells (WBC). The stability analysis of the system reveals an important practical direction to investigate as regards the ratio WBC over RBC since it is a fundamental parameter that characterizes stable regions. The model numerically presents a wide range of possible features of the disease. Even with its simplified form, the model not only recovers well-known results but in addition predicts possible hidden phenomenon and an interesting clinical feature a malaria crisis. (author)

  20. Improved statistical analysis of low abundance phenomena in bimodal bacterial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Reinhard

    Full Text Available Accurate detection of subpopulation size determinations in bimodal populations remains problematic yet it represents a powerful way by which cellular heterogeneity under different environmental conditions can be compared. So far, most studies have relied on qualitative descriptions of population distribution patterns, on population-independent descriptors, or on arbitrary placement of thresholds distinguishing biological ON from OFF states. We found that all these methods fall short of accurately describing small population sizes in bimodal populations. Here we propose a simple, statistics-based method for the analysis of small subpopulation sizes for use in the free software environment R and test this method on real as well as simulated data. Four so-called population splitting methods were designed with different algorithms that can estimate subpopulation sizes from bimodal populations. All four methods proved more precise than previously used methods when analyzing subpopulation sizes of transfer competent cells arising in populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas knackmussii B13. The methods' resolving powers were further explored by bootstrapping and simulations. Two of the methods were not severely limited by the proportions of subpopulations they could estimate correctly, but the two others only allowed accurate subpopulation quantification when this amounted to less than 25% of the total population. In contrast, only one method was still sufficiently accurate with subpopulations smaller than 1% of the total population. This study proposes a number of rational approximations to quantifying small subpopulations and offers an easy-to-use protocol for their implementation in the open source statistical software environment R.

  1. Improved statistical analysis of low abundance phenomena in bimodal bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Friedrich; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2013-01-01

    Accurate detection of subpopulation size determinations in bimodal populations remains problematic yet it represents a powerful way by which cellular heterogeneity under different environmental conditions can be compared. So far, most studies have relied on qualitative descriptions of population distribution patterns, on population-independent descriptors, or on arbitrary placement of thresholds distinguishing biological ON from OFF states. We found that all these methods fall short of accurately describing small population sizes in bimodal populations. Here we propose a simple, statistics-based method for the analysis of small subpopulation sizes for use in the free software environment R and test this method on real as well as simulated data. Four so-called population splitting methods were designed with different algorithms that can estimate subpopulation sizes from bimodal populations. All four methods proved more precise than previously used methods when analyzing subpopulation sizes of transfer competent cells arising in populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas knackmussii B13. The methods' resolving powers were further explored by bootstrapping and simulations. Two of the methods were not severely limited by the proportions of subpopulations they could estimate correctly, but the two others only allowed accurate subpopulation quantification when this amounted to less than 25% of the total population. In contrast, only one method was still sufficiently accurate with subpopulations smaller than 1% of the total population. This study proposes a number of rational approximations to quantifying small subpopulations and offers an easy-to-use protocol for their implementation in the open source statistical software environment R. PMID:24205184

  2. Magnesium aminoclay enhances lipid production of mixotrophic Chlorella sp. KR-1 while reducing bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bohwa; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Lee, Jiye; Nam, Bora; Kim, Dong-Myung; Lee, Kyubock; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Improving lipid productivity and preventing overgrowth of contaminating bacteria are critical issues relevant to the commercialization of the mixotrophic microalgae cultivation process. In this paper, we report the use of magnesium aminoclay (MgAC) nanoparticles for enhanced lipid production from oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 with simultaneous control of KR-1-associated bacterial growth in mixotrophic cultures with glucose as the model substrate. Addition of 0.01-0.1g/L MgAC promoted microalgal biomass production better than the MgAC-less control, via differential biocidal effects on microalgal and bacterial cells (the latter being more sensitive to MgAC's bio-toxicity than the former). The inhibition effect of MgAC on co-existing bacteria was, as based on density-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, largely dosage-dependent and species-specific. MgAC also, by inducing an oxidative stress environment, increased both the cell size and lipid content of KR-1, resulting in a considerable, ∼25% improvement of mixotrophic algal lipid productivity (to ∼410mgFAME/L/d) compared with the untreated control. PMID:27543952

  3. Population structure of the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa among street trees in Washington D.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jordan Lee; Balci, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial leaf scorch, associated with the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, is a widely established and problematic disease of landscape ornamentals in Washington D.C. A multi-locus sequence typing analysis was performed using 10 housekeeping loci for X. fastidiosa strains in order to better understand the epidemiology of leaf scorch disease in this municipal environment. Samples were collected from 7 different tree species located throughout the District of Columbia, consisting of 101 samples of symptomatic and asymptomatic foliage from 84 different trees. Five strains of the bacteria were identified. Consistent with prior data, these strains were host specific, with only one strain associated with members of the red oak family, one strain associated with American elm, one strain associated with American sycamore, and two strains associated with mulberry. Strains found for asymptomatic foliage were the same as strains from the symptomatic foliage on individual trees. Cross transmission of the strains was not observed at sites with multiple species of infected trees within an approx. 25 m radius of one another. X. fastidiosa strain specificity observed for each genus of tree suggests a highly specialized host-pathogen relationship. PMID:25815838

  4. Characterization of culturable bacterial populations associating with Pinus sylvestris--Suillus bovinus mycorrhizospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Sari; Hurek, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Bacterial isolations were carried out on Pinus sylvestris--Suillus bovinus mycorrhizospheres obtained directly from boreal pine forest. When samples were taken during dry weather, the numbers of bacterial colony-forming units were significantly higher in uncolonized short roots and external mycelia than in mycorrhizal roots and soil outside the mycorrhizosphere. In contrast, the colony-forming unit counts were similar in all hypogeous samples after rainy weather. Culturable bacteria were absent from most Suillus bovinus sporocarps. The bacteria isolated from all types of mycorr hizo sphere samples, i.e. short roots, mycorrhizal roots, and external mycelia, consisted primarily of Burkholderia spp., whereas most isolates from soil outside the mycorrhizosphere were identified as Paenibacillus spp. This study shows that mycorrhizal external mycelia can expand the habitat favourable for common rhizosphere bacteria into the soil far from the immediate rhizosphere. Some of these bacteria may help the trees with nitrogen acquisition, since potentially diazotrophic bacteria harbouring nitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes were isolated from mycorrhizal root tips. PMID:16917536

  5. Leveraging The Affordable Care Act To Enroll Justice-Involved Populations In Medicaid: State And Local Efforts

    OpenAIRE

    Bandara, Sachini N.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Riedel, Lauren E.; McGinty, Emma E.; Webster, Daniel; Toone, Robert E.; Barry, Colleen L

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to enroll criminal justice–involved populations in health insurance, particularly Medicaid. As a result, many state and county corrections departments have launched programs that incorporate Medicaid enrollment in discharge planning. Our study characterizes the national landscape of programs enrolling criminal justice–involved populations in Medicaid as of January 2015. We provide an overview of sixty-four programs operating in jai...

  6. Light Suppresses Bacterial Population through the Accumulation of Hydrogen Peroxide in Tobacco Leaves Infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dan-Dan; Liu, Mei-Jun; Sun, Xing-Bin; Zhao, Min; Chow, Wah S; Sun, Guang-Yu; Zhang, Zi-Shan; Hu, Yan-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pst) is a hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen responsible for tobacco wildfire disease. Although considerable research has been conducted on the tobacco plant's tolerance to Pst, the role of light in the responses of the photosystems to Pst infection is poorly understood. This study aimed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of the reduced photosystem damage in tobacco leaves due to Pst infection under light conditions. Compared to dark conditions, Pst infection under light conditions resulted in less chlorophyll degradation and a smaller decline in photosynthetic function. Although the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) and the activity of the photosystem I (PSI) complex decreased as Pst infection progressed, damage to PSI and PSII after infection was reduced under light conditions compared to dark conditions. Pst was 17-fold more abundant in tobacco leaves under dark compared to light conditions at 3 days post inoculation (dpi). Additionally, H2O2 accumulated to a high level in tobacco leaves after Pst infection under light conditions; although to a lesser extent, H2O2 accumulation was also significant under dark conditions. Pretreatment with H2O2 alleviated chlorotic lesions and decreased Pst abundance in tobacco leaves at 3 dpi under dark conditions. MV pretreatment had the same effects under light conditions, whereas 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea pretreatment aggravated chlorotic lesions and increased the Pst population. These results indicate that chlorotic symptoms and the size of the bacterial population are each negatively correlated with H2O2 accumulation. In other words, light appears to suppress the Pst population in tobacco leaves through the accumulation of H2O2 during infection. PMID:27148334

  7. The population structure of antibiotic-producing bacterial symbionts of Apterostigma dentigerum ants: impacts of coevolution and multipartite symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldera, Eric J; Currie, Cameron R

    2012-11-01

    Fungus-growing ants (Attini) are part of a complex symbiosis with Basidiomycetous fungi, which the ants cultivate for food, Ascomycetous fungal pathogens (Escovopsis), which parasitize cultivars, and Actinobacteria, which produce antibiotic compounds that suppress pathogen growth. Earlier studies that have characterized the association between attine ants and their bacterial symbionts have employed broad phylogenetic approaches, with conclusions ranging from a diffuse coevolved mutualism to no specificity being reported. However, the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution proposes that coevolved interactions likely occur at a level above local populations but within species. Moreover, the scale of population subdivision is likely to impact coevolutionary dynamics. Here, we describe the population structure of bacteria associated with the attine Apterostigma dentigerum across Central America using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of six housekeeping genes. The majority (90%) of bacteria that were isolated grouped into a single clade within the genus Pseudonocardia. In contrast to studies that have suggested that Pseudonocardia dispersal is high and therefore unconstrained by ant associations, we found highly structured ([Formula: see text]) and dispersal-limited (i.e., significant isolation by distance; [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) populations over even a relatively small scale (e.g., within the Panama Canal Zone). Estimates of recombination versus mutation were uncharacteristically low compared with estimates for free-living Actinobacteria (e.g., [Formula: see text] in La Selva, Costa Rica), which suggests that recombination is constrained by association with ant hosts. Furthermore, Pseudonocardia population structure was correlated with that of Escovopsis species ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]), supporting the bacteria's role in disease suppression. Overall, the population dynamics of symbiotic Pseudonocardia are more consistent with a

  8. Identification and characterization of metabolic properties of bacterial populations recovered from arsenic contaminated ground water of North East India (Assam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soma; Sar, Pinaki

    2013-12-01

    Diversity of culturable bacterial populations within the Arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater of North Eastern state (Assam) of India is studied. From nine As contaminated samples 89 bacterial strains are isolated. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis reveals predominance of Brevundimonas (35%) and Acidovorax (23%) along with Acinetobacter (10%), Pseudomonas (9%) and relatively less abundant (<5%) Undibacterium, Herbaspirillum, Rhodococcus, Staphylococcus, Bosea, Bacillus, Ralstonia, Caulobacter and Rhizobiales members. High As(III) resistance (MTC 10-50 mM) is observed for the isolates obtained from As(III) enrichment, particularly for 3 isolates of genus Brevundimonas (MTC 50 mM). In contrast, high resistance to As(V) (MTC as high as 550 mM) is present as a ubiquitous property, irrespective of isolates' enrichment condition. Bacterial genera affiliated to other groups showed relatively lower degree of As resistance [MTCs of 15-20 mM As(III) and 250-350 mM As(V)]. As(V) reductase activity is detected in strains with high As(V) as well as As(III) resistance. A strong correlation could be established among isolates capable of reductase activity and siderophore production as well as As(III) tolerance. A large number of isolates (nearly 50%) is capable of anaerobic respiration using alternate inorganic electron acceptors [As(V), Se(VI), Fe(III), [NO(3)(2), SO(4)(2), S(2)O(3)(2). Ability to utilize different carbon sources ranging from C2-C6 compounds along with some complex sugars is also observed. Particularly, a number of strains is found to possess ability to grow chemolithotrophically using As(III) as the electron donor. The study reports for the first time the identity and metabolic abilities of bacteria in As contaminated ground water of North East India, useful to elucidate the microbial role in influencing mobilization of As in the region. PMID:24210546

  9. The effects of a probiotic yeast on the bacterial diversity and population structure in the rumen of cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pinloche

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that the ability of live yeast to improve milk yield and weight gain in cattle is because the yeast stimulates bacterial activity within the rumen. However it remains unclear if this is a general stimulation of all species or a specific stimulation of certain species. Here we characterised the change in the bacterial population within the rumen of cattle fed supplemental live yeast. Three cannulated lactating cows received a daily ration (24 kg/d of corn silage (61% of DM, concentrates (30% of DM, dehydrated alfalfa (9% of DM and a minerals and vitamins mix (1% of DM. The effect of yeast (BIOSAF SC 47, Lesaffre Feed Additives, France; 0.5 or 5 g/d was compared to a control (no additive in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. The variation in the rumen bacterial community between treatments was assessed using Serial Analysis of V1 Ribosomal Sequence Tag (SARST-V1 and 454 pyrosequencing based on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Compared to the control diet supplementation of probiotic yeast maintained a healthy fermentation in the rumen of lactating cattle (higher VFA concentration [high yeast dose only], higher rumen pH, and lower Eh and lactate. These improvements were accompanied with a shift in the main fibrolytic group (Fibrobacter and Ruminococcus and lactate utilising bacteria (Megasphaera and Selenomonas. In addition we have shown that the analysis of short V1 region of 16s rRNA gene (50-60 bp could give as much phylogenetic information as a longer read (454 pyrosequencing of 250 bp. This study also highlights the difficulty of drawing conclusions on composition and diversity of complex microbiota because of the variation caused by the use of different methods (sequencing technology and/or analysis.

  10. Statistical analysis of long- and short-range forces involved in bacterial adhesion to substratum surfaces as measured using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem

    2011-08-01

    Surface thermodynamic analyses of microbial adhesion using measured contact angles on solid substrata and microbial cell surfaces are widely employed to determine the nature of the adhesion forces, i.e., the interplay between Lifshitz-van der Waals and acid-base forces. While surface thermodynamic analyses are often viewed critically, atomic force microscopy (AFM) can also provide information on the nature of the adhesion forces by means of Poisson analysis of the measured forces. This review first presents a description of Poisson analysis and its underlying assumptions. The data available from the literature for different combinations of bacterial strains and substrata are then summarized, leading to the conclusion that bacterial adhesion to surfaces is generally dominated by short-range, attractive acid-base interactions, in combination with long-range, weaker Lifshitz-van der Waals forces. This is in line with the findings of surface thermodynamic analyses of bacterial adhesion. Comparison with single-molecule ligand-receptor forces from the literature suggests that the short-range-force contribution from Poisson analysis involves a discrete adhesive bacterial cell surface site rather than a single molecular force. The adhesion force arising from these cell surface sites and the number of sites available may differ from strain to strain. Force spectroscopy, however, involves the tedious task of identifying the minor peaks in the AFM retraction force-distance curve. This step can be avoided by carrying out Poisson analysis on the work of adhesion, which can also be derived from retraction force-distance curves. This newly proposed way of performing Poisson analysis confirms that multiple molecular bonds, rather than a single molecular bond, contribute to a discrete adhesive bacterial cell surface site. PMID:21642399

  11. Bacterial Conversion of Hydroxylamino Aromatic Compounds by both Lyase and Mutase Enzymes Involves Intramolecular Transfer of Hydroxyl Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeau, Lloyd J.; He, Zhongqi; Spain, Jim C.

    2003-01-01

    Hydroxylamino aromatic compounds are converted to either the corresponding aminophenols or protocatechuate during the bacterial degradation of nitroaromatic compounds. The origin of the hydroxyl group of the products could be the substrate itself (intramolecular transfer mechanism) or the solvent water (intermolecular transfer mechanism). The conversion of hydroxylaminobenzene to 2-aminophenol catalyzed by a mutase from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45 proceeds by an intramolecular hydroxyl...

  12. Effects of gamma-irradiation before and after cooking on bacterial population and sensory quality of Dakgalbi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of gamma irradiation on the total bacterial population and the sensory quality of Dakgalbi irradiated before and after cooking. Fresh chicken meat was cut into small pieces and used to prepare Dakgalbi. For the preparation of Dakgalbi cooked with gamma-irradiated chicken meat and sauce (IBC), raw chicken meat and Dakgalbi sauce were irradiated and then stir-fried. For the preparation of Dakgalbi irradiated after cooking with raw chicken meat and sauce (IAC), raw chicken meat and Dakgalbi sauce were first cooked and subsequently irradiated. Under the accelerated storage condition of 35 °C for 7 days, bacteria in IBC were below the detection limit (1 log CFU/g) on day 1 but were detected on day 2 and gradually increased hereafter. In IAC, on the other hand, bacteria were not detected at all. Evaluation of sensory quality also decreased on both samples. However, IAC showed a better trend. Our results indicate that IAC protocol was a more effective method for reducing bacterial growth in Dakgalbi. - Highlights: ► We compared the microbial safety and sensory property of Dakgalbi irradiated before and after cooking. ► Dakgalbi irradiated after cooking can be more effective processing method on microbial safety. ► Sensory property decreased on both Dakgalbis by irradiation-induced off-flavor. ► Dakgalbi irradiated after cooking showed a better tendency on the sensory evaluation.

  13. BACTERIAL POPULATION SHIFTS IN THE RUMEN OF LACTATING DAIRY COWS WITHIN AND ACROSS FEEDING CYCLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    While species composition of the ruminal microflora is thought to change during the feeding cycle due to variations in feed intake and ruminal environmental conditions, no studies have systematically characterized these purported population shifts. We used PCR amplification and automated ribosomal ...

  14. Bacterial populations within copper mine tailings: long-term effects of amendment with Class A biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates the effect of surface application of dried Class A biosolids on microbial populations within copper mine tailings. Methods and Results: Mine tailing sites were established at ASARCO Mission Mine close to Sahuarita, Arizona. Site 1 (Dec. 1998) was amended with 248 tons ha-1 of C...

  15. Measuring the Rate of Conjugal Plasmid Transfer and Phage Infection in a Bacterial Population Using Quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhenmao; Goddard, Noel

    2012-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer between species is an important mechanism for bacterial genome evolution. In Escherichia coli, conjugation is the transfer from a donor(F^+) to a recipient(F^-) cell through cell-to-cell contact. We demonstrate a novel qPCR method for quantifying the transfer kinetics of the F plasmid in a population by enumerating the relative abundance of genetic loci unique to the plasmid and the chromosome. This approach allows us to query the plasmid transfer rate without the need for selective culturing with unprecedented single locus resolution. It also allows us to investigate the inhibition of conjugation in the presence of filamentous bacteriophages M13. Experimental data is then compared with numerical simulation using a mass action, resource limited model.

  16. A new method for determining the metabolic activity of specific bacterial populations in soil using tritiated leucine and immunomagnetic separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, Gitte; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Frette, Lone;

    2000-01-01

    time with immunomagnetic beads was not critical for optimal target cell recovery, but samples needed to be washed at least 5¿times during the immunomagnetic separation to reduce unspecific binding of the indigenous soil bacteria to the magnetic beads. Soil absorption of the polyclonal antibody further......A new assay, using immunomagnetic separation and uptake of tritiated leucine ([3H]-Leu), was developed for measuring the in situ metabolic activity of specific bacterial populations in soil. Such assays are needed to assess the role individual species play in diverse microbial soil communities. The...... method was optimized using Pseudomonas putida KT2440¿:¿:Tc+/TOL::gfp inoculated into soil microcosms. Inoculated soil samples were incubated with [3H]-Leu followed by an immunomagnetic separation to recover the target bacteria. Radiolabel incorporated by the target bacteria was then measured. Incubation...

  17. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-11-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days of full-scale manure vermicomposting. On day 6, the abundances of genes encoding tetracycline resistance [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)] were reduced (P vermicomposting, accompanied by a 100 times increase in the relative abundance of Flavobacteriaceae spp. Variations in the abundances of ARGs were correlated with the changing microbial community structure and the relative abundances of the family Ruminococcaceae, class Bacilli, or phylum Proteobacteria. Vermicomposting, as a waste management practice, can reduce the overall abundance of ARGs. More research is warranted to assess the use of this waste management practice as a measure to attenuate the dissemination of antimicrobial residues and ARGs from livestock production before vermicompost can be safely used as biofertilizer in agroecosystems. PMID:26296728

  18. Modeling physiological processes that relate toxicant exposure and bacterial population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin Klanjscek

    Full Text Available Quantifying effects of toxicant exposure on metabolic processes is crucial to predicting microbial growth patterns in different environments. Mechanistic models, such as those based on Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB theory, can link physiological processes to microbial growth.Here we expand the DEB framework to include explicit consideration of the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Extensions considered are: (i additional terms in the equation for the "hazard rate" that quantifies mortality risk; (ii a variable representing environmental degradation; (iii a mechanistic description of toxic effects linked to increase in ROS production and aging acceleration, and to non-competitive inhibition of transport channels; (iv a new representation of the "lag time" based on energy required for acclimation. We estimate model parameters using calibrated Pseudomonas aeruginosa optical density growth data for seven levels of cadmium exposure. The model reproduces growth patterns for all treatments with a single common parameter set, and bacterial growth for treatments of up to 150 mg(Cd/L can be predicted reasonably well using parameters estimated from cadmium treatments of 20 mg(Cd/L and lower. Our approach is an important step towards connecting levels of biological organization in ecotoxicology. The presented model reveals possible connections between processes that are not obvious from purely empirical considerations, enables validation and hypothesis testing by creating testable predictions, and identifies research required to further develop the theory.

  19. Finite-size effects on bacterial population expansion under controlled fow conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Tesser, Francesca; Clercx, Herman J H; Brunsveld, Luc; Toschi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of biological species in natural environments is usually described as the combined effect of individual spatial dispersal and growth. In the case of aquatic ecosystems flow transport can also be extremely relevant as an extra, advection induced, dispersal factor. There is a lack of reproducible experimental studies on biological fronts of living organisms in controlled streaming habitats. It is thus not clear if, and to which extent, the current theoretical and experimental knowledge on advective-reactive-diffusive fronts for chemical reactions can also apply to the expansion of biological populations. We designed and assembled a dedicated microfluidic device to control and quantify the expansion of populations of $E.coli$ bacteria under both co-flowing and counter-flowing conditions, measuring the front speed at varying intensity of the imposed flow. At variance with respect to the case of autocatalytic reactions, we measure that almost irrespective of the counter-flow velocity, the front speed...

  20. A three-scale analysis of bacterial communities involved in rocks colonization and soil formation in high mountain environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Alfonso; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Borruso, Luigimaria; Zerbe, Stefan; Daffonchio, Daniele; Brusetti, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    Alpha and beta diversities of the bacterial communities growing on rock surfaces, proto-soils, riparian sediments, lichen thalli, and water springs biofilms in a glacier foreland were studied. We used three molecular based techniques to allow a deeper investigation at different taxonomic resolutions: denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, length heterogeneity-PCR, and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Bacterial communities were mainly composed of Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria with distinct variations among sites. Proteobacteria were more represented in sediments, biofilms, and lichens; Acidobacteria were mostly found in proto-soils; and Cyanobacteria on rocks. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were mainly found in biofilms. UniFrac P values confirmed a significant difference among different matrices. Significant differences (P < 0.001) in beta diversity were observed among the different matrices at the genus-species level, except for lichens and rocks which shared a more similar community structure, while at deep taxonomic resolution two distinct bacterial communities between lichens and rocks were found. PMID:23712376

  1. Specialized peptidoglycan hydrolases sculpt the intra-bacterial niche of predatory Bdellovibrio and increase population fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Lerner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio are predatory bacteria that have evolved to invade virtually all gram-negative bacteria, including many prominent pathogens. Upon invasion, prey bacteria become rounded up into an osmotically stable niche for the Bdellovibrio, preventing further superinfection and allowing Bdellovibrio to replicate inside without competition, killing the prey bacterium and degrading its contents. Historically, prey rounding was hypothesized to be associated with peptidoglycan (PG metabolism; we found two Bdellovibrio genes, bd0816 and bd3459, expressed at prey entry and encoding proteins with limited homologies to conventional dacB/PBP4 DD-endo/carboxypeptidases (responsible for peptidoglycan maintenance during growth and division. We tested possible links between Bd0816/3459 activity and predation. Bd3459, but not an active site serine mutant protein, bound β-lactam, exhibited DD-endo/carboxypeptidase activity against purified peptidoglycan and, importantly, rounded up E. coli cells upon periplasmic expression. A ΔBd0816 ΔBd3459 double mutant invaded prey more slowly than the wild type (with negligible prey cell rounding and double invasions of single prey by more than one Bdellovibrio became more frequent. We solved the crystal structure of Bd3459 to 1.45 Å and this revealed predation-associated domain differences to conventional PBP4 housekeeping enzymes (loss of the regulatory domain III, alteration of domain II and a more exposed active site. The Bd3459 active site (and by similarity the Bd0816 active site can thus accommodate and remodel the various bacterial PGs that Bdellovibrio may encounter across its diverse prey range, compared to the more closed active site that "regular" PBP4s have for self cell wall maintenance. Therefore, during evolution, Bdellovibrio peptidoglycan endopeptidases have adapted into secreted predation-specific proteins, preventing wasteful double invasion, and allowing activity upon the diverse prey peptidoglycan

  2. Paths and patterns: the biology and physics of swimming bacterial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, J. O.; Strittmatter, R. P.; Swartz, D. L.; Wiseley, D. A.; Wojciechowski, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    The velocity distribution of swimming micro-organisms depends on directional cues supplied by the environment. Directional swimming within a bounded space results in the accumulation of organisms near one or more surfaces. Gravity, gradients of chemical concentration and illumination affect the motile behaviour of individual swimmers. Concentrated populations of organisms scatter and absorb light or consume molecules, such as oxygen. When supply is one-sided, consumption creates gradients; the presence of the population alters the intensity and the symmetry of the environmental cues. Patterns of cues interact dynamically with patterns of the consumer population. In suspensions, spatial variations in the concentration of organisms are equivalent to variations of mean mass density of the fluid. When organisms accumulate in one region whilst moving away from another region, the force of gravity causes convection that translocates both organisms and dissolved substances. The geometry of the resulting concentration-convection patterns has features that are remarkably reproducible. Of interest for biology are (1) the long-range organisation achieved by organisms that do not communicate, and (2) that the entire system, consisting of fluid, cells, directional supply of consumables, boundaries and gravity, generates a dynamic that improves the organisms' habitat by enhancing transport and mixing. Velocity distributions of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis have been measured within the milieu of the spatially and temporally varying oxygen concentration which they themselves create. These distributions of swimming speed and direction are the fundamental ingredients required for a quantitative mathematical treatment of the patterns. The quantitative measurement of swimming behaviour also contributes to our understanding of aerotaxis of individual cells.

  3. a Paradox in Life Thermodynamics:. the Long-Term Survival of Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnazza, S.; Guglielmino, S.; Nicolò, M.; Santoro, F.; Oliveri, F.

    2008-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an ubiquitous bacterium that, due to its high metabolic versatility, is able to persist for prolonged periods of time. It is the ethiological agent of cystic fibrosis and is involved in urinary infections, conjunctivitis, otitis and pneumonia. We present the results of a batch culture of P. aeruginosa inoculated in LB medium and monitored weekly for a period of 24 months during which no more nutrients are added. A mathematical model suitable to describe the experimental viability data is given.

  4. Metagenomics reveals pervasive bacterial populations and reduced community diversity across the Alaska tundra ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Robert Johnston

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available How soil microbial communities contrast with respect to taxonomic and functional composition within and between ecosystems remains an unresolved question that is central to predicting how global anthropogenic change will affect soil functioning and services. In particular, it remains unclear how small-scale observations of soil communities based on the typical volume sampled (1-2 grams are generalizable to ecosystem-scale responses and processes. This is especially relevant for remote, northern latitude soils, which are challenging to sample and are also thought to be more vulnerable to climate change compared to temperate soils. Here, we employed well-replicated shotgun metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to characterize community composition and metabolic potential in Alaskan tundra soils, combining our own datasets with those publically available from distant tundra and temperate grassland and agriculture habitats. We found that the abundance of many taxa and metabolic functions differed substantially between tundra soil metagenomes relative to those from temperate soils, and that a high degree of OTU-sharing exists between tundra locations. Tundra soils were an order of magnitude less complex than their temperate counterparts, allowing for near-complete coverage of microbial community richness (~92% breadth by sequencing, and the recovery of twenty-seven high-quality, almost complete (>80% completeness population bins. These population bins, collectively, made up to ~10% of the metagenomic datasets, and represented diverse taxonomic groups and metabolic lifestyles tuned toward sulfur cycling, hydrogen metabolism, methanotrophy, and organic matter oxidation. Several population bins, including members of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were also present in geographically distant (~100-530 km apart tundra habitats (full genome representation and up to 99.6% genome-derived average nucleotide identity. Collectively

  5. Metagenomics Reveals Pervasive Bacterial Populations and Reduced Community Diversity across the Alaska Tundra Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Eric R.; Rodriguez-R, Luis M.; Luo, Chengwei; Yuan, Mengting M.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2016-01-01

    How soil microbial communities contrast with respect to taxonomic and functional composition within and between ecosystems remains an unresolved question that is central to predicting how global anthropogenic change will affect soil functioning and services. In particular, it remains unclear how small-scale observations of soil communities based on the typical volume sampled (1–2 g) are generalizable to ecosystem-scale responses and processes. This is especially relevant for remote, northern latitude soils, which are challenging to sample and are also thought to be more vulnerable to climate change compared to temperate soils. Here, we employed well-replicated shotgun metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to characterize community composition and metabolic potential in Alaskan tundra soils, combining our own datasets with those publically available from distant tundra and temperate grassland and agriculture habitats. We found that the abundance of many taxa and metabolic functions differed substantially between tundra soil metagenomes relative to those from temperate soils, and that a high degree of OTU-sharing exists between tundra locations. Tundra soils were an order of magnitude less complex than their temperate counterparts, allowing for near-complete coverage of microbial community richness (~92% breadth) by sequencing, and the recovery of 27 high-quality, almost complete (>80% completeness) population bins. These population bins, collectively, made up to ~10% of the metagenomic datasets, and represented diverse taxonomic groups and metabolic lifestyles tuned toward sulfur cycling, hydrogen metabolism, methanotrophy, and organic matter oxidation. Several population bins, including members of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were also present in geographically distant (~100–530 km apart) tundra habitats (full genome representation and up to 99.6% genome-derived average nucleotide identity). Collectively, our results revealed

  6. Dominance of a clonal green sulfur bacterial population in a stratified lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea H; Habicht, Kirsten S; Peduzzi, Sandro;

    2009-01-01

    For many years, the chemocline of the meromictic Lake Cadagno, Switzerland, was dominated by purple sulfur bacteria. However, following a major community shift in recent years, green sulfur bacteria (GSB) have come to dominate. We investigated this community by performing microbial diversity...... population peaked in the chemocline (c. 8 x 10(6) GSB cells mL(-1)) and constituted about 50% of all cells in the anoxic zones of the water column. At least 99.5% of these GSB cells had SSU rRNA, fmoA, and csmCA sequences essentially identical to that of the previously isolated and genome-sequenced GSB...

  7. A Population Biology Perspective on the Stepwise Infection Process of the Bacterial Pathogen Pasteuria ramosa in Daphnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Dieter; Duneau, David; Hall, Matthew D; Luijckx, Pepijn; Andras, Jason P; Du Pasquier, Louis; Ben-Ami, Frida

    2016-01-01

    The infection process of many diseases can be divided into series of steps, each one required to successfully complete the parasite's life and transmission cycle. This approach often reveals that the complex phenomenon of infection is composed of a series of more simple mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that a population biology approach, which takes into consideration the natural genetic and environmental variation at each step, can greatly aid our understanding of the evolutionary processes shaping disease traits. We focus in this review on the biology of the bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa and its aquatic crustacean host Daphnia, a model system for the evolutionary ecology of infectious disease. Our analysis reveals tremendous differences in the degree to which the environment, host genetics, parasite genetics and their interactions contribute to the expression of disease traits at each of seven different steps. This allows us to predict which steps may respond most readily to selection and which steps are evolutionarily constrained by an absence of variation. We show that the ability of Pasteuria to attach to the host's cuticle (attachment step) stands out as being strongly influenced by the interaction of host and parasite genotypes, but not by environmental factors, making it the prime candidate for coevolutionary interactions. Furthermore, the stepwise approach helps us understanding the evolution of resistance, virulence and host ranges. The population biological approach introduced here is a versatile tool that can be easily transferred to other systems of infectious disease. PMID:27015951

  8. Multiplex cytokine analyses in dogs with pyometra suggest involvement of KC-like chemokine in canine bacterial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Iulia; Hagman, Ragnvi; Johannisson, Anders; Wang, Liya; Södersten, Fredrik; Wernersson, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Clinical diagnostic criteria for sepsis (systemic inflammatory response syndrome caused by infection) are unspecific and, therefore, biomarkers for sepsis diagnosis are needed for appropriate treatment and patient survival. Pyometra, a common disease caused by bacterial infection of the uterus, results in sepsis in nearly 60% of cases in dogs. We used dogs with pyometra as a natural model for sepsis and collected serum samples from 39 dogs, of which 22 with pyometra and 17 healthy controls. Dogs with pyometra were further grouped into dogs with sepsis (n=18) and without sepsis (n=4). Serum concentrations of a panel of cytokines, including keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC)-like, granulocyte-macrophages colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, IL-18, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL)10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, were measured using multiplex analyses. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were determined using an automated immunoturbidimetric assay. In addition to physical examination hematological and serum biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the overall status of the dogs. Significantly higher concentrations of KC-like (757 vs 304 pg/ml) were detected in dogs with pyometra as compared to healthy dogs. Within the pyometra group, dogs with sepsis compared to dogs without sepsis had a higher KC-like concentration (873 vs 300 pg/ml). Hemoglobin levels were significantly lower in dogs with pyometra compared to healthy dogs, regardless of the presence or absence of sepsis, and correlated negatively with KC-like. KC-like concentrations correlated positively with CRP, number of hospitalization days, number of monocytes, concentrations of IL-8, and percentage band neutrophils. Our data suggest that bacterial infection triggers the expression of KC-like and further studies are warranted of KC-like as a possible biomarker for diagnosing sepsis and uterine bacterial infection in dogs. PMID:26837616

  9. Dandruff Is Associated with Disequilibrium in the Proportion of the Major Bacterial and Fungal Populations Colonizing the Scalp

    OpenAIRE

    Cécile Clavaud; Roland Jourdain; Avner Bar-Hen; Magali Tichit; Christiane Bouchier; Florence Pouradier; Charles El Rawadi; Jacques Guillot; Florence Ménard-Szczebara; Lionel Breton; Jean-Paul Latgé; Isabelle Mouyna

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial and fungal communities associated with dandruff were investigated using culture-independent methodologies in the French subjects. The major bacterial and fungal species inhabiting the scalp subject's were identified by cloning and sequencing of the conserved ribosomal unit regions (16S for bacterial and 28S-ITS for fungal) and were further quantified by quantitative PCR. The two main bacterial species found on the scalp surface were Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epi...

  10. Genotypic characterisation of the dynamics of the lactic acid bacterial population of Comté cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Depouilly, Anna; Dufrene, Franck; Beuvier, Éric; Berthier, Françoise

    2004-01-01

    Caractérisation génotypique de la dynamique des populations de bactéries lactiques dans les fromages de Comté. Les espèces et souches de bactéries lactiques ont été suivies dans quatre fromages commerciaux de Comté fabriqués dans trois fromageries différentes en caractérisant génétiquement des isolats à neuf stades de fabrication et d'affinage. Elles ont été aussi suivies dans les laits crus et les cultures de levains correspondants. Dix espèces ont été identifiées : Streptococcus thermophilu...

  11. Characterization of the sulfate-reducing bacterial population in sediments of acid mining lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With respect to remediation of acid mine drainage (AMD), concomitant alteration of redox conditions, formation of metal sulfides and alkalinity generation are of special interest. The majority of lakes formed in the Lusatian lignite mining district bear waters of low pH and high ionic strength. For several of these acid mining lakes, sulfate-reducing activities have been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to find out which bacteria are responsible for these activities, whether these SRB exhibit special traits to thrive under extreme conditions, and whether the population differed from those inhabiting freshwater and marine environments. For this purpose we estimated the most probable number (MPN) of culturable SRB in surface sediments of three mining lakes (ML) and obtained isolates from the same sites. The strains were characterised physiologically and phylogenetically. (orig.)

  12. Predicting the pathway involved in post-translational modification of Elongation factor P in a subset of bacterial species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Crécy-Lagard Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial elongation factor P (EF-P is strictly conserved in bacteria and essential for protein synthesis. It is homologous to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A. A highly conserved eIF5A lysine is modified into an unusual amino acid derived from spermidine, hypusine. Hypusine is absolutely required for eIF5A's role in translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous lysine of EF-P is also modified to a spermidine derivative in Escherichia coli. However, the biosynthesis pathway of this modification in the bacterial EF-P is yet to be elucidated. Presentation of the Hypothesis Here we propose a potential mechanism for the post-translational modification of EF-P. By using comparative genomic methods based on physical clustering and phylogenetic pattern analysis, we identified two protein families of unknown function, encoded by yjeA and yjeK genes in E. coli, as candidates for this missing pathway. Based on the analysis of the structural and biochemical properties of both protein families, we propose two potential mechanisms for the modification of EF-P. Testing the hypothesis This hypothesis could be tested genetically by constructing a bacterial strain with a tagged efp gene. The tag would allow the purification of EF-P by affinity chromatography and the analysis of the purified protein by mass spectrometry. yjeA or yjeK could then be deleted in the efp tagged strain and the EF-P protein purified from each mutant analyzed by mass spectrometry for the presence or the absence of the modification. This hypothesis can also be tested by purifying the different components (YjeK, YjeA and EF-P and reconstituting the pathway in vitro. Implication of the hypothesis The requirement for a fully modified EF-P for protein synthesis in certain bacteria implies the presence of specific post-translational modification mechanism in these organisms. All of the 725 bacterial genomes analyzed, possess an efp gene

  13. Comparison of lysogeny (prophage induction) in heterotrophic bacterial and Synechococcus populations in the Gulf of Mexico and Mississippi River plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Amy; McDaniel, Lauren D; Mobberley, Jennifer; Paul, John H

    2008-02-01

    Lysogeny has been documented as a fundamental process occurring in natural marine communities of heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria. Prophage induction has been observed to be prevalent during conditions of low host abundance, but factors controlling the process are poorly understood. A research cruise was undertaken to the Gulf of Mexico during July 2005 to explore environmental factors associated with lysogeny. Ambient physical and microbial parameters were measured and prophage induction experiments were performed in contrasting oligotrophic Gulf and eutrophic Mississippi plume areas. Three of 11 prophage induction experiments in heterotrophic bacteria (27%) demonstrated significant induction in response to Mitomycin C. In contrast, there was significant Synechococcus cyanophage induction in seven of nine experiments (77.8%). A strong negative correlation was observed between lysogeny and log-transformed activity measurements for both heterotrophic and autotrophic populations (r=-0.876, P=0.002 and r=-0.815, P=0.025, respectively), indicating that bacterioplankton with low host growth favor lysogeny. Multivariate statistical analyses indicated that ambient level of viral abundance and productivity were inversely related to heterotrophic prophage induction and both factors combined were most predictive of lysogeny (rho=0.899, P=0.001). For Synechococcus, low ambient cyanophage abundance was most predictive of lysogeny (rho=0.862, P=0.005). Abundance and productivity of heterotrophic bacteria was strongly inversely correlated with salinity, while Synechococcus was not. This indicated that heterotrophic bacterial populations were well adapted to the river plume environments, thus providing a possible explanation for differences in prevalence of lysogeny observed between the two populations. PMID:18049460

  14. Characterization of bacterial populations in Danish raw milk cheeses made with different starter cultures by denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masoud, Wafa Mahmoud Hasan; Takamiya, Monica K Wik; Vogensen, Finn Kvist;

    2011-01-01

    ripening. Other bacteria like Corynebacterium, Halomonas, Pediococcus, Micrococcus and Staphylococcus, which were encountered in some cheese samples at low percentages compared with the total bacterial populations, were only detected by pyrosequencing. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing is an efficient method...

  15. Characterization by culture-dependent and culture-1 independent methods of the 2 bacterial population of suckling-lamb packaged in different atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oses, S.M.; Diez, A.M.; Melero, B.; Luning, P.A.; Jaime, I.; Rovira, J.

    2013-01-01

    This study offers insight into the dynamics of bacterial populations in fresh cuts of suckling lamb under four different atmospheric conditions: air (A), and three Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) environments, 15%O2/30%CO2/55%N2 (C, commercial), 70%O2/30%CO2 (O), and 15%O2/85%CO2 (H) for 18 days

  16. Interactions Between QTL SAP6 and SU91 on Resistance to Common Bacterial Blight in Red Kidney Bean and Pinto Bean Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance to common bacterial blight in common bean is a complex trait that is quantitatively inherited. We examined the interaction between two independent QTL, SAP6 and SU91, which condition resistance to CBB.The QTL were studied in a pinto bean F2 population a cross between Othello (sap6 sap6 //...

  17. Bacterial diversity losses: A potential extracellular driving mechanism involving the molecular ecological function of hydrophobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Hu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The DNA transformation is vital to the horizontal gene transfer (HGT. The low-efficiency transformation of bare plasmid exposed to hydrophobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs decreases the gene transfer level, and is possibly related to the loss of bacterial diversity at present. PAHs have great affinity for bare DNA through dispersion force and π–π overlap between PAHs and bases. These noncovalent interactions between PAHs and bases reduced the transformational efficiency of plasmid into bacterial recipients. Meanwhile these low-efficiency transformations for plasmid are controlled by the ions like Ca2+ in environment, in turn, presence of 0.5 mmol L−1 Ca2+ recovered the efficiency from 3.2 (phenanthrene, 3.5 (pyrene to about 4.45 and 4.75, respectively. The combination of Ca2+ with the –POO−– groups in DNA forms strong electrovalent bonds, weakening the molecular effect of DNA on PAHs and in turn promoting the gene transfer exposed to PAHs.

  18. Toll-like receptor 2 of tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis: Signaling pathway and involvement in bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Peng; Sun, Li

    2016-04-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 is a member of the TLR family that plays a pivotal role in innate immunity. In mammals, TLR2 is known to recognize specific microbial structures and trigger MyD88-dependent signaling to induce various cytokine responses. In this study, we examined the expression and function of the tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis TLR2, CsTLR2. CsTLR2 is composed of 898 amino acid residues and shares 25.6%-27.3% overall sequence identities with known teleost TLR2. CsTLR2 is a transmembrane protein with a toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain and eight leucine-rich repeats. Expression of CsTLR2 occurred in multiple tissues and was upregulated during bacterial infection. Stimulation of the CsTLR2 pathway led to enhanced expression of MyD88-dependent signaling molecules. Recombinant CsTLR2 (rCsTLR2) corresponding to the extracellular region was able to bind to a wide range of bacteria. Under both in vitro and in vivo conditions, rCsTLR2 significantly reduced bacterial infection. These observations add new insights into the signaling and function of teleost TLR2. PMID:26947353

  19. Enzymes Involved in the Aerobic Bacterial Degradation of N-Heteroaromatic Compounds: Molybdenum Hydroxylases and Ring-Opening 2,4-Dioxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzner, S.

    Many N-heteroaromatic compounds are utilized by micro-organisms as a source of carbon (and nitrogen) and energy. The aerobic bacterial degradation of these growth substrates frequently involves several hydroxylation steps and subsequent dioxygenolytic cleavage of (di)hydroxy-substituted heteroaromatic intermediates to aliphatic metabolites which finally are channeled into central metabolic pathways. As a rule, the initial bacterial hydroxylation of a N-heteroaromatic compound is catalyzed by a molybdenum hydroxylase, which uses a water molecule as source of the incorporated oxygen. The enzyme's redox-active centers - the active site molybdenum ion coordinated to a distinct pyranopterin cofactor, two different [2Fe2S] centers, and in most cases, flavin adenine dinucleotide - transfer electrons from the N-heterocyclic substrate to an electron acceptor, which for many molybdenum hydroxylases is still unknown. Ring-opening 2,4-dioxygenases involved in the bacterial degradation of quinaldine and 1H-4-oxoquinoline catalyze the cleavage of two carbon-carbon bonds with concomitant formation of carbon monoxide. Since they contain neither a metal center nor an organic cofactor, and since they do not show any sequence similarity to known oxygenases, these unique dioxygenases form a separate enzyme family. Quite surprisingly, however, they appear to be structurally and mechanistically related to enzymes of the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. Microbial enzymes are a great resource for biotechnological applications. Microbial strains or their enzymes may be used for degradative (bioremediation) or synthetic (biotransformation) purposes. Modern bioremediation or biotransformation strategies may even involve microbial catalysts or strains designed by protein engineering or pathway engineering. Prerequisite for developing such modern tools of biotechnology is a comprehensive understanding of microbial metabolic pathways, of the structure and function of enzymes, and of the

  20. Responses of heterotrophic bacterial populations to pH changes in coal ash effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, R.K. (Univ. of Texas, Houston); Cherry, D.S.; Singleton, F.L.

    1978-08-01

    Total culturable heterotrophic bacteria in a coal ash basin and drainage system were monitored over a period of two years. In the first year heavy (bottom) ash was sluiced to the basin resulting in a pH of 6.5. During the second year fly ash was precipitated and added to the sluice lowering the basin pH to 4.6. Sulfate concentrations during 1975 ranged from 16 to 73 ppM (mean 33) and in 1976 from 44 to 88 ppM (mean 72). Mean annual basin temperatures were 28.8 and 26.0/sup 0/C, respectively. Approximately 1500 m in the receiving swamp below the basin, mean pH and temperature were 6.8 and 22.2/sup 0/C for the first year, and 5.4 and 22.1/sup 0/C for the second. Total culturable bacteria and diversity (colony types) were reduced at all sampling stations by 44 and 30%, respectively, whereas the percentage of the population comprised of chromagenic bacteria increased by 51% at the lower pH. Data indicated the pH had a greater effect than did water temperature when temperature was within the range of 15 to 25/sup 0/C. The predominant genera within the system in the first year were Bacillus, Sarcina, Achromobacter, Flavobacterium, and Pseudomonas. In the second year, at the lower pH, predominant genera were Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Chromobacterium, Bacillus, and Brevibacterium.

  1. Dependence of the population on the temperature in the Boltzmann distribution: a simple relation involving the average energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angeli, C.; Cimiraglia, R.; Dallo, F.; Guareschi, R.; Tenti, L.

    2013-01-01

    The dependence on the temperature of the population of the ith state, Pi, in the Boltzmann distribution is analyzed by studying its derivative with respect to the temperature, T. A simple expression is found, involving Pi, the energy of the state, Ei, and the average energy, âŸ̈E⟩. This relation i

  2. Molecular characterization of bacterial populations of different soils Caracterização molecular de populações bacterianas de diferentes solos

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Matheus Pereira; Érico Leandro da Silveira; Denilson César Scaquitto; Eliamar Aparecida Nascimbém Pedrinho; Silvana Pompéia Val-Moraes; Ester Wickert; Lúcia Maria Carareto-Alves; Eliana Gertrudes de Macedo Lemos

    2006-01-01

    Until recently, few studies were carried out in Brazil about diversity of bacterial soil communities. Aiming to characterize the bacterial population in the soil through 16S rRNA analysis, two types of soil have been analyzed: one of them characterized by intensive use where tomato, beans and corn were cultivated (CS); the other analyzed soil was under forest (FS), unchanged by man; both located in Guaíra, São Paulo State, Brazil. Using specific primers, 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic DNA in...

  3. Analysis for the presence of determinants involved in the transport of mercury across bacterial membrane from polluted water bodies of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Azam, Mudsser; Choi, Inho; Ali, Arif; Haq, Qazi Mohd Rizwanul

    2016-01-01

    Mercury, which is ubiquitous and recalcitrant to biodegradation processes, threatens human health by escaping to the environment via various natural and anthropogenic activities. Non-biodegradability of mercury pollutants has necessitated the development and implementation of economic alternatives with promising potential to remove metals from the environment. Enhancement of microbial based remediation strategies through genetic engineering approaches provides one such alternative with a promising future. In this study, bacterial isolates inhabiting polluted sites were screened for tolerance to varying concentrations of mercuric chloride. Following identification, several Pseudomonas and Klebsiella species were found to exhibit the highest tolerance to both organic and inorganic mercury. Screened bacterial isolates were examined for their genetic make-up in terms of the presence of genes (merP and merT) involved in the transport of mercury across the membrane either alone or in combination to deal with the toxic mercury. Gene sequence analysis revealed that the merP gene showed 86-99% homology, while the merT gene showed >98% homology with previously reported sequences. By exploring the genes involved in imparting metal resistance to bacteria, this study will serve to highlight the credentials that are particularly advantageous for their practical application to remediation of mercury from the environment. PMID:26887227

  4. Analysis for the presence of determinants involved in the transport of mercury across bacterial membrane from polluted water bodies of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Azam, Mudsser; Choi, Inho; Ali, Arif; Haq, Qazi Mohd. Rizwanul

    2016-01-01

    Mercury, which is ubiquitous and recalcitrant to biodegradation processes, threatens human health by escaping to the environment via various natural and anthropogenic activities. Non-biodegradability of mercury pollutants has necessitated the development and implementation of economic alternatives with promising potential to remove metals from the environment. Enhancement of microbial based remediation strategies through genetic engineering approaches provides one such alternative with a promising future. In this study, bacterial isolates inhabiting polluted sites were screened for tolerance to varying concentrations of mercuric chloride. Following identification, several Pseudomonas and Klebsiella species were found to exhibit the highest tolerance to both organic and inorganic mercury. Screened bacterial isolates were examined for their genetic make-up in terms of the presence of genes (merP and merT) involved in the transport of mercury across the membrane either alone or in combination to deal with the toxic mercury. Gene sequence analysis revealed that the merP gene showed 86–99% homology, while the merT gene showed >98% homology with previously reported sequences. By exploring the genes involved in imparting metal resistance to bacteria, this study will serve to highlight the credentials that are particularly advantageous for their practical application to remediation of mercury from the environment. PMID:26887227

  5. A comparison of bacterial populations in enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes using membrane filtration or gravity sedimentation for solids-liquid separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric R; Monti, Alessandro; Mohn, William W

    2010-05-01

    In an earlier phase of this study, we compared the performances of pilot scale treatment systems operated in either a conventional enhanced biological phosphorus removal (CEBPR) mode, or a membrane enhanced biological phosphorus removal (MEBPR) mode. In the present investigation, we characterized the bacterial community populations in these processes during parallel operation with the same municipal wastewater feed. The objectives of the study were (1) to assess the similarity of the bacterial communities supported in the two systems over time, (2) to determine if distinct bacterial populations are associated with the MEBPR and CEBPR processes, and (3) to relate the dynamics of the community composition to changes in treatment process configuration and to treatment process performance. The characteristics of the bacterial populations were first investigated with ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, or RISA. To further understand the bacterial population dynamics, important RISA phylotypes were isolated and identified through 16S RNA gene sequencing. The parallel MEBPR and CEBPR systems developed bacterial communities that were distinct. The CEBPR community appeared to exhibit greater diversity, and this may have been the primary reason why the CEBPR treatment train demonstrated superior functional stability relative to the MEBPR counterpart. Moreover, the more diverse bacterial population apparent in the CEBPR system was observed to be more dynamic than that of the MEBPR process. Several RISA bands were found to be characteristic of either the membrane or conventional biological system. In particular, the MEBPR configuration appeared to be selective for the slow-growing organism Magnospira bakii and for the foam-associated Microthrix parvicella and Gordonia sp., while gravity separation led to the washout of M. parvicella. In both pilot trains, sequence analysis confirmed the presence of EBPR-related organisms such as Accumulibacter phosphatis. The survey of the

  6. Genetic diversity of variants involved in drug response and metabolism in Sri Lankan populations: implications for clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sze Ling; Samaranayake, Nilakshi; Ross, Colin J.D.; Toh, Meng Tiak; Carleton, Bruce; Hayden, Michael R.; Teo, Yik Ying; Dissanayake, Vajira H.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interpopulation differences in drug responses are well documented, and in some cases they correspond to differences in the frequency of associated genetic markers. Understanding the diversity of genetic markers associated with drug response across different global populations is essential to infer population rates of drug response or risk for adverse drug reactions, and to guide implementation of pharmacogenomic testing. Sri Lanka is a culturally and linguistically diverse nation, but little is known about the population genetics of the major Sri Lankan ethnic groups. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of pharmacogenomic variants in the major Sri Lankan ethnic groups. Methods We examined the allelic diversity of more than 7000 variants in genes involved in drug biotransformation and response in the three major ethnic populations of Sri Lanka (Sinhalese, Sri Lankan Tamils, and Moors), and compared them with other South Asian, South East Asian, and European populations using Wright’s Fixation Index, principal component analysis, and STRUCTURE analysis. Results We observed overall high levels of similarity within the Sri Lankan populations (median FST=0.0034), and between Sri Lankan and other South Asian populations (median FST=0.0064). Notably, we observed substantial differentiation between Sri Lankan and European populations for important pharmacogenomic variants related to warfarin (VKORC1 rs9923231) and clopidogrel (CYP2C19 rs4986893) response. Conclusion These data expand our understanding of the population structure of Sri Lanka, provide a resource for pharmacogenomic research, and have implications for the clinical use of genetic testing of pharmacogenomic variants in these populations. PMID:26444257

  7. Involvement of plasma membrane calcium influx in bacterial induction of the K+/H+ and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An early event in the hypersensitive response of tobacco to Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae is the initiation of a K+/H+ response characterized by specific plasma membrane K+ efflux, extracellular alkalinization, and intracellular acidification. We investigated the role of calcium in induction of these host responses. Suspension-cultured tobacco cells exhibited a baseline Ca2+ influx of 0.02 to 0.06 micromole per gram per hour as determined from 45Ca2+ uptake. Following bacterial inoculation, uptake rates began to increase coincidently with onset of the K+/H+ response. Rates increased steadily for 2 to 3 hours, reaching 0.5 to 1 micromole per gram per hour. This increased Ca2+ influx was prevented by EGTA and calcium channel blockers such as La3+, Co2+, and Cd2+ but not by verapamil and nifedipine. Lanthanum, cobalt, cadmium, and EGTA inhibited the K+/H+ response in both suspension-cultured cells and leaf discs and prevented hypersensitive cell death in leaf discs. We conclude that increase plasmalemma Ca2+ influx is required for the K+/H+ and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

  8. Few microorganisms associated with bacterial vaginosis may constitute the pathologic core: a population-based microbiologic study among 3596 pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, P; Jensen, I P; Jeune, B; Ebbesen, N; Arpi, M; Bremmelgaard, A; Møller, B R

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between various microorganisms isolated from the genital tract in pregnant women with bacterial vaginosis. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional population-based study among pregnant women addressed at their first antenatal visit before 24 full gestational weeks......) between the microorganisms isolated from the lower genital tract in pregnant women with and without clinical diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. RESULTS: Three thousand five hundred ninety-six (3596) pregnant women were asked to participate. Of the 3596 pregnant women 3174 (88.4%) agreed to participate...... before 24 full gestational weeks. After controlling for the presence of other microorganisms, strong associations between Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria, Mycoplasma hominis, and present bacterial vaginosis were found. Similarly Lactobacillus spp. were found to be associated with the absence of...

  9. Study on the Effect of Different Urea Fertilizer Rates and Plant Populations on the Severity of Bacterial Blight (BB of Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Si Myint

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of different urea fertilizer rates and plant populations on disease severity of bacterial blight of rice and yield lasses related to disease, the experiments including three plant populations (110000, 150000, 190000 and five urea fertilizer rates (0,56 lb, 112 lb, 168 lb and 224 lb per acre were conducted at Central Agriculture Research Institute farm in 1999 and 2000 rainy seasons. Manawthukha was used as a test variety that is susceptible to bacterial blight of rice. The disease severity could be increased by the application of urea. Although urea 112 lb per acre gave moderate disease severity than without urea, its yield is highest. The higher disease severity also showed the related effect of plant population of 150000 and above. However the combination of urea 224 lb per acre with the population of 190000 and 150000 gave the highest severity of bacterial blight disease and the minimum grain yield. The application of urea 224 lbs per acre can cause yield reduction ranging from 18.67 percent to 27.57 percent over the application of urea 112 lb per acre.

  10. Development of a real-time PCR assay for monitoring anaerobic fungal and cellulolytic bacterial populations within the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2006-12-01

    Traditional methods for enumerating and identifying microbial populations within the rumen can be time consuming and cumbersome. Methods that involve culturing and microscopy can also be inconclusive, particularly when studying anaerobic rumen fungi. A real-time PCR SYBR Green assay, using PCR primers to target total rumen fungi and the cellulolytic bacteria Ruminococcus flavefaciens and Fibrobacter succinogenes, is described, including design and validation. The DNA and crude protein contents with respect to the fungal biomass of both polycentric and monocentric fungal isolates were investigated across the fungal growth stages to aid in standard curve generation. The primer sets used were found to be target specific with no detectable cross-reactivity. Subsequently, the real-time PCR assay was employed in a study to detect these populations within cattle rumen. The anaerobic fungal target was observed to increase 3.6-fold from 0 to 12 h after feeding. The results also indicated a 5.4-fold increase in F. succinogenes target between 0 and 12 h after feeding, whereas R. flavefaciens was observed to maintain more or less consistent levels. This is the first report of a real-time PCR assay to estimate the rumen anaerobic fungal population. PMID:17117998

  11. Structural and Molecular Mechanism of CdpR Involved in Quorum-Sensing and Bacterial Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingru Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although quorum-sensing (QS systems are important regulators of virulence gene expression in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, their detailed regulatory mechanisms have not been fully characterized. Here, we show that deletion of PA2588 resulted in increased production of pyocyanin and biofilm, as well as enhanced pathogenicity in a mouse model. To gain insights into the function of PA2588, we performed a ChIP-seq assay and identified 28 targets of PA2588, including the intergenic region between PA2588 and pqsH, which encodes the key synthase of Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS. Though the C-terminal domain was similar to DNA-binding regions of other AraC family members, structural studies revealed that PA2588 has a novel fold at the N-terminal region (NTR, and its C-terminal HTH (helix-turn-helix domain is also unique in DNA recognition. We also demonstrated that the adaptor protein ClpS, an essential regulator of ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, directly interacted with PA2588 before delivering CdpR to ClpAP for degradation. We named PA2588 as CdpR (ClpAP-degradation and pathogenicity Regulator. Moreover, deletion of clpP or clpS/clpA promotes bacterial survival in a mouse model of acute pneumonia infection. Taken together, this study uncovered that CdpR is an important QS regulator, which can interact with the ClpAS-P system to regulate the expression of virulence factors and pathogenicity.

  12. Proteomic analysis of growth phase-dependent expression of Legionella pneumophila proteins which involves regulation of bacterial virulence traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Hayashi

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, which is a causative pathogen of Legionnaires' disease, expresses its virulent traits in response to growth conditions. In particular, it is known to become virulent at a post-exponential phase in vitro culture. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the exponential phase and post-exponential phase to identify candidates associated with L. pneumophila virulence using 2-Dimentional Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 68 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two growth phases, 64 were up-regulated at a post-exponential phase. The up-regulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis, ketone body biogenesis and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB biogenesis, suggesting that L. pneumophila may utilize sugars and lipids as energy sources, when amino acids become scarce. Proteins related to motility (flagella components and twitching motility-associated proteins were also up-regulated, predicting that they enhance infectivity of the bacteria in host cells under certain conditions. Furthermore, 9 up-regulated proteins of unknown function were found. Two of them were identified as novel bacterial factors associated with hemolysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBCs. Another 2 were found to be translocated into macrophages via the Icm/Dot type IV secretion apparatus as effector candidates in a reporter assay with Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase. The study will be helpful for virulent analysis of L. pneumophila from the viewpoint of physiological or metabolic modulation dependent on growth phase.

  13. Civil society involvement in informing population on potential risks of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1977 the town Cernavoda, Romania has been selected for the construction of the first Romanian Nuclear Power Plant provided with five CANDU type reactors, planned, at that time, to cover one third of the country power demand. The first Cernavoda Unit has been commissioned on December 2, 1996. The paper presents the preoccupation of different non-governmental organizations with respect to the impact of the nuclear plant operation on the environment and public health and, more generally, of the Uranium mining, heavy water production plants and radioactive waste disposal problems. Such issues, concerning the the energy efficiency and the nuclear power problems in Romania were not exposed so far to the public debate and little, if any, reliable information was provided to the population. The paper stresses the role of civil society in informing population on the risks implied by the nuclear power projects. 2 refs

  14. Population genomics of the killer whale indicates ecotype evolution in sympatry involving both selection and drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Andre E; Kenny, John G; Chaudhuri, Roy; Hughes, Margaret A; J Welch, Andreanna; Reisinger, Ryan R; de Bruyn, P J Nico; Dahlheim, Marilyn E; Hall, Neil; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of diversity in the marine ecosystem is poorly understood, given the relatively high potential for connectivity, especially for highly mobile species such as whales and dolphins. The killer whale (Orcinus orca) has a worldwide distribution, and individual social groups travel over a wide geographic range. Even so, regional populations have been shown to be genetically differentiated, including among different foraging specialists (ecotypes) in sympatry. Given the strong matrifocal social structure of this species together with strong resource specializations, understanding the process of differentiation will require an understanding of the relative importance of both genetic drift and local adaptation. Here we provide a high-resolution analysis based on nuclear single-nucleotide polymorphic markers and inference about differentiation at both neutral loci and those potentially under selection. We find that all population comparisons, within or among foraging ecotypes, show significant differentiation, including populations in parapatry and sympatry. Loci putatively under selection show a different pattern of structure compared to neutral loci and are associated with gene ontology terms reflecting physiologically relevant functions (e.g. related to digestion). The pattern of differentiation for one ecotype in the North Pacific suggests local adaptation and shows some fixed differences among sympatric ecotypes. We suggest that differential habitat use and resource specializations have promoted sufficient isolation to allow differential evolution at neutral and functional loci, but that the process is recent and dependent on both selection and drift. PMID:25244680

  15. Effect of Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647 on different parameters of honeybee colonies and bacterial populations of the bee gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audisio, M C; Sabaté, D C; Benítez-Ahrendts, M R

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647, isolated from the intestinal tract of a worker-bee in Salta, Argentina, was delivered to Apis mellifera L. honey bee colonies according to two different administration schedules: 1×10(5) cfu/ml every 15 days (2011) or monthly (2012). The effect of each treatment on the bee-colony performance was monitored by measuring honey production, and the prevalence of varroasis and nosemosis. Worker bees from each assay were randomly captured 3 days after administration and assayed for the following intestinal culturable and defined bacterial populations: total aerobic microorganisms, Bacillus spp. spores, Lactobacillus spp., Enterococcus spp. and enterobacteria. Interestingly, both treatments generated a similar increase in honey production in treated colonies compared to controls: 36.8% (every 15 days) and 36.3% (monthly). Nosema index always exhibited a reduction when lactobacilli were administered; in turn, Varroa incidence was lower when the lactobacilli were administered once a month. Moreover, the administration of L. johnsonii CRL1647 every 15 days produced an increase in the total number of aerobic microorganisms and in bacteria belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Enterococcus; at the same time, a decrease was observed in the number of total spores at the end of the treatment. The number of enterobacteria was constant and remained below that of control hives at the end of the assay. On the other hand, the delivery of lactobacilli once a month only showed an increase in the number of bacteria belonging to the genus Lactobacillus; meanwhile, viable counts of the remaining microorganisms assayed were reduced. Even though it seems that both treatments were similar, those bee colonies that received L. johnsonii CRL1647 every 15 days became so strong that they swarmed. PMID:25809216

  16. Molecular evolution and population genetics of two Drosophila mettleri cytochrome P450 genes involved in host plant utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremy M Bono; Matzkin, Luciano M.; Castrezana, Sergio; Therese A Markow

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation is one of the primary goals of evolutionary biology. The evolution of xenobiotic resistance in insects has proven to be an especially suitable arena for studying the genetics of adaptation, and resistant phenotypes are known to result from both coding and regulatory changes. In this study, we examine the evolutionary history and population genetics of two Drosophila mettleri cytochrome P450 genes that are putatively involved in the detoxification ...

  17. Combined Analysis of Variation in Core, Accessory and Regulatory Genome Regions Provides a Super-Resolution View into the Evolution of Bacterial Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alan; Oren, Yaara; Kelly, Darren; Pascoe, Ben; Dunn, Steven; Sreecharan, Tristan; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Prentice, Michael B; Ashour, Amgad; Avram, Oren; Pupko, Tal; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Literak, Ivan; Guenther, Sebastian; Schaufler, Katharina; Wieler, Lothar H; Zhiyong, Zong; Sheppard, Samuel K; McInerney, James O; Corander, Jukka

    2016-09-01

    The use of whole-genome phylogenetic analysis has revolutionized our understanding of the evolution and spread of many important bacterial pathogens due to the high resolution view it provides. However, the majority of such analyses do not consider the potential role of accessory genes when inferring evolutionary trajectories. Moreover, the recently discovered importance of the switching of gene regulatory elements suggests that an exhaustive analysis, combining information from core and accessory genes with regulatory elements could provide unparalleled detail of the evolution of a bacterial population. Here we demonstrate this principle by applying it to a worldwide multi-host sample of the important pathogenic E. coli lineage ST131. Our approach reveals the existence of multiple circulating subtypes of the major drug-resistant clade of ST131 and provides the first ever population level evidence of core genome substitutions in gene regulatory regions associated with the acquisition and maintenance of different accessory genome elements. PMID:27618184

  18. A case of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome which developed during chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The involvement of bacterial translocation was considered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combination therapy such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy is often chosen, depending on the case, for head and neck cancer in view of the preservation of potency. However, on the other hand, it is necessary to note the onset of therapeutic side effects. The patient was a 35-year-old woman. During chemoradiotherapy for mesopharyngeal carcinoma, she suddenly developed shock and multiple organ failure, requiring intensive treatment. She also developed reversible central nerve symptoms during the course. The involvement of bacterial translocation was thought to be the cause of shock, and the reversible central nerve symptoms were considered to be a pathological condition, known as reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. We discuss these conditions on the basis of the clinical features, and the process that led to diagnosis in this case. (author)

  19. Analysis of the LacI family regulators of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937, involvement in the bacterial phytopathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gijsegem, Frédérique; Wlodarczyk, Aleksandra; Cornu, Amandine; Reverchon, Sylvie; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, Nicole

    2008-11-01

    Analysis of the regulators of the LacI family was performed in order to identify those potentially involved in pathogenicity of Erwinia chrysanthemi (Dickeya dadantii). Among the 18 members of the LacI family, the function of 11 members is either known or predicted and only 7 members have, as yet, no proposed function. Inactivation of these seven genes, called lfaR, lfbR, lfcR, lfdR, lfeR, lffR, and lfgR, demonstrated that four of them are important for plant infection. The lfaR and lfcR mutants showed a reduced virulence on chicory, Saintpaulia sp., and Arabidopsis. The lfeR mutant showed a reduced virulence on Arabidopsis. The lfdR mutant was more efficient than the wild-type strain in initiating maceration on Saintpaulia sp. The genetic environment of each regulator was examined to detect adjacent genes potentially involved in a common function. Construction of transcriptional fusions in these neighboring genes demonstrated that five regulators, LfaR, LfcR, LfeR, LffR, and LfgR, act as repressors of adjacent genes. Analysis of these fusions also indicated that the genes controlled by LfaR, LfcR, LfgR, and LffR are expressed during plant infection. Moreover, addition of crude plant extracts to culture medium demonstrated that the expression of the LfaR- and LfgR-controlled genes is specifically induced by plant components. PMID:18842096

  20. Target population involvement in urban ciclovias: a preliminary evaluation of St. Louis open streets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, J Aaron; Eyler, Amy A; Kuhlberg, Jill A

    2013-12-01

    Ciclovias are active street events when roads are open to walkers, cyclists, and families and closed to automobiles. Over 70 cities in the USA have implemented ciclovias to promote physical activity. The authors evaluated four events during 2010 to determine what activities participants perform and who is attending. For two ciclovia events in St. Louis, Missouri, observation reports of activities, gender, and age of 1,452 participants were collected, and 82 adults were interviewed via direct approach. The survey covered six domains: physical activity, travel to event, sense of community, marketing, economic impact, and demographics. Each event occurred within the city, along multiple streets. Domains were selected from Ciclovia Recreativa developed by Ciclovia Bogota, Pan American Health Organization, and CDC. Additional questions addressed city-specific goals and matched similar evaluations in other cities. Over 50 % of participants met CDC-defined weekly minute thresholds for physical activity. Participants, primarily (>80 %) middle class, college educated, and white, were not representative of the majority minority city population, which has high rates of poverty, and low percentage of college graduates. Cities must work with residents to increase low-income minority population participation in ciclovia-based physical activity. PMID:22948790

  1. Involving Community Health Workers in the Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities Research Projects: Benefits and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krok-Schoen, Jessica L; Weier, Rory C; Hohl, Sarah D; Thompson, Beti; Paskett, Electra D

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the benefits and challenges of including community health workers (CHWs) in health disparities research can improve planning and delivery of culturally appropriate interventions. Representatives from 18 projects from the Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD) initiative completed an online questionnaire about the benefits and challenges of involving CHWs in their research. Eight emergent themes were classified into two categories: 1) Personal qualities and background CHWs bring to research including community knowledge and cultural sensitivity to improve recruitment and effectiveness of interventions; and 2) Workplace demands of CHWs including human resource policies and processes, research skills/background (training needs), and oversight despite distance. These findings demonstrate the benefits of involving CHWs in research and draw attention to the hiring, training, and oversight of CHWs and subsequent challenges. Additional research is needed to understand interactions between project staff and CHWs better and to identify best practices to involve CHWs in research. PMID:27524766

  2. Relationship between N2O Fluxes from an Almond Soil and Denitrifying Bacterial Populations Estimated by Quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiasek, M.; Suddick, E. C.; Smart, D. R.; Scow, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    Cultivated soils emit substantial quantities of nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas with almost 300 times the radiative forcing potential of CO2. Agriculture-related activities generate from 6 to 35 Tg N2O-N per year, or about 60 to 70% of global production. The microbial processes of nitrification, denitrification and nitrifier denitrification are major biogenic sources of N2O to the atmosphere from soils. Denitrification is considered the major source of N2O especially when soils are wet. The microbial N transformations that produce N2O depend primarily on nitrogen (N) fertilizer, with water content, available carbon and soil temperature being secondary controllers. Despite the fact that microbial processes are responsible for N2O emissions, very little is known about the numbers or types of populations involved. The objective of this study was to relate changes in denitrifying population densities, using quantitative PCR (qPCR) of functional genes, to N2O emissions in a fertilized almond orchard. Quantitative PCR targeted three specific genes involved in denitrification: nirS, nirK and nosZ. Copy numbers of the genes were related back to population densities and the portion of organisms likely to produce nitrous oxide. The study site, a 21.7 acre almond orchard fitted with micro-sprinklers, was fertigated (irrigated and fertilized simultaneously) with 50 lbs/acre sodium nitrate in late March 2008, then irrigated weekly. Immediately after the initial fertigation, fluxes of N2O and CO2, moisture content, inorganic N and denitrification gene copy numbers were measured 6 times over 24 days. Despite the fact that N2O emissions increased following fertigation, there was no consistent increase in any of the targeted genes. The genes nirK and nirS ranged from 0.4-1.4 × 107 and 0.4-1.4 × 108, whereas nosZ ranged from 2-8 × 106 copy numbers per g soil, respectively. Considerable variation, compounded by the small sample sizes used for DNA analysis, made it difficult

  3. Molecular evolution and population genetics of two Drosophila mettleri cytochrome P450 genes involved in host plant utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Jeremy M; Matzkin, Luciano M; Castrezana, Sergio; Markow, Therese A

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation is one of the primary goals of evolutionary biology. The evolution of xenobiotic resistance in insects has proven to be an especially suitable arena for studying the genetics of adaptation, and resistant phenotypes are known to result from both coding and regulatory changes. In this study, we examine the evolutionary history and population genetics of two Drosophila mettleri cytochrome P450 genes that are putatively involved in the detoxification of alkaloids present in two of its cactus hosts: saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea) and senita (Lophocereus schottii). Previous studies demonstrated that Cyp28A1 was highly up-regulated following exposure to rotting senita tissue while Cyp4D10 was highly up-regulated following exposure to rotting saguaro tissue. Here, we show that a subset of sites in Cyp28A1 experienced adaptive evolution specifically in the D. mettleri lineage. Moreover, neutrality tests in several populations were also consistent with a history of selection on Cyp28A1. In contrast, we did not find evidence for positive selection on Cyp4D10, although this certainly does not preclude its involvement in host plant use. A surprising result that emerged from our population genetic analyses was the presence of significant genetic differentiation between flies collected from different host plant species (saguaro and senita) at Organ Pipe National Monument, Arizona, USA. This preliminary evidence suggests that D. mettleri may have evolved into distinctive host races that specialize on different hosts, a possibility that warrants further investigation. PMID:18510584

  4. Leveraging The Affordable Care Act To Enroll Justice-Involved Populations In Medicaid: State And Local Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Sachini N; Huskamp, Haiden A; Riedel, Lauren E; McGinty, Emma E; Webster, Daniel; Toone, Robert E; Barry, Colleen L

    2015-12-01

    The Affordable Care Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to enroll criminal justice-involved populations in health insurance, particularly Medicaid. As a result, many state and county corrections departments have launched programs that incorporate Medicaid enrollment in discharge planning. Our study characterizes the national landscape of programs enrolling criminal justice-involved populations in Medicaid as of January 2015. We provide an overview of sixty-four programs operating in jails, prisons, or community probation and parole systems that enroll individuals during detention, incarceration, and the release process. We describe the variation among the programs in terms of settings, personnel, timing of eligibility screening, and target populations. Seventy-seven percent of the programs are located in jails, and 56 percent use personnel from public health or social service agencies. We describe four practices that have facilitated the Medicaid enrollment process: suspending instead of terminating Medicaid benefits upon incarceration, presuming that an individual is eligible for Medicaid before the process is completed, allowing enrollment during incarceration, and accepting alternative forms of identification for enrollment. The criminal justice system is a complex one that requires a variety of approaches to enroll individuals in Medicaid. Future research should examine how these approaches influence health and criminal justice outcomes. PMID:26643624

  5. Involvement of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene polymorphisms in susceptibility to tic disorder in Chinese Han population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ping

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2 is a potential candidate gene for screening tic disorder (TD. Methods A case–control study was performed to examine the association between the TPH2 gene and TD. The Sequenom® Mass ARRAY iPLEX GOLD System was used to genotype two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the TPH2 gene in 149 TD children and in 125 normal controls. Results For rs4565946, individuals with the TT genotype showed a significantly higher risk of TD than those with TC plus CC genotypes [odds ratio (OR =3.077, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.273–7.437; P = 0.009], as did male TD children with the TT genotype (OR = 3.228, 95% CI: 1.153–9.040; P = 0.020. The G allele of rs4570625 was significantly more frequent in TD children with higher levels of tic symptoms (Yale Global Tic Severity Scale, YGTSS than those in controls among the male children (OR = 1.684, 95%: 1.097–2.583; P = 0.017]. TD children with severe tic symptoms had significantly higher frequencies of rs4546946 TT genotype than did normal controls in boys (OR = 3.292, 95% CI: 1.139–9.513; P = 0.022. We also found that genotype distributions of both SNPs were different between the Asian and European populations. Conclusions Our results indicated that the TT genotype of rs4565946 is a potential genetic risk factor for TD, and the allele G of rs4570625 might be associated with the severity of tic symptoms in boys. These polymorphisms might be susceptibility loci for TD in the Chinese Han population. Because of the confounding of co-existing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD,these findings need to be confirmed by studies in much larger samples.

  6. Involvement of cd bioaccumulation in spinal deformities occurrence in natural populations of Mediterranean killifish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessabi, Kaouthar; Kerkeni, Abdelhamid; Saïd, Khaled; Messaoudi, Imed

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of environmental exposure to cadmium (Cd) on the spinal deformities occurrence in the Mediterranean killifish, Aphanius fasciatus (Pisces: Cyprinodontidae). For this purpose, some indicators of skeletal bone mineralization, Cd, and calcium (Ca) concentrations in spinal column as well as bioaccumulation of Cd from the water and the sediment have been compared in normal and deformed fish collected from polluted (S1) and nonpolluted (S2) areas in the Gulf of Gabès in Tunisia. When compared to the normal fish, the deformed fish showed signs of spinal column demineralization such as significant decrease in the ash weight/dry weight ratio, percentage of nonorganic components content, and Ca concentration. Cd concentrations in spinal column and liver were significantly higher in deformed fish than in normal fish. A highly significant negative correlation (r = -0.915, p < 0.01) between Cd and Ca concentrations was noted in spinal column of deformed fish. Bioaccumulation factors of Cd in the liver from the water and the sediment in deformed fish were also significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than in normal fish from S1 and S2. These findings suggest that the ability to accumulate large amount of Cd may represent a potential risk to induce spinal deformities in natural populations of Mediterranean killifish. PMID:18953499

  7. Ten-year mortality study of the population involved in the Seveso incident in 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertazzi, P.A.; Zocchetti, C.; Pesatori, A.C.; Guercilena, S.; Sanarico, M.; Radice, L.

    1989-06-01

    In 1976, an accidental explosion in a plant near Seveso, Italy, caused the contamination of a populated area by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The area was subdivided into three zones (A, B, and R) having decreasing mean levels of TCDD soil contamination. This study examines the mortality between 1976 and 1986 among the subjects, aged 20-74 years, who were resident in the area since the accident (n = 556 in zone A, n = 3,920 in zone B, n = 26,227 in zone R). Subjects' exposure was classified by residence. A referent cohort of 167,391 subjects who lived in the immediate surroundings was concurrently examined. Vital status ascertainment was successful for over 99% of the subjects. Increased mortality from cardiovascular causes was found; incident-related stressors were considered more relevant to increased mortality than was TCDD exposure. Mortality from several cancers was elevated. The increases in biliary cancer (females), brain cancer, and lymphatic and hemopoietic neoplasms (particularly leukemia in males) did not appear to result from chance, confounding, or information/comparison bias. However, no definite patterns related to exposure classification were apparent. Merely suggestive increases in soft tissue tumors and melanoma were also noted. Liver and breast cancer mortality tended to be below expectations. Interpretation is hampered by the short observation period, small number of deaths from certain causes, and poor exposure definition. Further research is in progress.

  8. A deployable in vivo EPR tooth dosimeter for triage after a radiation event involving large populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to meet the potential need for emergency large-scale retrospective radiation biodosimetry following an accident or attack, we have developed instrumentation and methodology for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify concentrations of radiation-induced radicals within intact teeth. This technique has several very desirable characteristics for triage, including independence from confounding biologic factors, a non-invasive measurement procedure, the capability to make measurements at any time after the event, suitability for use by non-expert operators at the site of an event, and the ability to provide immediate estimates of individual doses. Throughout development there has been a particular focus on the need for a deployable system, including instrumental requirements for transport and field use, the need for high throughput, and use by minimally trained operators. Numerous measurements have been performed using this system in clinical and other non-laboratory settings, including in vivo measurements with unexposed populations as well as patients undergoing radiation therapies. The collection and analyses of sets of three serially-acquired spectra with independent placements of the resonator, in a data collection process lasting approximately 5 min, provides dose estimates with standard errors of prediction of approximately 1 Gy. As an example, measurements were performed on incisor teeth of subjects who had either received no irradiation or 2 Gy total body irradiation for prior bone marrow transplantation; this exercise provided a direct and challenging test of our capability to identify subjects who would be in need of acute medical care. -- Highlights: → Advances in radiation biodosimetry are needed for large-scale emergency response. → Radiation-induced radicals in tooth enamel can be measured using in vivo EPR. → A novel transportable spectrometer was applied in the laboratory and at remote sites. → The current

  9. A deployable in vivo EPR tooth dosimeter for triage after a radiation event involving large populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin B., E-mail: Benjamin.B.Williams@dartmouth.edu [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Medicine, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Dong, Ruhong [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Flood, Ann Barry [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States); Grinberg, Oleg [Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States); Kmiec, Maciej; Lesniewski, Piotr N.; Matthews, Thomas P.; Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Raynolds, Tim [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Salikhov, Ildar K. [Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States)

    2011-09-15

    In order to meet the potential need for emergency large-scale retrospective radiation biodosimetry following an accident or attack, we have developed instrumentation and methodology for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify concentrations of radiation-induced radicals within intact teeth. This technique has several very desirable characteristics for triage, including independence from confounding biologic factors, a non-invasive measurement procedure, the capability to make measurements at any time after the event, suitability for use by non-expert operators at the site of an event, and the ability to provide immediate estimates of individual doses. Throughout development there has been a particular focus on the need for a deployable system, including instrumental requirements for transport and field use, the need for high throughput, and use by minimally trained operators. Numerous measurements have been performed using this system in clinical and other non-laboratory settings, including in vivo measurements with unexposed populations as well as patients undergoing radiation therapies. The collection and analyses of sets of three serially-acquired spectra with independent placements of the resonator, in a data collection process lasting approximately 5 min, provides dose estimates with standard errors of prediction of approximately 1 Gy. As an example, measurements were performed on incisor teeth of subjects who had either received no irradiation or 2 Gy total body irradiation for prior bone marrow transplantation; this exercise provided a direct and challenging test of our capability to identify subjects who would be in need of acute medical care. -- Highlights: > Advances in radiation biodosimetry are needed for large-scale emergency response. > Radiation-induced radicals in tooth enamel can be measured using in vivo EPR. > A novel transportable spectrometer was applied in the laboratory and at remote sites. > The current instrument

  10. Mapping of Genes Involved in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS in Pakistani Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiraz Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS, one of an autosomal recessive or clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, which prevails all over the world and results due to increased rate of consanguinity. All of these BBS genes are involved either directly or indirectly in signaling pathways such as Leptin receptor signaling pathway and Wnt signaling pathway. The study presented here includes genetic mapping of two consanguineous families (A & B with BBS. (21.63-Mb region was found to be critical as it was gene rich and contains approximately eighty known and predicted genes. Out of eighty genes six (FGF2, BBS7, BBS12, NUDT6, SPATA5 and SPRY1 were found to be candidate genes. On mutations screening, sequencing of the coding exon 2 of BBS12 in affected individuals identified a novel homozygous c.2103C 1 A mutation, which is predicted to insert a stop codon at position 701 of the BBS12 protein (p.S701X. Identification of BBS12 mutation in families B can increase our understanding of molecular genetics and pathophysiology of BBS.

  11. Galectin-9 Signaling through TIM-3 Is Involved in Neutrophil-Mediated Gram-Negative Bacterial Killing: An Effect Abrogated within the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrascal, Isabel; Bergin, David A.; McElvaney, Oliver J.; McCarthy, Cormac; Banville, Nessa; Pohl, Kerstin; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Reeves, Emer P.; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    The T cell Ig and mucin domain–containing molecule (TIM) family of receptors have emerged as potential therapeutic targets to correct abnormal immune function in chronic inflammatory conditions. TIM-3 serves as a functional receptor in structural cells of the airways and via the ligand galectin-9 (Gal-9) can modulate the inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate TIM-3 expression and function in neutrophils, focusing on its potential role in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Results revealed that TIM-3 mRNA and protein expression values of circulating neutrophils were equal between healthy controls (n = 20) and people with CF (n = 26). TIM-3 was detected on resting neutrophil membranes by FACS analysis, and expression levels significantly increased post IL-8 or TNF-α exposure (p < 0.05). Our data suggest a novel role for TIM-3/Gal-9 signaling involving modulation of cytosolic calcium levels. Via TIM-3 interaction, Gal-9 induced neutrophil degranulation and primed the cell for enhanced NADPH oxidase activity. Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was significantly increased upon bacterial opsonization with Gal-9 (p < 0.05), an effect abrogated by blockade of TIM-3 receptors. This mechanism appeared to be Gram-negative bacteria specific and mediated via Gal-9/ LPS binding. Additionally, we have demonstrated that neutrophil TIM-3/Gal-9 signaling is perturbed in the CF airways due to proteolytic degradation of the receptor. In conclusion, results suggest a novel neutrophil defect potentially contributing to the defective bacterial clearance observed in the CF airways and suggest that manipulation of the TIM-3 signaling pathway may be of therapeutic value in CF, preferably in conjunction with antiprotease treatment. PMID:24477913

  12. [Qualitative and quantitative determination of bacterial populations in an aquatic environment. 7. Development of bacterial growth on raw materials exposed to potable water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dott, W; Schoenen, D

    1985-05-01

    Refined steel plates coated with different materials that contained available organic compounds led to a microbial growth on the surface. Even plastics and bitumen which were used in the sphere of drinking water showed after an exposure time of three months up to 192 ml slime per square meter. The number of viable bacteria within the Aufwuchs was in the range of 10(7) cfu/ml. The production of slime increased with time. The relation of carbohydrate and protein content significantly changed from 2 at the beginning to 30 after 12 months of incubation the bitumen coating test plates. This indicates an increase synthesis of carbohydrate containing extracellular polymeric substances during the late phase of growth. The bacteria isolated from the Aufwuchs mainly belonged to the genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Acinetobacter, Caulobacter, sheated bacteria and other gramnegative physiologically nonreactiv roads. During exposure of the plates the relation changed within the bacterial communities of the main groups. Comparing the bacteria communities of inlet and outflow water it became evident that the later one was influenced by bacteria of the Aufwuchs. PMID:4024773

  13. Genetic variation in bacterial kidney disease (BKD) susceptibility in Lake Michigan Chinook Salmon and its progenitor population from the Puget Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K; Hard, Jeffrey J; Neely, Kathleen G; Park, Linda K; Winton, James R; Elliott, Diane G

    2014-03-01

    Mass mortality events in wild fish due to infectious diseases are troubling, especially given the potential for long-term, population-level consequences. Evolutionary theory predicts that populations with sufficient genetic variation will adapt in response to pathogen pressure. Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were introduced into Lake Michigan in the late 1960s from a Washington State hatchery population. In the late 1980s, collapse of the forage base and nutritional stress in Lake Michigan were thought to contribute to die-offs of Chinook Salmon due to bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Previously, we demonstrated that Lake Michigan Chinook Salmon from a Wisconsin hatchery have greater survival following BKD challenge relative to their progenitor population. Here, we evaluated whether the phenotypic divergence of these populations in BKD susceptibility was due to selection rather than genetic drift. Comparison of the overall magnitude of quantitative trait to neutral marker divergence between the populations suggested selection had occurred but a direct test of quantitative trait divergence was not significant, preventing the rejection of the null hypothesis of differentiation through genetic drift. Estimates of phenotypic variation (VP ), additive genetic variation (VA ) and narrow-sense heritability (h (2)) were consistently higher in the Wisconsin relative to the Washington population. If selection had acted on the Wisconsin population there was no evidence of a concomitant loss of genetic variation in BKD susceptibility. The Renibacterium salmoninarum exposures were conducted at both 14°C and 9°C; the warmer temperature accelerated time to death in both populations and there was no evidence of phenotypic plasticity or a genotype-by-environment (G × E) interaction. High h (2) estimates for BKD susceptibility in the Wisconsin population, combined with a lack of phenotypic plasticity, predicts that future adaptive gains in BKD resistance are still

  14. Effects of condensed tannins on hydrogen sulfide production and the sulfate-reducing bacterial population of swine manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condensed tannins are natural plant compounds that have antibacterial properties and have been used in studies to reduce methane emissions and frothy bloat in cattle. The objective of this study was to test the effects of condensed tannins on swine manure to target bacterial groups responsible for ...

  15. Interactions between algal-bacterial populations and trace metals in fjord surface waters during a nutrient stimulated summer bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, F.; Larsen, A.; Stedmon, C.; Søndergaard, M.

    2005-01-01

    We examined how variations in algal-bacterial community structure relate to Cu, Zn, and Mn speciation during a diatom-rich bloom that was induced by daily additions of inorganic macronutrients to fjord waters in August 2002. The experiments were carried out in 11-m3 floating mesocosm bags deployed...

  16. Bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan prevents DSS-induced IBD by restoring the reduced population of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Ho; Park, Min; Ji, Kon-Young; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Jang, Ji-Hun; Yoon, Il-Joo; Oh, Seung-Su; Kim, Su-Man; Jeong, Yun-Hwa; Yun, Chul-Ho; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, In-Young; Choi, Ha-Rim; Ko, Ki-sung; Kang, Hyung-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan has more advantages in terms of cost, yield and efficiency than that derived from mushrooms, plants, yeasts and fungi. We have previously developed a novel and high-yield β-(1,3)-glucan produced by Agrobacterium sp. R259. This study aimed to elucidate the functional mechanism and therapeutic efficacy of bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).Mice were orally pretreated with bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan at daily doses of 2.5 or 5mg/kg for 2 weeks. After 6 days of DSS treatment, clinical assessment of IBD severity and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines were evaluated. In vivo cell proliferation was examined by immunohistochemistry using Ki-67 and ER-TR7 antibodies. The frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) was analyzed by flow cytometry. Natural killer (NK) activity and IgA level were evaluated using NK cytotoxicity assay and ELISA.The deterioration of body weight gain, colonic architecture, disease score and histological score was recovered in DSS-induced IBD mice when pretreated with bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan. The recruitment of macrophages and the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17A/F, were markedly decreased in the colon of β-(1,3)-glucan-pretreated mice. β-(1,3)-Glucan induced the recovery of Tregs in terms of their frequency in DSS-induced IBD mice. Intriguingly, β-(1,3)-glucan reversed the functional defects of NK cells and excessive IgA production in DSS-induced IBD mice.We conclude that bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan prevented the progression of DSS-induced IBD by recovering the reduction of Tregs, functional defect of NK cells and excessive IgA production. PMID:25092569

  17. Analysis and exploitation of bacterial population from natural uranium-rich soils: selection of a model specie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that soils play a key role in controlling the mobility of toxic metals and this property is greatly influenced by indigenous bacterial communities. This study has been conducted on radioactive and controls soils, collected in natural uraniferous areas (Limousin). A physico-chemical and mineralogical analysis of soils samples was carried out.The structure of bacterial communities was estimated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The community structure is remarkably more stable in the uranium-rich soils than in the control ones, indicating that uranium exerts a high selection from the soils was constructed and screened for uranium resistance in order to study bacteria-uranium interactions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that a phylo-genetically diverse set of uranium-resistant species ware able to chelate uranium at the cell surface. (author)

  18. Prophage-Mediated Dynamics of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Populations, the Destructive Bacterial Pathogens of Citrus Huanglongbing

    OpenAIRE

    Lijuan Zhou; Powell, Charles A.; Wenbin Li; Mike Irey; Yongping Duan

    2013-01-01

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las) Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB), a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by s...

  19. Differences in Bacterial Population in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbum) Fry after Transfer from Incubator to Pools

    OpenAIRE

    Kapetanović, Damir; Kurtović, Božidar; Teskeredžić, Emin

    2005-01-01

    The microflora of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum) fry from a commercial freshwater hatchery, along with important water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH, was analysed. Samples for bacteriological analysis were taken from gill, heart and kidney, from the third to the eighth week after hatching. Pure bacterial colonies were examined macroscopically, with Gram staining and biochemical tests. For final identification, the APILAB Plus programme (bioMérieu...

  20. Prophage-Mediated Dynamics of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Populations, the Destructive Bacterial Pathogens of Citrus Huanglongbing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lijuan; Powell, Charles A.; Li, Wenbin; Irey, Mike; Duan, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB), a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by s...

  1. The Population Structure of Antibiotic-Producing Bacterial Symbionts of Apterostigma dentigerum Ants: Impacts of Coevolution and Multipartite Symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Caldera, Eric J.; Currie, Cameron R

    2012-01-01

    Fungus-growing ants (Attini) are part of a complex symbiosis with Basidiomycetous fungi, which the ants cultivate for food, Ascomycetous fungal pathogens (Escovopsis), which parasitize cultivars, and Actinobacteria, which produce antibiotic compounds that suppress pathogen growth. Earlier studies that have characterized the association between attine ants and their bacterial symbionts have employed broad phylogenetic approaches, with conclusions ranging from a diffuse coevolved mutualism to n...

  2. Taxonomic Structure and Stability of the Bacterial Community in Belgian Sourdough Ecosystems as Assessed by Culture and Population Fingerprinting▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Scheirlinck, Ilse; Van der Meulen, Roel; Van Schoor, Ann; Vancanneyt, Marc; De Vuyst, Luc; Vandamme, Peter; Huys, Geert

    2008-01-01

    A total of 39 traditional sourdoughs were sampled at 11 bakeries located throughout Belgium which were visited twice with a 1-year interval. The taxonomic structure and stability of the bacterial communities occurring in these traditional sourdoughs were assessed using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. A total of 1,194 potential lactic acid bacterium (LAB) isolates were tentatively grouped and identified by repetitive element sequence-based PCR, followed by sequence-base...

  3. Identification and characterization of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 from Litopenaeus vannamei involved in anti-bacterial host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Haoyang; L, Kai; Qian, Zhe; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Li, Chaozheng

    2016-05-01

    LvTAK1, a member of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) families, has been identified from Litopenaeus vannamei in this study. The full length of LvTAK1 is 2670 bp, including a 2277 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a putative protein of 758 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of ∼83.4 kDa LvTAK1 expression was most abundant in muscles and was up-regulated in gills after LPS, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphhylococcu saureus, Poly (I:C) and WSSV challenge. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments indicated that LvTAK1 could activate the expression of several antimicrobial peptide genes (AMPs). In addition, the dsRNA-mediated knockdown of LvTAK1 enhanced the susceptibility of shrimps to Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a kind of Gram-negative bacteria. These results suggested LvTAK1 played important roles in anti-bacterial infection. CoIP and subcellular localization assay demonstrated that LvTAK1 could interact with its binding protein LvTAB2, a key component of IMD pathway. Moreover, over-expression of LvTAK1 in Drosophila S2 cell could strongly induce the promoter activity of Diptericin (Dpt), a typical AMP which is used to read out of the activation of IMD pathway. These findings suggested that LvTAK1 could function as a component of IMD pathway. Interestingly, with the over-expression of LvTAK1 in S2 cell, the promoter activity of Metchnikowin (Mtk), a main target gene of Toll/Dif pathway, was up-regulated over 30 times, suggesting that LvTAK1 may also take part in signal transduction of the Toll pathway. In conclusion, we provided some evidences that the involvement of LvTAK1 in the regulation of both Toll and IMD pathways, as well as innate immune against bacterial infection in shrimp. PMID:27033469

  4. Dynamics of bacterial populations during bench-scale bioremediation of oily seawater and desert soil bioaugmented with coastal microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nidaa; Dashti, Narjes; Salamah, Samar; Sorkhoh, Naser; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Radwan, Samir

    2016-03-01

    This study describes a bench-scale attempt to bioremediate Kuwaiti, oily water and soil samples through bioaugmentation with coastal microbial mats rich in hydrocarbonoclastic bacterioflora. Seawater and desert soil samples were artificially polluted with 1% weathered oil, and bioaugmented with microbial mat suspensions. Oil removal and microbial community dynamics were monitored. In batch cultures, oil removal was more effective in soil than in seawater. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria associated with mat samples colonized soil more readily than seawater. The predominant oil degrading bacterium in seawater batches was the autochthonous seawater species Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. The main oil degraders in the inoculated soil samples, on the other hand, were a mixture of the autochthonous mat and desert soil bacteria; Xanthobacter tagetidis, Pseudomonas geniculata, Olivibacter ginsengisoli and others. More bacterial diversity prevailed in seawater during continuous than batch bioremediation. Out of seven hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species isolated from those cultures, only one, Mycobacterium chlorophenolicum, was of mat origin. This result too confirms that most of the autochthonous mat bacteria failed to colonize seawater. Also culture-independent analysis of seawater from continuous cultures revealed high-bacterial diversity. Many of the bacteria belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and were hydrocarbonoclastic. Optimal biostimulation practices for continuous culture bioremediation of seawater via mat bioaugmentation were adding the highest possible oil concentration as one lot in the beginning of bioremediation, addition of vitamins, and slowing down the seawater flow rate. PMID:26751253

  5. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  6. Bacterial vaginosis in early pregnancy is associated with low birth weight and small for gestational age, but not with spontaneous preterm birth: A population-based study on Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Poul; Vogel, Ida; Olsen, Jørn; Jeune, Bernard; Westergaard, Jes G.; Jacobsson, Bo; Møller, Birger R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the association between bacterial vaginosis (BV) in early pregnancy and preterm birth, low birth weight (LBW) and small for gestational age (SGA) in a Danish population. Methods. A geographically defined population-based prospective study of Danish-speaking pregnant women over...

  7. The bacterial population adherent to plant particles in the rumen of reindeer fed lichen, timothy hay or silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Alterskjær Olsen

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Male reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus calves taken from a natural winter pasture were given ad lib. access to lichen (n = 3, timothy silage (n = 3 and hay (n = 3 for 7 weeks. Median numbers of viable anaerobic bacteria adherent to the plant particles (cells/g wet weight of rumen solids, growing on a habitat simulating medium (M8V, were significantly higher (P = 0.05 in the rumen of reindeer fed lichen (26.5 x 109- 53.0 x 109 and hay (4.0 x 109- 40.5 x 109, compared to reindeer fed silage (1.15 x 109 - 3.25 x 109. Anaerobic bacterial strains (n = 551 from the plant particles obtained from the rumen of the nine reindeer examined, were isolated using an acid swollen cellulose medium (M8SC and tested for their ability to hydrolyse carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC. The proportion of CMC hydrolysing adherent bacteria isolated from M8SC was significantly higher in reindeer fed hay (21.5% compared ro animals fed lichen (5.3% and silage (2.7% (P = 0.05. The CMC hydrolysing bacterial srrains (n=42 isolated from reindeer fed hay where characterised as non-cellulolytic Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens (9.5%, cellulolytic B. fibrisolvens (50.0%, Clostridium sp. (2.4% and unknowns (38.1%, while CMC hydrolysing strains (n=11 isolated from animals fed lichen and strains (n=4 isolated from animals fed silage where all characterised as B. fibrisolvens. None of the bacterial strains isolated from the rumen solids of reindeer fed lichen or silage were found to be cellulolytic. This study suggests that both lichen and timothy silage have a negative influence, compared to hay, on the numbers of cellulolytic bacteria adherent to the plant particles in the rumen of reindeer.

  8. Molecular characterization of bacterial populations of different soils Caracterização molecular de populações bacterianas de diferentes solos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Matheus Pereira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, few studies were carried out in Brazil about diversity of bacterial soil communities. Aiming to characterize the bacterial population in the soil through 16S rRNA analysis, two types of soil have been analyzed: one of them characterized by intensive use where tomato, beans and corn were cultivated (CS; the other analyzed soil was under forest (FS, unchanged by man; both located in Guaíra, São Paulo State, Brazil. Using specific primers, 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic DNA in both soils were amplified by PCR, amplicons were cloned and 139 clones from two libraries were partially sequenced. The use of 16S rRNA analysis allowed identification of several bacterial populations in the soil belonging to the following phyla: Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria Verrucomicrobia in addition to the others that were not classified, beyond Archaea domain. Differences between FS and CS libraries were observed in size phyla. A larger number of phyla and, consequently, a greater bacterial diversity were found in the under-forest soil. These data were confirmed by the analyses of genetic diversity that have been carried out. The characterization of bacterial communities of soil has made its contribution by providing facts for further studies on the dynamics of bacterial populations in different soil conditions in Brazil.Até o momento poucos estudos foram realizados no Brasil a respeito da diversidade de comunidades bacterianas no solo. Com o objetivo de caracterizar as populações bacterianas presentes no solo através da análise do gene 16S rRNA, foram analisados dois solos: um caracterizado pelo uso intensivo, principalmente para a produção de tomate, feijão e milho (CS; e outro sob floresta (FS, não modificado pelo homem, ambos do município de Guaíra, no estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Usando oligonucleotídeos específicos, de genes 16S rRNA do DNA metagenomico de ambos os solos foram amplificados

  9. Populism

    OpenAIRE

    Abts, Koenraad; van Kessel, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    Populism is a concept applied to a wide range of political movements and actors across the globe. There is, at the same time, considerable confusion about the attributes and manifestation of populism, as well as its impact on democracy. This contribution identifies the defining elements of the populist ideology and discusses the varieties in which populism manifests itself, for instance as a component of certain party families. We finally discuss various normative interpretations of populism,...

  10. The Survival and Recovery of Irradiated Bacterial Spores as Affected by Population Density and Some External Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation resistance of Bacillus cereus spores as affected by the pH-value and cell density of the irradiated spore suspensions was investigated. The portions of the survival curves of suspensions of 108, 4 x 103 and 5 x 101 per millilitre viable cell counts, respectively, were compared for a three-orders-of-magnitude decrease in viable cell count. It was established that the initial cell density did not affect radiation resistance of spores. Radiation resistance as affected by pH-value in the range of 3 to 8 was investigated. In the range of pH 5 to 8, the radiation resistance of B. cereus spores was not affected. By lowering the pH-value to below 5, the radiation resistance decreased below that observed in the neutral region. The colony-forming capacity of B. cereus, B. coagulans and B. pumilus as a function of the pH-value in the nutrient medium, and the pH-sensitivity of bacterial spores as affected by radiation, were also investigated. It was established that irradiation increased the pH-sensitivity of surviving bacterial spores in all three strains. The initial phase of spore germination (the phase accompanied by decrease of refractivity of the spores) and the division stage of vegetative cells proved to be the most sensitive to the value of the hydrogen ion concentration. (author)

  11. Dinâmica das populações bacterianas em solos de Cerrados Dynamic of bacterial populations from Cerrado soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Pereira

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Nos ambientes tropicais, os Cerrados destacam-se pelo seu potencial agrícola. Apesar das funções dos microrganismos no crescimento das plantas e na produtividade das culturas, existem poucas informações dos efeitos resultantes do manejo do solo, na ecologia microbiana. Neste estudo, foram avaliados os efeitos das condições ambientais e das práticas agrícolas sobre as populações bacterianas. As densidades das populações em solos com vegetação nativa foram variáveis e diferenciadas. Em Sete Lagoas, MG, as populações de actinomicetos variaram de 1,7 a 50 X 10(4 UFC/g de solo seco, enquanto em Planaltina as densidades das populações bacterianas em solo com primeiro e segundo ano de cultivo de soja foram semelhantes, mas superiores ao solo com vegetação nativa. A utilização agrícola deste solo não resultou em desequilíbrios acentuados das populações de actinomicetos provenientes de esporos e hifas. As relações esporos/hifas variaram de 1,1 a 5,8. Na rizosfera da soja, os coeficientes de correlação entre as populações de actinomicetos com as demais populações bacterianas foram significativos. Os resultados evidenciam que as práticas agrícolas utilizadas na introdução da cultura da soja em solos de Cerrados pode influenciar o equilíbrio das populações na comunidade bacteriana.Among tropical environments, Cerrados stand out because of its agriculture potencial. Although microorganisms play an important role on soil sustainability and crop production, few information is available on the effects of soil management systems on Cerrado's microbial ecology. In this study the effects of environmental conditions and soil management practices on bacterial populations were evaluated. Bacterial population densities in soil under native vegetation were variable and diferentiated. Actinomycetes densities varied from 1.7 to 50 X 10(4 CFU/g dry soil in Sete Lagoas region, Brazil, whereas bacterial populations in both the

  12. Modulation of population density and size of silver nanoparticles embedded in bacterial cellulose via ammonia exposure: visual detection of volatile compounds in a piece of plasmonic nanopaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heli, B.; Morales-Narváez, E.; Golmohammadi, H.; Ajji, A.; Merkoçi, A.

    2016-04-01

    The localized surface plasmon resonance exhibited by noble metal nanoparticles can be sensitively tuned by varying their size and interparticle distances. We report that corrosive vapour (ammonia) exposure dramatically reduces the population density of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) embedded within bacterial cellulose, leading to a larger distance between the remaining nanoparticles and a decrease in the UV-Vis absorbance associated with the AgNP plasmonic properties. We also found that the size distribution of AgNPs embedded in bacterial cellulose undergoes a reduction in the presence of volatile compounds released during food spoilage, modulating the studied nanoplasmonic properties. In fact, such a plasmonic nanopaper exhibits a change in colour from amber to light amber upon the explored corrosive vapour exposure and from amber to a grey or taupe colour upon fish or meat spoilage exposure. These phenomena are proposed as a simple visual detection of volatile compounds in a flexible, transparent, permeable and stable single-use nanoplasmonic membrane, which opens the way to innovative approaches and capabilities in gas sensing and smart packaging.The localized surface plasmon resonance exhibited by noble metal nanoparticles can be sensitively tuned by varying their size and interparticle distances. We report that corrosive vapour (ammonia) exposure dramatically reduces the population density of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) embedded within bacterial cellulose, leading to a larger distance between the remaining nanoparticles and a decrease in the UV-Vis absorbance associated with the AgNP plasmonic properties. We also found that the size distribution of AgNPs embedded in bacterial cellulose undergoes a reduction in the presence of volatile compounds released during food spoilage, modulating the studied nanoplasmonic properties. In fact, such a plasmonic nanopaper exhibits a change in colour from amber to light amber upon the explored corrosive vapour exposure and

  13. [Comparison of the adaptive potential for Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae nodule bacterial populations isolated in natural ecosystems and agrocenoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurchak, O N; Provorov, N A; Simarov, B V

    2011-04-01

    Polymorphism analysis was performed in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae populations isolated from geographically distant regions of Ukraine and Middle Asia. Examination of cultural, biochemical, and symbiotic traits revealed interpopulation differences, which were attributed to the difference in conditions between natural ecosystems and agrocenoses. Vetch has high species diversity and is not cultivated in Middle Asia, and the corresponding rhizobial population displayed higher genetic diversity and higher polymorphism of adaptive traits ensuring saprophytic development in soil and the rhizosphere, including melanin synthesis (35%) and active exopolysaccharide production (90%). Strains of the Ukrainian population had a lower exopolysaccharide production (10%), did not produce melanin, had higher herbicide resistance, and utilized glucose and succinate (main components of plant root exudation) as carbon sources. Strains capable of efficient symbiosis with Vicia villosa Roth. had a higher frequency in the Middle Asian than in the Ukrainian population, especially among strains isolated from soil (80 and 35%, respectively). In addition, strains of the Middle Asian population better competed for nodulation. It was assumed that the formation of rhizobial populations in vetch cultivation regions (Ukraine) is aimed at adaptation to ectosymbiotic (rhizospheric) interactions with plants and anthropogenic stress factors, while strains of the vetch original center (Middle Asia) are mostly adapted to the endosymbiotic interaction and to natural edaphic stress factors. PMID:21675237

  14. Entrainment and Control of Bacterial Populations: An in Silico Study over a Spatially Extended Agent Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Petros; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Bernardo, Mario di

    2016-07-15

    We extend a spatially explicit agent based model (ABM) developed previously to investigate entrainment and control of the emergent behavior of a population of synchronized oscillating cells in a microfluidic chamber. Unlike most of the work in models of control of cellular systems which focus on temporal changes, we model individual cells with spatial dependencies which may contribute to certain behavioral responses. We use the model to investigate the response of both open loop and closed loop strategies, such as proportional control (P-control), proportional-integral control (PI-control) and proportional-integral-derivative control (PID-control), to heterogeinities and growth in the cell population, variations of the control parameters and spatial effects such as diffusion in the spatially explicit setting of a microfluidic chamber setup. We show that, as expected from the theory of phase locking in dynamical systems, open loop control can only entrain the cell population in a subset of forcing periods, with a wide variety of dynamical behaviors obtained outside these regions of entrainment. Closed-loop control is shown instead to guarantee entrainment in a much wider region of control parameter space although presenting limitations when the population size increases over a certain threshold. In silico tracking experiments are also performed to validate the ability of classical control approaches to achieve other reference behaviors such as a desired constant output or a linearly varying one. All simulations are carried out in BSim, an advanced agent-based simulator of microbial population which is here extended ad hoc to include the effects of control strategies acting onto the population. PMID:27110835

  15. Involvement in emergency situations by primary care doctors on-call in Norway - a prospective population-based observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunskaar Steinar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care doctors on-call in the emergency primary health care services in Norway are, together with the ambulances, the primary resources for handling emergencies outside hospitals. There is a lack of reliable data for Norway on how often the primary care doctors are alerted and on their responses in the most urgent emergency cases. The aim of this study was to investigate how doctors on-call are involved in red responses (highest priority, using three different emergency medical communication centres (EMCC as catchment area for a prospective population-based study. Methods In the period from October to December 2007 three dispatch centres covering approximately 816 000 inhabitants prospectively recorded all acute emergency cases. Ambulance records, air ambulance records and records from the doctors on-call were collected. NACA score was used to define the severity of the emergencies. Results 5 105 cases were classified as red responses during the period. We have complete basic recordings (AMIS forms from all and resaved ambulance records, air ambulance records and records from doctors on-call in 89% of the cases. Ambulances were alerted in 96% and doctors on-call in 47% of the cases, but there were large differences between the three EMCCs. Doctors on-call responded with call-out in 42% of the alerted cases. 28% of all patients were taken to a casualty clinic, 46% were admitted to hospital by a doctor and 24% were taken directly to hospital by ambulances. In total, primary care doctors on-call took active part in 42% of all red response cases, and together with GPs' daytime activity the primary health care services were involved in 50% of the cases. 29% of the cases were classified as life-threatening. Call-out by doctors on-call were found to be more frequent in life-threatening situations compared with not life-threatening situations. Conclusion Doctors on-call and GPs on daytime were involved in half of all red

  16. Generation of acid mine drainage around the Karaerik copper mine (Espiye, Giresun, NE Turkey): implications from the bacterial population in the Acısu effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, Emine Selva; Akçay, Miğraç; Çolak, Dilşat Nigar; İnan Bektaş, Kadriye; Beldüz, Ali Osman

    2016-09-01

    The Karaerik Cu mine is a worked-out deposit with large volumes of tailings and slags which were left around the mine site without any protection. Natural feeding of these material and run-off water from the mineralised zones into the Acısu effluent causes a serious environmental degradation and creation of acid mine drainage (AMD) along its entire length. This research aims at modelling the formation of AMD with a specific attempt on the characterisation of the bacterial population in association with AMD and their role on its occurrence. Based on 16SrRNA analyses of the clones obtained from a composite water sample, the bacterial community was determined to consist of Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Ferrovum myxofaciens, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans as iron-oxidising bacteria, Acidocella facilis, Acidocella aluminiidurans, Acidiphilium cryptum and Acidiphilium multivorum as iron-reducing bacteria, and Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidiphilium cryptum as sulphur-oxidising bacteria. This association of bacteria with varying roles was interpreted as evidence of a concomitant occurrence of sulphur and iron cycles during the generation of AMD along the Acısu effluent draining the Karaerik mine. PMID:27338270

  17. Effect of dietary supplementation of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) on growth performance, survival, lactobacillus bacterial population and hemato-immunological parameters of stellate sturgeon (Acipenser stellatus) juvenile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, Reza; Iri, Yousef; Rostami, Hosseinali Khoshbavar; Razeghi Mansour, Majid

    2013-10-01

    The dietary supplementation of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) in stellate sturgeon juvenile, Acipenser stellatus (with mean initial body weight of 30.16 ± 0.14 g) was evaluated for the effect on growth, autochthonous intestinal microbiata and hemato-immunological parameters for 11 weeks. FOS was added at a level of 0, 1% and 2% to the commercial pellet diet (BioMar). At the end of the experiment, growth parameters, survival rate, lactobacillus bacterial population, hematological and immunological parameters were determined. The fish fed on 1% FOS significantly showed higher final weight, WG%, SGR and PER and lower FCR compared to those of the control group (P  0.05). However, FOS administration resulted in lower survival. The serum lysozyme activity was significantly affected by dietary 1% FOS (P  0.05). In fish fed on the diet with 1% FOS showed a significant increase of total heterotrophic autochthonous bacterial and presumptive LAB levels (P prebiotics. In addition to increase in WBC, RBC, MCV, hematocrit, hemoglobin and lymphocyte levels were observed in this group. These results indicated that dietary supplementation of FOS at a dose of 1% improved growth performance, beneficial intestinal microbiata and stimulate immune response of stellate sturgeon juvenile. PMID:23973846

  18. EFFECT OF MONENSIN FEEDING AND WITHDRAWAL ON RUMINAL POPULATIONS OF INDIVIDUAL BACTERIAL SPECIES IN COWS FED HIGH-STARCH DIETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monensin is known to improve ruminant animal production, purportedly by inhibition of H2-producing Gram-positive bacteria, yet there is no in vivo evidence for shifts in populations of specific microbial taxa. We used real-time PCR with relative quantification to assess the fraction of 16S rRNA gene...

  19. The effect of wheat prebiotics on the gut bacterial population and iron status of iron deficient broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there is a lot of interest in improving the intestinal health, and consequently increasing minerals as iron absorption, by managing the intestinal microbial population. This is traditionally done by the consumption of probiotics, which are live microbial food supplements. However, a...

  20. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    -vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial......Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  1. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  2. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of bacterial populations isolated from diesel-contaminated soil and treated by two bioremediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study bioremediation is presented as an alternative for the recovery of contaminated ecosystems. In this work an experimental diesel spill on pasture land was remediated using two bioremediation technologies: natural attenuation, which is the natural capability of indigenous microorganisms to degrade a xenobiotic component in a determined time, and biostimulation, which consist in the acceleration of the degradation process through the stimulation of the metabolism of indigenous microorganisms by the addition of nutrients (P and N) to the media. Results of respirometry assays indicated that both treatments produced significant levels of hydrocarbon removal but the biostimulation treatment stranded out with 98.17% degradation. Seven bacterial isolates were obtained from these treatments which according to their molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis belong to the genus: Enterobacter, Bacillus, Arthrobacter, Sanguibacter, Staphylococcus and Flavobacterium. All isolates were able to metabolize diesel as a carbon and energy source; for this reason and taking into account that for some of these microorganisms their role in bioremediation have not been extensively studied, it is recommended to continue with their evaluation to know their real potential for the solution of environmental problems.

  3. Fructose Degradation in the Haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii Involves a Bacterial Type Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Phosphotransferase System, Fructose-1-Phosphate Kinase, and Class II Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase

    OpenAIRE

    Pickl, Andreas; Johnsen, Ulrike; Schönheit, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii utilizes fructose as a sole carbon and energy source. Genes and enzymes involved in fructose uptake and degradation were identified by transcriptional analyses, deletion mutant experiments, and enzyme characterization. During growth on fructose, the gene cluster HVO_1495 to HVO_1499, encoding homologs of the five bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS) components enzyme IIB (EIIB), enzyme I (EI), histidine protein (HPr), EIIA, and EIIC, was highly ...

  4. Involvement of and interaction between WNT10A and EDA mutations in tooth agenesis cases in the Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dental agenesis is the most common, often heritable, developmental anomaly in humans. Although WNT10A gene mutations are known to cause rare syndromes associated with tooth agenesis, including onycho-odontodermal dysplasia (OODD, Schöpf-Schulz-Passarge syndrome (SSPS, hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED, and more than half of the cases of isolated oligodontia recently, the genotype-phenotype correlations and the mode of inheritance of WNT10A mutations remain unclear. The phenotypic expression with WNT10A mutations shows a high degree of variability, suggesting that other genes might function with WNT10A in regulating ectodermal organ development. Moreover, the involvement of mutations in other genes, such as EDA, which is also associated with HED and isolated tooth agenesis, is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that EDA mutations interact with WNT10A mutations to play a role in tooth agenesis. Additionally, EDA, EDAR, and EDARADD encode signaling molecules in the Eda/Edar/NF-κB signaling pathways, we also checked EDAR and EDARADD in this study. METHODS: WNT10A, EDA, EDAR and EDARADD were sequenced in 88 patients with isolated oligodontia and 26 patients with syndromic tooth agenesis. The structure of two mutated WNT10A and two mutated EDA proteins was analyzed. RESULTS: Digenic mutations of both WNT10A and EDA were identified in 2 of 88 (2.27% isolated oligodontia cases and 4 of 26 (15.38% syndromic tooth agenesis cases. No mutation in EDAR or EDARADD gene was found. CONCLUSIONS: WNT10A and EDA digenic mutations could result in oligodontia and syndromic tooth agenesis in the Chinese population. Moreover, our results will greatly expand the genotypic spectrum of tooth agenesis.

  5. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadtanapuk, S. [Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Teraarusiri, W. [Central Laboratory, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Nanakorn, W. [The Crown Property Bureau, 173 Nakhonratchasrima Road, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S., E-mail: soanu.1@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  6. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection

  7. The screening of xanthomonas lactose – positive strains among bacterial populations of citrus canker disease isolated from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyat Jafari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Xanthan is a heteropolysaccharide that is produced by the group of plant pathogen bacteria from Xanthomonas genus. Usually, the media containing glucose, sucrose and starch is used for xanthan production. Because their preparation and transferring is expensive, the final cost of xanthan production by these carbon sources is high. On the other hand, many Xanthomonas species such as X.campestris are not able to use cheap media rich of lactose such as whey to produce xanthan due to the low expression and sometimes the defect of their β-galactosidase enzyme. The access to bacterial strains capable of decomposing lactose will provide a possibility for producing a valuable commercial product (xanthan from an inexpensive carbon source (whey.Materials and methods: In the present study, a collection containing 210 isolated Xanthomonas citrisubsp.citri Iranian strains from citrus orchards in south Iran was studied. Then, the genus of these bacteria was determined by using molecular techniques and sequencing of 16S-rDNA gene. Also, their growth in lactose – based medium was investigated.Results: Among 210 strains, 27 strains were able to grow on lactose rich medium. Then, the genus of these bacteria was proved by sequencing of 16S-rDNA gene and comparison with another 16S-rDNA gene sequences existing in NCBI. Also, these bacteria had considerable growth in lactose-based medium. Discussion and conclusion: At last, we can say that separated lactose-positive Xanthomonas strains from southern citrus orchards have good ability to utilize lactose and in the near future, it would be possible to apply these native strains for xanthan production in cheaper lactose media such as whey.

  8. Buffering effects of calcium salts in kimchi: lowering acidity, elevating lactic acid bacterial population and dextransucrase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Seo Eun; Moon, Jin Seok; Jung, Jee Yun; Kim, Ji-Sun; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Kim, So-Young; Yoon, Hyang Sik; Han, Nam Soo

    2009-12-01

    This study investigates the buffering effects of calcium salts in kimchi on total acidity, microbial population, and dextransucrase activity. Calcium chloride or calcium carbonate was added in dongchimi-kimchi, a watery-radish kimchi, and their effects on various biochemical attributes were analyzed. The addition of 0.1% calcium chloride produced a milder decrease in the pH after 24 days of incubation, which allowed the lactic acid bacteria to survive longer than in the control. In particular, the heterofermentative Leuconostoc genus population was 10-fold higher than that in the control. When sucrose and maltose were also added along with the calcium salts, the dextransucrase activity in the kimchi was elevated and a higher concentration of isomaltooligosaccharides was synthesized when compared with the control. Calcium chloride was determined as a better activator compound of dextransucrase than calcium carbonate, probably because of its higher solubility. Therefore, the results of this study confirm the ability of the proposed approach to modulate the kimchi fermentation process and possibly enhance the quality of kimchi based on the addition of dietary calcium salts. PMID:20075632

  9. Identification of new, well-populated amino-acid sidechain rotamers involving hydroxyl-hydrogen atoms and sulfhydryl-hydrogen atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Bosco K.; Agard, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Background An important element in homology modeling is the use of rotamers to parameterize the sidechain conformation. Despite the many libraries of sidechain rotamers that have been developed, a number of rotamers have been overlooked, due to the fact that they involve hydrogen atoms. Results We identify new, well-populated rotamers that involve the hydroxyl-hydrogen atoms of Ser, Thr and Tyr, and the sulfhydryl-hydrogen atom of Cys, using high-resolution crystal structures (

  10. Identification of new, well-populated amino-acid sidechain rotamers involving hydroxyl-hydrogen atoms and sulfhydryl-hydrogen atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Agard David A; Ho Bosco K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background An important element in homology modeling is the use of rotamers to parameterize the sidechain conformation. Despite the many libraries of sidechain rotamers that have been developed, a number of rotamers have been overlooked, due to the fact that they involve hydrogen atoms. Results We identify new, well-populated rotamers that involve the hydroxyl-hydrogen atoms of Ser, Thr and Tyr, and the sulfhydryl-hydrogen atom of Cys, using high-resolution crystal structures (

  11. Xylo-oligosaccharides and inulin affect genotoxicity and bacterial populations differently in a human colonic simulator challenged with soy protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, C. T.; Petersen, Anne; Licht, Tine Rask;

    2013-01-01

    High dietary intakes of some protein sources, including soy protein, can increase colonic DNA damage in animals, whereas some carbohydrates attenuate this. We investigated whether inulin and xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) could be protective against DNA strand breaks by adding them to a human colonic...... simulator consisting of a proximal vessel (PV) (pH 5.5) and a distal vessel (DV) (pH 6.8) inoculated with human faeces and media containing soy protein. Genotoxicity of the liquid phase and microbial population changes in the vessels were measured. Soy protein (3%) was fermented with 1% low amylose...... cornstarch for 10 day followed by soy protein with 1% XOS or 1% inulin for 10 day. Inulin did not alter genotoxicity but XOS significantly reduced PV genotoxicity and increased DV genotoxicity. Inulin and XOS significantly increased butyrate concentration in the DV but not PV. Numbers of the key butyrate...

  12. Arthromitus (Bacillus cereus) symbionts in the cockroach Blaberus giganteus: dietary influences on bacterial development and population density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, L.; Jorgensen, J.; Haselton, A.; Pitt, A.; Rudner, R.; Margulis, L.

    1999-01-01

    The filamentous spore-forming bacterium Arthromitus, discovered in termites, millipedes, sow bugs and other soil-dwelling arthropods by Leidy (1850), is the intestinal stage of Bacillus cereus. We extend the range of Arthromitus habitats to include the hindgut of Blaberus giganteus, the large tropical American cockroach. The occurrence and morphology of the intestinal form of the bacillus were compared in individual cockroaches (n=24) placed on four different diet regimes: diurnally maintained insects fed (1) dog food, (2) soy protein only, (3)purified cellulose only, and (4) a dog food-fed group maintained in continuous darkness. Food quality exerted strong influence on population densities and developmental stages of the filamentous bacterium and on fecal pellet composition. The most dramatic rise in Arthromitus populations, defined as the spore-forming filament intestinal stage, occurred in adult cockroaches kept in the dark on a dog food diet. Limited intake of cellulose or protein alone reduced both the frequency of Arthromitus filaments and the rate of weight gain of the insects. Spores isolated from termites, sow bugs, cockroaches and moths, grown on various hard surfaces display a branching mobility and resistance to antibiotics characteristic to group I Bacilli whose members include B. cereus, B. circulans, B. alvei and B. macerans. DNA isolated from pure cultures of these bacilli taken from the guts of Blaberus giganteus (cockroach), Junonia coenia (moth), Porcellio scaber (sow bug) and Cryptotermes brevis (termite) and subjected to Southern hybridization with a 23S-5S B. subtilis ribosomal sequence probe verified that they are indistinguishable from laboratory strains of Bacillus cereus.

  13. Effect of oxygen and temperature on the dynamic of the dominant bacterial populations of pig manure and on the persistence of pig-associated genetic markers, assessed in river water microcosms

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aim is to evaluate the dynamic of Bacteroides-Prevotella and Bacillus-Streptococcus-Lactobacillus populations originating from pig manure and the persistence of pig-associated markers belonging to these groups according to temperature and oxygen. Methods and Results: River water was inoculated with pig manure and incubated under microaerophilic and aerobic conditions, at 4 and 20 degrees C over 43 days. The diversity of bacterial populations was analysed by capillary electrophoresis...

  14. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Nanakorn, W.; Yu, L. D.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  15. Sexually transmitted infections, bacterial vaginosis, and candidiasis in women of reproductive age in rural Northeast Brazil: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Araújo Oliveira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Population-based data on sexually transmitted infections (STI, bacterial vaginosis (BV, and candidiasis reflect the epidemiological situation more accurately than studies performed in specific populations, but such data are scarce. To determine the prevalence of STI, BV, and candidiasis among women of reproductive age from a resource-poor community in Northeast Brazil, a population-based cross sectional study was undertaken. All women from seven hamlets and the centre of Pacoti municipality in the state of Ceará, aged 12 to 49 years, were invited to participate. The women were asked about socio-demographic characteristics and genital symptoms, and thereafter examined gynaecologically. Laboratory testing included polymerase chain reaction (PCR for human papillomavirus (HPV, ligase chain reaction (LCR for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, ELISA for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL and fluorescent treponema antibody absorption test (FTA-ABS for syphilis, and analysis of wet mounts, gram stains and Pap smears for trichomoniasis, candidiasis, and BV. Only women who had initiated sexual life were included in the analysis (n = 592. The prevalences of STI were: HPV 11.7% (95% confidence interval: 9.3-14.7, chlamydia 4.5% (3.0-6.6, trichomoniasis 4.1% (2.7-6.1, gonorrhoea 1.2% (0.5-2.6, syphilis 0.2% (0.0-1.1, and HIV 0%. The prevalence of BV and candidiasis was 20% (16.9-23.6 and 12.5% (10.0-15.5, respectively. The most common gynaecological complaint was lower abdominal pain. STI are common in women in rural Brazil and represent an important health threat in view of the HIV pandemic.

  16. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M;

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...... susceptibility occurred in 21 (23%) of 92 cases of known aetiology, compared to an estimated 6% in nationally notified cases (p <0.001). Ceftriaxone plus penicillin as empirical treatment was appropriate in 97% of ABM cases in the study population, and in 99.6% of nationally notified cases. The notification rate...... was 75% for penicillin-susceptible episodes, and 24% for penicillin-non-susceptible episodes (p <0.001). Cases involving staphylococci, Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae were under-reported. Among 51 ABM cases with no identified risk factors, nine of 11 cases with penicillin...

  17. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  18. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  19. Population dynamics of toxic phytoplankton and bacterial flora in the waters of the low Adriatic sea; Dinamica di popolazione di fitoplancton tossico e flora batterica nel basso Adriatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroppo, C.; Stabili, L.; Cavallo, R.A.; Pastore, M. [CNR, Ist. Sperimentale Talassografico Attlio Cerruti, Taranto (Italy); Marchiori, E. [Rome Univ., Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Organica; Bruno, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita' , Laboratorio di Igiene Ambientale, Rome (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The coastal areas of the Southern Adriatic Sea, in particular the Apulian ones, may be considered an example of intact ecosystem and represent an ideal term of comparison to other marine ecosystems having higher levels of pollution (Northern Adriatic Sea). In order to evaluate the sanitary levels of this environment, four transect were investigated during two years monitoring (April 1995-March 1997) along the Otranto Channel coasts, by joint research groups of the Environmental Hygiene Laboratory of the Istituto Superiore di Sanita' and the Istituto Sperimentale Talassografico A. Cerruti of CNR in Taranto. The study underlines the phytoplanktic and bacterial population dynamics, and the detection of the microbiological water quality along the coast tract Brindisi-Lecce-Otranto-S. Maria di Leuca. The results acquired pointed out population dynamics of some potantially toxic species of Dinophysis genus and Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima. These depended on the winter nutrient loads due to the ASW (Adriatic Superficial Waters) and to the LIW (Levantine Intermediate Waters). The bacterial community was mainly constituted by genera Aeromonas, Photobacterium, Cytophaga and Pseudomonas. Also the presence of Enterobacteriaceae family was relevant. Among the pathogenic vibrios the most frequently isolated species were Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus. [Italian] Considerando che le zone del basso Adriatico, in particolare quelle pugliesi, costituiscono un biotopo ancora relativamente inalterato, esse sono state oggetto di un'indagine sperimentale condotta in 24 mesi di attivita' (aprile 1995-marzo 1997) lungo le coste del Canale di Otranto, ad opera di un gruppo congiunto del Laboratorio di Igiene Ambientale dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanita' e dei laboratori dell'Istituto Sperimentale Talassografico A. Cerruti del CNR di Taranto, ai fini di valutare lo stato di salute di questo ambiente, che fornisce, con buona probabilita', un

  20. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getahun E Agga

    Full Text Available This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie. Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica and Gram-positive (enterococci bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174. The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44 by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine, low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05 in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar

  1. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Dayna M; Schmidt, John W

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P waste streams, but a higher diversity of antimicrobial resistance genes are present in treated human waste discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants than in

  2. Mind the Gaps: Exploring the Use of Technology to Facilitate Parental Involvement, Particularly for Historically Underserved Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    Decades of research establishes positive associations between parental involvement and a number of important student outcomes, including student achievement. Furthermore, a number of technological innovations make facilitating parental involvement more possible than ever. Those possibilities, however, require varying levels of technological…

  3. OppA of Listeria monocytogenes, an Oligopeptide-Binding Protein Required for Bacterial Growth at Low Temperature and Involved in Intracellular Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Borezee, Elise; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Berche, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    We identified a new oligopeptide permease operon in the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. This opp operon consists of five genes (oppA, oppB, oppC, oppD, and oppF) and displays the same genetic organization as those of several bacterial species. The first gene of this operon, oppA, encodes a 62-kDa protein sharing 33% identity with OppA of Bacillus subtilis and is expressed predominantly during exponential growth. The function of oppA was studied by constructing an oppA deletion mutant. The ph...

  4. Population variability in some genes involving the haemostatic system: data on the general population of Corsica (France, Sardinia and Sicily (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Falchi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three different population samples from Corsica (France, Sardinia and Sicily (Italy were studied using nine genetic markers. For the first time, allele distributions of FGA TaqI, FGB Bcl I, FGB Hind III, PAI-1 Hind III, PLAT TPA-25, GPIIIa Taq I, GPIIb I/D 9bp, FVII HVR4 and FVII -323 10 bp markers, which are thought to be associated with cardiovascular disease risk, were studied in the general population of the three islands. The frequencies of the markers analysed in the present work show some peculiarities: the locus FVII HVR4 is characterized by the presence of a rare allele (H5, found in Corsicans and in Sardinians; the locus FBG BcII shows a low frequency of the B1 allele and the absence of the B1B1 genotype. The frequencies of some alleles have a distribution that is in agreement with the low risk for cardiovascular diseases in south European countries. The results highlight a genetic differentiation between the three Mediterranean islands and the other European populations.

  5. Carbon transformations in deep granitic groundwater by attached bacterial populations characterized with 16S-rRNA gene sequencing technique and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents molecular characterization of attached bacterial populations growing in slowly flowing (1-3 mm s-1) artesian groundwater from deep crystalline bed-rock of the Stripa research mine, south central Sweden. The assimilation rate of CO2 and lactate, and the lactate respiration rates were also determined. The bacteria studied grew in anoxic, high pH, 9-10, and low redox artesian groundwater flowing up through tubings from two levels of a borehole designated V2, 812-820 m and 970-1240 m below ground. The major groups of bacteria were found. Signature bases placed them in the appropriate systematic groups. All belonged to the Proteobacterial groups beta and gamma. One group was found only at the 812-820 m level, where it constituted 63% of the sequenced clones, whereas the second group existed almost exclusively and constituted 85% of the sequenced clones at the 970-1240 m level. The third group was equally distributed between the levels. A few other bacteria were also found. None of the 16S-rRNA genes from the dominating bacteria resembled any of the other by more than 90% similarity, and none of them resembled anything in the database by more than 96%. Temperature did not seem to have any effect on species composition at the deeper level. SEM images showed rods appearing in microcolonies. The difference in population diversity between the two levels studied presumably reflect the different environments. The earlier proposed presence of sulphate reducing bacteria could no be confirmed

  6. Critical mass of bacterial populations in a generalized Keller Segel model. Analogy with the Chandrasekhar limiting mass of white dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clément

    2008-03-01

    We point out a remarkable analogy between the limiting mass of relativistic white dwarf stars (Chandrasekhar’s limit) and the critical mass of bacterial populations in a generalized Keller Segel model of chemotaxis [P.H. Chavanis, C. Sire, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 016116]. This model is based on generalized stochastic processes leading to the Tsallis statistics. The equilibrium states correspond to polytropic configurations similar to gaseous polytropes in astrophysics. For the critical index n3=d/(d-2) (where d≥2 is the dimension of space), the theory of polytropes leads to a unique value of the mass M that we interpret as a limiting mass. In d=3, we find M=202.8956… and in d=2, we recover the well-known result M=8π (in suitable units). For MM, the system collapses and forms a Dirac peak containing a mass M surrounded by a halo. This paper exposes the model and shows, by simple considerations, the origin of the critical mass. A detailed description of the critical dynamics of the generalized Keller Segel model will be given in a forthcoming paper.

  7. Determinants of Substance Abuse in a Population of Children and Adolescents Involved with the Child Welfare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Veeran-Anne S.; Thornton, Tiffany; Tonmyr, Lil

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse is an important health issue facing children involved with child welfare, but little is known about the associated factors. The purpose of this study was to build on findings from the "Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2003" and use a national sample of 10-15 year old children to examine the factors…

  8. Association of Polymorphisms in BDNF, MTHFR, and Genes Involved in the Dopaminergic Pathway with Memory in a Healthy Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Hu, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Lin, Pei-Jung; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Po-Lei; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to the memory is widely acknowledged. Research suggests that these factors include genes involved in the dopaminergic pathway, as well as the genes for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). The activity of the products of these genes is affected by single…

  9. Pinto Bean Consumption Changes SCFA Profiles in Fecal Fermentations, Bacterial Populations of the Lower Bowel, and Lipid Profiles in Blood of Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Beans improve serum lipids and may reduce the risk of colon cancer by increasing colonic short chain fatty acid (SCFAs) formation. Objective: We assessed whether pinto bean consumption affects 1) in vitro fecal bacterial fermentation and production of SCFAs, 2) colonic bacterial populat...

  10. Population genomic analysis of a bacterial plant pathogen: novel insight into the origin of Pierce's disease of grapevine in the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Nunney

    Full Text Available Invasive diseases present an increasing problem worldwide; however, genomic techniques are now available to investigate the timing and geographical origin of such introductions. We employed genomic techniques to demonstrate that the bacterial pathogen causing Pierce's disease of grapevine (PD is not native to the US as previously assumed, but descended from a single genotype introduced from Central America. PD has posed a serious threat to the US wine industry ever since its first outbreak in Anaheim, California in the 1880s and continues to inhibit grape cultivation in a large area of the country. It is caused by infection of xylem vessels by the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, a genetically distinct subspecies at least 15,000 years old. We present five independent kinds of evidence that strongly support our invasion hypothesis: 1 a genome-wide lack of genetic variability in X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa found in the US, consistent with a recent common ancestor; 2 evidence for historical allopatry of the North American subspecies X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex and X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa; 3 evidence that X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa evolved in a more tropical climate than X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex; 4 much greater genetic variability in the proposed source population in Central America, variation within which the US genotypes are phylogenetically nested; and 5 the circumstantial evidence of importation of known hosts (coffee plants from Central America directly into southern California just prior to the first known outbreak of the disease. The lack of genetic variation in X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa in the US suggests that preventing additional introductions is important since new genetic variation may undermine PD control measures, or may lead to infection of other crop plants through the creation of novel genotypes via inter-subspecific recombination. In general, geographically mixing of previously

  11. Gypsum amendment to rice paddy soil stimulated bacteria involved in sulfur cycling but largely preserved the phylogenetic composition of the total bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörner, Susanne; Zecchin, Sarah; Dan, Jianguo; Todorova, Nadezhda Hristova; Loy, Alexander; Conrad, Ralf; Pester, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Rice paddies are indispensable for human food supply but emit large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane. Sulfur cycling occurs at high rates in these water-submerged soils and controls methane production, an effect that is increased by sulfate-containing fertilizers or soil amendments. We grew rice plants until their late vegetative phase with and without gypsum (CaSO4 ·2H2 O) amendment and identified responsive bacteria by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Gypsum amendment decreased methane emissions by up to 99% but had no major impact on the general phylogenetic composition of the bacterial community. It rather selectively stimulated or repressed a small number of 129 and 27 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (out of 1883-2287 observed) in the rhizosphere and bulk soil, respectively. Gypsum-stimulated OTUs were affiliated with several potential sulfate-reducing (Syntrophobacter, Desulfovibrio, unclassified Desulfobulbaceae, unclassified Desulfobacteraceae) and sulfur-oxidizing taxa (Thiobacillus, unclassified Rhodocyclaceae), while gypsum-repressed OTUs were dominated by aerobic methanotrophs (Methylococcaceae). Abundance correlation networks suggested that two abundant (>1%) OTUs (Desulfobulbaceae, Rhodocyclaceae) were central to the reductive and oxidative parts of the sulfur cycle. PMID:27085098

  12. Emerging bacterial pathogens: the past and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouga, M; Greub, G

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1950s, medical communities have been facing with emerging and reemerging infectious diseases, and emerging pathogens are now considered to be a major microbiologic public health threat. In this review, we focus on bacterial emerging diseases and explore factors involved in their emergence as well as future challenges. We identified 26 major emerging and reemerging infectious diseases of bacterial origin; most of them originated either from an animal and are considered to be zoonoses or from water sources. Major contributing factors in the emergence of these bacterial infections are: (1) development of new diagnostic tools, such as improvements in culture methods, development of molecular techniques and implementation of mass spectrometry in microbiology; (2) increase in human exposure to bacterial pathogens as a result of sociodemographic and environmental changes; and (3) emergence of more virulent bacterial strains and opportunistic infections, especially affecting immunocompromised populations. A precise definition of their implications in human disease is challenging and requires the comprehensive integration of microbiological, clinical and epidemiologic aspects as well as the use of experimental models. It is now urgent to allocate financial resources to gather international data to provide a better understanding of the clinical relevance of these waterborne and zoonotic emerging diseases. PMID:26493844

  13. Efeito do cultivo da soja na dinâmica da população bacteriana, em solos de cerrado Effects of soybean cultivation on the bacterial population dynamics in cerrado soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOÃO CARLOS PEREIRA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a influência do cultivo da soja sobre a dinâmica da população bacteriana, em dois solos de Cerrado do Estado de São Paulo, originalmente cobertos com Paspalum notatum (em Barretos e Brachiaria decumbens (em S��o Carlos. Nesses solos, a densidade da população de bactérias em geral variou de 398,1 x 10³ a 467,7 x 10³ e de 123 x 10³ a 218,8 x 10³ ufc (unidades formadoras de colônias/g de solo seco, respectivamente. O cultivo da soja, em ambos os solos, resultou em incrementos variados nos números de ufc/g de solo seco da população de bactérias em geral, das resistentes aos antibióticos estreptomicina e cloranfenicol, e de actinomicetos. A população de actinomicetos ocorreu no solo principalmente como esporos, e as variações das relações esporos/hifas entre os solos não-rizosférico e rizosférico não foram significativas. Os resultados evidenciam que o cultivo da soja influenciou de forma diferenciada a população desses solos.The effect of soybean cultivation on the population dynamics of the bacterial community was evaluated in two "Cerrado" soils of São Paulo State, Brazil. The experimental areas, in the vicinities of the cities of São Carlos and Barretos, were previously cultivated, respectively, with Paspalum notatum and Brachiaria decumbens. The bacterial population densities in these soils varied from 398.1 x 10³ to 467.7 x 10³ cfu (colony forming units and from 123 x 10³ to 218.8 x 10³ cfu/g of dried soil, respectively, in São Carlos and Barretos soils. Soybean cultivation in both soils resulted in increments in the total bacterial population density, in the actinomycetes population, and in the bacterial population resistant to the antibiotics streptomycin and chloramphenicol. Actinomycetes were present in these soils mainly as spores. Soybean cultivation did not alter the actinomycetes spores/hyphae ratio when comparing rhizospheric and non-rhizospheric soils

  14. Variability, heritability and genetic advance in F2 populations of aromatic rice involving induced mutants and Basmati varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The F2 generation of five cross-combinations of aromatic rice involving two induced mutants 124-17-4 and 21-6-1 of aromatic tall Indica cultivar Gobindabhog and three basmati varieties was studied for mean performance, variability, heritability and genetic advance. The cross 21-6-1/Pakistan Basmati showed higher mean values for grain yield plant, and several yield components. Wide variability was observed for panicle number plant, filled grains panicle, test weight, dry matter production plant, harvest index and grain yield plant. Among the traits, filled grains panicle and test weight in all the crosses, grain yield plant, in five crosses and harvest index in two crosses had high heritability coupled with high genetic advance indicating predominant role of additive gene action. The crosses 21-6-1/Pakistan Basmati and 124-17-4/Pusa Basmati I could be exploited for isolation of promising aromatic recombinants. (author)

  15. Comparison of different techniques of cataract surgery in bacterial contamination of the anterior chamber in diabetic and non-diabetic population

    OpenAIRE

    M Ashok Kumar; Kurien, Sheen S; Stephen Selvaraj; Uma Devi; Selvasundari, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim : To compare the bacterial contamination of the anterior chamber (AC) between manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS) and phacoemulsification (Phaco). To study the conjunctival flora and bacterial contamination of AC between well-controlled diabetics and non-diabetics. Materials and Methods : Three hundred and sixty-eight patients were randomized to manual SICS and Phaco. Sixty-eight patients were excluded for not completing follow-up or for intraoperative complications like posteri...

  16. Thresholds of probable problematic gambling involvement for the German population: Results of the Pathological Gambling and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosowski, Tim; Hayer, Tobias; Meyer, Gerhard; Rumpf, Hans-Jürgen; John, Ulrich; Bischof, Anja; Meyer, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Consumption measures in gambling research may help to establish thresholds of low-risk gambling as 1 part of evidence-based responsible gambling strategies. The aim of this study is to replicate existing Canadian thresholds of probable low-risk gambling (Currie et al., 2006) in a representative dataset of German gambling behavior (Pathological Gambling and Epidemiology [PAGE]; N = 15,023). Receiver-operating characteristic curves applied in a training dataset (60%) extracted robust thresholds of low-risk gambling across 4 nonexclusive definitions of gambling problems (1 + to 4 + Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition [DSM-5] Composite International Diagnostic Interview [CIDI] symptoms), different indicators of gambling involvement (across all game types; form-specific) and different timeframes (lifetime; last year). Logistic regressions applied in a test dataset (40%) to cross-validate the heuristics of probable low-risk gambling incorporated confounding covariates (age, gender, education, migration, and unemployment) and confirmed the strong concurrent validity of the thresholds. Moreover, it was possible to establish robust form-specific thresholds of low-risk gambling (only for gaming machines and poker). Possible implications for early detection of problem gamblers in offline or online environments are discussed. Results substantiate international knowledge about problem gambling prevention and contribute to a German discussion about empirically based guidelines of low-risk gambling. PMID:26415065

  17. Microbes in crystalline bedrock. Assimilation of CO2 and introduced organic compounds by bacterial populations in groundwater from deep crystalline bedrock at Laxemar and Stripa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assimilation of CO2 and of introduced organic compounds by bacterial populations in deep groundwater from fractured crystalline bedrock has been studied. Three depth horizons of the subvertical boreholes KLZ01 at Laxemar in southeastern Sweden, 830-841 m, 910-921 m and 999-1078 m, and V2 in the Stripa mine, 799-807m 812-820 m and 970-1240 m were sampled. The salinity profile of the KLX01 borehole is homogeneous and the groundwater had the following physico-chemical characteristics: pH values of 8.2, 8.4 and 8.5; Eh values of 270, no data and -220 mV; sulphide: 2.3, 11.0 and 5.6 μM; CO32-: 104, 98 and 190 μM; CH4: 26, 27 and 31 μl/l and N2: 47, 25 and 18 ml/l, respectively. The groundwater in V2 in Stripa were obtained from fracture systems without close hydraulic connections and had the following physico-chemical characteristics: pH values of 9.5, 9.4 and 10.2; Eh values of +205, +199 and -3 mV; sulphide: 0, 106 and 233 μM; CO32-: 50, 57 and 158 μM; CH4: 245, 170 and 290 μl/l and N2: 25, 31 and 25 ml/l, respectively. Biofilm reactors with hydrophilic glass surfaces were connected to the flowing groundwaters from each of the 3 depths with flow rates of approximately 3x10-3 m sec-1 over 19 days in Laxemar and 27 to 161 days in Stripa. There were between 0.15 to 0.68 x 105 unattached bacteria ml-1 groundwater and 0.94 to 1.2 x 105 attached bacteria cm-2 on the surface in Laxemar and from 1.6 x 103 up to 3.2 x 105 bacteria ml-1 groundwater and from 2.4 x 105 up to 1.1 x 107 bacteria cm-2 of colonized test surfaces in Stripa. Assuming a mean channel width of 0.1 mm, our results imply that there would be from 103 up to 106 more attached than unattached bacteria in a water conducting channel in crystalline bedrock. (54 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.) (au)

  18. Leukocyte-subset counts in idiopathic parkinsonism provide clues to a pathogenic pathway involving small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. A surveillance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobbs R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following Helicobacter pylori eradication in idiopathic parkinsonism (IP, hypokinesia improved but flexor-rigidity increased. Small intestinal bacterial-overgrowth (SIBO is a candidate driver of the rigidity: hydrogen-breath-test-positivity is common in IP and case histories suggest that Helicobacter keeps SIBO at bay. Methods In a surveillance study, we explore relationships of IP-facets to peripheral immune/inflammatory-activation, in light of presence/absence of Helicobacter infection (urea-breath- and/or stool-antigen-test: positivity confirmed by gastric-biopsy and hydrogen-breath-test status for SIBO (positivity: >20 ppm increment, 2 consecutive 15-min readings, within 2h of 25G lactulose. We question whether any relationships found between facets and blood leukocyte subset counts stand in patients free from anti-parkinsonian drugs, and are robust enough to defy fluctuations in performance consequent on short t½ therapy. Results Of 51 IP-probands, 36 had current or past Helicobacter infection on entry, 25 having undergone successful eradication (median 3.4 years before. Thirty-four were hydrogen-breath-test-positive initially, 42 at sometime (343 tests during surveillance (2.8 years. Hydrogen-breath-test-positivity was associated inversely with Helicobacter-positivity (OR 0.20 (95% CI 0.04, 0.99, p In 38 patients (untreated (17 or on stable long-t½ IP-medication, the higher the natural-killer count, the shorter stride, slower gait and greater flexor-rigidity (by mean 49 (14, 85 mm, 54 (3, 104 mm.s-1, 89 (2, 177 Nm.10-3, per 100 cells.μl-1 increment, p=0.007, 0.04 & 0.04 respectively, adjusted for patient characteristics. T-helper count was inversely associated with flexor-rigidity before (p=0.01 and after adjustment for natural-killer count (-36(-63, -10 Nm.10-3 per 100 cells.μl-1, p=0.007. Neutrophil count was inversely associated with tremor (visual analogue scale, p=0.01. Effect-sizes were independent of IP

  19. Protective Behaviour of Citizens to Transport Accidents Involving Hazardous Materials: A Discrete Choice Experiment Applied to Populated Areas nearby Waterways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther W de Bekker-Grob

    Full Text Available To improve the information for and preparation of citizens at risk to hazardous material transport accidents, a first important step is to determine how different characteristics of hazardous material transport accidents will influence citizens' protective behaviour. However, quantitative studies investigating citizens' protective behaviour in case of hazardous material transport accidents are scarce.A discrete choice experiment was conducted among subjects (19-64 years living in the direct vicinity of a large waterway. Scenarios were described by three transport accident characteristics: odour perception, smoke/vapour perception, and the proportion of people in the environment that were leaving at their own discretion. Subjects were asked to consider each scenario as realistic and to choose the alternative that was most appealing to them: staying, seeking shelter, or escaping. A panel error component model was used to quantify how different transport accident characteristics influenced subjects' protective behaviour.The response was 44% (881/1,994. The predicted probability that a subject would stay ranged from 1% in case of a severe looking accident till 62% in case of a mild looking accident. All three transport accident characteristics proved to influence protective behaviour. Particularly a perception of strong ammonia or mercaptan odours and visible smoke/vapour close to citizens had the strongest positive influence on escaping. In general, 'escaping' was more preferred than 'seeking shelter', although stated preference heterogeneity among subjects for these protective behaviour options was substantial. Males were less willing to seek shelter than females, whereas elderly people were more willing to escape than younger people.Various characteristics of transport accident involving hazardous materials influence subjects' protective behaviour. The preference heterogeneity shows that information needs to be targeted differently depending on

  20. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, M.; Beek, D. van de; Weisfelt, M.; Gans, J. de; Schmand, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy c

  1. Changes in rhizosphere bacterial gene expression following glyphosate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Molli M; Lorenz, Nicola; Hoilett, Nigel; Lee, Nathan R; Dick, Richard P; Liles, Mark R; Ramsier, Cliff; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2016-05-15

    In commercial agriculture, populations and interactions of rhizosphere microflora are potentially affected by the use of specific agrichemicals, possibly by affecting gene expression in these organisms. To investigate this, we examined changes in bacterial gene expression within the rhizosphere of glyphosate-tolerant corn (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) in response to long-term glyphosate (PowerMAX™, Monsanto Company, MO, USA) treatment. A long-term glyphosate application study was carried out using rhizoboxes under greenhouse conditions with soil previously having no history of glyphosate exposure. Rhizosphere soil was collected from the rhizoboxes after four growing periods. Soil microbial community composition was analyzed using microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Total RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil, and samples were analyzed using RNA-Seq analysis. A total of 20-28 million bacterial sequences were obtained for each sample. Transcript abundance was compared between control and glyphosate-treated samples using edgeR. Overall rhizosphere bacterial metatranscriptomes were dominated by transcripts related to RNA and carbohydrate metabolism. We identified 67 differentially expressed bacterial transcripts from the rhizosphere. Transcripts downregulated following glyphosate treatment involved carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and upregulated transcripts involved protein metabolism and respiration. Additionally, bacterial transcripts involving nutrients, including iron, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, were also affected by long-term glyphosate application. Overall, most bacterial and all fungal PLFA biomarkers decreased after glyphosate treatment compared to the control. These results demonstrate that long-term glyphosate use can affect rhizosphere bacterial activities and potentially shift bacterial community composition favoring more glyphosate-tolerant bacteria. PMID:26901800

  2. The Bacterial Microflora of Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, B.

    2002-01-01

    The results of numerous studies indicate that fish possess bacterial populations on or in their skin, gills, digestive tract, and light-emitting organs. In addition, the internal organs (kidney, liver, and spleen) of healthy fish may contain bacteria, but there is debate on whether or not muscle is actually sterile. The numbers and taxonomic composition of the bacterial populations often reflect those of the surrounding water. The role of the bacteria includes the ability to degrade complex m...

  3. Bacterial population structure diversity in saline-alkali soil in Hexi corridor%河西走廊盐碱土细菌种群结构多样性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛世全; 景彩虹; 廖世齐; 朱学泰; 韩建山

    2013-01-01

    土壤盐碱化是引起土壤生态环境恶化的主要原因之一,盐碱土的改良利用是目前研究的热点.本文采用构建16S rRNA基因文库,研究了位于中国西北部的河西走廊盐碱土中细菌群落结构多样性.结果表明,原生盐碱土、次生盐碱土和农田土三种不同类型的土壤中细菌种群结构的组成和丰度具有明显差异.作为对照的农田土中存在3大细菌类群,其中Firmicutes为优势菌群;原生盐碱土中存在9大细菌类群,Firmicutes和γ-proteobacteria为优势菌群;三个次生盐碱土样品存在很大差异,γ-proteobacteria为其共同优势菌群.Marinobacter,Halomonas和Pseudomonas这些嗜盐菌普遍存在于盐碱土中.%Salinization of soil is one of the main reasons causing the deterioration of soil ecological environment, and the remediation and utilization of saline-alkali soil is the focus of current research. By building 16S rRNA gene library, this article reveal the diversity of bacterial population structure at the saline-alkali soil in the Hexi corridor in northwest China. Statistical analyses show that the significant difference in the composition and abundance of bacterial population structure exist in the primary saline-alkali soil, the secondary saline alkali soil and farmland soil. Three bacterial groups exist in the control soil, Firmicutes is the dominant population; Nine bacterial groups exist in the primary saline-alkali soil, Firmicutes and y-proteobacteria are the dominant population; existing a significant difference between the three samples of the secondary saline-alkali soil, y-proteobacteria is the common dominant bacteria group. The halophilic bacteria such as Marinobacter, Halomonas and Pseudomonas commonly are found in all saline-alkali soil.

  4. Spatial distribution of marine airborne bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Seifried, Jasmin S; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of bacterial populations in marine bioaerosol samples was investigated during a cruise from the North Sea to the Baltic Sea via Skagerrak and Kattegat. The analysis of the sampled bacterial communities with a pyrosequencing approach revealed that the most abundant phyla were represented by the Proteobacteria (49.3%), Bacteroidetes (22.9%), Actinobacteria (16.3%), and Firmicutes (8.3%). Cyanobacteria were assigned to 1.5% of all bacterial reads. A core of 37 bacterial ...

  5. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  6. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  7. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  8. The generation of CD8+ T-cell population specific for vaccinia virus epitope involved in the antiviral protection against ectromelia virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierynska, Malgorzata; Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Golke, Anna; Schollenberger, Ada

    2015-12-01

    Eradication of smallpox has led to cessation of vaccination programs. This has rendered the human population increasingly susceptible not only to variola virus infection but also to infections with other representatives of Poxviridae family that cause zoonotic variola-like diseases. Thus, new approaches for designing improved vaccine against smallpox are required. Discovering that orthopoxviruses, e.g. variola virus, vaccinia virus, ectromelia virus, share common immunodominant antigen, may result in the development of such a vaccine. In our study, the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice during the acute and memory phase of the immune response was induced using the vaccinia virus immunodominant TSYKFESV epitope and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as adjuvants. The role of the generated TSYKFESV-specific CD8(+) T cells was evaluated in mice during ectromelia virus infection using systemic and mucosal model. Moreover, the involvement of dendritic cells subsets in the adaptive immune response stimulation was assessed. Our results indicate that the TSYKFESV epitope/TLR9 agonist approach, delivered systemically or mucosally, generated strong CD8(+) T-cell response when measured 10 days after immunization. Furthermore, the TSYKFESV-specific cell population remained functionally active 2 months post-immunization, and gave cross-protection in virally challenged mice, even though the numbers of detectable antigen-specific T cells decreased. PMID:26474845

  9. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhle, Ülkü; Kükner, Şahap

    2003-01-01

    Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva, generally characterized by irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing and discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis may be distinguished from other types of conjunctivitis by the presence of yellow–white mucopurulent discharge. It is the most common form of ocular infection all around the world. Staphylococcus species are the most common bacterial pathogenes, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus i...

  10. Diagnosing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children involved with child protection services: are current diagnostic guidelines acceptable for vulnerable populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, B; Damiani-Taraba, G; Koster, A; Campbell, J; Scholz, C

    2015-03-01

    Children involved with child protection services (CPS) are diagnosed and treated for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at higher rates than the general population. Children with maltreatment histories are much more likely to have other factors contributing to behavioural and attentional regulation difficulties that may overlap with or mimic ADHD-like symptoms, including language and learning problems, post-traumatic stress disorder, attachment difficulties, mood disorders and anxiety disorders. A higher number of children in the child welfare system are diagnosed with ADHD and provided with psychotropic medications under a group care setting compared with family-based, foster care and kinship care settings. However, children's behavioural trajectories change over time while in care. A reassessment in the approach to ADHD-like symptoms in children exposed to confirmed (or suspected) maltreatment (e.g. neglect, abuse) is required. Diagnosis should be conducted within a multidisciplinary team and practice guidelines regarding ADHD diagnostic and management practices for children in CPS care are warranted both in the USA and in Canada. Increased education for caregivers, teachers and child welfare staff on the effects of maltreatment and often perplexing relationship with ADHD-like symptoms and co-morbid disorders is also necessary. Increased partnerships are needed to ensure the mental well-being of children with child protection involvement. PMID:24942100

  11. EFFECT OF MONENSIN FEEDING AND WITHDRAWAL ON POPULATIONS OF INDIVIDUAL BACTERIAL SPECIES IN THE RUMEN OF LACTATING DAIRY COWS FED HIGH-STARCH RATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monensin is known to improve ruminant animal production, purportedly by inhibition of H2-producing Gram-positive bacteria, yet there is no in vivo evidence for shifts in populations of specific microbial taxa. We used real-time PCR with relative quantification to assess the relative population size ...

  12. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  13. Comparison of different techniques of cataract surgery in bacterial contamination of the anterior chamber in diabetic and non-diabetic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ashok Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To compare the bacterial contamination of the anterior chamber (AC between manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS and phacoemulsification (Phaco. To study the conjunctival flora and bacterial contamination of AC between well-controlled diabetics and non-diabetics. Materials and Methods : Three hundred and sixty-eight patients were randomized to manual SICS and Phaco. Sixty-eight patients were excluded for not completing follow-up or for intraoperative complications like posterior capsule rupture. One hundred and fifty patients in each group were finally analyzed. Conjunctival swabs were taken on admission, after one day of topical ofloxacin and 15 min after 5% Povidone Iodine (PI instillation. AC aspirate at the end of the surgery was also cultured. Results : Fifty-six (18.66% patients had positive conjunctival swab on admission which was reduced to 19 (6.33% with topical ofloxacin and to five (1.66% with instillation of 5% PI. AC contamination in both manual SICS and Phaco was 0.66%. The conjunctival flora in diabetics was similar to non-diabetics. None of the diabetics had AC contamination. Statistical analysis was performed by Chi-Square test (with Yates′ correction. Conclusion : Statistically significant reduction in conjunctival flora was achieved with topical ofloxacin and 5% PI instillation and AC contamination in both manual SICS and Phaco was minimal (0.66%. Well-controlled diabetics who underwent cataract surgery in this study had similar conjunctival flora and AC contamination as non-diabetics.

  14. Bacterial flora of sturgeon fingerling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study on microbial populations is a suitable tool to understand and apply control methods to improve the sanitary level of production in fish breeding and rearing centers, ensure health of sturgeon fingerlings at the time of their release into the rivers and also in the conversation and restoration of these valuable stocks in the Caspian Sea, Iran. A laboratory research based on Austin methods (Austin, B., Austin, D.A. 1993) was conducted for bacterial study on 3 sturgeon species naming A. persicus, A. stellatus and A. nudiventris during different growth stages. Bacterial flora of Acinetobacter, Moraxella, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Edwardsiella, Staphylococcus, Proteus, Yersinia, Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas were determined. The factors which may induce changes in bacterial populations during different stages of fife are the followings: quality of water in rearing ponds, different conditions for growth stages, suitable time for colonization of bacterial flora in rearing pond, water temperature increase in fingerlings size and feeding condition. (author)

  15. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  16. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  17. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  18. Host Biomarkers for Distinguishing Bacterial from Non-Bacterial Causes of Acute Febrile Illness: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapasi, Anokhi J.; Dittrich, Sabine; González, Iveth J.; Rodwell, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource limited settings acute febrile illnesses are often treated empirically due to a lack of reliable, rapid point-of-care diagnostics. This contributes to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor treatment outcomes. The aim of this comprehensive review was to summarize the diagnostic performance of host biomarkers capable of differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infections to guide the use of antibiotics. Methods Online databases of published literature were searched from January 2010 through April 2015. English language studies that evaluated the performance of one or more host biomarker in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infection in patients were included. Key information extracted included author information, study methods, population, pathogens, clinical information, and biomarker performance data. Study quality was assessed using a combination of validated criteria from the QUADAS and Lijmer checklists. Biomarkers were categorized as hematologic factors, inflammatory molecules, cytokines, cell surface or metabolic markers, other host biomarkers, host transcripts, clinical biometrics, and combinations of markers. Findings Of the 193 citations identified, 59 studies that evaluated over 112 host biomarkers were selected. Most studies involved patient populations from high-income countries, while 19% involved populations from low- and middle-income countries. The most frequently evaluated host biomarkers were C-reactive protein (61%), white blood cell count (44%) and procalcitonin (34%). Study quality scores ranged from 23.1% to 92.3%. There were 9 high performance host biomarkers or combinations, with sensitivity and specificity of ≥85% or either sensitivity or specificity was reported to be 100%. Five host biomarkers were considered weak markers as they lacked statistically significant performance in discriminating between bacterial and non-bacterial infections. Discussion This manuscript provides a summary

  19. Microbial ecology of bacterially mediated PCB biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roles of plasmid mediated and consortia mediated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) biodegradation by bacterial populations isolated from PCB contaminated freshwater sediments were investigated. PCB degrading bacteria were isolated by DNA:DNA colony hybridization, batch enrichments, and chemostat enrichment. Analysis of substrate removal and metabolite production were done using chlorinated biphenyl spray plates, reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography, Cl- detection, and 14C-labeled substrate mineralization methods. A bacterial consortium, designated LPS10, involved in a concerted metabolic attack on chlorinated biphenyls, was shown to mineralize 4-chlorobiphenyl (4CB) and 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl (4,4' CB). The LPS10 consortium was isolated by both batch and chemostat enrichment using 4CB and biphenyl (BP) as sole carbon source and was found to have tree bacterial isolates that predominated; these included: Pseudomonas, testosteroni LPS10A which mediated the breakdown of 4CB and 4,4' CB to the putative meta-cleavage product and subsequently to 4-chlorobenzoic acid (4CBA), an isolate tentatively identified as an Arthrobacter sp. LPS10B which mediated 4CBA degradation, and Pseudomonas putida by A LPS10C whose role in the consortium has not been determined

  20. Targeted imaging of bacterial infections : advances, hurdles and hopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, Marleen; Hahn, Markus; Crane, Lucia M. A.; Pleijhuis, Rick G.; Francis, Kevin P.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; van Dam, Gooitzen M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections represent an increasing problem in modern health care, in particular due to ageing populations and accumulating bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Diagnosis is rarely straightforward and consequently treatment is often delayed or indefinite. Therefore, novel tools that can be

  1. Bacterial translocation: impact of probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppsson, Bengt; Mangell, Peter; Adawi, Diya; Molin, Göran

    2004-01-01

    There is a considerable amount of data in humans showing that patients who cannot take in nutrients enterally have more organ failure in the intensive care unit, a less favourable prognosis, and a higher frequency of septicaemia, in particular involving bacterial species from the intestinal tract. However, there is little evidence that this is connected with translocation of bacterial species in humans. Animal data more uniformly imply the existence of such a connection. The main focus of thi...

  2. Contrasting spatial patterns and ecological attributes of soil bacterial and archaeal taxa across a landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constancias, Florentin; Saby, Nicolas P A; Terrat, Sébastien; Dequiedt, Samuel; Horrigue, Wallid; Nowak, Virginie; Guillemin, Jean-Philippe; Biju-Duval, Luc; Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré, Nicolas; Ranjard, Lionel

    2015-06-01

    Even though recent studies have clarified the influence and hierarchy of environmental filters on bacterial community structure, those constraining bacterial populations variations remain unclear. In consequence, our ability to understand to ecological attributes of soil bacteria and to predict microbial community response to environmental stress is therefore limited. Here, we characterized the bacterial community composition and the various bacterial taxonomic groups constituting the community across an agricultural landscape of 12 km(2) , by using a 215 × 215 m systematic grid representing 278 sites to precisely decipher their spatial distribution and drivers at this scale. The bacterial and Archaeal community composition was characterized by applying 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing directly to soil DNA from samples. Geostatistics tools were used to reveal the heterogeneous distribution of bacterial composition at this scale. Soil physical parameters and land management explained a significant amount of variation, suggesting that environmental selection is the major process shaping bacterial composition. All taxa systematically displayed also a heterogeneous and particular distribution patterns. Different relative influences of soil characteristics, land use and space were observed, depending on the taxa, implying that selection and spatial processes might be differentially but not exclusively involved for each bacterial phylum. Soil pH was a major factor determining the distribution of most of the bacterial taxa and especially the most important factor explaining the spatial patterns of α-Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes. Soil texture, organic carbon content and quality were more specific to a few number of taxa (e.g., β-Proteobacteria and Chlorobi). Land management also influenced the distribution of bacterial taxa across the landscape and revealed different type of response to cropping intensity (positive, negative, neutral or hump-backed relationships

  3. How to Show the Real Microbial Biodiversity? A Comparison of Seven DNA Extraction Methods for Bacterial Population Analyses in Matrices Containing Highly Charged Natural Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Rene Kaden; Peter Krolla-Sidenstein

    2015-01-01

    A DNA extraction that comprises the DNA of all available taxa in an ecosystem is an essential step in population analysis, especially for next generation sequencing applications. Many nanoparticles as well as naturally occurring clay minerals contain charged surfaces or edges that capture negatively charged DNA molecules after cell lysis within DNA extraction. Depending on the methodology of DNA extraction, this phenomenon causes a shift in detection of microbial taxa in ecosystems and a poss...

  4. Characterization of bacterial populations of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) contaminated soils and isolation of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain with TNT denitration activities

    OpenAIRE

    Eyers, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a toxic and recalcitrant pollutant contaminating soils and groundwater. Therefore, characterization of microbial populations of TNT-contaminated soils and isolation of bacteria degrading this pollutant are of primordial importance. Comparison of hybridizations of 16S rRNA derived from uncontaminated and TNT-contaminated soil samples required the development of a functional ANOVA model. Specifically, a statistical tool was necessary to compare dissociation curves...

  5. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K.; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. I...

  6. Modeling bacterial chemotaxis inside a cell

    OpenAIRE

    Ouannes, Nesrine; Djedi, Noureddine; Luga, Hervé; Duthen, Yves

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a bacterial system that reproduces a population of bacteria that behave by simulating the internal reactions of each bacterial cell. The chemotaxis network of a cell is modulated by a hybrid approach that uses an algebraic model for the receptor clusters activity and an ordinary differential equation for the adaptation dynamics. The experiments are defined in order to simulate bacterial growth in an environment where nutrients are regularly added to it. The results show a...

  7. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell...... cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  8. Assessment of genetic correlation between bacterial cold water disease resistance and spleen index in a domesticated population of rainbow trout: identification of QTL on chromosome Omy19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Wiens

    Full Text Available Selective breeding of animals for increased disease resistance is an effective strategy to reduce mortality in aquaculture. However, implementation of selective breeding programs is limited by an incomplete understanding of host resistance traits. We previously reported results of a rainbow trout selection program that demonstrated increased survival following challenge with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD. Mechanistic study of disease resistance identified a positive phenotypic correlation between post-challenge survival and spleen somatic-index (SI. Herein, we investigated the hypothesis of a genetic correlation between the two traits influenced by colocalizing QTL. We evaluated the inheritance and calculated the genetic correlation in five year-classes of odd- and even-year breeding lines. A total of 322 pedigreed families (n = 25,369 fish were measured for disease resistance, and 251 families (n = 5,645 fish were evaluated for SI. Spleen index was moderately heritable in both even-year (h(2  = 0.56±0.18 and odd-year (h(2  = 0.60±0.15 lines. A significant genetic correlation between SI and BCWD resistance was observed in the even-year line (rg  = 0.45±0.20, P = 0.03 but not in the odd-year line (rg  = 0.16±0.12, P = 0.19. Complex segregation analyses of the even-year line provided evidence of genes with major effect on SI, and a genome scan of a single family, 2008132, detected three significant QTL on chromosomes Omy19, 16 and 5, in addition to ten suggestive QTL. A separate chromosome scan for disease resistance in family 2008132 identified a significant BCWD QTL on Omy19 that was associated with time to death and percent survival. In family 2008132, Omy19 microsatellite alleles that associated with higher disease resistance also associated with increased spleen size raising the hypothesis that closely linked QTL contribute to the correlation between

  9. IDENTIFICACIÓN MOLECULAR DE POBLACIONES BACTERIANAS ASOCIADAS AL CARACOL PALA (Strombus gigas DEL CARIBE COLOMBIANO Molecular Identification Of Bacterial Populations Associated To Queen Conch (Strombus gigas From Colombian Caribbe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDINSON ANDRÉS ACOSTA

    management of hatcheries for higher productivity and safety of these gastropods. In this study, we used a microbiology and molecular approach using the 16S-23S intergenic region, the 16S rDNA analysis and sequencing to determine the bacterial populations associated with Queen Conch (S. gigas. Also, the capacity to grow in marine agar and selective culture media was used to evaluate the composition of bacteria associated. The 28 total samples analysed we found the number of bacteria recovered after aerobic culture about 10ˆ6 cfu mL-1 and most belong to the Vibrionaceae family in the order of 10ˆ5 ufc mL-1. The molecular results of the spacer regions between the 16 and 23S genes from the different analyzed samples indicated a great complexity in the bacterial population associated to S. gigas. The sequencing of the amplicons of 16S rDNA identifies Pseudoalteromonas sp, Halomonas sp., Psycrobacter sp., Cobetia sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Vibrios sp. This suggests these bacteria can play an important role as components of the bacterial community associated to S. gigas. This information can help to improve both the management of hatcheries for higher productivity and for the implementation for the conservation processes of Colombian S. gigas.

  10. BACTERIAL INHIBITORS IN LAKE WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The populations of six bacterial genera fell rapidly after their addition to sterile lake water but not after their addition to buffer. The decline in numbers of two species that were studied further, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Micrococcus flavus, occurred even when the buffer was...

  11. Transfer, composition and technological characterization of the lactic acid bacterial populations of the wooden vats used to produce traditional stretched cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatassa, Maria Luisa; Gaglio, Raimondo; Macaluso, Giusi; Francesca, Nicola; Randazzo, Walter; Cardamone, Cinzia; Di Grigoli, Antonino; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Settanni, Luca

    2015-12-01

    The biofilms of 12 wooden vats used for the production of the traditional stretched cheeses Caciocavallo Palermitano and PDO Vastedda della valle del Belìce were investigated. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes were never detected. Total coliforms were at low numbers with Escherichia coli found only in three vats. Coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) were below the enumeration limit, whereas lactic acid bacteria (LAB) dominated the surfaces of all vats. In general, the dominance was showed by coccus LAB. Enterococci were estimated at high numbers, but usually between 1 and 2 Log cycles lower than other LAB. LAB populations were investigated at species and strain level and for their technological properties relevant in cheese production. Eighty-five strains were analysed by a polyphasic genetic approach and allotted into 16 species within the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus and Streptococcus. Enterococcus faecium was found in all wooden vats and the species most frequently isolated were Enterococcus faecalis, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Pediococcus acidilactici and Streptococcus thermophilus. The study of the quantitative data on acidification rate, autolysis kinetics, diacetyl production, antibacterial compound generation and proteolysis by cluster and principal component analysis led to the identification of some strains with promising dairy characteristics. Interestingly, a consistent percentage of LAB was bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) producer. Thus, the microbial biofilms of the wooden vats analysed in this study might contribute actively to the stability of the final cheeses. PMID:26338114

  12. The Bacterial Microflora of Fish, Revised

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, B.

    2006-01-01

    The results of numerous studies indicate that fish possess bacterial populations on or in their skin, gills, digestive tract, and light-emitting organs. In addition, the internal organs (kidney, liver, and spleen) of healthy fish may contain bacteria, but there is debate about whether or not muscle is actually sterile. Using traditional culture-dependent techniques, the numbers and taxonomic composition of the bacterial populations generally reflect those of the surrounding water. More modern...

  13. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  14. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte; Kruse, Torben; Nordström, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  15. Recent advances in bacterial heme protein biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mayfield, Jeffery A.; Dehner, Carolyn A.; Dubois, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in genetics, fed by the burst in genome sequence data, has led to the identification of a host of novel bacterial heme proteins that are now being characterized in structural and mechanistic terms. The following short review highlights very recent work with bacterial heme proteins involved in the uptake, biosynthesis, degradation, and use of heme in respiration and sensing.

  16. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Blaauwen; J.M. Andreu; O. Monasterio

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of protein

  17. Observation of excited level populations of Li-like aluminium ions in a recombining plasma: role of atomic processes involving doubly excited levels of Be-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aluminium slab target was irradiated by multiple pulses of Nd:glass laser light with the irradiance of 1.5x1012 W cm-2. After the laser irradiation, a laser-produced aluminium plasma was observed in its recombining phase using a spectrometer whose relative sensitivity was calibrated. We measured relative intensities of the resonance series lines and the lines of the 2p2P-nd2D and 2p2P-ns2S series of the Li-like aluminium ions and derived the excited level populations of the upper levels. >From the slope of the population distribution of the high-lying excited levels and the transition from the series lines to the continuum, the electron temperature and the electron density were estimated to be 8 eV and 3.5x1025 m-3. A comparison of the experimental population distribution with a collisional-radiative (CR) model calculation indicates that recombination of the excited Li-like ions through doubly excited levels of the Be-like ions plays an important role in the population kinetics of the Li-like ions. (author)

  18. [Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis, also called metastatic bacterial endophthalmitis, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a rare and potentially sight-threatening ocular infection that occurs when bacteria reach the eye via the bloodstream, cross the blood-ocular barrier, and multiply within the eye. It usually affects immunocompromised patients and those suffering from diabetes mellitus, malignancy, or cardiac disease, but has also been reported after invasive procedures or in previously healthy people. In most cases, the ocular symptoms occur after the diagnosis of septicemia or systemic infection. Ocular symptoms include decreased vision, redness, discharge, pain, and floaters. The ocular inflammatory signs may be anterior and/or posterior. Bilateral involvement occurs in nearly 25% of cases. A wide range of microorganisms are involved, with differences in their frequency according to geography as well as the patient's age and past medical history, because of variations in the predisposing conditions and the source of the sepsis. The majority of patients are initially misdiagnosed, and ophthalmologists should be aware of this because prompt local and general management is required to save the eye and/or the patient's life. PMID:21145128

  19. Family and Community Involvement: Reaching Out to Diverse Populations = La participacion de la familia y la comunidad: El acercamiento a las diversas poblaciones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.

    This handbook, in English and Spanish, is designed for educators who want to develop meaningful parent and community involvement in public education in culturally and linguistically diverse communities. The advice of leaders of Hispanic, African American, Native American, and Asian communities is incorporated into five strategies to help develop…

  20. Spatio-Temporal Detection of the Thiomonas Population and the Thiomonas Arsenite Oxidase Involved in Natural Arsenite Attenuation Processes in the Carnoulès Acid Mine Drainage

    OpenAIRE

    Hovasse, Agnès; Bruneel, Odile; Casiot, Corinne; Desoeuvre, Angélique; Farasin, Julien; Hery, Marina; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carapito, Christine; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted creek of the Carnoulès mine (Southern France) is characterized by acid waters with a high heavy metal content. The microbial community inhabiting this AMD was extensively studied using isolation, metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, and the results showed that a natural arsenic (and iron) attenuation process involving the arsenite oxidase activity of several Thiomonas strains occurs at this site. A sensitive quantitative Selected Reaction Monitoring (SR...

  1. Interfering with Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Kerstin; Steinbach, Anke; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the exchange of chemical signals in bacterial populations to adjust the bacterial phenotypes according to the density of bacterial cells. This serves to express phenotypes that are advantageous for the group and ensure bacterial survival. To do so, bacterial cells synthesize autoinducer (AI) molecules, release them to the environment, and take them up. Thereby, the AI concentration reflects the cell density. When the AI concentration exceeds a critical threshold in the cells, the AI may activate the expression of virulence-associated genes or of luminescent proteins. It has been argued that targeting the QS system puts less selective pressure on these pathogens and should avoid the development of resistant bacteria. Therefore, the molecular components of QS systems have been suggested as promising targets for developing new anti-infective compounds. Here, we review the QS systems of selected gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, namely, Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and discuss various antivirulence strategies based on blocking different components of the QS machinery. PMID:26819549

  2. Bayesian methods in bacterial population genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Vast amounts of molecular data are being generated every day. However, how to properly harness the data remains often a challenge for many biologists. Firstly, due to the typical large dimension of the molecular data, analyses can either require exhaustive amounts of computer memory or be very time-consuming, or both. Secondly, biological problems often have their own special features, which put demand on specially designed software to obtain meaningful results from statistical analyses witho...

  3. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten;

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... enzymes that are unique in exploiting the ATP/GTP-binding Walker motif to catalyze phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues. Characterized for the first time only a decade ago, BY-kinases have now come to the fore. Important regulatory roles have been linked with these enzymes, via their involvement...... in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by...

  4. The use of conspicuity aids by cyclists and risk of crashes involving other road users: a protocol for a population based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coupland Carol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular cycling has been shown to improve health and has a role in tackling the threats posed by obesity and inactivity. Cycle collisions, particularly those involving motorised vehicles, can lead to significant mortality and morbidity and are currently a barrier to wider uptake of cycling. There is evidence that the conspicuity of cyclists is a factor in many injury collisions. Low-cost, easy to use retro-reflective and fluorescent clothing and accessories ('conspicuity aids' are available. Their effectiveness in reducing cycling collisions is unknown. The study is designed to investigate the relationship between the use of conspicuity aids and risk of collision or evasion crashes for utility and commuter cyclists in the UK. Methods/Design A matched case-control study is proposed. Cases are adult commuter and utility cyclists involved in a crash resulting from a collision or attempted evasion of a collision with another road user recruited at a UK emergency department. Controls are commuter and utility cyclists matched by journey purpose, time and day of travel and geographical area recruited at public and private cycle parking sites. Data on the use of conspicuity aids, crash circumstances, demographics, cycling experience, safety equipment use, journey characteristics and route will be collected using self-completed questionnaires and maps. Conditional logistic regression will be used to calculate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of the risk of a crash when using any item of fluorescent or reflective clothing or equipment. Discussion This study will provide information on the effectiveness of conspicuity aids in reducing the risk of injury to cyclists resulting from crashes involving other road users.

  5. Population size of Cuban Parrots Amazona leucocephala and Sandhill Cranes Grus canadensis and community involvement in their conservation in northern Isla de la Juventud, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, X.G.; Alvarez, V.B.; Wiley, J.W.; Rosales, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Cuban Sandhill Crane Grus canadensis nesiotes and Cuban Parrot Amazona leucocephala palmarum are considered endangered species in Cuba and the Isla de la Juventud (formerly Isla de Pinos). Coincident with a public education campaign, a population survey for these species was conducted in the northern part of the Isla de la Juventud on 17 December 1995, from 06hoo to 10hoo. Residents from throughout the island participated, manning 98 stations, with 1-4 observers per station. Parrots were observed at 60 (61.2%) of the stations with a total of 1320, maximum (without correction for duplicate observations), and 1100, minimum (corrected), individuals counted. Sandhill cranes were sighted at 38 (38.8%) of the stations, with a total of 115 individuals. Cranes and parrots co-occurred at 20 (20.4%) of the stations.

  6. Spatio-Temporal Detection of the Thiomonas Population and the Thiomonas Arsenite Oxidase Involved in Natural Arsenite Attenuation Processes in the Carnoulès Acid Mine Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovasse, Agnès; Bruneel, Odile; Casiot, Corinne; Desoeuvre, Angélique; Farasin, Julien; Hery, Marina; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carapito, Christine; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted creek of the Carnoulès mine (Southern France) is characterized by acid waters with a high heavy metal content. The microbial community inhabiting this AMD was extensively studied using isolation, metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, and the results showed that a natural arsenic (and iron) attenuation process involving the arsenite oxidase activity of several Thiomonas strains occurs at this site. A sensitive quantitative Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based proteomic approach was developed for detecting and quantifying the two subunits of the arsenite oxidase and RpoA of two different Thiomonas groups. Using this approach combined with FISH and pyrosequencing-based 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, it was established here for the first time that these Thiomonas strains are ubiquitously present in minor proportions in this AMD and that they express the key enzymes involved in natural remediation processes at various locations and time points. In addition to these findings, this study also confirms that targeted proteomics applied at the community level can be used to detect weakly abundant proteins in situ. PMID:26870729

  7. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Bures, Jiri Cyrany, Darina Kohoutova, Miroslav Förstl, Stanislav Rejchrt, Jaroslav Kvetina, Viktor Vorisek, Marcela Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestina...

  8. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Bures, J.; Cyrany, J.; Kohoutova, D.; Förstl, M.; Rejchrt, S.; Kvetina, J.; Vorisek, V.; Kopacova, M.

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestina...

  9. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  10. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Deficiency is Involved in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Retinopathy in the Uygur Population of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xianglong; Sun, Jialin; Li, Li; Wei, Qin; Qian, Yi; Chen, Xueyi; Ma, Ling

    2016-06-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2 D3 ] has recently been shown to have immunomodulatory property. This study aimed to investigate the expression and potential role of 1,25(OH)2 D3 in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the Uygur population. Blood samples were obtained from 22 patients with proliferative DR (PDR), 29 patients with nonproliferative DR (NPDR), and 24 normal controls. ELISA was performed to estimate the serum levels of 1,25(OH)2 D3 . Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured with or without 1,25(OH)2 D3 in the presence of anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies to detect the secretion of cytokines and cell proliferation. The FACS cytometric bead array system was used to analyze cytokine levels in the serum and culture supernatants. The Cell Counting Kit was used to determine the rate of cell proliferation. In this study, we found that the patients with PDR showed a decreased serum level of 1,25(OH)2 D3 and increased production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17A, by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies activated PBMCs. Furthermore, 1,25(OH)2 D3 significantly inhibited the proliferation of PBMCs, as well as the secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17A. Overall, our findings suggest a potential protective effect of 1,25(OH)2 D3 in DR, whereas supplementation with 1,25(OH)2 D3 might be an effective strategy for preventing the development of DR. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(6):445-451, 2016. PMID:27080220

  11. Selection affects genes involved in replication during long-term evolution in experimental populations of the bacteriophage φX174.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste J Brown

    Full Text Available Observing organisms that evolve in response to strong selection over very short time scales allows the determination of the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation. Although dissecting these molecular mechanisms is expensive and time-consuming, general patterns can be detected from repeated experiments, illuminating the biological processes involved in evolutionary adaptation. The bacteriophage φX174 was grown for 50 days in replicate chemostats under two culture conditions: Escherichia coli C as host growing at 37°C and Salmonella typhimurium as host growing at 43.5°C. After 50 days, greater than 20 substitutions per chemostat had risen to detectable levels. Of the 97 substitutions, four occurred in all four chemostats, five arose in both culture conditions, eight arose in only the high temperature S. typhimurium chemostats, and seven arose only in the E. coli chemostats. The remaining substitutions were detected only in a single chemostat, however, almost half of these have been seen in other similar experiments. Our findings support previous studies that host recognition and capsid stability are two biological processes that are modified during adaptation to novel hosts and high temperature. Based upon the substitutions shared across both environments, it is apparent that genome replication and packaging are also affected during adaptation to the chemostat environment, rather than to temperature or host per se. This environment is characterized by a large number of phage and very few hosts, leading to competition among phage within the host. We conclude from these results that adaptation to a high density environment selects for changes in genome replication at both protein and DNA sequence levels.

  12. Transcriptomic Analysis of Paeonia delavayi Wild Population Flowers to Identify Differentially Expressed Genes Involved in Purple-Red and Yellow Petal Pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qianqian; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Yan; Li, Kui; Zheng, Baoqiang; Miao, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews) is a very famous traditional ornamental plant in China. P. delavayi is a species endemic to Southwest China that has aroused great interest from researchers as a precious genetic resource for flower color breeding. However, the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of flower pigmentation in this plant is limited, hindering the genetic engineering of novel flower color in tree peonies. In this study, we conducted a large-scale transcriptome analysis based on Illumina HiSeq sequencing of cDNA libraries generated from yellow and purple-red P. delavayi petals. A total of 90,202 unigenes were obtained by de novo assembly, with an average length of 721 nt. Using Blastx, 44,811 unigenes (49.68%) were found to have significant similarity to accessions in the NR, NT, and Swiss-Prot databases. We also examined COG, GO and KEGG annotations to better understand the functions of these unigenes. Further analysis of the two digital transcriptomes revealed that 6,855 unigenes were differentially expressed between yellow and purple-red flower petals, with 3,430 up-regulated and 3,425 down-regulated. According to the RNA-Seq data and qRT-PCR analysis, we proposed that four up-regulated key structural genes, including F3H, DFR, ANS and 3GT, might play an important role in purple-red petal pigmentation, while high co-expression of THC2'GT, CHI and FNS II ensures the accumulation of pigments contributing to the yellow color. We also found 50 differentially expressed transcription factors that might be involved in flavonoid biosynthesis. This study is the first to report genetic information for P. delavayi. The large number of gene sequences produced by transcriptome sequencing and the candidate genes identified using pathway mapping and expression profiles will provide a valuable resource for future association studies aimed at better understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying flower pigmentation in tree peonies. PMID

  13. Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors: a population-based clinical outcomes study involving 174 patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (1973–2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) are rare, highly malignant embryonal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) accounting for 20% of CNS tumors in children under the age of 3. This study examines a large cohort of ATRT patients to determine demographic, clinical, and pathologic factors which impact prognosis and survival. Demographic and clinical data were abstracted on 174 ATRT patients (171 pediatric patients age <20 and 3 adult patients age ≥20) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (1973–2010). Standard statistical methodology was used. A total of 174 ATRT cases (mean age of 2.84 years) were identified. ATRT had a higher incidence in males (56.3%), Caucasians (59.1%), and children <3 years of age (80.5%), P<0.001. The most common primary sites were the cerebellum (17.8%), ventricles (16.1%), and frontal lobe (12.6%). Mean overall survival was 3.2±0.4 years, while overall and cancer-specific mortality were 63.2% and 56.3%, respectively, P=0.005. Most ATRT cases were treated with surgery alone (58.0%), followed by a combination of surgery and radiation (34.3%), no treatment (6.5%), and radiation alone (1.2%). The use of combination therapy has increased significantly (16.1%) since 2005 (P<0.001), while primary surgical resection and radiation therapy rates remain relatively unchanged. The longest survival was observed among ATRT patients receiving combination therapy (5.9±0.7 years), followed by radiation alone (2.8±1.2 years), and surgery alone (1.9±0.4 years), P<0.001. Multivariable analysis identified only distant metastases (OR =4.6) as independently associated with increased mortality, whereas combination therapy (OR =0.4) was associated with reduced mortality, P<0.005. ATRT is a rare and highly aggressive embryonal malignancy of the CNS that presents more often as locoregional tumors >4 cm in male Caucasian children of age <3 years, involving the cerebellum, ventricles, or frontal lobe. Combination therapy

  14. Transcriptomic Analysis of Paeonia delavayi Wild Population Flowers to Identify Differentially Expressed Genes Involved in Purple-Red and Yellow Petal Pigmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Shi

    Full Text Available Tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews is a very famous traditional ornamental plant in China. P. delavayi is a species endemic to Southwest China that has aroused great interest from researchers as a precious genetic resource for flower color breeding. However, the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of flower pigmentation in this plant is limited, hindering the genetic engineering of novel flower color in tree peonies. In this study, we conducted a large-scale transcriptome analysis based on Illumina HiSeq sequencing of cDNA libraries generated from yellow and purple-red P. delavayi petals. A total of 90,202 unigenes were obtained by de novo assembly, with an average length of 721 nt. Using Blastx, 44,811 unigenes (49.68% were found to have significant similarity to accessions in the NR, NT, and Swiss-Prot databases. We also examined COG, GO and KEGG annotations to better understand the functions of these unigenes. Further analysis of the two digital transcriptomes revealed that 6,855 unigenes were differentially expressed between yellow and purple-red flower petals, with 3,430 up-regulated and 3,425 down-regulated. According to the RNA-Seq data and qRT-PCR analysis, we proposed that four up-regulated key structural genes, including F3H, DFR, ANS and 3GT, might play an important role in purple-red petal pigmentation, while high co-expression of THC2'GT, CHI and FNS II ensures the accumulation of pigments contributing to the yellow color. We also found 50 differentially expressed transcription factors that might be involved in flavonoid biosynthesis. This study is the first to report genetic information for P. delavayi. The large number of gene sequences produced by transcriptome sequencing and the candidate genes identified using pathway mapping and expression profiles will provide a valuable resource for future association studies aimed at better understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying flower pigmentation in tree

  15. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of nail infection is often caused by a bacterial infection but may also be caused by herpes, a ... to a type of yeast called Candida , or bacterial infection, and this may lead to abnormal nail growth. ...

  16. Sonographic findings in bacterial meningitis in neonates and young infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yikilmaz, Ali; Taylor, George A

    2008-02-01

    Cranial sonography plays an important role in the initial evaluation of infants with suspected bacterial meningitis and in monitoring for complications of the disease. Echogenic widening of the brain sulci, meningeal thickening and hyperemia suggest the diagnosis in an at-risk population. Sonography can identify the presence of extra-axial fluid collections, and color Doppler sonography can be very helpful in differentiating benign enlargement of subarachnoid spaces from subdural effusions. Intraventricular debris and stranding, and an irregular and echogenic ependyma are highly suggestive findings associated with ventriculitis. Sonography can play an important role in the detection of postinfectious hydrocephalus, in the determination of the level of obstruction, and in the evaluation of intracranial compliance. Focal or diffuse parenchymal involvement can represent parenchymal involvement by cerebritis, infarction, secondary hemorrhage or early abscess. PMID:17611750

  17. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  18. Characterization of three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) genes reveals involvement of ERK and JNK, not p38 in defense against bacterial infection in Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Meiwei; Li, Ruojiao; Li, Yangping; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin

    2016-07-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are protein Ser/Thr kinases that play a vital role in innate immune responses by converting extracellular stimuli into a wide range of cellular responses. Although MAPKs have been extensively studied in various vertebrates and invertebrates, our current understanding of MAPK signaling cascade in scallop is in its infancy. In this study, three MAPK genes (PyERK, PyJNK, and Pyp38) were identified from Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis. The open reading frame of PyERK, PyJNK, and Pyp38 was 1104, 1227, and 1104 bp, encoding 367, 408, and 367 amino acids, respectively. Conservation in some splicing sites was revealed across the three PyMAPKs, suggesting the common descent of MAPKs genes. The expression profiles of PyMAPKs over the course of ten different developmental stages showed that they had different expression patterns. In adult scallops, PyMAPKs were primarily expressed in muscles, hemocytes, gill, and mantle. To gain insights into their role in innate immunity, we investigated their expression profiles after infection with Gram-positive bacteria (Micrococcus luteus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio anguillarum). Significant difference in gene expression was only found in PyERK and PyJNK, but not Pyp38, suggesting Pyp38 may not participate in immune response to bacterial infection. Besides, PyERK and PyJNK exhibited more drastic change against the invasion of V. anguillarum than M. luteus, suggesting they could be more sensitive to Gram-negative bacteria than Gram-positive bacteria. This study provides valuable resource for elucidating the role of MAPK signal pathway in bivalve innate immune response. PMID:27155450

  19. Active bacterial community structure along vertical redox gradients in Baltic Sea sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Janet; Edlund, Anna; Hardeman, Fredrik; Jansson, Janet K.; Sjoling, Sara

    2008-05-15

    Community structures of active bacterial populations were investigated along a vertical redox profile in coastal Baltic Sea sediments by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis. According to correspondence analysis of T-RFLP results and sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community structures at three redox depths (179 mV, -64 mV and -337 mV) differed significantly. The bacterial communities in the community DNA differed from those in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled DNA, indicating that the growing members of the community that incorporated BrdU were not necessarily the most dominant members. The structures of the actively growing bacterial communities were most strongly correlated to organic carbon followed by total nitrogen and redox potentials. Bacterial identification by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from clones of BrdU-labeled DNA and DNA from reverse transcription PCR (rt-PCR) showed that bacterial taxa involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling were metabolically active along the redox profiles. Several sequences had low similarities to previously detected sequences indicating that novel lineages of bacteria are present in Baltic Sea sediments. Also, a high number of different 16S rRNA gene sequences representing different phyla were detected at all sampling depths.

  20. Genes as early responders regulate quorum-sensing and control bacterial cooperation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelei Zhao

    Full Text Available Quorum-sensing (QS allows bacterial communication to coordinate the production of extracellular products essential for population fitness at higher cell densities. It has been generally accepted that a significant time duration is required to reach appropriate cell density to activate the relevant quiescent genes encoding these costly but beneficial public goods. Which regulatory genes are involved and how these genes control bacterial communication at the early phases are largely un-explored. By determining time-dependent expression of QS-related genes of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aerugionsa, we show that the induction of social cooperation could be critically influenced by environmental factors to optimize the density of population. In particular, small regulatory RNAs (RsmY and RsmZ serving as early responders, can promote the expression of dependent genes (e.g. lasR to boost the synthesis of intracellular enzymes and coordinate instant cooperative behavior in bacterial cells. These early responders, acting as a rheostat to finely modulate bacterial cooperation, which may be quickly activated under environment threats, but peter off when critical QS dependent genes are fully functional for cooperation. Our findings suggest that RsmY and RsmZ critically control the timing and levels of public goods production, which may have implications in sociomicrobiology and infection control.

  1. Collective Functionality through Bacterial Individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Martin

    According to the conventional view, the properties of an organism are a product of nature and nurture - of its genes and the environment it lives in. Recent experiments with unicellular organisms have challenged this view: several molecular mechanisms generate phenotypic variation independently of environmental signals, leading to variation in clonal groups. My presentation will focus on the causes and consequences of this microbial individuality. Using examples from bacterial genetic model systems, I will first discuss different molecular and cellular mechanisms that give rise to bacterial individuality. Then, I will discuss the consequences of individuality, and focus on how phenotypic variation in clonal populations of bacteria can promote interactions between individuals, lead to the division of labor, and allow clonal groups of bacteria to cope with environmental uncertainty. Variation between individuals thus provides clonal groups with collective functionality.

  2. Association between the Interaction of Key Genes Involved in Effector T-Cell Pathways and Susceptibility to Develop allergic Rhinitis: A Population-Based Case-Control Association Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that interaction between key genes mediating signaling and transcriptional networks involving effector T-cell responses may influence an individual's susceptibility to develop allergic rhinitis(AR.The aim of this study was todetermine whether specific interactions between key genes involved in effector T-cell pathways are associated with an individual's susceptibility to develop AR in Han Chinese subjects.A cohort of 489 patients with AR and 421 healthy controls was enrolled from the Han Chinese population in Beijing, China. AR was established by questionnaire and clinical examination, and peripheral blood was drawn from all subjects for DNA extraction. A total of 96 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 26 reprehensive candidate genes involved in T helper 1 (Th1, Th2, Th17, Th9 and T regulatory cell pathways were selected from the International Haplotype Mappingdatabase for Han Chinese in Beijing (CHB population, and IlluminaGoldenGate assay was conducted for SNP genotyping. The PLINK software package was used to perform statistical analyses.Simple SNP-phenotype association analysis using logistic regression showed SNP rs8193036 in IL17A gene, rs2569254 in IL-12 and rs1898413 in RORα weresignificantlyassociatedwith AR.Simple SNP-phenotype association analysis with genetic models demonstrated thatrs2569254 in IL-12, rs1031508 in STAT4, and rs3741809 in IL-26 were likely to be recessive, rs8193036 in IL17A allelic, rs897200in STAT4 genotypic, and rs1898413 in RORα dominant. Epistasis analyses exhibited that 83 SNPs in 23 genes were significantly interactive; of which 59 interactions/SNP pairs demonstrated OR values higher than 2 or lower than 0.5, and 12 interactions/SNP pairs OR values higher than 4 or lower than 0.25. STAT3, RORα and IL-26, involved in Th17 pathway,were the mostfrequentlyinteractive genes.This study suggests that interactions between several SNPs in key genes involved in effector T-cell pathways are

  3. Exploring the links between natural products and bacterial assemblages in the sponge Aplysina aerophoba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán-Soriano, Oriol; Banaigs, Bernard; Casamayor, Emilio O; Becerro, Mikel A

    2011-02-01

    The sponge Aplysina aerophoba produces a large diversity of brominated alkaloids (BAs) and hosts a complex microbial assemblage. Although BAs are located within sponge cells, the enzymes that bind halogen elements to organic compounds have been exclusively described in algae, fungi, and bacteria. Bacterial communities within A. aerophoba could therefore be involved in the biosynthesis of these compounds. This study investigates whether changes in both the concentration of BAs and the bacterial assemblages are correlated in A. aerophoba. To do so, we quantified major natural products using high-performance liquid chromatography and analyzed bacterial assemblages using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis on the 16S rRNA gene. We identified multiple associations between bacteria and natural products, including a strong relationship between a Chloroflexi phylotype and aplysinamisin-1 and between an unidentified bacterium and aerophobin-2 and isofistularin-3. Our results suggest that these bacteria could either be involved in the production of BAs or be directly affected by them. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports that find a significant correlation between natural products and bacterial populations in any benthic organism. Further investigating these associations will shed light on the organization and functioning of host-endobiont systems such as Aplysina aerophoba. PMID:21115701

  4. Involved Consumers and Advertising Involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Lawlor, Katrina

    1988-01-01

    The question of consumer involvement has at times taken on the appearance of a theoretical quagmire. The proliferation of definitions apart, this confusion has been exacerbated by the failure to distinguish adequately between advertising and consumer involvement. The research outlined in this article attempts to probe the possible relationship between these two discrete entities. It takes as a starting point Kassarjian's postulate of a generalised trait of purchasing involvement. This novel ...

  5. Plasmids spread very fast in heterogeneous bacterial communities.

    OpenAIRE

    Dionisio, Francisco; Matic, Ivan; Radman, Miroslav; Rodrigues, Olivia R; Taddei, François

    2002-01-01

    Conjugative plasmids can mediate gene transfer between bacterial taxa in diverse environments. The ability to donate the F-type conjugative plasmid R1 greatly varies among enteric bacteria due to the interaction of the system that represses sex-pili formations (products of finOP) of plasmids already harbored by a bacterial strain with those of the R1 plasmid. The presence of efficient donors in heterogeneous bacterial populations can accelerate plasmid transfer and can spread by several order...

  6. Homoserine lactones: Do plants really listen to bacterial talk?

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Ilona; von Rad, Uta; Durner, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial quorum sensing signals N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHL) enable bacterial cells to regulate gene expression depending on population density, which eventually leads to invasion of hosts. Only little is known about the molecular ways of plants reacting to these bacterial signals. Recently, we showed that the contact of Arabidopsis thaliana roots with N-hexanoyl-DL-homoserine-lactone (HHL) resulted in distinct transcriptional changes in roots and shoots, respectively. In addition,...

  7. Particle Counter Determination of Bacterial Biomass in Seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Kogure, Kazuhiro; Koike, Isao

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of the Elzone particle counter to the determination of marine bacterial biomass was investigated. The biomass of bacterial pure cultures and a mixed natural population were followed by using the particle counter, a CHN analyzer, and an ATP analyzer. The particle counter showed the precise size distribution of number and volume of submicron-size particles in seawater. For the pure cultured bacterial strains, the conversion factor from volume to carbon is 0.209 mg of C per mm3...

  8. Exploring the complex response to linuron of bacterial communities from biopurification systems by means of cultivation-independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealtry, Simone; Nour, Eman H; Holmsgaard, Peter N; Ding, Guo-Chun; Weichelt, Viola; Dunon, Vincent; Heuer, Holger; Hansen, Lars H; Sørensen, Søren J; Springael, Dirk; Smalla, Kornelia

    2016-02-01

    On-farm biopurification systems (BPSs) treat pesticide-contaminated wastewater at farms through biodegradation and sorption processes. However, information on the microbiota involved in pesticide removal in BPSs is scarce. Here we report on the response of BPS bacterial communities to the herbicide linuron (BPS(+)) compared with the control (BPS(-)) in a microcosm experiment. Both denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from community DNA indicated shifts in the bacterial community after linuron application. Responding populations belonged to taxa that were previously reported from linuron degrading consortia cultivated from soil (Hyphomicrobiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Micrococcaceae). In addition, numerous taxa with increased relative abundance were identified that were previously not associated with linuron degradation. The relative abundance of IncP-1 korB copies increased in response to linuron application. Amplicon pyrosequencing of IncP-1 trfA genes revealed a high IncP-1 plasmid diversity and suggested that populations carrying IncP-1β plasmids increased in relative abundance. Transferable mercury resistance plasmids were exogenously captured from BPS(+)/BPS(-), and in three transconjugants from BPS(+) the gene hylA was detected. Our data suggest the existence of a multispecies linuron degrading bacterial food web and an involvement of IncP-1 plasmids in the adaptation of bacterial communities to pesticide pollution in BPSs. PMID:26705572

  9. Bacterial streamers in curved microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Biofilms, generally identified as microbial communities embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, are involved in a wide variety of health-related problems ranging from implant-associated infections to disease transmissions and dental plaque. The usual picture of these bacterial films is that they grow and develop on surfaces. However, suspended biofilm structures, or streamers, have been found in natural environments (e.g., rivers, acid mines, hydrothermal hot springs) and are always suggested to stem from a turbulent flow. We report the formation of bacterial streamers in curved microfluidic channels. By using confocal laser microscopy we are able to directly image and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of these filamentous structures. Such streamers, which always connect the inner corners of opposite sides of the channel, are always located in the middle plane. Numerical simulations of the flow provide evidences for an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism behind the formation of the streamers.

  10. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  11. Host Imprints on Bacterial Genomes—Rapid, Divergent Evolution in Individual Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zdziarski, Jaroslaw; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Wullt, Björn; Liesegang, Heiko; Biran, Dvora; Voigt, Birgit; Grönberg-Hernandez, Jenny; Ragnarsdottir, Bryndis; Hecker, Michael; Ron, Eliora Z.; Daniel, Rolf; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Hacker, Jörg; Svanborg, Catharina; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Author Summary Bacterial virulence results from the interaction between bacteria and their hosts. This interaction provides selection pressure for bacterial adaptation towards increased fitness or virulence. Basic mechanisms involved in bacterial adaptation at the genetic level are point mutations and recombination. As bacterial genome plasticity is higher in vivo than in vitro, host-pathogen interaction may facilitate bacterial adaptation. Comparative genomics has so far been almost entirely...

  12. The bacterial lipopeptide iturins induce Verticillium dahliae cell death by affecting fungal signalling pathways and mediate plant defence responses involved in pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qin; Wu, Fengli; Wang, Xiaonan; Qi, Hong; Shi, Liang; Ren, Ang; Liu, Qinghai; Zhao, Mingwen; Tang, Canming

    2015-04-01

    Verticillium wilt in cotton caused by Verticillium dahliae is one of the most serious plant diseases worldwide. Because no known fungicides or cotton cultivars provide sufficient protection against this pathogen, V. dahliae causes major crop yield losses. Here, an isolated cotton endophytic bacterium, designated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 41B-1, exhibited greater than 50% biocontrol efficacy against V. dahliae in cotton plants under greenhouse conditions. Through high-performance liquid chromatography and mass analysis of the filtrate, we found that the antifungal compounds present in the strain 41B-1 culture filtrate were a series of isoforms of iturins. The purified iturins suppressed V. dahliae microsclerotial germination in the absence or presence of cotton. Treatment with the iturins induced reactive oxygen species bursts, Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and defects in cell wall integrity. The oxidative stress response and high-osmolarity glycerol pathway contribute to iturins resistance in V. dahliae. In contrast, the Slt2 MAPK pathway may be involved in iturins sensitivity in this fungus. In addition to antagonism, iturins could induce plant defence responses as activators and mediate pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. These findings suggest that iturins may affect fungal signalling pathways and mediate plant defence responses against V. dahliae. PMID:24934960

  13. Pesticide Side Effects in an Agricultural Soil Ecosystem as Measured by amoA Expression Quantification and Bacterial Diversity Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Louise; Hjelmsø, Mathis Hjort; Nielsen, Morten Schostag; Jacobsen, Anne Dorthe; Rønn, Regin; Ekelund, Flemming; Krogh, Paul Henning; Strobel, Bjarne Westergaard; Jacobsen, Carsten Suhr

    2015-01-01

    Background and Methods Assessing the effects of pesticide hazards on microbiological processes in the soil is currently based on analyses that provide limited insight into the ongoing processes. This study proposes a more comprehensive approach. The side effects of pesticides may appear as changes in the expression of specific microbial genes or as changes in diversity. To assess the impact of pesticides on gene expression, we focused on the amoA gene, which is involved in ammonia oxidation. We prepared soil microcosms and exposed them to dazomet, mancozeb or no pesticide. We hypothesized that the amount of amoA transcript decreases upon pesticide application, and to test this hypothesis, we used reverse-transcription qPCR. We also hypothesized that bacterial diversity is affected by pesticides. This hypothesis was investigated via 454 sequencing and diversity analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA and RNA genes, representing the active and total soil bacterial communities, respectively. Results and Conclusion Treatment with dazomet reduced both the bacterial and archaeal amoA transcript numbers by more than two log units and produced long-term effects for more than 28 days. Mancozeb also inhibited the numbers of amoA transcripts, but only transiently. The bacterial and archaeal amoA transcripts were both sensitive bioindicators of pesticide side effects. Additionally, the numbers of bacterial amoA transcripts correlated with nitrate production in N-amended microcosms. Dazomet reduced the total bacterial numbers by one log unit, but the population size was restored after twelve days. The diversity of the active soil bacteria also seemed to be re-established after twelve days. However, the total bacterial diversity as reflected in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences was largely dominated by Firmicutes and Proteobacteria at day twelve, likely reflecting a halt in the growth of early opportunists and the re-establishment of a more diverse population. We observed no

  14. Pesticide Side Effects in an Agricultural Soil Ecosystem as Measured by amoA Expression Quantification and Bacterial Diversity Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Feld

    Full Text Available Assessing the effects of pesticide hazards on microbiological processes in the soil is currently based on analyses that provide limited insight into the ongoing processes. This study proposes a more comprehensive approach. The side effects of pesticides may appear as changes in the expression of specific microbial genes or as changes in diversity. To assess the impact of pesticides on gene expression, we focused on the amoA gene, which is involved in ammonia oxidation. We prepared soil microcosms and exposed them to dazomet, mancozeb or no pesticide. We hypothesized that the amount of amoA transcript decreases upon pesticide application, and to test this hypothesis, we used reverse-transcription qPCR. We also hypothesized that bacterial diversity is affected by pesticides. This hypothesis was investigated via 454 sequencing and diversity analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA and RNA genes, representing the active and total soil bacterial communities, respectively.Treatment with dazomet reduced both the bacterial and archaeal amoA transcript numbers by more than two log units and produced long-term effects for more than 28 days. Mancozeb also inhibited the numbers of amoA transcripts, but only transiently. The bacterial and archaeal amoA transcripts were both sensitive bioindicators of pesticide side effects. Additionally, the numbers of bacterial amoA transcripts correlated with nitrate production in N-amended microcosms. Dazomet reduced the total bacterial numbers by one log unit, but the population size was restored after twelve days. The diversity of the active soil bacteria also seemed to be re-established after twelve days. However, the total bacterial diversity as reflected in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences was largely dominated by Firmicutes and Proteobacteria at day twelve, likely reflecting a halt in the growth of early opportunists and the re-establishment of a more diverse population. We observed no effects of mancozeb on diversity.

  15. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  16. Bacterial strategies for chemotaxis response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celani, Antonio; Vergassola, Massimo

    2010-01-26

    Regular environmental conditions allow for the evolution of specifically adapted responses, whereas complex environments usually lead to conflicting requirements upon the organism's response. A relevant instance of these issues is bacterial chemotaxis, where the evolutionary and functional reasons for the experimentally observed response to chemoattractants remain a riddle. Sensing and motility requirements are in fact optimized by different responses, which strongly depend on the chemoattractant environmental profiles. It is not clear then how those conflicting requirements quantitatively combine and compromise in shaping the chemotaxis response. Here we show that the experimental bacterial response corresponds to the maximin strategy that ensures the highest minimum uptake of chemoattractants for any profile of concentration. We show that the maximin response is the unique one that always outcompetes motile but nonchemotactic bacteria. The maximin strategy is adapted to the variable environments experienced by bacteria, and we explicitly show its emergence in simulations of bacterial populations in a chemostat. Finally, we recast the contrast of evolution in regular vs. complex environments in terms of minimax vs. maximin game-theoretical strategies. Our results are generally relevant to biological optimization principles and provide a systematic possibility to get around the need to know precisely the statistics of environmental fluctuations. PMID:20080704

  17. Bacterial pleomorphism and competition in a relative humidity gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goffau, Marcus C.; Yang, Xiaomei; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The response of different bacterial species to reduced water availability was studied using a simple relative humidity gradient technique. Interestingly, distinct differences in morphology and growth patterns were observed between populations of the same species growing at different relative humidit

  18. Increased susceptibility to bacterial wilt in tomatoes by nematode galling and the role of the Mi gene in resistance to nematodes and bacterial wilt

    OpenAIRE

    Deberdt, P.; Quénéhervé, Patrick; Darrasse, A; Prior, P

    1999-01-01

    The soil-borne bacterial pathogen #Ralstonia solanacearum$ commonly coexists with polyspecific nematode populations in tropical and subtropical areas. The wounding of roots by nematodes is usually invoked to explain the correlation between nematode infection and bacterial wilt, since this wounding increases the number of sites for bacterial entry. Bacterial wilt development on tomato was investigated in a controlled environment on the susceptible tomato cultivar Floradel and the polygenically...

  19. Effect of copper on the performance and bacterial communities of activated sludge using Illumina MiSeq platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fu-Lin; Fan, Lei-Lei; Xie, Guang-Jian

    2016-08-01

    The anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic (A2O) process is a highly efficient sewage treatment method, which uses complex bacterial communities. However, the effect of copper on this process and the bacterial communities involved remains unknown. In this study, a systematic investigation of the effect of persistent exposure of copper in the A2O wastewater treatment system was performed. An A2O device was designed to examine the effect of copper on the removal efficiency and microbial community compositions of activated sludge that was continuously treated with 10, 20, and 40 mg L(-1) copper, respectively. Surprisingly, a decrease in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4N) removal efficiency was observed, and the toxicity of high copper concentration was significantly greater at 7d than at 1d. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, Chlorobi, and Nitrospirae were the dominant bacterial taxa in the A2O system, and significant changes in microbial community were observed during the exposure period. Most of the dominant bacterial groups were easily susceptible to copper toxicity and diversely changed at different copper concentrations. However, not all the bacterial taxa were inhibited by copper treatment. At high copper concentration, many bacterial species were stimulated and their abundance increased. Cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) based on operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed clear differences in the bacterial communities among the samples. These findings indicated that copper severely affected the performance and key microbial populations in the A2O system as well as disturbed the stability of the bacterial communities in the system, thus decreasing the removal efficiency. PMID:27179238

  20. Enumeration of Microbial Populations in Radioactive Environments by Epifluorescence Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epifluorescence microscopy was utilized to enumerate halophilic bacterial populations in two studies involving inoculated, actual radioactive waste/brine mixtures and pure brine solutions. The studies include an initial set of experiments designed to elucidate potential transformations of actinide-containing wastes under salt-repository conditions, including microbially mediated changes. The first study included periodic enumeration of bacterial populations of a mixed inoculum initially added to a collection of test containers. The contents of the test containers are the different types of actual radioactive waste that could potentially be stored in nuclear waste repositories in a salt environment. The transuranic waste was generated from materials used in actinide laboratory research. The results show that cell numbers decreased with time. Sorption of the bacteria to solid surfaces in the test system is discussed as a possible mechanism for the decrease in cell numbers. The second study was designed to determine radiological and/or chemical effects of 239Pu, 243Am, 237Np, 232Th and 238U on the growth of pure and mixed anaerobic, denitrifying bacterial cultures in brine media. Pu, Am, and Np isotopes at concentrations of -5M, -6M and -4M respectively, and Th and U isotopes -3M were tested in these media. The results indicate that high actinide concentration affected both the bacterial growth rate and morphology. However, relatively minor effects from Am were observed at all tested concentrations with the pure culture

  1. Shuffling bacterial metabolomes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomason, Brendan; Read, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has a far more significant role than gene duplication in bacterial evolution. This has recently been illustrated by work demonstrating the importance of HGT in the emergence of bacterial metabolic networks, with horizontally acquired genes being placed in peripheral pathways at the outer branches of the networks.

  2. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... become valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  3. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-07-16

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed. PMID:26244150

  4. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Microbiota on Brazilian Currency Note Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tairacan Augusto Pereira da Fonseca

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Currency notes have been implicated as a vehicle for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial population residing on banknotes is still unknown in Brazil. In this study, we aimed to investigate the overall bacterial population from 150 different Brazilian Rial (R$ notes in circulation using a culture-independent Illumina massively parallel sequencing approach of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were randomly collected from three different street markets or “feiras” in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Proteobacteria phyla, followed by Firmicutes and Streptophyta, with a total of 1193 bacterial families and 3310 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human, animal, and environmental origins. Also, our analysis revealed the presence of some potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, and Klebsiella. The results demonstrate that there is a tremendous diversity of bacterial contamination on currency notes, including organisms known to be opportunistic pathogens. One of the factors that may contribute to the richness of bacterial diversity in currency notes is personal hygiene. Thus, our results underscore the need to increase public awareness of the importance of personal hygiene of money handlers who also handle food.

  5. Lessons from Anaplasma phagocytophilum: Chromatin Remodeling by Bacterial Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens can alter global host gene expression via histone modifications and chromatin remodeling in order to subvert host responses, including those involved with innate immunity, allowing for bacterial survival. Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum express effector proteins that modify host histones and chromatin structure. A. phagocytophilum modulates granulocyte respiratory burst in part by dampening transcription of se...

  6. Discrete modelling of bacterial conjugation dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goni-Moreno, Angel

    2012-01-01

    In bacterial populations, cells are able to cooperate in order to yield complex collective functionalities. Interest in population-level cellular behaviour is increasing, due to both our expanding knowledge of the underlying biological principles, and the growing range of possible applications for engineered microbial consortia. Researchers in the field of synthetic biology - the application of engineering principles to living systems - have, for example, recently shown how useful decision-making circuits may be distributed across a bacterial population. The ability of cells to interact through small signalling molecules (a mechanism known as it quorum sensing) is the basis for the majority of existing engineered systems. However, horizontal gene transfer (or conjugation) offers the possibility of cells exchanging messages (using DNA) that are much more information-rich. The potential of engineering this conjugation mechanism to suit specific goals will guide future developments in this area. Motivated by a l...

  7. The intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JoseLMartinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically resistant bacteria have emerged as a relevant health problem in the last years. Those bacterial species, several of them with an environmental origin, present naturally a low-level susceptibility to several drugs. It has been proposed that intrinsic resistance is mainly the consequence of the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or the lack of appropriate targets for a given family of drugs. However, recently published articles indicate that the characteristic phenotype of susceptibility to antibiotics of a given bacterial species depends on the concerted activity of several elements, what has been named as intrinsic resistome. These determinants comprise not just classical resistance genes. Other elements, several of them involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes, are of relevance for the intrinsic resistance of bacterial pathogens. In the present review we analyse recent publications on the intrinsic resistomes of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present as well information on the role that global regulators of bacterial metabolism, as Crc from P. aeruginosa, may have on modulating bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, we discuss the possibility of searching inhibitors of the intrinsic resistome in the aim of improving the activity of drugs currently in use for clinical practice.

  8. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bacterial reverse transcriptases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Toro

    Full Text Available Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs, Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L, and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology.

  9. Molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial speck disease resistance of tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Y.-Q.

    1998-01-01

    An important recent advance in the field of plant-microbe interactions has been the cloning of genes that confer resistance to specific viruses, bacteria, fungi or nematodes. Disease resistance (R) genes encode proteins with predicted structural motifs consistent with them having roles in signal recognition and transduction. The future challenge is to understand how R gene products specifically perceive defence-eliciting signals from the pathogen and transduce those signals to pathways that l...

  10. Intergeneric bacterial coaggregations involving mutans streptococci and oral actinomyces.

    OpenAIRE

    Crowley, P J; Fischlschweiger, W; Coleman, S E; Bleiweis, A S

    1987-01-01

    Mutans streptococci (MS) representing eight different serotypes were tested for their ability to coaggregate in vitro with oral actinomyces and other streptococcal species. Of the mutans streptococci tested, only strains of S. cricetus (formerly S. mutans serotype a) displayed pronounced coaggregations and only with certain strains of actinomyces. S. cricetus coaggregated, by lactose nonreversible mechanisms, with serotype 4 Actinomyces naeslundii WVU963 and WVU924 and with serotype 2 Actinom...

  11. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  12. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  13. Calibrating bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ochman, Howard; Elwyn, Susannah; Moran, Nancy A

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to calibrate bacterial evolution have relied on the assumption that rates of molecular sequence divergence in bacteria are similar to those of higher eukaryotes, or to those of the few bacterial taxa for which ancestors can be reliably dated from ecological or geological evidence. Despite similarities in the substitution rates estimated for some lineages, comparisons of the relative rates of evolution at different classes of nucleotide sites indicate no basis for their universal appl...

  14. Bacterial community migration in the ripening of doenjang, a traditional Korean fermented soybean food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Do-Won; Kim, Hye-Rim; Jung, Gwangsick; Han, Seulhwa; Kim, Cheong-Tae; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Doenjang, a traditional Korean fermented soybean paste, is made by mixing and ripening meju with high salt brine (approximately 18%). Meju is a naturally fermented soybean block prepared by soaking, steaming, and molding soybean. To understand living bacterial community migration and the roles of bacteria in the manufacturing process of doenjang, the diversity of culturable bacteria in meju and doenjang was examined using media supplemented with NaCl, and some physiological activities of predominant isolates were determined. Bacilli were the major bacteria involved throughout the entire manufacturing process from meju to doenjang; some of these bacteria might be present as spores during the doenjang ripening process. Bacillus siamensis was the most populous species of the genus, and Bacillus licheniformis exhibited sufficient salt tolerance to maintain its growth during doenjang ripening. Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, the major lactic acid bacteria (LAB) identified in this study, did not continue to grow under high NaCl conditions in doenjang. Enterococci and certain species of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were the predominant acid-producing bacteria in meju fermentation, whereas Tetragenococcus halophilus and CNS were the major acid-producing bacteria in doenjang fermentation. We conclude that bacilli, LAB, and CNS may be the major bacterial groups involved in meju fermentation and that these bacterial communities undergo a shift toward salt-tolerant bacilli, CNS, and T. halophilus during the doenjang fermentation process. PMID:24548930

  15. Identifying the Fundamental Units of Bacterial Diversity: A Paradigm Shift to Incorporate Ecology into Bacterial Systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    How many ecologically distinct populations of bacteria are in a natural community, who are they, and what differences allow them to coexist or perform different ecosystem functions? These central questions of bacterial ecology and systematics require a method to consistently demarcate, from the vas...

  16. 根际促生细菌(PGPR)对冬枣根际土壤微生物数量及细菌多样性影响%Effect of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) on the Microorganism Population and Bacterial Diversity in Ziziphus jujuba Rhizosphere Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘方春; 邢尚军; 马海林; 丁延芹; 陈波; 杜秉海

    2013-01-01

    从6年生冬枣根际土壤中筛选出1株根际促生细菌(PGPR),以发酵鸡粪(DC)为吸附载体制成PGPR生物肥(PF),利用传统的氯仿熏蒸法和现代的T-RFLP技术,从冬枣根际土壤中可培养微生物的数量、细菌群落多样性和微生物量碳的动态变化3个方面,分析PF、普通生物肥料(NF)和DC对冬枣根际土壤微生物特征的影响.结果表明:同NF处理相比,PF处理中的细菌数量和微生物总量显著增加,真菌数量显著减少,但放线菌数量差异不显著.PF处理根际土壤具有较高的丰富度指数、多样性指数和均匀度指数.基于T-RFLP的主成分分析结果表明:PF处理的细菌群落结构成为1个独立的群,NF,DC和CK处理构成1个相对独立的群.此外,同其他试验处理相比,PF可相对稳定地提供冬枣生长周期内的微生物生物量碳.PGPR生物肥料的施用可提高可培养微生物数量,提高根际土壤中微生物多样性,有效改善冬枣根际土壤的微生态环境.%A dominant micro-organism strain was selected from rhizosphere soil of six-year-old Ziziphus jujuba trees by biological assay.A plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) fertilizer (PF) was made by adsorbing the PGPR to decomposed chicken manure (DC).The traditional chloroform fumigation method and modern Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) method were used to evaluate the effect of PF,DC and ordinary biological fertilizer (NF) on the microbial populations,the bacterial diversity and the dynamic soil microbial carbon in the Z.jujuba rhizosphere soil.Results showed that,compared with NF treatment,PF increased significantly the bacterial quantity and the total microorganism populations in the rhizosphere soil,but decreased significantly the fungus populations.However PF had no significant effect on actinomycetes populations in the rhizosphere soil.There was a significant difference in T-RFLP profiles of different treatments.PF had the highest

  17. A Comparison of Diets Supplemented with a Feed Additive Containing Organic Acids, Cinnamaldehyde and a Permeabilizing Complex, or Zinc Oxide, on Post-Weaning Diarrhoea, Selected Bacterial Populations, Blood Measures and Performance in Weaned Pigs Experimentally Infected with Enterotoxigenic E. coli †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensland, Ingunn; Kim, Jae Cheol; Bowring, Bethany; Collins, Alison M.; Mansfield, Josephine P.; Pluske, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary This experiment was conducted to assess the effects of three diets on diarrhoea, performance (weight change, feed intake and feed conversion ratio), selected bacterial populations and blood measures of weaner pigs infected with enterotoxigenic E. coli. The three diets were: base diet (no antimicrobial compounds), base diet containing zinc oxide, and base diet containing a feed additive (blend of organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and permeabilizing complex). Only feeding zinc oxide decreased diarrhoea, with zinc oxide-fed pigs performing better than base diet-fed pigs. Zinc oxide-fed pigs performed similarly to pigs fed the organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and permeabilizing complex. Significant interactions between treatment and day after weaning were found for some bacterial populations, although the implications of such findings require further examination. Abstract The effects of feeding a diet supplemented with zinc oxide (ZnO) or a blend of organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and a permeabilizing complex (OACP) on post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD) and performance in pigs infected with enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) were examined. Additionally, changes in selected bacterial populations and blood measures were assessed. A total of 72 pigs weaned at 22 d of age and weighing 7.2 ± 1.02 kg (mean ± SEM) was used. Treatments were: base diet (no antimicrobial compounds); base diet + 3 g ZnO/kg; base diet + 1.5 g OACP/kg. Dietary treatments started on the day of weaning and were fed ad libitum for 3 weeks. All pigs were infected with an F4 ETEC on d 4, 5 and 6 after weaning. The incidence of PWD was lower in pigs fed ZnO (p = 0.026). Overall, pigs fed ZnO grew faster (p = 0.013) and ate more (p = 0.004) than the base diet-fed pigs, with OACP-fed pigs performing the same (p > 0.05) as both the ZnO- and base diet-fed pigs. Feed conversion ratio was similar for all diets (p > 0.05). The percentage of E. coli with F4 fimbriae was affected a day by treatment interaction (p

  18. Survey of bacterial diversity in chronic wounds using Pyrosequencing, DGGE, and full ribosome shotgun sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Wolcott Benjamin M; Rhoads Daniel D; Secor Patrick R; Sun Yan; Dowd Scot E; James Garth A; Wolcott Randall D

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic wound pathogenic biofilms are host-pathogen environments that colonize and exist as a cohabitation of many bacterial species. These bacterial populations cooperate to promote their own survival and the chronic nature of the infection. Few studies have performed extensive surveys of the bacterial populations that occur within different types of chronic wound biofilms. The use of 3 separate16S-based molecular amplifications followed by pyrosequencing, shotgun Sanger ...

  19. Phylogenetic diversity of dominant bacterial communities during bioremediation of crude oil-polluted soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Thomas Cloete

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation of hydrocarbon pollutants is advantageous owing to the cost-effectiveness of the technology and the ubiquity of hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms in the soil. Soil microbial diversity is affected by hydrocarbon perturbation thus selective enrichment of hydrocarbon utilizers occurs. Hydrocarbons interact with the soil matrix and soil microorganisms determining the fate of the contaminants relative to their chemical nature and microbial degradative capabilities respectively. Bacterial dynamics in crude oil-polluted soil microcosms undergoing bioremediation were investigated over a 42-day period. Four out of the five microcosms containing 4kg of pristine soil each were contaminated with 4% Arabian light crude oil. Three microcosms were amended with either 25g of NPK fertilizer, calcium ammonium nitrate or poultry droppings respectively while the fourth designated oil-contaminated control was unamended. The fifth microcosm had only pristine soil and was set up to ascertain indigenous bacterial community structure pre-contamination. Biostimulated soils were periodically tilled and watered. Hydrocarbon degradation was measured throughout the experimental period by gas chromatography. Gas chromatographic tracing of residual hydrocarbons in biostimulated soils showed marked attenuation of contaminants starting from the second (day 14 till the sixth (day 42 week after contamination whereas no significant reduction in hydrocarbon peaks was seen in the oil contaminated control soil throughout the 6-week experimental period. Molecular fingerprints of bacterial communities involved in aerobic biodegradation of crude oil hydrocarbons in biostimulated soils and controls were generated with DGGE using PCR-amplification of 16S rRNA gene obtained from extracted total soil community DNA. DGGE fingerprints demonstrated that NPK, calcium ammonium nitrate and poultry droppings selected different bacterial populations during the active phase of oil

  20. BACTERIAL DESEASES IN SEA FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivančica Strunjak-Perović

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available With development of the fish culturing in the sea, the interest in their health also increased. The reason for this are diseases or rather mortality that occur in such controlled cultures and cause great economic losses. By growing large quantities of fish in rather small species, natural conditions are changed, so fish is more sensitive and prone to infection agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites. Besides, a large fish density in the cultural process accelerates spreading if the diseases, but also enables a better perception of them. In wild populations sick specimen very quickly become predator’s prey, witch makes it difficult to note any pathological changes in such fish. There are lots of articles on viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases nowdays, but this work deals exclusively with bacterial deseases that occur in the controlled sea cultures (vibriosis, furunculosis, pastherelosis, nocardiosis, mycobaceriosis, edwardsielosis, yersiniosis, deseases caused by bacteria of genera Flexibacter, Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Streptococus and bacteria nephryithis. Yet, the knowledge of these deseases vary, depending on wether a fish species is being cultured for a longer period of time or is only being introduced in the controlled culture.

  1. Liver Cirrhosis and Intestinal Bacterial Translocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction, facilitating translocation of bacteria and bacterial products, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Intestinal defense system including microbial barrier, immunologic barrier, mechanical barrier, chemical barrier, plays an important role in the maintenance of intestinal function. Under normal circumstances, the intestinal barrier can prevent intestinal bacteria through the intestinal wall from spreading to the body. Severe infection, trauma, shock, cirrhosis, malnutrition, immune suppression conditions, intestinal bacteria and endotoxin translocation, can lead to multiple organ dysfunction. The intestinal microlfora is not only involved in the digestion of nutrients, but also in local immunity, forming a barrier against pathogenic microorganisms. The derangement of the gut microlfora may lead to microbial translocation, deifned as the passage of viable microorganisms or bacterial products from the intestinal lumen to the mesenteric lymph nodes and other extraintestinal sites. In patients with cirrhosis, primary and intestinal lfora imbalance, intestinal bacterial overgrowth, intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction, endotoxemia is associated with weakened immunity.

  2. The Bacterial Microflora of Fish, Revised

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Austin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of numerous studies indicate that fish possess bacterial populations on or in their skin, gills, digestive tract, and light-emitting organs. In addition, the internal organs (kidney, liver, and spleen of healthy fish may contain bacteria, but there is debate about whether or not muscle is actually sterile. Using traditional culture-dependent techniques, the numbers and taxonomic composition of the bacterial populations generally reflect those of the surrounding water. More modern culture-independent approaches have permitted the recognition of previously uncultured bacteria. The role of the organisms includes the ability to degrade complex molecules (therefore exercising a potential benefit in nutrition, to produce vitamins and polymers, and to be responsible for the emission of light by the light-emitting organs of deep-sea fish. Taxa, including Pseudomonas, may contribute to spoilage by the production of histamines in fish tissue.

  3. Bats and bacterial pathogens: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühldorfer, K

    2013-02-01

    The occurrence of emerging infectious diseases and their relevance to human health has increased the interest in bats as potential reservoir hosts and vectors of zoonotic pathogens. But while previous and ongoing research activities predominantly focused on viral agents, the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria in bats and their impact on bat mortality have largely neglected. Enteric pathogens found in bats are often considered to originate from the bats' diet and foraging habitats, despite the fact that little is known about the actual ecological context or even transmission cycles involving bats, humans and other animals like pets and livestock. For some bacterial pathogens common in human and animal diseases (e.g. Pasteurella, Salmonella, Escherichia and Yersinia spp.), the pathogenic potential has been confirmed for bats. Other bacterial pathogens (e.g. Bartonella, Borrelia and Leptospira spp.) provide evidence for novel species that seem to be specific for bat hosts but might also be of disease importance in humans and other animals. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of bacterial pathogens identified in bats and to consider factors that might influence the exposure and susceptibility of bats to bacterial infection but could also affect bacterial transmission rates between bats, humans and other animals. PMID:22862791

  4. Bacterial persistence: some new insights into an old phenomenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Jayaraman

    2008-12-01

    Bigger discovered more than 60 years ago, at the very beginning of the antibiotic era, that populations of antibiotic-sensitive bacteria contained a very small fraction (approximately 10–6) of antibiotic-tolerant cells (persisters). Persisters are different from antibiotic-resistant mutants in that their antibiotic tolerance is non-heritable and reversible. In spite of its importance as an interesting biological phenomenon and in the treatment of infectious diseases, persistence did not attract the attention of the scientific community for more than four decades since its discovery. The main reason for this lack of interest was the difficulty in isolating sufficient numbers of persister cells for experimentation, since the proportion of persisters in a population of wild-type cells is extremely small. However, with the discovery of high-persister (hip) mutants of Escherichia coli by Moyed and his group in the early 1980s, the phenomenon attracted the attention of many groups and significant progress has occurred since then. It is now believed that persistence is the end result of a stochastic switch in the expression of some toxin–antitoxin (TA) modules (of which the hipA and hipB genes could be examples), creating an imbalance in their intracellular levels. There are also models invoking the involvement of the alarmone (p) ppGpp in the generation of persisters. However, the precise mechanisms are still unknown. Bacterial persistence is part of a wider gamut of phenomena variously called as bistability, multistability, phenotypic heterogeneity, stochastic switching processes, etc. It has attracted the attention of not only microbiologists but also a diverse band of researchers such as biofilm researchers, evolutionary biologists, sociobiologists, etc. In this article, I attempt to present a broad overview of bacterial persistence to illustrate its significance and the need for further exploration.

  5. Clearance of bacteria and differential involvement of mussel hyalinocytes, small and large granulocytes in antibacterial immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouvet, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    more than 48 h for Vibrio anguillarum. The total hemocyte count (THC) was dramatically lowered by the bacterial injections, as quantified by flow cytometry. V. splendidus induced the strongest decreases with -66% 9h post-injection of living bacteria and -56% 3h post-injection of heat-killed bacteria....... Flow cytometry was used to identify three main sub-populations of hemocytes, namely hyalinocytes, small granulocytes and large granulocytes. When THC was minimal, i.e. within the first 9h post-injection, proportions of the three cell categories varied dramatically, suggesting differential involvement...

  6. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  7. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  8. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria.......Biofilm resilience poses major challenges to the development of novel antimicrobial agents. Biofilm bacteria can be considered small groups of “Special Forces” capable of infiltrating the host and destroying important components of the cellular defense system with the aim of crippling the host...

  9. Biomimicry of quorum sensing using bacterial lifecycle model

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Ben; Wang, Hong; Duan, Qiqi; Li, Li

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent microbiologic studies have shown that quorum sensing mechanisms, which serve as one of the fundamental requirements for bacterial survival, exist widely in bacterial intra- and inter-species cell-cell communication. Many simulation models, inspired by the social behavior of natural organisms, are presented to provide new approaches for solving realistic optimization problems. Most of these simulation models follow population-based modelling approaches, where all the individu...

  10. Radionuclide scintigraphy of bacterial nephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyelonephritis is a leading cause of renal failure and is expected to cost as much as three billion dollars in 1984. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection is usually not difficult. However, localization of the infection within the renal parenchyma as opposed to the collecting system is much more difficult. Flank pain, fever, bacteiuria and evidence of parenchymal involvement by intravenous urography may be absent or unrecognized particularly in the infant. Ultrasound and Nuclear Medicine are advocated as better methods to define parenchymal involvement. Such definition is important in the consideration of treatment since parenchymal involvement of the kidney carries a much more ominous potential outcome than infection restricted to within the collecting system. 38 children with a clinical diagnosis of urinary tract infection were studied. 26 of the patients demonstrated abnormal renal parenchymal findings with Gallium-67 Citrate or Tc-99m Glucoheptonate scintigraphy. Intravenous urography was notably ineffective with only 5 of the 20 interpreted as abnormal due to parenchymal disease or decreased function. 11 were entirely normal while only 5 demonstrated scars or hydronephrosis. Only 10 of 17 patients demonstrated intranvesicoureteral reflux on x-ray or nuclear cystography. Ultrasound depicted 6 of 20 patients as having parenchymal abnormalities. Seven were normal. Nonspecific findings such as dilitation of the renal pelvis or renal enlargement was noted in 11 of the 20 patients. Radionuclide Scintigraphy is the most efficacious modality to detect since acute bacterial nephritis

  11. Self-organization in bacterial swarming: lessons from myxobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When colonizing surfaces, many bacteria are able to self-organize into an actively expanding biofilm, in which millions of cells move smoothly and orderly at high densities. This phenomenon is known as bacterial swarming. Despite the apparent resemblance to patterns seen in liquid crystals, the dynamics of bacterial swarming cannot be explained by theories derived from equilibrium statistical mechanics. To understand how bacteria swarm, a central question is how order emerges in dense and initially disorganized populations of bacterial cells. Here we briefly review recent efforts, with integrated computational and experimental approaches, in addressing this question

  12. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  13. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or scraped, the injury should be washed with soap and water and covered with a sterile bandage. Petrolatum may be applied to open areas to keep the tissue moist and to try to prevent bacterial invasion. Doctors recommend that people do not use ...

  14. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  15. Effect of a disinfectant udder wash and a post-milking teat dip on the bacterial population of the teat end and on the rate of new intramammary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, R F; Hoare, R J

    1980-10-01

    A pre-milking wash disinfectant procedure employing a 2% (w/v) chlorhexidine solution in a detergent basic did not reduce the rate of new intramammary infection in a lactating herd challenged with Staphylococcus aureus. Teat-end swabs showed no significant difference in the number of Staph. aureus isolated from the teat-ends pre-washed with either water, or water and chlorhexidine. In contrast, disinfecting teats after milking with a solution containing 5000 mg available iodine/l significantly reduced the staphylococcal population of the teat-ends and the rate of new intramammary infection, compared with teats not disinfected. PMID:7451707

  16. Impact of recombination on bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Didelot, Xavier; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic exchange plays a defining role in the evolution of many bacteria. The recent accumulation of nucleotide sequence data from multiple members of diverse bacterial genera has facilitated comparative studies that have revealed many features of this process. Here we focus on genetic exchange that has involved homologous recombination and illustrate how nucleotide sequence data have furthered our understanding of: (i) the frequency of recombination; (ii) the impact of recombination in diffe...

  17. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Bacterial Meningoencephalitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Belkys Rodríguez Llerena.; Luciano Núñez Almoguea.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Bacterial Meningoencephalitis. It has been defined as an acute inflammatory process caused by bacteria, often purulent, which involves the meninges, subarachnoid space around the brain, spinal cord and usually includes the ventricles. It is caused in the 80% of the patients by three bacteria: Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides and Streptococcus pneumonia. Concepts, classification, diagnosis and treatment were reviewed. It includes assessment guidel...

  18. Microbiology of bacterial translocation in humans

    OpenAIRE

    O'Boyle, C; MacFie, J; Mitchell, C.; Johnstone, D.; Sagar, P; Sedman, P

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gut translocation of bacteria has been shown in both animal and human studies. Evidence from animal studies that links bacterial translocation to the development of postoperative sepsis and multiple organ failure has yet to be confirmed in humans. 
Aims—To examine the spectrum of bacteria involved in translocation in surgical patients undergoing laparotomy and to determine the relation between nodal migration of bacteria and the development of postoperative septic co...

  19. Translocation of DNA across bacterial membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Dreiseikelmann, Brigitte

    1994-01-01

    DNA translocation across bacterial membranes occurs during the biological processes of infection by bacteriophages, conjugative DNA transfer of plasmids, T-DNA transfer, and genetic transformation. The mechanism of DNA translocation in these systems is not fully understood, but during the last few years extensive data about genes and gene products involved in the translocation processes have accumulated. One reason for the increasing interest in this topic is the discussion about horizontal g...

  20. Relating MEC population dynamics to anode performance from DGGE and electrical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croese, Elsemiek; Keesman, Karel J; Widjaja-Greefkes, Aura H C A; Geelhoed, Jeanine S; Plugge, Caroline M; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Stams, Alfons J M; Euverink, Gert-Jan W

    2013-09-01

    The microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a promising system for H2 production, but little is known about the active microbial population in MEC systems. Therefore, the microbial community of five different MEC graphite felt anodes was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling. The results showed that the bacterial population was very diverse and there were substantial differences between microorganisms in anolyte and anode samples. The archaeal population in the anolyte and at the anodes, and between the different MEC anodes, was very similar. SEM and FISH imaging showed that Archaea were mainly present in the spaces between the electrode fibers and Bacteria were present at the fiber surface, which suggested that Bacteria were the main microorganisms involved in MEC electrochemical activity. Redundancy analysis (RDA) and QR factorization-based estimation (QRE) were used to link the composition of the bacterial community to electrochemical performance of the MEC. The operational mode of the MECs and their consequent effects on current density and anode resistance on the populations were significant. The results showed that the community composition was most strongly correlated with current density. The DGGE band mostly correlated with current represented a Clostridium sticklandii strain, suggesting that this species had a major role in current from acetate generation at the MEC anodes. The combination of RDA and QRE seemed especially promising for obtaining an insight into the part of the microbial population actively involved in electrode interaction in the MEC. PMID:23830069

  1. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  2. Molecular pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection: the role of bacterial virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Bela; Galamb, Orsolya; Sipos, Ferenc; Leiszter, Katalin; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common pathogens affecting humankind, infecting approximately 50% of the world's population. Of those infected, many will develop asymptomatic gastritis, but 10% develop gastric or duodenal ulcers. The clinical outcome of the infection may involve a combination of bacterial factors, host factors and environmental factors. In the process of development of gastritis, ulceration and cancer, several cellular and molecular steps follow each other. Infection, acid survival, adhesion, cytotoxicity, epithelial cell turnover changes, inflammation, regeneration or pathological alteration towards erosions, ulceration, and cancer can be observed on the cellular level. Bacterial factors like urease, AmiE, AmiF, hydrogenase and arginase are needed for survival in the acidic gastric environment. The bacterial flagellae are essential to move the bacteria towards the epithelial surface. Adhesive factors like BabA, SabA and ureaseA are necessary for adhesion against MHC-II complexes and Le antigens. The bacteria VacA and CagA are cytotoxic factors. The Cag type IV secretion system delivers these proteins inside the epithelial cells. After disruption of epithelial cell junctions, the bacteria can pass through the gastric wall facing direct immune response from neutrophils, lymphocytes, mast cells and dendritic cells. This review describes and summarizes our present molecular biological information and knowledge about the Helicobacter infective component, cell functions and processes. The possible role of host counter responses and interactions with gastric epithelia and immune cells are also detailed. PMID:21088410

  3. Evolutionary transitions in bacterial symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs, Joel L.; Skophammer, Ryan G.; Regus, John U.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse bacterial lineages form beneficial infections with eukaryotic hosts. The origins, evolution, and breakdown of these mutualisms represent important evolutionary transitions. To examine these key events, we synthesize data from diverse interactions between bacteria and eukaryote hosts. Five evolutionary transitions are investigated, including the origins of bacterial associations with eukaryotes, the origins and subsequent stable maintenance of bacterial mutualism with hosts, the captur...

  4. Are grazer-induced adaptations of bacterial abundance and morphology timedependent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca CORNO

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Predation by protists is a well known force that shapes bacterial communities and can lead to filamentous forms and aggregations of large cell clusters. These classic resistance strategies were observed as a direct consequence of predation by heteroand mixotrophic flagellates (the main group of bacteria predators in water on natural assemblages of bacteria and on single plastic strains. Recently it was shown that a long time exposure (about 30 days of a bacterial strain, characterized by high degree of phenotypic plasticity, to flagellates, without direct predation, enhanced the formation of resistant forms (filaments in a continuous culture system. Target prey populations and predators were separated by a dialysis membrane. Moreover, the positive impact on bacterial growth, due to the chemical excretes released by flagellates was demonstrated for exudates of photosynthetic activity. The same positive impact may also be seen in response to exudates related to grazing. In this study, two short-term experiments (<100 hours were conducted to test for modifications in the morphology and productivity of three different bacterial strains that were induced by the presence of active predators, but without direct predation. The growth and morphological distribution of each of the selected strains was tested separately using batch cultures. Cultures were either enriched with carbon in the presence or absence of flagellate predators, or included pre-filtered exudates from flagellate activity. In a second experiment, bottles were provided with a central dialysis bag that contained active flagellates, and were inoculated with the selected bacterial strains. In this way, bacteria were exposed to the presence of predators without direct predation. The bacterial strains used in this experience were characterised by a high degree of phenotypic plasticity and exhibited different successful strategies of resistance against grazing. The flagellates selected as

  5. Bacterial Contamination of Iranian Paper Currency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-Hassan Moosavy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transmission of human pathogens can be occurred via inert objects. Paper currency is a further common contact surface whereby pathogens can be transferred within a population although the significance remains unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to investigate microbial populations associated with Iranian paper currency.Methods: This study was carried out by getting 108 samples of the Iranian currency notes (1000, 2000, 5000, 10000, 20000 and 50000 RIALS from food-related shops that included food service outlets, greengrocery, supermarket, bakery, confectionary and poultry meat retail outlets. All currency notes were examined for total bacterial count and identification of pathogenic bacteria.Results: The average total bacterial count that was recovered from currency notes was found to be 3.27±0.31 colony forming unites. 2000R had the highest total bacterial count, followed by 5000R, 10000R and the lowest in 50000R. In this study, the isolated bacteria recovered were Bacillus cereus (8.33%, E. coli (48.14%, Staphylococcus aureus (28.7%, Salmonella (0.92%, Listeria monocytogenes (0.92%, Yersinia entrocolitica (6.48%. It was revealed that all the pathogens screened for where encountered on currency notes were recovered from one sample. There were no significant (P>0.05 correlations between the carriage of pathogens/fecal indicator bacteria and currency note condition.Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that Iranian currency notes represent a significant vehicle for human pathogens.

  6. Connecting the dots between bacterial biofilms and ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley-Wall, Nicola R; MacPhee, Cait E

    2015-01-01

    Emerging research is revealing a diverse array of interfacially-active proteins that are involved in varied biological process from foaming horse sweat to bacterial raincoat formation. We describe an interdisciplinary approach to study the molecular and biophysical mechanisms controlling the activity of an unusual bacterial protein called BslA. This protein is needed for biofilm formation and forms a protective layer or raincoat over the bacterial community, but also has a multitude of potential applications in multiphase formulations. Here we document our journey from fundamental research to an examination of the applications for this surface-active protein in ice cream. PMID:26685107

  7. Connecting the dots between bacterial biofilms and ice cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.; MacPhee, Cait E.

    2015-12-01

    Emerging research is revealing a diverse array of interfacially-active proteins that are involved in varied biological process from foaming horse sweat to bacterial raincoat formation. We describe an interdisciplinary approach to study the molecular and biophysical mechanisms controlling the activity of an unusual bacterial protein called BslA. This protein is needed for biofilm formation and forms a protective layer or raincoat over the bacterial community, but also has a multitude of potential applications in multiphase formulations. Here we document our journey from fundamental research to an examination of the applications for this surface-active protein in ice cream.

  8. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Tablang, Michael Vincent F.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a severe and life-threatening complication in patients with ascites caused by advanced liver disease. The organisms most commonly involved are coliform bacteria and third-generation cephalosporins are the empiric antibiotics of choice. This is an uncommon case of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a female patient with liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis. She did not improve with ceftriaxone and her course was compl...

  9. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Species Associated with Childhood Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Mitzi R.; Paster, Bruce J.; Leys, Eugene J.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Kenyon, Sarah G.; Galvin, Jamie L.; Boches, Susan K.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Griffen, Ann L.

    2002-01-01

    Although substantial epidemiologic evidence links Streptococcus mutans to caries, the pathobiology of caries may involve more complex communities of bacterial species. Molecular methods for bacterial identification and enumeration now make it possible to more precisely study the microbiota associated with dental caries. The purpose of this study was to compare the bacteria found in early childhood caries (ECC) to those found in caries-free children by using molecular identification methods. C...

  10. [Bacterial diseases of rape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, O M; Mel'nychuk, M D; Dankevych, L A; Patyka, V P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial destruction of the culture was described and its agents identified in the spring and winter rape crops. Typical symptoms are the following: browning of stem tissue and its mucilagization, chlorosis of leaves, yellowing and beginning of soft rot in the place of leaf stalks affixion to stems, loss of pigmentation (violet). Pathogenic properties of the collection strains and morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties of the agents of rape's bacterial diseases isolated by the authors have been investigated. It was found that all the isolates selected by the authors are highly or moderately aggressive towards different varieties of rape. According to the complex of phenotypic properties 44% of the total number of isolates selected by the authors are related to representatives of the genus Pseudomonas, 37% - to Xanthomonas and 19% - to Pectobacterium. PMID:23293826

  11. A lack of consensus in the literature findings on the removal of airborne benzene by houseplants: Effect of bacterial enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriprapat, Wararat; Strand, Stuart E.

    2016-04-01

    Removal rates of benzene and formaldehyde gas by houseplants reported by several laboratories varied by several orders of magnitude. We hypothesized that these variations were caused by differential responses of soil microbial populations to the high levels of pollutant used in the studies, and tested responses to benzene by plants and soils separately. Five houseplant species and tobacco were exposed to benzene under hydroponic conditions and the uptake rates compared. Among the test plants, Syngonium podophyllum and Chlorophytum comosum and Epipremnum aureum had the highest benzene removal rates. The effects of benzene addition on populations of soil bacteria were determined using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays targeting microbial genes involved in benzene degradation. The total bacterial population increased as shown by increases in the levels of eubacteria 16S rRNA, which was significantly higher in the high benzene incubations than in the low benzene incubations. Transcripts (mRNA) of genes encoding phenol monooxygenases, catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and the housekeeping gene rpoB increased in all soils incubated with high benzene concentrations. Therefore the enrichment of soils with benzene gas levels typical of experiments with houseplants in the literature artificially increased the levels of total soil bacterial populations, and especially the levels and activities of benzene-degrading bacteria.

  12. Supramolecular bacterial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    For nearly over a decade, a wide variety of dynamic and responsive supramolecular architectures have been investigated and developed to address biological systems. Since the non-covalent interactions between individual molecular components in such architectures are similar to the interactions found in living systems, it was possible to integrate chemically-synthesized and naturally-occurring components to create platforms with interesting bioactive properties. Bacterial cells and recombinant ...

  13. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references

  14. Understanding Population Health Terminology

    OpenAIRE

    Kindig, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Population health is a relatively new term, with no agreement about whether it refers to a concept of health or a field of study of health determinants. There is debate, sometimes heated, about whether population health and public health are identical or different. Discussions of population health involve many terms, such as outcomes, disparities, determinants, and risk factors, which may be used imprecisely, particularly across different disciplines, such as medicine, epidemiology, economics...

  15. Use of Quantitative 16S Ribosomal DNA Detection for Diagnosis of Central Vascular Catheter-Associated Bacterial Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Warwick, S.; Wilks, M; Hennessy, E.; Powell-Tuck, J; Small, M.; Sharp, J.; Millar, M R

    2004-01-01

    Many central vascular catheters (CVCs) are removed unnecessarily because current diagnostic methods for CVC-associated infection are unreliable. A quantitative PCR assay using primers and probe targeted to bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA was used to measure the levels of bacterial DNA in blood samples drawn through the CVC in a population of patients receiving intravenous nutrition. Bacterial DNA concentrations were raised in 16 of 16 blood samples taken during episodes of probable bacterial CVC-...

  16. Enumeration of microbial populations in radioactive environments by epifluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epifluorescence microscopy was utilized to enumerate halophilic bacterial populations in two studies involving inoculated, actual waste/brine mixtures and pure brine solutions. The studies include an initial set of experiments designed to elucidate potential transformations of actinide-containing wastes under salt-repository conditions, including microbially mediated changes. The first study included periodic enumeration of bacterial populations of a mixed inoculum initially added to a collection of test containers. The contents of the test containers are the different types of actual radioactive waste that could potentially be stored in nuclear waste repositories in a salt environment. The transuranic waste was generated from materials used in actinide laboratory research. The results show that cell numbers decreased with time. Sorption of the bacteria to solid surfaces in the test system is discussed as a possible mechanism for the decrease in cell numbers. The second study was designed to determine radiological and/or chemical effects of 239Pu, 243Am, 237Np, 232Th and 238U on the growth of pure and mixed anaerobic, denitrifying bacterial cultures in brine media. Pu, Am, and Np isotopes at concentrations of ≤1x10-6 M , ≤5x10-6 M and ≤5x10-4M respectively, and Th and U isotopes ≤4x10-3M were tested in these media. The results indicate that high concentrations of certain actinides affected both the bacterial growth rate and morphology. However, relatively minor effects from Am were observed at all tested concentrations with the pure culture

  17. Bacterial Succession in the Broiler Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjitkar, Samir; Lawley, Blair; Tannock, Gerald; Engberg, Ricarda M

    2016-04-15

    A feeding trial was performed with broilers receiving a diet of wheat-based feed (WBF), maize-based feed (MBF), or maize-based concentrates supplemented with 15% or 30% crimped kernel maize silage (CKMS-15 or CKMS-30, respectively). The aim of the study was to investigate the bacterial community compositions of the crop, gizzard, ileum, and cecum contents in relation to the feeding strategy and age (8, 15, 22, 25, 29, or 36 days). Among the four dietary treatments, bacterial diversity was analyzed for MBF and CKMS-30 by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Since the diets had no significant influence on bacterial diversity, data were pooled for downstream analysis. With increasing age, a clear succession of bacterial communities and increased bacterial diversity were observed.Lactobacillaceae(belonging mainly to the genusLactobacillus) represented most of theFirmicutesat all ages and in all segments of the gut except the cecum. The development of a "mature" microbiota in broilers occurred during the period from days 15 to 22. Striking increases in the relative abundances ofLactobacillus salivarius(17 to 36%) and clostridia (11 to 18%), and a concomitant decrease in the relative abundance ofLactobacillus reuteri, were found in the ileum after day 15. The concentration of deconjugated bile salts increased in association with the increased populations ofL. salivariusand clostridia. BothL. salivariusand clostridia deconjugate bile acids, and increases in the abundances of these bacteria might be associated with growth reduction and gastrointestinal (GI) disorders occurring in the critical period of broiler life between days 20 and 30. PMID:26873323

  18. Variabilidade espacial da comunidade bacteriana intestinal de suínos suplementados com antibióticos ou extratos herbais Spacial variability of intestinal bacterial population of swine supplemented with antimicrobial or herbal extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ayres Pedroso

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi conduzido para se avaliar o efeito da suplementação com antimicrobianos (associação de 50 ppm de colistina, 50 ppm de bacitracina de zinco e 50 ppm de olaquindox ou extratos herbais (à base de tomilho, cravo e orégano, na concentração de 0 ppm, 700 ppm, 1.400 ppm e 2.100 ppm sobre a comunidade de Bacteria do duodeno, jejuno, íleo e ceco de suínos com 56 dias de idade. Foi utilizada a técnica de eletroforese em gel de poliacrilamida com gradiente de desnaturação de amplicons da região V3 do rDNA 16S. O antibiótico e o extrato herbal proporcionaram diminuição na incidência de diarréia. O extrato herbal, em diferentes concentrações, proporcionou desempenho similar ao dos animais suplementados com antibiótico. O nível de 2.100 ppm de extrato herbal proporcionou melhor ganho de peso que os menores níveis testados. O número de amplicons detectados variou em função do segmento intestinal analisado e da suplementação com promotores de crescimento. Foi possível estabelecer relações entre o número de amplicons observados nos quatro segmentos do trato intestinal, suplementação adotada, o ganho de peso diário e a incidência de diarréia. As estruturas da comunidade de Bacteria do trato intestinal de suínos apresentaram maior similaridade em função do local de amostragem que em relação ao promotor de crescimento suplementado.This trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of antimicrobial supplementation (association of 50 ppm of colistin, 50 ppm of zinc bacitracin and 50 ppm of olaquindox or herbal extract (based on thyme, clove and oregano at levels of 0, 700, 1,400 and 2,100 ppm on Bacteria population of duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecum of swine at 56 days old. Denaturing gradient technique in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (DGGE of amplicons from 16S rDNA V3 region was used. The number of detected amplicons changed according to intestinal segment analyzed and supplementation with growth

  19. Moment-flux models for bacterial chemotaxis in large signal gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chuan; Yang, Xige

    2016-10-01

    Chemotaxis is a fundamental process in the life of many prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Chemotaxis of bacterial populations has been modeled by both individual-based stochastic models that take into account the biochemistry of intracellular signaling, and continuum PDE models that track the evolution of the cell density in space and time. Continuum models have been derived from individual-based models that describe intracellular signaling by a system of ODEs. The derivations rely on quasi-steady state approximations of the internal ODE system. While this assumption is valid if cell movement is subject to slowly changing signals, it is often violated if cells are exposed to rapidly changing signals. In the latter case current continuum models break down and do not match the underlying individual-based model quantitatively. In this paper, we derive new PDE models for bacterial chemotaxis in large signal gradients that involve not only the cell density and flux, but also moments of the intracellular signals as a measure of the deviation of cell's internal state from its steady state. The derivation is based on a new moment closure method without calling the quasi-steady state assumption of intracellular signaling. Numerical simulations suggest that the resulting model matches the population dynamics quantitatively for a much larger range of signals. PMID:26922437

  20. Towards a conceptual and operational union of bacterial systematics, ecology, and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Cohan, Frederick M

    2006-01-01

    To completely understand the ecology of a bacterial community, we need to identify its ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes). The greatest promise for enumerating a community's constituent ecotypes is held by molecular approaches that identify bacterial ecotypes as DNA sequence clusters. These approaches succeed when ecotypes correspond with sequence clusters, but some models of bacterial speciation predict a one-to-many and others a many-to-one relationship between ecotypes and sequen...

  1. Hydrocarbon pollutants shape bacterial community assembly of harbor sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Barbato, Marta

    2016-02-02

    Petroleum pollution results in co-contamination by different classes of molecules, entailing the occurrence of marine sediments difficult to remediate, as in the case of the Ancona harbor (Mediterranean Sea, Italy). Autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA), by exploiting the indigenous microbes of the environment to be treated, could represent a successful bioremediation strategy. In this perspective we aimed to i) identify the main drivers of the bacterial communities\\' richness in the sediments, ii) establish enrichment cultures with different hydrocarbon pollutants evaluating their effects on the bacterial communities\\' composition, and iii) obtain a collection of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria potentially exploitable in ABA. The correlation between the selection of different specialized bacterial populations and the type of pollutants was demonstrated by culture-independent analyses, and by establishing a collection of bacteria with different hydrocarbon degradation traits. Our observations indicate that pollution dictates the diversity of sediment bacterial communities and shapes the ABA potential in harbor sediments.

  2. Hydrocarbon pollutants shape bacterial community assembly of harbor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, Marta; Mapelli, Francesca; Magagnini, Mirko; Chouaia, Bessem; Armeni, Monica; Marasco, Ramona; Crotti, Elena; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2016-03-15

    Petroleum pollution results in co-contamination by different classes of molecules, entailing the occurrence of marine sediments difficult to remediate, as in the case of the Ancona harbor (Mediterranean Sea, Italy). Autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA), by exploiting the indigenous microbes of the environment to be treated, could represent a successful bioremediation strategy. In this perspective we aimed to i) identify the main drivers of the bacterial communities' richness in the sediments, ii) establish enrichment cultures with different hydrocarbon pollutants evaluating their effects on the bacterial communities' composition, and iii) obtain a collection of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria potentially exploitable in ABA. The correlation between the selection of different specialized bacterial populations and the type of pollutants was demonstrated by culture-independent analyses, and by establishing a collection of bacteria with different hydrocarbon degradation traits. Our observations indicate that pollution dictates the diversity of sediment bacterial communities and shapes the ABA potential in harbor sediments. PMID:26849913

  3. The Significance of Mutualistic Phages for Bacterial Ecology and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng, Nancy; Pratama, Akbar Adjie; Elsas, Jan Dirk van

    2016-06-01

    Bacteria and phages have traditionally been viewed as 'antagonists'. However, temperate phages can transfer genes, which can broaden their bacterial hosts' metabolic repertoire, confer or enhance virulence, or eliminate competing organisms, and so enhance bacterial fitness. Recent evidence shows that phages can also promote biofilm formation leading to population-level benefits for their bacterial hosts. Here, we provide a perspective on the ecological and evolutionary consequences for the bacteria interacting with phages, when phage and host interests are aligned. Furthermore, we examine the question whether bacterial hosts can lower immune barriers to phage infection, thereby facilitating infection by beneficial phages. Taking recent evidence together, we suggest that in many cases temperate phages are to be considered as being mutualistic as well as parasitic, at the same time. PMID:26826796

  4. Congestion management using adaptive bacterial foraging algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economical operation of power system is associated with many sub-problems. The electric market background makes the operation of system further complicated one. The congestion management problem can be devised as the emerging problem needs to concentrate much in order to supply power to the consumers in most reliable manner. In this paper we have tried to remove the congestion in the transmission line by generation rescheduling with the cost involved in the rescheduling process should be minimized. The adaptive bacterial foraging algorithm with Nelder-Mead (ABFNM) is used in this work to optimize the congestion cost. The results are also compared with the genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and simple bacterial foraging (SBF) algorithms. Numerical results for the standard IEEE 30 bus system having six generating units have been presented to demonstrate the performance of the algorithm.

  5. Gene expression analysis during cassava defense response to bacterial blight disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soto-Suárez Mauricio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cassava bacterial blight (CBB caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam is a destructive disease in the South América and África and yield losses range between 12 and 100%. Cytochemistry and biochemistry of defense response to CBB have been well studied. However, the response of the plant to pathogen attack at the molecular and cellular level remains uncharacterized. Identification of genes associated with defense responses is one of most critical steps leading to the elucidation of disease resistance mechanisms in cassava. In this study, we identified differentially expressed genes during pathogen attack by subtractive hybridization, using the Differential Subtraction Chain method (DSC. A population of cDNA obtained from infected plants was used as ";treatment"; and a population of cDNA obtained from healthy plants was used as ";control";. 1536 clones were isolated from the resistant varieties (MBRA 685 and SG 107-35. Of these, 110 randomly selected clones were sequenced and a homology search was conducted. The sequence analysis showed that 14 cDNA clones shared homology with plant genes involved in defense responses, 70 clones were either homologous to plant genes of unknown function or showed no homology, representing new genes potentially involved in cassava defense responses. A cDNA microarray was constructed by spotting the clones identified from our subtractive libraries. Other clones potentially involved in cassava defense responses were also included. The cassava defense cDNA microarray was used to confirm the differential expression of the clones. Keywords: cassava, bacterial blight, gene expression, subtractive library, microarrays.

  6. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria and Bacterial Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2015-10-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is very common. In healthy women, asymptomatic bacteriuria increases with age, from asymptomatic bacteriuria, irrespective of age or gender. The prevalence is very high in residents of long-term-care facilities, from 25% to 50% of women and 15% to 40% of men. Escherichia coli is the most frequent organism isolated, but a wide variety of other organisms may occur. Bacteriuria may be transient or persist for a prolonged period. Pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria identified in early pregnancy and who are untreated have a risk of pyelonephritis later in pregnancy of 20% to 30%. Bacteremia is frequent in bacteriuric subjects following mucosal trauma with bleeding, with 5% to 10% of patients developing severe sepsis or septic shock. These two groups with clear evidence of negative outcomes should be screened for bacteriuria and appropriately treated. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in other populations is benign and screening and treatment are not indicated. Antimicrobial treatment has no benefits but is associated with negative outcomes including reinfection with antimicrobial resistant organisms and a short-term increased frequency of symptomatic infection post-treatment. The observation of increased symptomatic infection post-treatment, however, has led to active investigation of bacterial interference as a strategy to prevent symptomatic episodes in selected high risk patients. PMID:26542046

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Prokopjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to assess its efficacy. Hemogram, serum fibrinogen, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes (CIC, C-reactive protein levels were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL 1(3, IL6 and neopterin concentrations were examined by immune-enzyme assay in a part of pts. Typical clinical features of Cl were present in only 28 (60,9% pts. 13 (28,3% pts had fever, 12 (26,0% — leukocytosis, 15 (32,6% — changes of leucocyte populations. Some laboratory measures (thrombocytes, fibrinogen, CIC, neopterin levels significantly decreased (p<0,05 after infection focus sanation without correction of disease modifying therapy. Cl quite often develop as asymptomatic processes most often in pts with high activity and can induce disturbances promoting appearance of endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and reduction of life duration. So timely detection and proper sanation of infection focuses should be performed in pts with RA

  8. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    This PhD project was carried out as part of the Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) project, funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant number 2104-08-0012). The environment is contaminated with various xenobiotic compounds e.g. pesticides......D student, to construct fungal-bacterial consortia in order to potentially stimulate pesticide degradation thereby increasing the chance of successful bioaugmentation. The results of the project are reported in three article manuscripts, included in this thesis. In manuscript I, the mineralization of 2...

  9. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  10. Bacterial diseases of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    be divided into either a deep or a superficial type. In the superficial type, the pustule is located at the opening of the hair follicle. In the deep form, the infection may extend beyond the confines of the hair follicle, becoming a furuncle or boil. Carbuncles are aggregates of interconnected furuncles that drain through multiple openings of the skin. Treatment of folliculitis must include searching for and avoiding any factors predisposing to infection. If topical antibiotic therapy is ineffective in controlling the infection, surgical drainage of the infected skin abscess will be necessary. Paronychia is the most common bacterial infection of the hand, which often requires surgical incisional drainage. Similarly, a felon that is an infection of the distal pulp of a finger usually requires surgical drainage. Finally, cellulitis is an acute inflammatory reaction involving the skin and underlying subcutaneous tissue. It usually starts as erysipelas and may advance to lymphangitis, lymphadenitis, or gangrene,which will respond to life-saving interventions in the hospital that usually include systemic antibiotic treatment as well as surgical intervention. PMID:16218899

  11. Associations of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A level with essential hypertension and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy in Chinese population: a meta-analysis of 20 research studies involving 3332 individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Gaojun; Zhang, Bifeng; Weng, Weijin; Yang, Liping; Shi, Ganwei; Xue, Sheliang; Fu, Xingli

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the associations between serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) level, and essential hypertension (EH) and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP) in Chinese population. Methods Pertinent studies were independently searched in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), Wanfang databases and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). The standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% CIs was used to estimate the size of the effec...

  12. Population geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, A

    1994-03-01

    Population geographers are involved in contemporary policy issues, the production of quality work, and successful communication of research findings. This article reviewed some contributions population geographers have made to the understanding of the geographic impact of aging and the consequences of migration. Geographers have come late to the study of aging and have focused primarily on four main policy issues: 1) fertility decline, 2) housing demography, 3) aged patterns of housing and migration, and 4) government policy. Fertility decline research has highlighted information diffusion theories for fertility decline by researchers such as Zelinsky, Skeldon, and Noin. Changes in attitudes and the removal on constraints has been examined by Woods. Residential mobility studies have been the focus of researchers such as Gober, Moore, and Clark, and Myers. Regional labor markets and the movement of the "baby boom" through the life course have been examined by Miron, Plane and Rogerson, and Clout, who studied the empty nesters and the movement out of suburbia. Private residential housing has increased for the elderly in England and Wales (Hamnett and Mullings), and seasonal migration of Minnesotans results in lost sales revenues and high health and social costs for those too ill to travel (Craig). Geographers have not accomplished a significant thrust into the literature on demographic aging. Contributions to the transnational and international literature have resulted in internal migration studies by Clout on "counterurbanization" in northwestern industrial Europe, while Fielding, Baltensperger, Marchand and Scott, and Jones have examined the continuing rural-urban migration. The loss of urban population has been associated with inner city problems, the impact of labor supply and market demand, and the revenue and health care consequences in the work of Champion, Gibson, and Champion and Illeris, and Craig. Impacts are felt differently by geographic location, and

  13. The enzymes of bacterial census and censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Walter; Tipton, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    N-Acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are a major class of quorum-sensing signals used by Gram-negative bacteria to regulate gene expression in a population-dependent manner, thereby enabling group behavior. Enzymes capable of generating and catabolizing AHL signals are of significant interest for the study of microbial ecology and quorum-sensing pathways, for understanding the systems that bacteria have evolved to interact with small-molecule signals, and for their possible use in therapeutic and industrial applications. The recent structural and functional studies reviewed here provide a detailed insight into the chemistry and enzymology of bacterial communication. PMID:22099187

  14. Bacterial contamination of enteral diets.

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, I H; Vandewoude, M F

    1986-01-01

    Enteral feeding solutions can be contaminated by bacterial micro-organisms already present in the ingredients, or introduced during preparation or transport, or in the hospital ward. During jejunostomy feeding without pump or filter, ascending bacterial invasion of the feeding bag is possible. In patients with lowered immune response contaminated feedings can cause serious septic clinical problems. The progressive loss of the nutritional value of the enteral feeding solution by bacterial cont...

  15. Transport powered by bacterial turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peshkov, Anton; Sokolov, Andrey; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that collective turbulent-like motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. In our experiments and simulations, a microwedge-like "bulldozer" draws energy from a bacterial bath of varied density. We obtain that a maximal transport speed is achieved in the turbulent state of the bacterial suspension. This apparent rectification of random motion of bacteria is caused by polar ordered bacteria inside the cusp regi...

  16. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anastasios Koulaouzidis; Shivaram Bhat; Athar A Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Since its initial description in 1964, research has transformed spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) from a feared disease (with reported mortality of 90%) to a treatable complication of decompensated cirrhosis,albeit with steady prevalence and a high recurrence rate. Bacterial translocation, the key mechanism in the pathogenesis of SBP, is only possible because of the concurrent failure of defensive mechanisms in cirrhosis.Variants of SBP should be treated. Leucocyte esterase reagent strips have managed to shorten the 'tap-toshot' time, while future studies should look into their combined use with ascitic fluid pH. Third generation cephalosporins are the antibiotic of choice because they have a number of advantages. Renal dysfunction has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with SBP. Albumin is felt to reduce the risk of renal impairment by improving effective intravascular volume, and by helping to bind proinflammatory molecules. Following a single episode of SBP, patients should have long-term antibiotic prophylaxis and be considered for liver transplantation.

  17. Single Cell Analysis of a Bacterial Sender-Receiver System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Tiago; Meyer, Andrea; Mückl, Andrea; Kapsner, Korbinian; Gerland, Ulrich; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression dynamics on the single cell level provides important information on cellular heterogeneity and stochasticity, and potentially allows for more accurate quantitation of gene expression processes. We here study bacterial senders and receivers genetically engineered with components of the quorum sensing system derived from Aliivibrio fischeri on the single cell level using microfluidics-based bacterial chemostats and fluorescence video microscopy. We track large numbers of bacteria over extended periods of time, which allows us to determine bacterial lineages and filter out subpopulations within a heterogeneous population. We quantitatively determine the dynamic gene expression response of receiver bacteria to varying amounts of the quorum sensing inducer N-3-oxo-C6-homoserine lactone (AHL). From this we construct AHL response curves and characterize gene expression dynamics of whole bacterial populations by investigating the statistical distribution of gene expression activity over time. The bacteria are found to display heterogeneous induction behavior within the population. We therefore also characterize gene expression in a homogeneous bacterial subpopulation by focusing on single cell trajectories derived only from bacteria with similar induction behavior. The response at the single cell level is found to be more cooperative than that obtained for the heterogeneous total population. For the analysis of systems containing both AHL senders and receiver cells, we utilize the receiver cells as 'bacterial sensors' for AHL. Based on a simple gene expression model and the response curves obtained in receiver-only experiments, the effective AHL concentration established by the senders and their 'sending power' is determined. PMID:26808777

  18. BACTERIAL FLORA OF RAINBOW TROUT LARVAE AND FRY (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Kapetanović

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available There are no information in available literature about the structure of bacterial flora in rainbow trout larvae and fry in the first days of their lives. The objective of our work has been to follow bacteroflora between the third and the eighth week of their lives. During 35 days of experiment bacteroflora of rainbow trout has been examined, along with following physico–chemical characteristics of water quality as well as it’s influence on health. Samples for bacteriological examination were taken from gill, heart and kidney areas and innoculated on the plates. Bacterial colonies were examined macroscopically, slides with Gram staining, and afterwords biochemical tests were performed. For identification, APILAB Plus programme (bio Mérieux, France was used. Bacterial population of rainbow trout larvae and fry changed in dependence with their age. Physico–chemical characteristics of water ranged within optimal values. Most of bacterial colonies originated from gill isolates (64,4 %, than from heart (21,8 % and kidney areas (13,8 %. The bacterial flora of larvae in incubator was composed mostly of Gram–positive bacteria (75,1 %, genera: Renibacterium (25 %, Lactobacillus (16,7 %, Staphilococcus (16,7 % and Corynebacterium (16,7 %. The transfer of larvae from incubator into the pools resulted in reducing bacterial flora (–66,7 % after 45 minute stay in the pool. Gram–negative bacteria, which have been represented in larvae in incubator with low percent (24, 9 %, after the transfer of larvae to the pools became dominant and represented more than 95 % of rainbow trout larvae and fry bacterial flora. Flavobacterium, Acinetobacter and Yersinia were the predominant Gram–negative genera in larvae in incubator, whereas Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Pasteurella were the main isolates from rainbow trout larvae and fry until the end of experiment. Bacterial flora of larvae in incubator mostly consists of Gram–positive bacteria

  19. Periodic growth of bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Takemasa; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Hiramatsu, Fumiko; Kobayashi, Naoki; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Kurosu, Sayuri; Nakatsuchi, Michio; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2005-06-01

    The formation of concentric ring colonies by bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Proteus mirabilis has been investigated experimentally, focusing our attention on the dependence of local cell density upon the bacterial motility. It has been confirmed that these concentric ring colonies reflect the periodic change of the bacterial motility between motile cell state and immotile cell state. We conclude that this periodic change is macroscopically determined neither by biological factors (i.e., biological clock) nor by chemical factors (chemotaxis as inhibitor). And our experimental results strongly suggest that the essential factor for the change of the bacterial motility during concentric ring formation is the local cell density.

  20. Stimulation of bacterial DNA synthesis by algal exudates in attached algal-bacterial consortia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algal-bacterial consortia attached to polystyrene surfaces were prepared in the laboratory by using the marine diatom Amphora coffeaeformis and the marine bacterium Vibrio proteolytica (the approved name of this bacterium is Vibrio proteolyticus. The organisms were attached to the surfaces at cell densities of approximately 5 x 104 cells cm-2 (diatoms) and 5 x 106 cells cm-2 (bacteria). The algal-bacterial consortia consistently exhibited higher rates of [3H]thymidine incorporation than did biofilms composed solely of bacteria. The rates of [3H]thymidine incorporation by the algal-bacterial consortia were fourfold greater than the rates of incorporation by monobacterial biofilms 16 h after biofilm formation and were 16-fold greater 70 h after biofilm formation. Extracellular material released from the attached Amphora cells supported rates of bacterial activity (0.8 x 10-21 mol to 17.9 x 10-21 mol of [3H]thymidine incorporated cell -1 h-1) and growth (doubling time, 29.5 to 1.4 days) comparable to values reported for a wide variety of marine and freshwater ecosystems. In the presence of sessile diatom populations, DNA synthesis by attached V. proteolytica cells was light dependent and increased with increasing algal abundance. The metabolic activity of diatoms thus appears to be the rate-limiting process in biofilm development on illuminated surfaces under conditions of low bulk-water dissolved organic carbon

  1. Microbial Population Differentials between Mucosal and Submucosal Intestinal Tissues in Advanced Crohn's Disease of the Ileum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrick J Chiodini

    Full Text Available Since Crohn's disease is a transmural disease, we hypothesized that examination of deep submucosal tissues directly involved in the inflammatory disease process may provide unique insights into bacterial populations transgressing intestinal barriers and bacterial populations more representative of the causes and agents of the disease. We performed deep 16s microbiota sequencing on isolated ilea mucosal and submucosal tissues on 20 patients with Crohn's disease and 15 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with a depth of coverage averaging 81,500 sequences in each of the 70 DNA samples yielding an overall resolution down to 0.0001% of the bacterial population. Of the 4,802,328 total sequences generated, 98.9% or 4,749,183 sequences aligned with the Kingdom Bacteria that clustered into 8545 unique sequences with <3% divergence or operational taxonomic units enabling the identification of 401 genera and 698 tentative bacterial species. There were significant differences in all taxonomic levels between the submucosal microbiota in Crohn's disease compared to controls, including organisms of the Order Desulfovibrionales that were present within the submucosal tissues of most Crohn's disease patients but absent in the control group. A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp. In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp. This is the first study to examine the microbial populations within submucosal tissues of patients with Crohn's disease and to compare microbial communities found deep within the submucosal tissues with those present on mucosal surfaces. Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem

  2. Orally administered bovine lactoferrin inhibits bacterial translocation in mice fed bovine milk.

    OpenAIRE

    Teraguchi, S.; Shin, K.; Ogata, T; Kingaku, M; Kaino, A; Miyauchi, H; Fukuwatari, Y; Shimamura, S

    1995-01-01

    Feeding of bovine milk to mice induced a high incidence of bacterial translocation from the intestines to the mesenteric lymph nodes, and the bacteria involved were mainly members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Supplementation of the milk diet with bovine lactoferrin or a pepsin-generated hydrolysate of bovine lactoferrin resulted in significant suppression of bacterial translocation. Our findings suggest that this ability of lactoferrin to inhibit bacterial translocation may be due to its...

  3. Advances in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eBeare

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These bacteria include Chlamydia spp., which causes millions of cases of sexually transmitted disease and blinding trachoma annually, and members of the α-proteobacterial genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Orientia and Rickettsia, agents of serious human illnesses including epidemic typhus. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of human Q fever, has also been considered a prototypical obligate intracellular bacterium, but recent host cell-free (axenic growth has rescued it from obligatism. The historic genetic intractability of obligate intracellular bacteria has severely limited molecular dissection of their unique lifestyles and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Host cell restricted growth is a significant barrier to genetic transformation that can make simple procedures for free-living bacteria, such as cloning, exceedingly difficult. Low transformation efficiency requiring long term culture in host cells to expand small transformant populations is another obstacle. Despite numerous technical limitations, the last decade has witnessed significant gains in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacteria including allelic exchange. Continued development of genetic tools should soon enable routine mutation and complementation strategies for virulence factor discovery and stimulate renewed interest in these refractory pathogens. In this review, we discuss the technical challenges associated with genetic transformation of obligate intracellular bacteria and highlight advances made with individual genera.

  4. Function and modulation of bacterial porins: insights from electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcour, A H

    1997-06-15

    Electrophysiological techniques provide a wealth of information regarding the molecular mechanisms that underlie the function and modulation of ion channels. They have revealed that bacterial porins do not behave as static, permanently open pores but display a much more complex and dynamic behavior than anticipated from non-electrophysiological studies. The channels switch between short-lived open and closed conformations (gating activity), and can also remain in an inactivated, non-ion conducting state for prolonged periods of time. Thus the role of porins is not limited to that of a molecular filter, but is extended to the control of outer membrane permeability through the regulation of their activity. Electrophysiological studies have indeed demonstrated that both gating and inactivation are modulated by a variety of physical and chemical parameters and are highly cooperative phenomena, often involving numerous channels working in concert. Cooperativity acts as an amplification mechanism that grants a large population of porins, such as found in the outer membrane, with sensitivity to modulation by external or internal factors. By conferring permeability properties to the outer membrane, porins play a crucial role in the bacterium's antibiotic susceptibility and survival in various environmental conditions. The detailed information that electrophysiology only can provide on porin function and modulation promises to yield a more accurate description of how porin properties can be used by cells to adapt to a changing environment, and to offer mechanisms that might optimize the drug sensitivity of the microorganism. PMID:9228742

  5. Antagonistic interactions are sufficient to explain self-assemblage of bacterial communities in a homogeneous environment: a computational modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román eZapién-Campos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies in Ecology have been devoted to analyzing the effects the environment has on individuals, populations, and communities, thus neglecting the effects of biotic interactions on the system dynamics. In the present work we study the structure of bacterial communities in the oligotrophic shallow water system of Churince, Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico. Since the physicochemical conditions of this water system are homogeneous and quite stable in time, it is an excellent candidate to study how biotic factors influence the structure of bacterial communities. In a previous study, the binary antagonistic interactions of 78 bacterial strains, isolated from Churince, were experimentally determined. We employ these data to develop a computer algorithm to simulate growth experiments in a cellular grid representing the pond. Remarkably, in our model, the dynamics of all the simulated bacterial populations is determined solely by antagonistic interactions. Our results indicate that all bacterial strains (even those that are antagonized by many other bacteria survive in the long term, and that the underlying mechanism is the formation of bacterial community patches. Patches corresponding to less antagonistic and highly susceptible strains are consistently isolated from the highly-antagonistic bacterial colonies by patches of neutral strains. These results concur with the observed features of the bacterial community structure previously reported. Finally, we study how our findings depend on factors like initial population size, differential population growth rates, homogeneous population death rates, and enhanced bacterial diffusion.

  6. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  7. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...... the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the...... benefits and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial...

  8. The physical basis of bacterial quorum communication

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book aims to educate physical scientists and quantitatively-oriented biologists on the application of physical experimentation and analysis, together with appropriate modeling, to understanding and interpreting microbial chemical communication and especially quorum sensing (QS). Quorum sensing describes a chemical communication behavior that is nearly universal among bacteria. Individual cells release a diffusible small molecule (an autoinducer) into their environment. A high concentration of this autoinducer serves as a signal of high population density, triggering new patterns of gene expression throughout the population. However QS is often much more complex than simple census-taking. Many QS bacteria produce and detect multiple autoinducers, which generate quorum signal cross talk with each other and with other bacterial species. QS gene regulatory networks operate in physically complex environments and respond to a range of inputs in addition to autoinducer signals. While many individual QS systems ...

  9. Bacterial assemblages in rivers and billabongs of Southeastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, P I

    1991-12-01

    Billabongs, lentic waterbodies common to the floodplain of Australian rivers, differ considerably from the lotic riverine environment in terms of hydrology, physiochemical characteristics, and biological assemblages present. As little is known regarding the bacterial ecology of billabong habitats, a comparison was made of the bacterial assemblages in the water column of seven paired river/billabong sites in the Murray-Darling Basin of southeastern Australia. Billabongs supported larger populations of bacteria (1-157×10(9) cells liter(-1); 11-10,270 μg C liter(-1)) than did rivers (1-10×10(9) cells liter(-1); 6-143 μg C liter(-1)). Phospholipid analyses confirmed that billabongs (14-111 μg phospholipid fatty acid liter(-1)) had larger bacterial populations than rivers (billabongs (0.28-3.05 μg C liter(-1) hour(-1)) than rivers (0.05-0.62 μg C liter(-1) hour(-1)). Production calculated from the frequency of dividing cells confirmed this conclusion, and suggested bacterial production in some billabongs could exceed 100 μg C liter(-1) hour(-1). An INT-formazan method indicated that usually billabongs, and the cell-specific activity greater for billabong than river assemblages. The factors most likely to be responsible for the differences between the bacterial assemblages in rivers and billabongs relate to hydrological regime and the availability of organic carbon substrates. PMID:24194324

  10. Corruption of Innate Immunity by Bacterial Proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host’s innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections. PMID:19756242

  11. Bacterial interactions in pathogenic subgingival plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hong Min; Kin, Lin Xin; Dashper, Stuart G; Slakeski, Nada; Butler, Catherine A; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-05-01

    Chronic periodontitis has a polymicrobial biofilm aetiology. Polymicrobial biofilms are complex, dynamic microbial communities formed by two or more bacterial species that are important for the persistence and proliferation of participating microbes in the environment. Interspecies adherence, which often involves bacterial surface-associated molecules, and communications are essential in the spatial and temporal development of a polymicrobial biofilm, which in turn is necessary for the overall fitness of a well-organized multispecies biofilm community. In the oral cavity, interactions between key oral bacterial species, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, are essential for the progression of chronic periodontitis. In vivo, P. gingivalis and T. denticola are frequently found to co-exist in deep periodontal pockets and have been co-localized to the superficial layers of subgingival plaque as microcolony blooms adjacent to the pocket epithelium, suggesting possible interbacterial interactions that contribute towards disease. The motility and chemotactic ability of T. denticola, although not considered as classic virulence factors, are likely to be important in the synergistic biofilm formation with P. gingivalis. In vitro, P. gingivalis and T. denticola display a symbiotic relationship in nutrient utilization and growth promotion. Together these data suggest there is an intimate relationship between these two species that has evolved to enhance their survival and virulence. PMID:26541672

  12. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  13. Resonant activation: a strategy against bacterial persistence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bacterial colony may develop a small number of cells genetically identical to, but phenotypically different from, other normally growing bacteria. These so-called persister cells keep themselves in a dormant state and thus are insensitive to antibiotic treatment, resulting in serious problems of drug resistance. In this paper, we proposed a novel strategy to 'kill' persister cells by triggering them to switch, in a fast and synchronized way, into normally growing cells that are susceptible to antibiotics. The strategy is based on resonant activation (RA), a well-studied phenomenon in physics where the internal noise of a system can constructively facilitate fast and synchronized barrier crossings. Through stochastic Gilliespie simulation with a generic toggle switch model, we demonstrated that RA exists in the phenotypic switching of a single bacterium. Further, by coupling single cell level and population level simulations, we showed that with RA, one can greatly reduce the time and total amount of antibiotics needed to sterilize a bacterial population. We suggest that resonant activation is a general phenomenon in phenotypic transition, and can find other applications such as cancer therapy

  14. Multisystem involvement in neuromyelitis optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M Langille

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of pediatric neuromyelitis optica (NMO with muscle and lung involvement in addition to central nervous system disease. Our patient initially presented with features of area postrema syndrome, then subsequently with optic neuritis. The patient also had recurrent hyperCKemia that responded to corticosteroids. Finally, axillary and hilar adenopathy with pulmonary consolidation were noted as well and responded to immunomodulation. Our case highlights multisystem involvement in NMO including non-infectious pulmonary findings which have not been described in the pediatric population previously.

  15. The social structure of microbial community involved in colonization resistance

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xuesong; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Guo, Lihong; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that host-associated microbial communities can interfere with the colonization and establishment of microbes of foreign origins, a phenomenon often referred to as bacterial interference or colonization resistance. However, due to the complexity of the indigenous microbiota, it has been extremely difficult to elucidate the community colonization resistance mechanisms and identify the bacterial species involved. In a recent study, we have established an in vitro mice oral...

  16. Characteristics of phylogenetic diversity in airborne bacterial populations in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Zahra; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Martins, J. V.

    2011-05-01

    Considering their potential implications for human health, agricultural productivity, and ecosystem stability, surprisingly little is known about the composition or dynamics of the atmosphere's biological aerosols. The few studies that have examined phylogenetic diversity in China focused on a single sampling period, whereas this study spans 3 months and includes over 300 samples. The 300+ samples were categorized by month and direction of their back-trajectory. DNA extraction was carried out on the pooled samples in a quantitative manner to allow for comparison between the amount of extracted material and the amount of initial total aerosol mass. Within an individual month, samples originating from similar land types and approximately equidistant to the sampling location exhibited similar diversity, whereas samples originating from much greater distances and from different land types included phyla unique to that location. Phyla from the same origin also varied from one month to the next. The biological diversity found from the Phylochips reinforces the hypothesis that air samples carry a biological record of their history.

  17. Genetic drift suppresses bacterial conjugation in spatially structured populations

    OpenAIRE

    Freese, Peter D.; Korolev, Kirill S.; Jiménez, José I.; Chen, Irene A.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugation is the primary mechanism of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Although conjugation normally occurs in surface-associated growth (e.g., biofilms), it has been traditionally studied in well-mixed liquid cultures lacking spatial structure, which is known to affect many evolutionary and ecological processes. Here we visualize spatial patterns of gene transfer mediated by F plasmid conjugation in a colony of Escherichia coli growing on solid ag...

  18. Genetic Drift Suppresses Bacterial Conjugation in Spatially Structured Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Peter D.; Korolev, Kirill S.; Jiménez, José I.; Chen, Irene A.

    2014-02-01

    Conjugation is the primary mechanism of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Although conjugation normally occurs in surface-associated growth (e.g., biofilms), it has been traditionally studied in well-mixed liquid cultures lacking spatial structure, which is known to affect many evolutionary and ecological processes. Here we visualize spatial patterns of gene transfer mediated by F plasmid conjugation in a colony of Escherichia coli growing on solid agar, and we develop a quantitative understanding by spatial extension of traditional mass-action models. We found that spatial structure suppresses conjugation in surface-associated growth because strong genetic drift leads to spatial isolation of donor and recipient cells, restricting conjugation to rare boundaries between donor and recipient strains. These results suggest that ecological strategies, such as enforcement of spatial structure and enhancement of genetic drift, could complement molecular strategies in slowing the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  19. Coexistence among Epiphytic Bacterial Populations Mediated through Nutritional Resource Partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Mark; Lindow, Steven E.

    1994-01-01

    The levels of coexistence between Pseudomonas syringae and various nonpathogenic epiphytic species in the phyllosphere of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) were assessed by using replacement series. The epiphytic species Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pantoea agglomerans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Methylobacterium organophilum were all capable of exhibiting higher levels of coexistence with P. syringae than was observed with a near-isogenic P. syringae strain pair. The ecological similarity of the...

  20. Enthalpy of interaction between coaggregating and non-coaggregating oral bacterials pairs - a microcalorimetric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postollec, F.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and coaggregation are involved in the development of oral biofilms, called dental plaque. Although various techniques have already been used to study different aspects of these bacterial interactions, microcalorimetry has not yet been applied. This paper describes how isothermal r

  1. Enthalpy of interaction between coaggregating and non-coaggregating oral bacterial pairs - a microcalorimetric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postollec, F; Norde, W; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and coaggregation are involved in the development of oral biofilms, called dental plaque. Although various techniques have already been used to study different aspects of these bacterial interactions, microcalorimetry has not yet been applied. This paper describes how isothermal r

  2. Assessment of bacterial and structural dynamics in aerobic granular biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Weissbrodt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic granular sludge is based on self-granulated flocs forming mobile biofilms with a gel-like consistence. Bacterial and structural dynamics from flocs to granules were followed in anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors fed with synthetic wastewater, namely a bubble column (BC-SBR operated under wash-out conditions for fast granulation, and two stirred-tank enrichments of Accumulibacter (PAO-SBR and Competibacter (GAO-SBR operated at steady-state. In the BC-SBR, granules formed within two weeks by swelling of Zoogloea colonies around flocs, developing subsequently smooth zoogloeal biofilms. However, Zoogloea predominance (37-79% led to deteriorated nutrient removal during the first months of reactor operation. Upon maturation, improved nitrification (80-100%, nitrogen removal (43-83%, and high but unstable dephosphatation (75-100% were obtained. Proliferation of dense clusters of nitrifiers, Accumulibacter, and Competibacter from granule cores outwards resulted in heterogeneous bioaggregates, inside which only low abundance Zoogloea (<5% were detected in biofilm interstices. The presence of different extracellular glycoconjugates detected by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis showed the complex nature of the intracellular matrix of these granules. In the PAO-SBR, granulation occurred within two months with abundant and active Accumulibacter populations (56±10% that were selected under full anaerobic uptake of volatile fatty acids and that aggregated as dense clusters within heterogeneous granules. Flocs self-granulated in the GAO-SBR after 480 days during a period of over-aeration caused by biofilm growth on the oxygen sensor. Granules were dominated by heterogeneous clusters of Competibacter (37±11%. Zoogloea were never abundant in biomass of both PAO- and GAO-SBRs. This study showed that Zoogloea, Accumulibacter, and Competibacter affiliates can form granules, and that the granulation mechanisms rely on the dominant population

  3. Efecto de la adición de materia orgánica sobre la dinámica poblacional bacteriana del suelo en cultivos de papa y maíz Effect of addition of organic matter on bacterial population dynamics of soil in potato and corn crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David García Ventocilla

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Se determinó el efecto de la fertilización orgánica sobre las poblaciones bacterianas del suelo en cultivos de papa y maíz durante la campaña agrícola 2008-2009 en terrenos de cuatro localidades del Valle del Mantaro: INIA Santa Ana (Huancayo, en la EEA El Mantaro (Jauja, Vista Alegre y Huayao (ambos en Chupaca. En estos lugares se instalaron parcelas experimentales de papa (Solanum tuberosum L. Var. Canchan y maíz (Zea maíz L. Var. Cusco mejorado bajo abonamiento orgánico (vacuno, ovino, cuy, fertilización química y sin fertilización alguna (testigo. Para dicho efecto se empleó las técnicas de la Electroforesis en Gel de Gradiente Desnaturalizante (DGGE con amplificación de la región 968 – 1401 del rDNA 16S. Los resultados obtenidos muestran que la variabilidad de las poblaciones bacterianas en los suelos está afectado directamente por el tipo de cultivo mas no por el tipo de fertilización ya que el efecto de este último resulta variable para cada zona experimental y cultivo encontrándose solo en la zona experimental de Chupaca - Maíz una segregación de los tratamientos con fertilización orgánica de los tratamientos químicos. También se ha encontrado que la variación de las comunidades microbianas no sufre variaciones significativas en los suelos con cultivos de maíz obteniéndose coeficientes de similaridad para todos los tratamientos por encima del 80% mientras que para los tratamientos en los cultivos de papa dicho coeficiente fue de tan solo del 60%.The effect of organic fertilization on soil bacterial populations in potato and corn crops during the crop season 2008-2009 at four sites in the Mantaro Valley locations: INIA Santa Ana (Huancayo, the EEA El Mantaro (Jauja, Vista Alegre and Huayao (both in Chupaca. In these places were set up experimental plots of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. var. Canchan and corn (Zea maize L. Var. Cusco enhanced under organic manure (cattle, sheep, guinea pig, chemical fertilizer

  4. Mutation breeding of rice for bacterial leaf-blight resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seedlings of controls and of M2 generation originating from the irradiation treatment of seeds of four rice varieties with thermal neutrons, 60Co gamme-ray, ethylene-imine (EI), were inoculated with some isolates of Xanthomonas oryzae. The variability of the disease reaction in the populations arising from irradiation and chemical treatment increased both resistance and susceptibility compared with the control average, irrespective of chlorophyll mutations in M2. The increased variability was assumed to be due to polygenic mutations giving both germ types more resistance and more susceptibility to bacterial leaf blight. The value of the induced polygenic mutations in resistance breeding for bacterial leaf blight is briefly discussed. (author)

  5. Bacterial communities of two parthenogenetic aphid species cocolonizing two host plants across the Hawaiian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan T; Bressan, Alberto; Greenwell, April M; Fierer, Noah

    2011-12-01

    Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) have been the focus of several studies with respect to their interactions with inherited symbionts, but bacterial communities of most aphid species are still poorly characterized. In this research, we used bar-coded pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities in aphids. Specifically, we examined the diversity of bacteria in two obligately parthenogenetic aphid species (the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii, and the cardamom aphid, Pentalonia caladii) cocolonizing two plant species (taro, Colocasia esculenta, and ginger, Alpinia purpurata) across four Hawaiian Islands (Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Oahu). Results from this study revealed that heritable symbionts dominated the bacterial communities for both aphid species. The bacterial communities differed significantly between the two species, and A. gossypii harbored a more diverse bacterial community than P. caladii. The bacterial communities also differed across aphid populations sampled from the different islands; however, communities did not differ between aphids collected from the two host plants. PMID:21965398

  6. Increased Bacterial Load and Expression of Antimicrobial Peptides in Skin of Barrier-Deficient Mice with Reduced Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuga, Ken; Cipolat, Sara; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-01-01

    Mice lacking three epidermal barrier proteins-envoplakin, periplakin, and involucrin (EPI-/- mice)-have a defective cornified layer, reduced epidermal γδ T cells, and increased dermal CD4(+) T cells. They are also resistant to developing skin tumors. The tumor-protective mechanism involves signaling between Rae-1 expressing keratinocytes and the natural killer group 2D receptor on immune cells, which also plays a role in host defenses against infection. Given the emerging link between bacteria and cancer, we investigated whether EPI-/- mice have an altered skin microbiota. The bacterial phyla were similar in wild-type and EPI-/- skin. However, bacteria were threefold more abundant in EPI-/- skin and penetrated deeper into the epidermis. The major epithelial defense mechanism against bacteria is production of antimicrobial proteins (AMPs). EPI-/- skin exhibited enhanced expression of antimicrobial peptides. However, reducing the bacterial load by antibiotic treatment or breeding mice under specific pathogen-free conditions did not reduce AMP expression or alleviate the abnormalities in T-cell populations. We conclude that the atopic characteristics of EPI-/- skin are a consequence of the defective barrier rather than a response to the increased bacterial load. It is therefore unlikely that the increase in skin microbiota contributes directly to the observed cancer resistance. PMID:26763429

  7. Mechanism of fusidic acid inhibition of RRF- and EF-G-dependent splitting of the bacterial post-termination ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Anneli; Pavlov, Michael; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2016-04-20

    The antibiotic drug fusidic acid (FA) is commonly used in the clinic against gram-positive bacterial infections. FA targets ribosome-bound elongation factor G (EF-G), a translational GTPase that accelerates both messenger RNA (mRNA) translocation and ribosome recycling. How FA inhibits translocation was recently clarified, but FA inhibition of ribosome recycling by EF-G and ribosome recycling factor (RRF) has remained obscure. Here we use fast kinetics techniques to estimate mean times of ribosome splitting and the stoichiometry of GTP hydrolysis by EF-G at varying concentrations of FA, EF-G and RRF. These mean times together with previous data on uninhibited ribosome recycling were used to clarify the mechanism of FA inhibition of ribosome splitting. The biochemical data on FA inhibition of translocation and recycling were used to model the growth inhibitory effect of FA on bacterial populations. We conclude that FA inhibition of translocation provides the dominant cause of bacterial growth reduction, but that FA inhibition of ribosome recycling may contribute significantly to FA-induced expression of short regulatory open reading frames, like those involved in FA resistance. PMID:27001509

  8. Cultivation and qPCR Detection of Pathogenic and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacterial Establishment in Naive Broiler Houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J P; McLaughlin, M R; Adeli, A; Miles, D M

    2016-05-01

    Conventional commercial broiler production involves the rearing of more than 20,000 broilers in a single confined space for approximately 6.5 wk. This environment is known for harboring pathogens and antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but studies have focused on previously established houses with mature litter microbial populations. In the current study, a set of three naive houses were followed from inception through 11 broiler flocks and monitored for ambient climatic conditions, bacterial pathogens, and antibiotic resistance. Within the first 3 wk of the first flock cycle, 100% of litter samples were positive for and , whereas was cultivation negative but PCR positive. Antibiotic resistance genes were ubiquitously distributed throughout the litter within the first flock, approaching 10 to 10 genomic units g. Preflock litter levels were approximately 10 CFU g for heterotrophic plate count bacteria, whereas midflock levels were >10 colony forming units (CFU) g; other indicators demonstrated similar increases. The influence of intrahouse sample location was minor. In all likelihood, given that preflock levels were negative for pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes and 4 to 5 Log lower than flock levels for indicators, incoming birds most likely provided the colonizing microbiome, although other sources were not ruled out. Most bacterial groups experienced a cyclical pattern of litter contamination seen in other studies, whereas microbial stabilization required approximately four flocks. This study represents a first-of-its-kind view into the time required for bacterial pathogens and antibiotic resistance to colonize and establish in naive broiler houses. PMID:27136163

  9. Participation of ezrin in bacterial uptake by trophoblast giant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Suk

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trophoblast giant (TG cells are involved in systematic removal of bacterial pathogens from the maternal-fetal interface of the placenta. In particular, TG cells have the ability to take up extracellular antigens by active phagocytosis induced by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma. We previously reported that heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70 present on the surface of TG cells mediated the uptake of Brucella abortus. However, the mechanism of bacterial uptake by TG cells is not completely understood. Here we identified ezrin, a member of ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM protein family, as a molecule associated with Hsc70. Methods Mouse TG cells were employed in all experiments, and B. abortus was used as the bacterial antigen. Confirmation of the binding capacity of ERM protein was assessed by pull-down assay and ELISA using recombinant Hsc70 and ERM proteins. Ezrin was depleted using siRNA and the depletion examined by immunoblotting or immunofluorescence staining. Results The expression level of ezrin was higher in TG cells than in trophoblast stem (TS cells, and ezrin knockdown TG cells showed a reduction in bacterial uptake ability. Although tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin was not related to bacterial uptake activity, localization of Hsc70 on the membrane was affected by the depletion of ezrin in TG cells. Conclusion Ezrin associates with Hsc70 that locates on the membrane of TG cells and participates in the bacterial uptake by TG cells.

  10. Population dynamics of active and total ciliate populations in arable soil amended with wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, F.; Frederiksen, Helle B.; Ronn, R.

    2002-01-01

    population may be encysted. The factors governing the dynamics of active and encysted cells in the soil are not well understood. Our objective was to determine the dynamics of active and encysted populations of ciliates during the decomposition of freshly added organic material. We monitored, in soil...... mathematical modeling. Following the addition of fresh organic material, bacterial numbers increased more than 1,400-fold. There was a temporary increase in the number of active ciliates, followed by a rapid decline, although the size of the bacterial prey populations remained high. During this initial burst...

  11. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  12. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  13. The rare bacterial biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    All communities are dominated by a few species that account for most of the biomass and carbon cycling. On the other hand, a large number of species are represented by only a few individuals. In the case of bacteria, these rare species were until recently invisible. Owing to their low numbers, conventional molecular techniques could not retrieve them. Isolation in pure culture was the only way to identify some of them, but current culturing techniques are unable to isolate most of the bacteria in nature. The recent development of fast and cheap high-throughput sequencing has begun to allow access to the rare species. In the case of bacteria, the exploration of this rare biosphere has several points of interest. First, it will eventually produce a reasonable estimate of the total number of bacterial taxa in the oceans; right now, we do not even know the right order of magnitude. Second, it will answer the question of whether "everything is everywhere." Third, it will require hypothesizing and testing the ecological mechanisms that allow subsistence of many species in low numbers. And fourth, it will open an avenue of research into the immense reserve of genes with potential applications hidden in the rare biosphere. PMID:22457983

  14. Polymorphisms in XRCC5, XRCC6, XRCC7 genes are involved in DNA double-strand breaks(DSBs) repair associated with the risk of acute myeloid leukemia(AML) in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoqiang Wang; Shuyu Wang; Qun Shen; Shiwei Yin; Chunping Li; Aiping Li; Jianyong Li; Jianwei Zhou; Qizhan Liu

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the association between the X-ray repair cross complementing(XRCC) group 5, XRCC6 and XRCC7 polymorphisms and risk of acute myeloid leukemia(AML). Methods:This hospital-based case-control study included 120 AML patients and 210 cancer-free controls in a Chinese population. Three polymorphisms of XRCCS, XRCC6 and XRCC7 were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction(PCR) or polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism(PCR-RFLP) method. Results: We found that there was a significant decrease in risk of AML associated with the XRCC6-61 CG/GG genotype(adjusted odd ratio (OR)=0.55;95% confident interval(CI)=0.34-0.89) compared with the-61CC genotype. For the novel tandem repeat polymorphism (VNTR) in the XRCC5 promoter, we found when the XRCC5 six genotypes were dichotomized(i.e., 2R/2R, 2R/1R versus 2R/0R, 1R/1R, 1R/0R and 0R/0R), the latter group was associated with increased risk of AML(adjusted OR=1.67;95% CI=1.00-2.79) compared to 2R/ 2R+2R/1R genotype. However, the XRCC7 6721G>T polymorphism had no effect on risk of AML. Conclusion:The XRCC6-61C > G and XRCC5 2R/1R/0R polymorphisms, but not XRCC7 6721G > T polymorphism, could play an important role in the development of AML. Larger scale studies with more detailed data on environment exposure are needed to verify these findings.

  15. Transport Powered by Bacterial Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peshkov, Anton; Sokolov, Andrey; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate that collective turbulentlike motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer the directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. In our experiments and simulations, a microwedgelike "bulldozer" draws energy from a bacterial bath of varied density. We obtain that an optimal transport speed is achieved in the turbulent state of the bacterial suspension. This apparent rectification of random motion of bacteria is caused by polar ordered bacteria inside the cusp region of the carrier, which is shielded from the outside turbulent fluctuations.

  16. Transport powered by bacterial turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peshkov, Anton; Sokolov, Andrey; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-04-18

    We demonstrate that collective turbulentlike motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer the directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. In our experiments and simulations, a microwedgelike "bulldozer" draws energy from a bacterial bath of varied density. We obtain that an optimal transport speed is achieved in the turbulent state of the bacterial suspension. This apparent rectification of random motion of bacteria is caused by polar ordered bacteria inside the cusp region of the carrier, which is shielded from the outside turbulent fluctuations. PMID:24785075

  17. Emergence of potential superbug mycobacterium tuberculosis, lessons from new delhi mutant-1 bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Taha; Abraham, Suraj; Islam, Azharul

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that certain bacterial strains attain the New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) enzyme and become resistant to a broad range of antibiotics. Similarly, more dangerous "superbugs" of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensive drug resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are gradually emerging through rapid genetic mutation caused by prescription non-compliance or unsupervised indiscriminate use of anti-tubercular drugs or other antibiotics. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases have been reported in highly susceptible population groups including the aboriginal communities of US and Canada. In Canada alone, the total number of reported tuberculosis cases has decreased over the past decade. However, there is a steady increase in HIV cases in certain communities including the aboriginal communities. Reintroduction of MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis is possible in these susceptible communities, which in turn may pose serious public health situation. MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis are virtually untreatable using current anti-tubercular medication protocols. Thus, MDR/XDR tuberculosis presents a grave global public health threat. The unpredictable genetic mechanism involved in generating MDR/XDR resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may pose greater challenges in developing appropriate treatment strategies. In this article, we briefly review potential genetic mechanism of emerging NDM-1 bacterial strains and draw a rationale parallel to the underlying genetic mechanism of MDR/XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain development. PMID:23267308

  18. Phase variation of Opa proteins of Neisseria meningitidis and the effects of bacterial transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish Sadarangani; J Claire Hoe; Katherine Makepeace; Peter Van Der Ley; Andrew J Pollard

    2016-03-01

    Opa proteins are major proteins involved in meningococcal colonization of the nasopharynx and immune interactions. Opa proteins undergo phase variation (PV) due to the presence of the 5′-CTCTT-3′ coding repeat (CR) sequence. The dynamics of PV of meningococcal Opa proteins is unknown. Opa PV, including the effect of transformation on PV, was assessed using a panel of Opa-deficient strains of Neisseria meningitidis. Analysis of Opa expression from UK disease-causing isolates was undertaken. Different opagenes demonstrated variable rates of PV, between 6.4 ×10–4 and 6.9 ×10–3 per cell per generation. opa genes with a longer CR tract had a higher rate of PV (r2=0.77, p=0.1212). Bacterial transformation resulted in a 180-fold increase in PV rate. The majority of opagenes in UK disease isolates (315/463, 68.0%) were in the ‘on’ phase, suggesting the importance of Opa proteins during invasive disease. These data provide valuable information for the first time regarding meningococcal Opa PV. The presence of Opa PV in meningococcal populations and high expression of Opa among invasive strains likely indicates the importance of this protein in bacterial colonization in the human nasopharynx. These findings have potential implications for development of vaccines derived from meningococcal outer membranes.

  19. Mini-review: Strategies for Variation and Evolution of Bacterial Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Foley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the eubacteria, antigenic variation has emerged as a strategy to evade host immunity. However, phenotypic variation in some of these antigens also allows the bacteria to exploit variable host niches as well. The specific mechanisms are not shared-derived characters although there is considerable convergent evolution and numerous commonalities reflecting considerations of natural selection and biochemical restraints. Unlike in viruses, mechanisms of antigenic variation in most bacteria involve larger DNA movement such as gene conversion or DNA rearrangement, although some antigens vary due to point mutations or modified transcriptional regulation. The convergent evolution that promotes antigenic variation integrates various evolutionary forces: these include mutations underlying variant production; drift which could remove alleles especially early in infection or during life history phases in arthropod vectors (when the bacterial population size goes through a bottleneck; selection not only for any particular variant but also for the mechanism for the production of variants (i.e., selection for mutability; and overcoming negative selection against variant production. This review highlights the complexities of drivers of antigenic variation, in particular extending evaluation beyond the commonly cited theory of immune evasion. A deeper understanding of the diversity of purpose and mechanisms of antigenic variation in bacteria will contribute to greater insight into bacterial pathogenesis, ecology and coevolution with hosts.

  20. The role of temperate bacteriophages in bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Emily V; Winstanley, Craig; Fothergill, Joanne L; James, Chloe E

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. There are an estimated 10(31) phage on the planet, making them the most abundant form of life. We are rapidly approaching the centenary of their identification, and yet still have only a limited understanding of their role in the ecology and evolution of bacterial populations. Temperate prophage carriage is often associated with increased bacterial virulence. The rise in use of technologies, such as genome sequencing and transcriptomics, has highlighted more subtle ways in which prophages contribute to pathogenicity. This review discusses the current knowledge of the multifaceted effects that phage can exert on their hosts and how this may contribute to bacterial adaptation during infection. PMID:26825679