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Sample records for bacterial pneumonia

  1. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar, Jose E-mail: vilar_jlu@gva.es; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings.

  2. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar, Jose; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings

  3. Influenza and bacterial pneumonia - constant companions

    OpenAIRE

    Wunderink, Richard G

    2010-01-01

    Sequential or concomitant influenza and bacterial pneumonia are two common syndromes seen in community-acquired pneumonia. Inadequacies of diagnostic testing make separating simple pneumonia with either bacteria or influenza from concomitant or sequential influenza with both microorganisms difficult, although the novel 2009 H1N1 epidemic may improve the availability of molecular testing for viruses. Given the frequency of viral pneumonia and diagnostic limitations, empirical antivirals may be...

  4. Bacterial Pneumonia in Elderly Japanese Populations

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    Naoya Miyashita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pneumonia is one of the most important infectious diseases in terms of incidence, effect on quality of life, mortality, and impact on society. Pneumonia was the third leading cause of death in Japan in 2011. In 2016, 119 650 Japanese people died of pneumonia, 96% of whom were aged 65 years and above. The symptoms of pneumonia in elderly people are often atypical. Aspiration pneumonia is seen more frequently than in young people because of swallowing dysfunction in the elderly. The mortality rate is also higher in the elderly than in young people. In Japan, the population is aging at an unprecedented rate, and pneumonia in the elderly will be increasingly important in medicine and medical economics in the future. To manage pneumonia in the elderly, it is important to accurately evaluate its severity, administer appropriate antibiotic treatment, and implement effective preventive measures.

  5. Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know you have it. Walking pneumonia (also called atypical pneumonia because it's different from the typical bacterial pneumonia) ... ray and blood tests. People with bacterial or atypical pneumonia will probably be given antibiotics to take at ...

  6. Disease Severity in Patients with Simultaneous Influenza and Bacterial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Seki, Masafumi; Kosai, Kosuke; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Higashiyama, Yasuhito; Kurihara, Shintaro; Izumikawa, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Hirakata, Yoichi; Tashiro, Takayoshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the differences in the clinical features of bacterial pneumonia patients between patients co-infected with influenza virus or not co-infected. Methods Fifteen adult patients with bacterial pneumonia (7 men and 8 women) who also tested positive for influenza virus antigen were compared with those with bacterial pneumonia alone (n=28). Results Complications with chronic lung diseases were more frequently found in bacterial pneumonia patients with influenza virus infection...

  7. Immunotolerance during bacterial pneumonia and sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwerf, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia and sepsis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Massive use of antibiotics promotes pathogen resistance, and, as a consequence, the incidence of drug-resistant bacteria is increasing. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to expand our comprehension of host

  8. The radiological appearance of bacterial pneumonias and their differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.H.; Fabel, H.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1985-01-01

    Under the influence of antibiotic therapy, bacterial pneumonias have undergone a remarkable change in the last few decades. Individual forms of pneumonia can be distinguished morphologically by their localization, the way in which they spread, their limitations, and their course. Clinically, opportunistic bacterial infections predominate. Increasingly, secondary pneumonias are observed in poststenotic areas, areas of infarction, in hypostatic areas, after aspiration, and in previously damaged lobes. Radiologic criteria for differentiating from atypical pneumonias (viruses, mycoplasmas and chlamydia) are discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Klebsiella pneumoniae Siderophores Induce Inflammation, Bacterial Dissemination, and HIF-1α Stabilization during Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Victoria I; Breen, Paul; Houle, Sébastien; Dozois, Charles M; Bachman, Michael A

    2016-09-13

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, and is rapidly acquiring antibiotic resistance. K. pneumoniae requires secretion of siderophores, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators, for bacterial replication and full virulence. The specific combination of siderophores secreted by K. pneumoniae during infection can impact tissue localization, systemic dissemination, and host survival. However, the effect of these potent iron chelators on the host during infection is unknown. In vitro, siderophores deplete epithelial cell iron, induce cytokine secretion, and activate the master transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein that controls vascular permeability and inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae directly contributes to inflammation and bacterial dissemination during pneumonia. To examine the effects of siderophore secretion independently of bacterial growth, we performed infections with tonB mutants that persist in vivo but are deficient in siderophore import. Using a murine model of pneumonia, we found that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae induces the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL1, and CXCL2, as well as bacterial dissemination to the spleen, compared to siderophore-negative mutants at an equivalent bacterial number. Furthermore, we determined that siderophore-secreting K. pneumoniae stabilized HIF-1α in vivo and that bacterial dissemination to the spleen required alveolar epithelial HIF-1α. Our results indicate that siderophores act directly on the host to induce inflammatory cytokines and bacterial dissemination and that HIF-1α is a susceptibility factor for bacterial invasion during pneumonia. Klebsiella pneumoniae causes a wide range of bacterial diseases, including pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and sepsis. To cause infection, K. pneumoniae steals

  10. Bench-to-bedside review: Bacterial pneumonia with influenza - pathogenesis and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluijs, K.F.; van der Poll, T.; Lutter, R.; Juffermans, N.P.; Schultz, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are frequently complicated by bacterial infections, causing additional hospitalization and mortality. Secondary bacterial respiratory infection can be subdivided into combined viral/bacterial pneumonia and post-influenza pneumonia, which differ in their pathogenesis.

  11. Lung Dendritic Cells Facilitate Extrapulmonary Bacterial Dissemination during Pneumococcal Pneumonia

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    Alva eRosendahl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DC-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DC-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection.

  12. Atypical bacterial pneumonia in the HIV-infected population.

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    Head, Breanne M; Trajtman, Adriana; Rueda, Zulma V; Vélez, Lázaro; Keynan, Yoav

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are more susceptible to respiratory tract infections by other infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi) as their disease progresses to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Despite effective antiretroviral therapy, bacterial pneumonia (the most frequently occurring HIV-associated pulmonary illness) remains a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the HIV-infected population. Over the last few decades, studies have looked at the role of atypical bacterial pneumonia (i.e. pneumonia that causes an atypical clinical presentation or responds differently to typical therapeutics) in association with HIV infection. Due to the lack of available diagnostic strategies, the lack of consideration, and the declining immunity of the patient, HIV co-infections with atypical bacteria are currently believed to be underreported. Thus, following an extensive database search, this review aimed to highlight the current knowledge and gaps regarding atypical bacterial pneumonia in HIV. The authors discuss the prevalence of Chlamydophila pneumoniae , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , Coxiella burnetii , Legionella species and others in the HIV-infected population as well as their clinical presentation, methods of detection, and treatment. Further studies looking at the role of these microbes in association with HIV are required. Increased knowledge of these atypical bacteria will lead to a more rapid diagnosis of these infections, resulting in an improved quality of life for the HIV-infected population.

  13. Pattern of Community Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia in Kano, North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to determine the clinical pattern of bacterial community acquired pneumonia amongst patients admitted into medical wards in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano. The study was a descriptive prospective study incorporating consecutive adult patients aged fifteen years and above admitted ...

  14. Solithromycin for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viasus, Diego; Ramos, Oscar; Ramos, Leidy; Simonetti, Antonella F; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is a major public health problem worldwide. In recent years, there has been an increase in the frequency of resistance to the antimicrobials such as β-lactams or macrolides which have habitually been used against the causative pathogens. Solithromycin, a next-generation macrolide, is the first fluoroketolide with activity against most of the frequently isolated bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia, including typical and atypical bacteria as well as macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Areas covered: A detailed assessment of the literature relating to the antimicrobial activity, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, efficacy, tolerability and safety of solithromycin for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia Expert commentary: Recent randomized controlled phase II/III trials have demonstrated the equivalent efficacy of oral and intravenous solithromycin compared with fluoroquinolones in patients with lower mild-to-moderate respiratory infections, and have shown that systemic adverse events are comparable between solithromycin and alternative treatments. However, studies of larger populations which are able to identify infrequent adverse events are now needed to confirm these findings. On balance, current data supports solithromycin as a promising therapy for empirical treatment in adults with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

  15. Differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia by thin-section computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Isao; Ishida, Tadashi; Togashi, Kaori; Niimi, Akio; Koyama, Hiroshi; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Mishima, Michiaki

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective: The management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depends, in part, on the identification of the causative agents. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of thin-section computed tomography (CT) in differentiating bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonia. Patients and methods: Thin-section CT studies were prospectively examined in hospitalized CAP patients within 2 days of admission, followed by retrospective assessment by two pulmonary radiologists. Thin-section CT findings on the pneumonias caused by each pathogen were examined, and two types of pneumonias were compared. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were produced. Results: Among 183 CAP episodes (181 patients, 125 men and 56 women, mean age ± S.D.: 61.1 ± 19.7) examined by thin-section CT, the etiologies of 125 were confirmed (94 bacterial pneumonia and 31 non-bacterial pneumonia). Centrilobular nodules were specific for non-bacterial pneumonia and airspace nodules were specific for bacterial pneumonia (specificities of 89% and 94%, respectively) when located in the outer lung areas. When centrilobular nodules were the principal finding, they were specific but lacked sensitivity for non-bacterial pneumonia (specificity 98% and sensitivity 23%). To distinguish the two types of pneumonias, centrilobular nodules, airspace nodules and lobular shadows were found to be important by multivariate analyses. ROC curve analysis discriminated bacterial pneumonia from non-bacterial pneumonia among patients without underlying lung diseases, yielding an optimal point with sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 79%, respectively, but was less effective when all patients were analyzed together (70% and 84%, respectively). Conclusion: Thin-section CT examination was applied for the differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonias. Though showing some potential, this examination at the present time would not

  16. Measurement of complement receptor 1 on neutrophils in bacterial and viral pneumonia

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    Nikoskelainen Jukka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A reliable prediction of the causative agent of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is not possible based on clinical features. Our aim was to test, whether the measurement of the expression of complement receptors or Fcγ receptors on neutrophils and monocytes would be a useful preliminary test to differentiate between bacterial and viral pneumonia. Methods Sixty-eight patients with CAP were studied prospectively. Thirteen patients had pneumococcal pneumonia; 13 patients, influenza A pneumonia; 5 patients, atypical pneumonia, and 37 patients, aetiologically undefined pneumonia. Leukocyte receptor expression was measured within 2 days of hospital admission. Results The mean expression of complement receptor 1 (CR1 on neutrophils was significantly higher in the patients with pneumococcal pneumonia than in those with influenza A pneumonia. The mean expression of CR1 was also significantly higher in aetiologically undefined pneumonia than in influenza A pneumonia, but there was no difference between pneumococcal and undefined pneumonia. Conclusion Our results suggest that the expression of CR1 is higher in classical bacterial pneumonia than in viral pneumonia. Determination of the expression of CR1 may be of value as an additional rapid tool in the aetiological diagnosis, bacterial or viral infection, of CAP. These results are preliminary and more research is needed to assess the utility of this new method in the diagnostics of pneumonia.

  17. Phasic characteristics of inspiratory crackles of bacterial and atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norisue, Y; Tokuda, Y; Koizumi, M; Kishaba, T; Miyagi, S

    2008-08-01

    No known physical findings are available to differentiate between bacterial pneumonia (BP) and atypical pneumonia (AP) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). To evaluate the possible differences in phasic characteristics of inspiratory crackles between BP and AP in patients with CAP. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted to obtain phasic characteristics of inspiratory crackles (early, early-to-mid, late and pan-inspiratory crackles) in AP and BP groups in a community teaching hospital in Japan (n = 183). 100 patients with BP and 83 patients with AP were evaluated. Patients with BP were significantly more likely to present with pan-inspiratory crackles (49 (49.0) vs 5 (6.0); ppneumonia patients with audible crackles, the sensitivity and specificity of pan-inspiratory crackles for BP were 83.1% and 85.7%, respectively, and the sensitivity and specificity of late inspiratory crackles for AP were 80.0% and 84.7%, respectively. In patients with CAP and audible crackles, phasic characteristics of inspiratory crackles may be used to distinguish AP from BP. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  18. Cost Drivers of a Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia Phase 3 Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulos, Stella; Calvert, Sara B; Brown, Carrie A; Awatin, Josephine; Tenaerts, Pamela; Holland, Thomas L; DiMasi, Joseph A; Getz, Kenneth A

    2018-01-06

    Studies indicate that the prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections, including hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP), has been rising. There are many challenges associated with these disease conditions and the ability to develop new treatments. Additionally, HABP/VABP clinical trials are very costly to conduct given their complex protocol designs and the difficulty in recruiting and retaining patients. With input from clinicians, representatives from industry, and the US Food and Drug Administration, we conducted a study to (1) evaluate the drivers of HABP/VABP phase 3 direct and indirect clinical trial costs; (2) to identify opportunities to lower these costs; and (3) to compare (1) and (2) to endocrine and oncology clinical trials. Benchmark data were gathered from proprietary and commercial databases and used to create a model that calculates the fully loaded (direct and indirect) cost of typical phase 3 HABP/VABP endocrine and oncology clinical trials. Results indicate that the cost per patient for a 200-site, 1000-patient phase 3 HABP/VABP study is $89600 per patient. The cost of screen failures and screen failure rates are the main cost drivers. Results indicate that biopharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies should consider strategies to improve screening and recruitment to decrease HABP/VABP clinical trial costs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  19. Influenza-associated bacterial pneumonia; managing and controlling infection on two fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campigotto, Aaron; Mubareka, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia complicating influenza is well-recognized as a severe manifestation of influenza, accounting for a substantial number of deaths from the 1918 influenza pandemic. Influenza-associated bacterial pneumonia remains a major contributor to the burden of influenza, and poses new challenges as antibiotic-resistant organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus spread. We provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of the epidemiology and co-pathogenesis of influenza-associated bacterial pneumonia, and outline management approaches and their limitations. We review preventative measures and discuss implications for pandemic planning. Knowledge gaps are underscored and future research directions are proposed.

  20. Atypical bacterial pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia in children: a hospital-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Jyotsna; Awasthi, Shally; Rajput, Anuradha; Tiwari, Manoj; Jain, Amita

    2009-04-01

    A total of 243 children aged one month to five years with World Health Organization defined severe community acquired pneumonia were studied for the presence of atypical bacterial pathogens: 24 were found positive for mycoplasma infection. There was no significant association with any of the clinical, laboratory and radiological variables in children with pneumonia by the atypical pathogen.

  1. Nasopharyngeal co-colonization with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in children is bacterial genotype independent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melles, D.C.; Bogaert, D.; Gorkink, R.F.; Peeters, J.K.; Moorhouse, M.J.; Ott, A.; Leeuwen, W.B. van; Simons, G.; Verbrugh, H.A.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Belkum, A. van

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial interference between Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the nasopharynx has been observed during colonization, which might have important clinical implications for the widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in young children. This study aimed to determine

  2. High positive end-expiratory pressure levels promote bacterial translocation in experimental pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lachmann, Robert A.; van Kaam, Anton H.; Haitsma, Jack J.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    A previous study in piglets with experimental pneumonia showed that reducing atelectasis by means of open lung ventilation attenuated bacterial translocation compared to conventional ventilation settings. This study examined the effect of open lung ventilation with higher than necessary positive

  3. Identification of Bacterial and Viral Codetections With Mycoplasma pneumoniae Using the TaqMan Array Card in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Maureen H; Cross, Kristen E; Benitez, Alvaro J; Hicks, Lauri A; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected in a number of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in a recent prospective study. To assess whether other pathogens were also detected in these patients, TaqMan Array Cards were used to test 216 M pneumoniae-positive respiratory specimens for 25 additional viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens. It is interesting to note that 1 or more codetections, predominantly bacterial, were identified in approximately 60% of specimens, with codetections being more common in children.

  4. Detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens causing atypical pneumonia by multiplex Lightmix®RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karoline; Springer, Burkard; Imkamp, Frank; Opota, Onya; Greub, Gilbert; Keller, Peter M

    2018-04-01

    Pneumonia is a severe infectious disease. In addition to common viruses and bacterial pathogens (e.g. Streptococcus pneumoniae), fastidious respiratory pathogens like Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella spp. can cause severe atypical pneumonia. They do not respond to penicillin derivatives, which may cause failure of antibiotic empirical therapy. The same applies for infections with B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, the cause of pertussis disease, that may present atypically and need to be treated with macrolides. Moreover, these fastidious bacteria are difficult to identify by culture or serology, and therefore often remain undetected. Thus, rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens causing atypical pneumonia is crucial. We performed a retrospective method evaluation study to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the new, commercially available Lightmix ® multiplex RT-PCR assay that detects these fastidious bacterial pathogens causing atypical pneumonia. In this retrospective study, 368 clinical respiratory specimens, obtained from patients suffering from atypical pneumonia that have been tested negative for the presence of common agents of pneumonia by culture and viral PCR, were investigated. These clinical specimens have been previously characterized by singleplex RT-PCR assays in our diagnostic laboratory and were used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the respiratory multiplex Lightmix ® RT-PCR. The multiplex RT-PCR displayed a limit of detection between 5 and 10 DNA copies for different in-panel organisms and showed identical performance characteristics with respect to specificity and sensitivity as in-house singleplex RT-PCRs for pathogen detection. The Lightmix ® multiplex RT-PCR assay represents a low-cost, time-saving and accurate diagnostic tool with high throughput potential. The time-to-result using an automated DNA extraction device for respiratory specimens followed by multiplex RT-PCR detection was

  5. [Comparative diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV positive patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horo, K; Koné, A; Koffi, M-O; Ahui, J M B; Brou-Godé, C V; Kouassi, A B; N'Gom, A; Koffi, N G; Aka-Danguy, E

    2016-01-01

    Immunodepression induced by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) modifies the clinical, radiological and microbiological manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis; leading to similarities between pulmonary tuberculosis and acute community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. A consequence is the high proportion of discordant pre- and post-mortem diagnoses of pneumonia. The aim of our study was to contribute to the improvement in the diagnosis of acute bacterial pneumonia in HIV positive patients in areas where tuberculosis is endemic. This retrospective study in HIV positive patients has compared 94 cases of positive smear cases pulmonary tuberculosis and 78 cases of acute community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Using logistic regression, the following features were positively associated with bacterial pneumonia: the sudden onset of signs (OR=8.48 [CI 95% 2.50-28.74]), a delay in the evolution of symptoms of less than 15 days (OR=3.70 [CI 95% 1.11-12.35]), chest pain (OR=2.81 [CI 95% 1.10-7.18]), radiological alveolar shadowing (OR=12.98 [CI 95% 4.66-36.12) and high leukocytosis (OR=3.52 [CI 95% 1.19-10.44]). These five variables allowed us to establish a diagnostic score for bacterial pneumonia ranging from 0 to 5. The area under the ROC curve was 0.886 [CI 95% 0.84-0.94, P96.8% for a score of greater than or equal to 4. The diagnostic score for acute community-acquired pneumonia may improve the management of bacterial pneumonia in areas where tuberculosis is endemic. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased risk of pneumonia and bronchiolitis after bacterial colonization of the airways as neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissing, Nadja H; Chawes, Bo L K; Bisgaard, Hans

    2013-11-15

    The frequency of pneumonia and bronchiolitis exhibits considerable variation in otherwise healthy children, and suspected risk factors explain only a minor proportion of the variation. We hypothesized that alterations in the airway microbiome in early life may be associated with susceptibility to pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children. To investigate the relation between neonatal airway colonization and pneumonia and bronchiolitis during the first 3 years of life. Participants comprised children of the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2000 (COPSAC2000) cohort, a prospective birth cohort study of 411 children born to mothers with asthma. Aspirates from the hypopharynx at age 4 weeks were cultured for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Clinical information on pneumonia and bronchiolitis within the first 3 years of life was prospectively collected by the research physicians at the center. Analyses were adjusted for covariates associated with pneumonia and bronchiolitis and bacterial airway colonization. Hypopharyngeal aspirates and full clinical follow-up until 3 years of age were available for 265 children. Of these, 56 (21%) neonates were colonized with S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and/or M. catarrhalis at 4 weeks of age. Colonization with at least one of these microorganisms (but not S. aureus) was significantly associated with increased incidence of pneumonia and bronchiolitis (adjusted incidence rate ratio, 1.79 [1.29-2.48]; P Neonatal airway colonization with S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, or M. catarrhalis is associated with increased risk of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in early life independently of asthma. This suggests a role of pathogenic bacterial colonization of the airways in neonates for subsequent susceptibly to pneumonia and bronchiolitis.

  7. Viral and bacterial pathogens identification in children hospitalised for severe pneumonia and parapneumonic empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Noël Telles

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is caused by respiratory bacteria and/or viruses. Little is known if co-infections are an aggravating factor in hospitalised children with severe pneumonia. We studied the impact of respiratory pathogens on the severity of pneumonia. Between 2007 and 2009, 52 children hospitalised with a well-documented diagnosis of communityacquired pneumonia (CAP, with or without parapneumonic empyema (PPE, were enrolled in the study. The patients were classified into 2 groups: CAP + PPE (n = 28 and CAP (n = 24. The identification of respiratory viruses and bacteria in nasopharyngeal aspirates and pleural effusion samples were performed using conventional bacterial techniques and molecular assays. Using real-time multiplex PCR and antigen detection, Streptococcus pneumoniae was the main agent identified in 76% of the cases by molecular tests and BinaxNOW® in pleural fluid. A total of 8% of pleural fluid samples remained undiagnosed. In nasopharyngeal aspirates, rhinovirus, parainfluenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus were detected in both CAP and CAP + PPE populations; however, the percentage of viral co-detection was significantly higher in nasopharyngeal aspirates from CAP + PPE patients (35% compared with CAP patients (5%. In conclusion, viral co-detection was observed mainly in patients with more severe pneumonia. Molecular biology assays improved the pathogens detection in pneumonia and confirmed the S. pneumoniae detection by BinaxNOW® in pleural effusion samples. Interestingly, the main S. pneumoniae serotypes found in PPE are not the ones targeted by the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

  8. Viral and bacterial pathogens identification in children hospitalised for severe pneumonia and parapneumonic empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Noël Telles

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is caused by respiratory bacteria and/or viruses. Little is known if co-infections are an aggravating factor in hospitalised children with severe pneumonia. We studied the impact of respiratory pathogens on the severity of pneumonia. Between 2007 and 2009, 52 children hospitalised with a well-documented diagnosis of communityacquired pneumonia (CAP, with or without parapneumonic empyema (PPE, were enrolled in the study. The patients were classified into 2 groups: CAP + PPE (n = 28 and CAP (n = 24. The identification of respiratory viruses and bacteria in nasopharyngeal aspirates and pleural effusion samples were performed using conventional bacterial techniques and molecular assays. Using real-time multiplex PCR and antigen detection, Streptococcus pneumoniae was the main agent identified in 76% of the cases by molecular tests and BinaxNOW® in pleural fluid. A total of 8% of pleural fluid samples remained undiagnosed. In nasopharyngeal aspirates, rhinovirus, parainfluenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus were detected in both CAP and CAP + PPE populations; however, the percentage of viral co-detection was significantly higher in nasopharyngeal aspirates from CAP + PPE patients (35% compared with CAP patients (5%. In conclusion, viral co-detection was observed mainly in patients with more severe pneumonia. Molecular biology assays improved the pathogens detection in pneumonia and confirmed the S. pneumoniae detection by BinaxNOW® in pleural effusion samples. Interestingly, the main S. pneumoniae serotypes found in PPE are not the ones targeted by the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

  9. Interleukin-8 and leukotriene B4 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from HIV-infected patients with bacterial pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, E; Vestbo, Jørgen; Benfield, T L

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are at increased risk of contracting bacterial infections, mainly pneumonia. Despite this, little is known about immunopathogenic mechanisms in HIV-related bacterial pneumonia. This paper investigates the presence of the neutrophil chemotactic...... mediators, interleukin-8 (IL_8) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 27 HIV-infected patients with bacterial pneumonia. Significantly elevated levels of IL-8 were found in BAL fluid of patients with bacterial pneumonia [529 pg ml-1 (296-1161 pg ml-1)] compared to matched...... patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) [59 pg ml-1 (42-254 pg ml-1)] and healthy controls [58 pg ml-1 (37-82 pg ml-1)]. Levels of LTB4 were not elevated during bacterial pneumonia when compared to PCP patients and healthy controls. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between IL-8...

  10. Critical appraisal of ceftaroline in the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and skin infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman JJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Julian J Goodman, Stanley I MartinDivision of Infectious Diseases, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline is a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin ß-lactam antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA as well as multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae among other routine Gram positive and Gram negative organisms. It has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs. Ceftaroline is approved for treatment of ABSSSI due to MRSA, however currently there are no data for pneumonia due to MRSA in humans. Herein we review the major clinical trials as well as ceftaroline microbiology, pharmacokinetics, and safety, followed by a look at further directions for investigation of this new agent.Keywords: ceftaroline, pneumonia, skin infection

  11. Increased Risk of Pneumonia and Bronchiolitis after Bacterial Colonization of the Airways as Neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Chawes, Bo Lk; Bisgaard, Hans

    2013-01-01

    with susceptibility to pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children. Objectives: To investigate the relation between neonatal airway colonization and pneumonia and bronchiolitis during the first three years of life. Methods: Participants comprised children of the COPSAC2000 cohort; a prospective birth cohort study...... physicians at the center. Analyses were adjusted for covariates associated pneumonia and bronchiolitisand bacterial airway colonization. Measurements and Main Results: Hypopharyngeal aspirates and full clinical follow-up until three years of age were available for 265 children. Of these, 56 (21%) neonates...... were colonized with S.pneumoniae, H.influenzae and/or M.catarrhalis at four weeks of age. Colonization with at least one of these microorganisms, (but not S.aureus), was significantly associated with increased incidence of pneumonia and bronchiolitis (adjusted Incidence Rate Ratio=1.79[1.29-2.48], p-value...

  12. BILATERAL ENDOGENOUS BACTERIAL ENDOPHTHALMITIS SECONDARY TO PNEUMONIA IN AN AIDS PATIENT : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Ku.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTI ON: Endogenous or metastatic endophthalmitis is a very rare sever form of ocular disease which is uncommon now - a - days. Prevalence of endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis is 2 - 8% of all cases of endophthalmitis 1 . Mostly it is associated with chronic disease like diabetes mellitus, renal failure, liver abscesses, prolong placement of catheter, IV line or central venous line, drug abusers and immunocompromise d patients. Gram +bacteria are the most common causative organism of the endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis . 1 A few cases of endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis due to klebsiella pneumonias, a gram - ve organism have been documented and majority of them were in Taiwan . 2, 3,4,5,6, 7 K. pneumonia endophthalmitis is associated with diabetes mellitus and hepatic abscesses can be bilateral and resulted into poor visual outcome . 2,3,4,5,6, 7 K. pneumonia pneumonia has been reported most frequently from patients with alcoholic liver diseases and one of the common cause of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis . 8,9 In this scenario we report the case of a Malawian in African Continent who developed bilateral endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis after suffering from pneumonia in immunocompromise state. PURPOSE : to report a case bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis secondary to pneumonia in an AIDS patient . DESIGN : Observational case report . METHODS : A patient with bilateral pain full red eye with diminution of vision was seen in c onsultation by ophthalmology. RESULT : with clinical characteristic and laboratory diagnosis of sputum and blood conf i rmed the causative agent for pneumonia and endophthalmitis is K.pneumonia. CONCLUSION : it is unusual disease, required early detection and prompt treatment.

  13. The value of clinical features in differentiating between viral, pneumococcal and atypical bacterial pneumonia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korppi, Matti; Don, Massimiliano; Valent, Francesca; Canciani, Mario

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the value of clinical features in differentiating between viral, pneumococcal and atypical bacterial pneumonia in children. A retrospective analysis of clinical signs and symptoms, supplemented with chest radiograph and serum procalcitonin data, in 101 children with community-acquired pneumonia. Viral and bacterial aetiology was studied prospectively by antibody assays, and pneumococcal infection was found in 18, atypical bacterial infection in 28 and viral infection alone in 22 cases. Chest radiographs and serum procalcitonin were studied in all cases. Data on clinical signs and symptoms were retrospectively collected from the medical cards of the patients. Among symptoms, cough was present in 89% and fever (>37.5 degrees C) in 88% of the cases. Among physical signs, crackles were present in 49% and decreased breath sounds in 58%. No significant associations were found between any of the clinical signs or symptoms and the aetiology of pneumonia. In multivariate analyses, age over 5 years and serum procalcitonin over 1.0 ng/mL were the only independent predictors of bacterial aetiology, but no finding was able to screen between pneumococcal and atypical bacterial aetiology of infection. No clinical or radiological characteristic was helpful in the separation between viral, pneumococcal and atypical bacterial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children.

  14. Influence of the blood bacterial load on the meningeal inflammatory response in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, C; O´Reilly, T; Brandt, C

    2006-01-01

    was induced by intracisternal injection of approximately 1 x 10(6) CFU Streptococcus pneumoniae, type 3, and the 26 rabbits were either provided with approximately 1 x 10(6) CFU S. pneumoniae intravenously at 0 hour ("bacteraemic" rabbits, n = 9), immunized with paraformaldehyde-killed S. pneumoniae for 5...... weeks prior to the experiment ("immunized" rabbits", n = 8), or not treated further ("control" rabbits, n = 9). WBC and bacterial concentrations were determined in CSF and blood every second hour during a 16 hours study period together with CSF IL-8 and protein levels. We also studied CSF and blood WBC...... bacterial levels were observed (P > 0.05). Blood WBC decreased in bacteraemic rabbits between approximately 10-16 hours after the bacterial inoculation in contrast to an increase for both the immunized rabbits and controls (P rabbits as compared...

  15. Biomarkers and bacterial pneumonia risk in patients with treated HIV infection: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja M Bjerk

    Full Text Available Despite advances in HIV treatment, bacterial pneumonia continues to cause considerable morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Studies of biomarker associations with bacterial pneumonia risk in treated HIV-infected patients do not currently exist.We performed a nested, matched, case-control study among participants randomized to continuous combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial. Patients who developed bacterial pneumonia (cases and patients without bacterial pneumonia (controls were matched 1∶1 on clinical center, smoking status, age, and baseline cART use. Baseline levels of Club Cell Secretory Protein 16 (CC16, Surfactant Protein D (SP-D, C-reactive protein (hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and d-dimer were compared between cases and controls.Cases (n = 72 and controls (n = 72 were 25.7% female, 51.4% black, 65.3% current smokers, 9.7% diabetic, 36.1% co-infected with Hepatitis B/C, and 75.0% were on cART at baseline. Median (IQR age was 45 (41, 51 years with CD4+ count of 553 (436, 690 cells/mm(3. Baseline CC16 and SP-D were similar between cases and controls, but hsCRP was significantly higher in cases than controls (2.94 µg/mL in cases vs. 1.93 µg/mL in controls; p = 0.02. IL-6 and d-dimer levels were also higher in cases compared to controls, though differences were not statistically significant (p-value 0.06 and 0.10, respectively.In patients with cART-treated HIV infection, higher levels of systemic inflammatory markers were associated with increased bacterial pneumonia risk, while two pulmonary-specific inflammatory biomarkers, CC16 and SP-D, were not associated with bacterial pneumonia risk.

  16. 75 FR 73107 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0589] Draft Guidance for Industry on Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  17. Reducing atelectasis attenuates bacterial growth and translocation in experimental pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kaam, Anton H.; Lachmann, Robert A.; Herting, Egbert; de Jaegere, Anne; van Iwaarden, Freek; Noorduyn, L. Arnold; Kok, Joke H.; Haitsma, Jack J.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    Besides being one of the mechanisms responsible for ventilator-induced lung injury, atelectasis also seems to aggravate the course of experimental pneumonia. In this study, we examined the effect of reducing the degree of atelectasis by natural modified surfactant and/or open lung ventilation on

  18. Role of Autophagy and Apoptosis in the Postinfluenza Bacterial Pneumonia

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    Zhen Qin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of influenza A virus (IAV is more likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. During the past decades, a great amount of studies have been conducted on increased morbidity from secondary bacterial infections following influenza and provide an increasing number of explanations for the mechanisms underlying the infections. In this paper, we first review the recent research progress that IAV infection increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. We then propose an assumption that autophagy and apoptosis manipulation are beneficial to antagonize post-IAV bacterial infection and discuss the clinical significance.

  19. Vaccination for the control of childhood bacterial pneumonia - Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C Otczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia in childhood is endemic in large parts of the world and in particular, in developing countries, as well as in many indigenous communities within developed nations. Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae conjugate vaccines are currently available against the leading bacterial causes of pneumonia.  The use of the vaccines in both industrialised and developing countries have shown a dramatic reduction in the burden of pneumonia and invasive disease in children.  However, the greatest threat facing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine effectiveness is serotype replacement.  The current vaccines provide serotype-specific, antibody–mediated protection against only a few of the 90+ capsule serotypes.  Therefore, there has been a focus in recent years to rapidly advance technologies that will result in broader disease coverage and more affordable vaccines that can be used in developing countries.  The next generation of pneumococcal vaccines have advanced to clinical trials.

  20. Role of bacterial surface structures on the interaction of Klebsiella pneumoniae with phagocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina March

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis is a key process of the immune system. The human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae is a well known example of a pathogen highly resistant to phagocytosis. A wealth of evidence demonstrates that the capsule polysaccharide (CPS plays a crucial role in resistance to phagocytosis. The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum shares with mammalian macrophages the ability to phagocytose and kill bacteria. The fact that K. pneumoniae is ubiquitous in nature and, therefore, should avoid predation by amoebae, poses the question whether K. pneumoniae employs similar means to counteract amoebae and mammalian phagocytes. Here we developed an assay to evaluate K. pneumoniae-D. discoideum interaction. The richness of the growth medium affected the threshold at which the cps mutant was permissive for Dictyostelium and only at lower nutrient concentrations the cps mutant was susceptible to predation by amoebae. Given the critical role of bacterial surface elements on host-pathogen interactions, we explored the possible contribution of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS and outer membrane proteins (OMPs to combat phagoyctosis by D. discoideum. We uncover that, in addition to the CPS, the LPS O-polysaccharide and the first core sugar participate in Klebsiella resistance to predation by D. discoideum. K. pneumoniae LPS lipid A decorations are also necessary to avoid predation by amoebae although PagP-dependent palmitoylation plays a more important role than the lipid A modification with aminoarabinose. Mutants lacking OMPs OmpA or OmpK36 were also permissive for D. discoideium growth. Except the LPS O-polysaccharide mutants, all mutants were more susceptible to phagocytosis by mouse alveolar macrophages. Finally, we found a correlation between virulence, using the pneumonia mouse model, and resistance to phagocytosis. Altogether, this work reveals novel K. pneumoniae determinants involved in resistance to phagocytosis and supports the notion that Dictyostelium amoebae

  1. Nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage and antimicrobial resistance in underfive children with community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cissy B. Kartasasmita

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung puncture is the best way to determine the etiology of pneumonia since it yields the highest rate of positive cultures. However, this procedure is difficult, especially for a study in the community. According to WHO, isolates to be tested for antimicrobial resistance in the community should be obtained from nasopharyngeal (NP swabs. Previous studies support the use of NP isolates to determine antimicrobial resistance patterns of isolates from children with pneumonia. The aim of our study was to know the bacterial patterns of the nasopharynx in underfive children with community acquired pneumonia and their antimicrobial resistance. The study was carried out in 4 Primary Health Clinics in Majalaya sub-district, Bandung, Indonesia. All underfives with cough or difficult breathing and classified as having non-severe pneumonia (WHO guidelines, were included in the study. Nasopharyngeal swabs (CDC/WHO Manual were obtained by the doctor, the swabs were placed in Amies transport medium and stored in a sterile jar before taken to the laboratory in the same day. All children were treated with co-trimoxazole. During the nine month study, 698 children with clinical signs of non-severe pneumonia were enrolled. About 25% of the nasopharyngeal specimens yielded bacterial isolates; the two most frequently found were S. pneumoniae and S. epidermidis. The antimicrobial resistance test to co-trimoxazole showed 48.2% S. pneumoniae strain had full resistance and 32.7% showed intermediate resistance to co-trimoxazole. This result is almost similar to other studies from Asian countries. It seems that H. influenzae is not a problem in the study area; however, further studies are needed.

  2. Bacterial nosocomial pneumonia in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullu M

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To determine the incidence, risk factors, mortality and organisms causing nosocomial pneumonia (NP in intubated patients in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU. MATERIALS & METHODS: All patients with endotracheal (ET tube with or without mechanical ventilation (MV in a PICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital were included in this prospective study. Clinical parameters and investigations were evaluated in patients who developed nosocomial pneumonia (NP. Colonisation of the ET tube tip was studied by culture and the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the isolates was determined. RESULTS: Sixty-nine patients had an ET tube inserted and fifty-nine of these underwent MV. ET tube tip colonisation was seen in 70 out of 88 ET tubes inserted. The incidence of NP in patients with ET tube was 27.54% (7.96/100 days of ET intubation. NP developed only in patients undergoing MV. The main risk factors for developing NP were - duration of MV and duration of stay in the PICU. Age, sex, immunocompromised status and altered sensorium did not increase the risk of NP. The mortality in cases with NP was 47. 37%. E. coli and Klebsiella were the commonest organisms isolated from the ET tube tip cultures with maximum susceptibility to amikacin and cefotaxime. CONCLUSIONS: NP developed only in patients undergoing MV. Duration of MV and duration of stay in the PICU increased the risk of developing NP.

  3. Genome-wide identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae genes essential for bacterial replication during experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molzen, T E; Burghout, P; Bootsma, H J

    2010-01-01

    Meningitis is the most serious of invasive infections caused by the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Vaccines protect only against a limited number of serotypes, and evolving bacterial resistance to antimicrobials impedes treatment. Further insight into the molecular pathogenesis...... of invasive pneumococcal disease is required in order to enable the development of new or adjunctive treatments and/or pneumococcal vaccines that are efficient across serotypes. We applied genomic array footprinting (GAF) in the search for S. pneumoniae genes that are essential during experimental meningitis...

  4. Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you have viral pneumonia, your doctor may prescribe an antiviral medicine to ...

  5. Procalcitonin Accurately Identifies Hospitalized Children With Low Risk of Bacterial Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Chris; Ampofo, Krow; Killpack, Jarrett; Williams, Derek J; Edwards, Kathryn M; Grijalva, Carlos G; Arnold, Sandra R; McCullers, Jonathan A; Anderson, Evan J; Wunderink, Richard G; Self, Wesley H; Bramley, Anna; Jain, Seema; Pavia, Andrew T; Blaschke, Anne J

    2018-02-19

    Lower procalcitonin (PCT) concentrations are associated with reduced risk of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults, but data in children are limited. We analyzed serum PCT concentrations from children hospitalized with radiographically confirmed CAP enrolled in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) Study. Blood and respiratory specimens were tested using multiple pathogen detection methods for typical bacteria (eg, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus), atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae), and respiratory viruses. Multivariable regression was used to assess associations between PCT concentrations and etiology and severity. Among 532 children (median age, 2.4 years; interquartile range [IQR], 1.0-6.3), patients with typical bacteria had higher PCT concentrations (±viruses; n = 54; median, 6.10; IQR, 0.84-22.79 ng/mL) than those with atypical bacteria (±viruses; n = 82; median, 0.10; IQR, 0.06-0.39 ng/mL), viral pathogens only (n = 349; median, 0.33; IQR, 0.12-1.35 ng/mL), or no pathogen detected (n = 47; median, 0.44; IQR, 0.10-1.83 ng/mL) (P < .001 for all). No child with PCT <0.1 ng/mL had typical bacteria detected. Procalcitonin <0.25 ng/mL featured a 96% negative predictive value (95% confidence interval [CI], 93-99), 85% sensitivity (95% CI, 76-95), and 45% specificity (95% CI, 40-50) in identifying children without typical bacterial CAP. Lower PCT concentrations in children hospitalized with CAP were associated with a reduced risk of typical bacterial detection and may help identify children who would not benefit from antibiotic treatment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia--a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Dohn, Birthe

    2002-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis) is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To investigate the clinical importance of a positive P...... Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted....

  7. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia – a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Jensen, JS; Dohn, G

    2002-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis) is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To investigate the clinical importance of a positive P...... Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted....

  8. Failure of respiratory defenses in the pathogenesis of bacterial pneumonia of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, J L

    2014-03-01

    The respiratory system is well defended against inhaled bacteria by a dynamic system of interacting layers, including mucociliary clearance, host defense factors including antimicrobial peptides in the epithelial lining fluid, proinflammatory responses of the respiratory epithelium, resident alveolar macrophages, and recruited neutrophils and monocytes. Nevertheless, these manifold defenses are susceptible to failure as a result of stress, glucocorticoids, viral infections, abrupt exposure to cold air, and poor air quality. When some of these defenses fail, the lung can be colonized by bacterial pathogens that are equipped to evade the remaining defenses, resulting in the development of pneumonia. This review considers the mechanisms by which these predisposing factors compromise the defenses of the lung, with a focus on the development of bacterial pneumonia in cattle and supplemented with advances based on mouse models and the study of human disease. Deepening our understanding of how the respiratory defenses fail is expected to lead to interventions that restore these dynamic immune responses and prevent disease.

  9. Risk factors and bacterial spectrum for pneumonia after abdominal surgery in elderly Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; A, Yongjun; Hu, Zongqiang; Cun, Dongyun; Liu, Feng; Li, Wen; Hu, Mingdao

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pneumonia is a common complication of abdominal surgery in the elderly. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors and bacterial spectrum for pneumonia after abdominal surgery in elderly Chinese patients. We performed a case-control study in a total of 5431 patients aged 65 years and over who had undergone abdominal surgery at the 2nd affiliated hospital of Kunming medical college between June 2003 and June 2011. Postoperative pneumonia developed in 86 patients (1.58%). Gram-negative bacilli were the principal microorganisms (82.86%) isolated from patients. The most common organisms isolated were Klebsiella spp. (28.57%), Acinetobacter spp. (17.14%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17.14%). Multivariate analysis confirmed the following to be independent risk factors for postoperative pneumonia in the elderly after abdominal surgery: age ≥70 (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.16-3.22, p=0.01), upper abdominal surgery (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.18-3.64, p=0.01) and duration of operation >3 h (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.49-4.15, p=0.00). Identifying these risk factors may help achieve better prevention and treatment for postoperative pneumonia in elderly patients after abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Age-related risk factors for bacterial aetiology in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahuquillo-Arce, José M; Menéndez, Rosario; Méndez, Raúl; Amara-Elori, Isabel; Zalacain, Rafael; Capelastegui, Alberto; Aspa, Javier; Borderías, Luis; Martín-Villasclaras, Juan J; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; de Castro, Felipe Rodriguez; Rello, Jordi; Molinos, Luis; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Torres, Antoni

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of age and comorbidities, smoking and alcohol use on microorganisms in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A prospective multicentre study was performed with 4304 patients. We compared microbiological results, bacterial aetiology, smoking, alcohol abuse and comorbidities in three age groups: young adults (65 years). Bacterial aetiology was identified in 1522 (35.4%) patients. In seniors, liver disease was independently associated with Gram-negative bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae and Enterobacteriaceae), COPD with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (OR = 2.69 (1.46-4.97)) and Staphylococcus aureus (OR = 2.8 (1.24-6.3)) and neurological diseases with S. aureus. In adults, diabetes mellitus (DM) was a risk factor for Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. aureus, and COPD for H. influenzae (OR = 3.39 (1.06-10.83)). In young adults, DM was associated with S. aureus. Smoking was a risk factor for Legionella pneumophila regardless of age. Alcohol intake was associated with mixed aetiology and Coxiella burnetii in seniors, and with S. pneumoniae in young adults. It should be considered that the bacterial aetiology may differ according to the patient's age, comorbidities, smoking and alcohol abuse. More extensive microbiological testing is warranted in those with risk factors for infrequent microorganisms. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. Present and future etiological treatment of bacterial pneumonia 3. The antibacterial drugs under development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Abaturov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapid spread of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains necessitates the development of new antibacterial agents and a review of the guidelines for etiological treatment of bacterial infections, including pneumonia. Currently, new antibacterial agents are being developed that disrupt the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, teichoic and lipoteichoic acids, and also block the attachment of virulent factors to the bacterial wall. New molecules of old classes of antibiotics and representatives of new classes of antibiotics with their targets (lipid II and III, teichoic and lipoteichoic acids, alanine racemase, and sortase A will become practical tools in clinical practice in the very near future. The goals and mechanisms of action of new antibacterial compounds predetermine their clinical prospects in future strategies for the treatment of infectious bacterial diseases.

  12. Association of C-Reactive Protein With Bacterial and Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Associated Pneumonia Among Children Aged <5 Years in the PERCH Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Melissa M; Le, Tham; O'Brien, Katherine L; Murdoch, David R; Prosperi, Christine; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R; Hammitt, Laura L; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Awori, Juliet O; Baillie, Vicky L; Cascio, Stephanie; Chuananon, Somchai; DeLuca, Andrea N; Driscoll, Amanda J; Ebruke, Bernard E; Endtz, Hubert P; Kaewpan, Anek; Kahn, Geoff; Karani, Angela; Karron, Ruth A; Moore, David P; Park, Daniel E; Rahman, Mohammed Ziaur; Salaudeen, Rasheed; Seidenberg, Phil; Somwe, Somwe Wa; Sylla, Mamadou; Tapia, Milagritos D; Zeger, Scott L; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Madhi, Shabir A

    2017-06-15

    Lack of a gold standard for identifying bacterial and viral etiologies of pneumonia has limited evaluation of C-reactive protein (CRP) for identifying bacterial pneumonia. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of CRP for identifying bacterial vs respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pneumonia in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) multicenter case-control study. We measured serum CRP levels in cases with World Health Organization-defined severe or very severe pneumonia and a subset of community controls. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of elevated CRP for "confirmed" bacterial pneumonia (positive blood culture or positive lung aspirate or pleural fluid culture or polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) compared to "RSV pneumonia" (nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal or induced sputum PCR-positive without confirmed/suspected bacterial pneumonia). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to assess the performance of elevated CRP in distinguishing these cases. Among 601 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative tested controls, 3% had CRP ≥40 mg/L. Among 119 HIV-negative cases with confirmed bacterial pneumonia, 77% had CRP ≥40 mg/L compared with 17% of 556 RSV pneumonia cases. The ROC analysis produced an area under the curve of 0.87, indicating very good discrimination; a cut-point of 37.1 mg/L best discriminated confirmed bacterial pneumonia (sensitivity 77%) from RSV pneumonia (specificity 82%). CRP ≥100 mg/L substantially improved specificity over CRP ≥40 mg/L, though at a loss to sensitivity. Elevated CRP was positively associated with confirmed bacterial pneumonia and negatively associated with RSV pneumonia in PERCH. CRP may be useful for distinguishing bacterial from RSV-associated pneumonia, although its role in discriminating against other respiratory viral-associated pneumonia needs further study. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  13. [A case of pulmonary-limited Wegener granulomatosis mimicking bacterial pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugajin, Motoi; Miwa, Seiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Shirai, Masahiro; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Chida, Kingo

    2011-04-01

    A 56-year-old woman who had suffered from systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren syndrome was admitted complaining of persistent cough. Chest X-ray films showed an infiltrative shadow in the right middle lung field. Her serum PR3-ANCA titer was high, and granulomatous inflammation with Langhans giant cell was noted in a transbronchial biopsy specimen. About 3 months later, purulent sputum and high grade fever developed, with a new infiltrative shadow in the left upper lung field noted on a chest X-ray film. We treated her based on a diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, but her condition did not improve. We finally gave her a diagnosis of pulmonary-limited Wegener's granulomatosis. Her condition improved with the administration of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, prednisolone and cyclophosphamide. We report a case of pulmonary-limited Wegener granulomatosis which mimicked bacterial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This case suggests that Wegener's granulomatosis should be considered on encountering pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

  14. Chemical interference with iron transport systems to suppress bacterial growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Yang

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient for the growth of most bacteria. To obtain iron, bacteria have developed specific iron-transport systems located on the membrane surface to uptake iron and iron complexes such as ferrichrome. Interference with the iron-acquisition systems should be therefore an efficient strategy to suppress bacterial growth and infection. Based on the chemical similarity of iron and ruthenium, we used a Ru(II complex R-825 to compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae. R-825 inhibited the bacterial growth of S. pneumoniae and stimulated the expression of PiuA, the iron-binding protein in the ferrichrome-uptake system on the cell surface. R-825 treatment decreased the cellular content of iron, accompanying with the increase of Ru(II level in the bacterium. When the piuA gene (SPD_0915 was deleted in the bacterium, the mutant strain became resistant to R-825 treatment, with decreased content of Ru(II. Addition of ferrichrome can rescue the bacterial growth that was suppressed by R-825. Fluorescence spectral quenching showed that R-825 can bind with PiuA in a similar pattern to the ferrichrome-PiuA interaction in vitro. These observations demonstrated that Ru(II complex R-825 can compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport system to enter S. pneumoniae, reduce the cellular iron supply, and thus suppress the bacterial growth. This finding suggests a novel antimicrobial approach by interfering with iron-uptake pathways, which is different from the mechanisms used by current antibiotics.

  15. The role of solithromycin in the management of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bambeke, Françoise; Tulkens, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    The fluoroketolide solithromycin is 2-fold more potent in vitro than telithromycin against pneumococci (including macrolide-resistant strains) and Haemophilus influenzae and very active on pathogens causing atypical pneumonia. In contrast, it is a 30-fold less potent inhibitor of nicotinic receptors incriminated in telithromycin toxicity. In Phase II/III trials, oral solithromycin once-daily (800 mg on day 1; 400 mg on days 2-5) proved effective and safe when compared to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). A Phase III intravenous trial vs. moxifloxacin has been recently completed for the same indication. Solithromycin may restore interest in ketolides as a first-line therapy for CAPB. Solithromycin safety should nevertheless be confirmed in larger populations allowing for detection of rare adverse events.

  16. [Pathogen distribution and bacterial resistance in children with severe community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun-Yun; Luo, Rong; Fu, Zhou

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the distribution of pathogens and bacterial resistance in children with severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A total of 522 children with severe CAP who were hospitalized in 2016 were enrolled as study subjects. According to their age, they were divided into infant group (402 infants aged 28 days to 1 year), young children group (73 children aged 1 to 3 years), preschool children group (35 children aged 3 to 6 years), and school-aged children group (12 children aged ≥6 years). According to the onset season, all children were divided into spring group (March to May, 120 children), summer group (June to August, 93 children), autumn group (September to November, 105 children), and winter group (December to February, 204 children). Sputum specimens from the deep airway were collected from all patients. The phoenix-100 automatic bacterial identification system was used for bacterial identification and drug sensitivity test. The direct immunofluorescence assay was used to detect seven common respiratory viruses. The quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT). Of all the 522 children with severe CAP, 419 (80.3%) were found to have pathogens, among whom 190 (45.3%) had mixed infection. A total of 681 strains of pathogens were identified, including 371 bacterial strains (54.5%), 259 viral strains (38.0%), 12 fungal strains (1.8%), 15 MP strains (2.2%), and 24 CT strains (3.5%). There were significant differences in the distribution of bacterial, viral, MP, and fungal infections between different age groups (Presistance rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae to erythromycin, tetracycline, and clindamycin reached above 85%, and the drug-resistance rates of Staphylococcus aureus to penicillin, erythromycin, and clindamycin were above 50%; they were all sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid. The drug-resistance rates of Haemophilus influenzae to cefaclor and cefuroxime were above 60%, but it was

  17. What Is Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Pneumonia Pneumonia Also known as Pneumonia is a bacterial, viral, ... t last as long Fewer serious complications Pneumococcal pneumonia vaccines Two vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal ...

  18. M2b Monocytes Provoke Bacterial Pneumonia and Gut Bacteria-Associated Sepsis in Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimoto, Yusuke; Asai, Akira; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Ito, Ichiaki; Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Garcia, Melanie C; Suzuki, Sumihiro; Kobayashi, Makiko; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Suzuki, Fujio

    2015-12-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption markedly impairs host antibacterial defense against opportunistic infections. γ-irradiated NOD-SCID IL-2Rγ(null) mice inoculated with nonalcoholic PBMCs (control PBMC chimeras) resisted Klebsiella pneumonia and gut bacteria-associated sepsis, whereas the chimeras created with alcoholic PBMCs (alcoholic PBMC chimeras) were very susceptible to these infections. M1 monocytes (IL-12(+)IL-10(-)CD163(-)CD14(+) cells), major effector cells in antibacterial innate immunity, were not induced by a bacterial Ag in alcoholic PBMC cultures, and M2b monocytes (CCL1(+)CD163(+)CD14(+) cells), which predominated in alcoholic PBMCs, were shown to be inhibitor cells on the Ag-stimulated monocyte conversion from quiescent monocytes to M1 monocytes. CCL1, which functions to maintain M2b macrophage properties, was produced by M2b monocytes isolated from alcoholic PBMCs. These M2b monocytes reverted to quiescent monocytes (IL-12(-)IL-10(-)CCL1(-)CD163(-)CD14(+) cells) in cultures supplemented with CCL1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide, and the subsequent quiescent monocytes easily converted to M1 monocytes under bacterial Ag stimulation. Alcoholic PBMC chimeras treated with CCL1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide were resistant against pulmonary infection by K. pneumoniae and sepsis stemming from enterococcal translocation. These results indicate that a majority of monocytes polarize to an M2b phenotype in association with alcohol abuse, and this polarization contributes to the increased susceptibility of alcoholics to gut and lung infections. Bacterial pneumonia and gut bacteria-associated sepsis, frequently seen in alcoholics, can be controlled through the polarization of macrophage phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Bronchoalveolar lavage amylase is associated with risk factors for aspiration and predicts bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Curtis H; Moazed, Farzad; DiBardino, David; Swaroop, Mamta; Wunderink, Richard G

    2013-03-01

    Aspiration of oropharyngeal or gastric contents into the respiratory tract leads to a spectrum of disorders with high morbidity. Aspiration is a diagnostic dilemma, because clinical characteristics and diagnostic tests are not effective predicting or confirming aspiration. We sought to determine whether α-amylase, a protein secreted by salivary glands and the pancreas, is elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens in patients with clinical risk factors for aspiration and whether bronchoalveolar lavage amylase predicts bacterial pneumonia. Retrospective analysis. Five adult ICUs at a tertiary care urban medical center. Mechanically ventilated patients who underwent either bronchoscopic or nonbronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage within 72 hrs of endotracheal intubation between August 1, 2008 and June 30, 2010. A total of 296 bronchoalveolar lavage amylase results from 280 patients were included in the analysis, and 155 bronchoalveolar lavage amylase specimens were obtained from patients with at least one predefined preintubation risk factor (altered consciousness, swallowing dysfunction, difficult intubation, peri-intubation vomiting, or cardiac arrest). Bronchoalveolar lavage amylase concentration increased as the number of preintubation risk factors increased (p bronchoalveolar lavage amylase was elevated in patients with bacterial pneumonia (cfu/mL ≥ 10) (p bronchoalveolar lavage amylase to differentiate between positive and negative bronchoalveolar lavage culture was 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 0.60-0.75). The lower 95% confidence interval for bronchoalveolar lavage amylase in patients with at least one preintubation risk factor for aspiration was 125.9 units/L. In multivariate analysis, bronchoalveolar lavage amylase bronchoalveolar lavage amylase is associated with risk factors for aspiration and may predict bacterial pneumonia. Bronchoalveolar lavage amylase may be useful as an early screening tool to guide management of patients suspected of

  20. Influence of the blood bacterial load on the meningeal inflammatory response in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frimodt-Møller Niels

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite bacteraemia is present in the majority of patients with pneumococcal, little is known about the influence of the systemic infection on the meningeal inflammatory response. Methods To explore the role of systemic infection on the meningeal inflammation, experimental meningitis was induced by intracisternal injection of ~1 × 106 CFU Streptococcus pneumoniae, type 3, and the 26 rabbits were either provided with ~1 × 106 CFU S. pneumoniae intravenously at 0 hour ("bacteraemic" rabbits, n = 9, immunized with paraformaldehyde-killed S. pneumoniae for 5 weeks prior to the experiment ("immunized" rabbits", n = 8, or not treated further ("control" rabbits, n = 9. WBC and bacterial concentrations were determined in CSF and blood every second hour during a 16 hours study period together with CSF IL-8 and protein levels. We also studied CSF and blood WBC levels in 153 pneumococcal meningitis patients with and without presence of bacteraemia. Results As designed, blood bacterial concentrations were significantly different among three experimental groups during the 16 hours study period (Kruskal Wallis test, P P > 0.05. Blood WBC decreased in bacteraemic rabbits between ~10–16 hours after the bacterial inoculation in contrast to an increase for both the immunized rabbits and controls (P P In patients with pneumococcal meningitis, no significant difference in CSF WBC was observed between patients with or without bacteraemia at admission (n = 103, 1740 cells/μL (123–4032 vs. n = 50, 1961 cells/μL (673–5182, respectively, P = 0.18, but there was a significant correlation between CSF and blood WBC (n = 127, Spearman rho = 0.234, P = 0.008. Conclusion Our results suggest that a decrease in peripheral WBC induced by enhanced bacteraemia in pneumococcal meningitis results in an attenuated CSF pleocytosis.

  1. Ginseng treatment reduces bacterial load and lung pathology in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Z; Johansen, H K; Faber, V

    1997-01-01

    improved bacterial clearance from the lungs (P mast cell numbers in the lung foci (P ... the inflammation and antibody responses could be changed by treatment with the Chinese herbal medicine ginseng. An aqueous extract of ginseng was injected subcutaneously, and cortisone and saline were used as controls. Two weeks after challenge with P. aeruginosa, the ginseng-treated group showed a significantly...... against P. aeruginosa sonicate and a shift from an acute type to a chronic type of lung inflammation compared to those in the control and cortisone-treated groups were observed. These findings indicate that ginseng treatment of an experimental P. aeruginosa pneumonia in rats promotes a cellular response...

  2. Importance of Bacterial Replication and Alveolar Macrophage-Independent Clearance Mechanisms during Early Lung Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camberlein, Emilie; Cohen, Jonathan M.; José, Ricardo; Hyams, Catherine J.; Callard, Robin; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Edwards, Lindsey A.; Marshall, Helina; van Rooijen, Nico; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of alveolar macrophages for host immunity during early Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection is well established, the contribution and relative importance of other innate immunity mechanisms and of bacterial factors are less clear. We have used a murine model of S. pneumoniae early lung infection with wild-type, unencapsulated, and para-amino benzoic acid auxotroph mutant TIGR4 strains to assess the effects of inoculum size, bacterial replication, capsule, and alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent clearance mechanisms on bacterial persistence within the lungs. Alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent (calculated indirectly) clearance half-lives and bacterial replication doubling times were estimated using a mathematical model. In this model, after infection with a high-dose inoculum of encapsulated S. pneumoniae, alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms were dominant, with a clearance half-life of 24 min compared to 135 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance. In addition, after a high-dose inoculum, successful lung infection required rapid bacterial replication, with an estimated S. pneumoniae doubling time of 16 min. The capsule had wide effects on early lung clearance mechanisms, with reduced half-lives of 14 min for alveolar macrophage-independent and 31 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance of unencapsulated bacteria. In contrast, with a lower-dose inoculum, the bacterial doubling time increased to 56 min and the S. pneumoniae alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance half-life improved to 42 min and was largely unaffected by the capsule. These data demonstrate the large effects of bacterial factors (inoculum size, the capsule, and rapid replication) and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with S. pneumoniae. PMID:25583525

  3. Efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil for bacteremia associated with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandourek, Alena; Smith, Alexander; Llorens, Lily; Thye, Dirk A; Eckburg, Paul B; Friedland, H David

    2014-02-01

    Few publications of prospective studies have described patient outcomes in community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP)-associated bacteremia. Our objective, in performing this subgroup analysis, was to assess outcomes in subjects with CABP-associated bacteremia in 2 randomized, double-blind clinical studies comparing treatment with ceftaroline fosamil versus ceftriaxone. Our analysis summarizes baseline subject demographics, distribution of baseline pathogens isolated from blood cultures, clinical response rates at Day 4, and clinical cure rates at end of therapy and test of cure (8 to 15 days after end of therapy) in subjects with bacteremic CABP in the ceFtarOline Community-acquired pneUmonia trial vS ceftriaxone in hospitalized patients (FOCUS) studies. In the FOCUS studies, 23 of 614 patients in the ceftaroline fosamil-treated group and 22 of 614 patients in the ceftriaxone-treated group had CABP-associated bacteremia. Baseline demographics were similar between groups. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common baseline bloodstream isolate. For subjects with CABP-associated bacteremia, clinical response/cure rates were similar at Day 4 (60.9% vs 59.1%), end of therapy (69.6% vs 72.7%), and test of cure (69.6% vs 68.2%) for ceftaroline fosamil and ceftriaxone, respectively. In subjects with CABP-associated bacteremia, ceftaroline fosamil demonstrated similar clinical outcomes at Day 4, end of therapy, and test of cure compared with ceftriaxone.

  4. Antimicrobial potential of Halophilic actinomycetes against multi drug resistant (MDR) ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Sana; Sajid, Imran

    2016-03-01

    A collection of forty halophilic actinomycetes isolated from water and mud samples of the saline lake at Kalar Kahar, salt range, Pakistan, was screened to investigate their antimicrobial potential against multi drug resistant (MDR) ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacterial pathogens. The isolates exhibited significant tolerance to alkaline conditions and grew well at pH 9-11. The taxonomic status of the isolated strains was determined by morphological, biochemical and physiological characterization and by 16s rRNA gene sequencing. The results revealed that majority of the isolates (90%) belong to the genus Streptomyces. Most of the isolates exhibited remarkable antimicrobial activity up to 20mm zone of inhibition against MDR ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter and Acinetobacter spp. Additionally the isolates showed moderate to high cytotoxicity in the range of 40 to 80% larval mortality against Artemia salina in a micro well cytotoxicity assay. The chemical screening or the so called metabolic fingerprinting of the methanolic extracts of each isolate, by thin layer chromatography (TLC) using various staining reagents and by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV), indicated an impressive diversity of the compounds produced by these strains. The study reveals that these halophilic actinomycetes are a promising source of bioactive compounds. The preparative scale fermentation, isolation, purification and structure elucidation of the compounds produced by them may yield novel antimicrobial or chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. Host Defense and the Airway Epithelium: Frontline Responses That Protect against Bacterial Invasion and Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Eisele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial cells are the first line of defense against invading microbes, and they protect themselves through the production of carbohydrate and protein matrices concentrated with antimicrobial products. In addition, they act as sentinels, expressing pattern recognition receptors that become activated upon sensing bacterial products and stimulate downstream recruitment and activation of immune cells which clear invading microbes. Bacterial pathogens that successfully colonize the lungs must resist these mechanisms or inhibit their production, penetrate the epithelial barrier, and be prepared to resist a barrage of inflammation. Despite the enormous task at hand, relatively few virulence factors coordinate the battle with the epithelium while simultaneously providing resistance to inflammatory cells and causing injury to the lung. Here we review mechanisms whereby airway epithelial cells recognize pathogens and activate a program of antibacterial pathways to prevent colonization of the lung, along with a few examples of how bacteria disrupt these responses to cause pneumonia.

  6. Antimicrobial and biophysical properties of surfactant supplemented with an antimicrobial peptide for treatment of bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaschewski, Brandon J H; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Keating, Eleonora; Haagsman, Henk P; Zuo, Yi Y; Yamashita, Cory M; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections represent an emerging health concern in clinical settings, and a lack of novel developments in the pharmaceutical pipeline is creating a "perfect storm" for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been suggested as future therapeutics for these drug-resistant bacteria, since they have potent broad-spectrum activity, with little development of resistance. Due to the unique structure of the lung, bacterial pneumonia has the additional problem of delivering antimicrobials to the site of infection. One potential solution is coadministration of AMPs with exogenous surfactant, allowing for distribution of the peptides to distal airways and opening of collapsed lung regions. The objective of this study was to test various surfactant-AMP mixtures with regard to maintaining pulmonary surfactant biophysical properties and bactericidal functions. We compared the properties of four AMPs (CATH-1, CATH-2, CRAMP, and LL-37) suspended in bovine lipid-extract surfactant (BLES) by assessing surfactant-AMP mixture biophysical and antimicrobial functions. Antimicrobial activity was tested against methillicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All AMP/surfactant mixtures exhibited an increase of spreading compared to a BLES control. BLES+CATH-2 mixtures had no significantly different minimum surface tension versus the BLES control. Compared to the other cathelicidins, CATH-2 retained the most bactericidal activity in the presence of BLES. The BLES+CATH-2 mixture appears to be an optimal surfactant-AMP mixture based on in vitro assays. Future directions involve investigating the potential of this mixture in animal models of bacterial pneumonia. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Antimicrobial and Biophysical Properties of Surfactant Supplemented with an Antimicrobial Peptide for Treatment of Bacterial Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Keating, Eleonora; Haagsman, Henk P.; Zuo, Yi Y.; Yamashita, Cory M.; Veldhuizen, Ruud A. W.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections represent an emerging health concern in clinical settings, and a lack of novel developments in the pharmaceutical pipeline is creating a “perfect storm” for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been suggested as future therapeutics for these drug-resistant bacteria, since they have potent broad-spectrum activity, with little development of resistance. Due to the unique structure of the lung, bacterial pneumonia has the additional problem of delivering antimicrobials to the site of infection. One potential solution is coadministration of AMPs with exogenous surfactant, allowing for distribution of the peptides to distal airways and opening of collapsed lung regions. The objective of this study was to test various surfactant-AMP mixtures with regard to maintaining pulmonary surfactant biophysical properties and bactericidal functions. We compared the properties of four AMPs (CATH-1, CATH-2, CRAMP, and LL-37) suspended in bovine lipid-extract surfactant (BLES) by assessing surfactant-AMP mixture biophysical and antimicrobial functions. Antimicrobial activity was tested against methillicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All AMP/surfactant mixtures exhibited an increase of spreading compared to a BLES control. BLES+CATH-2 mixtures had no significantly different minimum surface tension versus the BLES control. Compared to the other cathelicidins, CATH-2 retained the most bactericidal activity in the presence of BLES. The BLES+CATH-2 mixture appears to be an optimal surfactant-AMP mixture based on in vitro assays. Future directions involve investigating the potential of this mixture in animal models of bacterial pneumonia. PMID:25753641

  8. The potential of methylethylpiridinol in treatment of bacterial infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae (experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Brykhanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Investigated the activity of methylethylpiridinol (6-methyl-2-ethyl-pyridin-3-ol hydrochloride in the comprehensive treatment of the experimental bacterial infection caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae.Materials and methods. The study was conducted on clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. At the first stage of the study (in vitro studied the effect of methylethylpiridinol in concentrations 0,25–4 mM on the growth of the strain and the activity of the sublethal concentrations of antibiotics – gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, ceftazidime. In the second stage of the study (in vivo in rats Wistar simulated bacterial peritonitis by intraperitoneal injection of a suspension of Klebsiella pneumoniae and investigated the effect of methylethylpiridinol (80 mg/kg on the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy with gentamicin (30 mg/kg, ciprofloxacin (50 mg/kg, ceftazidime (120 mg/kg or tetracycline (80 mg/kg. The animal blood plasma was determined ceruloplasmin concentration (marker of the intensity of infectious-inflammatory process and thiobarbiturate-jet products, erythrocytes – the concentration of reduced glutathione, catalase and glutathione peroxidase.Results. It is found that a methylethylpiridinol inhibits the development of periodic bacterial cultures, but exhibits a pronounced antagonism with respect to gentamicin. Antioxidant slightly increases the activity of ciprofloxacin and tetracycline. The bacteriostatic effect of antioxidant reduces the action of ceftazidime in vitro. In conditions of chemotherapy by using of gentamicin and ciprofloxacin additional injection of methylethylpiridinol leads to the preservation of ceruloplasmin level to the level of non-treated animals without showing the antioxidant effect. Ceftazidime exhibits antioxidant effect, reduces the introduction of methylethylpiridinol. The antioxidant properties of methylethylpiridinol did not appear in the application of

  9. STUDY OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED BACTERIAL PNEUMONIAS PRESENTING TO TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna Rachakonda

    2017-11-01

    diagnosed as having gram-positive cocci and nearly 15% gram-negative bacilli. 5.12% had mixed organisms and 28% had normal Gram stain study. 3.20% patients had fungal elements in Gram stain study. 127 out of 156 patients were positive for bacterial pathogens by culture. Commonest organism isolated was Streptococcus pneumonia in 32.69% followed by Staph aureus in 18.59%, Klebsiella in 8.97%, Pseudomonas in 5.76%, Haemophilus influenza in 4.48%, mixed pathogens in 8.97% and Citrobacter in 1.92%. No organism was isolated by culture in 18.58%. Streptococcus pneumonia and Haemophilus influenzae organisms isolated in these patients were sensitive to routine drugs in all these patients. Nearly, 10% of Staphylococci, 7% of Klebsiella and 22% Pseudomonas organisms are found resistant to the routine drugs. Tazobactam-Piperacillin resistance was seen in both Klebsiella and Pseudomonas species and both were sensitive to meropenem. CONCLUSION Community acquired pneumonia occurs in the older age group among the adult population. Smoking has a significant correlation with development of pneumonia. Predominant number of patients are male. Bilateral and bronchopneumonia pattern is the commonest presentation. Comorbidities and initial white blood cell concentration enhance the duration of hospital stay and the values are statistically significant. Commonest organism isolated is Streptococcus pneumonia followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella, Haemophilus and Pseudomonas. Staphylococci, Klebsiella and Pseudomonas species showed resistance. Tazobactam + Piperacillin resistance is seen among Klebsiella and Pseudomonas species isolated in our centre.

  10. pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the first report in 1967, the incidence of Penicillin Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pneu- mococcus) has risen steadily worldwide, and now complicates diagnostic and treatment strategies for infections due to this organism. More worrisome is the fact that in areas where Penicillin Resistant. Streptococcus ...

  11. Allergic Airway Inflammation Decreases Lung Bacterial Burden following Acute Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection in a Neutrophil- and CCL8-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulek, Daniel E.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Moore, Martin L.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2014-01-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infection, we developed a combined model in which allergic airway inflammation and lung IL-4 and IL-13 expression were induced by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge prior to acute lung infection with K. pneumoniae. We hypothesized that preexisting allergic airway inflammation decreases lung IL-17A expression and airway neutrophil recruitment in response to acute K. pneumoniae infection and thereby increases the lung K. pneumoniae burden. As hypothesized, we found that allergic airway inflammation decreased the number of K. pneumoniae-induced airway neutrophils and lung IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 expression. Despite the marked reduction in postinfection airway neutrophilia and lung expression of Th17 cytokines, allergic airway inflammation significantly decreased the lung K. pneumoniae burden and postinfection mortality. We showed that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden was independent of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17A and partially dependent on IL-13 and STAT6. Additionally, we demonstrated that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden associated with allergic airway inflammation was both neutrophil and CCL8 dependent. These findings suggest a novel role for CCL8 in lung antibacterial immunity against K. pneumoniae and suggest new mechanisms of orchestrating lung antibacterial immunity. PMID:24958709

  12. Investigating the adaptive immune response in influenza and secondary bacterial pneumonia and nanoparticle based therapeutic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Krishnan V.

    In early 2000, influenza and its associated complications were the 7 th leading cause of death in the United States[1-4]. As of today, this major health problem has become even more of a concern, with the possibility of a potentially devastating avian flu (H5N1) or swine flu pandemic (H1N1). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), over 10 countries have reported transmission of influenza A (H5N1) virus to humans as of June 2006 [5]. In response to this growing concern, the United States pledged over $334 million dollars in international aid for battling influenza[1-4]. The major flu pandemic of the early 1900's provided the first evidence that secondary bacterial pneumonia (not primary viral pneumonia) was the major cause of death in both community and hospital-based settings. Secondary bacterial infections currently account for 35-40% mortality following a primary influenza viral infection [1, 6]. The first component of this work addresses the immunological mechanisms that predispose patients to secondary bacterial infections following a primary influenza viral infection. By assessing host immune responses through various immune-modulatory tools, such as use of volatile anesthetics (i.e. halothane) and Apilimod/STA-5326 (an IL-12/Il-23 transcription blocker), we provide experimental evidence that demonstrates that the overactive adaptive Th1 immune response is critical in mediating increased susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections. We also present data that shows that suppressing the adaptive Th1 immune response enhances innate immunity, specifically in alveolar macrophages, by favoring a pro anti-bacterial phenotype. The second component of this work addresses the use of nanotechnology to deliver therapeutic modalities that affect the primary viral and associated secondary bacterial infections post influenza. First, we used surface functionalized quantum dots for selective targeting of lung alveolar macrophages both in vitro and in vivo

  13. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Secondary to Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections or Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, Jose A.; Maggiore, Christy R.; Cole, Phillip; Smith, Alexander; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, H. David

    2014-01-01

    Background The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro? Utilization Registry is designed to collect information on the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in the Unites States. This report presents data on the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) secondary to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Methods Patients diagnosed with ABSSSI or CABP were identified through sequential review of rando...

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Scott A; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Rubino, Christopher M; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Riccobene, Todd; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-11-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of ceftaroline fosamil, is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic. A population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model for ceftaroline was developed in NONMEM® using data from 185 healthy subjects and 92 patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI). Data from 128 patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were used for external model validation. Healthy subjects received 50-2,000 mg ceftaroline fosamil via intravenous (IV) infusion over 1 hour or intramuscular (IM) injection q12h or q24h. ABSSSI and CABP patients received 600 mg of ceftaroline fosamil IV over 1 hour q12h. A three-compartment model with zero-order IV or parallel first-order IM input and first-order elimination described ceftaroline fosamil PK. A two-compartment model with first-order conversion of prodrug to ceftaroline and parallel linear and saturable elimination described ceftaroline PK. Creatinine clearance was the primary determinant of ceftaroline exposure. Good agreement between the observed data and both population (r(2)  = 0.93) and individual post-hoc (r(2)  = 0.98) predictions suggests the PPK model can adequately approximate ceftaroline PK using covariate information. Such a PPK model can evaluate dose adjustments for patients with renal impairment and generate ceftaroline exposures for use in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessments of efficacy in patients with ABSSSI or CABP. © 2013, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  15. Assessment of ceftaroline fosamil in the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae: insights from two randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorr, Andrew F; Kollef, Marin; Eckburg, Paul B; Llorens, Lily; Friedland, H David

    2013-03-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil resulted in higher cure rates than ceftriaxone in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in 2 randomized trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2). The present analysis examines the subgroup of patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection to determine whether the apparent difference in cure rates persists after adjusting for potential covariates. We retrospectively pooled subjects with S. pneumoniae isolated at baseline in the original studies and employed logistic regression to evaluate the independent relationship between clinical cure and treatment with ceftaroline. Covariates evaluated included demographics, severity of illness, bacteremia, and pathogen characteristics. The final cohort included 139 subjects (69 ceftaroline, 70 ceftriaxone). Unadjusted cure rates were 85.5% and 68.6% (P = 0.009) in the ceftaroline and ceftriaxone groups, respectively. After logistic regression, ceftaroline remained associated with higher cure rates. Our findings indicate that ceftaroline may result in improved outcomes of S. pneumoniae pneumonia. Formal clinical trials are warranted to confirm this hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Linezolid Exerts Greater Bacterial Clearance but No Modification of Host Lung Gene Expression Profiling: A Mouse MRSA Pneumonia Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwang Chen

    Full Text Available Linezolid (LZD is beneficial to patients with MRSA pneumonia, but whether and how LZD influences global host lung immune responses at the mRNA level during MRSA-mediated pneumonia is still unknown.A lethal mouse model of MRSA pneumonia mediated by USA300 was employed to study the influence of LZD on survival, while the sublethal mouse model was used to examine the effect of LZD on bacterial clearance and lung gene expression during MRSA pneumonia. LZD (100mg/kg/day, IP was given to C57Bl6 mice for three days. On Day 1 and Day 3 post infection, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF protein concentration and levels of cytokines including IL6, TNFα, IL1β, Interferon-γ and IL17 were measured. In the sublethal model, left lungs were used to determine bacterial clearance and right lungs for whole-genome transcriptional profiling of lung immune responses.LZD therapy significantly improved survival and bacterial clearance. It also significantly decreased BALF protein concentration and levels of cytokines including IL6, IL1β, Interferon-γ and IL17. No significant gene expression changes in the mouse lungs were associated with LZD therapy.LZD is beneficial to MRSA pneumonia, but it does not modulate host lung immune responses at the transcriptional level.

  17. Comparison of bacterial cultivation, PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry as tools for diagnosis of Haemophilus somnus pneumonia in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tegtmeier, Conny; Angen, Øystein; Ahrens, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the potential of bacterial cultivation (BC), PCR, in situ hybridisation (ISH), and immunohistochemistry (MC) in the diagnosis of Haemophilus somnus, when applied to pneumonic bovine tissue. Lungs from 65 field cases submitted for bacteriological examina...... be considered as a supplementary tool in the diagnosis of H. somnus induced calf pneumonia....

  18. Impact of bacterial load on pharmacodynamics and susceptibility breakpoints for tigecycline and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsala, Marilena; Vourli, Sophia; Daikos, George L; Tsakris, Athanassios; Zerva, Loukia; Mouton, Johan W; Meletiadis, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of other therapeutic options, tigecycline is used to treat bloodstream infections and pneumonia caused by carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (CP-Kp). In this study, the standard and high tigecycline dosing regimens were simulated and tested against different inocula of CP-Kp isolates in an in vitro pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model. Four susceptible isolates (EUCAST MICs of 0.125-1 mg/L) and two intermediately susceptible CP-Kp clinical isolates (MICs of 2 mg/L) were tested at three different inocula (10 7 , 10 5 and 10 3 cfu/mL), simulating tigecycline serum and lung fC max concentrations of 0.15 and 1.5 mg/L, respectively, of 50 mg tigecycline every 12 h for 48 h. The exposure-effect relationships were described and the probability of target attainment was calculated for each inoculum in order to determine PK/PD susceptibility breakpoints. No cfu reduction was observed at serum concentrations. At lung concentrations and low inocula, a bacteriostatic and killing effect was found for isolates with MICs of 0.25 and 0.125 mg/L, respectively. The fAUC 0-24 /MIC (tAUC 0-24 /MIC) associated with half-maximal activity was 16 (150) with 10 3 cfu/mL, 28 (239) with 10 5 cfu/mL and 79 (590) with 10 7 cfu/mL. A PK/PD susceptibility breakpoint of ≤0.06 and ≤0.125 mg/L for bacteraemia with ≤10 1 cfu/mL and ≤0.25 and ≤0.5 mg/L for pneumonia with ≤10 3 cfu/g was determined for the standard tigecycline dose of 50 mg and the higher dose of 100 mg, respectively. Tigecycline monotherapy with either 50 or 100 mg would not be sufficient for most patients with bacteraemia, though the higher dose of 100 mg could be effective for patients with pneumonia with low bacterial load. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Acute bacterial meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to the antimicrobian agents and their serotypes Meningite bacteriana aguda por Streptococcus pneumoniae resistente aos antimicrobianos e seus sorotipos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maciel de Oliveira Rossoni

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this study are to evaluate the resistance rates of Streptococcus pneumonia to penicillin G, ceftriaxone and vancomycin in patients with meningitis; to analyze possible risk factors to the antimicrobian resistance; to describe the serotypes detected and to suggest an initial empirical treatment for meningitis. The sensitiveness and serotypes of all isolated S. pneumoniae of patients with acute bacterial meningitis received by the Paraná State Central Laboratory from April 2001 to august 2002 have been evaluated. One hundred S. pneumoniae have been isolated, of which 15% were resistant to penicillin, 1% to cephalosporin and 0% to vancomycin. The serotypes most found were 14 (19%, 3 and 23F (10% each. When only the resistant serotypes were analyzed, the most prevalent was the 14 with 44%. The risk factors found in relation to the S. pneumoniae resistance were: age under one year old (p=0.01 and previous use of antibiotic (p=0.046. The resistance rates found, which were moderate to penicillin, low to cephalosporin and neutral to vancomycin, suggest the isolated use of a 3rd generation cephalosporin as an initial empirical therapy for the treatment of acute bacterial meningitis with a communitarian background.Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar as taxas de resistência de Streptococcus pneumoniae, isolados de pacientes com meningite, à penicilina G, ceftriaxona e vancomicina; avaliar possíveis fatores de risco para resistência antimicrobiana; descrever os sorotipos encontrados e sugerir a terapêutica empírica inicial para meningite. Foram isoladas 100 amostras de S. pneumoniae, encontrando-se 15% de resistência à penicilina, 1% à cefalosporina e 0% à vancomicina. Os sorotipos mais encontrados foram 14 (19%, 3 e 23F (10% cada. Analisando-se os resistentes, o sorotipo 14 (44% também foi o mais freqüente. Os fatores de risco para resistência de S. pneumoniae encontrados foram: idade menor que um ano (p=0,01 e o uso

  20. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Christy; Vazquez, Jose A; Guervil, David J; Ramani, Ananthakrishnan; Jandourek, Alena; Cole, Phillip; Friedland, H David

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter study evaluating the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection. Data were collected between August 2011 and February 2013, from 398 evaluable patients receiving treatment at 33 sites in the USA. This manuscript presents data collected from patients with CABP who received care in an intensive care unit (ICU) or in general medical wards (35% and 64% of evaluable patients, respectively). The majority of ICU and general medical ward patients had underlying comorbidities (78% and 74%, respectively), with structural lung disease being the most common (42% in the ICU and 40% in general medical wards). Patients admitted to the ICU had a longer duration of stay, a longer duration of symptoms before treatment, and a longer duration of ceftaroline fosamil therapy than did general medical ward patients. Most patients treated in the ICU and in general medical wards were given ceftaroline fosamil as second-line therapy (87% and 80%, respectively). The overall rate of clinical success for patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil was 68% in the ICU and 85% in the general medical wards. Clinical success for patients receiving ceftaroline fosamil as a second-line agent was 84% in the ICU and 86% in general medical wards. These findings indicate that ceftaroline fosamil is a viable treatment option for CABP, both in the ICU and in general medical wards.

  1. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udeani, George; Evans, John; Cole, Phillip; Friedland, H David

    2014-08-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter study, assessing the contemporary use of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection. This article discusses the data collected from 528 evaluable patients with CABP, from 39 sites in the United States, between August 2011 and April 2013. The majority of patients (51%) were elderly (aged ≥ 65 years), most of whom were treated in general hospital wards (70%). Approximately one quarter of elderly patients had ≥ 2 comorbidities (26%), the most common of which was structural lung disease (51%). The majority of elderly patients received ceftaroline fosamil as second-line therapy (85%), concurrently with other antibiotics (61%). Similar patterns of ceftaroline fosamil usage were noted in younger patients (aged ceftaroline fosamil was 81% for elderly patients with CABP and 82% for younger patients. These data suggest that ceftaroline fosamil is a potentially effective treatment option for CABP in the elderly.

  2. Spotlight on solithromycin in the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia: design, development, and potential place in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Bryan J; Surani, Salim; Deol, Harmeet S; Mbadugha, Uche J; Udeani, George

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) is a leading cause of death worldwide. However, antibacterial agents used to treat common pathogens in CABP are marked by adverse drug events and increasing antimicrobial resistance. Solithromycin is a new ketolide antibiotic, based on the macrolide antibiotic structure, being studied for use in CABP. It has efficacy in vitro against the common causative pathogens in CABP including Streptococcus pneumoniae , Haemophilus influenzae , and atypical pathogens. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, it has been demonstrated efficacious as a single agent for treatment of CABP with an apparently milder adverse event profile than alternative agents.

  3. The Effect of Antibiotic Exposure and Specimen Volume on the Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Children With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Amanda J; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Howie, Stephen R C; Adrian, Peter V; Ahmed, Dilruba; DeLuca, Andrea N; Ebruke, Bernard E; Gitahi, Caroline; Higdon, Melissa M; Kaewpan, Anek; Karani, Angela; Karron, Ruth A; Mazumder, Razib; McLellan, Jessica; Moore, David P; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Rhodes, Julia; Saifullah, Md; Seidenberg, Phil; Sow, Samba O; Tamboura, Boubou; Zeger, Scott L; Murdoch, David R

    2017-06-15

    Antibiotic exposure and specimen volume are known to affect pathogen detection by culture. Here we assess their effects on bacterial pathogen detection by both culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in children. PERCH (Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health) is a case-control study of pneumonia in children aged 1-59 months investigating pathogens in blood, nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs, and induced sputum by culture and PCR. Antibiotic exposure was ascertained by serum bioassay, and for cases, by a record of antibiotic treatment prior to specimen collection. Inoculated blood culture bottles were weighed to estimate volume. Antibiotic exposure ranged by specimen type from 43.5% to 81.7% in 4223 cases and was detected in 2.3% of 4863 controls. Antibiotics were associated with a 45% reduction in blood culture yield and approximately 20% reduction in yield from induced sputum culture. Reduction in yield of Streptococcus pneumoniae from NP culture was approximately 30% in cases and approximately 32% in controls. Several bacteria had significant but marginal reductions (by 5%-7%) in detection by PCR in NP/OP swabs from both cases and controls, with the exception of S. pneumoniae in exposed controls, which was detected 25% less frequently compared to nonexposed controls. Bacterial detection in induced sputum by PCR decreased 7% for exposed compared to nonexposed cases. For every additional 1 mL of blood culture specimen collected, microbial yield increased 0.51% (95% confidence interval, 0.47%-0.54%), from 2% when volume was ≤1 mL to approximately 6% for ≥3 mL. Antibiotic exposure and blood culture volume affect detection of bacterial pathogens in children with pneumonia and should be accounted for in studies of etiology and in clinical management. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  4. Simultaneous Detection of Key Bacterial Pathogens Related to Pneumonia and Meningitis Using Multiplex PCR Coupled With Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia and meningitis continue to present an enormous public health burden and pose a major threat to young children. Among the causative organisms of pneumonia and meningitis, bacteria are the most common causes of serious disease and deaths. It is challenging to accurately and rapidly identify these agents. To solve this problem, we developed and validated a 12-plex PCR coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS method (bacterial pathogen-mass spectrometry, BP-MS that can be used to simultaneously screen for 11 key bacterial pathogens related to pneumonia and meningitis. Forty-six nasopharyngeal swabs and 12 isolates were used to determine the specificity of the method. The results showed that, using the BP-MS method, we could accurately identify the expected bacteria without cross-reactivity with other pathogens. For the 11 target bacterial pathogens, the analytical sensitivity of the BP-MS method was as low as 10 copies/reaction. To further evaluate the clinical effectiveness of this method, 204 nasopharyngeal swabs from hospitalized children with suspected pneumonia were tested using this method. In total, 81.9% (167/204 of the samples were positive for at least one of the 11 target pathogens. Among the 167 bacteria-positive samples, the rate of multiple infections was 55.7% (93/167, and the most frequent combination was Streptococcus pneumoniae with Haemophilus influenzae, representing 46.2% (43/93 two-pathogen mixed infections. We used real-time PCR and nested PCR to confirm positive results, with identical results obtained for 81.4% (136/167 of the samples. The BP-MS method is a sensitive and specific molecular detection technique in a multiplex format and with high sample throughput. Therefore, it will be a powerful tool for pathogen screening and antibiotic selection at an early stage of disease.

  5. Co-infections with respiratory viruses in dogs with bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, S J; Lappalainen, A; Rajamäki, M M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia (BP) is an inflammation of the lower airways and lung parenchyma secondary to bacterial infection. The pathogenesis of BP in dogs is complex and the role of canine respiratory viruses has not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of viral co-infections in dogs with BP and to assess demographic or clinical variables as well as disease severity associated with viral co-infections. Twenty household dogs with BP caused by opportunistic bacteria and 13 dogs with chronic (>30 days) tracheobronchitis caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica (BBTB). Prospective cross-sectional observational study. Diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and laboratory findings, diagnostic imaging, and cytologic and microbiologic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage or transtracheal wash fluid. Canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus, canine herpes virus, canine influenzavirus, canine distemper virus, canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) and canine pneumovirus, as well as B. bronchiseptica and Mycoplasma spp. were analyzed in respiratory samples using PCR assays. CPIV was detected in 7/20 and CRCoV in 1/20 dogs with BP. Respiratory viruses were not detected in dogs with BBTB. There were no significant differences in clinical variables between BP dogs with and without a viral co-infection. Respiratory viruses were found frequently in dogs with BP and may therefore play an important role in the etiology and pathogenesis of BP. Clinical variables and disease severity did not differ between BP dogs with and without viral co-infection. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggiore C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Christy Maggiore,1 Jose A Vazquez,2 David J Guervil,3 Ananthakrishnan Ramani,4 Alena Jandourek,5 Phillip Cole,5 H David Friedland5 1Gulf Coast Medical Center, Panama City, FL, USA; 2Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA; 3Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA; 4Mountain View Medical Practice (Columbia Memorial Hospital, Catskill, NY, USA; 5Cerexa, Inc., Oakland, CA, USA Abstract: The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro® Utilization Registry (CAPTURE is a multicenter study evaluating the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection. Data were collected between August 2011 and February 2013, from 398 evaluable patients receiving treatment at 33 sites in the USA. This manuscript presents data collected from patients with CABP who received care in an intensive care unit (ICU or in general medical wards (35% and 64% of evaluable patients, respectively. The majority of ICU and general medical ward patients had underlying comorbidities (78% and 74%, respectively, with structural lung disease being the most common (42% in the ICU and 40% in general medical wards. Patients admitted to the ICU had a longer duration of stay, a longer duration of symptoms before treatment, and a longer duration of ceftaroline fosamil therapy than did general medical ward patients. Most patients treated in the ICU and in general medical wards were given ceftaroline fosamil as second-line therapy (87% and 80%, respectively. The overall rate of clinical success for patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil was 68% in the ICU and 85% in the general medical wards. Clinical success for patients receiving ceftaroline fosamil as a second-line agent was 84% in the ICU and 86% in general medical wards. These findings indicate that ceftaroline fosamil is a viable treatment option for CABP, both in the ICU and in general

  7. Understanding the bacterial polysaccharide antigenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae versus Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Gonzalez-Outeiriño, Jorge; Foley, B Lachele; Beckham, Meredith L; Jennings, Harold J; Foote, Simon; Ford, Michael G; Woods, Robert J

    2006-05-23

    Bacterial surface capsular polysaccharides (CPS) that are similar in carbohydrate sequence may differ markedly in immunogenicity and antigenicity. The structural origin of these phenomena is poorly understood. Such a case is presented by the Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus; GBS) type III (GBSIII) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn) type 14 (Pn14), which share closely related CPS sequences. Nevertheless, antibodies (Abs) against GBSIII rarely cross-react with the CPS from Pn14. To establish the origin for the variation in CPS antigenicity, models for the immune complexes of CPS fragments from GBSIII and Pn14, with the variable fragment (Fv) of a GBS-specific mAb (mAb 1B1), are presented. The complexes are generated through a combination of comparative Ab modeling and automated ligand docking, followed by explicitly solvated 10-ns molecular dynamics simulations. The relationship between carbohydrate sequence and antigenicity is further quantified through the computation of interaction energies using the Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA) method, augmented by conformational entropy estimates. Despite the electrostatic differences between Pn14 and GBSIII CPS, analysis indicates that entropic penalties are primarily responsible for the loss of affinity of the highly flexible Pn14 CPS for mAb 1B1. The similarity of the solution conformation of the relatively rigid GBSIII CPS with that in the immune complex characterizes the previously undescribed 3D structure of the conformational epitope. The analysis provides a comprehensive interpretation for a large body of biochemical and immunological data related to Ab recognition of bacterial polysaccharides and should be applicable to other Ab-carbohydrate interactions.

  8. Solithromycin: A Novel Fluoroketolide for the Treatment of Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanel, George G; Hartel, Erika; Adam, Heather; Zelenitsky, Sheryl; Zhanel, Michael A; Golden, Alyssa; Schweizer, Frank; Gorityala, Bala; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe R S; Walkty, Andrew J; Gin, Alfred S; Hoban, Daryl J; Lynch, Joseph P; Karlowsky, James A

    2016-12-01

    Solithromycin is a novel fluoroketolide developed in both oral and intravenous formulations to address increasing macrolide resistance in pathogens causing community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). When compared with its macrolide and ketolide predecessors, solithromycin has several structural modifications which increase its ribosomal binding and reduce its propensity to known macrolide resistance mechanisms. Solithromycin, like telithromycin, affects 50S ribosomal subunit formation and function, as well as causing frame-shift errors during translation. However, unlike telithromycin, which binds to two sites on the ribosome, solithromycin has three distinct ribosomal binding sites. Its desosamine sugar interacts at the A2058/A2059 cleft in domain V (as all macrolides do), an extended alkyl-aryl side chain interacts with base pair A752-U2609 in domain II (similar to telithromycin), and a fluorine at C-2 of solithromycin provides additional binding to the ribosome. Studies describing solithromycin activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae have reported that it does not induce erm-mediated resistance because it lacks a cladinose moiety, and that it is less susceptible than other macrolides to mef-mediated efflux due to its increased ribosomal binding and greater intrinsic activity. Solithromycin has demonstrated potent in vitro activity against the most common CABP pathogens, including macrolide-, penicillin-, and fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates of S. pneumoniae, as well as Haemophilus influenzae and atypical bacterial pathogens. Solithromycin displays multi-compartment pharmacokinetics, a large volume of distribution (>500 L), approximately 67% bioavailability when given orally, and serum protein binding of 81%. Its major metabolic pathway appears to follow cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, with metabolites of solithromycin undergoing biliary excretion. Its serum half-life is approximately 6-9 h, which is sufficient for once-daily administration. Pharmacodynamic

  9. [Analysis of multiple stepwise regression for prognosis in patients with bacterial pneumonias in elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, W W

    1990-12-01

    This paper was based on the material of 100 patients with elderly bacterial pneumonias, doing analysis of multiple stepwise regression for factors effecting prognosis with IBC-PC electronic computer. 100 patients (82 men, 18 women), average ages were 69.6 +/- 7.9 (60-90) years. According to the materials of clinical selected 39 items of possible affect prognosis factors. Item is independent variable (xi). The prognosis is emergency variable (y). Between both were doing analysis of regression, factors of significance were selected to multiple regression equation. In order to decide the closer relations degree between the xi and the y the F values were regulated. Using quantitative analysis and measure, the primary factors were founded. When F value is equal to 1, selected 22 factors related to prognosis. F value is equal to 2, selected factors decrease to 12, F value is equal to 3, selected factors were 6 items. Respectively, F value is 4, 5, selected factors were 5 items, they have very close regression coefficient. That showed the equation was tendency stable. According to the big or small standard regression coefficient, the sequence of affecting prognosis factors were course of disease, upper digestive tract haemorrhage, dielectric disorder, respiratory failure and gram-negative bacilli infection. The result of analysis showed that the key factors were: treatment and diagnosis without delay, pay great attention to examine of pathogen and management of complication.

  10. Spotlight on solithromycin in the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia: design, development, and potential place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald BJ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bryan J Donald,1,2 Salim Surani,3–5 Harmeet S Deol,1,6 Uche J Mbadugha,1 George Udeani1,7 1Department of Pharmacy, Corpus Christi Medical Center, Corpus Christi, TX, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA, 3Department of Pulmonology/Critical Care, Corpus Christi Medical Center, Corpus Christi, TX, 4Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College Station, TX, 5Department of Medicine, College of Osteopathic Medicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Denton, TX, 6Department of Pharmacy Services, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, 7Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Kingsville, TX, USA Abstract: Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP is a leading cause of death worldwide. However, antibacterial agents used to treat common pathogens in CABP are marked by adverse drug events and increasing antimicrobial resistance. Solithromycin is a new ketolide antibiotic, based on the macrolide antibiotic structure, being studied for use in CABP. It has efficacy in vitro against the common causative pathogens in CABP including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and atypical pathogens. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, it has been demonstrated efficacious as a single agent for treatment of CABP with an apparently milder adverse event profile than alternative agents. Keywords: solithromycin, macrolide antibiotics, community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, CABP

  11. Viral and bacterial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; Buiting, Anton G. M.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Rossen, John W. A.

    BACKGROUND: Modern molecular techniques reveal new information on the role of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia. In this study, we tried to determine the prevalence of respiratory viruses and bacteria in patients with community-acquired pneumonia who were admitted to the hospital.

  12. Comparative effects of carbapenems on bacterial load and host immune response in a Klebsiella pneumoniae murine pneumonia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Jamese J; Melton, John L; Hall, LeRoy; Abbanat, Darren; Fernandez, Jeffrey; Ward, Christine K; Bunting, Rachel A; Barron, A; Lynch, A Simon; Flamm, Robert K

    2011-02-01

    Doripenem is a carbapenem with potent broad-spectrum activity against Gram-negative pathogens, including antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. As the incidence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Gram-negative bacilli is increasing, it was of interest to examine the in vivo comparative efficacy of doripenem, imipenem, and meropenem against a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate expressing the TEM-26 ESBL enzyme. In a murine lethal lower respiratory infection model, doripenem reduced the Klebsiella lung burden by 2 log(10) CFU/g lung tissue over the first 48 h of the infection. Treatment of mice with meropenem or imipenem yielded reductions of approximately 1.5 log(10) CFU/g during this time period. Seven days postinfection, Klebsiella titers in the lungs of treated mice decreased an additional 2 log(10) CFU/g relative to those in the lungs of untreated control animals. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin release assays indicated that 6 h postinfection, meropenem- and imipenem-treated animals had 10-fold more endotoxin in lung homogenates and sera than doripenem-treated mice. Following doripenem treatment, the maximum endotoxin release postinfection (6 h) was 53,000 endotoxin units (EU)/ml, which was 2.7- and 6-fold lower than imipenem or meropenem-treated animals, respectively. While the levels of several proinflammatory cytokines increased in both the lungs and sera following intranasal K. pneumoniae inoculation, doripenem treatment, but not meropenem or imipenem treatment, resulted in significantly increased interleukin 6 levels in lung homogenates relative to those in lung homogenates of untreated controls, which may contribute to enhanced neutrophil killing of bacteria in the lung. Histological examination of tissue sections indicated less overall inflammation and tissue damage in doripenem-treated mice, consistent with improved antibacterial efficacy, reduced LPS endotoxin release, and the observed cytokine induction profile.

  13. Pneumonia in slaughtered sheep in south-western Iran: pathological characteristics and aerobic bacterial aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Shahrzad; Korani, Farzad Shahrani; Oryan, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the lungs of 1,000 sheep carcasses were subjected to gross examination and those suspected to be infected with pneumonia were studied at histopathological level as well as examined for presence of bacteria. Pneumonia was detected in 42 (4.2%) carcasses. Based on histopathological lesions, 45.24% were affected with suppurative bronchopneumonia, 20.93% with interstitial pneumonia, 11.9% bronchointerstitial pneumonia, 7.14% with fibrinous bronchopneumonia and 2.38% with embolic pneumonia. In addition, 11.9% of the lungs showed lung abscesses and 2.33% were affected with pleuritis without involving pulmonary parenchyma. Bacteriological examination revealed presence of ovine pathogens, such as Pasteurella multocida (24.53%), Staphylococcus aureus (20.75%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (15.09%), Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (7.55%) and Actinomyces pyogenes (1.89%). The most common form of pneumonia was suppurative bronchopneumonia with moderate amounts of fibrin deposits on the pleural surface and inside the bronchioles and alveoli.

  14. Pneumonia in slaughtered sheep in south-western Iran: pathological characteristics and aerobic bacterial aetiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Azizi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the lungs of 1,000 sheep carcasses were subjected to gross examination and those suspected to be infected with pneumonia were studied at histopathological level as well as examined for presence of bacteria. Pneumonia was detected in 42 (4.2% carcasses. Based on histopathological lesions, 45.24% were affected with suppurative bronchopneumonia, 20.93% with interstitial pneumonia, 11.9% bronchointerstitial pneumonia, 7.14% with fibrinous bronchopneumonia and 2.38% with embolic pneumonia. In addition, 11.9% of the lungs showed lung abscesses and 2.33% were affected with pleuritis without involving pulmonary parenchyma. Bacteriological examination revealed presence of ovine pathogens, such as Pasteurella multocida (24.53%, Staphylococcus aureus (20.75%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (15.09%, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (7.55% and Actinomyces pyogenes (1.89%. The most common form of pneumonia was suppurative bronchopneumonia with moderate amounts of fibrin deposits on the pleural surface and inside the bronchioles and alveoli.

  15. Acute pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown, that in the detailed study of various types of acute pneumonia s the roentgenologic method plays a great role. The most characteristic roentge nological signs of primary (bacterial, viral, rickettsial, parasitogenic and fun gous) and secondary pneumonias (in the case of lessions in lesser circulation, changes in bronchi, aspirational and other diseases of organism) are presented

  16. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  17. Nationwide survey on the 2005 Guidelines for the Management of Community-Acquired Adult Pneumonia: validation of differentiation between bacterial pneumonia and atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akira; Goto, Hajime; Kohno, Shigeru; Matsushima, Toshiharu; Abe, Shosaku; Aoki, Nobuki; Shimokata, Kaoru; Mikasa, Keiichi; Niki, Yoshihito

    2012-03-01

    The Japanese Respiratory Society Guidelines for the Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) in Adults (JRS 2005) was published as a revision of the Basic Concept for the Management of CAP in Adults (JRS 2000). To evaluate the JRS 2005 criteria for differentiating between disease types and assessing the status of antimicrobial agent use in initial treatment, we conducted a prospective survey. The survey was conducted from July 2006 to March 2007 as a nationwide joint study by 200 institutions. The study subjects included patients aged ≥16 years of age who had CAP, and patients who met the inclusion criteria were consecutively enrolled. Disease type differentiation based on JRS 2005 and JRS 2000 was conducted. Disease type diagnosis was also performed based on test results. The sensitivity and specificity of disease type differentiation were calculated. The antimicrobial agents used in the initial treatment were classified as recommended or non-recommended based on JRS 2005. The validity of non-recommended antimicrobial agent use was investigated. A total of 1875 patients were analyzed. Differentiation of atypical pneumonia using the JRS 2005 criteria had higher sensitivity and lower specificity than differentiation using the JRS 2000 criteria. The antimicrobial agents recommended by JRS 2005 were used as initial treatment in a low number of cases. The efficacy of the recommended antimicrobial agents was similar to that of the non-recommended agents. JRS 2005 is advantageous in terms of reducing the number of items used in disease type differentiation. The recommended antimicrobial agents used for the initial treatment are believed to be appropriate. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The significance of oral streptococci in patients with pneumonia with risk factors for aspiration: the bacterial floral analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akata, Kentaro; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Kei; Kawanami, Toshinori; Naito, Keisuke; Noguchi, Shingo; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-05-11

    Aspiration pneumonia has been a growing interest in an aging population. Anaerobes are important pathogens, however, the etiology of aspiration pneumonia is not fully understood. In addition, the relationship between the patient clinical characteristics and the causative pathogens in pneumonia patients with aspiration risk factors are unclear. To evaluate the relationship between the patient clinical characteristics with risk factors for aspiration and bacterial flora in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in pneumonia patients, the bacterial floral analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene was applied in addition to cultivation methods in BALF samples. From April 2010 to February 2014, BALF samples were obtained from the affected lesions of pneumonia via bronchoscopy, and were evaluated by the bacterial floral analysis of 16S rRNA gene in addition to cultivation methods in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). Factors associated with aspiration risks in these patients were analyzed. A total of 177 (CAP 83, HCAP 94) patients were enrolled. According to the results of the bacterial floral analysis, detection rate of oral streptococci as the most detected bacterial phylotypes in BALF was significantly higher in patients with aspiration risks (31.0 %) than in patients without aspiration risks (14.7 %) (P = 0.009). In addition, the percentages of oral streptococci in each BALF sample were significantly higher in patients with aspiration risks (26.6 ± 32.0 %) than in patients without aspiration risks (13.8 ± 25.3 %) (P = 0.002). A multiple linear regression analysis showed that an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) of ≥3, the presence of comorbidities, and a history of pneumonia within a previous year were significantly associated with a detection of oral streptococci in BALF. The bacterial floral analysis of 16S rRNA gene revealed that oral streptococci were mostly

  19. Clinical evaluation of the role of ceftaroline in the management of community acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maselli DJ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diego J Maselli1, Juan F Fernandez1, Christine Y Whong2, Kelly Echevarria1,3, Anoop M Nambiar1,3, Antonio Anzueto1,3, Marcos I Restrepo1,3,41University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, 2Memorial Hermann – Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, 3South Texas Veterans Health Care System Audie l Murphy Division, San Antonio, TX, 4Veterans Evidence Research Dissemination and Implementation Center (VERDICT, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline was recently approved for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2, ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP.Keywords: s. pneumoniae, s. aureus, cephalosporins, pneumonia, ceftaroline, community acquired pneumonia

  20. Antimicrobial and Biophysical Properties of Surfactant Supplemented with an Antimicrobial Peptide for Treatment of Bacterial Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banaschewski, Brandon J H; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Keating, Eleonora; Haagsman, Henk P; Zuo, Yi Y; Yamashita, Cory M; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistant bacterial infections represent an emerging health concern in clinical settings, and a lack of novel developments in the pharmaceutical pipeline is creating a "perfect storm" for multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been

  1. Review of Non-Bacterial Infections in Respiratory Medicine: Viral Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, José María; Rajas, Olga; Aspa, Javier

    2015-11-01

    Although bacteria are the main pathogens involved in community-acquired pneumonia, a significant number of community-acquired pneumonia are caused by viruses, either directly or as part of a co-infection. The clinical picture of these different pneumonias can be very similar, but viral infection is more common in the pediatric and geriatric populations, leukocytes are not generally elevated, fever is variable, and upper respiratory tract symptoms often occur; procalcitonin levels are not generally affected. For years, the diagnosis of viral pneumonia was based on cell culture and antigen detection, but since the introduction of polymerase chain reaction techniques in the clinical setting, identification of these pathogens has increased and new microorganisms such as human bocavirus have been discovered. In general, influenza virus type A and syncytial respiratory virus are still the main pathogens involved in this entity. However, in recent years, outbreaks of deadly coronavirus and zoonotic influenza virus have demonstrated the need for constant alert in the face of new emerging pathogens. Neuraminidase inhibitors for viral pneumonia have been shown to reduce transmission in cases of exposure and to improve the clinical progress of patients in intensive care; their use in common infections is not recommended. Ribavirin has been used in children with syncytial respiratory virus, and in immunosuppressed subjects. Apart from these drugs, no antiviral has been shown to be effective. Prevention with anti-influenza virus vaccination and with monoclonal antibodies, in the case of syncytial respiratory virus, may reduce the incidence of pneumonia. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. [Preoperatiove Airway Bacterial Colonization: the Missing Link between Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Following Lobectomy and Postoperative Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ke; Lai, Yutian; Huang, Jian; Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xiaowei; Che, Guowei

    2017-04-20

    Surgical procedure is the main method of treating lung cancer. Meanwhile, postoperative pneumonia (POP) is the major cause of perioperative mortality in lung cancer surgery. The preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization is an independent risk factor causing postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC). This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the relationship between preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization and POP in lung cancer and to identify the high-risk factors of preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization. A total of 125 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent thoracic surgery in six hospitals of Chengdu between May 2015 and January 2016. Preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization was detected in all patients via fiber bronchoscopy. Patients' PPC, high-risk factors, clinical characteristics, and the serum surfactant protein D (SP-D) level were also analyzed. The incidence of preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization among NSCLC patients was 15.2% (19/125). Up to 22 strains were identified in the colonization positive group, with Gram-negative bacteria being dominant (86.36%, 19/22). High-risk factors of pathogenic airway bacterial colonization were age (≥75 yr) and smoking index (≥400 cigarettes/year). PPC incidence was significantly higher in the colonization-positive group (42.11%, 8/19) than that in the colonization-negative group (16.04%, 17/106)(P=0.021). POP incidence was significantly higher in the colonization-positive group (26.32%, 5/19) than that in the colonization-negative group (6.60%, 7/106)(P=0.019). The serum SP-D level of patients in the colonization-positive group was remarkably higher than that in the colonization-negative group [(31.25±6.09) vs (28.17±5.23)](P=0.023). The incidence of preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization among NSCLC patients with POP was 41.67% (5/12). This value was 3.4 times higher than that among the patients without

  3. Retrospective Analysis of Bacterial and Viral Co-Infections in Pneumocystis spp. Positive Lung Samples of Austrian Pigs with Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Weissenbacher-Lang

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was the retrospective investigation of viral (porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV, torque teno sus virus type 1 and 2 (TTSuV1, TTSuV2 and bacterial (Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. b., Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. h., and Pasteurella multocida (P. m. co-infections in 110 Pneumocystis spp. positive lung samples of Austrian pigs with pneumonia. Fifty-one % were positive for PCV2, 7% for PRRSV, 22% for TTSuV1, 48% for TTSuV2, 6% for B. b., 29% for M. h., and 21% for P. m. In 38.2% only viral, in 3.6% only bacterial and in 40.0% both, viral and bacterial pathogens were detected. In 29.1% of the cases a co-infection with 1 pathogen, in 28.2% with 2, in 17.3% with 3, and in 7.3% with 4 different infectious agents were observed. The exposure to Pneumocystis significantly decreased the risk of a co-infection with PRRSV in weaning piglets; all other odds ratios were not significant. Four categories of results were compared: I = P. spp. + only viral co-infectants, II = P. spp. + both viral and bacterial co-infectants, III = P. spp. + only bacterial co-infectants, and IV = P. spp. single infection. The evaluation of all samples and the age class of the weaning piglets resulted in a predomination of the categories I and II. In contrast, the suckling piglets showed more samples of category I and IV. In the group of fattening pigs, category II predominated. Suckling piglets can be infected with P. spp. early in life. With increasing age this single infections can be complicated by co-infections with other respiratory diseases.

  4. Molecular etiological profile of atypical bacterial pathogens, viruses and coinfections among infants and children with community acquired pneumonia admitted to a national hospital in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Cornejo-Tapia, Angela; Orellana-Peralta, Fiorella; Verne, Eduardo; Ugarte, Claudia; Aguilar-Luis, Miguel Angel; De Lama-Odría, María Del Carmen; Nazario-Fuertes, Ronald; Esquivel-Vizcarra, Mónica; Casabona-Ore, Verónica; Weilg, Pablo; Del Valle, Luis J

    2017-12-06

    The main objective of this study was to detect the presence of 14 respiratory viruses and atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae), via polymerase chain reaction in patients under 18 years old hospitalized due to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) from Lima, Peru. Atypical pathogens were detected in 40% (58/146); viral etiologies in 36% (52/146) and coinfections in 19% (27/146). The most common etiological agent was M. pneumoniae (n = 47), followed by C. pneumoniae (n = 11). The most frequent respiratory viruses detected were: respiratory syncytial virus A (n = 35), influenza virus C (n = 21) and parainfluenza virus (n = 10). Viral-bacterial and bacterium-bacterium coinfections were found in 27 cases. In our study population, atypical bacteria (40%) were detected as frequently as respiratory viruses (36%). The presence of M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae should not be underestimated as they can be commonly isolated in Peruvian children with CAP.

  5. Bacterial pericarditis and tamponade due to nonencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae complicating a case of adult community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Praveen; Gupta, Ruchi; Szalados, James E

    2006-12-07

    We report a case of bacterial pericarditis in an immunologically competent adult female caused by nonencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae (H influenzae) that was complicated by the acute development of life-threatening pericardial tamponade. H influenzae is a gram-negative coccobacillus, a pathogen most frequently associated with childhood exanthema (otitis media, meningitis) and, less frequently, adult pneumonia. Encapsulated, type b, or typable H influenzae is the strain implicated in childhood infections. On the other hand, nonencapsulated or nontypable H influenzae is the specific strain most often associated with exacerbation of chronic obstructive airway disease. Bacterial pericarditis caused by either subtype of H influenzae is exceedingly rare. We have located only 15 previously reported cases of H influenzae pericarditis occurring in adults in the world medical literature, the majority of which date back to the pre-antibiotic era. In 12 of these 15 cases (the only cases in which typing could be accomplished), the encapsulated strain of H influenzae was cultured from the pericardial fluid. Thus, to the best of our knowledge, we are reporting here the first case of bacterial pericarditis caused by nonencapsulated H influenzae in an immunologically competent adult.

  6. Atg7 deficiency impairs host defense against Klebsiella pneumoniae by impacting bacterial clearance, survival and inflammatory responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan; Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Wenxue; Ouedraogo, Kiswendsida Claude; Li, Yi; Gan, Changpei; Tan, Shirui; Zhou, Xikun; Wu, Min

    2014-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp) is a Gram-negative bacterium that can cause serious infections in humans. Autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7) has been implicated in certain bacterial infections; however, the role of Atg7 in macrophage-mediated immunity against Kp infection has not been elucidated. Here we showed that Atg7 expression was significantly increased in murine alveolar macrophages (MH-S) upon Kp infection, indicating that Atg7 participated in host defense. Knocking down Atg7 with small-interfering RNA increased bacterial burdens in MH-S cells. Using cell biology assays and whole animal imaging analysis, we found that compared with wild-type mice atg7 knockout (KO) mice exhibited increased susceptibility to Kp infection, with decreased survival rates, decreased bacterial clearance, and intensified lung injury. Moreover, Kp infection induced excessive proinflammatory cytokines and superoxide in the lung of atg7 KO mice. Similarly, silencing Atg7 in MH-S cells markedly increased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Collectively, these findings reveal that Atg7 offers critical resistance to Kp infection by modulating both systemic and local production of proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Pneumonia associada à ventilação mecânica: impacto da multirresistência bacteriana na morbidade e mortalidade Ventilator-associated pneumonia: impact of bacterial multidrug-resistance on morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo José Zimermann Teixeira

    2004-12-01

    : Retrospective cohort study. Over 40 consecutive months, 91 patients on mechanical ventilation developed pneumonia. Cases were grouped into those caused by multidrug-resistant microorganisms and those caused by drug-sensitive microorganisms. RESULTS: Multidrug-resistant bacteria were isolated in 75 cases (82.4% and drug-sensitive bacteria in 16 (17.6%. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics were not statistically different between the groups. Staphylococcus aureus was responsible for 27.5% of ventilator-associated pneumonia episodes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa for 17.6%. Early-onset ventilator-associated pneumonia occurred in 33 patients (36.3% and late-onset in 58 (63.7%. Time on mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay and overall length of hospital stay were not statistically different between groups. Empirical treatment was considered inadequate in 42 patients with pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant microorganisms (56% and in 4 with pneumonia caused by drug-sensitive microorganisms (25% (p = 0.02. Death occurred in 46 patients with pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant microorganisms (61.3% and in 4 with pneumonia caused by drug-sensitive microorganisms (25% (p = 0.008. CONCLUSION: Bacterial multidrug-resistance had no impact on morbidity but was associated with higher mortality.

  8. Contemporary use of ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia: CAPTURE study experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Ananthakrishnan; Udeani, George; Evans, John; Jandourek, Alena; Cole, Phillip; Smith, Alexander; David Friedland, H

    2014-08-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter cohort study designed to collect information on the contemporary use of ceftaroline fosamil in the US. Data collected from 398 evaluable patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) (mean age 64 years) during the first 18 months of the study are presented. Most patients had co-morbidities (76%; primarily structural lung disease), and ≧2 signs and symptoms of CABP (76%). Overall clinical success was 79% which varied little with ceftaroline fosamil usage (monotherapy vs concurrent therapy; first-line vs second-line therapy). Most patients were discharged home (60%) or to another healthcare facility (35%). These data suggest that ceftaroline, in contemporary clinical use, is an effective antibiotic for the treatment of patients with CABP, including those with significant co-morbidities or who required a change of their prior antibiotic therapy.

  9. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analyses for efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnani, Sujata M; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Van Wart, Scott A; Rubino, Christopher M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Friedland, H David; Riccobene, Todd A; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) analyses for efficacy using phase III trial data from patients treated with a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg intravenously (i.v.) every 12 h (q12h) for 5 to 7 days for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were conducted. High clinical and microbiological success rates (84.7 and 86.3%, respectively) and percentages of time during the dosing interval that free-drug steady-state concentrations remained above the MIC (f%T>MIC) (98.4% had f%T>MIC values of ≥63.3) were observed among 124 microbiologically evaluable patients. As a result, significant PK-PD relationships could not be identified. These data provide support for the use of a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg i.v. q12h to treat patients with CABP.

  10. Ceftaroline fosamil as first-line versus second-line treatment for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervil, David J; Kaye, Keith S; Hassoun, Ali; Cole, Phillip; Huang, Xing-Yue; Friedland, H David

    2016-06-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter registry study of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil in the US. Data for this analysis were collected between August 2011 and February 2013 at US study centres by randomly ordered chart review. Clinical success rates among ABSSSI patients were >81% when ceftaroline fosamil was used as first- or second-line therapy, including monotherapy and concurrent therapy. Among CABP patients, clinical success rates were >77% among first-line and second-line patients and patients who received first-line concurrent therapy or second line monotherapy or concurrent therapy. For CABP patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil as first-line monotherapy, the clinical success rate was 70%. Ceftaroline fosamil is an effective treatment option for patients with ABSSSI or CABP with similar clinical success rates when used as first-line or second-line treatment.

  11. Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae induce different intracerebral mRNA cytokine patterns during the course of experimental bacterial meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DIAB, A; ZHU, J; LINDQUIST, L; WRETLIND, B; BAKHIET, M; LINK, H

    1997-01-01

    Using in situ hybridization with radiolabelled oligonucleotide probes, we studied the mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), TNF-β, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) in the brain during the lethal course of experimental meningitis in a rat model inoculated intracisternally with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) or Streptococcus pneumoniae and in uninfected control rats inoculated with the same volume of PBS. The production of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ was also evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In the brain of Hib-inoculated rats, there was marked mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-12 and IFN-γ. IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were up-regulated throughout the observation period at 2, 8 and 18 h post-inoculation (p.i.), with similar patterns of induction. The Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-β were up-regulated within 8 h p.i. IL-10 and TGF-β were down-regulated at 18 h p.i., while IL-4 was not detected. In contrast, the brain of S. pneumoniae-inoculated rats showed lower levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, but higher levels of TNF-β and detectable mRNA expression of IL-4 when compared with Hib-inoculated rats. IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-10 and TGF-β exhibited similar patterns of induction in the brains of Hib- and S. pneumoniae-inoculated rats. At 18 h p.i., immunohistochemistry showed similar patterns of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ as mRNA expression in the brains of Hib- and S. pneumoniae-inoculated rats. The differences of cytokine profiles induced by the two bacterial strains may imply that different immunomodulating approaches should be considered, depending on etiology. PMID:9276517

  12. Hot Topics in Primary Care: Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia: Is There Anything New?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hans

    2017-04-01

    The management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an ongoing challenge in the primary care setting. This is due, in part, to the fact that management guidelines in the United States were published nearly a decade ago. Furthermore, there has been a dearth of new treatments. But that may be about to change. Management guidelines are being updated by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and are expected to be released this summer. In addition, several new antibiotics for the treatment of CAP are on the horizon.

  13. Bacterial pneumonia following bone marrow transplantation: HRCT findings Achados de TCAR nas pneumonias bacterianas após transplante de medula óssea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Otávio de Mattos Coelho

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe HRCT findings in patients with bacterial pneumonia following bone marrow transplantation (BMT. METHODS: This was a retrospective study involving 30 patients diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia in whom HRCT of the chest was performed within 24 h after the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis was confirmed, based on a positive culture of sputum or bronchial aspirate, together with a positive pleural fluid or blood culture, within one week after symptom onset. There were 20 male patients and 10 female patients. The median age was 21 years (range, 1-41 years. The BMT had been performed for the treatment of the following: chronic myeloid leukemia, in 14 cases; severe aplastic anemia, in 6; acute myeloid leukemia, in 4; Fanconi's anemia, in 3; and acute lymphocytic leukemia, in 3. Two radiologists analyzed the HRCT scans and reached their final decisions by consensus. RESULTS: The most common HRCT findings were air-space consolidation (in 60%, small centrilobular nodules (in 50%, ground-glass opacities (in 40%, bronchial wall thickening (in 20%, large nodules (in 20%, pleural lesions (in 16.7% and tree-in-bud opacities (in 10%. The pulmonary lesions were distributed in the central and peripheral areas in 15 patients, whereas they were exclusively peripheral in 11. Lesions were located in the lower and middle lobes of the lung in 22 and 20 patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The most common HRCT findings in our patient sample were air-space consolidation, small centrilobular nodules and ground-glass opacities, most often in the central and peripheral regions of the middle and lower lung zones.OBJETIVO: Descrever os achados de TCAR em pacientes com pneumonia bacteriana após transplante de medula óssea (TMO. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo com 30 pacientes diagnosticados com pneumonia bacteriana, documentada com TCAR do tórax realizada em até 24 h do início dos sintomas, e com diagnóstico comprovado com base em cultura positiva

  14. Time window for positive cerebrospinal fluid broad-range bacterial PCR and Streptococcus pneumoniae immunochromatographic test in acute bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Magnus; Welinder-Olsson, Christina; Hagberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Reliable microbiological tests are essential for the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM). In this study we investigated the time period after the start of antibiotic therapy during which culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the immunochromatographic test (ICT) are able to detect bacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The study was performed on CSF samples from adults with ABM admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden, from January 2007 to April 2014. In addition to the initial lumbar puncture (LP), the participants underwent one or two more LPs during 10 days following the start of antibiotics. The analyses performed on the CSF samples were culture, PCR and ICT. The study comprised 70 CSF samples from 25 patients with ABM. A bacterium could be identified by CSF culture in 44%, by blood culture in 58% and by PCR in 100% of the patients. There were no positive CSF cultures in samples taken later than the day of starting antibiotics. PCR was positive in 89% on days 1-3, 70% on days 4-6 and 33% on days 7-10. For cases of pneumococcal meningitis, the ICT was positive in 88% on days 1-3, 90% on days 4-6 and 75% on days 7-10. This study shows that PCR is highly sensitive for bacterial detection in CSF samples taken up to 1 week into antibiotic therapy. The ICT is highly sensitive for the detection of pneumococci in CSF samples taken during the first week of antibiotic treatment.

  15. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Secondary to Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections or Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jose A; Maggiore, Christy R; Cole, Phillip; Smith, Alexander; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, H David

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro® Utilization Registry is designed to collect information on the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in the Unites States. This report presents data on the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) secondary to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Patients diagnosed with ABSSSI or CABP were identified through sequential review of randomly ordered charts generated from pharmacy listings from August 2011 to February 2013. Data were collected by chart review 30 days or more after completion of ceftaroline fosamil therapy. Secondary SAB was reported in a total of 48 of 1428 evaluable patients (27 with ABSSSI, 21 with CABP). The mean (SD) patient age was 61 (15) years. At least 1 comorbidity was recorded for 74% of patients with ABSSSI and 81% with CABP. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus was isolated from 59% of patients with ABSSSI and 76% with CABP. The mean (SD) duration of ceftaroline fosamil therapy was 5.8 (4.8) days for ABSSSI and 7.0 (3.8) days for CABP. Clinical success among all patients with SAB treated with ceftaroline fosamil was 58% (52% for SAB secondary to ABSSSI, 67% for SAB secondary to CABP). Clinical success rates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus SAB were 50% (8/16) for ABSSSI and 63% (10/16) for CABP. This study supports the use of ceftaroline fosamil as a viable treatment option in hospitalized patients with SAB secondary to ABSSSI or CABP. Further studies evaluating the use of ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of SAB are warranted.

  16. Influence of the blood bacterial load on the meningeal inflammatory response in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, C; O´Reilly, T; Brandt, C

    2006-01-01

    levels in 153 pneumococcal meningitis patients with and without presence of bacteraemia. RESULTS: As designed, blood bacterial concentrations were significantly different among three experimental groups during the 16 hours study period (Kruskal Wallis test, P ...BACKGROUND: Despite bacteraemia is present in the majority of patients with pneumococcal, little is known about the influence of the systemic infection on the meningeal inflammatory response. METHODS: To explore the role of systemic infection on the meningeal inflammation, experimental meningitis...... weeks prior to the experiment ("immunized" rabbits", n = 8), or not treated further ("control" rabbits, n = 9). WBC and bacterial concentrations were determined in CSF and blood every second hour during a 16 hours study period together with CSF IL-8 and protein levels. We also studied CSF and blood WBC...

  17. Bacteriological incidence in pneumonia patients with pulmonary emphysema: a bacterial floral analysis using the 16S ribosomal RNA gene in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naito K

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Keisuke Naito,1 Kei Yamasaki,1 Kazuhiro Yatera,1 Kentaro Akata,1 Shingo Noguchi,1 Toshinori Kawanami,1 Kazumasa Fukuda,2 Takashi Kido,1 Hiroshi Ishimoto,3 Hiroshi Mukae3 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, 2Department of Microbiology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu City, Fukuoka, 3Second Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki City, Nagasaki, Japan Abstract: Pulmonary emphysema is an important radiological finding in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, but bacteriological differences in pneumonia patients according to the severity of emphysematous changes have not been reported. Therefore, we evaluated the bacteriological incidence in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF of pneumonia patients using cultivation and a culture-independent molecular method. Japanese patients with community-acquired pneumonia (83 and healthcare-associated pneumonia (94 between April 2010 and February 2014 were evaluated. The BALF obtained from pneumonia lesions was evaluated by both cultivation and a molecular method. In the molecular method, ~600 base pairs of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes in the BALF were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and clone libraries were constructed. The nucleotide sequences of 96 randomly selected colonies were determined, and a homology search was performed to identify the bacterial species. A qualitative radiological evaluation of pulmonary emphysema based on chest computed tomography (CT images was performed using the Goddard classification. The severity of pulmonary emphysema based on the Goddard classification was none in 47.4% (84/177, mild in 36.2% (64/177, moderate in 10.2% (18/177, and severe in 6.2% (11/177. Using the culture-independent molecular method, Moraxella catarrhalis was significantly more frequently detected in moderate or severe emphysema patients than in patients with no or mild emphysematous changes. The

  18. Changes in the incidence of pneumonia, bacterial meningitis, and infant mortality 5 years following introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in a "3+0" schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Blette, Bryan; Briceño, Rafaela; Alemán, Jorge; Hudgens, Michael G; Moreno, Gilberto; Ordoñez, Ana; Rocha, Julio; Weber, David J; Amaya, Erick

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes about 826,000 deaths of children in the world each year and many health facility visits. To reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease, many nations have added pneumococcal conjugate vaccines to their national immunization schedules. Nicaragua was the first country eligible for GAVI Alliance funding to introduce the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in 2010, provided to infants at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. The goal of this study was to evaluate the population impact of the first five years of the program. Numbers of visits for pneumonia, pneumonia-related deaths, and bacterial meningitis in both children and adults, and infant deaths between 2008 and 2015 were collected from all 107 public health facilities in León Department. Vital statistics data provided additional counts of pneumonia-related deaths that occurred outside health facilities. Adjusted incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRa) in the vaccine (2011-2015) and pre-vaccine periods (2008-2010) were estimated retrospectively using official population estimates as exposure time. The IRRa for pneumonia hospitalizations was 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66, 0.75) for infants, and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.99) for one year-olds. The IRRa for post-neonatal infant mortality was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.41, 0.77). In the population as a whole, ambulatory visits and hospitalizations for pneumonia, as well as pneumonia-related mortality and rates of bacterial meningitis were lower in the vaccine period. During the first five years of program implementation, reductions were observed in health facility visits for pneumonia in immunized age groups and infant mortality, which would be hard to achieve with any other single public health intervention. Future study is warranted to understand whether the lack of a booster dose (e.g., at 12 months) may be responsible for the small reductions in pneumonia hospitalizations observed in one year-olds as compared to infants.

  19. Changes in the incidence of pneumonia, bacterial meningitis, and infant mortality 5 years following introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in a "3+0" schedule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Becker-Dreps

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae causes about 826,000 deaths of children in the world each year and many health facility visits. To reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease, many nations have added pneumococcal conjugate vaccines to their national immunization schedules. Nicaragua was the first country eligible for GAVI Alliance funding to introduce the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 in 2010, provided to infants at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. The goal of this study was to evaluate the population impact of the first five years of the program.Numbers of visits for pneumonia, pneumonia-related deaths, and bacterial meningitis in both children and adults, and infant deaths between 2008 and 2015 were collected from all 107 public health facilities in León Department. Vital statistics data provided additional counts of pneumonia-related deaths that occurred outside health facilities. Adjusted incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRa in the vaccine (2011-2015 and pre-vaccine periods (2008-2010 were estimated retrospectively using official population estimates as exposure time.The IRRa for pneumonia hospitalizations was 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66, 0.75 for infants, and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.99 for one year-olds. The IRRa for post-neonatal infant mortality was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.41, 0.77. In the population as a whole, ambulatory visits and hospitalizations for pneumonia, as well as pneumonia-related mortality and rates of bacterial meningitis were lower in the vaccine period.During the first five years of program implementation, reductions were observed in health facility visits for pneumonia in immunized age groups and infant mortality, which would be hard to achieve with any other single public health intervention. Future study is warranted to understand whether the lack of a booster dose (e.g., at 12 months may be responsible for the small reductions in pneumonia hospitalizations observed in one year-olds as compared to

  20. Is there any relationship between asthma and asthma attack in children and atypical bacterial infections; Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annagür, Ali; Kendirli, S G; Yilmaz, M; Altintas, D U; Inal, A

    2007-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease characterized by variable airway obstruction and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. There are many factors affecting the development and severity of childhood asthma such as genetic predisposition, atopy, environmental factors, obesity, diet, socioeconomic status, and infectious triggers. In the present study we aimed to investigate the frequency of Mycdoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Helicobacter pylori infections in asthmatic children. We investigated also whether there is a relationship between these agents and asthma attacks. Seventy-nine asthmatic children (46 males, aged 5-15 years) were included in study. The study group was divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of 37 children with asthma attacks and group 2 consisted of 42 children with stable asthma. As a control group we studied 36 healthy children. Pulmonary function tests, skin prick tests for common allergens were performed; serum total IgE, phadiatop, specific IgM and IgG antibody levels (ELISA) for M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae and H. pylori were measured in all patients. Mycoplasma IgM and Chlamidia IgM were positive in 8.1% (3 patients) and 18.9% (7 patients) of group 1 patients, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference for Mycoplasma IgM (p = 0.031) and Chlamidia IgM (p = 0.03) between group1 and other two groups. We have not found significant difference for M. pneumoniae IgG, C. pneumoniae IgG and H. pylori IgM and IgG among groups. M. Pneumoniae and C. Pneumoniae may play a role in development of asthma exacerbations in childhood. We could not find a relationship between H. Pylori and asthma.

  1. Prevent Pneumonia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-06

    CDC’s Matthew Westercamp explains what pneumonia is, its symptoms, and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/6/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Respiratory Diseases Branch (RDB).   Date Released: 8/6/2015.

  2. Sphingosine Prevents Bacterial Adherence to Endotracheal Tubes: A Novel Mechanism to Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    rinsed in 100 mL HEPES/saline (H/S) (132 mM NaCl [sodium chloride], 20 mM HEPES [ pH 7.4], 5 mM KCl [potassium chloride], 1 mM CaCl2 [calcium chloride...kinase reaction was initiated by addition of 0.004 units sphingosine kinase in 50 mM HEPES ( pH 7.4), 250 mM NaCl, 30 mM MgCl2, 1 µM adenosine...adhere to the surface prior to biofilm formation. The source of the bacterial inoculant (i.e., oral secretions, gastric reflux, inhaled droplets, etc

  3. Improving Conduct and Feasibility of Clinical Trials to Evaluate Antibacterial Drugs to Treat Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia: Recommendations of the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative Antibacterial Drug Development Project Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knirsch, Charles; Alemayehu, Demissie; Botgros, Radu; Comic-Savic, Sabrina; Friedland, David; Holland, Thomas L; Merchant, Kunal; Noel, Gary J; Pelfrene, Eric; Reith, Christina; Santiago, Jonas; Tiernan, Rosemary; Tenearts, Pamela; Goldsack, Jennifer C; Fowler, Vance G

    2016-08-15

    The etiology of hospital-acquired or ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP) is often multidrug-resistant infections. The evaluation of new antibacterial drugs for efficacy in this population is important, as many antibacterial drugs have demonstrated limitations when studied in this population. HABP/VABP trials are expensive and challenging to conduct due to protocol complexity and low patient enrollment, among other factors. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) seeks to advance antibacterial drug development by streamlining HABP/VABP clinical trials to improve efficiency and feasibility while maintaining ethical rigor, patient safety, information value, and scientific validity. In 2013, CTTI engaged a multidisciplinary group of experts to discuss challenges impeding the conduct of HABP/VABP trials. Separate workstreams identified challenges associated with HABP/VABP protocol complexity. The Project Team developed potential solutions to streamline HABP/VABP trials using a Quality by Design approach. CTTI recommendations focus on 4 key areas to improve HABP/VABP trials: informed consent processes/practices, protocol design, choice of an institutional review board (IRB), and trial outcomes. Informed consent processes should include legally authorized representatives. Protocol design decisions should focus on eligibility criteria, prestudy antibacterial therapy considerations, use of new diagnostics, and sample size. CTTI recommends that sponsors use a central IRB and discuss trial endpoints with regulators, including defining a clinical failure and evaluating the impact of concomitant antibacterial drugs. Streamlining HABP/VABP trials by addressing key protocol elements can improve trial startup and patient recruitment/retention, reduce trial complexity and costs, and ensure patient safety while advancing antibacterial drug development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of

  4. Streamlining Safety Data Collection in Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia Trials: Recommendations of the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative Antibacterial Drug Development Project Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Helen; Alemayehu, Demissie; Botgros, Radu; Comic-Savic, Sabrina; Eisenstein, Barry; Lorenz, Benjamin; Merchant, Kunal; Pelfrene, Eric; Reith, Christina; Santiago, Jonas; Tiernan, Rosemary; Wunderink, Richard; Tenaerts, Pamela; Knirsch, Charles

    2016-08-15

    Resistant bacteria are one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP). HABP/VABP trials are complex and difficult to conduct due to the large number of medical procedures, adverse events, and concomitant medications involved. Differences in the legislative frameworks between different regions of the world may also lead to excessive data collection. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) seeks to advance antibacterial drug development (ABDD) by streamlining clinical trials to improve efficiency and feasibility while maintaining ethical rigor, patient safety, information value, and scientific validity. In 2013, CTTI engaged a multidisciplinary group of experts to discuss challenges impeding the conduct of HABP/VABP trials. Separate workstreams identified challenges associated with current data collection processes. Experts defined "data collection" as the act of capturing and reporting certain data on the case report form as opposed to recording of data as part of routine clinical care. The ABDD Project Team developed strategies for streamlining safety data collection in HABP/VABP trials using a Quality by Design approach. Current safety data collection processes in HABP/VABP trials often include extraneous information. More targeted strategies for safety data collection in HABP/VABP trials will rely on optimal protocol design and prespecification of which safety data are essential to satisfy regulatory reporting requirements. A consensus and a cultural change in clinical trial design and conduct, which involve recognition of the need for more efficient data collection, are urgently needed to advance ABDD and to improve HABP/VABP trials in particular. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. MicroRNA expression in lung tissue and blood isolated from pigs suffering from bacterial pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Wendt, Karin Tarp; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a highly evolutionarily conserved group of small non-coding RNA molecules, which regulate the activity of other genes at the post-transcriptional level. Recently it has become evident that miRNA plays an important role in modulating and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive...... expressed (p-values lower than 0.05). MicroRNA expression in lung tissue over time in response to the two different serotypes were very similar. miR-223 was found to be highly up regulated, followed by miR-146a and to a lesser degree miR-21 in lung tissue of the AP serotype 2 infected animals. MiR-233...... immune responses. Still, little is known about the impact of miRNAs in the development and pathogenesis of lung infections. Expression of miRNA, known to be induced by bacterial (i.e., LPS) ligands and thus supposed to play a role in the regulation of antimicrobial defence, were studied in lung tissue...

  6. Atypical pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Bacteria that cause atypical pneumonia include: Mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae . It often affects people younger than age 40. Pneumonia due ...

  7. ROLE OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE IN THE STRUCTURE OF BACTERIAL INFECTIONS IN THE CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED TO INPATIENT HOSPITALS IN MOSCOW IN 2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baranov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on the spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes in the RF are extremely limited. 3 pneumococcal conjugated vaccines are approved inRussia; however, neither has yet been employed in the framework of the national population immunization program. At the same time, it is the dataon the serotype range of pneumococcal infections that may be considered the prognostic efficacy criterion for the national vaccination programs.The objective of this research is identification of the circulating S. pneumoniae serotypes and spread of pneumococcal etiology infections in the structure of bacterial infections in the infants hospitalized to 5 inpatient hospital of Moscow in 2011–2012. The trial involved 864 patients in tote. Vast majority of patients (86% had acute purulent otitis media and sinusitis. Community-acquired pneumonia was diagnosed in 9% of patients, sepsis and bacteremia — in 3.6%; purulent meningitis — 1.2% of patients. It has been revealed that S. pneumoniae is the primary pathogen in the structure of nasopharyngeal carriage in the children under 5 years of age hospitalized with acute bacterial infections, and the primary bacterial causative agent of acute otitis media at this age. Nasopharyngeal pneumococcal carriage analysis revealed the prevalent serotypes — 19F, 14, 23F, 3, 6A and B; they were present in 3/4 of all cases; 19F was the most frequent (> 20%. Diversity of the S. pneumoniae serotypes detected in middle ear liquid was less significant — 17 serotypes (in comparison with 24 serotypes in nasopharynx. The 5 prevalent serotypes were 19F, 3, 14, 23F, 6B and 19A (> 75% in tote. Detection rate of serotypes 3 and 19A in middle ear liquid significantly exceeded the detection rate of these serotypes in case of nasopharyngeal carriage. The study of invasive infections revealed serotypes 14, 23F, 3 and 15C. These data may be used as a benchmark for future monitoring and evaluation of effect of PCV vaccines on epidemiology of

  8. Pediatric bacterial meningitis in Japan, 2013-2015 - 3-5 years after the wide use of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae conjugated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; Iwata, Satoshi

    2017-07-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine and pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV) have been widely used since 2010 in Japan when both vaccines were supported by the regional governments, and they were covered as routine recommended vaccines in 2013. The incidence of bacterial meningitis due to these organisms decreased in 2011 and 2012, but meningitis due to Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli remained unchanged. We planned to confirm whether the incidence also decreased in subsequent years. We analyzed the epidemiological and clinical data for 2013-2015, and compared the information obtained in the previous nationwide survey database and our previous reports. We also investigated the risk factors for disease outcome. In the 2013-2015 surveys, 407 patients from 366 hospitals from all prefectures were evaluated. S. agalactiae (33%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (25%), and E. coli (10%) were the main organisms. The total number of patients hospitalized with bacterial meningitis per 1000 admissions decreased from 1.19 in 2009-2010 to 0.37 in 2013-2015 (p influenzae and S. pneumoniae meningitis significantly decreased from 0.66 in 2009-2010 to 0.01 in 2013-2015, and from 0.30 to 0.09, respectively (p influenzae, S. pneumoniae, S. agalactiae, and E. coli in 2013-2015 were 0.0, 4.1, 3.1, and 2.6%, respectively. Risk factors for death and sequelae were consciousness disturbance, convulsion, low CSF glucose, and Staphylococcus sp. as a causative organism (p < 0.01). Hib vaccine and PCV have decreased the rate of bacterial meningitis. S. agalactiae has subsequently become the most common cause of bacterial meningitis in Japan. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CD44 Deficiency Is Associated with Increased Bacterial Clearance but Enhanced Lung Inflammation During Gram-Negative Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, Gerritje J. W.; Florquin, Sandrine; de Vos, Alex F.; van't Veer, Cornelis; Queiroz, Karla C. S.; Liang, Jiurong; Jiang, Dianhua; Noble, Paul W.; van der Poll, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a frequently isolated causative pathogen in respiratory tract infections. CD44 is a transmembrane adhesion molecule that has been implicated in several immunological processes. To determine the role of CD44 during Klebsiella pneumonia, we intranasally infected wild-type and

  10. Acute pancreatitis in mice impairs bacterial clearance from the lungs, whereas concurrent pneumonia prolongs the course of pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westerloo, David J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bruno, Marco J.; de Vos, Alex F.; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Nosocomial pneumonia is a feared complication in the critically ill patient. Serious acute pancreatitis is frequently complicated by infections. The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of acute pancreatitis on host defense against Pseudomonas pneumonia and to

  11. Serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with acute bacterial meningitis in Mozambique: implications for a national immunization strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhantumbo, Aquino Albino; Gudo, Eduardo Samo; Caierão, Juliana; Munguambe, Alcides Moniz; Comé, Charlotte Elizabeth; Zimba, Tomás Francisco; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Dias, Cícero; Cantarelli, Vlademir Vicente

    2016-06-29

    S. pneumoniae is the leading cause of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in children. Vaccination using the 10-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV-10) was recently introduced into the National Immunization Program in Mozambique, but data on serotype coverage of this vaccine formulation are scarce. In this study, we investigated the serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of isolates of S. pneumoniae causing ABM in children < 5 years at the two largest hospitals in Mozambique. Between March 2013 and March 2014, a total of 352 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected from eligible children, of which 119 (33.8 %) were positive for S. pneumoniae. Of these, only 50 samples met the criteria for serotyping and were subsequently serotyped using sequential multiplex PCR (SM-PCR), but 15 samples were non-typable. The most common serotypes of S. pneumoniae were 1 (18.2 %), 5 (15.2 %), 14 (12.1 %), 9 V (12.1 %), 23 F (9.1 %), 6A (9.1 %), 4 (9.1 %) and 6B (6.1 %). Serotypes 1, 5, 9 V, 6A and 12 were mostly prevalent in Northern Mozambique, while serotypes 23 F, 4, 6B, 3 and 15B were predominant in Southern. Serotype coverage of PCV-10 and PCV-13 vaccine formulations were 81.8 % and 93.9 %, respectively. Serotypes 1, 3, 4, 6B, 14, 23 F were resistant to penicillin and sensitive to ceftriaxone. Our findings shows that changing the current in use PCV-10 vaccine formulation to PCV-13 formulation might increase substantially the protection against invasive strains of S. pneumoniae as the PCV-10 vaccine formulation does not cover the serotypes 3 and 6A, which are prevalent in Mozambique.

  12. Direct analysis of bacterial viability in endotracheal tube biofilm from a pig model of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia following antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barat, Laia; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Ferrer, Miquel; Bosch, Anna; Calvo, Maria; Vila, Jordi; Gabarrús, Albert; Martínez-Olondris, Pilar; Rigol, Montse; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Néstor; Torres, Antoni

    2012-07-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) helps to observe the biofilms formed in the endotracheal tube (ETT) of ventilated subjects and to determine its structure and bacterial viability using specific dyes. We compared the effect of three different treatments (placebo, linezolid, and vancomycin) on the bacterial biofilm viability captured by CLSM. Eight pigs with pneumonia induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were ventilated up to 96 h and treated with linezolid, vancomycin, or placebo (controls). ETT images were microscopically examined after staining with the live/dead(®) BacLight(™) Kit (Invitrogen, Barcelona, Spain) with a confocal laser scanning microscope. We analyzed 127 images obtained by CLSM. The median ratio of live/dead bacteria was 0.51, 0.74, and 1 for the linezolid, vancomycin, and control groups, respectively (P = 0.002 for the three groups); this ratio was significantly lower for the linezolid group, compared with the control group (P = 0.001). Images showed bacterial biofilm attached and non-attached to the ETT surface but growing within secretions accumulated inside ETT. Systemic treatment with linezolid is associated with a higher proportion of dead bacteria in the ETT biofilm of animals with MRSA pneumonia. Biofilm clusters not necessarily attach to the ETT surface. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae Proteins AmiA, AliA, and AliB Bind Peptides Found in Ribosomal Proteins of Other Bacterial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzy Nasher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The nasopharynx is frequently colonized by both commensal and pathogenic bacteria including Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus. Pneumococcus is an important pathogen responsible for bacterial meningitis and community acquired pneumonia but is also commonly an asymptomatic colonizer of the nasopharynx. Understanding interactions between microbes may provide insights into pathogenesis. Here, we investigated the ability of the three oligopeptide-binding proteins AmiA, AliA, and AliB of an ATP-binding cassette transporter of pneumococcus to detect short peptides found in other bacterial species. We found three possible peptide ligands for AmiA and four each for AliA and AliB of which two for each protein matched ribosomal proteins of other bacterial species. Using synthetic peptides we confirmed the following binding: AmiA binds peptide AKTIKITQTR, matching 50S ribosomal subunit protein L30, AliA binds peptide FNEMQPIVDRQ, matching 30S ribosomal protein S20, and AliB binds peptide AIQSEKARKHN, matching 30S ribosomal protein S20, without excluding the possibility of binding of the other peptides. These Ami–AliA/AliB peptide ligands are found in multiple species in the class of Gammaproteobacteria which includes common colonizers of the nostrils and nasopharynx. Binding such peptides may enable pneumococcus to detect and respond to neighboring species in its environment and is a potential mechanism for interspecies communication and environmental surveillance.

  14. Understanding Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Pneumonia Learn About Pneumonia Pneumonia is a common lung infection caused by ... vaccinated and practicing good health habits What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection in one or both ...

  15. Valproic acid mitigates the inflammatory response and prevents acute respiratory distress syndrome in a murine model of Escherichia coli pneumonia at the expense of bacterial clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasotakis, George; Galvan, Manuel; King, Elizabeth; Sarkar, Beda; Stucchi, Arthur; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Burke, Peter A; Remick, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) are members of a family of epigenetic modifying agents with broad anti-inflammatory properties. These anti-inflammatory properties may have important therapeutic implications in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, administration of HDACI may create an immunosuppressive environment conducive to bacterial growth. Accordingly, the aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of HDACI valproic acid (VPA) on host inflammatory response and bacterial burden in a murine model of Escherichia coli pneumonia-induced ARDS. ARDS was induced in male C57BL6 mice (n = 24) by endotracheal instillation of 3 × 10 E. coli. VPA (250 mg/kg) was administered 30 minutes after E. coli instillation in the intervention group. Blood samples were collected at 3 and 6 hours, and animals were sacrificed at 6 hours. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed, and tissue specimens were harvested. Cytokine levels were measured in blood and BAL, and so was transalveolar protein transit. Cell counts and colony forming units were quantified in BAL fluid. VPA reduced neutrophil influx into the lungs and local tissue destruction through decreased myeloperoxidase activity. It also ameliorated the pulmonary and systemic inflammatory response. This led to greater bacterial proliferation in the pulmonary parenchyma. Administration of VPA in a clinically relevant bacterial model of murine ARDS mitigates the host inflammatory response, essentially preventing ARDS, but creates an immunosuppressive environment that favors bacterial overgrowth.

  16. Recent trends in pediatric bacterial meningitis in Japan--a country where Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae conjugated vaccines have just been introduced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Yagihashi, Tatsuhiko; Sato, Yoshitake; Akita, Hironobu; Takahashi, Takao; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the trends in incidence and the characteristics of bacterial meningitis in Japan where Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine and 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) were introduced in 2008 and 2010, respectively, which was 5-20 years after their introduction in western countries. The nationwide Japanese survey of pediatric and neonatal bacterial meningitis was performed in 2011 and 2012. We analyzed the epidemiological and clinical data, and compared the information obtained in the previous nationwide survey database. We also investigated the risk factors for disease outcome. In the 2011-2012 surveys, 357 patients were evaluated. H. influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli were the main organisms. The number of patients hospitalized with bacterial meningitis per 1000 admissions decreased from 1.31 in 2009 to 0.43 in 2012 (p meningitis also decreased from 0.66 to 0.08 (p bacterial meningitis. Earlier introduction of these vaccines may have prevented bacterial meningitis among Japanese children. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Multiplex PCR for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Bordetella pertussis in Clinical Specimens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDonough, E. A; Barrozo, C. P; Russell, K. L; Metzgar, D

    2005-01-01

    A multiplex PCR was developed that is capable of detecting four of the most important bacterial agents of atypical pneumophia, Mycaplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila...

  18. Peracute Bacterial Meningitis due to Infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae in Captive-bred Ruffed Lemurs (Varecia variegate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, E; Tokiwa, T; Tsugo, K; Higashi, Y; Hori, H; Une, Y

    We describe the development of neurological signs in four juvenile black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegate), housed at a petting zoo in Japan. The clinical course was severe, with three lemurs dying within 1 day of the appearance of clinical signs. The other lemur was treated and survived. Pathological analyses demonstrated meningitis and the presence of gram-negative bacilli in the cerebrum, cerebellum, palatine tonsil and liver. Klebsiella pneumoniae was isolated from the brain of all of the dead lemurs. Multilocus sequence typing analysis showed that all the isolates were sequence type 86 (ST86). To our knowledge, this is the first determination of K. pneumoniae infection in ruffed lemurs of this genus. K. pneumoniae infection may represent a risk to lemurs and people who come into contact with infected animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Aspiration pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic pneumonia; Aspiration of vomitus; Necrotizing pneumonia; Aspiration pneumonitis ... The type of bacteria that caused the pneumonia depends on: Your ... facility, for example) Whether you were recently hospitalized ...

  20. Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Kumaraguruparan; Balasubramanian, Sowmya; Manickam, Krishnan; Pandranki, Lavanya; Taylor, Alexander B; Hart, P John; Baseman, Joel B; Kannan, T R

    2018-01-23

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an atypical bacterium that causes respiratory illnesses in humans, including pharyngitis, tracheobronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). It has also been directly linked to reactive airway disease, asthma, and extrapulmonary pathologies. During its colonization, M. pneumoniae expresses a unique ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating cytotoxin designated c ommunity- a cquired r espiratory d istress s yndrome (CARDS) toxin. CARDS toxin persists and localizes in the airway in CAP patients, asthmatics, and trauma patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia. Although CARDS toxin binds to specific cellular receptors, is internalized, and induces hyperinflammation, histopathology, mucus hyperplasia, and other airway injury, the intracellular trafficking of CARDS toxin remains unclear. Here, we show that CARDS toxin translocates through early and late endosomes and the Golgi complex and concentrates at the perinuclear region to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Using ER-targeted SNAP-tag, we confirmed the association of CARDS toxin with the ER and determined that CARDS toxin follows the retrograde pathway. In addition, we identified a novel CARDS toxin amino acid fingerprint, KELED, that is required for toxin transport to the ER and subsequent toxin-mediated cytotoxicity. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasma pneumoniae , a leading cause of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among children and adults in the United States, synthesizes a 591-amino-acid ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating protein, designated c ommunity- a cquired r espiratory d istress s yndrome (CARDS) toxin. CARDS toxin alone is sufficient to induce and mimic major inflammatory and histopathological phenotypes associated with M. pneumoniae infection in rodents and primates. In order to elicit its ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating activities, CARDS toxin must bind to host cell receptors, be internalized via clathrin-mediated pathways, and subsequently be transported to specific

  1. Population PK Modeling and Target Attainment Simulations to Support Dosing of Ceftaroline Fosamil in Pediatric Patients With Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections and Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccobene, Todd A; Khariton, Tatiana; Knebel, William; Das, Shampa; Li, James; Jandourek, Alena; Carrothers, Timothy J; Bradley, John S

    2017-03-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is approved for use in adults with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) in the United States and for similar indications in Europe. Pharmacokinetic (PK) data from 5 pediatric (birth to ceftaroline fosamil were combined with PK data from adults to update a population PK model for ceftaroline and ceftaroline fosamil. This model, based on a data set including 305 children, was used to conduct simulations to estimate ceftaroline exposures and percentage of time that free drug concentrations were above the minimum inhibitory concentration (%fT>MIC) for pediatric dose regimens. With dose regimens of 8 mg/kg every 8 hours (q8h) in children aged 2 months to 90% of children were predicted to achieve a target of 36% fT>MIC at an MIC of 2 mg/L, and >97% were predicted to achieve 44% fT>MIC at an MIC of 1 mg/L. Thus, high PK/pharmacodynamic target attainment would be maintained in children for targets associated with 1-log kill of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The predicted ceftaroline exposures for these dose regimens were similar to those in adults given 600 mg q12h ceftaroline fosamil. This work contributed to the approval of dose regimens for children aged 2 months to <18 years by the FDA and EMA, which are presented. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - mycoplasma; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Mycoplasma pneumonia usually affects people younger than 40. People who live or work in crowded areas such as schools ...

  3. Effects of three approaches to standardized oral hygiene to reduce bacterial colonization and ventilator associated pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients: a randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, A M; Davidson, P M; Masters, J; Rolls, K; Ollerton, R

    2011-06-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia remains an important concern in the intensive care unit (ICU). An increasing body of evidence shows that mortality and morbidity can be reduced by implementing a range of preventive strategies, including optimizing oral hygiene. The aim of this feasibility study was to test two oral hygiene strategies on the effects of microbial colonization of dental plaque with respiratory pathogens (primary outcome) and incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia (secondary outcome). A single blind randomised comparative study was conducted in a 20-bed adult intensive care unit in a university hospital. Patients with an expected duration of mechanical ventilation more than 48 h were eligible. Patients were randomised to one of three study regimens (Group A control, second hourly oral rinse with sterile water, Group B sodium bicarbonate mouth wash second hourly, and Group C twice daily irrigations with chlorhexidine 0.2% aqueous oral rinse and second hourly irrigations with sterile water). All study options included cleaning with a toothbrush and non foaming toothpaste. Data from a total of 109 patients were analyzed. Group A 43, Group B 33 and Group C 33 (mean age: 58 ± 17 years, simplified acute physiology score II: 44 ± 14 points). On admission no significant differences were found between groups for all clinical data. While Group B showed a greater trend to reduction in bacterial colonization no significant differences could be demonstrated at Day 4 of admission (p=0.302). The incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia was evenly spread between Groups B and C (5%) while Group A was only 1%. While a number of studies have advocated the use of various mouth rinses in reducing colonization of dental plaque a standardized oral hygiene protocol which includes the use of mechanical cleaning with a toothbrush may be a factor in the reduction of colonization of dental plaque with respiratory pathogens. This feasibility study provides data to

  4. Development and Validation of a Multiplex PCR-Based Assay for the Upper Respiratory Tract Bacterial Pathogens Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post; White; Aul; Zavoral; Wadowsky; Zhang; Preston; Ehrlich

    1996-06-01

    Background: Conventional simplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays are limited in that they only provide for the detection of a single infectious agent. Many clinical diseases, however, present in a nonspecific, or syndromic, fashion, thereby necessitating the simultaneous assessment of multiple pathogens. Panel-based molecular diagnostic testing can be accomplished by the development of multiplex PCR-based assays, which can detect, individually or severally, different pathogens that are associated with syndromic illness. As part of a larger program of panel development, an assay that can simultaneously detect Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis was developed. These organisms were chosen as they are the most common bacterial pathogens associated with both the acute and chronic forms of otitis media; they are also responsible for a high percentage of sinus infections in both children and adults. In addition, H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae are commonly associated with septic meningitits. Methods and Results: Multiple individual PCR-based assays were developed for each of the three target organisms which were then evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. Utilizing the simplex assays that met our designated performance criteria, a matrix style approach was used to develop a duplex H. influenzae-S. pneumoniae assay. The duplex assay was then used as a single component in the development of a triplex assay, wherein the various M. catarrhalis primer-probe sets were tested for compatibility with the existing assay. A single-step PCR protocol, with species-specific primers for each of the three target organisms and a liquid hybridization-gel retardation amplimer detection system, was developed, which amplifies and then discriminates among each of the amplification products according to size. This assay is able to detect all three organisms in a specific manner, either individually or severally. Dilutional experiments

  5. Can routine surveillance samples from tracheal aspirate predict bacterial flora in cases of ventilator-associated pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampati, L; Maggioni, E; Langer, M; Malacarne, P; Mozzo, R; Pesenti, A; Fumagalli, R

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that periodical sampling of the tracheo-bronchial tree in the absence of clinical suspicion of pneumonia is useful to identify bacteria responsible for subsequent late ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). This was a retrospective observational human study carried out in two medical-surgical intensive care units of two different hospitals. From January 1999 to December 2000, 559 patients, who received invasive respiratory support for more than 48 hours, were screened. Tracheal aspiration (TA) was performed once or twice weekly in all mechanically ventilated patients. The microbiological findings from TA surveillance cultures done in the eight days before suspicion of VAP were compared to those isolated from the positive diagnostic samples done for late onset VAP (after more than four days of mechanical ventilation). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive/negative predictive values of the ability of the surveillance sample to anticipate the VAP pathogen were calculated. Among the microorganisms isolated from TA, 68% were retrieved from diagnostic samples. All VAP pathogens previously isolated were from 43% of the TA samples. If TA was collected 2-4 days before the clinical diagnosis of VAP, pathogens were detected in 58% of samples. In contrast, only 27% were collected more than four days earlier (PVAP is suspected.

  6. Pneumonia Nosokomial

    OpenAIRE

    Keliat, E.N; Abidin, Alwinsyah; Lubis, Nursyamsiah

    2017-01-01

    Pada masa yang lalu pneumonia diklasifikasikan sebagai pneumonia tipikal yang disebabkan oleh Str. Pneumonia daan atipikal yang disebabkan kuman atipik seperti halnya M. pneumonia. Kemudian ternyata manifestasi dari patogen lain seperti H. influenza, S. aureus dan bakteri Gram negatif memberikan sindrom klinik yang identik dengan pneumonia oleh Str E.N Keliat

  7. Ventilator-associated pneumonia: the influence of bacterial resistance, prescription errors, and de-escalation of antimicrobial therapy on mortality rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Souza-Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Prescription errors influenced mortality of patients with Ventilator-associated pneumonia, underscoring the challenge of proper Ventilator-associated pneumonia treatment, which requires continuous reevaluation to ensure that clinical response to therapy meets expectations.

  8. Pneumonia: high-resolution CT findings in 114 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reittner, Pia; Ward, Suzanne; Heyneman, Laura; Mueller, Nestor L.; Johkoh, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the high-resolution CT appearances of different types of pneumonia. The high-resolution CT scans obtained in 114 patients (58 immunocompetent, 59 immunocompromised) with bacterial, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, viral, fungal, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonias were analyzed retrospectively by two independent observers for presence, pattern, and distribution of abnormalities. Areas of air-space consolidation were not detected in patients with viral pneumonia and were less frequently seen in patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (2 of 22 patients, 9%) than in bacterial (30 of 35, 85%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (22 of 28, 79%), and fungal pneumonias (15 of 20, 75%; p<0.01). There was no significant difference in the prevalence or distribution of consolidation between bacterial, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and fungal pneumonias. Extensive symmetric bilateral areas of ground-glass attenuation were present in 21 of 22 (95%) patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and were not seen in other pneumonias except in association with areas of consolidation and nodules. Centrilobular nodules were present less commonly in bacterial pneumonia (6 of 35 patients, 17%) than in Mycoplasma pneumoniae (24 of 28, 96%), viral (7 of 9, 78%), or fungal (12 of 20, 92%) pneumonia (p<0.01). Except for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, which often have a characteristic appearance, high-resolution CT is of limited value in the differential diagnosis of the various types of infective pneumonia. (orig.)

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility in community-acquired bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, two bacterial pathogens commonly associated with communityacquired pneumonia. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Bacterial isolates were obtained from adults suspected to have ...

  10. Radiographic features of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia: differential diagnosis and performance timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Sugiu, Tadaaki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Oda, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Tetsuya; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Kobashi, Yoshihiro; Oka, Mikio

    2009-01-01

    The Japanese Respiratory Society guidelines propose a differential diagnosis for atypical pneumonia and bacterial pneumonia using a scoring system for the selection of appropriate antibiotic. In order to improve this scoring system, the guidelines are seeking new specific parameter. The purpose of this study was to clarify the pattern of abnormalities with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia on chest computed tomography (CT) and whether the radiographic findings could distinguish M. pneumoniae pneumonia from Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. A retrospective review was performed of the CT findings of 64 cases and 68 cases where M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae, respectively, were the only pathogen identified by the panel of diagnostic tests used. Of the 64 patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia, bronchial wall thickening was observed most frequently (81%), followed by centrilobular nodules (78%), ground-glass attenuation (78%), and consolidation (61%). Bronchial wall thickening and centrilobular nodules were observed more often in M. pneumoniae patients than in S. pneumoniae patients (p < 0.0001). The presence of bilateral bronchial wall thickening or centrilobular nodules was only seen in patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Using the scoring system of the Japanese Respiratory Society guidelines and chest CT findings, 97% of M. pneumoniae patients were suspected to be M. pneumoniae pneumonia without serology. When comparing the CT findings between early stage and progressed stage in the same patients with severe pneumonia, the radiographic features of early stage M. pneumoniae pneumonia were not observed clearly in the progressed stage. The present results indicate that the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae pneumonia would appear to be reliable when found with a combination of bronchial wall thickening and centrilobular nodules in the CT findings. However, these CT findings are not observed in progressed severe M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients

  11. A compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Lynn Parrott

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, walking pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review.

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenfelz, Caroline; Hakansson, Anders P

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to review the literature regarding the mechanisms of transition from asymptomatic colonization to induction of otitis media and how the insight into the pathogenesis of otitis media has the potential to help design future otitis media-directed vaccines. Respiratory viruses have long been shown to predispose individuals to bacterial respiratory infections, such as otitis media. Recent information suggests that Streptococcus pneumoniae , which colonize the nasopharynx asymptomatically, can sense potentially "threatening" changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by virus infection by upregulating specific sets of genes involved in biofilm release, dissemination from the nasopharynx to other sites, and protection against the host immune system. Furthermore, an understanding of the transcriptional and proteomic changes occurring in bacteria during transition to infection has led to identification of novel vaccine targets that are disease-specific and will not affect asymptomatic colonization. This approach will avoid major changes in the delicate balance of microorganisms in the respiratory tract microbiome due to elimination of S. pneumoniae . Our recent findings are reviewed in the context of the current literature on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of otitis media. We also discuss how other otopathogens, such as Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis , as well as the normal respiratory microbiome, can modulate the ability of pneumococci to cause infection. Furthermore, the unsatisfactory protection offered by the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is highlighted and we review potential future strategies emerging to confer a more specific protection against otitis media.

  13. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Modern Detoxification Techniques in a Puerpera with Viral and Bacterial Pneumonia Caused by Flu A(H1N1 Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Kornelyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of viral infections have become a global healthcare challenge over the last decade. The 2009—2010 flu A (H1N1 outbreak resulted in global pandemia, associated with high morbidity and mortality reaching 31%. Another flu A (H1N1 outbreak occurred in 2015—2016. There is a strong probability that it may be repeated in the future. This infection is associated with its high incidence among pregnant women. There are some published reports describing the efficacy and safety of veno%venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome that is refractory to standard therapeutic options. The article presents a clinical case of a successful use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and intermittent renal replacement therapy in a puerpera with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by flu A (H1N1-related severe viral and bacterial pneumonia. The positive effects of the combination of veno%venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and modern detoxification techniques have been demonstrated. Revealed organizational problemswere related to selection criteria for prescription of extracorporeal gas exchange, as well as to carrying out the procedure in an institution in the deficiency of the experienced staff and corresponding equipment.

  14. Restoring Functional Status: A Long-Term Case Report of Severe Lung and Ventilatory Muscle Pump Dysfunction Involving Recurrent Bacterial Pneumonias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobush, Dennis C.; Laatsch, Linda; Lipchik, Randolph J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prolonged mechanical ventilation contributes to immobility and deconditioning making efforts to safely discontinue ventilator support desirable. This case report documents how implementing physical therapy treatment interventions, based on the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, can help to restore a person's functional status even after multiple years of mechanical ventilation dependency. Case Description A patient (female; aged 63 years) with severe restrictive and obstructive ventilatory impairment has survived 34 recurrent pneumonias involving 6 bacterial pathogens while being mechanically ventilated at home. A 3-year study was approved and informed consent obtained for a home exercise program of resistive extremity and inspiratory muscle training along with exercise reconditioning. Tolerable distances walked, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, hours spent on versus off mechanical ventilation, activities performed within and around her home, and community excursions taken were charted. Outcomes Daily time tolerated off the ventilator improved from less than one to 12 hours, distance walked in 6 minutes increased 33%, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures improved 62% and 9.6% respectively. These improvements made out-of-home social excursions possible. Discussion and Conclusions This patient's functional status improved following multiple physical therapy interventions dictated by the evaluation of initial physical therapy examination findings according to the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Long term mechanical ventilator dependency in the home environment did not exclude this patient from achieving clinically significant gains in functional status even when having severe restrictive and obstructive ventilator impairment. PMID:22833704

  15. Restoring functional status: a long-term case report of severe lung and ventilatory muscle pump dysfunction involving recurrent bacterial pneumonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobush, Dennis C; Laatsch, Linda; Lipchik, Randolph J

    2012-06-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation contributes to immobility and deconditioning making efforts to safely discontinue ventilator support desirable. This case report documents how implementing physical therapy treatment interventions, based on the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, can help to restore a person's functional status even after multiple years of mechanical ventilation dependency. A patient (female; aged 63 years) with severe restrictive and obstructive ventilatory impairment has survived 34 recurrent pneumonias involving 6 bacterial pathogens while being mechanically ventilated at home. A 3-year study was approved and informed consent obtained for a home exercise program of resistive extremity and inspiratory muscle training along with exercise reconditioning. Tolerable distances walked, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, hours spent on versus off mechanical ventilation, activities performed within and around her home, and community excursions taken were charted. Daily time tolerated off the ventilator improved from less than one to 12 hours, distance walked in 6 minutes increased 33%, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures improved 62% and 9.6% respectively. These improvements made out-of-home social excursions possible. This patient's functional status improved following multiple physical therapy interventions dictated by the evaluation of initial physical therapy examination findings according to the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Long term mechanical ventilator dependency in the home environment did not exclude this patient from achieving clinically significant gains in functional status even when having severe restrictive and obstructive ventilator impairment.

  16. Pneumonia in HIV-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Tural Önür

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS is an immune system disease caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The purpose of this review is to investigate the correlation between an immune system destroyed by HIV and the frequency of pneumonia. Observational studies show that respiratory diseases are among the most common infections observed in HIV-infected patients. In addition, pneumonia is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. According to articles in literature, in addition to antiretroviral therapy (ART or highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, the use of prophylaxis provides favorable results for the treatment of pneumonia. Here we conduct a systematic literature review to determine the pathogenesis and causative agents of bacterial pneumonia, tuberculosis (TB, nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, fungal pneumonia, Pneumocystis pneumonia, viral pneumonia and parasitic infections and the prophylaxis in addition to ART and HAART for treatment. Pneumococcus-based polysaccharide vaccine is recommended to avoid some type of specific bacterial pneumonia.

  17. Chest radiographic findings of tuberculous pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seung Hye; Sung, Dong Wook; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1991-01-01

    When tuberculous pneumonia appears as a segmental or loabr consolidation, its is difficult to differentiate tuberculous pneumonia from nontuberculous bacterial pneumonia radiologically. The object of this study was to define the typical radiographic findings of tuberculous pneumonia through comparative analysis of tuberculous and nontuberculous pneumonia. A review of chest radiolograph in 29 patients with tuberculous pneumonia and in 23 patients with nontuberculous bacterial pneumonia was made with regard to homogeneity, volume loss, air-fluid level within the cavities, air-bronchogram, pleural disease, and predilection sites. The characteristic findings of tuberculous pneumonia are a heterogeneous density of infiltration (66%), evidence of volume loss of infiltrative lesion (52%), and cavity formation (48%) without air - fluid level. An associated parameter of analysis is the relative absence of leukocytosis (76%)

  18. In Vitro Activities of Tedizolid and Linezolid against Gram-Positive Cocci Associated with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections and Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ko-Hung; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Hui; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-10-01

    Tedizolid is a novel, expanded-spectrum oxazolidinone with potent activity against a wide range of Gram-positive pathogens. A total of 425 isolates of Gram-positive bacteria were obtained consecutively from patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or pneumonia. These isolates included methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (n = 100), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n = 100), Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 50), Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 50), Streptococcus anginosus group (n = 75), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 50), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) (Enterococcus faecium) (n = 50). The MICs of tedizolid and linezolid were determined by the agar dilution method. Tedizolid exhibited better in vitro activities than linezolid against MSSA (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), MRSA (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), S. pyogenes (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), S. agalactiae (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), Streptococcus anginosus group (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), E. faecalis (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), and VRE (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml). The tedizolid MICs against E. faecalis (n = 3) and VRE (n = 2) intermediate to linezolid (MICs, 4 μg/ml) were 1 μg/ml and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The tedizolid MIC90s against S. anginosus, S. constellatus, and S. intermedius were 0.5, 1, and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively, and the rates of susceptibility based on the U.S. FDA MIC interpretive breakpoints to the isolates were 16%, 28%, and 72%, respectively. Tedizolid exhibited 2- to 4-fold better in vitro activities than linezolid against a variety of Gram-positive cocci associated with ABSSSIs and pneumonia. The lower susceptibilities of tedizolid against isolates of S. anginosus and S. constellatus than against those of S. intermedius in Taiwan were noted. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Defective bacterial clearance is responsible for the enhanced lung pathology characteristic of Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia in bighorn sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Renuka; Herndon, Caroline N; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Dassanayake, Rohana P; Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Potter, Kathleen A; Knowles, Donald P; Foreyt, William J; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2011-12-15

    The molecular and cellular basis for the enhanced lung pathology and mortality caused by Mannheimia haemolytica in bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadenesis), in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries), is not clear. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) of BHS are four- to eight-fold more susceptible to M. haemolytica leukotoxin-induced cytolysis, which is likely to reduce the number of functional phagocytes in the lung. We hypothesized that enhanced lung pathology is due to defective clearance of M. haemolytica from the lungs of BHS. To test this hypothesis, M. haemolytica (1 × 10(7) colony forming units [cfu]) were inoculated intra-tracheally into three groups each of BHS and DS, which were euthanized and necropsied at 4, 12, and 18 h post-inoculation (hpi). Bacterial and leukocyte counts were performed on broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) collected at necropsy. BALF from BHS euthanized at 4 and 12 hpi contained a significantly higher number of M. haemolytica than that from DS. More importantly, DS did not have any bacteria in BALF at 18 hpi, while the BHS still had significant numbers. As expected, the BHS did exhibit more extensive lung lesions at 12 and 18 hpi when compared to DS. At 18 hpi, necrotic PMNs were observed in the lesional lung tissues of BHS, but not DS. Furthermore, BALF from BHS had significantly lower titers of antibodies to Lkt and surface antigens of M. haemolytica, than that of DS. These findings suggest that the enhanced pathology in BHS lungs is due to defective clearance of M. haemolytica from the lungs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess presenting with myasthenia and tea-colored urine: A case report and review of 77 cases of bacterial rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lihua; Jia, Rong; Li, Wei; Xue, Qian; Liu, Jie; Miao, Yide; Wang, Jingtong

    2017-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a well-known syndrome in clinical practice, although rhabdomyolysis caused by a liver abscess is rarely reported and the patient may lack symptoms that are associated with a primary site of infection. Early recognition of this possibility is needed to avoid diagnostic delay and facilitate treatment. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with a Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) pyogenic liver abscess who presented with myasthenia and tea-colored urine and also review the 77 reported cases of bacterial rhabdomyolysis. The patient was 71 years old and presenting with a 7-day history of myasthenia and a 3-day history of tea-colored urine, but without fever or abdominal pain. Laboratory testing in our case revealed rhabdomyolysis, and blood culture revealed KP. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic enclosed mass, and computed tomography (CT) revealed an enclosed low-density mass (8.3 × 6.6 × 6.1 cm). The main diagnoses were a pyogenic liver abscess with rhabdomyolysis. Empirically intravenous piperacillin-sulbactam and intravenous potassium treatment, as well as fluid infusions and other supportive treatments were provided after admission. After the diagnosis was confirmed and susceptibility test results were available, we adjusted the antibiotics to cefoperazone and sulbactam, which were maintained for 6 weeks. The patient's symptoms relieved and the abnormal laboratory parameters corrected. Follow-up abdominal ultrasonography at 24 months after her discharge revealed that the abscess had disappeared. Early recognition and careful consideration of the underlying cause of rhabdomyolysis are critical to improving the patient's prognosis. Thus, physicians should carefully consider the underlying cause in elderly patients who present with rhabdomyolysis, as they may lack symptoms of a primary infection. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pneumonia (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  2. Rocking pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers, Ger T; Rodriguez Gomez, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Ever since Chuck Berry coined the term "rocking pneumonia" in his 1956 song "Roll over Beethoven", pneumonia has been mentioned frequently in modern blues and rock songs. We analyzed the lyrics of these songs to examine how various elements of pneumonia have been represented in popular music, specifically the cause of pneumonia, the risk groups, comorbidity (such as the boogie woogie flu), the clinical symptoms, and treatment and outcome. Up to this day, songwriters suggest that pneumonia is caused mainly by the cold and rain and that treatment is hardly possible, aside from a shot of rhythm and blues.

  3. Osteopontin promotes host defense during Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Windt, G J W; Hoogerwerf, J J; de Vos, A F; Florquin, S; van der Poll, T

    2010-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein involved in inflammatory processes, some of which is mediated by CD44. The aim of this study was to determine the role of OPN during K. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia. Wild-type (WT) and OPN knockout (KO) mice were intranasally infected with 10⁴ colony forming units of K. pneumoniae, or administered Klebsiella lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In addition, recombinant OPN (rOPN) was intranasally administered to WT and CD44 KO mice. During Klebsiella pneumonia, WT mice displayed elevated pulmonary and plasma OPN levels. OPN KO and WT mice showed similar pulmonary bacterial loads 6 h after infection; thereafter, Klebsiella loads were higher in lungs of OPN KO mice and the mortality rate in this group was higher than in WT mice. Early neutrophil recruitment into the bronchoalveolar space was impaired in the absence of OPN after intrapulmonary delivery of either Klebsiella bacteria or Klebsiella LPS. Moreover, rOPN induced neutrophil migration into the bronchoalveolar space, independent from CD44. In vitro, OPN did not affect K. pneumoniae growth or neutrophil function. In conclusion, OPN levels were rapidly increased in the bronchoalveolar space during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, where OPN serves a chemotactic function towards neutrophils, thereby facilitating an effective innate immune response.

  4. Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter Phase 2 Study Comparing the Efficacy and Safety of Oral Solithromycin (CEM-101) to Those of Oral Levofloxacin in the Treatment of Patients with Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Oldach, David; Clark, Kay; Schranz, Jennifer; Das, Anita; Craft, J Carl; Scott, Drusilla; Jamieson, Brian D.; Fernandes, Prabhavathi

    2013-01-01

    Solithromycin, a new macrolide, and the first fluoroketolide in clinical development, with activity against macrolide-resistant bacteria, was tested in 132 patients with moderate to moderately severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized phase 2 study. Patients were enrolled and randomized (1:1) to either 800 mg solithromycin orally (PO) on day 1, followed by 400 mg PO daily on days 2 to 5, or 750 mg levofloxacin PO daily on days 1 to 5. Effi...

  5. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Eric W [Middleton, WI; Kaeppler, Shawn M [Oregon, WI; Chelius, Marisa K [Greeley, CO

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  6. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiere, H A; Niederman, M S

    1998-11-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups, especially the elderly, which is a patient population that continues to grow. Recently the spectrum and clinical picture of pneumonia has been changing as a reflection of this aging population; this requires a reassessment of and a new approach to the patient with pneumonia. Currently, pneumonia patients are classified as having either community-acquired or hospital-acquired infection rather than typical versus atypical. Patients who have CAP are categorized by age, presence of a coexisting medical illness, and the severity of the pneumonia. The rationale behind categorizing patients is to stratify them in terms of mortality risk to help determine the location of therapy (e.g., outpatient, inpatient, intensive care unit) and focus the choice of initial antimicrobial therapy. Once the decision to hospitalize a patient with pneumonia is made, the next step is to decide on an appropriate diagnostic evaluation and antibiotic therapy. Both decisions have evolved over the last several years since the publication of the American Thoracic Society's CAP guidelines. The current approach to the diagnostic work-up of pneumonia stresses a limited role of diagnostic tests and procedures. The antimicrobial regimen has now evolved into one that is empiric in nature and based on the age of the patient, the presence of coexisting medical disease, and the overall severity of the pneumonia. This process is a dynamic once because bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics can further complicate the course of pneumonia therapy, but the impact of resistance on outcome is less clear. Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to penicillin is a prime example of this growing problem, and adjustment to pneumonia therapy may be required. A difficult but not uncommon problem in pneumonia patients is slow recovery and delayed resolution of radiographic infiltrates. Factors that impact

  7. Comparison of radiological findings and microbial aetiology of childhood pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korppi, M.; Kiekara, O.; Kosma, T.H.; Soimakallio, S.

    1993-01-01

    61 children were treated in hospital from 1981 to 1982 because of both radiologically and microbiologically verified viral or bacterial pneumonia. The chest radiographs were interpreted by two radiologists, not familiar with the clinical data, on two occasions three years apart, and only those patients with a definite alveolar or interstitial pneumonia at both evaluations were included in the present analysis. In addition, all patients had viral, mixed viral-bacterial or bacterial infections diagnosed by viral or bacterial antibody or antigen assays. Viral infection alone was seen in 7, mixed viral-bacterial infection in 8 and bacterial infection alone in 12 of the 27 patients with alveolar pneumonia. The respective figures were 13, 13 and 8 for the 34 patients with interstitial pneumonia. C-reactive protein concentration was greater than 40 mg/l in 15 of the patients with alveolar and in 11 of the patients with interstitial pneumonia. Thus 74% of the patients with alveolar and 62% with interstitial pneumonia had bacterial infection, either alone or as a mixed viral-bacterial infection. The results suggest that the presence of an alveolar infiltrate in a chest radiograph is a specific but insensitive indicator of bacterial pneumonia. It is concluded that patients with alveolar pneumonia should be treated with antibiotics. In patients with interstitial pneumonia, however, both viral and bacterial aetiology are possible. In those, the decision concerning antibiotic treatment should be based on clinical and laboratory findings. 21 refs., 4 tabs

  8. SOLITAIRE-IV: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter Study Comparing the Efficacy and Safety of Intravenous-to-Oral Solithromycin to Intravenous-to-Oral Moxifloxacin for Treatment of Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, Thomas M; Rewerska, Barbara; Vucinic-Mihailovic, Violeta; Gonong, Joven Roque V; Das, Anita F; Keedy, Kara; Taylor, David; Sheets, Amanda; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Oldach, David; Jamieson, Brian D

    2016-10-15

    Solithromycin, a novel macrolide antibiotic with both intravenous and oral formulations dosed once daily, has completed 2 global phase 3 trials for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. A total of 863 adults with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (Pneumonia Outcomes Research Team [PORT] class II-IV) were randomized 1:1 to receive either intravenous-to-oral solithromycin or moxifloxacin for 7 once-daily doses. All patients received 400 mg intravenously on day 1 and were permitted to switch to oral dosing when clinically indicated. The primary objective was to demonstrate noninferiority (10% margin) of solithromycin to moxifloxacin in achievement of early clinical response (ECR) assessed 3 days after first dose in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. Secondary endpoints included demonstrating noninferiority in ECR in the microbiological ITT population (micro-ITT) and determination of investigator-assessed success rates at the short-term follow-up (SFU) visit 5-10 days posttherapy. In the ITT population, 79.3% of solithromycin patients and 79.7% of moxifloxacin patients achieved ECR (treatment difference, -0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], -6.1 to 5.2). In the micro-ITT population, 80.3% of solithromycin patients and 79.1% of moxifloxacin patients achieved ECR (treatment difference, 1.26; 95% CI, -8.1 to 10.6). In the ITT population, 84.6% of solithromycin patients and 88.6% of moxifloxacin patients achieved clinical success at SFU based on investigator assessment. Mostly mild/moderate infusion events led to higher incidence of adverse events overall in the solithromycin group. Other adverse events were comparable between treatment groups. Intravenous-to-oral solithromycin was noninferior to intravenous-to-oral moxifloxacin. Solithromycin has potential to provide an intravenous and oral option for monotherapy for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. NCT01968733. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious

  9. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis to evaluate ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimens for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and complicated skin and skin-structure infections in patients with normal and impaired renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, A; Isla, A; Rodríguez-Gascón, A

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the probability of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic target attainment (PTA) of ceftaroline against clinical isolates causing community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) and complicated skin and skin-structure infection (cSSSI) in Europe was evaluated. Three dosing regimens were assessed: 600 mg every 12 h (q12 h) as a 1-h infusion (standard dose) or 600 mg every 8 h (q8 h) as a 2-h infusion in virtual patients with normal renal function; and 400 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pharmacokinetic and microbiological data were obtained from the literature. The PTA and the cumulative fraction of response (CFR) were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. In patients with normal renal function, the ceftaroline standard dose (600 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion) can be sufficient to treat CABP due to ceftazidime-susceptible (CAZ-S) Escherichia coli, CAZ-S Klebsiella pneumoniae, meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis (CFR>90%). However, against meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), the CFR was 72%. In cSSSI, the CFR was also ceftaroline 600 mg q8 h as a 2-h infusion or 400 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion in patients with moderate renal insufficiency provided a high probability of treatment success (CFR ca. 100%) for most micro-organisms causing CABP and cSSSI, including MRSA and penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae. These results suggest that in patients with normal renal function, ceftaroline 600 mg q8 h as a 2-h infusion may be a better option than the standard dose, especially if the MRSA rate is high. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Klebsiella pneumoniae FimK Promotes Virulence in Murine Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David A; Hilliard, Julia K; Tiemann, Kristin M; Todd, Elizabeth M; Morley, S Celeste; Hunstad, David A

    2016-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a chief cause of nosocomial pneumonia, is a versatile and commonly multidrug-resistant human pathogen for which further insight into pathogenesis is needed. We show that the pilus regulatory gene fimK promotes the virulence of K. pneumoniae strain TOP52 in murine pneumonia. This contrasts with the attenuating effect of fimK on urinary tract virulence, illustrating that a single factor may exert opposing effects on pathogenesis in distinct host niches. Loss of fimK in TOP52 pneumonia was associated with diminished lung bacterial burden, limited innate responses within the lung, and improved host survival. FimK expression was shown to promote serum resistance, capsule production, and protection from phagocytosis by host immune cells. Finally, while the widely used K. pneumoniae model strain 43816 produces rapid dissemination and death in mice, TOP52 caused largely localized pneumonia with limited lethality, thereby providing an alternative tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis and control within the lung. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. How Is Pneumonia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following types of bacteria, it is called atypical pneumonia. Legionella pneumophila. This type of pneumonia sometimes is ... ventilator machine to help them breathe get pneumonia. Atypical pneumonia . Atypical pneumonia is a type of CAP. It ...

  12. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following types of bacteria, it is called atypical pneumonia. Legionella pneumophila. This type of pneumonia sometimes is ... ventilator machine to help them breathe get pneumonia. Atypical pneumonia . Atypical pneumonia is a type of CAP. It ...

  13. What Is Walking Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pneumonia: What does it mean? What is walking pneumonia? How is it different from regular pneumonia? Answers from Eric J. Olson, M.D. Walking pneumonia is an informal term for pneumonia that isn' ...

  14. Healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgie, Sarah; Marrie, Thomas J

    2009-02-01

    Atypical pneumonia was first described in 1938, and over time, Mycoplasma, Legionella, and Chlamydophila were the agents commonly linked with community-associated atypical pneumonia. However, as technology has improved, so has our understanding of this clinical entity. It is now known that there are many agents linked with atypical pneumonia in the community, and many of these agents are also major causes of healthcare-associated pneumonia. This article discusses the history, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of infection; control of infection; clinical findings; diagnosis; and, where applicable, treatment of the agents of healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia. Bacterial agents include Legionella species, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila species, and Coxiella burnetii. Although there are over 100 viruses that can cause respiratory tract infections, only a fraction of those have been defined in the context of healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia: adenovirus and human bocavirus (HBoV); rhinovirus; human coronaviruses (HCoV), including HCoV 229E, HCoV OC43, HCoV NL63, HCoV HKU1; members of the paramyxoviridae (parainfluenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus); hantavirus; influenza; and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) Co-V. Our knowledge about healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia will continue to evolve as newer pathogens are identified and as newer diagnostic modalities such as multiplex polymerase chain reaction are introduced.

  15. Clinical differentiation of atypical pneumonia using Japanese guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Tadashi; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Nakahama, Chikara

    2007-01-01

    Atypical pneumonia occupies an important position in community-acquired pneumonia. The aim of this study was to examine whether making a diagnosis of atypical pneumonia is possible based upon the Japanese Respiratory Society guidelines. The data from three prospective studies were reviewed. A total of 285 patients with mycoplasmal pneumonia or chlamydial pneumonia and 515 patients with pneumococcal pneumonia or Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia were assessed to determine whether these pneumonias met the diagnostic criteria for atypical pneumonia used in the Japanese Respiratory Society guidelines. The criteria were: (i) age less than 60 years; (ii) no or only minor underlying diseases; (iii) persistent cough; (iv) limited chest auscultatory findings; (v) no sputum, or no identified aetiological agent by rapid diagnosis; and (vi) a peripheral white blood cell count below 10,000/microL. All items of the criteria proved to be valid except for 'age' in patients with Chlamydophila pneumoniae pneumonia using multiple regression analysis. The sensitivity and specificity for atypical pneumonia were 77.0% and 93.0% based on four or more of the criteria respectively. Pure atypical pneumonia can be differentiated to some degree by clinical symptoms and laboratory findings. It is important to differentiate and treat bacterial pneumonia and atypical pneumonia in regions such as Japan, where Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance to macrolides is high. Treatment covering the two types of pneumonia should be considered in elderly patients and those with underlying respiratory disease.

  16. Toll-like receptor 9 enhances bacterial clearance and limits lung consolidation in murine pneumonia caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Anne Jan; Achouiti, Achmed; van der Ende, Arie; Soussan, Aicha A.; Florquin, Sandrine; de Vos, Alex; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen in pneumonia, associated with severe lung damage. Tissue injury causes release of Damage Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs), which may perpetuate inflammation. DNA has been implicated as a DAMP that activates inflammation

  17. The value of signs and symptoms in differentiating between bacterial, viral and mixed aetiology in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Koopmans, Marion; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Rossen, John W. A.

    Current diagnostics for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) include testing for a wide range of pathogens, which is costly and not always informative. We compared clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with CAP caused by different groups of pathogens to evaluate the potential for targeted

  18. The role of atypical pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Thomas J; Costain, Nicholas; La Scola, Bernard; Patrick, Ward; Forgie, Sarah; Xu, Zhaolin; McNeil, Shelly A

    2012-06-01

    The term atypical pneumonia was first used in 1938, and by the 1970s it was widely used to refer to pneumonia due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila (or other Legionella species), and Chlamydophila pneumoniae. However, in the purest sense all pneumonias other than the classic bacterial pneumonias are atypical. Currently many favor abolition of the term atypical pneumonia.This review categorizes atypical pneumonia pathogens as conventional ones; viral agents and emerging atypical pneumonia pathogens. We emphasize viral pneumonia because with the increasing availability of multiplex polymerase chain reaction we can identify the agent(s) responsible for viral pneumonia. By using a sensitive assay for procalcitonin one can distinguish between viral and bacterial pneumonia. This allows pneumonia to be categorized as bacterial or viral at the time of admission to hospital or at discharge from the emergency department and soon thereafter further classified as to the etiology, which should be stated as definite or probable. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. [Clinical features and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li-Yun; Wang, Ying-Jian; Li, Ji-Mei

    2012-11-01

    To study the clinical features and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in infants. The clinical data of 65 infants with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae between 2007 and 2011 were retrospectively studied. Of the 65 infants, 37 cases (57%) were aged ≤3 months, 17 cases (26%) over 4 months, 7 cases (11%) over 7 months and 4 cases (6%) between 13 and 24 months. There were no significant differences in clinical manifestations and chest X-ray features between the infants with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and those with other bacterial pneumonia. Forty strains (62%) of ESBLs-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were detected. Klebsiella pneumoniae was 100% sensitive to imipenem, meropenem and amikacin but resistant to penicillins and cephalosporins. The resistance rates of ESBLs-producing strains to penicillins, cephalosporins, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin/sulbactam, compound sulfamethoxazole, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam were significantly higher than for non-ESBLs-producing strains. ESBLs-producing strains also showed multiple-drug resistance. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae is common in infants aged ≤3 months. ESBLs-producing strains are prevalent in community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and demonstrate both high rates of drug resistance and multiple-drug resistance.

  20. Efficiency of Vanilla, Patchouli and Ylang Ylang Essential Oils Stabilized by Iron Oxide@C14 Nanostructures against Bacterial Adherence and Biofilms Formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Bilcu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14 in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties.

  1. Efficiency of vanilla, patchouli and ylang ylang essential oils stabilized by iron oxide@C14 nanostructures against bacterial adherence and biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcu, Maxim; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Mogoșanu, George Dan; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A; Mihailescu, Dan Florin; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-11-04

    Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14) in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h) and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties.

  2. Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae and other respiratory bacterial pathogens in low and lower-middle income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Adegbola

    Full Text Available Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in low income countries where pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs are still underused. In countries where PCVs have been introduced, much of their efficacy has resulted from their impact on nasopharyngeal carriage in vaccinated children. Understanding the epidemiology of carriage for S. pneumoniae and other common respiratory bacteria in developing countries is crucial for implementing appropriate vaccination strategies and evaluating their impact.We have systematically reviewed published studies reporting nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal carriage of S. pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Neisseria meningitidis in children and adults in low and lower-middle income countries. Studies reporting pneumococcal carriage for healthy children <5 years of age were selected for a meta-analysis. The prevalences of carriage for S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and M. catarrhalis were generally higher in low income than in lower-middle income countries and were higher in young children than in adults. The prevalence of S. aureus was high in neonates. Meta-analysis of data from young children before the introduction of PCVs showed a pooled prevalence estimate of 64.8% (95% confidence interval, 49.8%-76.1% in low income countries and 47.8% (95% confidence interval, 44.7%-50.8% in lower-middle income countries. The most frequent serotypes were 6A, 6B, 19A, 19F, and 23F.In low and lower-middle income countries, pneumococcal carriage is frequent, especially in children, and the spectrum of serotypes is wide. However, because data are limited, additional studies are needed to adequately assess the impact of PCV introduction on carriage of respiratory bacteria in these countries.

  3. [Pneumonia with empyema during varicella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, A; Bosdure, E; Schott, A; Beydon, N; Chabrol, B; Dubus, J-C

    2008-11-01

    Chicken pox is usually considered a benign viral affection; however, possible infectious complications are observed. Although cutaneous infections are well described, bacterial pneumonia with empyema is more exceptionally reported. To describe the clinical characteristics of bacterial pneumonia with empyema associated with chicken pox. This descriptive multicenter retrospective study was based on a questionnaire sent by Internet to 30 French pediatric and pediatric respiratory hospital wards. We found 4 cases of children (mean age, 19 months) presenting during the chicken pox eruption concomitant bacterial pneumonia with empyema. The average time of diagnosis was 4.5 days after the beginning of the eruption. All the children were febrile and had an average pulsed oxygen saturation of 87%. The inflammatory syndrome was constant with a mean C reactive protein of 253 mg/l. Group A Streptococcus was identified in 3 cases out of 4. Admission to an intensive care unit was necessary for 3 children, 1 of them requiring mechanical ventilation. No clinical or radiological sequelae were observed during the complete year of follow-up. Bacterial pneumoniae with empyema are not current complications of chicken pox but have to be sought when prolonged fever and/or alteration of the health status occurs during chicken pox eruption.

  4. A Multicenter, Randomized, Observer-blinded, Active-controlled Study Evaluating the Safety and Effectiveness of Ceftaroline Compared With Ceftriaxone Plus Vancomycin in Pediatric Patients With Complicated Community-acquired Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Jeffrey L; Ghonghadze, Tina; Cannavino, Christopher; O'Neal, Tanya; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, Hillel David; Bradley, John S

    2016-07-01

    The broad-spectrum cephalosporin ceftaroline, a metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, has shown in vitro activity against clinical isolates from pediatric patients. This multicenter, randomized, observer-blinded, active-controlled study (NCT01669980) assessed the safety and effectiveness of ceftaroline fosamil compared with ceftriaxone plus vancomycin in patients between 2 months and 17 years of age with complicated community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Patients were randomized 3:1 (stratified by age cohort) to receive either ceftaroline fosamil or ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (comparator) as intravenous therapy for ≥3 days. Patients who met specific study criteria on or after Study Day 4 were permitted to switch to an oral study drug. Safety assessments were treatment-emergent adverse events, and the effectiveness of treatment was assessed by clinical and microbiologic outcomes. The median duration of intravenous treatment was 9.0 (range, 3.0-19.0) days in the ceftaroline fosamil group (N=30) and 7.5 (5.0-13.0) days in the comparator group (N=10). At least one treatment-emergent adverse event was experienced by 12/30 patients (40%) in the ceftaroline fosamil group and 8/10 (80%) in the comparator group; most treatment-emergent adverse events in both groups were mild to moderate in intensity. Clinical response rates in the modified intent-to-treat population were 52% (15/29 patients) in the ceftaroline fosamil group and 67% in the comparator group (6/9); clinical stability at Study Day 4 was 21% (6/29) and 22% (2/9), respectively. Ceftaroline fosamil was well tolerated and showed similar clinical response rates to ceftriaxone plus vancomycin in pediatric patients with complicated community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

  5. Corticosteroids for pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Anat; Skalsky, Keren; Avni, Tomer; Carrara, Elena; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2017-12-13

    .84; moderate-quality evidence), but not in adults with non-severe pneumonia (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.45 to 2.00). Early clinical failure rates (defined as death from any cause, radiographic progression, or clinical instability at day 5 to 8) were significantly reduced with corticosteroids in people with severe and non-severe pneumonia (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.7; and RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.83, respectively; high-quality evidence). Corstocosteroids reduced time to clinical cure, length of hospital and intensive care unit stays, development of respiratory failure or shock not present at pneumonia onset, and rates of pneumonia complications.Among children with bacterial pneumonia, corticosteroids reduced early clinical failure rates (defined as for adults, RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.70; high-quality evidence) based on two small, clinically heterogeneous trials, and reduced time to clinical cure.Hyperglycaemia was significantly more common in adults treated with corticosteroids (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.38 to 2.14). There were no significant differences between corticosteroid-treated people and controls for other adverse events or secondary infections (RR 1.19, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.93). Corticosteroid therapy reduced mortality and morbidity in adults with severe CAP; the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome was 18 patients (95% CI 12 to 49) to prevent one death. Corticosteroid therapy reduced morbidity, but not mortality, for adults and children with non-severe CAP. Corticosteroid therapy was associated with more adverse events, especially hyperglycaemia, but the harms did not seem to outweigh the benefits.

  6. Ventilator-associated Pneumonia After Elective Cardiac Surgery Caused by Pneumocystis Jirovecii

    OpenAIRE

    Tobar, E.; Silva, F.; Zamorano, A.; Cifuentes, M.; Miller, R. F.; Vargas, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a severe complication among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Although hospital-acquired bacterial pathogens, often multidrug resistant, are the most frequent cause, non-bacterial atypical and opportunistic agents traditionally associated with immunocompromise are increasingly recognized. We describe ventilator-associated pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii in the absence of traditional risk factors for Pneumocystis pneumonia in a patie...

  7. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A D

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated-if any-cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS.

  8. (PCR) in the diagnosis of bacterial infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... bacterial infections that can be diagnosed using the technique which include among others; Tuberculosis (TB), whooping cough, brain abscesses and spinal infection, otitis media with effusion, Mycoplasmal pneumonia, endophthalmitis and bacterial meningitis. Keywords: Polymerase chain reaction, Diagnosis, Bacteria, ...

  9. A case of pneumonia and sepsis in cirrhosis as paradigm of the problems in the management of bacterial infections in cirrhosis and of the limitations of current knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Tufoni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are a major problem in the management of liver cirrhosis. They represent the first precipitating cause of death since patients with cirrhosis carry an increased risk of sepsis, sepsis-induced organ failure and death. Although the clinical presentation is often misleading, the presence of bacterial infection should always be actively searched and ruled out with certainty whenever a cirrhotic patient is admitted to the hospital with an acute clinical deterioration. Major changes in the epidemiology of bacterial infections have also occurred in the last decade making the choice of empirical antibiotic therapy a challenge. We report a paradigmatic case of a 54-year old man with hepatitis C-related cirrhosis admitted to the hospital for worsening of his ascites and onset of hepatic encephalopathy, an excellent example for the difficulties of management of sepsis in cirrhosis and the limits of current knowledge.

  10. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis in alcoholic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisfelt, M.; de Gans, J.; van der Ende, A.; van de Beek, D.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcoholism is associated with susceptibility to infectious disease, particularly bacterial pneumonia. In the present study we described characteristics in alcoholic patients with bacterial meningitis and delineate the differences with findings in non-alcoholic adults with bacterial

  11. Enterobacter Asburiae Pneumonia with Cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Enterobacter species have increasingly been identified as pathogens over the past several decades. These bacterial species have become more important because most are resistant to cephalothin and cefoxitin, and can produce extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase. Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a gram-negative rod of the family Enterobacteriaceae, named in 1986. Since then, there has been only one clinical report of E. asburiae pneumonia. We report a case of E. asburiae pneumonia with cavitation and compare it with the previous case.

  12. Enterobacter Asburiae Pneumonia with Cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacter species have increasingly been identified as pathogens over the past several decades. These bacterial species have become more important because most are resistant to cephalothin and cefoxitin, and can produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a gram-negative rod of the family Enterobacteriaceae, named in 1986. Since then, there has been only one clinical report of E. asburiae pneumonia. We report a case of E. asburiae pneumonia with cavitation and compare it with the previous case.

  13. CT findings of necrotizing pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Im, Jung Gi; Whang, Sung Il; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, Jae Kyo; Song, Jae Woo

    1998-01-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia causes necrosis of pulmonary parenchyma and may lead to pulmonary gangrene. Prior to the antibiotic era, extensive pulmonary involvement was potentially fatal, but the incidence of necrotizing pneumoniais now less common. On contrast-enhanced CT scans, consolidation with contrast enhancement containing necrotic foci with low attenuation and cavities is characteristic. Radiologic findings do not differ according to the causative organism and in most of cases, specific diagnosis may be impossible. Clinical findings and certain characteristic radiologic findings may be helpful for narrowing the differential diagnosis. We illustrate the clinical and radiologic characteristics of necrotizing pneumonia according to causative bacterial organisms

  14. Pneumonia in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tow Keang; Siow, Wen Ting

    2018-01-01

    Pneumonia in the tropics poses a heavy disease burden. The complex interplay of climate change, human migration influences and socio-economic factors lead to changing patterns of respiratory infections in tropical climate but also increasingly in temperate countries. Tropical and poorer countries, especially South East Asia, also bear the brunt of the global tuberculosis (TB) pandemic, accounting for almost one-third of the burden. But, as human migration patterns evolve, we expect to see more TB cases in higher income as well as temperate countries, and rise in infections like scrub typhus from ecotourism activities. Fuelled by the ease of air travel, novel zoonotic infections originating from the tropics have led to global respiratory pandemics. As such, clinicians worldwide should be aware of these new conditions as well as classical tropical bacterial pneumonias such as melioidosis. Rarer entities such as co-infections of leptospirosis and chikungunya or dengue will need careful consideration as well. In this review, we highlight aetiologies of pneumonia seen more commonly in the tropics compared with temperate regions, their disease burden, variable clinical presentations as well as impact on healthcare delivery. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  15. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Sook Youn

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP, the smallest self-replicating biological system, is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections, leading to a wide range of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary manifestations. MP pneumonia has been reported in 10 to 40% of cases of community-acquired pneumonia and shows an even higher proportion during epidemics. MP infection is endemic in larger communities of the world with cyclic epidemics every 3 to 7 years. In Korea, 3 to 4-year cycles have been observed from the mid-1980s to present. Although a variety of serologic assays and polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques are available for the diagnosis of MP infections, early diagnosis of MP pneumonia is limited by the lack of immunoglobulin (Ig M antibodies and variable PCR results in the early stages of the infection. Thus, short-term paired IgM serologic tests may be mandatory for an early and definitive diagnosis. MP infection is usually a mild and self-limiting disease without specific treatment, and if needed, macrolides are generally used as a first-choice drug for children. Recently, macrolide-resistant MP strains have been reported worldwide. However, there are few reports of apparent treatment failure, such as progression of pneumonia to acute respiratory distress syndrome despite macrolide treatment. The immunopathogenesis of MP pneumonia is believed to be a hyperimmune reaction of the host to the insults from MP infection, including cytokine overproduction and immune cell activation (T cells. In this context, immunomodulatory treatment (corticosteroids or/and intravenous Ig, in addition to antibiotic treatment, might be considered for patients with severe infection.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical significance of antimicrobial resistance in. Streptococcus pneumoniae. Michael R Jacobs. Despite increasing resistance in the pneumococcus over the past 30 years, there are few cases of treatment failure of non-meningeal infections with high-dosage parenteral penicillin G, which still remains highly effective for.

  17. Randomized, double-blind, multicenter phase 2 study comparing the efficacy and safety of oral solithromycin (CEM-101) to those of oral levofloxacin in the treatment of patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldach, David; Clark, Kay; Schranz, Jennifer; Das, Anita; Craft, J Carl; Scott, Drusilla; Jamieson, Brian D; Fernandes, Prabhavathi

    2013-06-01

    Solithromycin, a new macrolide, and the first fluoroketolide in clinical development, with activity against macrolide-resistant bacteria, was tested in 132 patients with moderate to moderately severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized phase 2 study. Patients were enrolled and randomized (1:1) to either 800 mg solithromycin orally (PO) on day 1, followed by 400 mg PO daily on days 2 to 5, or 750 mg levofloxacin PO daily on days 1 to 5. Efficacy outcome rates of clinical success at the test-of-cure visit 4 to 11 days after the last dose of study drug were comparable in the intent-to-treat (ITT) (84.6% for solithromycin versus 86.6% for levofloxacin) and microbiological-intent-to-treat (micro-ITT) (77.8% for solithromycin versus 71.4% for levofloxacin) populations. Early response success rates at day 3, defined as improvement in at least two cardinal symptoms of pneumonia, were also comparable (72.3% for solithromycin versus 71.6% for levofloxacin). More patients treated with levofloxacin than with solithromycin experienced treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) during the study (45.6% versus 29.7%). The majority of TEAEs were mild or moderate gastrointestinal symptoms and included nausea (1.6% for solithromycin; 10.3% for levofloxacin), diarrhea (7.8% for solithromycin; 5.9% for levofloxacin), and vomiting (0% for solithromycin; 4.4% for levofloxacin). Six patients, all of whom received levofloxacin, discontinued the study drug due to an adverse event. Solithromycin demonstrated comparable efficacy and favorable safety relative to levofloxacin. These findings support a phase 3 study of solithromycin for the treatment of CABP. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01168713.).

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; McDunn, Jonathan E; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Dixon, David J; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dipasco, Peter J; Osberghaus, William F; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R; Walter, Michael J; Cobb, J Perren; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, then treatment involves only nonspecific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar after disparate infections with similar mortalities. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple time points. The host response was dependent on the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses were independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of five distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary macrophage inflammatory peptide-2 and interleukin-10 with progression of infection, whereas elevated plasma tumor necrosis factor sr2 and macrophage chemotactic peptide-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hrs. Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a

  19. Atypical pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubairi, Ali Bin Sarwar; Zafar, Afia; Salahuddin, Nawal; Haque, Ahmed Suleman; Waheed, Shahan; Khan, Javaid Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    To determine the frequency of community-acquired respiratory pathogens with special focus on atypical organisms in patients presenting to a tertiary care facility with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The descriptive study on adult patients was conducted from February 2007 to March 2008 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised 124 consenting patients of age 16 and above who presentd with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia. The diagnostic modalities used were based on significant changes in antibody titer or persisting high antibody titers in the case of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chalmydia pneumoniae infections, or bacterial antigen in urine, in the case of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 infection. Pyogenic bacteria were identified on the results of respiratory secretions or blood cultures. Continuous data and categorical variables were worked out using SPSS version 15. Among the 124 patients enrolled, an etiologic agent was identified in 44 (35.4%) patients. The most common organism was Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 21, 17%), followed by Chlamydia pneumoniae (n = 15, 12%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 9, 7%), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 2, 1.6%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 2, 1.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 1, 0.8%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism isolated from blood cultures. No cases of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were identified. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chalmydia pneumoniae are significant etiologic agents for community-acquired pneumonia occurring in Karachi. Local treatment guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia should include therapy directed specifically at these agents.

  20. Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardi, Vincenzo; Domenichini, Paolo; Reali, Silvia; Chiappara, Gian Marco; Devoto, Gianluigi; Valbusa, Ugo

    2017-12-01

    In the last decade the detection of the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics treatment, developed by different kind of bacteria, is becoming a huge problem. We hereby present a different approach to the current problem of detection of bacteria resistance to antibiotics. Our aims were to use the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate bacteria morphological changes in response to antibiotics treatment and explore the possibility of reducing the time required to obtain information on their resistance. In particular, we studied Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria provided by the Lavagna Hospital ASL4 Liguria (Italy), where there are cases linked with antibiotics resistance of the Klebsiella pneumoniae . By comparing AFM images of bacteria strains treated with different antibiotics is possible to identify unambiguously the Klebsiella pneumoniae strains resistant to antibiotics. In fact, the analysis of the AFM images of the antibiotic-sensitive bacteria shows clearly the presence of morphological alterations in the cell wall. While in the case of the antibiotic-resistant bacteria morphological alterations are not present. This approach is based on an easy and potentially rapid AFM analysis.

  1. Therapeutic potential of bacteriophage in treating Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-mediated lobar pneumonia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhibber, Sanjay; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumari, Seema

    2008-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae causes infections in humans especially in immunocompromised patients. About 80 % of nosocomial infections caused by K. pneumoniae are due to multidrug-resistant strains. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains necessitates the exploration of alternative antibacterial therapies, which led our group to study the ability of bacterial viruses (known as bacteriophages or simply phages) to treat mice challenged with K. pneumoniae. Phage SS specific for K. pneumoniae B5055 was isolated and characterized, and its potential as a therapeutic agent was evaluated in an experimental model of K. pneumoniae-mediated lobar pneumonia in mice. Mice were challenged by intranasal (i.n.) inoculation with bacteria (10(8) c.f.u. ml(-1)). A single intraperitoneal injection of 10(10) p.f.u. ml(-1) phage administered immediately after i.n. challenge was sufficient to rescue 100 % of animals from K. pneumoniae-mediated respiratory infections. Administration of the phage preparation 3 h prior to i.n. bacterial challenge provided significant protection in infected mice, while even 6 h delay of phage administration after the induction of infection rendered the phage treatment ineffective. The results of this study therefore suggest that the timing of starting the phage therapy after initiation of infection significantly contributes towards the success of the treatment.

  2. [Problems in the serological diagnosis of atypical pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmietańska, Karolina; Chróst, Anna; Rastawicki, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    The clinical presentation of atypical pneumonia is often similar to the presentation of more typical bacterial pneumonias and the etiological agent must be confirmed by laboratory diagnosis. This article will discuss the problems in the serological diagnosis of atypical pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae which are the agents most commonly associated with atypical pneumonia. Specifically, seeking the possibility of non-specific response, we evaluated the prevalence of antibodies to M. pneumoniae in serum samples obtained from patients suspected in clinical investigation for legionellosis. The total numbers of 261 serum obtained from patients suspected in clinical investigation for legionellosis, were tested by in-house ELISA with M. pneumoniae sonicated antigen. Some of the positive sera were also re-tested by western-blot with high specific recombinant M. pneumoniae P1 protein. The diagnostic significant level of IgA antibodies to M. pneumoniae were diagnosed by ELISA in 71 (27,2%) of tested serum samples. Some of the IgA-positive sera have also high level of IgG and IgM antibodies to M pneumoniae (respectively 4,2% and 6,5%). Most from the 18 selected positive results obtained by ELISA were also confirmed by western-blot. It was characteristic that IgA antibodies to M pneumoniae were detected more than three times often in serum samples with positive serological tests for Legionnaires' disease than in samples with negative results for L. pneumophila. This study showed the possibility of non-specific reactions in serological diagnosis of atypical pneumonia. However, according to the data of the literature, co-infections of L. pneumophila and M pneumoniae can not be excluded.

  3. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following types of bacteria, it is called atypical pneumonia. Legionella pneumophila. This type of pneumonia sometimes is ... ventilator machine to help them breathe get pneumonia. Atypical pneumonia . Atypical pneumonia is a type of CAP. It ...

  4. Attenuation of the bacterial load in blood by pretreatment with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor protects rats from fatal outcome and brain damage during Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Lund, Søren Peter

    2004-01-01

    A model of pneumococcal meningitis in young adult rats receiving antibiotics once the infection was established was developed. The intent was to mimic clinical and histopathological features of pneumococcal meningitis in humans. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate whether medical...... boosting of the peripheral neutrophil count affected the outcome of the meningitis. The risk of terminal illness over the first 7 days after infection was significantly reduced for rats who had elevated peripheral white blood cell counts after receiving granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prior...... to the infection compared to that for untreated rats (P = 0.039 by the log rank test). The improved outcome was associated with reduced signs of cerebral cortical damage (P = 0.008). Furthermore, the beneficial effects of G-CSF were associated with reduced bacterial loads in the cerebrospinal fluid (median, 1.1 x...

  5. A prospective study of the diagnostic utility of sputum Gram stain in pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anevlavis, Stavros; Petroglou, Niki; Tzavaras, Athanasios; Maltezos, Efstratios; Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Froudarakis, Marios; Anevlavis, Eleftherios; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2009-08-01

    Sputum Gram stain and culture have been said to be unreliable indicators of the microbiological diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia. The etiological diagnosis of pneumonia is surrounded by great degree of uncertainty. This uncertainty should be and can be calculated and incorporated in the diagnosis and treatment. To determine the diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic value of sputum Gram stain in etiological diagnosis and initial selection of antimicrobial therapy of bacterial community acquired pneumonia (CAP). DESIGN-METHOD: Prospective study of 1390 patients with CAP admitted January 2002-June 2008, to our institutions. Of the 1390 patients, 178 (12.8%) fulfilled the criteria for inclusion into this study (good-quality sputa and presence of the same microorganism in blood and sputum cultures which was used as gold standard for assessing the diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic value of sputum Gram stain). The sensitivity of sputum Gram stain was 0.82 for Pneumococcal pneumonia, 0.76 for Staphylococcal pneumonia, 0.79 for Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia and 0.78 for Gram-negative bacilli pneumonia. The specificity of sputum Gram stain was 0.93 for Pneumococcal pneumonia, 0.96 for Staphylococcal pneumonia, 0.96 for H. influenzae pneumonia and 0.95 for Gram-negative bacilli pneumonia. The positive likelihood ratio (LR+) was 11.58 for Pneumococcal pneumonia, 19.38 for Staphylococcal pneumonia, 16.84 for H. influenzae pneumonia, 14.26 for Gram-negative bacilli pneumonia. The negative likelihood ratio (LR-) was 0.20 for Pneumococcal pneumonia, 0.25 for Staphylococcal pneumonia, 0.22 for H. influenzae pneumonia, and 0.23 for Gram-negative bacilli pneumonia. Sputum Gram stain is a dependable diagnostic test for the early etiological diagnosis of bacterial CAP that helps in choosing orthological and appropriate initial antimicrobial therapy.

  6. Pneumonia due to pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus and Klebsiella pneumoniae capsular serotype K16 in a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Pei-Lin; Tan, Che-Kim; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Kao, Chiang-Lian; Wang, Jin-Town; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptoccocus, but no Klebsiella pneumoniae were responsible for bacterial coinfections during the 2009 and previous influenza pandemics. We hereby report a case with concurrent bacteremic pneumonia due to an unusual capsular serotype K16 K. pneumoniae and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza in a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer. Such a coinfection has not previously been described. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Childhood pneumonia at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objectives: Pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children and thus this study was designed to document the sociodemographic, clinical features as well as the bacterial agents responsible for pneumonia in children seen at University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital. Methodology: A descriptive ...

  8. Granzymes A and B Regulate the Local Inflammatory Response during Klebsiella pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Laorden, M Isabel; Stroo, Ingrid; Blok, Dana C; Florquin, Sandrine; Medema, Jan Paul; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia. Granzymes (gzms), mainly found in cytotoxic lymphocytes, have been implicated as mediators of infection and inflammation. We here sought to investigate the role of gzmA and gzmB in the host response to K. pneumoniae-induced airway infection and sepsis. For this purpose, pneumonia was induced in wild-type (WT) and gzmA-deficient (gzmA-/-), gzmB-/- and gzmAxB-/- mice by intranasal infection with K. pneumoniae. In WT mice, gzmA and gzmB were mainly expressed by natural killer cells. Pneumonia was associated with reduced intracellular gzmA and increased intracellular gzmB levels. Gzm deficiency had little impact on antibacterial defence: gzmA-/- and gzmAxB-/- mice transiently showed modestly higher bacterial loads in the lungs but not in distant organs. GzmB-/- and, to a larger extent, gzmAxB-/- mice displayed transiently increased lung inflammation, reflected in the semi-quantitative histology scores and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Most differences between gzm-deficient and WT mice had disappeared during late-stage pneumonia. Gzm deficiency did not impact on distant organ injury or survival. These results suggest that gzmA and gzmB partly regulate local inflammation during early pneumonia but eventually play an insignificant role during pneumosepsis by the common human pathogen K. pneumoniae. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. [Common pathogens and clinical characteristics of neonatal pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Juan; Shi, Hua; Zhou, Wei; Hu, Zheng-Qiang; Mu, Li-Yuan; Su, Min; Jiang, Yong-Mei

    2012-12-01

    To study common pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility as well as clinical characteristics of neonatal pneumonia. A retrospective study on neonatal pneumonia was performed. The study investigated antibiotic susceptibility of four common pathogens (339 strains) that caused neonatal pneumonia. Clinical characteristics of the newborns with pneumonia were analyzed. Of the 339 strains, 185 were isolated from bronchial secretions, 72 from blood samples, and 82 with positive results of both samples. Four hundred and seventy-four neonates with pneumonia presented positive results of bacterial culture. the most common pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (21.9%), Escherichia coli (19.2%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (19.0%) and Enterobacter cloacae (11.4%). The birth weight of newborns infected with Staphylococcus aureus was generally normal, and the time of hospital admission was later (after 24 hours of life). In contrast, the newborns with gram-negative bacterial infection, especially Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, had lower birth weights and early time of hospital admission (within 24 hours of life). Nearly more than 50% gram-negative bacteria were resistant to second, third and forth generation cephaloporins. Gram-negative bacteria are predominant pathogens of neonatal pneumonia. Neonatal pneumonia caused by gram-negative bacteria is common in newborns with low birth weight and its onset time is relatively earlier. Gram-negative bacteria that cause neonatal pneumonia are highly resistant to cephaloporins.

  10. Pneumoniae in immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, Volkmar; Lehnert, Thomas; Thalhammer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Due to the large surface area, heat, high humidity and high oxygen supply in the lung makes an ideal environment for the propagation of germs. The purpose of the immune system is to establish and maintain the balance between saprophytes and immune defense so as to depress and ultimately kill germs as they infiltrate the body. This usually is achieved by the use of a highly complex immune system. It is a perfect combination of non-specific, cellular and humoral immune mechanisms with very specific immune cells and antibodies, which are specialized on particular pathogens. The specific defenses potentiate the effect of the nonspecific defense in a large extent so as to prevent re-infection and ultimately eliminate recognized pathogens. The causes of immune deficiency can be related to either the cellular or humoral level and affect both the specific and nonspecific defenses. There is a different excitation spectrum depending on the type of immune deficiency. Immune deficiency can prevalently cause complications in the course of infections, decelerate the healing and allow the occurrence of rare pathogens. In particular, the radiological characteristics of typical and atypical pneumonia in immunocompromised patients will be discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the appearance of bacterial infections, mycobacterioses, PCP, CMV, and laid fungual pneumonia. Even it is not possible to identify certain pathogens radiologically, it is often possible to narrow the spectrum of germs causing pulmonary infections significantly by comparing with other pulmonary complications such as lymphoma or kaposisarcomas. (orig.)

  11. Complete genome sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a known cotton insect boll vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (associated with bacterial pneumonia) was previously isolated from Nezara viridula, a significant vector of cotton boll-rot pathogens. We provide the first annotated genome sequence of the cotton opportunistic strain K. pneumoniae 5-1. This data provides guidance to study the...

  12. [Ventilator associated pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellani, S; Nesci, M; Celotto, S; Lampati, L; Lucchini, A

    2003-04-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a nosocomial lower respiratory tract infection that ensues in critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. The reported incidence of VAP varies between 9% and 68% with a mortality ranging between 33% and 71%. Two key factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of VAP: bacterial colonization of the upper digestive-respiratory tract and aspiration of oral secretions into the trachea. Preventive measurements are advocated to reduce the incidence of VAP, such as selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD), supraglottic aspiration and positioning. Prompt recognition and treatment of established VAP has also been demostrated to affect outcome. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors associated with the development of VAP and the implementation of strategies to prevent, diagnose and treat VAP are mainstems in the nursing of mechanically ventilated patients.

  13. Efficacy and safety of oral solithromycin versus oral moxifloxacin for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia: a global, double-blind, multicentre, randomised, active-controlled, non-inferiority trial (SOLITAIRE-ORAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Carlos M; Mykietiuk, Analia; Metev, Hristo; Nitu, Mimi Floarea; Karimjee, Najumuddin; Doreski, Pablo Alexis; Mitha, Ismail; Tanaseanu, Cristina Mihaela; Molina, Joseph McDermott; Antonovsky, Yuri; Van Rensburg, Dirkie Johanna; Rowe, Brian H; Flores-Figueroa, Jose; Rewerska, Barbara; Clark, Kay; Keedy, Kara; Sheets, Amanda; Scott, Drusilla; Horwith, Gary; Das, Anita F; Jamieson, Brian; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Oldach, David

    2016-04-01

    Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and treatment recommendations, each with specific limitations, vary globally. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of solithromycin, a novel macrolide, with moxifloxacin for treatment of CABP. We did this global, double-blind, double-dummy, randomised, active-controlled, non-inferiority trial at 114 centres in North America, Latin America, Europe, and South Africa. Patients (aged ≥18 years) with clinically and radiographically confirmed pneumonia of Pneumonia Outcomes Research Team (PORT) risk class II, III, or IV were randomly assigned (1:1), via an internet-based central block randomisation procedure (block size of four), to receive either oral solithromycin (800 mg on day 1, 400 mg on days 2-5, placebo on days 6-7) or oral moxifloxacin (400 mg on days 1-7). Randomisation was stratified by geographical region, PORT risk class (II vs III or IV), and medical history of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The study sponsor, investigators, staff, and patients were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was early clinical response, defined as an improvement in at least two of four symptoms (cough, chest pain, sputum production, dyspnoea) with no worsening in any symptom at 72 h after the first dose of study drug, with a 10% non-inferiority margin. The primary analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT-01756339. Between Jan 3, 2013, and Sept 24, 2014, we randomly assigned 860 patients to receive solithromycin (n=426) or moxifloxacin (n=434). Patients were followed up to days 28-35 after first dose. Solithromycin was non-inferior to moxifloxacin in achievement of early clinical response: 333 (78·2%) patients had an early clinical response in the solithromycin group versus 338 (77·9%) patients in the moxifloxacin group (difference 0·29, 95% CI -5·5 to 6·1). Both drugs had a similar safety

  14. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated—if any—cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  15. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Achouiti

    Full Text Available Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K. pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/- and normal wild-type (Wt mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated-if any-cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS.

  16. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Pneumonia KidsHealth / For Parents / Pneumonia What's in this article? ... the Doctor? Print en español Neumonía What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs . The ...

  17. Bacterial meningitis in immunocompromised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, K.E.B.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an acute infection of the meninges, in The Netherlands most commonly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitides. Risk factors for acquiring bacterial meningitis include a decreased function of the immune system. The aim of this thesis was to study

  18. The radiological diagnosis of pneumonia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry-Ann F O'Grady

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of paediatric pneumonia as a cause of short and long-term morbidity and mortality worldwide, a reliable gold standard for its diagnosis remains elusive. The utility of clinical, microbiological and radiological diagnostic approaches varies widely within and between populations and is heavily dependent on the expertise and resources available in various settings. Here we review the role of radiology in the diagnosis of paediatric pneumonia. Chest radiographs (CXRs are the most widely employed test, however, they are not indicated in ambulatory settings, cannot distinguish between viral and bacterial infections and have a limited role in the ongoing management of disease. A standardised definition of alveolar pneumonia on a CXR exists for epidemiological studies targeting bacterial pneumonias but it should not be extrapolated to clinical settings. Radiography, computed tomography and to a lesser extent ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging play an important role in complicated pneumonias but there are limitations that preclude their use as routine diagnostic tools. Large population-based studies are needed in different populations to address many of the knowledge gaps in the radiological diagnosis of pneumonia in children, however, the feasibility of such studies is an important barrier.

  19. Modulation of pulmonary innate immunity during bacterial infection: Animal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, Marcus J.; van der Poll, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Both the increasing number of immunocompromised patients susceptible to pneumonia and the development of bacterial resistance are significant problems related to the treatment of pneumonia. The primary outcome of treatment for pneumonia is to tip the balance towards a successful host response. An

  20. The tissue factor pathway in pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, F.E.

    2015-01-01

    Since the respiratory tract is in continuous contact with the external environment, it is particularly prone to invading pathogens. Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity worldwide with substantial mortality. Emerging bacterial resistance and stagnation of mortality rates urge us to expand our

  1. Pneumonia in neutropenic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heussel, C.P. [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131, Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Department of Radiology, Division Innovative Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg (Germany); Ullmann, A.J. [Department of Medicine, Johannes Gutenberg University, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131, Mainz (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Radiologists have a special role in the management of neutropenic patients. The appropriate investigational technique, frequently targeted differential diagnosis, and the special needs of these patients, need to be understood. Early detection of a focus is the major goal in febrile neutropenic patients. As pneumonia is the most common focus, chest imaging is a special radiological task. The sensitivity of chest X-ray, especially in supine position, is known to be low; therefore, the very sensitive high-resolution CT (HRCT) became gold standard in neutropenic hosts and will probably be replaced by thin-section multislice CT (MSCT) in the near future. Costs of high-resolution CT are low in comparison to antibiotics. An infiltrate needs to be localised, so that a physician can utilise this information as a guidance for invasive procedures for further microbiological work-up. The radiological characterisation of infiltrates gives a first and rapid hint to differentiate between different sorts of infectious (typical bacterial, atypical bacterial, fungal) and non-infectious aetiologies. Follow-up investigations need careful interpretation according to disease and concomitant treatment. Due to an increased incidence of fungal infiltrates even with appropriate therapy, follow-up of an infiltrate must use further parameters in addition to lesion size. Temporary exclusion of infectious involvement of the lung with high accuracy remains of special interest for clinicians. (orig.)

  2. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marji, S.

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  3. Influence of age on the clinical differentiation of atypical pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Akaike, Hiroto; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Hayashi, Toshikiyo; Kurihara, Takeyuki; Okimoto, Niro

    2012-10-01

    The Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) scoring system is a useful tool for the early and simple presumptive diagnosis of atypical pneumonia (Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonia). However, it has been suggested that it is difficult to diagnose atypical pneumonia in the elderly using this system. In the present study, we evaluated the accuracy and usefulness of the JRS scoring system for diagnosing atypical pneumonia in different age groups. Cases of M. pneumoniae (n = 262), C. pneumoniae (n = 98) and common bacterial pneumonia (n = 364) were analysed. For both atypical pneumonias, the frequency of comorbid illnesses and being in a higher risk category were significantly greater in elderly (age ≥60 years) than in non-elderly patients (age atypical pneumonia were 39% and 88%, respectively, in the elderly group, and 86% and 88%, respectively, in the non-elderly group. When the patients were stratified into 10-year age groups, the diagnostic sensitivity was highest in the 18- to 29-year age group and decreased from the youngest to the oldest age group. These results indicate that it is difficult to distinguish between atypical pneumonia and bacterial pneumonia in the elderly using the JRS scoring system. When treating patients aged ≥60 years, physicians should use fluoroquinolones or β-lactam antibiotics + macrolides as empirical first-choice drugs so as to always provide antibiotic protection against potential atypical pathogens. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  4. Binding and entry of DNA in bacterial transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Bacterial transformation in relation to DNA transport and competence in Streptococcus pneumoniae (also called Diplococcus pneumoniae) is discussed. This species will serve as a model with which to compare transformation in other bacterial species, particularly Bacillus subtilis and Haemophilus influenzae, with emphasis on the many similarities as well as differences.

  5. Pneumonia after kidney transplant: incidence, risk factors, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdar, Oguzhan Sitki; Ersoy, Alparslan; Akalin, Halis

    2014-06-01

    Pneumonia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in recipients of solid-organ transplant. We aimed to determine risk factors for development of pneumonia and associated deaths in kidney transplant recipients. A retrospective review of medical records was performed for all kidney transplant recipients from December 1988, to April 2011. The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia was made from symptoms, clinical findings, and chest radiography. The diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia was made according to published criteria. Laboratory and serologic tests, radiographic findings, cultures of respiratory specimens, and tissue biopsies were reviewed. In 406 kidney transplant recipients, there were 82 patients (20%) who had 111 episodes of pneumonia, including 49 nosocomial episodes of pneumonia (44%). Bacterial infections were the most common cause (34 episodes [31%]). In multivariate analysis, significant risk factors associated with pneumonia episodes were older age, hypertension, cardiac disease, history of acute graft rejection, and not using everolimus/mycophenolate mofetil/prednisolone protocol. There were 28 episodes that resulted in death (25%), including 20 nosocomial episodes (71%). In multivariate analysis, significant risk factors associated with death from pneumonia episodes were antibiotic use in the previous 3 months, high C-reactive protein, and low albumin. Cutoff values for increased risk of death from pneumonia included C-reactive protein > 10 mg/dL and procalcitonin > 8.8 ng/mL. Recipients of kidney transplant may be at risk for pneumonia and associated death. Nosocomial pulmonary infections may be associated with marked morbidity and mortality in kidney transplant recipients.

  6. Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Jih Lu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP in humans is caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii, which has recently been reclassified as a fungus because its cell wall composition and nucleotide sequences are more similar to those of fungi. PcP occurs only in immunocompromised individuals such as those with AIDS. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, PcP remains the leading opportunistic infection in AIDS patients. Based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer region of rRNA genes, more than 60 different types of P. jirovecii have been identified. Although type differences do not appear to correlate with the clinical characteristics of PcP, nucleotide sequence variations of the organism have been useful in epidemiologic studies. As a result, some recurrent infections are found to be due to re-infection with new types, and outbreaks due to the same types of P. jirovecii have been identified. Initial diagnosis of PcP is usually based on symptoms and chest radiography. A characteristic histopathologic feature is the presence of acellular eosinophilic exudates and organisms in the alveoli. Ultimate diagnosis of PcP is achieved by demonstration of the organism in induced sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by tinctorial staining or polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Among the many different PCR methods, the nested PCR that targets the large subunit mitochondrial rRNA gene is the most sensitive and specific. Combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole is the first choice of drugs for both treatment and prophylaxis of PcP. Other drugs that can be used include a combination of primaquine and clindamycin, pentamidine, atovaquone, and a combination of dapsone and trimethoprim. Pneumocystis organisms have the ability to inactivate the phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages and to induce them to undergo apoptosis. This apoptosis is due to activation of caspase 9 by polyamines that are present in high levels in the lung

  7. Pneumonia - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 简体中文) Expand Section Pneumonia - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Pneumonia in Children - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) ...

  8. Neonatal herpes simplex pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Lissauer, T J; Shaw, P J; Underhill, G

    1984-01-01

    A neonate with herpes simplex pneumonia is described. Herpes simplex infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pneumonia in newborn infants, even in the absence of clinically apparent herpes in the mother.

  9. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000093.htm Pneumonia - weakened immune system To use the sharing features on this page, ... fighting off infection because of problems with the immune system. This type of disease is called "pneumonia in ...

  10. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000017.htm Pneumonia in adults - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In ...

  11. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000671.htm Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is a fungal infection of the lungs. The ...

  12. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000011.htm Pneumonia in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. In ...

  13. FastStats: Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Pneumonia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with pneumonia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 423,000 ...

  14. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  15. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  16. streptococcus pneumoniae , klebsiella pneumoniae proteus vulgaris

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. This investigation was conducted to determine the in-vitro effect of aqueous, ethanol and methanol crude extracts of Euphorbia hirta at concentrations ranging from 10mg/ml – 100mg/ml against three pathogenic bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris) using cup plate ...

  17. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  18. Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Melissa D; Winkler, Marisa L; Taracila, Magdalena A; Page, Malcolm G; Desarbre, Eric; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Shields, Ryan K; Nguyen, Minh-Hong; Clancy, Cornelius; Spellberg, Brad; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M; Bonomo, Robert A

    2017-10-31

    The emergence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs), β-lactamases that inactivate "last-line" antibiotics such as imipenem, represents a major challenge to contemporary antibiotic therapies. The combination of ceftazidime (CAZ) and avibactam (AVI), a potent β-lactamase inhibitor, represents an attempt to overcome this formidable threat and to restore the efficacy of the antibiotic against Gram-negative bacteria bearing KPCs. CAZ-AVI-resistant clinical strains expressing KPC variants with substitutions in the Ω-loop are emerging. We engineered 19 KPC-2 variants bearing targeted mutations at amino acid residue Ambler position 179 in Escherichia coli and identified a unique antibiotic resistance phenotype. We focus particularly on the CAZ-AVI resistance of the clinically relevant Asp179Asn variant. Although this variant demonstrated less hydrolytic activity, we demonstrated that there was a prolonged period during which an acyl-enzyme intermediate was present. Using mass spectrometry and transient kinetic analysis, we demonstrated that Asp179Asn "traps" β-lactams, preferentially binding β-lactams longer than AVI owing to a decreased rate of deacylation. Molecular dynamics simulations predict that (i) the Asp179Asn variant confers more flexibility to the Ω-loop and expands the active site significantly; (ii) the catalytic nucleophile, S70, is shifted more than 1.5 Å and rotated more than 90°, altering the hydrogen bond networks; and (iii) E166 is displaced by 2 Å when complexed with ceftazidime. These analyses explain the increased hydrolytic profile of KPC-2 and suggest that the Asp179Asn substitution results in an alternative complex mechanism leading to CAZ-AVI resistance. The future design of novel β-lactams and β-lactamase inhibitors must consider the mechanistic basis of resistance of this and other threatening carbapenemases. IMPORTANCE Antibiotic resistance is emerging at unprecedented rates and threatens to reach crisis levels. One key

  19. Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing (NOD 2 in Host Defense during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijmen J Hommes

    Full Text Available Streptococcus (S. pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing (NOD 2 is a pattern recognition receptor located in the cytosol of myeloid cells that is able to detect peptidoglycan fragments of S. pneumoniae. We here aimed to investigate the role of NOD2 in the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae was studied in NOD2 deficient (Nod2-/- and wild-type (Wt alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. In subsequent in vivo experiments Nod2-/- and Wt mice were inoculated with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae (D39, an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39Δcps or serotype 3 S. pneumoniae (6303 via the airways, and bacterial growth and dissemination and the lung inflammatory response were evaluated. Nod2-/- alveolar macrophages and blood neutrophils displayed a reduced capacity to internalize pneumococci in vitro. During pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae D39 Nod2-/- mice were indistinguishable from Wt mice with regard to bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs, lung pathology and neutrophil recruitment. While Nod2-/- and Wt mice also had similar bacterial loads after infection with the more virulent S. pneumoniae 6303 strain, Nod2-/- mice displayed a reduced bacterial clearance of the normally avirulent unencapsulated D39Δcps strain. These results suggest that NOD2 does not contribute to host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia and that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of S. pneumoniae by NOD2.

  20. Identification of putative plant pathogenic determinants from a draft genome sequence of an opportunistic klebsiella pneumoniae strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebsiella pneumoniae has been known historically as a causal agent of bacterial pneumonia. More recently, K. pneumoniaerepresentatives have been shown to have a broad ecological distribution and are recognized nitrogen-fixers. Previously, we demonstrated the capacity of K. pneumoniae strain Kp 5-1R...

  1. Pneumonia in HIV-infected persons: increased risk with cigarette smoking and treatment interruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordin, Fred M; Roediger, Mollie P; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity for HIV-infected persons and contributes to excess mortality in this population. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the frequency and risk factors for occurrence of bacterial pneumonia in the present era of potent antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: We...... evaluated data from a randomized trial of episodic antiretroviral therapy. The study, Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy, enrolled 5,472 participants at 318 sites in 33 countries. Study patients had more than 350 CD4 cells at baseline. Diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia was confirmed...... by a blinded clinical-events committee. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 16 months, 116 participants (2.2%) developed at least one episode of bacterial pneumonia. Patients randomized to receive episodic antiretroviral therapy were significantly more likely to develop pneumonia than...

  2. Antibiotic Therapy in Comatose Mechanically Ventilated Patients Following Aspiration: Differentiating Pneumonia From Pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascarrou, Jean Baptiste; Lissonde, Floriane; Le Thuaut, Aurélie; Bachoumas, Konstantinos; Colin, Gwenhael; Henry Lagarrigue, Matthieu; Vinatier, Isabelle; Fiancette, Maud; Lacherade, Jean Claude; Yehia, Aihem; Joret, Aurélie; Lebert, Christine; Bourdon, Sandra; Martin Lefèvre, Laurent; Reignier, Jean

    2017-08-01

    To determine the proportion of patients with documented bacterial aspiration pneumonia among comatose ICU patients with symptoms suggesting either bacterial aspiration pneumonia or non-bacterial aspiration pneumonitis. Prospective observational study. University-affiliated 30-bed ICU. Prospective cohort of 250 patients admitted to the ICU with coma (Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8) and treated with invasive mechanical ventilation. None. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with microbiologically documented bacterial aspiration pneumonia. Patients meeting predefined criteria for aspiration syndrome routinely underwent telescopic plugged catheter sampling during bronchoscopy before starting probabilistic antibiotic treatment. When cultures were negative, the antibiotic treatment was stopped. Of 250 included patients, 98 (39.2%) had aspiration syndrome, including 92 before mechanical ventilation discontinuation. Telescopic plugged catheter in these 92 patients showed bacterial aspiration pneumonia in 43 patients (46.7%). Among the remaining 49 patients, 16 continued to receive antibiotics, usually for infections other than pneumonia; of the 33 patients whose antibiotics were discontinued, only two subsequently showed signs of lung infection. In the six patients with aspiration syndrome after mechanical ventilation, and therefore without telescopic plugged catheter, antibiotic treatment was continued for 7 days. Mechanical ventilation duration, ICU length of stay, and mortality did not differ between the 43 patients with bacterial aspiration pneumonia and the 49 patients with non-bacterial aspiration pneumonitis. The 152 patients without aspiration syndrome did not receive antibiotics. Among comatose patients receiving mechanical ventilation, those without clinical, laboratory, or radiologic evidence of bacterial aspiration pneumonia did not require antibiotics. In those with suspected bacterial aspiration pneumonia, stopping empirical antibiotic therapy

  3. Epidemiological typing of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, which causes paediatric ventilator-associated pneumonia in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Eman R; Aly, Sherine A; Halby, Hamada M; Ahmed, Shabaan H; Zakaria, Amira M; El-Asheer, Osama M

    2017-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common nosocomial pathogen that plays an important role in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study aimed to define the clonal relatedness of K. pneumoniae strains isolated from paediatric VAP in addition to those isolated from environmental samples. This study included 19 clinical and 4 environmental K. pneumoniae isolates recovered from the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in Assiut University Children's Hospital. The K. pneumoniae isolates were confirmed by biotyping using API strips and subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The genes coding K1 and K2 capsular types were detected by PCR. The clonal relationships between the K. pneumoniae isolates were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Ten resistotypes were detected among all the K. pneumoniae isolates, while PFGE identified seventeen K. pneumoniae pulsotypes. Similar PFGE patterns were found between environmental and clinical isolates and between isolates recovered from different patients, suggesting the circulation of K. pneumoniae pathogens in the PICU and the role of the environment in the spread of infection. No correlation was found between the resistotypes and pulsotypes of the K. pneumoniae isolates. PFGE showed higher discriminatory power for the typing of nosocomial K. pneumoniae [Simpson's diversity index (DI)=0.96] than resistotyping (DI=0.72). As far as we know, this is the first report of the isolation of the same multidrug-resistant (MDR) K. pneumoniae pulsotype from patients and environmental samples in the same hospital ward in Egypt. This study provides a step on the way to understanding the genotyping and epidemiology of MDR K. pneumoniae for enhanced prevention of bacterial transmission.

  4. Respiratory Review of 2012: Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Young-Soon

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality, despite advances in diagnosis and antibacterial treatment. Pneumonia is often misdiagnosed and mistreated up until recently. Recent classification of pneumonia consists of community-acquired pneumonia, health care-associated pneumonia, hospital-acquired pneumonia, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. The etiology, risk factors, and treatment are different among them. This article briefly introduces new concepts and ideas in biomar...

  5. Recurrent wheezing in neonatal pneumonia is associated with combined infection with Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qin; Feng, Hui; Lu, Qi; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Qi; Du, Yue; Zhang, Xian-Hong; Wang, Jia-Rong

    2018-01-17

    Both viral and bacterial infections can be associated with wheezing episodes in children; however, information regarding combined infections with both viral and bacterial pathogens in full term neonates is limited. We sought to investigate the effects of viral-bacterial codetection on pneumonia severity and recurrent wheezing. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on neonates admitted to our hospital with pneumonia from 2009 to 2015. Of 606 total cases, 341 were diagnosed with RSV only, and 265 were diagnosed with both RSV and a potential bacterial pathogen. The leading four species of bacteria codetected with RSV were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter cloacae. Neonates with RSV and a potential bacterial pathogen were significantly more likely to have worse symptoms, higher C-reactive protein values and more abnormal chest x-ray manifestations with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons (P Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings indicate that the combination of bacteria and RSV in the neonatal airway is associated with more serious clinical characteristics. The presence of RSV and Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae may provide predictive markers for wheeze.

  6. Bacterial meningitis in Nottingham.

    OpenAIRE

    Ispahani, P.

    1983-01-01

    Records of 171 cases of bacterial meningitis admitted to Nottingham hospitals from January 1974 to June 1980 were reviewed. The distribution of organisms producing meningitis and the factors influencing mortality in different age groups were assessed. Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae accounted for 69% of all proven cases. The overall mortality was 26% being lowest in patients with meningococcal meningitis (0%) and highest in those with pneumococcal m...

  7. Plasma metabolomics for the diagnosis and prognosis of H1N1 influenza pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoei, Mohammad M; Vogel, Hans J; Weljie, Aalim M; Kumar, Anand; Yende, Sachin; Angus, Derek C; Winston, Brent W

    2017-04-19

    Metabolomics is a tool that has been used for the diagnosis and prognosis of specific diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine if metabolomics could be used as a potential diagnostic and prognostic tool for H1N1 pneumonia. Our hypothesis was that metabolomics can potentially be used early for the diagnosis and prognosis of H1N1 influenza pneumonia. 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to profile the metabolome in 42 patients with H1N1 pneumonia, 31 ventilated control subjects in the intensive care unit (ICU), and 30 culture-positive plasma samples from patients with bacterial community-acquired pneumonia drawn within the first 24 h of hospital admission for diagnosis and prognosis of disease. We found that plasma-based metabolomics from samples taken within 24 h of hospital admission can be used to discriminate H1N1 pneumonia from bacterial pneumonia and nonsurvivors from survivors of H1N1 pneumonia. Moreover, metabolomics is a highly sensitive and specific tool for the 90-day prognosis of mortality in H1N1 pneumonia. This study demonstrates that H1N1 pneumonia can create a quite different plasma metabolic profile from bacterial culture-positive pneumonia and ventilated control subjects in the ICU on the basis of plasma samples taken within 24 h of hospital/ICU admission, early in the course of disease.

  8. Risk factors for cefotaxime resistance in children with pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Made Sucipta; Ida Bagus Subanada; Samik Wahab

    2012-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a health problem in developing countries, often caused by bacterial agents. The widespread use of cefotaxime, a third-generation of cephalosporin to increased incidence of resistance to this antibiotic. Several studies have reported on risk factors associated with resistance to cefotaxime. Objective To oidentify risk factors for cefoxime resistence in children with pneumonia. Methods We performed a case-control study at Sanglah Hospital between January 2006-Dec...

  9. El uso de la radiografía de tórax para la vigilancia de neumonías bacterianas en niños latinoamericanos The use of chest X-rays for surveillance of bacterial pneumonias in children in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Lagos

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available La División de Vacunas e Inmunización de la Organización Panamericana de la Salud (OPS está promoviendo la vigilancia epidemiológica de neumonías bacterianas en niños latinoamericanos, con el objetivo de generar pruebas científicas que sustenten futuras decisiones de control mediante vacunas en los países de la Región. Como es poco frecuente que el diagnóstico de estas enfermedades abarque la documentación bacteriológica del agente causal, los estudios de este tipo que se realizan en el mundo aceptan la imagen radiológica de consolidación alveolar como criterio confirmatorio de una neumonía presuntamente bacteriana. En este informe se examinan la racionalidad teórica y los requisitos necesarios para utilizar la radiología de tórax como instrumento para la vigilancia epidemiológica de neumonías bacterianas. Además, se ofrece un resumen de las actividades realizadas en dos años de trabajo conjunto entre el Centro para Vacunas en Desarrollo, en Chile, y la División de Vacunas e Inmunización de la OPS. Durante ese período se fomentó el estudio epidemiológico de las neumonías bacterianas en niños latinoamericanos utilizando los criterios y definiciones acordados a escala internacional, así como herramientas y soluciones prácticas ajustadas a la realidad de la Región. Las actividades desarrolladas hasta ahora evidencian la necesidad y factibilidad de estandarizar la interpretación de las radiografías de tórax para utilizarlas en estudios epidemiológicos.The Division of Vaccines and Immunization of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO is promoting epidemiological surveillance of bacterial pneumonias in children in Latin America in order to generate scientific evidence to support future decisions concerning using vaccines to control such pneumonias in the countries of the Region of the Americas. The diagnosis of these diseases rarely includes bacteriological documentation of the causative agent. Therefore

  10. Efficacies of colistin and tigecycline in mice with experimental pneumonia due to NDM-1-producing strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docobo-Pérez, Fernando; Nordmann, Patrice; Domínguez-Herrera, Juan; López-Rojas, Rafael; Smani, Younes; Poirel, Laurent; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2012-03-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1)-producing Enterobacteriaceae have emerged as a global threat. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacies of colistin and tigecycline in an experimental model of pneumonia caused by NDM-1-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The susceptibilities of K. pneumoniae NDM, E. coli NDM and K. pneumoniae ATCC 29665 were determined using the broth microdilution technique. The pharmacokinetics of colistin and tigecycline in an experimental model of pneumonia were performed using immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Mice were treated with colistin (60 mg/kg/day) or tigecycline (10 mg/kg/day). Mortality, bacteraemia and lung bacterial concentrations were recorded. The strains were susceptible to colistin and tigecycline. The ratio of area under the concentration-time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC/MIC) for colistin was 158.5 (all three strains) and that for tigecycline was 18.5 (K. pneumoniae NDM) and 37 (K. pneumoniae ATCC 29665 and E. coli NDM). In vivo, colistin decreased bacterial lung concentrations of K. pneumoniae NDM and K. pneumoniae ATCC 29665 by 1.16 log colony-forming units (CFU)/g and 2.23 logCFU/g, respectively, compared with controls (not significant). Tigecycline reduced K. pneumoniae NDM and K. pneumoniae ATCC 29665 load by 2.67 logCFU/g and 4.62 logCFU/g (Ppneumonia due to NDM-1-producing K. pneumoniae and its efficacy was suboptimal against NDM-1-producing E. coli. A high tigecycline dose was efficacious for treating experimental pneumonia due to NDM-1-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. Congenital and neonatal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Michael D

    2007-09-01

    The greatest risk of death from pneumonia in childhood is in the neonatal period. It is estimated that pneumonia contributes to between 750000-1.2 million neonatal deaths annually, accounting for 10% of global child mortality. Congenital and neonatal pneumonias are often a difficult disease to identify and treat, with clinical manifestations often being non-specific. Many of the normal lung defences are compromised in the fetus and neonate, leading to an increased susceptibility to infection. The aetiology and epidemiology of congenital and neonatal pneumonias will depend on the clinical setting and population that the baby belongs to, the stage in the perinatal period, the gestational age of the baby and the definition of pneumonia. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention strategies are therefore also dependent on these factors, and will differ depending on the clinical setting. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning congenital and neonatal pneumonia worldwide and discusses future directions in the prevention of the disease.

  12. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, Ppneumonia patients and their healthy controls. Clustering resulted in 11 (sub)clusters including 95% (386/405) of samples. We observed three microbiota profiles strongly associated with pneumonia (Ppneumoniae (n=42). In contrast, three other microbiota clusters (in total n=183) were correlated with health (Ppneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with disease status remains a question for future research.

  13. Pneumonia Caused by Klebsiella spp. in 46 Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estell, K E; Young, A; Kozikowski, T; Swain, E A; Byrne, B A; Reilly, C M; Kass, P H; Aleman, M

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella spp. are implicated as a common cause of bacterial pneumonia in horses, but few reports describe clinical presentation and disease progression. To describe the signalment, clinicopathologic data, radiographic and ultrasonographic findings, antimicrobial susceptibility, outcome, and pathologic lesions associated with Klebsiella spp. pneumonia in horses. Forty-six horses from which Klebsiella spp. was isolated from the lower respiratory tract. Retrospective study. Medical records from 1993 to 2013 at the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California, Davis were reviewed. Exact logistic regression was performed to determine if any variables were associated with survival to hospital discharge. Survival in horses Klebsiella pneumoniae was the primary isolate, survival was 52%. Mechanical ventilation preceded development of pneumonia in 11 horses. Complications occurred in 25/46 horses, with thrombophlebitis and laminitis occurring most frequently. Multi-drug resistance was found in 47% of bacterial isolates. Variables that significantly impacted survival included hemorrhagic nasal discharge, laminitis, and thoracic radiographs with a sharp demarcation between marked caudal pulmonary alveolar infiltration and more normal-appearing caudodorsal lung. Klebsiella spp. should be considered as a differential diagnosis for horses presenting with hemorrhagic pneumonia and for horses developing pneumonia after mechanical ventilation. Multi-drug resistance is common. Prognosis for survival generally is fair, but is guarded for adult horses in which K. pneumoniae is isolated as the primary organism. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Pneumonia - Forgotten No More

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Chapman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CommentaryPneumonia - Forgotten No MoreChapman, P.L.Pneumonia is the leading cause of death in children worldwide and kills an estimated 1.2 million children under the age of five every year; more than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Relatively few resources have been committed to addressing the problem of childhood pneumonia, particularly in resource poor settings. Yet effective interventions are available but reach too few children.

  15. The History of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the United States in the 1930s, although the pathogen was not known, atypical pneumonia was clinically distinguished from pneumococcal pneumonia by its resistance to sulfonamides. Reimann (1938) reported seven patients with an unusual form of tracheo bronchopneumonia and severe constitutional symptoms. He believed the clinical picture of this disease differed from that of the disease caused by influenza viruses or known bacteria and instead suspected "primary atypical pneumonia." For many years, the responsible infectious agent was tentatively classified as a filterable virus that could pass through a Seitz filter to remove bacteria and was reported to be a psittacosis-like or new virus. After that, Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) identified an agent that was the principal cause of primary atypical pneumonia using cotton rats, hamsters, and chick embryos. Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) did not perform an inoculation study in human volunteers. During the 1940s, there were three groups engaged in discovering the etiology of the primary atypical pneumonia. (1) Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases Diseases directed by John Dingle, (2) Dr. Monroe Eaton's group, the Virus Research Laboratory of the California State Public Health Department, (3) The Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research directed by Horsfall. During 1940s, the members of the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases concluded that the bacteria-free filtrates obtained from the patients, presumably containing a virus, could induce primary atypical pneumonia in human volunteers via Pinehurst trials. During 1950s, serological approaches for identification of the Eaton agent developed such as Fluorescent-Stainable Antibody, and at the beginning of the1960s, the Eaton agent successfully grew in media, and finally accepted as a cause of primary atypical pneumonia. Thus, technical difficulties with visualizing the agent and failure to recognize the full significance of the Pinehurst

  16. Meningitis and pneumonia in Guatemalan children: the importance of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J. Asturias

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib and Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive infections in hospitalized Guatemalan children. This is an important issue since Hib vaccine has not been incorporated into the routine immunization program in Guatemala and information from hospital records in 1995 indicated a low incidence of Hib and S. pneumoniae as causes of meningitis and invasive infections. METHODS: Children who were hospitalized in Guatemala City with clinical signs compatible with bacterial infections were evaluated for evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae infection. Normally sterile body fluids were cultured, and antigen detection was performed on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and pleural fluid. RESULTS: Of 1 203 children 1-59 months of age hospitalized over a 28-month period, 725 of them (60.3% had a primary diagnosis of pneumonia, 357 (29.7% of meningitis, 60 (5.0% of cellulitis, and 61 (5.1% of sepsis and other conditions. Hib was identified in 20.0% of children with meningitis and S. pneumoniae in 12.9%. The average annual incidence of Hib meningitis was 13.8 cases per 100 000 children under 5 years of age, and 32.4% of meningitides caused by Hib and 58.7% of S. pneumoniae meningitides occurred prior to 6 months of age. Case fatality rates were 14.1%, 37.0%, and 18.0%, respectively, for children with Hib, S. pneumoniae, and culture-negative and antigen-negative meningitis. Prior antibiotic therapy was common and was associated with significant reductions in CSF-culture-positive results for children with other evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in case detection, culture methods, and latex agglutination for antigen detection in CSF resulted in identification of Hib and S. pneumoniae as important causes of severe disease in Guatemalan children. Using a cutoff of > 10 white blood cells per cubic millimeter in CSF would improve the sensitivity for detection of bacterial

  17. Streptococcus pneumoniae serine protease HtrA, but not SFP or PrtA, is a major virulence factor in pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Bootsma, Hester J; Zomer, Aldert; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Hermans, Peter W M; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen in pneumonia. Serine protease orthologs expressed by a variety of bacteria have been found of importance for virulence. Previous studies have identified two serine proteases in S. pneumoniae, HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) and PrtA (cell wall-associated serine protease A), that contributed to virulence in models of pneumonia and intraperitoneal infection respectively. We here sought to identify additional S. pneumoniae serine proteases and determine their role in virulence. The S. pneumoniae D39 genome contains five putative serine proteases, of which HtrA, Subtilase Family Protein (SFP) and PrtA were selected for insertional mutagenesis because they are predicted to be secreted and surface exposed. Mutant D39 strains lacking serine proteases were constructed by in-frame insertion deletion mutagenesis. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal infection of mice with wild-type or mutant D39. After high dose infection, only D39ΔhtrA showed reduced virulence, as reflected by strongly reduced bacterial loads, diminished dissemination and decreased lung inflammation. D39ΔprtA induced significantly less lung inflammation together with smaller infiltrated lung surface, but without influencing bacterial loads. After low dose infection, D39ΔhtrA again showed strongly reduced bacterial loads; notably, pneumococcal burdens were also modestly lower in lungs after infection with D39Δsfp. These data confirm the important role for HtrA in S. pneumoniae virulence. PrtA contributes to lung damage in high dose pneumonia; it does not however contribute to bacterial outgrowth in pneumococcal pneumonia. SFP may facilitate S. pneumoniae growth after low dose infection.

  18. Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment of Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Pneumonia Pneumonia Symptoms, Causes, and Risk Factors Anyone can get ... risk for pneumonia. What Are the Symptoms of Pneumonia? Pneumonia symptoms can vary from mild to severe, ...

  19. Pneumonia Can Be Prevented -- Vaccines Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Pneumonia Can Be Prevented—Vaccines Can Help Language: English ( ... with pneumonia. World Pneumonia Day is November 12th. Pneumonia Affects the Young and Old Pneumonia is an ...

  20. Pneumonia. Treatment and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Joshua T; Fine, Michael J; Limper, Andrew H; Murray, Patrick R; Chen, Bill B; Lin, Philana Ling

    2014-08-01

    Pneumonia remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality despite advances in treatment and therapy. The "Pneumonia: Treatment and Diagnosis" session of the Pittsburgh International Lung Conference examined topics related to improving care of patients with pneumonia. These topics included the process and quality of care for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), diagnosis and treatment of emerging fungal pathogens, an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of different diagnostic modalities, and an example of how basic science is exploring immunomodulatory strategies for pneumonia treatment. Systematic health care provider and institutional improvements can decrease mortality rates in CAP, particularly in patients with increasingly complex comorbidities. Aspects of current guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of fungal pneumonia were reviewed through a series of case presentations. Proper treatment of pneumonia hinges on correct pathogen identification but is complicated by the variety of diagnostic assays with variable specificity, sensitivity, and interpretation. In addressing this topic, Dr. Patrick Murray, Ph.D., discussed a range of diagnostic tests for a variety of pathogens and guidelines for their use. In addition to the current state of CAP treatment, Bill (Beibei) Chen, M.D., Ph.D., presented a new potential therapeutic agent called forsythin, an immunomodulatory compound derived from a plant used in traditional Chinese medicine. These topics, ranging from institution-sized policy to interactions at the molecular scale, paint a broad perspective of the efforts against pneumonia.

  1. Secondary acute pneumonias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Pathological changes, promoting the development of secondary pneumonias, are investigated. To this group belong: blood circulation disturbance in small circle, bronchial passability disturbance, aspiration of liquids, gases and vapors, infections and purulent processes, intoxications, injuries, operative interference. Roetgenologic symptomatics of each secondary acute pneumonia form is presented in detail

  2. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordonnier, Catherine; Cesaro, Simone; Maschmeyer, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii can cause life-threatening pneumonia following treatment for haematological malignancies or after HSCT. The mortality rate of P. jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in these patients is 30%-60%, especially after HSCT. The clinical presentation of PCP in haematology differs from that ...

  3. Clinico-pathological study of atypical pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Goda, Tarek

    2009-04-30

    Atypical respiratory pathogens such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella species, and Chlamydia pneumoniae are isolated with increasing frequency from community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This study highlights the importance of organisms responsible for CAP. One hundred consecutive patients with clinically and radiographically diagnosed CAP were evaluated from October 2005 to October 2006. Sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, and blood samples were collected for microbiological culture. Determination was performed for specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) for Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Coxiella burnettii, adenovirus, and influenza virus. The most common isolated bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae (22%) followed by Haemophilus influenzae (18%). Mycoplasma pneumoniae was isolated from 5% and Legionella pneumophila was isolated from 5% of patients. The most common positive serological reaction was for Chlamydia pneumoniae (30%) and Adenovirus (30%). In the study of accuracy of determination of specific IgM for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila compared to culture, the sensitivity was 60% and 80% respectively, specificity was 93.7 %, and 98.9 % respectively, and accuracy was 92 % and 97 % respectively. This study highlights the prominence of mixed bacterial/viral infections in lower respiratory tract infection diagnosis. Our data showed that at least 30% of our patients had concurrent infections. This observation raises two important questions: 1) whether sequential or concurrent viral and bacterial infections have a synergistic impact on the evolution of disease in children; and 2) should diagnostic batteries for any patient with CAP include methods for detecting both the typical and atypical bacterial or viral pathogens.

  4. The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuijt, T.J.; Lankelma, J.M.; Scicluna, B.P.; Melo, e F.S.; Roelofs, J.J.; Boer, de J.D.; Hoogendijk, A.J.; Beer, de R.; Vos, de A.; Belzer, C.; Vos, de W.M.; Poll, van der T.; Wiersinga, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia,

  5. The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuijt, Tim J.; Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; Scicluna, Brendon P.; de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; de Boer, J. Daan; Hoogendijk, Arjan J.; de Beer, Regina; de Vos, Alex; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M.; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia, however, is

  6. Interaction of lipocalin 2, transferrin, and siderophores determines the replicative niche of Klebsiella pneumoniae during pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Michael A; Lenio, Steven; Schmidt, Lindsay; Oyler, Jennifer E; Weiser, Jeffrey N

    2012-11-20

    Pathogenic bacteria require iron for replication within their host. Klebsiella pneumoniae and other Gram-negative pathogens produce the prototypical siderophore enterobactin (Ent) to scavenge iron in vivo. In response, mucosal surfaces secrete lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), an innate immune protein that binds Ent to disrupt bacterial iron acquisition and promote acute inflammation during colonization. A subset of K. pneumoniae isolates attempt to evade Lcn2 by producing glycosylated Ent (Gly-Ent, salmochelin) or the alternative siderophore yersiniabactin (Ybt). However, these siderophores are not functionally equivalent and differ in their abilities to promote growth in the upper respiratory tract, lungs, and serum. To understand how Lcn2 exploits functional differences between siderophores, isogenic mutants of an Ent(+) Gly-Ent(+) Ybt(+) K. pneumoniae strain were inoculated into Lcn2(+/+) and Lcn2(-/-) mice, and the pattern of pneumonia was examined. Lcn2 effectively protected against the iroA ybtS mutant (Ent(+) Gly-Ent(-) Ybt(-)). Lcn2(+/+) mice had small foci of pneumonia, whereas Lcn2(-/-) mice had many bacteria in the perivascular space. The entB mutant (Ent(-) Ybt(+) Gly-Ent(-)) caused moderate bronchopneumonia but did not invade the transferrin-containing perivascular space. Accordingly, transferrin blocked Ybt-dependent growth in vitro. The wild type and the iroA mutant, which both produce Ent and Ybt, had a mixed phenotype, causing a moderate bronchopneumonia in Lcn2(+/+) mice and perivascular overgrowth in Lcn2(-/-) mice. Together, these data indicate that Lcn2, in combination with transferrin, confines K. pneumoniae to the airways and prevents invasion into tissue containing the pulmonary vasculature. Gram-negative bacteria are a common cause of severe hospital-acquired infections. To cause disease, they must obtain iron and secrete the small molecule enterobactin to do so. Animal models of pneumonia using Klebsiella pneumoniae indicate that enterobactin promotes

  7. Osteopontin promotes host defense during Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, G. J. W.; Hoogerwerf, J. J.; de Vos, A. F.; Florquin, S.; van der Poll, T.

    2010-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein involved in inflammatory processes, some of which is mediated by CD44. The aim of this study was to determine the role of OPN during K. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia. Wild-type (WT) and

  8. Dichotomy between Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Klebsiella pneumoniae on dendritic cell phenotype and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, Henri; de Jong, Esther C.; van den Brande, Jan M. H.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van Tol, Eric A. F.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction of the intestinal immune system to intestinal bacteria shows striking differences between various bacterial strains. Whereas Klebsiella pneumoniae induces a fierce proinflammatory reaction, the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus has clear anti-inflammatory effect in

  9. Dissecting the energy metabolism in Mycoplasma pneumoniae through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wodke, J.A.; Puchalka, J.; Lluch-Senar, M.; Marcos, J.; Yus, E.; Godinho, M.; Gutierrez-Gallego, R.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.; Serrano, L.; Klipp, E.; Maier, T.

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a threatening pathogen with a minimal genome, is a model organism for bacterial systems biology for which substantial experimental information is available. With the goal of understanding the complex interactions underlying its metabolism, we analyzed and characterized the

  10. Neonatal pneumonia in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robin J; Kolberg, Jessica M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal pneumonia is a devastating condition. Most deaths in sub-Saharan Africa can be attributed to preventable diseases, including pneumonia, diarrhoea and malaria, which together killed an estimated 2.2 million children under the age of 5 years in 2012, accounting for a third of all under-five deaths in this region. Some countries are making progress in reducing mortality through community-based health schemes; however, most countries in this region are far from achieving the World Health Organization Sustainable Development Goals for reducing childhood morbidity and mortality. The microorganisms causing neonatal pneumonia are well known. Both bacteria and viruses are commonly responsible, while fungal organisms occur in the context of nosocomial disease, and parasites occur in HIV-infected children. The common bacterial pathogens are group B streptococci (and other streptococcal species) and Gram-negative organisms, most notably Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. The viruses that predominate are the common respiratory pathogens, namely respiratory syncytial virus, human rhinovirus, and influenza virus. Viral disease is often nosocomial and transmitted to infected neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit or other neonatal facilities by infected parents and staff. Neonatal pneumonia often presents with non-specific respiratory distress in newborns. In the premature infant it is often indistinguishable from surfactant deficiency-associated respiratory distress syndrome. Therefore, diagnostic testing that is cheap and reliable is urgently sought in this region. All neonates with pneumonia must receive broad-spectrum antibiotic cover. This usually entails the combination of penicillin and an aminoglycoside. A lack of appropriate drugs and neonatal intensive care unit facilities are hampering progress in managing neonatal pneumonia.

  11. Etiology of severe pneumonia in Ecuadorian children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivani Jonnalagadda

    Full Text Available In Latin America, community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children. Few studies have examined the etiology of pneumonia in Ecuador.This observational study was part of a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among children aged 2-59 months with severe pneumonia in Quito, Ecuador. Nasopharyngeal and blood samples were tested for bacterial and viral etiology by polymerase chain reaction. Risk factors for specific respiratory pathogens were also evaluated.Among 406 children tested, 159 (39.2% had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, 71 (17.5% had human metapneumovirus (hMPV, and 62 (15.3% had adenovirus. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified in 37 (9.2% samples and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in three (0.74% samples. The yearly circulation pattern of RSV (P = 0.0003 overlapped with S. pneumoniae, (P = 0.03 with most cases occurring in the rainy season. In multivariable analysis, risk factors for RSV included younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.9, P = 0.01 and being underweight (aOR = 1.8, P = 0.04. Maternal education (aOR = 0.82, P = 0.003, pulse oximetry (aOR = 0.93, P = 0.005, and rales (aOR = 0.25, P = 0.007 were associated with influenza A. Younger age (aOR = 3.5, P = 0.007 and elevated baseline respiratory rate were associated with HPIV-3 infection (aOR = 0.94, P = 0.03.These results indicate the importance of RSV and influenza, and potentially modifiable risk factors including undernutrition and future use of a RSV vaccine, when an effective vaccine becomes available.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00513929.

  12. Pneumonia a Varicella zoster Varicella zoster pneumonia

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    Carla Ferreira Santos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A varicela é uma doença infecto contagiosa comum na infância, ocorrendo pouco mais de 2% dos casos em adultos. Desde a década de 80 que a sua incidência nos adultos tem vindo a aumentar, dos quais apenas 7% são seronegativos¹. A pneumonia a Varicella zoster, se bem que rara, constitui a complicação mais grave e mais frequente no adulto. Os autores apresentam um caso clínico ilustrativo de pneumonia a Varicella zoster num adulto fumador e imunocompetente e fazem uma breve revisão teórica sobre o tema.Varicella (chickenpox is a common contagious infection of childhood, with fewer than 2% of the cases occurring in adults. Since the early 1980s the incidence of chickenpox in adults has been increasing and only 7% of them are seronegative for Varicella zoster antibodies. Pneumonia, although rare, is the most common and serious complication of chickenpox infection in adults. The authors present an illustrative case of varicella pneumonia in an immunocompetent adult with smoking habits and make a brief thematic review.

  13. Computed tomographic study on Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Koba, Hiroyuki; Mori, Takuji; Mori, Masaki; Tsunematsu, Kazunori; Natori, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Akira; Doi, Mikio.

    1985-01-01

    Serologically proven 21 patients with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia that showed infiltrative shadows on chest radiograms were studied by computed tomography (CT). Localization of the lesion and the fashion of its progression through the lung were analyzed. Following 3 loci were defined on the basis of the investigations of critical analysis of the chest radiograms, and of radiopathological analysis of the experimental animal model of mycoplasmal pneumonia with soft X-ray image. I: Peribronchial and periarterial interstitium. II: Bronchiole and its surroundings. III: Lung parenchyma, on hilar area as IIIh, on marginal area as IIIm. Even in the early phase of this disease, radiopathological findings on CT have been distributed in all loci mentioned above. The Shadow disappeared from locus III approximately 14th day from the onset. The shadow have remained, however, loci I, II for a long period. Those findings suggest that locus I and II are one of the major focus of Mycoplasma neumoniae pneumonia. Volume loss in the locus III was observed 78 % of the cases at 28th day from the onset. The shadow on locus IIIh was more prominent than locus IIIm. Reported analytical method with CT could be widely applied to disclose a radiopathological details in other infectious diseases of the lung. (author)

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae triggers a cytotoxic effect on airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llobet-Brossa Enrique

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a capsulated Gram negative bacterial pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. Despite its clinical relevance, little is known about the features of the interaction between K. pneumoniae and lung epithelial cells on a cellular level, neither about the role of capsule polysaccharide, one of its best characterised virulence factors, in this interaction. Results The interaction between Klebsiella pneumoniae and cultured airway epithelial cells was analysed. K. pneumoniae infection triggered cytotoxicity, evident by cell rounding and detachment from the substrate. This effect required the presence of live bacteria and of capsule polysaccharide, since it was observed with isolates expressing different amounts of capsule and/or different serotypes but not with non-capsulated bacteria. Cytotoxicity was analysed by lactate dehydrogenase and formazan measurements, ethidium bromide uptake and analysis of DNA integrity, obtaining consistent and complementary results. Moreover, cytotoxicity of non-capsulated strains was restored by addition of purified capsule during infection. While a non-capsulated strain was avirulent in a mouse infection model, capsulated K. pneumoniae isolates displayed different degrees of virulence. Conclusion Our observations allocate a novel role to K. pneumoniae capsule in promotion of cytotoxicity. Although this effect is likely to be associated with virulence, strains expressing different capsule levels were not equally virulent. This fact suggests the existence of other bacterial requirements for virulence, together with capsule polysaccharide.

  15. The role of influenza in the epidemiology of pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sourya; Foxman, Betsy; Berus, Joshua; van Panhuis, Willem G.; Steiner, Claudia; Viboud, Cécile; Rohani, Pejman

    2015-01-01

    Interactions arising from sequential viral and bacterial infections play important roles in the epidemiological outcome of many respiratory pathogens. Influenza virus has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several respiratory bacterial pathogens commonly associated with pneumonia. Though clinical evidence supporting this interaction is unambiguous, its population-level effects—magnitude, epidemiological impact and variation during pandemic and seasonal outbreaks—remain unclear. To address these unknowns, we used longitudinal influenza and pneumonia incidence data, at different spatial resolutions and across different epidemiological periods, to infer the nature, timing and the intensity of influenza-pneumonia interaction. We used a mechanistic transmission model within a likelihood-based inference framework to carry out formal hypothesis testing. Irrespective of the source of data examined, we found that influenza infection increases the risk of pneumonia by ~100-fold. We found no support for enhanced transmission or severity impact of the interaction. For model-validation, we challenged our fitted model to make out-of-sample pneumonia predictions during pandemic and non-pandemic periods. The consistency in our inference tests carried out on several distinct datasets, and the predictive skill of our model increase confidence in our overall conclusion that influenza infection substantially enhances the risk of pneumonia, though only for a short period. PMID:26486591

  16. Signs and symptoms indicative of community-acquired pneumonia in infants under six months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo March

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the clinical signs and symptoms predicting bacterial and viral pneumonia, in accordance with the Brazilian National Control Program for Acute Respiratory (ARI. METHODS: Observational prospective study. Seventy-six children from birth to six months of age who had pneumonia were studied in the emergency room. The patients were subdivided into two groups, based on radiological findings (gold-standard: 47 had bacterial pneumonia, and 29 had viral pneumonia. The frequencies, sensitivities, and specificities of the signs and symptoms were evaluated. RESULTS: The sensibilities and sensitivities of general findings in bacterial pneumonia were, respectively: fever 53.2%/40.0%; hypoactivity 68.4%/55.6% and prostration detected by the doctor 72.7%/55.0%. The same findings in viral pneumonias showed, respectively: 37.9%/40.0%, 66.7%/55.6% and 66.7%/55.6%. The sensibilities and sensitivities of respiratory findings in bacterial pneumonia were, respectively: coughing 66.0/38.1%, Respiratory rate = 50 ripm 76.6%/38.1%, altered respiratory auscultation 91.3%/10.5%, and chest indrawing 46.7%/80.0%. The same findings in viral pneumonias were, respectively: 69.0%/38.1%, 86.2%/38.1%, 85.7%/10.5% and 44.8%/80.0%. CONCLUSION: Analysis of signs and symptoms in each group did not distinguish bacterial from viral pneumonia. Our findings reinforce the adequacy of the ARI program in Brazil, which gives an early diagnosis of pneumonia, independent of its etiology.

  17. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Case Report of Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is an extremely rare and life-threatening bacterial soft tissue infection. We report a case of early necrotizing fasciitis associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in a 26-year-old man who was immunocompromised with mixed connective tissue disease. The patient presented with acute, painful, erythematous, and edematous skin lesions of his right lower back, which rapidly progressed to the right knee. The patient underwent surgical exploration, and a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was confirmed by pathological evidence of necrosis of the fascia and neutrophil infiltration in tissue biopsies. Cultures of fascial tissue biopsies and blood samples were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae diagnosed at early phase; the patient recovered well without surgical debridement.

  19. Acute interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuervo M, Francisco; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge; Ojeda, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    The paper refers to a 71 year-old patient, to who is diagnosed acute interstitial pneumonia; with square of 20 days of evolution of cough dry emetizant, fever, general uneasiness, migraine, progressive dyspnoea and lost of weight

  20. What Is Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fungus is found in the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys. Cryptococcus . This fungus is found throughout the ... of breathing in some areas of your chest. Diagnostic tests If your doctor thinks you have pneumonia, ...

  1. Chlamydia Pneumoniae Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary ... Pneumoniae Infections Page Content Article Body When you hear the word chlamydia, you might think of the sexually transmitted disease (STD) by that ...

  2. K. pneumoniae: ¿The new “superbacteria”? Pathogenicity, epidemiology and resistance mechanisms K. pneumoniae: ¿la nueva

    OpenAIRE

    Lina María Echeverri Toro; Jaime Alberto López Vargas

    2010-01-01

    The antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem of public health. Klebsiella pneumoniae has become one of the most important pathogens because it is a frequent cause of nosocomial and community acquired infections and it has pathogenicity mechanisms like capsules, adhesive properties mediated by specialized estructures (pillis) and siderophores that are capable of taking up iron, an essential factor in bacterial growth. The increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics has evolved wit...

  3. Platelets: versatile effector cells in pneumonia and sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Stoppelaar, S.F.

    2015-01-01

    The role of platelets in infection and immunity is an exciting new theme, which is rapidly evolving. In this thesis we studied the involvement of platelets in the host response to pneumonia and sepsis. We made use of well established mouse models in which mice were infected with a bacterial inoculum

  4. Acute renal failure caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae pyelonephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, W. M.; Lobatto, S.; Weening, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    We report a 34-year-old male patient without prior medical history who presented with acute renal failure due to acute bacterial pyelonephritis. Both blood and urine cultures grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. Although a kidney biopsy revealed extensive necrosis and no viable glomeruli, renal function

  5. Haemophilus influenzae type b pneumonia in Egyptian children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence or absence of a polysaccharide capsule is an important distinguishing characteristic of H. influenzae species. The polysaccharide capsule can ... One hundred patients with community-acquired pneumonia were investigated for Hib by both real-time PCR and bacterial culture. Haemophilus influenzae type b ...

  6. Sensitivity of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and nine other ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sensitivity of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and nine other bacterial species isolated from drinking water in the lower Volta Basin to some commonly used ... It is suggested that close monitoring of quality of water coupled with education in cleaning storage containers, using the traditional heat sterilisation method, ...

  7. Pneumonia a Varicella zoster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Ferreira Santos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A varicela é uma doença infecto contagiosa comum na infância, ocorrendo pouco mais de 2% dos casos em adultos. Desde a década de 80 que a sua incidência nos adultos tem vindo a aumentar, dos quais apenas 7% são seronegativos1. A pneumonia a Varicella zoster, se bem que rara, constitui a complicação mais grave e mais frequente no adulto.Os autores apresentam um caso clínico ilustrativo de pneumonia a Varicella zoster num adulto fumador e imunocompetente e fazem uma breve revisão teórica sobre o tema. Abstract: Varicella (chickenpox is a common contagious infection of childhood, with fewer than 2% of the cases occurring in adults. Since the early 1980s the incidence of chickenpox in adults has been increasing and only 7% of them are seronegative for Varicella zoster antibodies. Pneumonia, although rare, is the most common and serious complication of chickenpox infection in adults.The authors present an illustrative case of varicella pneumonia in an immunocompetent adult with smoking habits and make a brief thematic review. Palavras-chave: Varicela, pneumonia, ARDS, Key-words: Chickenpox, pneumonia, ARDS

  8. A decoy receptor 3 analogue reduces localised defects in phagocyte function in pneumococcal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Helen M; Daigneault, Marc; Thompson, Alfred A R; Walmsley, Sarah R; Gill, Sharonjit K; Witcher, Derrick R; Wroblewski, Victor J; Hellewell, Paul G; Whyte, Moira K B; Dockrell, David H

    2012-11-01

    Therapeutic strategies to modulate the host response to bacterial pneumonia are needed to improve outcomes during community-acquired pneumonia. This study used mice with impaired Fas signalling to examine susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia and decoy receptor 3 analogue (DcR3-a) to correct factors associated with increased susceptibility. Wild-type mice and those with varying degrees of impairment of Fas (lpr) or Fas ligand signalling (gld) were challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae and microbiological and immunological outcomes measured in the presence or absence of DcR3-a. During established pneumonia, neutrophils became the predominant cell in the airway and gld mice were less able to clear bacteria from the lungs, demonstrating localised impairment of pulmonary neutrophil function in comparison to lpr or wild-type mice. T-cells from gld mice had enhanced activation and reduced apoptosis in comparison to wild-type and lpr mice during established pneumonia. Treatment with DcR3-a reduced T-cell activation and corrected the defect in pulmonary bacterial clearance in gld mice. The results suggest that imbalance in tumour necrosis factor superfamily signalling and excessive T-cell activation can impair bacterial clearance in the lung but that DcR3-a treatment can reduce T-cell activation, restore optimal pulmonary neutrophil function and enhance bacterial clearance during S pneumoniae infection.

  9. Comparison of real-time polymerase chain reaction and serological tests for the confirmation of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in children with clinical diagnosis of atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yu; Chang, Luan-Yin; Shao, Pei-Lan; Lee, Ping-Ing; Chen, Jong-Min; Lee, Chin-Yun; Lu, Chun-Yi; Huang, Li-Min

    2014-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common pathogen of respiratory tract infection in children, and its correct and rapid diagnosis is a clinical challenge. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been used frequently for the detection of this pathogen. Medical records from all children with a clinical diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia and whose respiratory samples were tested for M. pneumoniae (using RT-PCR) during 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of serological assays versus those of RT-PCR for diagnosis of M. pneumoniae infections. We also reviewed retrospectively clinical characteristics, and laboratory and imaging findings of children with laboratory evidence of M. pneumoniae infection. In 2011, 290 children were diagnosed to have mycoplasma pneumonia clinically and had their respiratory samples tested for M. pneumoniae by RT-PCR. Fifty-four children (19%) had a positive result. Meanwhile, 63% (182/290) of these children also underwent serological tests, out of whom 44 (24%) were found to be positive for immunoglobulin M (IgM). Using PCR as a gold standard, M. pneumoniae IgM assay was found to show a sensitivity of 62.2% and a specificity of 85.5%. Positive and negative predictive values of IgM were 52.3% and 89.9%, respectively. In M. pneumoniae IgM-positive children, a negative PCR result was associated with more coinfection by other pathogens and longer duration of prehospitalization fever. Bacterial loads of M. pneumoniae were not correlated with clinical outcomes. The majority of clinically diagnosed mycoplasma pneumonia was unconfirmed. Mycoplasma pneumoniae IgM has poor sensitivity and a positive predictive value. Interpretation of Mycoplasma pneumoniae IgM should be done with caution. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bacterial Keratitis Sections What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ... Lens Care Bacterial Keratitis Treatment What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es la Queratitis Bacteriana? ...

  11. Moxifloxacin modulates inflammation during murine pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisswenger, Christoph; Honecker, Anja; Kamyschnikow, Andreas; Bischoff, Markus; Tschernig, Thomas; Bals, Robert

    2014-07-17

    Moxifloxacin is a synthetic antibacterial agent belonging to the fluoroquinolone family. The antimicrobial activity of quinolones against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is based on their ability to inhibit topoisomerases. Quinolones are described to have immunomodulatory features in addition to their antimicrobial activities. It was the goal of this study to examine whether a short term treatment with moxifloxacin modulates the inflammation during a subsequently induced bacterial infection in an animal model. Mice were treated with moxifloxacin or saline for two consecutive days and were subsequently intranasally infected with viable or heat-inactivated bacterial pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) for 6 and 24 hours. Measurements of cytokines in the lungs and plasma were performed. Alveolar cells were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluits. The inflammation was increased after the inoculation of viable bacteria compared to inactivated bacteria. Numbers of total immune cells and neutrophils and concentrations of inflammatory mediators (e.g. KC, IL-1β, IL-17A) were significantly reduced in lungs of moxifloxacin-treated mice infected with inactivated and viable bacterial pathogens as compared to infected control mice. Plasma concentrations of inflammatory mediators were significantly reduced in moxifloxacin-treated mice. Immunohistochemistry showed a stronger infiltrate of TNF-α-expressing cells into lungs of saline-treated mice infected with viable P. aeruginosa as compared to moxifloxacin-treated mice. These data show that in this pneumonia model moxifloxacin has anti-inflammatory properties beyond its antibacterial activity.

  12. Novel pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Doo Ryeon; Huh, Kyungmin

    2015-02-01

    Postinfluenza bacterial pneumonia is a leading cause of influenza-associated death, and Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae have been important pathogens that have caused pneumonia since the influenza pandemic in 1919. Emergence of novel influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 and the concomitant global spread of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) have led to increasing prevalence of CA-MRSA pneumonia following influenza infection. Such an epidemiologic change poses a therapeutic challenge due to a high risk of inappropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy and poor clinical outcomes. Early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for post-influenza bacterial pneumonia have become even more important in the era of CA-MRSA. Therefore, novel molecular diagnostic techniques should be applied to more readily diagnose MRSA pneumonia.

  13. Semi-automated method to measure pneumonia severity in mice through computed tomography (CT) scan analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johri, Ansh; Schimel, Daniel; Noguchi, Audrey; Hsu, Lewis L.

    2010-03-01

    Imaging is a crucial clinical tool for diagnosis and assessment of pneumonia, but quantitative methods are lacking. Micro-computed tomography (micro CT), designed for lab animals, provides opportunities for non-invasive radiographic endpoints for pneumonia studies. HYPOTHESIS: In vivo micro CT scans of mice with early bacterial pneumonia can be scored quantitatively by semiautomated imaging methods, with good reproducibility and correlation with bacterial dose inoculated, pneumonia survival outcome, and radiologists' scores. METHODS: Healthy mice had intratracheal inoculation of E. coli bacteria (n=24) or saline control (n=11). In vivo micro CT scans were performed 24 hours later with microCAT II (Siemens). Two independent radiologists scored the extent of airspace abnormality, on a scale of 0 (normal) to 24 (completely abnormal). Using the Amira 5.2 software (Mercury Computer Systems), a histogram distribution of voxel counts between the Hounsfield range of -510 to 0 was created and analyzed, and a segmentation procedure was devised. RESULTS: A t-test was performed to determine whether there was a significant difference in the mean voxel value of each mouse in the three experimental groups: Saline Survivors, Pneumonia Survivors, and Pneumonia Non-survivors. It was found that the voxel count method was able to statistically tell apart the Saline Survivors from the Pneumonia Survivors, the Saline Survivors from the Pneumonia Non-survivors, but not the Pneumonia Survivors vs. Pneumonia Non-survivors. The segmentation method, however, was successfully able to distinguish the two Pneumonia groups. CONCLUSION: We have pilot-tested an evaluation of early pneumonia in mice using micro CT and a semi-automated method for lung segmentation and scoring system. Statistical analysis indicates that the system is reliable and merits further evaluation.

  14. Pneumonia Intersticial Descamativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. La Salete Valente

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Os autores descrevem um caso raro de Pneumonia Intersticial Descamativa, num rapaz de 12 anos, internado com o diagnóstico de pneumonía adquirida na comunidade. A sintomatologia inicial foi de febre alta, tosse produtiva de expectoração mucopurulenta e cansaço fácil. A telerradiografia do tórax mostrava consolidação do campo pulmonar inferior direito. A persistência do quadro clínico e radiológico apesar da terapêutica antibiótica prescrita, motivou a realização de uma biópsia transtorácica que mostrou alterações compatíveis com Pneumonia Intersticial Linfóide, embora não pudesse ser excluído um processo linfoproliferativo, dada a pequena área de tecido estudada; por este motivo, o doente foi submetido a toracotomia exploradora a qual terminaria com lobectomia inferior dìreita e esvaziamento ganglionar, dada a aparência macroscópica daquele lobo pulmonar e gânglios linfáticos. Isto permitiu o diagnóstico de Pneumonia Intersticial Descamativa. Houve uma evolução favorável, com regressão completa do quadro clínico.A etiopatogénese, diagnóstico e tratamento são revistos.REV PORT PNEUMOL 1999; V (3: 357-364 ABSTRACT: Authors describe a case of Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia in a twelve years old boy, with a clinical picture of ligh fever, productive cough and fatigue. The chest X-ray demonstrated the existence of opacity of the right lower lobe. The persistence of the symtoms and radiological alterations, in spite of appropriate antibiotics, motivated the realisation of a thoracotomy that conclued in a righ lower lobectomy and gangliooar deplection, due to the macroscopic apearence af the lung lobe and the lymphadenapaties. The diagnosis of Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia was made after histological examination of this lung lobe. The ethiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment are discussed.REV PORT PNEUMOL. 1999; V (3: 357-364 Palavras-chave: Pneumonia intersticial descamativa, pneumonia

  15. Prevalence, characterization and clinical significance of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    : Sarita Nayak, Suman Singh, Soeb Jankhwala, Riddhi Pradhan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella peumoniae, a capsulated gram negative bacillus is responsible for causing life threatening infections in humans. Carbapenems are the drug of choice for serious infection caused by multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. The emergence of carbapenem resistance has made it extremely difficult to treat such infections resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Aims: To study the prevalence of carbapenem resistance using ertapenem as a marker and to detect Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC producing Klebsiella pneumoniae as a mechanism of resistance. Material and Methods: The study included 102 patients from which Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated. Identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Klebsiella pneumoniae was performed on miniAPI (Analytical Profile Index, Semiautomated bacterial identification system according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines of 2011. The modified Hodge test was performed for detection of Carbapenemase production. Patient’s clinical and demographic details along with risk factors and co-morbid conditions, type of response to antimicrobial therapy and mortality were collected. Results: The prevalence of carbapenem resistance was found to be 30.41% with 16.6% KPC producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. The co-morbid conditions like immunocompromised state (p =0.042, prior antibiotics therapy (p=0.047, previous hospitalization (p =0.021, intensive care unit stay (p=0.047 and use of indwelling devices (p =0.013 were found to be significantly associated with carbapenem resistance. Adverse clinical outcomes (death or worsening among patients infected with ertapenem resistant patients was found to be statistically significant than ertapenem sensitive strains (p =0.008. Conclusions: A high degree of carbapenem resistance in present study is alarming and poses therapeutic dilemmas for clinicians. Initiating timely and appropriate infection control measures along with a

  16. Conventional NK cells can produce IL-22 and promote host defense in Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Weiss, Ido D; Zhang, Hongwei H; Singh, Satya P; Wynn, Thomas A; Wilson, Mark S; Farber, Joshua M

    2014-02-15

    It was reported that host defense against pulmonary Klebsiella pneumoniae infection requires IL-22, which was proposed to be of T cell origin. Supporting a role for IL-22, we found that Il22(-/-) mice had decreased survival compared with wild-type mice after intratracheal infection with K. pneumoniae. Surprisingly, however, Rag2(-/-) mice did not differ from wild-type mice in survival or levels of IL-22 in the lungs postinfection with K. pneumoniae. In contrast, K. pneumoniae-infected Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice failed to produce IL-22. These data suggested a possible role for NK cells or other innate lymphoid cells in host defense and production of IL-22. Unlike NK cell-like innate lymphoid cells that produce IL-22 and display a surface phenotype of NK1.1(-)NKp46(+)CCR6(+), lung NK cells showed the conventional phenotype, NK1.1(+)NKp46(+)CCR6(-). Mice depleted of NK cells using anti-asialo GM1 showed decreased survival and higher lung bacterial counts, as well as increased dissemination of K. pneumoniae to blood and liver, compared with control-treated mice. NK cell depletion also led to decreased production of IL-22 in the lung. Within 1 d postinfection, although there was no increase in the number of lung NK cells, a subset of lung NK cells became competent to produce IL-22, and such cells were found in both wild-type and Rag2(-/-) mice. Our data suggest that, during pulmonary infection of mice with K. pneumoniae, conventional NK cells are required for optimal host defense, which includes the production of IL-22.

  17. [Cryptogenic organising pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazor, Romain

    2005-06-01

    Organising Pneumonia (formerly called Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organising Pneumonia) is a particular form of inflammatory and fibroproliferative lung disease. Its idiopathic form called Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia, was recently defined by an ATS/ERS consensus conference. The disease onset is subacute with cough, dyspnea, fever, asthenia, weight loss, crackles, and elevation of biological inflammatory markers. Bronchoalveolar lavage reveals a mixed alveolitis with elevated lymphocyte, neutrophil, and eosinophil counts. Chest imaging usually shows multifocal alveolar opacities predominating in the subpleural regions, often with a migratory pattern. Lung biopsy reveals budding connective tissue filling the distal airspaces. Diagnosis is established by combining clinical, radiological and histological criteria. Similarities with other disease processes can lead to delayed or erroneous diagnosis. Most patients respond well to corticosteroid therapy. Relapses are frequent but can generally be controlled with moderate doses of prednisone and do not worsen the prognosis. The therapeutic strategy aims at reducing the steroid doses while maintaining an optimal disease control.

  18. The pavA gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae encodes a fibronectin-binding protein that is essential for virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, AR; McNab, R; Millsap, KW; Rohde, M; Hammerschmidt, S; Mawdsley, JL; Jenkinson, HF

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx in up to 40% of healthy subjects, and is a leading cause of middle ear infections (otitis media), meningitis and pneumonia. Pneumococci adhere to glycosidic receptors on epithelial cells and to immobilized fibronectin, but the bacterial adhesins

  19. Genetic mechanisms of multidrug resistance among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from food-producing animals and humans in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen that commonly causes hospital and community acquired bacterial infections in humans. The emergence and rapid spread of multi- drug resistant (MDR) K. pneumoniae is causing drug therapy failure amid patients leading to poor antibiotic management glob...

  20. Pneumonia-like form of bronchioloalveolar lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinner, M.G.; Mazur, G.I.; Tregubov, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    The authors managed to observe 53 patients with this form of lung cancer, of them in 19 patients a pneumonia-like form was diagnosed. Clinical signs were not defined and were frequently expressed in the form of increasing dyspnea and coughing. The authors revealed 2 main variants of roentgenologic changes that would require differential diagnosis with central cancer complicated by obstructive pneumonitis, with bacterial pneumonia and infiltrative tuberculosis. Distinctive recognition was based on the progression of the clinicoroentgenological signs of the disease in spite of antiinflammatory therapy, on maintaining the bronchial permeability and on the absence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the sputum and ronchial washing liquid

  1. Detection and serotyping of pneumococci in community acquired pneumonia patients without culture using blood and urine samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elberse, Karin; van Mens, Suzan; Cremers, Amelieke J; Meijvis, Sabine C A; Vlaminckx, Bart; de Jonge, Marien I; Meis, Jacques F; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; van de Pol, Ingrid; Schouls, Leo M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients with antibiotics before laboratory-confirmed diagnosis leads to loss of knowledge on the causative bacterial pathogen. Therefore, an increasing number of pneumococcal infections is identified using non-culture based techniques.

  2. Treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae septicemia in normal and leukopenic mice by liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Melissen (Petronella Maria Bernadette); W. van Vianen (Wim); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of free muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamide (MTPPE) and liposome-encapsulated MTPPE (LE-MTPPE) on Klebsiella pneumoniae septicemia resulting from intraperitoneal bacterial inoculation was investigated in mice. When administering a single

  3. Virome and bacteriome characterization of children with pneumonia and asthma in Mexico City during winter seasons 2014 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Espinoza, Jose A; Moreno-Valencia, Yazmin; Coronel-Tellez, Rodrigo H; Castillejos-Lopez, Manuel; Hernandez, Andres; Dominguez, Aaron; Miliar-Garcia, Angel; Barbachano-Guerrero, Arturo; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Alejandre-Garcia, Alejandro; Vazquez-Perez, Joel A

    2018-01-01

    Acute asthma exacerbations and pneumonia are important causes of morbidity and mortality in children and may coexist in the same children, although symptom overlap may lead to difficulties in diagnosis. Microbial and viral diversity and differential abundance of either may play an important role in infection susceptibility and the development of acute and chronic respiratory diseases. To describe the virome and bacteriome present in the upper respiratory tract of hospitalized children with a clinical diagnosis of asthma and pneumonia during an acute exacerbation and an acute respiratory illness ARI episode respectively. During the winter seasons of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015, 134 nasopharyngeal swabs samples of children pneumonia. The virome and bacteriome were characterized using Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) and in-house bioinformatics analysis pipeline. The Asthma group was represented mainly by RV-C, BoV-1 and RSV-B and the pneumonia group by Bacteriophage EJ-1 and TTMV. TTV was found in both groups with a similar amount of reads. About bacterial composition Moraxella catarrhalis, Propionibacterium acnes and Acinetobacter were present in asthma and Veillonella parvula and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in pneumonia. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were mostly found with both asthma and pneumonia. Our results show a complex viral and bacterial composition in asthma and pneumonia groups with a strong association of RV-C presence in asthmatic children. We observed Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae concurrently in both groups.

  4. Evaluation of the efficacy of a bacteriophage in the treatment of pneumonia induced by multidrug resistance Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fang; Wang, Xitao; Wang, Linhui; Li, Zhen; Che, Jian; Wang, Lili; Li, Xiaoyu; Cao, Zhenhui; Zhang, Jiancheng; Jin, Liji; Xu, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (MRKP) has steadily grown beyond antibiotic control. However, a bacteriophage is considered to be a potential antibiotic alternative for treating bacterial infections. In this study, a lytic bacteriophage, phage 1513, was isolated using a clinical MRKP isolate KP 1513 as the host and was characterized. It produced a clear plaque with a halo and was classified as Siphoviridae. It had a short latent period of 30 min, a burst size of 264 and could inhibit KP 1513 growth in vitro with a dose-dependent pattern. Intranasal administration of a single dose of 2×10(9) PFU/mouse 2 h after KP 1513 inoculation was able to protect mice against lethal pneumonia. In a sublethal pneumonia model, phage-treated mice exhibited a lower level of K. pneumoniae burden in the lungs as compared to the untreated control. These mice lost less body weight and exhibited lower levels of inflammatory cytokines in their lungs. Lung lesion conditions were obviously improved by phage therapy. Therefore, phage 1513 has a great effect in vitro and in vivo, which has potential to be used as an alternative to an antibiotic treatment of pneumonia that is caused by the multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae.

  5. Natural killer cell-intrinsic type I IFN signaling controls Klebsiella pneumoniae growth during lung infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroni, Martina; Kavirayani, Anoop; Przybyszewska, Kornelia N.; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Lienenklaus, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a significant cause of nosocomial pneumonia and an alarming pathogen owing to the recent isolation of multidrug resistant strains. Understanding of immune responses orchestrating K. pneumoniae clearance by the host is of utmost importance. Here we show that type I interferon (IFN) signaling protects against lung infection with K. pneumoniae by launching bacterial growth-controlling interactions between alveolar macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells. Type I IFNs are important but disparate and incompletely understood regulators of defense against bacterial infections. Type I IFN receptor 1 (Ifnar1)-deficient mice infected with K. pneumoniae failed to activate NK cell-derived IFN-γ production. IFN-γ was required for bactericidal action and the production of the NK cell response-amplifying IL-12 and CXCL10 by alveolar macrophages. Bacterial clearance and NK cell IFN-γ were rescued in Ifnar1-deficient hosts by Ifnar1-proficient NK cells. Consistently, type I IFN signaling in myeloid cells including alveolar macrophages, monocytes and neutrophils was dispensable for host defense and IFN-γ activation. The failure of Ifnar1-deficient hosts to initiate a defense-promoting crosstalk between alveolar macrophages and NK cell was circumvented by administration of exogenous IFN-γ which restored endogenous IFN-γ production and restricted bacterial growth. These data identify NK cell-intrinsic type I IFN signaling as essential driver of K. pneumoniae clearance, and reveal specific targets for future therapeutic exploitations. PMID:29112952

  6. Pneumomediastinum and Pneumothorax Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Xavier Colón; González Monroig, Hernán A.; Puebla, Juan Garcia

    2018-01-01

    Patient: Male, 37 Final Diagnosis: HSV pneumonia Symptoms: Cough • fever • sob Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Pneumonia is one of the most common causes of death from infectious disease in the United States (US). Although most cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are secondary to bacterial infection, up to one-third of cases are secondary to viral infection, most commonly due to rhinovirus and influenza virus. Pneumonia due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) is rare, and there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis and clinical complications. This report is of a fatal case of HSV pneumonia associated with bilateral pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. Case Report: A 36-year-old homeless male Hispanic patient, who was a chronic smoker, with a history of intravenous drug abuse and a medical history of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), was admitted to hospital as an emergency with a seven-day history of productive purulent cough. The patient was admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) with a diagnosis of CAP, with intubation and mechanical ventilation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and was positive for HSV. The patient developed bilateral pneumothorax with pneumomediastinum, which was fatal, despite aggressive clinical management. Conclusions: Pneumonia due to HSV infection is uncommon but has a high mortality. Although HSV pneumonia has been described in immunocompromised patients, further studies are required to determine the pathogenesis, early detection, identification of patients who are at risk and to determine the most effective approaches to prophylaxis and treatment for HSV pneumonia. PMID:29379004

  7. Pneumonia in renal transplant patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowie, D. M.; Marrie, T. J.; Janigan, D. T.; MacKeen, A. D.; Belitsky, P.; MacDonald, A. S.; Lannon, S. G.; Cohen, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 28 episodes of pneumonia occurred in 26 renal transplant patients. The overall mortality rate was 46%. Of the 16 patients with nosocomial pneumonia 9 (56%) died, whereas of the 12 patients with community-acquired pneumonia 4 (33%) died. In all 9 cases of unknown cause the response to empiric treatment was prompt, whereas in 4 of the 10 cases of monomicrobial pneumonia and 8 of the 9 cases of polymicrobial pneumonia the patient died. Cytomegalovirus was the...

  8. Mechanisms of dexamethasone-mediated inhibition of Toll-like receptor signaling induced by Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Trine; Berg, Randi S; Paludan, Søren R

    2008-01-01

    significantly reduces mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms behind the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone upon the inflammatory responses evoked by Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, two of the major causes of bacterial meningitis......B alpha synthesis. Our data also revealed that the timing of steroid treatment relative to infection was important for achieving strong inhibition, particularly in response to S. pneumoniae. Altogether, we describe important targets of dexamethasone in the inflammatory responses evoked by N. meningitidis...

  9. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español ... Print Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , a microscopic fungus that ...

  10. Exogenous lipid pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasconi, A.; Gavelli, G.; Zompatori, M.; Galleri, C.; Zanasi, A.; Fabbri, M.; Bazzocchi, F.

    1988-01-01

    Exogenous lipid pneumonia (ELP) is caused by the aspiration of animal, vegetal or, more often, mineral oils. Even though it may also be acute, ELP is most frequently a chronic disease, affecting people with predisposing factors, such as neuromuscular disorders, structural abnormalities and so on; very often exogenous lipid pneumonia is found in tracheotomized patients. The pathology of lipid pneumonia is a chronic inflammatory process evolving in foreign-body-like reaction, and eventually in ''end-stage lung'' condition. Clinically, most patients are asymptomatic; few cases only present with cough, dyspnea and chest pain. Eight cases of ELP, studied over the past 3 years, are described in this paper. All the patients were examined by chest radiographs and standard tomograms; 3 patients underwent CT. X-ray features were mono/bilateral consolidation of the lower zones, with air bronchogram and variable reduction in volume. CT density was not specific for fat tissue. In all cases the diagnosis was confirmed at biopsy. In 5 patients, followed for at least one year, clinical-radiological features showed no change. Thus, complications of ELP (especially malignant evolution) could be excluded. The authors conclude that lipid pneumonia must be considered in differential diagnosis of patients with history of usage of oils and compatible X-ray findings. The usefulness of an accurate follow-up is stressed

  11. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J S; Jensen, T G; Kolmos, H J

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based cohort study among adult patients with first-time Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (SPB) from 2000 through 2008. Patients were identified in a population-based bacteremia database and followed up for mortality through the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS...

  12. Etiología bacteriana de la neumonía nosocomial y resistencia a los antimicrobianos en pacientes con y sin tratamiento antimicrobiano previo Bacterial etiology of nosocomial pneumonia and antimicrobial resistance in patients with and without antimicrobial treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Weyland

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available La neumonía nosocomial (NN se asocia a una elevada morbimortalidad y es la segunda causa de infección intrahospitalaria después de la infección urinaria. El objetivo de este trabajo fue conocer la etiología de la NN en adultos y evaluar el perfil de resistencia a los antimicrobianos de los microorganismos aislados teniendo en cuenta si los pacientes recibieron o no tratamiento antimicrobiano previo. Desde el año 2000 hasta el 2005 se analizaron 430 lavados broncoalveolares provenientes de 430 pacientes adultos con diagnóstico de neumonía internados en la unidad de cuidados intensivos del Hospital de Clínicas "José de San Martín". El 74% (199/ 269 de los pacientes con tratamiento previo tuvieron cultivos positivos, mientras que en el grupo sin tratamiento previo esta proporción fue del 83% (134/161 (p = 0,03. Los microorganismos prevalentes fueron Acinetobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus y Pseudomonas aeruginosa (37,9% ; 21,3% y 20,9% vs. 36,1%; 26,6% y 17,7% en los pacientes con tratamiento previo o sin él, respectivamente; p > 0,05. La resistencia a los antimicrobianos de los citados microorganismos cuando los aislamientos provinieron de pacientes que recibieron antes tratamiento antibiótico fue superior a la encontrada en el grupo de pacientes que no recibió tratamiento previo (p Nosocomial pneumonia (NP is associated with high morbimortality, representing the second cause of nosocomial infection after urinary tract infection. The objective of this work was to become acquainted with the etiology of NP and to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance profile of the isolated microorganisms from adult patients with and without previous antimicrobial treatment admitted in the intensive care unit (ICU. From 2000 to 2005, 430 bronchoalveolar lavages from 430 adult patients diagnosed with pneumonia admitted in the ICU were analyzed. Seventy-four percent (199/ 269 of the patients with previous treatment had positive cultures, whereas in

  13. The Nasal Bacterial Flora Changes in Experimental Peste des Petits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study into the nasal bacterial flora changes associated with common viral and bacterial complicated viral pneumonia in subsaharan goats and its implications in the treatment plans is scanty in literatures. This investigation was part of a larger study that involved fifty apparently healthy West Africa Dwarf goats (WAD) of ...

  14. Bacterial meningitis in adults at the University of Calabar Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The common complications associated with adult bacterial meningitis were septicemia, aspiration pneumonia and cranial nerve palsies. Bacterial meningitis still remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in this environment. Adequate therapeutic coverage, health education, and immunization where available, ...

  15. Effect of vaccines on bacterial meningitis worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McIntyre, Peter B.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Greenwood, Brian; van de Beek, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    Three bacteria-Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis-account for most acute bacterial meningitis. Measurement of the effect of protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines is most reliable for H influenzae meningitis because one serotype and one age group account

  16. Epidemiology of community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has been dynamic in the past 30 years following introduction of conjugated vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type B, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in

  17. Hemophagocytic Syndrome Associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Koike

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp sometimes causes immunological complications in children. We present a rare case of hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS caused by Mp in a previously healthy 7-year-old Japanese girl. A chest radiograph obtained to evaluate the source of her fever showed infiltration in the lower right lung with mild splenomegaly. We could diagnose the patient with HPS on the basis of the hemophagocytic-lymphohistiocytosis- (HLH 2004 criteria. She met the criteria for fever, splenomegaly, neutrophil count (265 mg/dL, and ferritin level (>500 ng/mL. Furthermore, a peripheral blood smear showed an increased number of monocytes/macrophages with erythrophagocytosis. Treatment with clarithromycin and prednisolone, which was initiated soon after the diagnosis, was successful. Mp infection might partly progress to HPS in certain conditions. Clinicians should be aware of HPS caused by Mp and start appropriate treatment as soon as possible if the disease is suspected.

  18. Radiographic and HRCT findings of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Jin Sam; Kim, Kun Il; Kim, Chang Won; Park, Soon Kew; Cho, Goon Jae

    1999-01-01

    To analyze the radiographic and HRCT findings of Pneumocystic carinii pneumonia. We reviewed the medical records and retrospectively analysed the chest radiographs(n=31) and HRCT scans(n=17) of 31 patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia who had been followed up at our institute between, 1993 and March 1998. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was confirmed by cytologic evaluation of sputum stained with methenamine silver(n=25) or on the basis of clinical history(n=6). The study group included 17 men and 14 women aged 28-78(average, 53.6) years. Twenty-eight patients had underlying conditions such as hematologic diseases(n=13), AIDS(n=8), malignancy(n=2), DM(n=2) and malnutrition(n=1), and three were free from underlying diseases. Twenty patients had pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and 11 had combined lung diseases, namely pulmonary tuberculosis(n=4), pulmonary metastasis(n=2), bacterial pneumonia(n=2), atypical mycobacterial infection(n=1), pulmonary edema(n=1), and Kaposi' s sarcoma(n=1). Chest radiographic findings of 20 cases of pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included consolidation(n=12), linear-reticular opacity(n=8), ill defined haziness(n=7), and nodules(n=6), with bilaterality in is cases and zonal predominance in ten [central(n=5), lower(n=5)]. Ancillary findings included pleural effusion(n=10), cysts(n=5), lymphadenopathy(n=4) and pneumothorax(n=1). In two patients, findings were entirely normal. HRCT findings in ten cases of pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included ground-glass opacity(n=6), consolidation(n=6), linear-reticular opacity(n=8), and nodules(n=5), with bilaterallity in seven cases and zonal predominance in five [central(n=5), lower(n=2)]. Ancillary findings among these cases included pleural effusion(n=4), lymphadenopathy(n=2), cysts(n=1), and pneumothorax(n=1). HRCT findings in seven cases of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia combined with other lung diseases included nodules(n=6), ground-glass opacity(n=5), linear-reticular opacity

  19. Radiographic and HRCT findings of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jin Sam; Kim, Kun Il; Kim, Chang Won; Park, Soon Kew; Cho, Goon Jae [Pusan National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    To analyze the radiographic and HRCT findings of Pneumocystic carinii pneumonia. We reviewed the medical records and retrospectively analysed the chest radiographs(n=31) and HRCT scans(n=17) of 31 patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia who had been followed up at our institute between, 1993 and March 1998. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was confirmed by cytologic evaluation of sputum stained with methenamine silver(n=25) or on the basis of clinical history(n=6). The study group included 17 men and 14 women aged 28-78(average, 53.6) years. Twenty-eight patients had underlying conditions such as hematologic diseases(n=13), AIDS(n=8), malignancy(n=2), DM(n=2) and malnutrition(n=1), and three were free from underlying diseases. Twenty patients had pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and 11 had combined lung diseases, namely pulmonary tuberculosis(n=4), pulmonary metastasis(n=2), bacterial pneumonia(n=2), atypical mycobacterial infection(n=1), pulmonary edema(n=1), and Kaposi' s sarcoma(n=1). Chest radiographic findings of 20 cases of pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included consolidation(n=12), linear-reticular opacity(n=8), ill defined haziness(n=7), and nodules(n=6), with bilaterality in is cases and zonal predominance in ten [central(n=5), lower(n=5)]. Ancillary findings included pleural effusion(n=10), cysts(n=5), lymphadenopathy(n=4) and pneumothorax(n=1). In two patients, findings were entirely normal. HRCT findings in ten cases of pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included ground-glass opacity(n=6), consolidation(n=6), linear-reticular opacity(n=8), and nodules(n=5), with bilaterallity in seven cases and zonal predominance in five [central(n=5), lower(n=2)]. Ancillary findings among these cases included pleural effusion(n=4), lymphadenopathy(n=2), cysts(n=1), and pneumothorax(n=1). HRCT findings in seven cases of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia combined with other lung diseases included nodules(n=6), ground-glass opacity(n=5), linear

  20. A Neonatal Murine Model of MRSA Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth A; You, Dahui; Shrestha, Bishwas; Siefker, David; Patel, Vivek S; Yadav, Nikki; Jaligama, Sridhar; Cormier, Stephania A

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in infants particularly following lower respiratory tract viral infections such as Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). However, the mechanisms by which co-infection of infants by MRSA and RSV cause increased lung pathology are unknown. Because the infant immune system is qualitatively and quantitatively different from adults we developed a model of infant MRSA pneumonia which will allow us to investigate the effects of RSV co-infection on disease severity. We infected neonatal and adult mice with increasing doses of MRSA and demonstrate that neonatal mice have delayed kinetics in clearing the bacteria in comparison to adult mice. There were differences in recruitment of immune cells into the lung following infection. Adult mice exhibited an increase in neutrophil recruitment that coincided with reduced bacterial titers followed by an increase in macrophages. Neonatal mice, however, exhibited an early increase in neutrophils that did not persist despite continued presence of the bacteria. Unlike the adult mice, neonatal mice failed to exhibit an increase in macrophages. Neonates exhibited a decrease in phagocytosis of MRSA suggesting that the decrease in clearance was partially due to deficient phagocytosis of the bacteria. Both neonates and adults responded with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines following infection. However, in contrast to the adult mice, neonates did not express constitutive levels of the anti-microbial peptide Reg3γ in the lung. Infection of neonates did not stimulate expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 by dendritic cells and neonates exhibited a diminished T cell response compared to adult mice. Overall, we have developed a neonatal model of MRSA pneumonia that displays a similar delay in bacterial clearance as is observed in the neonatal intensive care unit and will be useful for performing co

  1. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance pattern of bacterial meningitis in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Lamyaa; Siam, Rania

    2009-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. In Egypt bacterial diseases constitute a great burden, with several particular bacteria sustaining the leading role of multiple serious infections. This article addresses profound bacterial agents causing a wide array of infections including but not limited to pneumonia and meningitis. The epidemiology of such infectious diseases and the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae are reviewed in the context of bacterial meningitis. We address prevalent serotypes in Egypt, antimicrobial resistance patterns and efficacy of vaccines to emphasize the importance of periodic surveillance for appropriate preventive and treatment strategies. PMID:19778428

  2. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance pattern of bacterial meningitis in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaban Lamyaa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Infectious diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. In Egypt bacterial diseases constitute a great burden, with several particular bacteria sustaining the leading role of multiple serious infections. This article addresses profound bacterial agents causing a wide array of infections including but not limited to pneumonia and meningitis. The epidemiology of such infectious diseases and the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae are reviewed in the context of bacterial meningitis. We address prevalent serotypes in Egypt, antimicrobial resistance patterns and efficacy of vaccines to emphasize the importance of periodic surveillance for appropriate preventive and treatment strategies.

  3. Escherichia fergusonii Associated with Pneumonia in a Beef Cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo M. Rimoldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An adult Angus cow developed hyperthermia, prostration, and respiratory distress, dying 36 hours after the onset of clinical signs. The main finding during postmortem examination was a severe focally extensive pneumonia. Icterus and a chronic mastitis were also noticed. Histologic examination of the lungs detected fibrinonecrotic pneumonia, with large number of oat cells and intralesional Gram-negative bacterial colonies. Samples from lung lesions were collected, and a pure growth of Escherichia fergusonii was obtained. E. fergusonii is a member of Enterobacteriaceae, related to Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. In veterinary medicine, E. fergusonii has been reported in calves and sheep with clinical cases suggestive of salmonellosis; in a horse and a goat with enteritis and septicemia; and in ostriches with fibrinonecrotic typhlitis. To our knowledge, this report represents the first description of E. fergusonii associated with an acute pneumonia in cattle.

  4. Etiologic spectrum and occurrence of coinfections in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wujun; Wu, Min; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Yuqing; Hao, Chuangli; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Xinxing; Gu, Wenjing; Shao, Xuejun

    2017-12-20

    Co-infections are common in childhood community acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, their etiological pattern and clinical impact remains inconclusive. Eight hundred forty-six consecutive children with CAP were evaluated prospectively for the presence of viral and bacterial pathogens. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were examined by direct immunofluorescence assay or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for viruses. PCR of nasopharyngeal aspirates and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to detect M. pneumoniae. Bacteria was detected in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage specimen, or pleural fluid by culture. Causative pathogen was identified in 70.1% (593 of 846) of the patients. The most commonly detected pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (22.9%), human rhinovirus (HRV) (22.1%), M. pneumoniae (15.8%). Coinfection was identified in 34.6% (293 of 846) of the patients. The majority of these (209 [71.3%] of 293) were mixed viral-bacterial infections. Age pneumonia pathogens.

  5. BLOOD CONTENTS OF DEFENSINS IN PATIENTS WITH PNEUMONIAS CAUSED BY INFLUENZA А/H1N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Romanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Defensin amounts in severe forms of influenza-associated pneumonia and acute respiratory distresssyndrome is increased to a lesser degree than in pneumonias with milder clinical course. This difference may be determined by selective accumulation of defensins in areas of infectious lesions. Mean content of α-defensins in non-severe pneumonias with influenza А/H1N1 accompanied by normocytosis or leukopenia, is higher than in bacterial pneumonias with leukocytosis. High levels of defensins, along with substantially increased neutrophil counts, associated with normocytosis or leukopenia, reflect a pronounced systemic inflammatory response caused by influenza А/H1N1.

  6. Aetiology and prediction of pneumonia in lower respiratory tract infection in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anette; Nexoe, Joergen; Bistrup, Lene A

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of predominant pathogens and their association with outcome are of importance for the management of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). As antibiotic therapy is indicated in pneumonia and not in acute bronchitis, a predictor of pneumonia is needed. AIM: To describe...... the aetiology and outcome of LRTI in adults with pneumonic and adults with non-pneumonic LRTI treated in general practice and to identify predictors of radiographic pneumonia. DESIGN OF STUDY: Prospective, observational study. SETTING: Forty-two general practices and an outpatient clinic at the Department....... Primary outcome measure was hospitalisation within 4 weeks. RESULTS: Pneumonia was radiographically verified in 48 of 364 patients (13%). Bacterial infection was seen more often in patients with pneumonia (33% versus 17%, P

  7. [Atypical pathogens in adult patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi-hong; Deng, Rui; Fu, Rong-rong; Li, De-zhi; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yu-sheng; Hu, Cheng-ping; Li, Jia-shu; Wang, Rui-qin; Wei, Li-ping; Zhong, Xiao-ning; Tian, Gui-zhen; Mu, Lan; Wan, Huan-ying; Yu, Qin; He, Pei; Ma, Jian-jun; Gao, Zhan-cheng

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the current status of atypical pathogen associated infections in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults, and their clinical attributes. Clinical data, sputum specimens from acute phase, and paired sera from acute- and convalescent-phases of CAP in 153 adult patients were collected from May 2005 to May 2008 in multiple medical centers. Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) IgG antibody, and Legionella pneumophila (LP) mixed IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies were determined by indirect immuno-fluorescent assay. Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mpn) mixed IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies were determined by passive agglutination assay. All the sputum specimens were routinely cultured for bacterial isolation. Fifty-two (34%) out of the 153 cases were diagnosed as atypical CAP per the paired serum-antibody assay. Forty-seven of the 52 atypical CAP cases were infected by one atypical pathogen, 38 with Cpn, 4 with Mpn, and 5 with LP, while 5 out of the 52 atypical CAP cases were infected by 2 pathogens, Cpn and Mpnin 2, Cpn and LP in 3 cases. Eleven cases (21.2%) out of the 52 patients with atypical pneumonia were complicated with bacterial infection. Except peripheral white blood count was significant increased in the group of typical (bacterial only) pneumonia (WBC > 10 × 10⁹)/L, P = 0.03), all the other clinical parameters did not show statistically significant difference between the typical and the atypical pneumonia groups. Our data suggest that Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are common pathogens of adult CAP. Chlamydia pneumoniae might be the most frequent atypical pathogen associated with atypical CAP.

  8. Klebsiella pneumoniae Invasive Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Evangelista

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive syndrome (KPIS is a rare clinical condition characterized by primary liver abscess associated with metastatic infection. Most case reports are from Southeast Asia, with only one case described in Portugal. The Authors present the case of a 44-year-old man with a history of fever, dry cough and cervicalgia. A thoracic computed tomography (CT scan showed multiple pulmonary and hepatic nodules, suggestive of metastatic malignancy. Both blood cultures and bronchoalveolar lavage were positive for Klebsiella pneumoniae. Imaging studies were repeated during his hospital stay, showing a reduction in both number and volume of identified lesions, thus revealing their infectious nature. This case illustrates how much this entity can mimic other illnesses.

  9. Pneumonia in patients on the background of blood cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertseva T.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Problematic issues of etiologic diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia are being studied actively. At the same time specific features of pneumonia in patients with severe immune defects, against blood cancer including are studied insufficiently. By the result of microbiological examinations of 149 patients with pneumonia on the background of blood cancer, who have undergone treatment in hematological center of CE “Dnipropetrovsk local multi-field clinical hospital №4” in 2010-2012, bacterial causative agents were determined in 59,7% of accidents, among which gram-negative microorganisms made up 69,7%, gram-positive – 30,3%. In 63% of accidents the asso¬ciations of causative agents were determined: the combination of fungal flora made up 58, 4% bacterial associations – 25, 8%. Invasive methods of research have demonstrated a considerably bigger informativeness in determination of possible etiological diagnosis of pneumonia. In determination of causative agent in fluid of brochoalveolar lavage the part of positive results made up 77,4% against 30,3% in examination of sputum.

  10. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  11. Hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Alyssa S.; Bajwa, Rajinder P.S.; Russo, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    A new hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged. First described in the Asian Pacific Rim, it now increasingly recognized in Western countries. Defining clinical features are the ability to cause serious, life-threatening community-acquired infection in younger healthy hosts, including liver abscess, pneumonia, meningitis and endophthalmitis and the ability to metastatically spread, an unusual feature for enteric Gram-negative bacilli in the non-immunocompromised. Despite infecting a healthier population, significant morbidity and mortality occurs. Although epidemiologic features are still being defined, colonization, particularly intestinal colonization, appears to be a critical step leading to infection. However the route of entry remains unclear. The majority of cases described to date are in Asians, raising the issue of a genetic predisposition vs. geospecific strain acquisition. The traits that enhance its virulence when compared with “classical” K. pneumoniae are the ability to more efficiently acquire iron and perhaps an increase in capsule production, which confers the hypermucoviscous phenotype. An objective diagnostic test suitable for routine use in the clinical microbiology laboratory is needed. If/when these strains become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials, we will be faced with a frightening clinical scenario. PMID:23302790

  12. Clinicoroentgenological control in chronic pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamilyaev, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive clinicoroentgenological study was used to examine 494 patients with chronic pneumonia. Morphological and functional changes observed in the pulmonary pare and functional changes observed in the pulmonary parenchyma and bronchial tree were studied. Types of pneumosclerosis, tigns of exacerbation of chronic pneumonia and abscess formation, morphological and functional disorders of bronchial penetrability in the pneumonic zone were described. Three forms of chronic pneumonia: bronchial, bronchiectatic and abscessing are signled out. The bronchial form is subdivided into chronic pneumonia with chronic bronchitis without deformity and wi.th deforming chronic bronchitis. In the bronchiectatic form pneumonia can be with cylindrical, saccular and cyst-like bronchiectasia. The general diagnosis of chronic pneumonia is established clinically depending on type and variants in 89-94% of cases, by X-ray and sonographic findings in all patients; types and variants of disease are most frequently defined after bronchography

  13. Efficacy and safety of garenoxacin tablets on clinically diagnosed atypical pneumonia: postmarketing surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumikawa, Koichi; Watanabe, Akira; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Ishida, Tadashi; Hosono, Hiroaki; Kushimoto, Satoru; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-09-01

    We performed a postmarketing surveillance study to determine the efficacy and safety of the oral quinolone antibacterial agent garenoxacin (Geninax(®) Tablets 200 mg) against atypical pneumonia. Between October 2009 and July 2011, patients with community-acquired pneumonia visited 26 facilities in Japan; we collected survey forms from 105 of these patients who were suspected of having atypical pneumonia based on the Japanese Respiratory Society Guidelines for the Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults. We examined the safety in 105 patients and the efficacy in 71 patients. 1. The efficacy rates among patients suspected of having atypical pneumonia and those with a confirmed diagnosis of atypical pneumonia were 94.8% (55/58 patients) and 92.3% (12/13 patients), respectively. The efficacy rate was 4/4 for patients in whom Chlamydophila pneumoniae was detected (including 1 patient with a polymicrobial infection with another bacterial strain) and 90% (9/10 patients) for patients in whom Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected (garenoxacin was ineffective in 1 of 2 patients with a polymicrobial infection with another bacterial strain). 2. The incidence of adverse drug reactions (including abnormal laboratory tests) was 4.8% (5/105 patients). Among the adverse drug reactions, gastrointestinal disorders, infection and infestation, nervous system disorder, and skin and subcutaneous tissue disorder were observed in 2.9% of patients (3/105), 1.0% (1/105), 1.0% (1/105), and 1.0% (1/105), respectively. In conclusion, garenoxacin showed an efficacy rate of greater than 90% for suspected atypical pneumonia and confirmed atypical pneumonia. Garenoxacin is considered to be useful in daily practice. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Significant variation in transformation frequency in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Benjamin A; Rozen, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    The naturally transformable bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is able to take up extracellular DNA and incorporate it into its genome. Maintaining natural transformation within a species requires that the benefits of transformation outweigh its costs. Although much is known about the distribution of natural transformation among bacterial species, little is known about the degree to which transformation frequencies vary within species. Here we find that there is significant variation in transformation frequency between strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from asymptomatic carriage, and that this variation is not concordant with isolate genetic relatedness. Polymorphism in the signalling system regulating competence is also not causally related to differences in transformation frequency, although this polymorphism does influence the degree of genetic admixture experienced by bacterial strains. These data suggest that bacteria can evolve new transformation frequencies over short evolutionary timescales. This facility may permit cells to balance the potential costs and benefits of transformation by regulating transformation frequency in response to environmental conditions. PMID:23303370

  15. Neutrophil evasion strategies by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Megan L; Surewaard, Bas G J

    2018-03-01

    Humans are well equipped to defend themselves against bacteria. The innate immune system employs diverse mechanisms to recognize, control and initiate a response that can destroy millions of different microbes. Microbes that evade the sophisticated innate immune system are able to escape detection and could become pathogens. The pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are particularly successful due to the development of a wide variety of virulence strategies for bacterial pathogenesis and they invest significant efforts towards mechanisms that allow for neutrophil evasion. Neutrophils are a primary cellular defense and can rapidly kill invading microbes, which is an indispensable function for maintaining host health. This review compares the key features of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in epidemiology, with a specific focus on virulence mechanisms utilized to evade neutrophils in bacterial pathogenesis. It is important to understand the complex interactions between pathogenic bacteria and neutrophils so that we can disrupt the ability of pathogens to cause disease.

  16. [Seroprevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Poland in 2008-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałużewski, Stanisław; Rastawicki, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common causative agent of tracheobronchitis and atypical pneumonia, mainly in children and adolescents. The infections are often seen as epidemics occurring in autumn-winter seasons at intervals of 4-7 years. Epidemiological studies showed that M. pneumoniae is responsible for 30% to 40% of all cases of bacterial respiratory infections in Poland. The aim of the study was estimate the seroprevalence of M. pneumoniae in Poland in 2008-2013 in comparing to results obtained in other European countries. The results of diagnostic serological tests (ELISA) in particular immunoglobulin classes for infection with M. pneumoniae performed in 16.825 persons were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were mostly children at the preschool and school age with clinical symptoms of respiratory tract infection. The data were obtained from Bacteriology Department of National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene in Warsaw and from 13 Sanitary and Epidemiological Stations through the country which send quarterly or monthly reports. The serological results showed that in autumn-winter seasons of 2011-2012 the "early antibodies" (IgA and/or IgM) for M. pneumoniae were twice more often diagnosed in sera of patients with respiratory tract infection than in analogous seasons of 2008-2010. The antibodies were detected in 34% and 42% of patients, respectively in third quarter of 2011 and 2012. Epidemic increase of M. pneumoniae infections in Poland in autumn-winter seasons of 2011-2012 was mainly observed due to diagnosis of the IgA and/or IgM antibodies in serological tests.

  17. Atherosclerosis Induced by Chlamydophila pneumoniae: A Controversial Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Honarmand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available More than a century ago, inflammation and infection were considered to have atherogenic effects. The old idea that coronary heart disease (CHD possibly has an infectious etiology has only reemerged in recent years. Atherosclerosis is the main pathological process involved in CHD and is, logically, the first place to look for infectious etiology. The process of atherosclerosis itself provides the first hints of potential infectious cause. Smooth muscle proliferation, with subsequent intimal thickening, luminal narrowing, and endothelial degeneration, constitutes the natural history of atherosclerosis, being with the severity and speed of these changes. Both viral and bacterial pathogens have been proposed to be associated with the inflammatory changes found in atherosclerosis. Recently, Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae has been implicated as a possible etiologic agent of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. New evidence which supports a role for C. pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has emerged. C. pneumoniae has been detected in atherosclerotic arteries by several techniques, and the organism has been isolated from both coronary and carotid atheromas. Recent animal models have suggested that C. pneumoniae is capable of inducing atherosclerosis in both rabbit and mouse models of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, human clinical treatment studies which examined the use of antichlamydial macrolide antibiotics in patients with coronary atherosclerosis have been carried out. The causal relationship has not yet been proven, but ongoing large intervention trials and research on pathogenetic mechanisms may lead to the use of antimicrobial agents in the treatment of CHD in the future.

  18. IVIG-mediated protection against necrotizing pneumonia caused by MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Badiou, Cedric; Le, Hoan N; Pinheiro, Marcos Gabriel; Duong, Au H; Wang, Xing; Dip, Etyene Castro; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio; Basuino, Li; Marbach, Helene; Mai, Thuy T; Sarda, Marie N; Kajikawa, Osamu; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Tkaczyk, Christine; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Sellman, Bret R; Chambers, Henry F; Lina, Gerard

    2016-09-21

    New therapeutic approaches are urgently needed to improve survival outcomes for patients with necrotizing pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus One such approach is adjunctive treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), but clinical practice guidelines offer conflicting recommendations. In a preclinical rabbit model, prophylaxis with IVIG conferred protection against necrotizing pneumonia caused by five different epidemic strains of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) as well as a widespread strain of hospital-associated MRSA. Treatment with IVIG, either alone or in combination with vancomycin or linezolid, improved survival outcomes in this rabbit model. Two specific IVIG antibodies that neutralized the toxic effects of α-hemolysin (Hla) and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) conferred protection against necrotizing pneumonia in the rabbit model. This mechanism of action of IVIG was uncovered by analyzing loss-of-function mutant bacterial strains containing deletions in 17 genes encoding staphylococcal exotoxins, which revealed only Hla and PVL as having an impact on necrotizing pneumonia. These results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of IVIG in the treatment of severe pneumonia induced by S. aureus. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Cross-protective mucosal immunity mediated by memory Th17 cells against Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Jiang, B; Guo, Y; Li, W; Tian, Y; Sonnenberg, G F; Weiser, J N; Ni, X; Shen, H

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) remains a leading cause of serious illness and death worldwide. Immunization with conjugated pneumococcal vaccine has lowered the colonization rate and consequently invasive diseases by inducing serotype-specific antibodies. However, many of the current pneumonia cases result from infection by serotype strains not included in the vaccine. In this study, we asked if cross-protection against lung infection by heterologous strains can be induced, and investigated the underlying immune mechanism. We found that immune mice recovered from a prior infection were protected against heterologous Sp strains in the pneumonia challenge model, as evident by accelerated bacterial clearance, reduced pathology, and apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Sp infection in the lung induced strong T-helper type 17 (Th17) responses at the lung mucosal site. Transfer of CD4 + T cells from immune mice provided heterologous protection against pneumonia, and this protection was abrogated by interleukin-17A (IL-17A) blockade. Transfer of memory CD4 + T cells from IL-17A-knockout mice failed to provide protection. These results indicate that memory Th17 cells had a key role in providing protection against pneumonia in a serotype-independent manner and suggest the feasibility of developing a broadly protective vaccine against bacterial pneumonia by targeting mucosal Th17 T cells.

  20. In vitro activity of bioactive extracts from rare actinomycetes against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, K; Raj, V S; Upadhyay, D J; Gupta, R K

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vitro potential of the bioactive extracts from five putatively novel species of actinomycetes isolated from the Indian hot desert against multi-drug resistant (MDR) Streptococcus pneumoniae. The antimicrobial activity of 10 different extracts was evaluated against S. pneumoniae strains with, erm(B) and mef(E) genes as well as fluoroquinolone-resistant (FQ(R) ) strains using the micro-broth dilution method. Of these 10 extracts, four exhibited good to excellent anti-S. pneumoniae activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 0·125 to 8 μg ml(-1) . The time-kill kinetics study showed that these extracts killed the pathogens in 2-8 h. In vitro cell-free transcription/translation of luciferase gene using S30 bacterial extract and TNT mammalian ribosome indicated that they inhibited bacterial ribosomes at much lower concentrations than those required to inhibit the mammalian ribosomes. This study demonstrates that these are potent concentration-dependent bactericidal metabolites with 16-fold higher in vitro activity than levofloxacin against MDR S. pneumoniae. Metabolites from actinomycetes can be excellent inhibitors of MDR S. pneumoniae. Considering the in vitro efficacy of these crude extracts against S. pneumoniae MDR spp., once purified these can be used against streptococcal pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. A comparative study of induction of pneumonia in mice with planktonic and biofilm cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonica; Mohan, Harsh; Sharma, Saroj; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, the course of acute pneumonia in normal BALB/c mice infected by intranasal inoculation of planktonic and preformed biofilm cells (3 days old) of Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 was studied and compared. With both cell forms the peak of infection was observed on the third post infection day, as assessed on the basis of lung bacterial load and corresponding pathology. There was an intense neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Tissue damage was assessed on the basis of increased amounts of nitrite, malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase in lung homogenates. The phagocytic potential of alveolar macrophages was lower in biofilm cell-induced infection than in that induced by planktonic cells. Biofilm cell induced infection generated significantly greater production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β on the third and fifth days of infection, respectively. Production of interleukin-10 was, however, variable. There was no significant difference in the ability of planktonic and biofilm cell forms of K. pneumoniae to induce acute pneumonia in mice in terms of bacterial counts and histopathological changes. However, biofilm cell-induced infection showed delayed clearance as compared to infection induced with the planktonic form. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demuth Donald R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacterial function of leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, T cells and B cells, providing a mechanistic explanation for increased infection risk. Further epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic research into this important area is warranted.

  3. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The commonest sequelae of bacterial meningitis are related to the inner ear. Little is known about the inner ear immune defense. Evidence suggests that the endolymphatic sac provides some protection against infection. A potential involvement of the endolymphatic sac in bacterial meningitis...... is largely unaccounted for, and thus the object of the present study. A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was employed. Thirty adult rats were inoculated intrathecally with Streptococcus pneumoniae and received no additional treatment. Six rats were sham...... days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges...

  4. Evaluation of silicon oil on bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Fabio; Romero, Ivana Lopes; Silva, Cely Barreto da; Manzano, Roberta Pereira de Almeida

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the antimicrobial properties of silicon oil (Óleo de Silicone®, Ophthalmos, Brazil) on in vitro bacterial growth of different microorganisms related to endophthalmitis. The following microorganisms were analyzed: (1) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27583); (2) Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922); (3) Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923); (4) Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228); (5) Candida albicans (ATCC 10231); (6) Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 13883); and (7) Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 49619). The plates were incubated at 35 ± 2ºC and its growth examined after 24 hours. An empty disk was placed in the center of each plate as a control. No inhibition halos were verified in any of the plates containing the four different concentrations of the bacterial inocula. The silicon oil 1000 cps does not have any effect on bacterial growth of any of the studied microorganisms.

  5. Evaluation of silicon oil on bacterial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Adams

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze the antimicrobial properties of silicon oil (Óleo de Silicone®, Ophthalmos, Brazil on in vitro bacterial growth of different microorganisms related to endophthalmitis. METHODS: The following microorganisms were analyzed: (1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27583; (2 Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922; (3 Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923; (4 Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228; (5 Candida albicans (ATCC 10231; (6 Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 13883; and (7 Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 49619. The plates were incubated at 35 ± 2ºC and its growth examined after 24 hours. An empty disk was placed in the center of each plate as a control. RESULTS: No inhibition halos were verified in any of the plates containing the four different concentrations of the bacterial inocula. CONCLUSIONS: The silicon oil 1000 cps does not have any effect on bacterial growth of any of the studied microrganisms.

  6. The role of the intestinal microbiota in pneumonia and sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Lankelma, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Humans carry with them trillions of bacteria, viruses and fungi that are collectively called the human microbiota. The intestinal microbiota fulfills essential functions in human physiology and has recently been suggested as a potential therapeutic target for several diseases. This thesis focuses on the role of the intestinal microbiota in pneumonia and sepsis. Our main hypothesis was that the gut microbiota plays a protective role in innate host defenses against systemic bacterial infections...

  7. Significant variation in transformation frequency in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Benjamin A; Rozen, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    The naturally transformable bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is able to take up extracellular DNA and incorporate it into its genome. Maintaining natural transformation within a species requires that the benefits of transformation outweigh its costs. Although much is known about the distribution of natural transformation among bacterial species, little is known about the degree to which transformation frequencies vary within species. Here we find that there is significant variation in trans...

  8. Streptococcus group B positive mothers and neonatal pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Zisovska, Elizabeta; Pehcevska, Nevena

    2013-01-01

    Background: Maternal vaginal swabs positive for Streptococcus group B (GBS) can cause severe infections in newborns. The aims of this study were: to identufy the rate of neonatal pneumonia in GBS positive mothers, GBS negative mothers, and mothers with unknown bacterial status. The positive predictive value of GBS positive status for neonatal plenumonia is only 23,5%, but the negative predictive value is 91%, which means that the GBS negative mothers have really low risk for having baby w...

  9. Bullous Skin Manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Bhoopalan, Senthil Velan; Chawla, Vonita; Hogan, Mary Beth; Wilson, Nevin W.; Das, Samrat U.

    2017-01-01

    Bullous skin lesions are uncommon in children. While it is well known that Mycoplasma infections are associated with papular skin manifestations, bullous skin lesions are not commonly reported. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a very common bacterial pathogen causing respiratory tract infection in children and adults. We report 2 children with serology-confirmed Mycoplasma infection who were hospitalized for blistering skin lesions. Both of our patients responded well to corticosteroids and one of th...

  10. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Habib; Jit, Mark; Heymann, David L.; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3–3.9 million) episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31–0.40 million) all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths) Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths), and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths). Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49–0.64 million) severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92–119 thousand) pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India’s pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our

  11. EXPERIMENTAL PNEUMONIA (FRIEDLANDER TYPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, W R; Walker, I C

    1915-12-01

    The foregoing experiments show that in cats a definite lobar pneumonia may be caused by Bacillus mucosus capsulatus. Judging both from the clinical course and from the pathological findings, this form of pulmonary infection differs from the usual pneumococcus types of pneumonia and closely resembles the so called Friedländer's bacillus or Bacillus pneumonioe in man. In all instances in which a lobar pneumonia was found after the injection of the bacillus, a similar organism was recovered from the lung, and in no case was this associated with other organisms. The course of the disease in cats is very short, the animals developing early symptoms of profound toxemia. In 87 per cent of the animals showing a lobar pneumonia positive blood cultures were obtained. The pathological findings, judging from the early stages of the disease, are subject to considerable variation. In some instances the process may suggest a pseudolobar or confluent lobular distribution. In these cases the lung has a mottled, marble-like appearance. In the majority of cases, however, the process gave a more homogeneous appearance, suggesting a diffuse and uniform distribution. Foci of hemorrhage were not uncommon in both. Such areas cause the mottled appearance sometimes found. In all instances the consolidated lung presents a greater infiltration of tissue than is usually seen in other types of experimental pneumonia. Although the exudate as seen on the cut surface may be abundant and especially viscid in character, this is not present in most cases. The cut surface of the consolidated lung does not present a granular appearance. The histological findings are also subject to considerable variation. In most instances the infundibular and alveolar spaces are completely filled with an exudate made up chiefly of polymorphonuclear cells. Associated with these are the capsulated bacilli, large vacuolated mononuclear phagocytic cells, and red blood cells, and occasionally small amounts of fibrin. The

  12. Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organizing Pneumonia (BOOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What can you tell me about cryptogenic organizing pneumonia? Answers from Teng Moua, M.D. Previously called bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a rare lung ...

  13. Systemic bacteraemia in children presenting with clinical pneumonia and the impact of non-typhoid salmonella (NTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Norbert G; Sarpong, Nimako; Hünger, Frank; Marks, Florian; Acquah, Samuel Ek; Agyekum, Alex; Nkrumah, Bernard; Loag, Wibke; Hagen, Ralf M; Evans, Jennifer A; Dekker, Denise; Fobil, Julius N; Meyer, Christian G; May, Jürgen; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw

    2010-11-04

    The diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment of pneumonia in African children in the absence of diagnostic means such as x-ray facilities or microbiological laboratories relies primarily on clinical symptoms presented by the patients. In order to assess the spectrum of bacterial pathogens, blood cultures were performed in children fulfilling the clinical criteria of pneumonia. In total, 1032 blood cultures were taken from children between 2 months and 5 years of age who were admitted to a rural hospital in Ghana between September 2007 and July 2009. Pneumonia was diagnosed clinically and according to WHO criteria classified as "non-severe pneumonia" and "severe pneumonia" ("severe pneumonia" includes the WHO categories "severe pneumonia" and "very severe pneumonia"). The proportion of bacteriaemia with non-typhoid salmonella (NTS) was similar in children with pneumonia (16/173, 9.2%) compared to children hospitalized for other reasons (112/859, 13%). NTS were the predominant organisms isolated from children with clinical pneumonia and significantly more frequent than Streptococcus pneumoniae (8/173, 4.6%). Nine percent (9/101) of children presenting with severe pneumonia and 10% (7/72) of children with non-severe pneumonia were infected with NTS. Nineteen out of 123 NTS isolates (15%) were susceptible to aminopenicillins (amoxycillin/ampicillin), 23/127 (18%) to chlorampenicol, and 23/98 (23%) to co-trimoxazole. All NTS isolates were sensitive to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. In Sub-saharan Africa, sepsis with NTS should be considered in children with symptoms of pneumonia and aminopenicillins might often not be the adequate drugs for treatment.

  14. Silica desiccant packets for storage and transport of Streptococcus pneumoniae and other clinically relevant species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L Pell

    Full Text Available Bacterial isolates are often transported between laboratories for research and diagnostic purposes. Silica desiccant packets (SDPs, which are inexpensive and do not require freezing, were evaluated for storage and recovery of bacterial isolates. Conditions such as inoculum size, swab type and temperature of storage were investigated using ten Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. The optimized protocol was then tested using 49 additional S. pneumoniae isolates representing 40 serogroups. Overall, S. pneumoniae growth was considered satisfactory (>100 colony forming units for 98/109 (89.9% and 20/20 (100% swabs after 14 days at room temperature or 28 days at 4° C, respectively. Storage in SDPs did not impact on the ability of S. pneumoniae isolates to be subsequently serotyped. When the survival of nine other clinically relevant bacterial species was tested, seven were viable after 28 days at room temperature, the exceptions being Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae. SDPs are suitable for transport and short-term storage of bacterial species including S. pneumoniae.

  15. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following types of bacteria, it is called atypical pneumonia. Legionella pneumophila. This type of pneumonia sometimes is ... ventilator machine to help them breathe get pneumonia. Atypical pneumonia . Atypical pneumonia is a type of CAP. It ...

  16. Pneumonia aguda fibrinosa e organizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Santos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O padrão histológico de Pneumonia Aguda Fibrinosa e Organizante (AFOP – Acute Fibrinous And Organizing Pneumonia, descrito por Beasley em 2002, caracteriza-se pela existência de fibrina intra-alveolar sob a forma de bolas de fibrina e pneumonia organizativa difusa. A apresentação clínica desta doença intersticial pulmonar pode ser aguda ou subaguda, diferindo no entanto dos outros padrões histológicos habitualmente associados a lesão pulmonar aguda – Lesão Alveolar Difusa (DAD, Pneumonia Organizativa (OP e Pneumonia Eosinofílica (EP.A propósito deste tema, os autores fazem uma revisão da literatura e descrevem o caso clínico de um doente de 44 anos, com aspectos imagiológicos e evolução pouco habituais. Abstract: The histologic pattern of Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia (AFOP, described by Beasley in 2002, is characterized by the existence of intra alveolar fibrin in the form of fibrin “balls” and diffuse organizing pneumonia. Presenting symptoms of this interstitial pulmonary disease can be acute or subacute. However, it differs from the well-recognized histologic patterns of acute pulmonary lesion – Diffuse Alveolar Damage (DAD, Organizing Pneumonia (OP and Eosinophilic Pneumonia (EP.The authors carry out a review of the literature concerning this topic and describe the clinical case of a 44-year-old patient with unusual imaging features and outcome. Palavras-chave: AFOP, bolas de fibrina, pneumonia organizativa, Key-word: AFOP, fibrin balls, organizing pneumonia

  17. Overview perspective of bacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Guilherme H; Nicolau, David P

    2010-10-01

    The rapidly escalating prevalence of antimicrobial resistance is a global concern. This reduced susceptibility to currently available antimicrobial agents coupled with the progressive shortage of newly approved compounds is a worrisome situation. Major problems are encountered for a growing number of Gram-positive (i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus spp.) and Gram-negative pathogens (i.e., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae). We provide an overview of bacterial resistance focusing on the most common pathogens responsible for infection in both the community and healthcare settings. In addition, several strategies to curb antimicrobial resistance are also discussed. It is increasingly evident that without the introduction of novel antimicrobial agents, a return to the clinical outcomes associated with the pre-antibiotic era are inevitable.

  18. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia

  19. An Update on the Management Of Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hsien Lee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is the leading cause of infection-related death and represents the fifth cause of mortality in the elderly. There are several reported risk factors for acquiring pneumonia at an older age, such as alcoholism, lung and heart diseases, nursing home residence, and swallowing disorders. Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP is reviewed, with an emphasis on multidrug-resistant (MDR bacterial pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter species, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The clinical characteristics of pneumonia in the elderly differ substantially compared with younger patients, and the severity of the disease is strongly associated with increased age and age-related comorbid disorders. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the pathogen most frequently responsible for pneumonia in the elderly with early HAP without risk factors for MDR; enteric Gram-negative rods should be considered in nursing home-associated pneumonia, as well as anaerobes in patients with aspiration pneumonia. Special attention should be given to preventive measures such as vaccination, oral care, and nutrition. The management of HAP should be instituted early with: appropriate use of antibiotics in adequate doses; avoidance of excessive use of antibiotics by de-escalation of initial antibiotic therapy, based on microbiologic cultures and the clinical response of the patient; and reduction of the duration of treatment to the minimum effective period.

  20. Viral and atypical bacterial infections in the outpatient pediatric cystic fibrosis clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Nielsen, Lars P; Schiotz, Peter Oluf

    2006-01-01

    for 12 months at regular clinic visits. Routine sputum/laryngeal aspirations were tested with PCR for 7 respiratory viruses. Antibodies against C. pneumoniae, M. pneumoniae and B. pertussis were measured every 3-4 months. FEV-1, FEF(25-75) and specific airway resistance, "viral" symptoms and bacterial...

  1. Decreased virulence of a pneumolysin-deficient strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae in murine meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Andreas; Zysk, Gregor; Gerber, Joachim; Kunst, Tammo; Von Mering, Matthias; Bunkowski, Stefanie; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland

    2002-11-01

    Pneumolysin, neuraminidases A and B, and hyaluronidase are virulence factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae that appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of meningitis. In a murine model of meningitis after intracerebral infection using mutants of S. pneumoniae D39, only mice infected with a pneumolysin-deficient strain were healthier at 32 and 36 h, had lower bacterial titers in blood at 36 h, and survived longer than the D39 parent strain. Cerebellar and spleen bacterial titers, meningeal inflammation, and neuronal damage scores remained uninfluenced by the lack of any of the virulence factors.

  2. The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuijt, Tim J; Lankelma, Jacqueline M; Scicluna, Brendon P; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Roelofs, Joris J T H; de Boer, J Daan; Hoogendijk, Arjan J; de Beer, Regina; de Vos, Alex; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia, however, is unknown. Here, we investigate the function of the gut microbiota in the host defence against Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. Design We depleted the gut microbiota in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently infected them intranasally with S. pneumoniae. We then performed survival and faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) experiments and measured parameters of inflammation and alveolar macrophage whole-genome responses. Results We found that the gut microbiota protects the host during pneumococcal pneumonia, as reflected by increased bacterial dissemination, inflammation, organ damage and mortality in microbiota-depleted mice compared with controls. FMT in gut microbiota-depleted mice led to a normalisation of pulmonary bacterial counts and tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 levels 6 h after pneumococcal infection. Whole-genome mapping of alveolar macrophages showed upregulation of metabolic pathways in the absence of a healthy gut microbiota. This upregulation correlated with an altered cellular responsiveness, reflected by a reduced responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid. Compared with controls, alveolar macrophages derived from gut microbiota-depleted mice showed a diminished capacity to phagocytose S. pneumoniae. Conclusions This study identifies the intestinal microbiota as a protective mediator during pneumococcal pneumonia. The gut microbiota enhances primary alveolar macrophage function. Novel therapeutic strategies could exploit the gut–lung axis in bacterial infections. PMID:26511795

  3. Pathogenic Link Between Postextubation Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezoagli, Emanuele; Zanella, Alberto; Cressoni, Massimo; De Marchi, Lorenzo; Kolobow, Theodor; Berra, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    The presence of an endotracheal tube is the main cause for developing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), but pneumonia can still develop in hospitalized patients after endotracheal tube removal (postextubation pneumonia [PEP]). We hypothesized that short-term intubation (24 hours) can play a role in the pathogenesis of PEP. To test such hypothesis, we initially evaluated the occurrence of lung colonization and VAP in sheep that were intubated and mechanically ventilated for 24 hours. Subsequently, we assessed the incidence of lung colonization and PEP at 48 hours after extubation in sheep previously ventilated for 24 hours. To simulate intubated intensive care unit patients placed in semirecumbent position, 14 sheep were intubated and mechanically ventilated with the head elevated 30° above horizontal. Seven of them were euthanized after 24 hours (Control Group), whereas the remaining were euthanized after being awaken, extubated, and left spontaneously breathing for 48 hours after extubation (Awake Group). Criteria of clinical diagnosis of pneumonia were tested. Microbiological evaluation was performed on autopsy in all sheep. Only 1 sheep in the Control Group met the criteria of VAP after 24 hours of mechanical ventilation. However, heavy pathogenic bacteria colonization of trachea, bronchi, and lungs (range, 10-10 colony-forming unit [CFU]/g) was reported in 4 of 7 sheep (57%). In the Awake Group, 1 sheep was diagnosed with VAP and 3 developed PEP within 48 hours after extubation (42%), with 1 euthanized at 30 hours because of respiratory failure. On autopsy, 5 sheep (71%) confirmed pathogenic bacterial growth in the lower respiratory tract (range, 10-10 CFU/g). Twenty-four hours of intubation and mechanical ventilation in semirecumbent position leads to significant pathogenic colonization of the lower airways, which can promote the development of PEP. Strategies directed to prevent pathogenic microbiological colonization before and after mechanical

  4. Management of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals

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    Johns I

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Imogen Johns Department of Clinical Sciences and Services, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, UK Abstract: Rhodococcus equi, a gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, is the most important cause of pneumonia in foals aged 3 weeks to 5 months. The disease occurs worldwide, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality on endemically affected farms. Foals appear to become infected early in life, but clinical signs are typically delayed until 1–3 months of age because of the insidious nature of the disease. Although pneumonia is the most common clinical manifestation, up to 74% of foals may concurrently have extrapulmonary disorders, including both extrapulmonary infections (abdominal abscessation, colitis, osteomyelitis and immune-mediated disorders (nonseptic synovitis, uveitis. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical signs and abnormalities on hematologic screening and thoracic imaging in an appropriately aged foal and is confirmed by bacteriologic culture of the organism. Management of R. equi infections, in particular on farms with endemic disease, combines appropriate treatment of affected foals with preventative measures targeted at preventing infection and identifying foals before the development of severe disease. The combination of rifampin and a macrolide antimicrobial is recommended for treatment, as the combination is synergistic, reaches high intracellular concentrations, and should minimize the development of antimicrobial resistance. The prognosis for survival for foals with R. equi pneumonia is good, especially in foals mildly or subclinically affected, as is the prognosis for future athletic performance. Screening for early identification before the development of clinical signs has been advocated on endemically affected farms, although the most appropriate method, the timing of screening, and the selection of foals requiring treatment have yet to be determined. Recent evidence suggests that

  5. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kei; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Noguchi, Shingo; Nagata, Shuya; Nishida, Chinatsu; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%), Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%)], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6%) and oral bacteria (15.6%) than previous reports. Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  6. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Yamasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. METHODS: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. RESULTS: In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%, Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6% and oral bacteria (15.6% than previous reports. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  7. Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae in whole blood by PCR.

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    Zhang, Y; Isaacman, D J; Wadowsky, R M; Rydquist-White, J; Post, J C; Ehrlich, G D

    1995-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of bacteremia in both children and adults. Currently, the diagnosis of pneumococcal bacteremia relies on the isolation and identification of the bacteria from blood cultures. We have developed a sensitive assay for the detection of S. pneumoniae in whole blood by the PCR. A specific primer-probe set (JM201 and JM202 primers with JM204 probe) designed from the penicillin-binding protein 2B gene was demonstrated to reproducibly detect between 10 and 100 fg of input purified S. pneumoniae DNA. This assay system was shown to be inclusive for all strains of S. pneumoniae evaluated, including 15 different serotypes and a battery of penicillin-resistant and -sensitive strains. The specificity of this PCR-based assay was demonstrated by its inability to support amplification from a series of human, bacterial, and yeast genomic DNAs. A general specimen preparation method which should be suitable for the purification of DNA from any pathogens in whole blood was developed. With this protocol it was possible to detect S. pneumoniae-specific DNA from whole blood specimens inoculated with as little as 4 CFU/ml. Copurified human blood DNA, ranging from 0 to 4.5 micrograms per PCR, did not affect the sensitivity of S. pneumoniae detection by PCR. A blinded clinical trial was used to compare the PCR-based assay with standard microbiological blood culture for the detection of S. pneumoniae bacteremia in 36 specimens obtained from pediatric patients seen in the emergency room of Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. With culture as the "gold standard," the PCR-based assay had a sensitivity of 80% (4 of 5 culture-positive specimens were PCR positive) and a specificity of 84% (26 of 31 culture-negative specimens were PCR negative). However, three patients whose specimens were PCR positive and culture negative had histories suggestive of bacteremia, including recent positive blood cultures, treatment with antibiotics, cellulitis, and multiple

  8. Ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Michael Jan

    2005-05-01

    This review summarises some of the notable papers on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) from January 2003 to October 2004. Ventilator-associated pneumonia remains an important drain on hospital resources. All population groups are affected, but patients with VAP are more likely to be older, sicker, and male, with invasive medical devices in situ. Early VAP diagnosis is desirable to reduce VAP mortality and to retard emergence of multidrug-resistant microbes. This may be possible using preliminary culture results or intracellular organism in polymorphonuclear cells. In most intensive care units, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii are the commonest organisms isolated in VAP. However, causative organisms vary between and within hospitals. Consequently, individual intensive care units should develop empirical antibiotic policies to target the pathogenic bacteria prevalent in their patient populations. Preventative strategies aimed at reducing aerodigestive tract colonisation by pathogenic organisms, and also their subsequent aspiration, are becoming increasingly important. Educating medical staff about these simple measures is therefore pertinent. To reduce the occurrence of multidrug-resistant organisms, limiting the duration of antibiotic treatment to 8 days and antimicrobial rotation should be contemplated. Empirical therapy with antipseudomonal penicillins plus beta-lactamase inhibitors should be considered. If methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus VAP is a possibility, linezolid may be better than vancomycin. Prevention remains the key to reducing VAP prevalence.

  9. Bacterial Proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrab, Jordan B; Darwin, K Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology.

  10. Responses to Bacteria, Virus, and Malaria Distinguish the Etiology of Pediatric Clinical Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valim, Clarissa; Ahmad, Rushdy; Lanaspa, Miguel; Tan, Yan; Acácio, Sozinho; Gillette, Michael A; Almendinger, Katherine D; Milner, Danny A; Madrid, Lola; Pellé, Karell; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Silterra, Jacob; Alonso, Pedro L; Carr, Steven A; Mesirov, Jill P; Wirth, Dyann F; Wiegand, Roger C; Bassat, Quique

    2016-02-15

    Plasma-detectable biomarkers that rapidly and accurately diagnose bacterial infections in children with suspected pneumonia could reduce the morbidity of respiratory disease and decrease the unnecessary use of antibiotic therapy. Using 56 markers measured in a multiplexed immunoassay, we sought to identify proteins and protein combinations that could discriminate bacterial from viral or malarial diagnoses. We selected 80 patients with clinically diagnosed pneumonia (as defined by the World Health Organization) who also met criteria for bacterial, viral, or malarial infection based on clinical, radiographic, and laboratory results. Ten healthy community control subjects were enrolled to assess marker reliability. Patients were subdivided into two sets: one for identifying potential markers and another for validating them. Three proteins (haptoglobin, tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 or IL-10, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1) were identified that, when combined through a classification tree signature, accurately classified patients into bacterial, malarial, and viral etiologies and misclassified only one patient with bacterial pneumonia from the validation set. The overall sensitivity and specificity of this signature for the bacterial diagnosis were 96 and 86%, respectively. Alternative combinations of markers with comparable accuracy were selected by support vector machine and regression models and included haptoglobin, IL-10, and creatine kinase-MB. Combinations of plasma proteins accurately identified children with a respiratory syndrome who were likely to have bacterial infections and who would benefit from antibiotic therapy. When used in conjunction with malaria diagnostic tests, they may improve diagnostic specificity and simplify treatment decisions for clinicians.

  11. Pneumoniae in immunocompromised patients; Pneumonien bei Immunsuppression

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    Jacobi, Volkmar; Lehnert, Thomas; Thalhammer, Axel [Klinikum der Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2009-12-15

    Due to the large surface area, heat, high humidity and high oxygen supply in the lung makes an ideal environment for the propagation of germs. The purpose of the immune system is to establish and maintain the balance between saprophytes and immune defense so as to depress and ultimately kill germs as they infiltrate the body. This usually is achieved by the use of a highly complex immune system. It is a perfect combination of non-specific, cellular and humoral immune mechanisms with very specific immune cells and antibodies, which are specialized on particular pathogens. The specific defenses potentiate the effect of the nonspecific defense in a large extent so as to prevent re-infection and ultimately eliminate recognized pathogens. The causes of immune deficiency can be related to either the cellular or humoral level and affect both the specific and nonspecific defenses. There is a different excitation spectrum depending on the type of immune deficiency. Immune deficiency can prevalently cause complications in the course of infections, decelerate the healing and allow the occurrence of rare pathogens. In particular, the radiological characteristics of typical and atypical pneumonia in immunocompromised patients will be discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the appearance of bacterial infections, mycobacterioses, PCP, CMV, and laid fungual pneumonia. Even it is not possible to identify certain pathogens radiologically, it is often possible to narrow the spectrum of germs causing pulmonary infections significantly by comparing with other pulmonary complications such as lymphoma or kaposisarcomas. (orig.)

  12. Effect of radiation processing in elimination of Klebsiella pneumoniae from food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, Raj Kamal; Nagar, Vandan; Shashidhar, Ravindranath

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae has been considered as an important foodborne pathogen which causes severe infections that include meningitis, bronchitis, bacteremia, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections in humans and animals. It is well known to most clinicians as a cause of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Klebsiella is an opportunistic pathogen, that primarily attacks neonates, infants, elderly and immuno-compromised patients and therefore impose a serious, emerging public health hazard globally. Contaminated sprouts, vegetables, seafood and other animal meat products are considered as main sources of Klebsiella infection. In the current study, radiation sensitivity of K. pneumoniae MTCC 109 was determined in different food samples. The decimal reduction dose (D 10 ) values of K. pneumoniae MTCC 109 in saline and nutrient broth at 0–4 °C were 0.116±0.009, 0.136±0.005 kGy, respectively. The mixed sprouts, fish and poultry samples were inoculated with K. pneumoniae MTCC 109 and exposed to gamma radiation to evaluate the effectiveness of radiation treatment in the elimination of K. pneumoniae. D 10 values of K. pneumoniae in mixed sprouts, poultry and fish samples were found to be 0.142±0.009, 0.125±0.0004 and 0.277±0.012 kGy, respectively. Radiation treatment with a 1.5 kGy dose resulted in the complete elimination of 3.1±1.8×10 5 CFU/g of K. pneumoniae from these food samples. No recovery of K. pneumoniae was observed in the 1.5 kGy treated samples stored at 4 °C up to 12 days, even after enrichment and selective plating. This study shows that a 1.5 kGy dose of irradiation treatment could lead to the complete elimination of 3.1±1.8×10 5 CFU/g of K. pneumoniae from mixed sprouts, poultry and fish samples. - Highlights: • K. pneumoniae MTCC 109 is sensitive to gamma radiation. • D 10 values is in the range of 0.116–0.277 kGy. • Dose of 1.5 kGy reduced K. pneumonia from 3.1±1.8×10 5 CFU/g to undetectable. • No recovery of K. pneumoniae

  13. Genome-Wide Identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae Fitness Genes during Lung Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Michael A; Breen, Paul; Deornellas, Valerie; Mu, Qiao; Zhao, Lili; Wu, Weisheng; Cavalcoli, James D; Mobley, Harry L T

    2015-06-09

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an urgent public health threat because of resistance to carbapenems, antibiotics of last resort against Gram-negative bacterial infections. Despite the fact that K. pneumoniae is a leading cause of pneumonia in hospitalized patients, the bacterial factors required to cause disease are poorly understood. Insertion site sequencing combines transposon mutagenesis with high-throughput sequencing to simultaneously screen thousands of insertion mutants for fitness defects during infection. Using the recently sequenced K. pneumoniae strain KPPR1 in a well-established mouse model of pneumonia, insertion site sequencing was performed on a pool of >25,000 transposon mutants. The relative fitness requirement of each gene was ranked based on the ratio of lung to inoculum read counts and concordance between insertions in the same gene. This analysis revealed over 300 mutants with at least a 2-fold fitness defect and 69 with defects ranging from 10- to >2,000-fold. Construction of 6 isogenic mutants for use in competitive infections with the wild type confirmed their requirement for lung fitness. Critical fitness genes included those for the synthesis of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids that are essential in mice and humans, the transcriptional elongation factor RfaH, and the copper efflux pump CopA. The majority of fitness genes were conserved among reference strains representative of diverse pathotypes. These results indicate that regulation of outer membrane components and synthesis of amino acids that are essential to its host are critical for K. pneumoniae fitness in the lung. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a bacterium that commonly causes pneumonia in patients after they are admitted to the hospital. K. pneumoniae is becoming resistant to all available antibiotics, and when these infections spread to the bloodstream, over half of patients die. Since currently available antibiotics are failing, we must discover new ways to treat these infections

  14. Purpura Fulminans Secondary to Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis

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    Erick F. Alvarez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpura fulminans (PF is a rare skin disorder with extensive areas of blueblack hemorrhagic necrosis. Patients manifest typical laboratory signs of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Our case describes a 37-year-old previously healthy man who presented with 3 days of generalized malaise, headache, vomiting, photophobia, and an ecchymotic skin rash. Initial laboratory workup revealed DIC without obvious infectious trigger including unremarkable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical analysis. There was further progression of the skin ecchymosis and multiorgan damage consistent with PF. Final CSF cultures revealed Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite normal initial CSF biochemical analysis, bacterial meningitis should always be considered in patients with otherwise unexplained DIC as this may be an early manifestation of infection. PF is a clinical diagnosis that requires early recognition and prompt empirical treatment, especially, in patients with progressive altered mental status, ecchymotic skin rash, and DIC.

  15. Acanthamoeba castellanii interactions with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Yee Ong, Timothy Yu; Jung, Suk Yul; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Among the genus Streptococcus, S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae are the major causes of pharyngitis, impetigo, pneumonia and meningitis in humans. Streptococcus spp. are facultative anaerobes that are nutritionally fastidious, yet survive in the environment and target the predisposed population. Antibacterial disinfectants have been partially effective only, indicating the need for novel preventative measures and to understand mechanisms of bacterial resistance. Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist that is known to harbour microbial pathogens, provide shelter, and assist in their transmission to susceptible population. The overall aim of this study was to determine whether S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae can interact with A. castellanii by associating, invading, and surviving inside trophozoites and cysts. It was observed that both S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae were able to associate as well as invade and/or taken up by the phagocytic A. castellanii trophozoite. Notably, S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae survived the encystation process, avoided phagocytosis, multiplied, and exhibited higher recovery from the mature cysts, compared with the trophozoite stage (approximately 2 bacteria per amoebae ratio for cyst stage versus 0.02 bacteria per amoeba ration for trophozoite stage). As Acanthamoeba cysts are resilient and can disperse through the air, A. castellanii can act as a vector in providing shelter, facilitating growth and possibly genetic exchanges. In addition, these interactions may contribute to S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae survival in harsh environments, and transmission to susceptible population and possibly affecting their virulence. Future studies will determine the molecular mechanisms associated with Acanthamoeba interactions with Streptococcus and the evolution of pathogenic bacteria and in turn expedite the discovery of novel therapeutic and/or preventative measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae: Going on the Offense with a Strong Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczosa, Michelle K.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Klebsiella pneumoniae causes a wide range of infections, including pneumonias, urinary tract infections, bacteremias, and liver abscesses. Historically, K. pneumoniae has caused serious infection primarily in immunocompromised individuals, but the recent emergence and spread of hypervirulent strains have broadened the number of people susceptible to infections to include those who are healthy and immunosufficient. Furthermore, K. pneumoniae strains have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics, rendering infection by these strains very challenging to treat. The emergence of hypervirulent and antibiotic-resistant strains has driven a number of recent studies. Work has described the worldwide spread of one drug-resistant strain and a host defense axis, interleukin-17 (IL-17), that is important for controlling infection. Four factors, capsule, lipopolysaccharide, fimbriae, and siderophores, have been well studied and are important for virulence in at least one infection model. Several other factors have been less well characterized but are also important in at least one infection model. However, there is a significant amount of heterogeneity in K. pneumoniae strains, and not every factor plays the same critical role in all virulent Klebsiella strains. Recent studies have identified additional K. pneumoniae virulence factors and led to more insights about factors important for the growth of this pathogen at a variety of tissue sites. Many of these genes encode proteins that function in metabolism and the regulation of transcription. However, much work is left to be done in characterizing these newly discovered factors, understanding how infections differ between healthy and immunocompromised patients, and identifying attractive bacterial or host targets for treating these infections. PMID:27307579

  17. Severe virus influenza A H1N1 related pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia: differences in the evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardocci, Paula; Gullo, Caio Eduardo; Lobo, Suzana Margareth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical, laboratory and evolution data of patients with severe influenza A H1N1 pneumonia and compare the data with that of patients with severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Methods Cohort and retrospective study. All patients admitted to the intensive care unit between May 2009 and December 2010 with a diagnosis of severe pneumonia caused by the influenza A H1N1 virus were included in the study. Thirty patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia admitted within the same period were used as a control group. Severe community-acquired pneumonia was defined as the presence of at least one major severity criteria (ventilator or vasopressor use) or two minor criteria. Results The data of 45 patients were evaluated. Of these patients, 15 were infected with H1N1. When compared to the group with community-acquired pneumonia, patients from the H1N1 group had significantly lower leukocyte counts on admission (6,728±4,070 versus 16,038±7,863; p<0.05) and lower C-reactive protein levels (Day 2: 15.1±8.1 versus 22.1±10.9 mg/dL; p<0.05). The PaO2/FiO2 ratio values were lower in the first week in patients with H1N1. Patients who did not survive the H1N1 severe pneumonia had significantly higher levels of C-reactive protein and higher serum creatinine levels compared with patients who survived. The mortality rate was significantly higher in the H1N1 group than in the control group (53% versus 20%; p=0.056, respectivelly). Conclusion Differences in the leukocyte count, C-reactive protein concentrations and oxygenation profiles may contribute to the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with severe influenza A H1N1 virus-related pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:23917977

  18. Pherotypes are driving genetic differentiation within Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez Mario

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The boundaries of bacterial species and the mechanisms underlying bacterial speciation are matters of intense debate. Theoretical studies have shown that recombination acts as a strong cohesive force preventing divergence in bacterial populations. Streptococcus pneumoniae populations have the telltale signs of high recombination with competence implicated as the major driving force behind gene exchange. Competence in S. pneumoniae is triggered by a quorum-sensing mechanism controlled by the competence-stimulating peptide pheromone. Results We studied the distribution of the two major pherotypes in the pneumococcal population and their association with serotype, antimicrobial resistance and genetic lineage. Using multilocus sequence data we evaluated pherotype influence on the dynamics of horizontal gene transfer. We show that pherotype is a clonal property of pneumococci. Standard population genetic analysis and multilocus infinite allele model simulations support the hypothesis that two genetically differentiated populations are defined by the major pherotypes. Conclusion Severe limitations to gene flow can therefore occur in bacterial species in the absence of geographical barriers and within highly recombinogenic populations. This departure from panmixia can have important consequences for our understanding of the response of pneumococci to human imposed selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic use.

  19. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  20. Pathogenesis of Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Cyclophosphamide-Induced Leukopenia in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Erjian; Simard, Marie; Ouellet, Nathalie; Bergeron, Yves; Beauchamp, Denis; Bergeron, Michel G.

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia frequently occurs in leukopenic hosts, and most patients subsequently develop lung injury and septicemia. However, few correlations have been made so far between microbial growth, inflammation, and histopathology of pneumonia in specific leukopenic states. In the present study, the pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia was investigated in mice rendered leukopenic by the immunosuppressor antineoplastic drug cyclophosphamide. Compared to the immunocompetent state, cyclophosphamide-induced leukopenia did not hamper interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1), MIP-2, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 secretion in infected lungs. Leukopenia did not facilitate bacterial dissemination into the bloodstream despite enhanced bacterial proliferation into lung tissues. Pulmonary capillary permeability and edema as well as lung injury were enhanced in leukopenic mice despite the absence of neutrophilic and monocytic infiltration into their lungs, suggesting an important role for bacterial virulence factors and making obvious the fact that neutrophils are ultimately not required for lung injury in this model. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed extensive disruption of alveolar epithelium and a defect in surfactant production, which were associated with alveolar collapse, hemorrhage, and fibrin deposits in alveoli. These results contrast with those observed in immunocompetent animals and indicate that leukopenic hosts suffering from pneumococcal pneumonia are at a higher risk of developing diffuse alveolar damage. PMID:12117931

  1. Will Maintenance of Oral Hygiene in Nursing Home Residents Prevent Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylotte, Joseph M

    2018-03-01

    This article is an evaluation of the literature on oral hygiene as a risk factor for nursing home-associated pneumonia (NHAP) and with interventions to improve oral hygiene and reduce the incidence of NHAP. The background for this article is that studies that have evaluated interventions to improve oral hygiene and prevent NHAP have conflicting results. To try to understand the reason for these results, the objective was to examine risk factor and intervention studies and determine their methodological validity. Review of studies evaluating oral hygiene status as a risk factor for NHAP found multiple methodological problems, resulting in limited evidence to support this association. Studies of intervention methods, whether finding benefit or not in preventing NHAP, all had methodological limitations. Therefore, it is unclear whether oral hygiene is a risk factor for NHAP and whether improving oral hygiene decreases the incidence of this infection. A recommendation is made that future studies should carefully define the etiology of suspected NHAP using molecular techniques when evaluating methods to prevent this infection because viral pneumonia and aspiration pneumonitis may mimic bacterial pneumonia even though, at times, there may be coinfection with bacteria. In this latter situation, improving oral hygiene may not prevent pneumonia. Therefore, viral infection and pneumonitis with or without bacterial coinfection need to be excluded so that the focus is on prevention of bacterial pneumonia. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. Klebsiella pneumoniae alleviates influenza-induced acute lung injury via limiting NK cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Li, Fengqi; Sun, Rui; Gao, Xiang; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2014-08-01

    A protective effect induced by bacterial preinfection upon a subsequent lethal influenza virus infection has been observed, but the underlying immune mechanisms have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we used a mouse model of Klebsiella pneumoniae preinfection to gain insight into how bacterial preinfection influences the subsequent lethal influenza virus infection. We found that K. pneumoniae preinfection significantly attenuated lung immune injury and decreased mortality during influenza virus infection, but K. pneumoniae-specific immunity was not involved in this cross-protection against influenza virus. K. pneumoniae preinfection limited NK cell expansion, which was involved in influenza-induced immune injury and death. Furthermore, K. pneumoniae preinfection could not control NK cell expansion and death during influenza virus infection in Rag1(-/-) mice, but adoptive transfer of T cells from wild-type mice was able to restore this protective effect. Our data suggest that the adaptive immune response activated by bacterial infection limits the excessive innate immune response induced by a subsequent influenza infection, ultimately protecting mice from death. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Modulation of respiratory dendritic cells during Klebsiella pneumonia infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a leading cause of severe hospital-acquired respiratory tract infections and death but little is known regarding the modulation of respiratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Plasmacytoid DC (pDC) are specialized type 1 interferon producing cells and considered to be classical mediators of antiviral immunity. Method By using multiparameter flow cytometry analysis we have analysed the modulation of respiratory DC subsets after intratracheal Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Results Data indicate that pDCs and MoDC were markedly elevated in the post acute pneumonia phase when compared to mock-infected controls. Analysis of draining mediastinal lymph nodes revealed a rapid increase of activated CD103+ DC, CD11b+ DC and MoDC within 48 h post infection. Lung pDC identification during bacterial pneumonia was confirmed by extended phenotyping for 120G8, mPDCA-1 and Siglec-H expression and by demonstration of high Interferon-alpha producing capacity after cell sorting. Cytokine expression analysis of ex vivo-sorted respiratory DC subpopulations from infected animals revealed elevated Interferon-alpha in pDC, elevated IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-13 in CD103+ DC and IL-19 and IL-12p35 in CD11b+ DC subsets in comparison to CD11c+ MHC-class IIlow cells indicating distinct functional roles. Antigen-specific naive CD4+ T cell stimulatory capacity of purified respiratory DC subsets was analysed in a model system with purified ovalbumin T cell receptor transgenic naive CD4+ responder T cells and respiratory DC subsets, pulsed with ovalbumin and matured with Klebsiella pneumoniae lysate. CD103+ DC and CD11b+ DC subsets represented the most potent naive CD4+ T helper cell activators. Conclusion These results provide novel insight into the activation of respiratory DC subsets during Klebsiella pneumonia infection. The detection of increased respiratory pDC numbers in bacterial pneumonia may indicate possible novel pDC functions with respect to lung repair

  4. T cell responses in senior patients with community-acquired pneumonia related to disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Lu-Qin; Bi, Ying; Zhou, Shao-Wei; Chen, Zi-Dan; Wen, Jun; Shi, Jin; Mao, Ling; Wang, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Senior individuals older than 65 years of age are at a disproportionally higher risk of developing pneumonia. Impaired capacity to defend against airway infections may be one of the reasons. It is generally believed that weaker regulatory T cell responses may be beneficial to host defense against pathogens. In senior patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, we investigated the frequencies and functions of regulatory T cells. Interestingly, we found that compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls, senior pneumonia patients presented lower frequencies of Foxp3-expressing and Helios-expressing CD4 + T cells. The quantity of Foxp3 and Helios being expressed, measured by their mRNA transcription levels, was also lower in CD4 + T cells from pneumonia patients. Furthermore, following TCR and TGF-β stimulation, pneumonia patients presented impaired capacity to upregulate Foxp3 and Helios. Functional analyses revealed that CD4 + T cells from pneumonia patients secreted lower amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β, two cytokines critical to regulatory T cell-mediated suppression. Also, the expression of granzyme B and perforin, which were cytolytic molecules potentially utilized by regulatory T cells to mediate the elimination of antigen-presenting cells and effector T cells, were reduced in CD4 + CD25 + T cells from senior pneumonia patients. In addition, the CD4 + CD25 + T cells from senior pneumonia patients presented reduced capacity to suppress effector CD4 + and CD8 + T cell proliferation. Moreover, the value of pneumonia severity index was inversely correlated with several parameters of regulatory T cell function. Together, our results demonstrated that senior pneumonia patients presented a counterintuitive impairment in regulatory T cell responses that was associated with worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Community-acquired pneumonia; Ambulant erworbene Pneumonien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2017-01-15

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [German] Anhand der klinischen Symptome und laborchemischen Befundkonstellation alleine ist es oft nicht moeglich, die Diagnose einer ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie (''community-acquired pneumonia'', CAP) zu stellen. Bei jedem Patienten mit Verdacht auf CAP sollte eine Roentgenthoraxaufnahme in 2 Ebenen angefertigt werden. Weiter muss eine Risikostratifizierung im Sinne der Entscheidung ambulante Therapie vs. Hospitalisierung erfolgen. Anhand der Analyse radiologischer Muster sowie deren Verteilung und Ausdehnung koennen eine grobe Zuordnung zu sogenannten Erregergruppen sowie eine Differenzierung zwischen viralen und bakteriellen Infektionen gelingen. Da

  6. Pneumonia in bighorn sheep: Risk and resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassirer, E. Frances; Manlove, Kezia R.; Almberg, Emily S.; Kamath, Pauline; Cox, Mike; Wolff, Peregrine L.; Roug, Annette; Shannon, Justin M.; Robinson, Rusty; Harris, Richard B.; Gonzales, Ben J.; Plowright, Raina K.; Hudson, Peter J.; Cross, Paul C.; Dobson, Andrew; Besser, Thomas E.

    2018-01-01

    Infectious disease was an important driver of historic declines and extirpations of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) in North America and continues to impede population restoration and management. Domestic sheep have long been linked to pneumonia outbreaks in bighorn sheep and this association has now been confirmed in 13 captive commingling experiments. However, ecological and etiological complexities still hinder our understanding and control of the disease. We provide an overview of the current state of knowledge about the biology and management of respiratory disease in bighorn sheep and propose strategies for moving forward. Epizootic pneumonia in bighorn sheep is polymicrobial. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, a bacterium host-specific to Caprinae and commonly carried by healthy domestic sheep and goats appears to be a necessary primary agent. All-age epizootics following introduction of M. ovipneumoniae along with other pathogens into bighorn sheep populations are usually severe (median mortality 47%) but fatality rates vary widely, from 15 – 100%. Disease severity may be influenced by the strain of M. ovipneumoniae, by secondary bacterial and viral pathogens, and by factors affecting transmission and host immunity. Once introduced, M. ovipneumoniae can persist in bighorn sheep populations for decades. Carrier dams transmit the pathogen to their susceptible lambs, triggering fatal pneumonia outbreaks in nursery groups, which limits recruitment and slows or prevents population recovery. The result is that demographic costs of pathogen persistence often outweigh the impacts of the initial invasion and die-off. There is currently no effective vaccine or antibiotic for domestic or wild sheep and to date, no management actions have been successful in reducing morbidity, mortality, or disease spread once pathogen invasion has occurred. Molecular-based strain typing suggests that spillover of M. ovipneumoniae into bighorn sheep populations from domestic small ruminants

  7. [Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel Botella, F; Balaguer Martínez, J V; Labios Gómez, M; Vera Sempere, G; Manzanera Escarti, R; García Fuster, M J

    1991-12-01

    We present twelve cases of Pneumocystis Carinii Pneumonia (PCP) hospitalized at the Internal Medicine Service of the Hospital Clínico de Valencia between 1989 and 1990. All patients were infected by HIV-1, with ages between 25 and 32 years, with circulating CD4 lymphocytes lower than 25% or 200 cells per cubic millimeter and with positive p24 antigen. Ten of them were parenterally drug addicts and two of them, homosexuals. Diagnosis was made by fibrobronchoscopy (FB) with bronchoaspiration (BAS) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), or sputum induced by physiological serum aerosol at three per cent, using in both cases blue tinction with toluidine 0 of the samples obtained. Given the foreseeable increase of this disease in our country, we stress the risk of a potential change in its clinical spectrum, affecting new population groups, mainly the elderly, as well as the development of new early diagnosis techniques and the emergence of new treatments, including corticotherapy.

  8. BRONCHOSCOPY IN THE DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY OF NOSOCOMIAL PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikša Šegota

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of bronchoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of hospital pneumonias by microbiological cultures obtained from bronchial aspirates.Methods. We included all patients treated for hospital pneumonias during 1999 in General Hospital Celje (Division of cardiology and pulmonary medical care, internal and surgical intensive care unit in whom bronchoscopy was performed. Only the patients with obtained microbiological cultures (isolation and bacterial sensitivity to antibiotics were studied.Results. We performed 112 bronchoscopies. Sixty-nine (62% patients were males and 43 (38% of female. Microbiological cultures were positive in 95 (85% and negative in 17 (15% specimens. Mortality rate was 32% and average length of stay was 14 days. The most frequently isolated bacteria was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (20 patients – 26%, followed by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus – MSSA in 14 patients. E. coli was present in 14 cultures and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 12 patients. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus – MRSA was found in 10 patients. Blood and central venous catheter clutures were positive in 10 patients. The same bacteria were also isolated in other specimens in 26 patients.Conclusions. Bronchoscopy is an important aid in diagnosing hospital pneumonias. In high percentage it provides microbiological evaluation of bronchial aspirate, and has major impact in selection of an appropriate antibiotic treatment.

  9. Zinc oxide nanoparticle inhibits the biofilm formation of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Purnita; Agarwal, Bikash; Goswami, Madhurankhi; Maiti, Debasish; Baruah, Sunandan; Tribedi, Prosun

    2018-01-01

    Biofilms are structured consortia of microbial cells that grow on living and non living surfaces and surround themselves with secreted polymers. Infections with bacterial biofilms have emerged as a foremost public health concern because biofilm growing cells can be highly resistant to both antibiotics and host immune defenses. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been reported as a potential antimicrobial agent, thus, in the current study, we have evaluated the antimicrobial as well as antibiofilm activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles against the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae which is a significant cause of disease. Zinc oxide nanoparticles showed strong antimicrobial activity against S. pneumoniae, with an MIC value of 40 μg/ml. Biofilm inhibition of S. pneumoniae was also evaluated by performing a series of experiments such as crystal violet assay, microscopic observation, protein count, EPS secretion etc. using sub-MIC concentrations (3, 6 and 12 µg/ml) of zinc oxide nanoparticles. The results showed that the sub-MIC doses of zinc oxide nanoparticles exhibited significant anti-biofilm activity against S. pneumoniae, with maximum biofilm attenuation found at 12 μg/ml. Taken together, the results indicate that zinc oxide nanoparticles can be considered as a potential agent for the inhibition of microbial biofilms.

  10. Probenecid reduces infection and inflammation in acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonnenberg, Bodo; Tschernig, Thomas; Voss, Meike; Bischoff, Markus; Meier, Carola; Schirmer, Stephan H; Langer, Frank; Bals, Robert; Beisswenger, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    The activation of inflammasome signaling mediates pathology of acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. This suggests that the inflammasome might represent a target to limit the pathological consequences of acute P. aeruginosa lung infection. Pannexin-1 (Px1) channels mediate the activation of caspase-1 and release of IL-1β induced by P2X7 receptor activation. The approved drug probenecid is an inhibitor of Px1 and ATP release. In this study, we demonstrate that probenecid reduces infection and inflammation in acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Treatment of mice prior to infection with P. aeruginosa resulted in an enhanced clearance of P. aeruginosa and reduced levels of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1β. In addition, probenecid inhibited the release of inflammatory mediators in murine alveolar macrophages and human U937 cell-derived macrophages upon bacterial infection but not in human bronchial epithelial cells. Thus, Px1 blockade via probenecid treatment may be a therapeutic option in P. aeruginosa pneumonia by improving bacterial clearance and reducing negative consequences of inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Protective Capacity of Statins during Pneumonia Is Dependent on Etiological Agent and Obesity

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    Erik A. Karlsson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of death worldwide. Clinical data is conflicted regarding whether statins improve outcomes for pneumonia. Potential confounding factors including specific etiology of pneumonia as well as obesity could potentially mask protective benefit. Obesity is a risk factor for high cholesterol, the main target for statin therapy. We demonstrate that statin intervention conferred no protective benefit in the context of wild-type mice regardless of infectious agent. Statin intervention conferred either a protective benefit, during influenza infection, or detrimental effect, in the case of pneumococcal infection, in obese animals. These data suggest etiology of pneumonia in the context of obesity could be dramatically altered by the protective effects of statin therapy during bacterial and viral pneumonia.

  12. Infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with or without radiologically confirmed pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne C. Andrade

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Among children with clinical diagnosis of community‐acquired pneumonia submitted to chest radiograph, those with radiologically confirmed pneumonia present a higher rate of infection by S. pneumoniae when compared with those with a normal chest radiograph.

  13. Fastidious intracellular bacteria as causal agents of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoth, Frédéric; Greub, Gilbert

    2010-07-01

    Intracellular bacteria are common causes of community-acquired pneumonia that grow poorly or not at all on standard culture media and do not respond to beta-lactam antibiotic therapy. Apart from well-established agents of pneumonia such as Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci and Coxiella burnetii, some new emerging pathogens have recently been recognized, mainly Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Simkania negevensis, two Chlamydia-related bacteria. Most of them are causes of benign and self-limited infections. However, they may cause severe pneumonia in some cases (i.e., Legionnaires' disease) and they may cause outbreaks representing a public health problem deserving prompt recognition and appropriate therapy. Although extrapulmonary manifestations are often present, no clinical features allow them to be distinguished from classical bacterial agents of pneumonia such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus, specific molecular diagnostic tools are very helpful for early recognition of the offending bacteria, whereas serology often only allows retrospective or late diagnosis. Macrolides remain the best empirical treatment of intracellular respiratory pathogens, although some observational studies suggest that quinolones may be superior for the treatment of legionellosis.

  14. Bacteriophage-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier: improved pharmacokinetics mediates effective resolution of Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced lobar pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Saloni; Harjai, Kusum; Katare, Om Prakash; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2015-07-15

    This study examined the therapeutic and prophylactic potential of bacteriophages in a mouse model of Klebsiella pneumoniae lobar pneumonia. Phages were administered intraperitoneally. Liposome-entrapped phages (LP) were effective in treating infection, even when therapy was delayed by 3 days after the induction of pneumonia. In contrast, nonliposomal phages provided protection when administered 24 hours after infection. Administration of nonliposomal phages 6 hours prior to intranasal bacterial challenge resulted in complete protection, compared with LP, which was effective even when administered 48 hours prior to infection. Increased reduction and a greater increment in the levels of proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines, respectively, in homogenates of lung from LP-treated mice were suggestive of increased efficacy of LP in the treatment of pneumonia. This is the first study to assess liposomes as a delivery vehicle for phage, and the results confirm the superiority of LP for both therapeutic and prophylactic applications. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. CNS Complications of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of acute central nervous system disease occurring subsequent to infection with M pneumoniae are reported from University College, Institute of Child Health, and Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK.

  16. Pneumonia Outbreak Caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae Among US Air Force Academy Cadets, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    2014 Bacteria or virus No. (%) positive Cadets with pneumonia , n = 15 Cadets without pneumonia , n = 53 Chlamydophila pneumonia 11 (73) 19 (36...Article 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) Sep 2013 – May 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pneumonia Outbreak Caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae among US Air Force...October 2013–May 2014, there were 102 cases of pneumonia diagnosed in US Air Force Academy cadets. A total of 73% of tested nasal washes contained

  17. Genotoxic Klebsiella pneumoniae in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chyi Lai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colibactin is a nonribosomal peptide-polyketide synthesized by multi-enzyme complexes encoded by the pks gene cluster. Colibactin-producing Escherichia coli have been demonstrated to induce host DNA damage and promote colorectal cancer (CRC development. In Taiwan, the occurrence of pyogenic liver abscess (PLA has been suggested to correlate with an increasing risk of CRC, and Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant PLA pathogen in Taiwan. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At the asn tRNA loci of the newly sequenced K. pneumoniae 1084 genome, we identified a 208-kb genomic island, KPHPI208, of which a module identical to the E. coli pks colibactin gene cluster was recognized. KPHPI208 consists of eight modules, including the colibactin module and the modules predicted to be involved in integration, conjugation, yersiniabactin production, microcin production, and unknown functions. Transient infection of BALB/c normal liver cells with K. pneumoniae 1084 increased the phosphorylation of histone H2AX, indicating the induction of host DNA damage. Colibactin was required for the genotoxicity of K. pneumoniae 1084, as it was diminished by deletion of clbA gene and restored to the wild type level by trans-complementation with a clbA coding plasmid. Besides, BALB/c mice infected with K. pneumoniae 1084 exhibited enhanced DNA damage in the liver parenchymal cells when compared to the isogenic clbA deletion mutant. By PCR detection, the prevalence of pks-positive K. pneumoniae in Taiwan is 25.6%, which is higher than that reported in Europe (3.5%, and is significantly correlated with K1 type, which predominantly accounted for PLA in Taiwan. CONCLUSIONS: Our knowledge regarding how bacteria contribute to carcinogenesis has just begun. The identification of genotoxic K. pneumoniae and its genetic components will facilitate future studies to elucidate the molecular basis underlying the link between K. pneumoniae, PLA, and CRC.

  18. In vitro Reconstitution of Peptidoglycan Assembly from the Gram-Positive Pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zapun, A.; Philippe, J.; Abrahams, K.A.; Signor, L.; Roper, D.I.; Breukink, E.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120305100; Vernet, T.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of bacterial cell wall assembly is of paramount importance in addressing the threat of increasing antibiotic resistance worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae presents a particularly acute problem in this respect, as it is capable of rapid evolution by homologous

  19. Aetiology and resistance patterns of community-acquired pneumonia in León, Nicaragua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matute, A J; Brouwer, W P; Hak, E; Delgado, E; Alonso, E; Hoepelman, I M

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prevalence study to gain greater insight into the aetiology, bacterial resistance and risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the region of León, Nicaragua. During the period from July 2002 to January 2005, all consecutive patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of

  20. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children Caused by Pneumococci of MLSB- and M-Phenotype: Clinical Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya A. Ilenkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The key to effective treatment of a bacterial infection is a rapid and proper selection of antimicrobial therapy. WHO and UNICEF developed the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD aimed to elimination of the preventable causes of child death by 2025 by optimizing diagnosis and treatment. The main pneumonia agents are fastidious microorganisms that require special nutrient media and cultivation conditions that are absent in many laboratories. Due to low effectiveness of the etiological diagnosis, the choice of antibiotic therapy for pneumonia in the practice of a pediatrician is usually empirical. The article describes clinical cases of community-acquired pneumonia in children caused by strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae with a multiple antibiotic resistance. The above experience can be used by pediatricians in everyday practice.

  1. Bacterial pneumonia in the AIDS patients | Salami | West African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. West African Journal of Medicine Vol. 25 (1) 2006: pp. 1-5. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/wajm.v25i1.28236 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  2. Identification and Characterization of Imipenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Susceptible Klebsiella variicola Isolates Obtained from the Same Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Moreno-Dominguez, Stephania; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Silva-Sanchez, Jesús; Barrios, Humberto; Reyna-Flores, Fernando; Sanchez-Perez, Alejandro; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Sanchez-León, María Carmen; Moncada-Barron, David

    2016-04-01

    Klebsiella variicola, a bacterium closely genetically related to Klebsiella pneumoniae, is commonly misidentified as K. pneumoniae by biochemical tests. To distinguish between the two bacteria, phylogenetic analysis of the rpoB gene and the identification of unique genes in both bacterial species by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provide the means to reliably identify and genotype K. variicola. In recent years, K. variicola has been described both as the cause of an intrahospital outbreak in a pediatric hospital, which resulted in sepsis in inpatients, and as a frequent cause of bloodstream infections. In the present study, K. pneumoniae and K. variicola were isolated from a unique patient displaying different antimicrobial susceptibility phenotypes and different genotypes of virulence determinants. Eight clinical isolates were obtained at different time intervals; all during a 5-month period. The isolates were identified as K. pneumoniae by an automated identification system. The clinical (biochemical test) and molecular (multiplex-PCR and rpoB gene) characterization identified imipenem resistance in the first six K. pneumoniae ST258 isolates, which encode the SHV-12 cephalosporinase and KPC-3 carbapenemase genes. The two last remaining isolates corresponded to susceptible K. variicola. The bacterial species showed a specific profile of virulence-associated determinants, specifically the fimA, fimH, and ecpRAB fimbrial-encoding genes identified only in K. pneumoniae isolates. However, the entb (enterobactin), mrkD (fimbrial adhesin), uge (epimerase), ureA (urease), and wabG (transferase) genes were shared between both bacterial species. Recent studies attribute a higher mortality rate to K. variicola than to K. pneumonia. This work highlights the identification of K. pneumoniae and the closely related K. variicola isolated from the same patient. The value of distinguishing between these two bacterial species is in their clinical significance, their

  3. Clinical behavior of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis Comportamiento clinico y terapéutico de la meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Bu-Coifiu Fanego

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There was an increased number of cases of meningoencephalitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, after the successful vaccination campaigns against Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae. This paper aims at describing the clinical characteristics, the laboratory findings, the complications, and the therapeutic management of these patients, who have been suffering from this disease since 1993 to 2006. METHOD: Twelve children with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis admitted to the pediatric hospital of San Miguel del Padron, City of Havana in this period were assessed. RESULTS: Children under one year are the most frequently affected. Septic shock and brain edema were the most severe complications. Three patients died, implying that this disease has a serious course. Early treatment of brain edema is very important to reduce mortality. The elective drugs for treatment of these cases of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis were vancomycin combined with cephalosporin, cefotaxime or ceftriaxone type. CONCLUSION: Patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis show clinical characteristics, complications, and sequels that are different to other bacterial meningoencephalitis, meaning that they could be helpful for physicians considering the differential diagnosis of meningoencephalitis.OBJETIVO: Existe un incremento de la meningoencefalitis producida por Streptococcus pneumoniae, después de las campañas exitosas de vacunación contra Neisseria meningitidis y Haemophilus influenzae. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir las caracteristicas clinicas, los hallazgos de laboratorio, las complicaciones y el manejo terapéutico de los pacientes que sufrieron esta enfermedad desde 1993 a 2006. MÉTODO: Se estudiaron doce niños con meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae ingresados en el Hospital Pediátrico de San Miguel del Padrón, Ciudad de La Habana en este periodo. RESULTADOS: Los ni

  4. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive STDs Home Page Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ( ... of getting other STDs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea . These bacteria can sometimes cause pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  5. The roentgenological study of measles pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, U.; Song, C. H.; Lee, H. Y.; Chung, H. K.; Joo, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Measles is important infectious disease of pediatrics and pneumonia is the most commonest complication of measles. We have experienced 20 cases of pneumonia among 31 cases of measles in infant nursing home of Chae Chun during of December. 1981. The results a are as follows; 1. The incidence of measles pneumonia is 64.5%. 2. The patterns of pneumonic infiltration is : The pneumonia may have a bronchopneumonia (60%), Lobar pneumonia (15%), or combined form (35%). 3. Both lungs are involved by measles pneumonia: Right lung only (30%), Left lung only (5%), or Bilateral (65%). 4. Hilar lymphadenopathy (51.6%). Hilar lymphadenopathy with pneumonia (82.2%) and hilar lymphadenopathy without pneumonia (17.8%). 5. There is no pulmonary nodule which is noted frequently in atypical measles pneumonia as a seguale

  6. Cavity Forming Pneumonia Due to Staphylococcus aureus Following Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Nobuyuki; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Amano, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Yohei; Kosuge, Youko

    2015-11-01

    While visiting Malaysia, a 22-year-old previously healthy Japanese man developed myalgia, headache, and fever, leading to a diagnosis of classical dengue fever. After improvement and returning to Japan after a five day hospitalization, he developed productive cough several days after defervescing from dengue. Computed tomography (CT) thorax scan showed multiple lung cavities. A sputum smear revealed leukocytes with phagocytized gram-positive cocci in clusters, and grew an isolate Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to semi-synthetic penicillin; he was treated successfully with ceftriaxone and cephalexin. This second reported case of pneumonia due to S. aureus occurring after dengue fever, was associated both with nosocomial exposure and might have been associated with dengue-associated immunosuppression. Clinicians should pay systematic attention to bacterial pneumonia following dengue fever to establish whether such a connection is causally associated. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. Virome and bacteriome characterization of children with pneumonia and asthma in Mexico City during winter seasons 2014 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Espinoza, Jose A.; Moreno-Valencia, Yazmin; Coronel-Tellez, Rodrigo H.; Castillejos-Lopez, Manuel; Hernandez, Andres; Dominguez, Aaron; Miliar-Garcia, Angel; Barbachano-Guerrero, Arturo; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Alejandre-Garcia, Alejandro

    2018-01-01

    Background Acute asthma exacerbations and pneumonia are important causes of morbidity and mortality in children and may coexist in the same children, although symptom overlap may lead to difficulties in diagnosis. Microbial and viral diversity and differential abundance of either may play an important role in infection susceptibility and the development of acute and chronic respiratory diseases. Objectives To describe the virome and bacteriome present in the upper respiratory tract of hospitalized children with a clinical diagnosis of asthma and pneumonia during an acute exacerbation and an acute respiratory illness ARI episode respectively. Methods During the winter seasons of 2013–2014 and 2014–2015, 134 nasopharyngeal swabs samples of children <15 years of age with ARI hospitalized at a referral hospital for respiratory diseases were selected based on clinical diagnosis of asthma or pneumonia. The virome and bacteriome were characterized using Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) and in-house bioinformatics analysis pipeline. Results The Asthma group was represented mainly by RV-C, BoV-1 and RSV-B and the pneumonia group by Bacteriophage EJ-1 and TTMV. TTV was found in both groups with a similar amount of reads. About bacterial composition Moraxella catarrhalis, Propionibacterium acnes and Acinetobacter were present in asthma and Veillonella parvula and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in pneumonia. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were mostly found with both asthma and pneumonia. Conclusions Our results show a complex viral and bacterial composition in asthma and pneumonia groups with a strong association of RV-C presence in asthmatic children. We observed Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae concurrently in both groups. PMID:29447223

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia in Chile: the clinical relevance in the detection of viruses and atypical bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchsinger, Vivian; Ruiz, Mauricio; Zunino, Enna; Martínez, María Angélica; Machado, Clarisse; Piedra, Pedro A; Fasce, Rodrigo; Ulloa, María Teresa; Fink, Maria Cristina; Lara, Pamela; Gebauer, Mónica; Chávez, Fernando; Avendaño, Luis F

    2013-11-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a relevant worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality, however the aetiology often remains uncertain and the therapy is empirical. We applied conventional and molecular diagnostics to identify viruses and atypical bacteria associated with CAP in Chile. We used sputum and blood cultures, IgG/IgM serology and molecular diagnostic techniques (PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR) for detection of classical and atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumoniae) and respiratory viruses (adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenzavirus, rhinovirus, coronavirus) in adults >18 years old presenting with CAP in Santiago from February 2005 to September 2007. Severity was qualified at admission by Fine's pneumonia severity index. Overall detection in 356 enrolled adults were 92 (26%) cases of a single bacterial pathogen, 80 (22%) cases of a single viral pathogen, 60 (17%) cases with mixed bacterial and viral infection and 124 (35%) cases with no identified pathogen. Streptococcus pneumoniae and RSV were the most common bacterial and viral pathogens identified. Infectious agent detection by PCR provided greater sensitivity than conventional techniques. To our surprise, no relationship was observed between clinical severity and sole or coinfections. The use of molecular diagnostics expanded the detection of viruses and atypical bacteria in adults with CAP, as unique or coinfections. Clinical severity and outcome were independent of the aetiological agents detected.

  9. Incidence and Consequences of Near-Drowning-Related Pneumonia-A Descriptive Series from Martinique, French West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerland, Laura; Mégarbane, Bruno; Kallel, Hatem; Brouste, Yanick; Mehdaoui, Hossein; Resiere, Dabor

    2017-11-17

    Drowning represents one major cause of accidental death. Near-drowning patients are exposed to aspiration that may result in pneumonia with life-threatening consequences. We designed this descriptive study to investigate the frequency, nature, and consequences of post-drowning pneumonia. One hundred and forty-four near-drowning patients (33 children and 111 adults) admitted during four years to the University Hospital of Martinique, French Indies, were included. Patients presented pre-hospital cardiac arrest (41%) and exhibited acute respiratory failure (54%), cardiovascular failure (27%), and lactic acidosis (75%) on admission. Empirical antibiotics, as decided by the physicians in charge, were administered in 85 patients (59%). Post-drowning early onset bacterial pneumonia was diagnosed as "possible" in 13 patients (9%) and "confirmed" in 22 patients (15%). Tracheal aspiration revealed the presence of polymorphous pharyngeal flora (59%) or one predominant bacteria species (41%) including Enterobacter aerogenes , Enterobacter cloacae , Staphylococcus aureus , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Aeromonas hydrophilia , and Morganella morgani . Despite adequate supportive care, drowning resulted in 45 fatalities (31%). Early onset bacterial aspiration pneumonia (either possible or confirmed) did not significantly influence the risk of death. In conclusion, near-drowning-related bacterial aspiration pneumonia seems rare and does not influence the mortality rate. There is still a need for practice standardization to improve diagnosis of post-drowning pneumonia and near-drowning patient management.

  10. Clinical case review: a method to improve identification of true clinical and radiographic pneumonia in children meeting the World Health Organization definition for pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puumalainen, Taneli; Quiambao, Beatriz; Abucejo-Ladesma, Erma; Lupisan, Socorro; Heiskanen-Kosma, Tarja; Ruutu, Petri; Lucero, Marilla G; Nohynek, Hanna; Simoes, Eric A F; Riley, Ian

    2008-07-21

    The World Health Organization's (WHO) case definition for childhood pneumonia, composed of simple clinical signs of cough, difficult breathing and fast breathing, is widely used in resource poor settings to guide management of acute respiratory infections. The definition is also commonly used as an entry criteria or endpoint in different intervention and disease burden studies. A group of paediatricians conducted a retrospective review of clinical and laboratory data including C-reactive protein concentration and chest radiograph findings among Filipino children hospitalised in the Bohol Regional Hospital who were enrolled in a pneumococcal vaccine efficacy study and had an episode of respiratory disease fulfilling the WHO case definition for clinical pneumonia. Our aim was to evaluate which disease entities the WHO definition actually captures and what is the probable aetiology of respiratory infections among these episodes diagnosed in this population. Among the 12,194 children enrolled to the vaccine study we recorded 1,195 disease episodes leading to hospitalisation which fulfilled the WHO criteria for pneumonia. In total, 34% of these episodes showed radiographic evidence of pneumonia and 11% were classified as definitive or probable bacterial pneumonia. Over 95% of episodes of WHO-defined severe pneumonia (with chest indrawing) had an acute lower respiratory infection as final diagnosis whereas 34% of those with non-severe clinical pneumonia had gastroenteritis or other non-respiratory infection as main cause of hospitalisation. The WHO definition for severe pneumonia shows high specificity for acute lower respiratory infection and provides a tool to compare the total burden of lower respiratory infections in different settings. ISRCTN62323832.

  11. Clinical case review: A method to improve identification of true clinical and radiographic pneumonia in children meeting the World Health Organization definition for pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruutu Petri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization's (WHO case definition for childhood pneumonia, composed of simple clinical signs of cough, difficult breathing and fast breathing, is widely used in resource poor settings to guide management of acute respiratory infections. The definition is also commonly used as an entry criteria or endpoint in different intervention and disease burden studies. Methods A group of paediatricians conducted a retrospective review of clinical and laboratory data including C-reactive protein concentration and chest radiograph findings among Filipino children hospitalised in the Bohol Regional Hospital who were enrolled in a pneumococcal vaccine efficacy study and had an episode of respiratory disease fulfilling the WHO case definition for clinical pneumonia. Our aim was to evaluate which disease entities the WHO definition actually captures and what is the probable aetiology of respiratory infections among these episodes diagnosed in this population. Results Among the 12,194 children enrolled to the vaccine study we recorded 1,195 disease episodes leading to hospitalisation which fulfilled the WHO criteria for pneumonia. In total, 34% of these episodes showed radiographic evidence of pneumonia and 11% were classified as definitive or probable bacterial pneumonia. Over 95% of episodes of WHO-defined severe pneumonia (with chest indrawing had an acute lower respiratory infection as final diagnosis whereas 34% of those with non-severe clinical pneumonia had gastroenteritis or other non-respiratory infection as main cause of hospitalisation. Conclusion The WHO definition for severe pneumonia shows high specificity for acute lower respiratory infection and provides a tool to compare the total burden of lower respiratory infections in different settings. Trial registration ISRCTN62323832

  12. Detection of plant DNA in the bronchoalveolar lavage of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Bousbia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hospital-acquired infections such as nosocomial pneumonia are a serious cause of mortality for hospitalized patients, especially for those admitted to intensive care units (ICUs. Despite the number of the studies reported to date, the causative agents of pneumonia are not completely known. Herein, we found by molecular technique that vegetable and tobacco DNA may be detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we studied bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL from patients admitted to ICUs with ventilator-associated pneumonia. BAL fluids were assessed with molecular tests, culture and blood culture. We successfully identified plant DNA in six patients out of 106 (6% with ventilator-associated pneumonia. Inhalation was confirmed in four cases and suspected in the other two cases. Inhalation was significantly frequent in patients with plant DNA (four out of six patients than those without plant DNA (three out of 100 patients (P<0.001. Nicotiana tabacum chloroplast DNA was identified in three patients who were smokers (cases 2, 3 and 6. Cucurbita pepo, Morus bombycis and Triticum aestivum DNA were identified in cases 1, 4 and 5 respectively. Twenty-three different bacterial species, two viruses and five fungal species were identified from among these six patients by using molecular and culture techniques. Several of the pathogenic microorganisms identified are reported to be food-borne or tobacco plant-associated pathogens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows that plants DNA may be identified in the BAL fluid of pneumonia patients, especially when exploring aspiration pneumonia, but the significance of the presence of plant DNA and its role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia is unknown and remains to be investigated. However, the identification of these plants may be a potential marker of aspiration in patients with pneumonia.

  13. A meta-analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for pneumococcal pneumonia in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Sadoh, Ayebo E; Obaro, Stephen K

    2018-02-01

    Pneumonia causes an enormous burden of childhood disease globally, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Pneumococcus is the most common bacterial aetiology of pneumonia; however, antimicrobials are limited and may not adequately address the local epidemiology of the region. To undertake a review and meta-analysis of pneumonia studies in sub-Saharan Africa to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in childhood pneumonia. Articles published in PubMed and Google between 2006 and 2016 which evaluated antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of pneumococcal pneumonia in children in sub-Saharan Africa were identified. The source of specimens, pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility data were extracted. Pooled analysis of susceptible isolates was conducted using random effects models. Children from 15 studies and 1634 isolates were included in the meta-analysis. In cases of childhood pneumonia, the mean overall proportion of penicillin susceptibility from invasive specimens of Streptococcus pneumoniae was 85.7% (95% CI 80.1-91.3), and of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 21.0% (95% CI 5.1-36.9). Compared with all S. pneumoniae specimens, penicillin susceptibility was 68.6% (95% CI 59.6-77.5) and that of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 26.3% (95% CI 14.1-38.6). A high level of heterogeneity was detected, reflecting the paucity of data available. The establishment of national and regional diagnostic platforms to monitor antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for pneumonia as well as other invasive diseases will provide data with which to assess the relevance and adaptation of antimicrobial prescribing recommendations.

  14. CT appearance of pyogenic liver abscesses caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaif, Hind S; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Chan, Douglas S G; Archuleta, Sophia

    2011-07-01

    To retrospectively compare the computed tomographic (CT) features of liver abscesses caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae with those caused by other bacterial pathogens. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, with waiver of informed consent. Hospital records of all patients with a diagnosis of liver abscess between July 2003 and July 2010 were retrieved from an electronic hospital database. One hundred and thirty-one consecutive patients with confirmed pyogenic liver abscesses were studied. Data on clinical presentation, comorbid conditions, septic hematogenous complications, hospitalization duration, and abscess-related mortality were obtained. CT characteristics of abscesses including number, distribution, unilocular or multilocular appearance, cystic or solid appearance, gas in cavity, pylephlebitis, thrombophlebitis, and pneumobilia were reviewed. Etiology was established by pus and/or blood culture. Patients were placed into a monomicrobial K pneumoniae liver abscess group and a comparison group. A comparison of the CT features and clinical findings between the two groups was performed. The χ(2) analysis or Fisher exact test was used for categorical variables, and Student t and log-rank tests were used for continuous variables. A P value of less than .05 was considered to indicate a significant difference. Monomicrobial K pneumoniae liver abscesses were present in 92 cases (70.2%). On CT images, characteristics more likely to be associated with monomicrobial K pneumoniae liver abscesses than other pyogenic liver abscesses were a single abscess (79.3% vs 56.4%, P = .01), unilobar involvement (82.6% vs 61.5%, P = .01), solid appearance (57.6% vs 35.9%, P = .03), multilocular (94.6% vs 71.8%, P = .01), association with thrombophlebitis (30.4% vs 5.1%, P shock and abscess-related mortality as compared with other pyogenic liver abscesses. Monomicrobial K pneumoniae liver abscesses appear as single, solid, or multiloculated liver

  15. Host susceptibility to gram-negative pneumonia after lung contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgachev, Vladislav A; Yu, Bi; Reinke, Julia M; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Hemmila, Mark R

    2012-03-01

    Lung contusion (LC) induces inflammation with high local concentrations of proinflammatory mediators stimulating chemotaxis and activation of neutrophils. LC is also a risk factor for development of pneumonia; however, the reason for this increased susceptibility is not clearly identified. We hypothesize that LC creates acute changes in the host pulmonary innate immune system that leads to vulnerability from a "second" hit bacterial infection. Female C57Bl/6 mice underwent LC injury at time -6 hours. At 0 hours, these mice were inoculated intratracheally with 1,000 colony forming unit (CFU) of Klebsiella pneumoniae (LC+Pneu) or vehicle (LC). Control animals underwent a sham LC injury followed by pneumonia (Sham+Pneu). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue specimens were collected. Lung bacteria levels were quantified by serial dilution, plating, and counting CFUs. Cytokine levels were assayed by ELISA. Cell type identification and quantification was performed using flow cytometry. Survival at 72 hours was markedly different for the LC, Sham+Pneu, and LC+Pneu groups (100%, 80%, 20%, p Pneu vs. LC+Pneu). LC+Pneu animals had decreased pulmonary bacterial clearance at 24 hours compared with the Sham+Pneu group (4 × 10(7) vs. 8 × 10(6) CFUs, p Pneu mice compared with the Sham+Pneu group at 24 hours. Conversely, the Sham+Pneu mice had increased levels of macrophage inflammatory protein-2, total cells, macrophages, and neutrophils in BAL compared with the LC+Pneu group at 24 hours. LC+Pneu animals demonstrated changes in macrophage apoptosis and necrosis in BAL samples obtained 2 hours after induction of pneumonia when compared with the Sham+Pneu group. Both Sham+Pneu and LC+Pneu animals demonstrated an increase in the level of IL-10 in BAL fluid compared with LC animals. Acute inflammation after LC acts to modulate the presence of inflammatory cells necessary to combat gram-negative bacteria. This results in decreased bacterial clearance and increased

  16. Prospectively defined murine mesenchymal stem cells inhibit Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced acute lung injury and improve pneumonia survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackstein, Holger; Lippitsch, Anne; Krug, Philipp; Schevtschenko, Inna; Kranz, Sabine; Hecker, Matthias; Dietert, Kristina; Gruber, Achim D; Bein, Gregor; Brendel, Cornelia; Baal, Nelli

    2015-10-06

    Numerous studies have described the immunosuppressive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) but these studies use mixtures of heterogeneous progenitor cells for in vitro expansion. Recently, multipotent MSC have been prospectively identified in murine bone marrow (BM) on the basis of PDFGRa(+) SCA1(+) CD45(-) TER119(-) (PαS) expression but the immunomodulatory capacity of these MSC is unknown. We isolated PαS MSC by high-purity FACS sorting of murine BM and after in vitro expansion we analyzed the in vivo immunomodulatory activity during acute pneumonia. PαS MSC (1 × 10(6)) were applied intratracheally 4 h after acute respiratory Klebsiella pneumoniae induced infection. PαS MSC treatment resulted in significantly reduced alveolitis and protein leakage in comparison to mock-treated controls. PαS MSC-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced alveolar TNF-α and IL-12p70 expression, while IL-10 expression was unaffected. Dissection of respiratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets by multiparameter flow cytometry revealed significantly reduced lung DC infiltration and significantly reduced CD86 costimulatory expression on lung CD103(+) DC in PαS MSC-treated mice. In the post-acute phase of pneumonia, PαS MSC-treated animals exhibited significantly reduced respiratory IL-17(+) CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, PαS MSC treatment significantly improved overall pneumonia survival and did not increase bacterial load. In this study we demonstrated for the first time the feasibility and in vivo immunomodulatory capacity of prospectively defined MSC in pneumonia.

  17. Dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ameliorates acute pneumonia induced by Klebsiella pneumoniae in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonica; Chhibber, Sanjay; Mohan, Harsh; Sharma, Saroj

    2013-07-01

    The immune benefits associated with the optimal intake of dietary fatty acids are widely known. The objective of the present investigation was to elucidate the role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) food source on acute pneumonia induced by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Three different n-3 PUFA preparations (cod liver oil, Maxigard, and flaxseed oil) were orally supplemented and infection was induced in different groups of experimental mice. Mice fed olive oil and normal saline served as oil and saline controls, respectively. After 2 weeks of fatty acid feeding, no effect on the establishment of infection was observed when acute pneumonia was induced in animals. On the other hand, 6 weeks of n-3 PUFA administration was found to improve resistance in mice, as reduced lung bacterial load coupled with significant improvement in pathology was seen in infected mice. Alveolar macrophages collected from all 3 groups of mice fed n-3 PUFA exhibited a significant decrease in the level of apoptosis following infection with K. pneumoniae and an enhanced in vitro phagocytic potential for the pathogen. Lower lung levels of nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and lactate dehydrogenase were associated with a decrease in the severity of tissue damage. There was a significant increase in the lung levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)). No significant change was observed in the levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10). This study highlights that dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation exerts an overall beneficial effect against acute experimental pneumonia. This mechanism is operative through upregulation of nonspecific and specific immune defenses of the host.

  18. Real-time qPCR improves meningitis pathogen detection in invasive bacterial-vaccine preventable disease surveillance in Fiji

    OpenAIRE

    Dunne, Eileen M.; Mantanitobua, Silivia; Singh, Shalini P.; Reyburn, Rita; Tuivaga, Evelyn; Rafai, Eric; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Porter, Barbara; Satzke, Catherine; Strachan, Janet E.; Fox, Kimberly K.; Jenkins, Kylie M.; Jenney, Adam; Baro, Silo; Mulholland, E. Kim

    2016-01-01

    As part of the World Health Organization Invasive Bacterial-Vaccine Preventable Diseases (IB-VPD) surveillance in Suva, Fiji, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from suspected meningitis patients of all ages were examined by traditional methods (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination for bacterial antigen) and qPCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. Of 266 samples tested, pathogens were identified in 47 (17.7%). S. pneumoniae was the most co...

  19. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    of these are pathogen-specific, while some are shared between different bacteria. METHODS: We searched the database PubMed to identify host risk factors for bacterial meningitis caused by the pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b, because they are three most common...

  20. Bacterial Pathogens Associated with Tap and Well Waters in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Our finding revealed that all the well waters from the locations under study were contaminated with one or more of the following bacterial pathogens Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, Enterobacter aerogenes, Shigella dysenteriae, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with E coli ...

  1. An Audit Report on Bacterial Meningintis among Children Admitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The commonest isolates were Klebsiella species (26%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (22%), Haemophilus influenzae (13%), Salmonella species (9.1%) and E. coli (6.5%). N. meningitidis was not isolated during the three year period. Of all children with suspected bacterial meningitis, 61% were in the first 12 months of life ...

  2. Bacterial Isolates andAntibiotic Sensitivity in Community Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of the studywas to determine bacterial causes of community acquired pneumonia and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern amongst patients admitted intomedicalwards inAminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria Methods: The study incorporated patients aged fifteen years and above admitted into ...

  3. Serious bacterial infections in febrile young children: Lack of value ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fever is both a marker of insignificant viral infection, as well as more serious bacterial sepsis. Therefore ... febrile children under the age of 5 years (with an axillary temperature ≥38°C) who presented to Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Pretoria, with signs and symptoms of pneumonia, meningitis and/or generalised sepsis.

  4. Molecular detection of atypical microorganisms in patients with ventilator associated pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahida Akter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among the critically ill patients of intensive care units (ICU. The present cross sectional study was conducted to isolate and identify bacterial causes of VAP among the patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU of Dhaka Medical College Hospital. The study was conducted between July, 2013 to June 2014. A total of 65 endotracheal aspirate (ETA and blood samples were collected from patients with clinically suspected ventilator associated peumonia(VAP. Samples were collected from patients on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. ETA and blood samples were cultured aerobically. Multiplex PCR was performed with ETA to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Among the atypical bacteria, M. pneumoniae were detected in 5 (7.69%, L. pneumophila in 4 (6.15% cases by multiplex PCR in ETA from VAP cases. No C. pneumoniae was detected. The study revealed that in VAP cases atypical bacteria should be considered as a possible bacterial agents. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2015; 9(1: 22-25

  5. Delivery of the endolysin Cpl-1 by inhalation rescues mice with fatal pneumococcal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehn, Jan M; Fischer, Katja; Reppe, Katrin; Gutbier, Birgitt; Tschernig, Thomas; Hocke, Andreas C; Fischetti, Vincent A; Löffler, Jutta; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Witzenrath, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Pneumonia is associated with a high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the most common cause of pneumonia, and pneumococcal antibiotic resistance is increasing. The purified bacteriophage endolysin Cpl-1 rapidly and specifically kills pneumococci. We tested the hypothesis that a single dose of recombinant aerosolized Cpl-1 would rescue mice with severe pneumococcal pneumonia. Female C57Bl/6 mice (aged 8-12 weeks) were transnasally infected with pneumococci. When severe pneumonia was established 24 h after infection, mice were treated with 25 μL of aerosolized Cpl-1. Survival was monitored for 10 days and the pulmonary and systemic bacterial burdens were assessed. Furthermore, cytokines were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung morphology was analysed histologically. The endolysin efficiently reduced pulmonary bacterial counts and averted bacteraemia. Although concentrations of inflammatory cytokines were increased shortly after Cpl-1 inhalation, mice recovered rapidly, as shown by increasing body weight, and inflammatory infiltrates resolved in the lungs, leading to a reduction in mortality of 80%. Administration of Cpl-1 by inhalation may offer a new therapeutic perspective for the treatment of pneumococcal lung infection.

  6. Development of a new trend conjugate vaccine for the prevention of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek A. Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major cause of nosocomial pneumonia, septicemia and urinary tract infections, especially in newborns, blood cancer patients, and other immunocompromised candidates. The control of K. pneumoniae is a complicated issue due to its tight pathogenesis. Immuno-prophylactic preparations, especially those directed toward the bacterium O-antigen, showed to be the most successful way to prevent the infection incidence. However, all previously proposed preparations were either of limited spectrum or non-maternal, and hence not targeting the main Klebsiella patients. Moreover, all preparations were directed only to prevent the respiratory diseases due to that pathogen. This article addresses the development of a method originally used to purify the non-capsular bacterial- endotoxins, as a new and easy method for vaccine production against K. pneumoniae. The application of this method was preceded by a biotechnological control of capsular polysaccharide production in K. pneumoniae. The new produced natural conjugate between the bacterial O-antigen and its outer membrane proteins was evaluated by physicochemical and immunological methods to investigate its purity, integrity, safety and immunogenicity. It showed to be pure, stable, safe for use, and able to elicit a protective immunoglobulin titer against different Klebsiella infections. This immune-response proved to be transferable to the offspring of the vaccinated experimental rabbits via placenta.

  7. Intranasal treatment with bacteriophage rescues mice from Acinetobacter baumannii-mediated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Mi, Zhiqiang; Niu, Wenkai; An, Xiaoping; Yuan, Xin; Liu, Huiying; Li, Puyuan; Liu, Yannan; Feng, Yuzhong; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xianglilan; Zhang, Zhiyi; Fan, Hang; Peng, Fan; Tong, Yigang; Bai, Changqing

    2016-05-01

    With the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria, finding alternative agents to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections is imperative. A mouse pneumonia model was developed by combining cyclophosphamide pretreatment and Acinetobacter baumannii challenge, and a lytic bacteriophage was evaluated for its therapeutic efficacy in this model by examining the survival rate, bacterial load in the lung and lung pathology. Intranasal instillation with bacteriophage rescued 100% of mice following lethal challenge with A. baumannii. Phage treatment reduced bacterial load in the lung. Microcomputed tomography indicated a reduction in lung inflammation in mice given phage. This research demonstrates that intranasal application of bacteriophage is viable, and could provide complete protection from pneumonia caused by A. baumannii.

  8. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  9. Impacto de Streptococcus pneumoniae en las neumonías del niño latinoamericano Impact of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pneumonias of Latin American children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Hortal

    2000-09-01

    xico (47,0% y los menores a Colombia (12,1%. La resistencia a la penicilina se asoció con un reducido número de serotipos capsulares, fundamentalmente el 14 y el 23F, el primero resistente a la penicilina y a la trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol, y el segundo multirresistente. La frecuencia de la resistencia a la trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol fue elevada en todos los países y el valor máximo correspondió a Argentina (58,0%. La disminución de la susceptibilidad al cloranfenicol tuvo baja frecuencia, salvo en Colombia (23,4%. La resistencia a la eritromicina fue baja en todos los países y todos los aislados fueron sensibles a la vancomicina.Community-acquired pneumonia is one of the leading causes of infant morbidity and mortality. Studies conducted in developing countries indicate that the most serious symptoms of pneumonia are associated with bacterial causes, mainly Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenzae type b. Managing those infections in children under two years of age is hindered by the lack of appropriate vaccines and by the decreased susceptibility of S. pneumoniae to penicillin and other antibiotics. In 1993, at the initiative of the Regional System for Vaccines of the Pan American Health Organization, and with funding from the Canadian International Development Agency, a study was designed to identify the S. pneumoniae capsular types that cause invasive disease in Latin American children under 5 years of age. The objective of the study was to determine the ideal composition of a conjugate vaccine that could be used in Latin America, and the penicillin susceptibility of the S. pneumoniae isolates. The initiative was undertaken in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Uruguay. This report analyzes the information that the participating countries generated on pneumococcal pneumonia. A total of 3 393 children were found with systemic S. pneumoniae infections, of which 1 578 corresponded to pneumonias. The analysis focused on 1 409 cases

  10. [Antibiotic therapy of hospital-acquired pneumonia and its pharmacoeconomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolář, Milan; Htoutou Sedláková, Miroslava; Urbánek, Karel; Uvízl, Radomír; Adamus, Milan; Imwensi, O P

    2016-03-01

    Important hospital-acquired infections include pneumonia, mainly because of the increasing resistance of bacterial pathogens to antimicrobials and the associated potential failure of antibiotic therapy. The present study aimed at determining the most frequent etiological agents of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and assessing the relationship between 30-day mortality and adequacy of antibiotic therapy. Based on the obtained information, optimal patterns of antibiotic therapy were to be defined, including a pharmacoeconomic perspective. In patients with clinically confirmed HAP, bacterial etiological agents were identified, their susceptibility to antimicrobials was determined and statistical methods were used to assess the relationship between adequacy of antibiotic therapy and 30-day mortality. The study comprised 68 patients with clinically confirmed HAP. The most common etiological agents were strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.8 %), Klebsiella pneumoniae (23.1 %) and Burkholderia cepacia complex (15.4 %). Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 86.5 % of all bacterial pathogens. The overall mortality reached 42.5 %. In the subgroup of patients with inadequate antibiotic therapy, 30-day mortality was significantly higher (83.3 %) than in the subgroup with adequate therapy (30.0 %; p = 0.002). The risk for 30-day mortality was 2.78 times higher in case of inadequate antibiotic therapy (95%CI: 1.52-5.07). The proportion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains was significantly higher in the subgroup of patients with inadequate antibiotic therapy than in those with adequate therapy (67 % vs. 27 %; p = 0.032). Results of the present study suggest a significant relationship between mortality of patients with HAP and ineffective antibiotic therapy due to resistance of the bacterial pathogen. Thus, it is clear that initial antibiotic therapy must be based on qualified assumption of sufficient activity against the most common bacterial pathogens and results of surveillance

  11. A review of Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Fasting, H; Henneberg, E W

    1999-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium that causes acute upper and lower respiratory infections. Its distribution is worldwide. Seroepidemiological studies have shown an association between C. pneumoniae and atherosclerosis, and the risk of acute myocardial...

  12. Cilia-associated bacteria in fatal Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha-Abdelaziz, Khaled; Bassel, Laura L; Harness, Melanie L; Clark, Mary Ellen; Register, Karen B; Caswell, Jeff L

    2016-07-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica frequently causes nonfatal tracheobronchitis, but its role in fatal pneumonia is less recognized. Our study evaluated histologic identification of cilia-associated bacteria as a method for diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. Cases of fatal bronchopneumonia were studied retrospectively, excluding neonates and cases of aspiration pneumonia, minor lung lesions, or autolysis. The study population comprised 36 canine and 31 feline cases of bronchopneumonia. B. bronchiseptica was identified in 8 of 36 canine and 14 of 31 feline cases based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) using serum from a rabbit hyperimmunized with pertactin, PCR testing (Fla2/Fla12), and/or bacterial culture data when available. Of these, IHC was positive in 4 canine and 7 feline cases, PCR was positive in 8 canine and 14 feline cases, and B. bronchiseptica was isolated in 2 of 5 canine and 3 of 9 feline cases tested. Examination of histologic sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin revealed bronchial cilia-associated bacteria in 4 of 36 canine and 5 of 31 feline cases; these were all positive by IHC and PCR. The presence of cilia-associated bacteria had been noted in the pathology report for only 2 of these 9 cases. Thus, the presence of cilia-associated bacteria seems frequently overlooked by pathologists, but is a diagnostically significant feature of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. A specific diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia is important because it suggests primary or opportunistic bacterial pneumonia rather than aspiration pneumonia, and because of the risk of animal-to-animal transmission of B. bronchiseptica, the availability of vaccines for disease prevention, and the potential zoonotic risk to immunocompromised pet owners. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. A preliminary study of pneumonia etiology among hospitalized children in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammitt, Laura L; Kazungu, Sidi; Morpeth, Susan C; Gibson, Dustin G; Mvera, Benedict; Brent, Andrew J; Mwarumba, Salim; Onyango, Clayton O; Bett, Anne; Akech, Donald O; Murdoch, David R; Nokes, D James; Scott, J Anthony G

    2012-04-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of childhood death in the developing world. Higher-quality etiological data are required to reduce this mortality burden. We conducted a case-control study of pneumonia etiology among children aged 1-59 months in rural Kenya. Case patients were hospitalized with World Health Organization-defined severe pneumonia (SP) or very severe pneumonia (VSP); controls were outpatient children without pneumonia. We collected blood for culture, induced sputum for culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and obtained oropharyngeal swab specimens for multiplex PCR from case patients, and serum for serology and nasopharyngeal swab specimens for multiplex PCR from case patients and controls. Of 984 eligible case patients, 810 (84%) were enrolled in the study; 232 (29%) had VSP. Blood cultures were positive in 52 of 749 case patients (7%). A predominant potential pathogen was identified in sputum culture in 70 of 417 case patients (17%). A respiratory virus was detected by PCR from nasopharyngeal swab specimens in 486 of 805 case patients (60%) and 172 of 369 controls (47%). Only respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) showed a statistically significant association between virus detection in the nasopharynx and pneumonia hospitalization (odds ratio, 12.5; 95% confidence interval, 3.1-51.5). Among 257 case patients in whom all specimens (excluding serum specimens) were collected, bacteria were identified in 24 (9%), viruses in 137 (53%), mixed viral and bacterial infection in 39 (15%), and no pathogen in 57 (22%); bacterial causes outnumbered viral causes when the results of the case-control analysis were considered. A potential etiology was detected in >75% of children admitted with SP or VSP. Except for RSV, the case-control analysis did not detect an association between viral detection in the nasopharynx and hospitalization for pneumonia.

  14. Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects in post-influenza community acquired MRSA pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvashi Bhan

    Full Text Available Post influenza pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, with mortality rates approaching 60% when bacterial infections are secondary to multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus, in particular community acquired MRSA (cMRSA, has emerged as a leading cause of post influenza pneumonia.Linezolid (LZD prevents acute lung injury in murine model of post influenza bacterial pneumonia.Mice were infected with HINI strain of influenza and then challenged with cMRSA at day 7, treated with antibiotics (LZD or Vanco or vehicle 6 hours post bacterial challenge and lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL harvested at 24 hours for bacterial clearance, inflammatory cell influx, cytokine/chemokine analysis and assessment of lung injury.Mice treated with LZD or Vanco had lower bacterial burden in the lung and no systemic dissemination, as compared to the control (no antibiotic group at 24 hours post bacterial challenge. As compared to animals receiving Vanco, LZD group had significantly lower numbers of neutrophils in the BAL (9×10(3 vs. 2.3×10(4, p < 0.01, which was associated with reduced levels of chemotactic chemokines and inflammatory cytokines KC, MIP-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β in the BAL. Interestingly, LZD treatment also protected mice from lung injury, as assessed by albumin concentration in the BAL post treatment with H1N1 and cMRSA when compared to vanco treatment. Moreover, treatment with LZD was associated with significantly lower levels of PVL toxin in lungs.Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects on host inflammatory response and lung injury in a murine model of post-viral cMRSA pneumonia.

  15. Viruses and bacteria in sputum samples of children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkinen, M; Lahti, E; Österback, R; Ruuskanen, O; Waris, M

    2012-03-01

    Few comprehensive studies have searched for viruses and bacteria in children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We identified 76 children hospitalized for pneumonia. Induced sputum samples were analysed for 18 viruses by antigen detection and PCR, and for six bacteria by culture and PCR. Viruses were found in 72% of samples, bacteria in 91%, and both in 66%. Rhinovirus (30%), human bocavirus (18%) and human metapneumovirus (14%) were the most commonly detected viruses. Two viruses were found in 22% of samples and three in 8%. The most common bacteria found were Streptococcus pneumoniae (50%), Haemophilus influenzae (38%), and Moraxella catarrhalis (28%). Rhinovirus-S. pneumoniae was the most commonly found combination of virus and bacterium (16%). All six children with treatment failure had both viruses and bacteria detected in the sputum. Otherwise, we found no special clinical characteristics in those with mixed viral-bacterial detections. With modern molecular diagnostic techniques, there are high rates of both viral and bacterial identification in childhood CAP. The clinical significance of mixed viral-bacterial infections remains unclear, although we found a potential association between them and treatment failure. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  16. Delivering vaccines for the prevention of pneumonia - programmatic and financial issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C Otczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children younger than 5 years. Vaccines are available against the main bacterial pathogens Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae. There are also vaccines against measles and pertussis; diseases that can predispose a child to pneumonia. Partners such as the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI, the Hib Initiative, the Accelerated Development and Introduction Plan for pneumococcal vaccines and the Measles Initiative, have accelerated the introduction of vaccines into developing countries. Whilst significant improvements in vaccine coverage have occurred globally over the past decade, there still remains an urgent need to scale-up key pneumonia protection and treatment interventions as identified in the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia (GAPP. There is promise that global immunisation will continue to improve child survival. However, there are several challenges to vaccine implementation that must first be addressed, including: a lack of access to under-served and marginalised populations; inadequate planning and management; a lack of political commitment; weak monitoring and surveillance programmes and assured sustainable finance and supply of quality vaccines. There is an urgent need to increase global awareness of the devastation that pneumonia brings to the worlds poorest communities.

  17. Diversity of genotypes in CTX-M-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated in different hospitals in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Pavoni Gomes Chagas

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study was undertaken to characterize CTX-M ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae collected from hospitals in different cities of Brazil. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty-five K. pneumoniae strains isolated from hospitalized patients in six different hospitals of three cities of Brazil were analyzed. ESBL production was confirmed by the standard double-disk synergy test and the Etest®. The MIC50 and MIC90 for ESBL-producing isolates were determined by the Etest® method. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of bacterial isolates were determined using the agar diffusion method according to the CLSI. Screening for blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M genes and class 1 integron was performed by PCR amplification. To determine the genomic diversity of CTX-M-producers, isolates were analyzed by macrorestriction profile analysis following PFGE. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Seventy-one K. pneumoniae isolates were ESBL-producing. PCR and sequencing experiments detected 38 CTX-M-producing K. pneumoniae belonged to groups CTX-M 1, CTX-M 2, CTX-M 8 and CTX-M 9. The association of different types ESBL (CTX-M, SHV and TEM was frequent. All K. pneumoniae isolates carried class 1 integron. PFGE analysis revealed thirty-one clonal types among CTX-M-producing isolates. The data presented herein illustrate the diversity of genotypes of CTX-M producing K. pneumoniae among Brazilians hospitals.

  18. Association of Unfinished Root Canal Treatments with the Risk of Pneumonia Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Yen; Chiang, Yu-Chih; Chou, Yu-Ju; Chang, Hong-Ji; Chi, Lin-Yang

    2017-01-01

    The objective of root canal treatments (RCTs) is to control pulpal diseases and salvage infected teeth by eradicating microorganisms within the root canal system. However, an unfinished RCT can leave a space for bacterial accumulation, which can leak into the oral cavity and then aspirate into the lower respiratory tract and the lungs, causing infection. This study investigated the association of unfinished RCTs with the possible risk of pneumonia hospitalization using a nationwide population-based database. After a matching process, we recruited 116,490 subjects who received an initiated RCT and had no history of pneumonia before 2005 and observed until the end of 2011. An unfinished RCT was operationally defined as an endodontic session that was started on a tooth but had no subsequent completion records. Cox proportional hazards models and subgroup analyses were used to estimate the association of unfinished RCTs on the risk of pneumonia hospitalization. In total, 1285 subjects were hospitalized for pneumonia during 2005 to 2011 with an overall pneumonia hospitalization incidence rate of 0.22% per person year. After adjusting for confounding factors, the adjusted pneumonia hospitalization hazard ratio for subjects who had unfinished RCTs was 1.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.24-1.59) compared with subjects without unfinished RCTs (P endodontic treatments once started. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel screening assay for in vivo selection of Klebsiella pneumoniae genes promoting gastrointestinal colonisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic pathogen causing pneumonia, sepsis and urinary tract infections. Colonisation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a key step in the development of infections; yet the specific factors important for K. pneumoniae to colonize and reside in the GI tract of the host are largely unknown. To identify K. pneumoniae genes promoting GI colonisation, a novel genomic-library-based approach was employed. Results Screening of a K. pneumoniae C3091 genomic library, expressed in E. coli strain EPI100, in a mouse model of GI colonisation led to the positive selection of five clones containing genes promoting persistent colonisation of the mouse GI tract. These included genes encoding the global response regulator ArcA; GalET of the galactose operon; and a cluster of two putative membrane-associated proteins of unknown function. Both ArcA and GalET are known to be involved in metabolic pathways in Klebsiella but may have additional biological actions beneficial to the pathogen. In support of this, GalET was found to confer decreased bile salt sensitivity to EPI100. Conclusions The present work establishes the use of genomic-library-based in vivo screening assays as a valuable tool for identification and characterization of virulence factors in K. pneumoniae and other bacterial pathogens. PMID:22967317

  20. Imaging of pneumocystic carinii pneumonia in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dawei; Zhang Ke; Ma Daqing; Jia Cuiyu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the X-ray and CT findings of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in AIDS. Methods: Five AIDS patients who had chest abnormalities were analyzed. Results: Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia appeared as diffuse infiltrative and interstitial fine nodules. Conclusion: If the diffuse and infiltrative interstitial fine nodule are the appearances in patients with AIDS, the pneumocystic carinii pneumonia should be considered

  1. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  2. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained,

  3. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation,

  4. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    , the production and oxidation of methane, nitrate reduction and fixation of atmospheric nitrogen are exclusively carried out by different groups of bacteria. Some bacterial species – ‘extremophiles’ – thrive in extreme environments in which no eukaryotic organisms can survive with respect to temperature, salinity...

  5. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that coats the walls of the vagina Vaginal discharge with an unpleasant or fishlike odor Vaginal pain or itching Burning during urination Doctors are unsure of the incubation period for bacterial vaginosis. How Is the Diagnosis Made? Your child’s pediatrician can make the diagnosis ...

  6. Bacterial stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Bacterial stress. Physicochemical and chemical parameters: temperature, pressure, pH, salt concentration, oxygen, irradiation. Nutritional depravation: nutrient starvation, water shortage. Toxic compounds: Antibiotics, heavy metals, toxins, mutagens. Interactions with other cells: ...

  7. Childhood Pneumonia Screener: a concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Räsänen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To the Editor:We thank Dr Grimwood for his interest and thoughtful comments on our concept of a ‘smart’ phone based Childhood Pneumonia Screener [1]. The comments are directed in particular to the third phase of the evaluation, an outcome study. Much development and deployment work needs to be conducted before we get to this phase, and the specifics of the outcome study have not yet been formulated. Therefore, Dr Grimwood’s comments are quite timely and helpful.Read the full Letter to the Editor here.Full article - Childhood Pneumonia Screener: a conceptCorrespondence

  8. Pneumonia in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Joshi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available No large data based, or randomized controlled studies are available in reference to pneumonia in ICU especially in adult population, in India. Moreover the types of ICU infrastructure, sterilization& disinfection protocols, empirical antibiotics and antibiotics policy are standardized in the country. Hence this review article has mainly utilized available literature from developed countries. This review article briefly discusses the definition of various pneumonia, epidemiology, causative organism, patho-genesis, risk factors, diagnostic strategies and management modalities. By this article, authors hope that a certain guidelines or standardization of protocols in India will be formulated.

  9. Clusters of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Tsolaki, A G; Miller, Raymonde

    1998-01-01

    Genotyping at the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear rRNA operon was performed on isolates of P. carinii sp. f. hominis from three clusters of P. carinii pneumonia among eight patients with haematological malignancies and six with HIV infection. Nine different ITS sequence...... types of P. carinii sp. f. hominis were identified in the samples from the patients with haematological malignancies, suggesting that this cluster of cases of P. carinii pneumonia was unlikely to have resulted from nosocomial transmission. A common ITS sequence type was observed in two of the patients...

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among U.S. children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Seema; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Bramley, Anna M; Reed, Carrie; Stockmann, Chris; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Self, Wesley H; Zhu, Yuwei; Patel, Anami; Hymas, Weston; Chappell, James D; Kaufman, Robert A; Kan, J Herman; Dansie, David; Lenny, Noel; Hillyard, David R; Haynes, Lia M; Levine, Min; Lindstrom, Stephen; Winchell, Jonas M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Erdman, Dean; Schneider, Eileen; Hicks, Lauri A; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Pavia, Andrew T; McCullers, Jonathan A; Finelli, Lyn

    2015-02-26

    Incidence estimates of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia among children in the United States that are based on prospective data collection are limited. Updated estimates of pneumonia that has been confirmed radiographically and with the use of current laboratory diagnostic tests are needed. We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among children younger than 18 years of age in three hospitals in Memphis, Nashville, and Salt Lake City. We excluded children with recent hospitalization or severe immunosuppression. Blood and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for pathogen detection with the use of multiple methods. Chest radiographs were reviewed independently by study radiologists. From January 2010 through June 2012, we enrolled 2638 of 3803 eligible children (69%), 2358 of whom (89%) had radiographic evidence of pneumonia. The median age of the children was 2 years (interquartile range, 1 to 6); 497 of 2358 children (21%) required intensive care, and 3 (<1%) died. Among 2222 children with radiographic evidence of pneumonia and with specimens available for bacterial and viral testing, a viral or bacterial pathogen was detected in 1802 (81%), one or more viruses in 1472 (66%), bacteria in 175 (8%), and both bacterial and viral pathogens in 155 (7%). The annual incidence of pneumonia was 15.7 cases per 10,000 children (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.9 to 16.5), with the highest rate among children younger than 2 years of age (62.2 cases per 10,000 children; 95% CI, 57.6 to 67.1). Respiratory syncytial virus was more common among children younger than 5 years of age than among older children (37% vs. 8%), as were adenovirus (15% vs. 3%) and human metapneumovirus (15% vs. 8%). Mycoplasma pneumoniae was more common among children 5 years of age or older than among younger children (19% vs. 3%). The burden of hospitalization for children with community-acquired pneumonia

  11. Bullous Skin Manifestations ofMycoplasma pneumoniaeInfection: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoopalan, Senthil Velan; Chawla, Vonita; Hogan, Mary Beth; Wilson, Nevin W; Das, Samrat U

    2017-01-01

    Bullous skin lesions are uncommon in children. While it is well known that Mycoplasma infections are associated with papular skin manifestations, bullous skin lesions are not commonly reported. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a very common bacterial pathogen causing respiratory tract infection in children and adults. We report 2 children with serology-confirmed Mycoplasma infection who were hospitalized for blistering skin lesions. Both of our patients responded well to corticosteroids and one of them required intravenous immunoglobulin. The aim of this case report is to raise awareness that Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection can present with bullous skin lesions, and to briefly review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of the skin manifestation of Mycoplasma infection.

  12. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink (Neovison vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Themudo, G. E.; Jelsbak, Lars

    2013-01-01

    . The objective of this study was to determine the genetic and geographical relationship among outbreaks of hemorrhagic pneumonia by pulsed field gel electrophoresis typing of P. aeruginosa isolates. Furthermore, chosen isolates were typed by a commercial genotyping method based on single nucleotide polymorphisms...... (SNPs) and compared to a larger dataset of human and environmental origin. The bacterial isolates were obtained from diagnostic samples from 2002-2009 and contained 164 isolates from 95 outbreaks on 90 farms. Our results show that most outbreaks of hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink are caused by distinct...

  13. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    reduce or delay bacterial biofilm formation of a range of urinary tract infectious E.coli and Klebsiella isolates. Several other proteinaceous coatings were also found to display anti-adhesive properties, possibly providing a measure for controlling the colonization of implant materials. Several other...... components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  14. Antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with acute otitis media treatment failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Bielicka, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major cause of treatment failure in children with acute otitis media (AOM). This study aimed to analyze the types of bacterial strains in fluid isolated from the middle ear of children with AOM who did not respond to oral antibiotic treatment. We also determined the antibiotic resistance of the most frequently isolated bacterial strain (Streptococcus pneumoniae) found in these children. This was a prospective study of 157 children with AOM aged from 6 months to 7 years admitted due to unsuccessful oral antibiotic treatment. All children underwent a myringotomy, and samples of the middle ear fluid were collected for bacteriological examination. Positive bacterial cultures were obtained in 104 patients (66.2%), with Streptococcus pneumoniae (39.69%), Haemophilus influenzae (16.03%) Staphylococcus aureus (16.03%), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (6.9%) and Streptococcus pyogenes (5.34%) found most frequently. The majority (65.4%) of S. pneumoniae strains were penicillin-intermediate-resistant or penicillin-resistant, and 67.2% strains of S. pneumoniae were multidrug-resistant. We identified S. pneumoniae as the most frequently isolated pathogen from the middle ear in children with AOM treatment failure and determined that the majority of strains were antibiotic-resistant. We propose that the microbiological identification of bacterial strains and their degree of antibiotic resistance should be performed prior to therapy in order to choose the most appropriate antibiotic therapy for children with AOM treatment failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  16. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia.

  17. Role of 'atypical pathogens' among adult hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Grace; Ip, Margaret; Lee, Nelson; Rainer, Timothy H; Man, Shin Y; Cockram, Clive S; Antonio, Gregory E; Ng, Margaret H L; Chan, Michael H M; Chau, Shirley S L; Mak, Paulina; Chan, Paul K S; Ahuja, Anil T; Sung, Joseph J Y; Hui, David S C

    2009-11-01

    Agents such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are recognized as important causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) worldwide. This study examined the role of these 'atypical pathogens' (AP) among adult hospitalized patients with CAP. A prospective, observational study of consecutive adult CAP (clinico-radiological diagnosis) patients hospitalized during 2004-2005 was conducted. Causal organisms were determined using cultures, antigen testing and paired serology. Clinical/laboratory/radiological variables and outcomes were compared between different aetiologies, and a clinical prediction rule for AP was constructed. There were 1193 patients studied (mean age 70.8 +/- 18.0 years, men 59.3%). Causal organisms were identified in 468 (39.2%) patients: 'bacterial' (48.7%), 'viral' (26.9%), 'AP' (28.6%). The AP infections comprised Mycoplasma or Chlamydophila pneumoniae (97.8%) and co-infection with bacteria/virus (30.6%). The majority of AP infections involved elderly patients (63.4%) with comorbidities (41.8%), and more than one-third of patients were classified as 'intermediate' or 'high' risk CAP on presentation (pneumonia severity index IV-V (35.1%); CURB-65 2-5 (42.5%)). Patients with AP infections had disease severities and outcomes similar to patients with CAP due to other organisms (oxygen therapy 29.1% vs 29.8%; non-invasive ventilation 3.7% vs 3.3%; admission to the intensive care unit 4.5% vs 2.7%; length of hospitalization 6 day vs 7 day; 30-day mortality: 2.2% vs 6.0%; overall P > 0.05). Age or =38.0 degrees C, respiratory rate 130 mmol/L, leucocyte count pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae as single/co-pathogens are important causes of severe pneumonia among older adults. No reliable clinical indicators exist, so empirical antibiotic coverage for hospitalized CAP patients may need to be considered.

  18. Prevalence of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Klebsiella Pneumoniae Isolated From Urinary Tract Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, P; Bhandari, D; Thapa, K; Thapa, P; Shrestha, D; Chaudhary, H K; Shrestha, A; Parajuli, H; Gupta, B P

    2016-05-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, one of the bacterial agents associated with urinary tract infection has been often implicated as a major extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producer in last few decades. This study was designed to assess the prevalence of ESBL producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in urinary isolates at a tertiary care hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal, from July to December 2014. One thousand nine hundred eighty six mid-stream urine specimens were collected aseptically from the clinically suspected patients of urinary tract infections attending Capital Hospital and Research Center, Kathmandu. The samples were processed following standard guidelines as recommended by American Society for Microbiology (ASM) and the isolates including Klebsiella spp. were identified using the specific biochemical and sugar fermentation tests recommended by ASM. Antibiotic sensitivity testing was done by modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and interpreted following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates showing resistance upon initial screening with ceftriaxone (30 μg) disc were then confirmed for ESBL production by phenotypic confirmatory disc diffusion test (PCDDT) using ceftazidime (30 µg) and ceftazidime + clavulanic acid (30 µg + 10µg) and cefotaxime (30 µg) and cefotaxime + clavulanic acid (30 µg +10µg) disc as per CLSI guidelines. Out of a total 1986 specimens investigated, Escherichia coli was isolated in 309 (83.9%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae in 38 (10.3%) cases. Initial screening with ceftriaxone disc revealed 18 isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae to be resistant. Further testing by PCDDT method confirmed 7 (18.4%) Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates to be ESBL producers. Compared to some earlier studies done in Nepal, higher prevalence of ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae was observed warranting a national surveillance for routine monitoring of ESBL producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates.

  19. Epithelial Myeloid-Differentiation Factor 88 Is Dispensable during Klebsiella Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas, Adam A; Claushuis, Theodora A M; Mohan, Rajiv A; Christoffels, Vincent M; Aidinis, Vassilis; Florquin, Sandrine; Van't Veer, Cornelis; Hou, Baidong; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2017-05-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia. Previous studies have documented an important role for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expressed by myeloid cells in the recognition of K. pneumoniae and the initiation of a protective immune response. Lung epithelial cells also express TLRs and can participate in innate immune defense. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the common TLR adaptor protein myeloid-differentiation factor (MyD) 88 in lung epithelium during host defense against K. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia. To this end, we first crossed mice expressing cre recombinase under the control of the surfactant protein C (SftpCcre) or the club cell 10 kD (CC10cre) promoter with reporter mice to show that SftpCcre mice mainly express cre in type II alveolar cells, whereas CC10cre mice express cre almost exclusively in bronchiolar epithelial cells. We then generated mice with cell-targeted deletion of MyD88 in type II alveolar (SftpCcre-MyD88-lox) and bronchiolar epithelial (CC10cre-MyD88-lox) cells, and infected them with K. pneumoniae via the airways. Bacterial growth and dissemination were not affected by the loss of MyD88 in SftpCcre-MyD88-lox or CC10cre-MyD88-lox mice compared with control littermates. Furthermore, inflammatory responses induced by K. pneumoniae in the lung were not dependent on MyD88 expression in type II alveolar or bronchiolar epithelial cells. These results indicate that MyD88 expression in two distinct lung epithelial cell types does not contribute to host defense during pneumonia caused by a common human gram-negative pathogen.

  20. Isolation of genes involved in biofilm formation of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain causing pyogenic liver abscess.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA complicated with meningitis and endophthalmitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae is an emerging infectious disease. To investigate the mechanisms and effects of biofilm formation of K. pneumoniae causing PLA, microtiter plate assays were used to determine the levels of biofilm formed by K. pneumoniae clinical isolates and to screen for biofilm-altered mutants from a transposon mutant library of a K. pneumoniae PLA-associated strain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The biofilm formation of K. pneumoniae was examined by microtiter plate assay. Higher levels of biofilm formation were demonstrated by K. pneumoniae strains associated with PLA. A total of 23 biofilm-decreased mutants and 4 biofilm-increased mutants were identified. Among these mutants, a biofilm-decreased treC mutant displayed less mucoviscosity and produced less capsular polysaccharide (CPS, whereas a biofilm-increased sugE mutant displayed higher mucoviscosity and produced more CPS. The biofilm phenotypes of treC and sugE mutants also were confirmed by glass slide culture. Deletion of treC, which encodes trehalose-6-phosphate hydrolase, impaired bacterial trehalose utilization. Addition of glucose to the culture medium restored the capsule production and biofilm formation in the treC mutant. Transcriptional profile analysis suggested that the increase of CPS production in ΔsugE may reflect elevated cps gene expression (upregulated through rmpA in combination with increased treC expression. In vivo competition assays demonstrated that the treC mutant strain was attenuated in competitiveness during intragastric infection in mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genes important for biofilm formation by K. pneumoniae PLA strain were identified using an in vitro assay. Among the identified genes, treC and sugE affect biofilm formation by modulating CPS production. The importance of treC in gastrointestinal tract colonization suggests

  1. Organizing pneumonia: the many morphological faces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikonomou, Anastasia; Hansell, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Organizing pneumonia is a non-specific response to various forms of lung injury and is the pathological hallmark of the distinct clinical entity termed cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. The typical imaging features of this syndrome have been widely documented and consist of patchy air-space consolidation, often subpleural, with or without ground-glass opacities. The purpose of this article is to highlight the less familiar imaging patterns of organizing pneumonia which include focal organizing pneumonia, a variety of nodular patterns, a bronchocentric distribution, band-like opacities, a perilobular pattern and a progressive fibrotic form of organizing pneumonia. (orig.)

  2. The clinical characteristics of the radiation pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fuzheng; Wang Mingzhi; Chen Jianjiang; Wang Zhongxiang; Mao Yongjie

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the clinical characteristics of the radiation pneumonia, sum the experience and the basis of the radiation pneumonia for its prevention and treatment. Method: Twenty three cases with radiation pneumonia from 1991 to 1998 were retrospectively analysed. Its clinical manifestation, chest X-ray, thoracic CT and blood routine were evaluated. Result: The acute manifestation was fever, cough, dyspnea, and the chronic manifestation was cough and insufficiency of pulmonary function. Conclusion: The prevention of radiation pneumonia is more important, high dose cortical steroids and antibiotics were prescribed during the acute stage and the chronic radiation pneumonia is irreversible

  3. Welcome to pneumonia Volume 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Cripps

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Commentary Welcome to pneumonia Volume 2 Cripps, A.W.  Starting a new journal is always challenging as new IT systems are put in place. Thank you to all our readers, our reviewers, those who submitted manuscripts and those whose manuscripts were published, for their patience and generosity in thought.

  4. Wegener granulomatosis masquerading as pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, D J; Theodorou, S J; Mpougias, K; Mastora, M; Stefanaki, S; Akritidis, N C

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of an elderly patient with a limited form of Wegener granulomatosis, which simulated the clinical and imaging features of organizing pneumonia. Here we call attention to this atypical case presentation that eloquently illustrates the many faces of Wegener granulomatosis.

  5. Epimorphin expression in interstitial pneumonia

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    Suga Moritaka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epimorphin modulates epithelial morphogenesis in embryonic mouse organs. We previously suggested that epimorphin contributes to repair of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice via epithelium-mesenchyme interactions. To clarify the role of epimorphin in human lungs, we evaluated epimorphin expression and localization in normal lungs, lungs with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, and lungs with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP; we also studied the effect of recombinant epimorphin on cultured human alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. Northern and Western blotting analyses revealed that epimorphin expression in NSIP samples were significantly higher than those in control lungs and lungs with UIP. Immunohistochemistry showed strong epimorphin expression in mesenchymal cells of early fibrotic lesions and localization of epimorphin protein on mesenchymal cells and extracellular matrix of early fibrotic lesions in the nonspecific interstitial pneumonia group. Double-labeled fluorescent images revealed expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 in re-epithelialized cells overlying epimorphin-positive early fibrotic lesions. Immunohistochemistry and metalloproteinase activity assay demonstrated augmented expression of metalloproteinase induced by recombinant epimorphin in human alveolar epithelial cells. These findings suggest that epimorphin contributes to repair of pulmonary fibrosis in nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, perhaps partly by inducing expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2, which is an important proteolytic factor in lung remodeling.

  6. Childhood Pneumonia Screener: a concept

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    Jukka Räsänen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Childhood pneumonia continues to be the number one cause of death in children under five years of age in developing countries. In addition to mortality, pneumonia constitutes an enormous economic and social burden because late diagnosis is associated with high cost of treatment and often leads to chronic health problems. There are several bottlenecks in developing countries in the case flow of a child with lung infection: 1 recognising the symptoms as a reason to seek care, 2 getting the patient to a first-tier health facility, 3 scarcity of trained healthcare personnel who can diagnose the condition and its severity, 4 access to a second-tier facility in severe cases. These factors are commonly present in rural areas but even in more urban settings, access to a physician is often delayed. The Childhood Pneumonia Screener project aims at bridging the diagnostic gap using emerging technology. Mobile “smart” phone communication with several inexpensive dedicated sensors is proposed as a rapid data-collection and transmission unit that is connected to a central location where trained personnel assisted by sophisticated signal processing algorithms, evaluate the data and determine if the child is likely to have pneumonia and what the level and urgency of care should be.

  7. Prevotella intermedia induces severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in mice with upregulated platelet-activating factor receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory infection worldwide. Although oral hygiene has been considered a risk factor for developing pneumonia, the relationship between oral bacteria and pneumococcal infection is unknown. In this study, we examined the synergic effects of Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathic bacterium, on pneumococcal pneumonia. The synergic effects of the supernatant of P. intermedia (PiSup) on pneumococcal pneumonia were investigated in mice, and the stimulation of pneumococcal adhesion to human alveolar (A549) cells by PiSup was assessed. The effects of PiSup on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) transcript levels in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the differences between the effects of pneumococcal infection induced by various periodontopathic bacterial species were verified in mice. Mice inoculated with S. pneumoniae plus PiSup exhibited a significantly lower survival rate, higher bacterial loads in the lungs, spleen, and blood, and higher inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) than those infected without PiSup. In A549 cells, PiSup increased pneumococcal adhesion and PAFR transcript levels. PiSup also increased lung PAFR transcript levels in mice. Similar effects were not observed in the supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Thus, P. intermedia has the potential to induce severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia with enhanced pneumococcal adhesion to lower airway cells.

  8. Bacterial lipases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, meaning a sharp increase in lipase activity observed when the substrate starts to form an emulsion, thereby presenting to the enzyme an interfacial area. As a consequence, the kinetics of a lipase rea...

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Cathelicidin Correlates With the Bacterial Load and Outcomes in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savonius, Okko; Helve, Otto; Roine, Irmeli; Andersson, Sture; Saukkoriipi, Annika; González Mata, Antonio; Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula

    2018-02-01

    Large cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) bacterial load in bacterial meningitis (BM) relates to poor outcome. However, the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin seems important to host defense. We studied how cathelicidin concentrations and bacterial load in CSF relate in childhood BM and to what extent they may predict the disease outcome. The patient data originated from a large prospective clinical trial in Latin America in 1996-2003 in which the CSF samples were collected on admission (CSF1) and 12-24 hours later (CSF2). The cathelicidin concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the CSF bacterial load by real-time polymerase chain reaction. This analysis comprised 76 children with meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (n = 44), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 28) or Neisseria meningitidis (n = 4). The cathelicidin concentration correlated with the bacterial genome count in both samples (CSF1: ρ = 0.531, P < 0.001; CSF2: ρ = 0.553, P < 0.001). A high CSF1 ratio of cathelicidin to the bacterial genome count was associated with fewer audiologic sequelae (odds ratio: 0.11, 95% confidence interval: 0.02-0.61, P = 0.01) and more favorable neurologic outcomes (odds ratio: 3.95, 95% confidence interval: 1.22-12.8, P = 0.02), but not with better survival. In conclusion, CSF cathelicidin and the bacterial load were closely related in childhood BM. A high initial cathelicidin-to-bacterial genome count ratio predicted better outcomes in survivors.

  10. Etiology of pediatric pneumonia with effusion in the Dominican Republic and potential impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines

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    Jesús Feris-Iglesias

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusion is a serious complication of pneumonia, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause. We describe the aetiology of pneumonia with effusion among children in the Dominican Republic before the introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV in 2013 and the performance characteristics of a rapid immunochromatographic test (ICT for detecting S. pneumoniae in pleural fluid. From July 2009 to June 2011, we enrolled children <15 years old admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion to Robert Reid Cabral Children’s Hospital, Dominican Republic. Pleural fluid was tested by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR for bacterial (S. pyogenes, S. pneumoniae and viral (respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus pathogens, and by ICT for S. pneumoniae. We calculated the performance of ICT and culture compared with PCR. Among 121 cases, the median age was 31 months (range 1 week to 14 years. Pleural fluid culture (n = 121 and PCR testing (n = 112 identified an aetiology in 85 (70.2% cases, including 62 S. pneumoniae (51.2% and 19 Staphylococcus aureus (15.7%. The viruses tested were not detected. The most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes were 14 (n = 20, 1 (n = 13, and 3 (n = 12. Serotype coverage of the 10- and 13-valent PCVs would be 70.5% and 95.1%, respectively. The sensitivity of point-of-care ICT was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94.1% - 100%, while specificity was 86.3% (95% CI 73.7% - 94.3%. S. pneumoniae caused more than half of paediatric pneumonia with effusion cases; introduction of PCV in the Dominican Republic could reduce the burden by 36-49%. ICT is a practical, valid diagnostic tool for clinical care and surveillance in settings with limited laboratory capacity

  11. Clinical features of Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess

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    CHEN Fan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo analyze the clinical data of Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess (KPLA, and to provide a reference for early diagnosis and proper treatment. MethodsThe etiological features of 156 patients with bacterial liver abscess (BLA and positive culture results who were hospitalized in The First Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University from March 2009 to July 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. According to the culture results, BLA patients were divided into KPLA group (81 patients and non-KPLA (NKPLA group (61 patients, and other positive strains including Escherichia coli were found in the other 14 patients with positive culture results for Klebsiella pneumoniae. The clinical, laboratory, and imaging data of KPLA and NKPLA were compared. The t-test was applied for comparison of normally distributed continuous data between groups, and the Mann-Whitney U test was applied for continuous data with skewed distribution between groups; the chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test was applied for comparison of categorical data between groups. ResultsThe most common pathogenic bacteria for BLA were Klebsiella pneumonia. In comparison with the NKPLA group, the KPLA group had a significantly higher proportion of male patients (χ2=4.50, P=0.03, a significantly higher proportion of patients with diabetes (χ2=27.28,P<0.001, and a significantly lower proportion of patients who complained of abdominal pain (χ2=5.24, P=0.02. In the aspects of underlying diseases, the prevalence of biliary tract diseases, previous abdominal surgery, and a history of intraperitoneal tumors showed significant differences between the NKPLA group and the KPLA group (χ2=18.38, 20.87, and 21.68, all P<0.001. As for laboratory examination, the NKPLA group had a significantly greater reduction in hemoglobin compared with the KPLA group (t=4.903, P<0.001. In terms of imaging examination, most BLA patients showed a single lesion in the right lobe of the liver, but

  12. Bidirectional Relationship between Cognitive Function and Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Faraaz Ali; Pike, Francis; Alvarez, Karina; Angus, Derek; Newman, Anne B.; Lopez, Oscar; Tate, Judith; Kapur, Vishesh; Wilsdon, Anthony; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Hansel, Nadia; Au, David; Avdalovic, Mark; Fan, Vincent S.; Barr, R. Graham

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Relationships between chronic health conditions and acute infections remain poorly understood. Preclinical studies suggest crosstalk between nervous and immune systems. Objectives: To determine bidirectional relationships between cognition and pneumonia. Methods: We conducted longitudinal analyses of a population-based cohort over 10 years. We determined whether changes in cognition increase risk of pneumonia hospitalization by trajectory analyses and joint modeling. We then determined whether pneumonia hospitalization increased risk of subsequent dementia using a Cox model with pneumonia as a time-varying covariate. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 5,888 participants, 639 (10.9%) were hospitalized with pneumonia at least once. Most participants had normal cognition before pneumonia. Three cognition trajectories were identified: no, minimal, and severe rapid decline. A greater proportion of participants hospitalized with pneumonia were on trajectories of minimal or severe decline before occurrence of pneumonia compared with those never hospitalized with pneumonia (proportion with no, minimal, and severe decline were 67.1%, 22.8%, and 10.0% vs. 76.0%, 19.3%, and 4.6% for participants with and without pneumonia, respectively; P pneumonia, even in those with normal cognition and physical function before pneumonia (β = −0.02; P pneumonia were subsequently at an increased risk of dementia (hazard ratio, 2.24 [95% confidence interval, 1.62–3.11]; P = 0.01). Associations were independent of demographics, health behaviors, other chronic conditions, and physical function. Bidirectional relationship did not vary based on severity of disease, and similar associations were noted for those with severe sepsis and other infections. Conclusions: A bidirectional relationship exists between pneumonia and cognition and may explain how a single episode of infection in well-appearing older individuals accelerates decline in chronic health conditions and loss of

  13. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

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    Xiang-hua Hou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Selective pressure, the extensive use of antibiotics, and the conjugational transmission of antibiotic resistance genes across bacterial species and genera facilitate the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR K. pneumoniae. Here, we examined the occurrence, phenotypes and genetic features of MDR K. pneumoniae isolated from patients in intensive care units (ICUs at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University in Xiamen, China, from January to December 2011. Thirty-eight MDR K. pneumoniae strains were collected. These MDR K. pneumoniae isolates possessed at least seven antibiotic resistance determinants, which contribute to the high-level resistance of these bacteria to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones and β-lactams. Among these isolates, 24 strains were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producers, 2 strains were AmpC producers, and 12 strains were both ESBL and AmpC producers. The 38 MDR isolates also contained class I (28/38 and class II integrons (10/38. All 28 class I-positive isolates contained aacC1, aacC4, orfX, orfX’ and aadA1 genes. β-lactam resistance was conferred through blaSHV (22/38, blaTEM (10/38, and blaCTX-M (7/38. The highly conserved blaKPC-2 (37/38 and blaOXA-23(1/38 alleles were responsible for carbapenem resistance, and a gyrAsite mutation (27/38 and the plasmid-mediated qnrB gene (13/38 were responsible for quinolone resistance. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR fingerprinting of these MDR strains revealed the presence of five groups and sixteen patterns. The MDR strains from unrelated groups showed different drug resistance patterns; however, some homologous strains also showed different drug resistance profiles. Therefore, REP-PCR-based analyses can provide information to evaluate the epidemic status of nosocomial infection caused by MDR K. pneumoniae; however, this test lacks the power to discriminate some

  14. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis in alcoholic patients.

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    Martijn Weisfelt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholism is associated with susceptibility to infectious disease, particularly bacterial pneumonia. In the present study we described characteristics in alcoholic patients with bacterial meningitis and delineate the differences with findings in non-alcoholic adults with bacterial meningitis.This was a prospective nationwide observational cohort study including patients aged >16 years who had bacterial meningitis confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid (696 episodes of bacterial meningitis occurring in 671 patients. Alcoholism was present in 27 of 686 recorded episodes of bacterial meningitis (4% and alcoholics were more often male than non-alcoholics (82% vs 48%, P = 0.001. A higher proportion of alcoholics had underlying pneumonia (41% vs 11% P<0.001. Alcoholics were more likely to have meningitis due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (70% vs 50%, P = 0.01 and Listeria monocytogenes (19% vs 4%, P = 0.005, whereas Neisseria meningitidis was more common in non-alcoholic patients (39% vs 4%, P = 0.01. A large proportion of alcoholics developed complications during clinical course (82% vs 62%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.04, often cardiorespiratory failure (52% vs 28%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.01. Alcoholic patients were at risk for unfavourable outcome (67% vs 33%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P<0.001.Alcoholic patients are at high risk for complications resulting in high morbidity and mortality. They are especially at risk for cardiorespiratory failure due to underlying pneumonia, and therefore, aggressive supportive care may be crucial in the treatment of these patients.

  15. Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis in Alcoholic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Background Alcoholism is associated with susceptibility to infectious disease, particularly bacterial pneumonia. In the present study we described characteristics in alcoholic patients with bacterial meningitis and delineate the differences with findings in non-alcoholic adults with bacterial meningitis. Methods/Principal Findings This was a prospective nationwide observational cohort study including patients aged >16 years who had bacterial meningitis confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid (696 episodes of bacterial meningitis occurring in 671 patients). Alcoholism was present in 27 of 686 recorded episodes of bacterial meningitis (4%) and alcoholics were more often male than non-alcoholics (82% vs 48%, P = 0.001). A higher proportion of alcoholics had underlying pneumonia (41% vs 11% Pmeningitis due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (70% vs 50%, P = 0.01) and Listeria monocytogenes (19% vs 4%, P = 0.005), whereas Neisseria meningitidis was more common in non-alcoholic patients (39% vs 4%, P = 0.01). A large proportion of alcoholics developed complications during clinical course (82% vs 62%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.04), often cardiorespiratory failure (52% vs 28%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.01). Alcoholic patients were at risk for unfavourable outcome (67% vs 33%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance Alcoholic patients are at high risk for complications resulting in high morbidity and mortality. They are especially at risk for cardiorespiratory failure due to underlying pneumonia, and therefore, aggressive supportive care may be crucial in the treatment of these patients. PMID:20161709

  16. Effect of radiation processing in elimination of Klebsiella pneumoniae from food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Raj Kamal; Nagar, Vandan; Shashidhar, Ravindranath

    2015-10-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae has been considered as an important foodborne pathogen which causes severe infections that include meningitis, bronchitis, bacteremia, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections in humans and animals. It is well known to most clinicians as a cause of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Klebsiella is an opportunistic pathogen, that primarily attacks neonates, infants, elderly and immuno-compromised patients and therefore impose a serious, emerging public health hazard globally. Contaminated sprouts, vegetables, seafood and other animal meat products are considered as main sources of Klebsiella infection. In the current study, radiation sensitivity of K. pneumoniae MTCC 109 was determined in different food samples. The decimal reduction dose (D10) values of K. pneumoniae MTCC 109 in saline and nutrient broth at 0-4 °C were 0.116±0.009, 0.136±0.005 kGy, respectively. The mixed sprouts, fish and poultry samples were inoculated with K. pneumoniae MTCC 109 and exposed to gamma radiation to evaluate the effectiveness of radiation treatment in the elimination of K. pneumoniae. D10 values of K. pneumoniae in mixed sprouts, poultry and fish samples were found to be 0.142±0.009, 0.125±0.0004 and 0.277±0.012 kGy, respectively. Radiation treatment with a 1.5 kGy dose resulted in the complete elimination of 3.1±1.8×105 CFU/g of K. pneumoniae from these food samples. No recovery of K. pneumoniae was observed in the 1.5 kGy treated samples stored at 4 °C up to 12 days, even after enrichment and selective plating. This study shows that a 1.5 kGy dose of irradiation treatment could lead to the complete elimination of 3.1±1.8×105 CFU/g of K. pneumoniae from mixed sprouts, poultry and fish samples.

  17. A type IV pilus mediates DNA binding during natural transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenceau, Raphaël; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Baconnais, Sonia; Gault, Joseph; Malosse, Christian; Dujeancourt, Annick; Campo, Nathalie; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Le Cam, Eric; Claverys, Jean-Pierre; Fronzes, Rémi

    2013-01-01

    Natural genetic transformation is widely distributed in bacteria and generally occurs during a genetically programmed differentiated state called competence. This process promotes genome plasticity and adaptability in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Transformation requires the binding and internalization of exogenous DNA, the mechanisms of which are unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a transformation pilus at the surface of competent Streptococcus pneumoniae cells. This Type IV-like pilus, which is primarily composed of the ComGC pilin, is required for transformation. We provide evidence that it directly binds DNA and propose that the transformation pilus is the primary DNA receptor on the bacterial cell during transformation in S. pneumoniae. Being a central component of the transformation apparatus, the transformation pilus enables S. pneumoniae, a major Gram-positive human pathogen, to acquire resistance to antibiotics and to escape vaccines through the binding and incorporation of new genetic material.

  18. A type IV pilus mediates DNA binding during natural transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Raphaël Laurenceau

    Full Text Available Natural genetic transformation is widely distributed in bacteria and generally occurs during a genetically programmed differentiated state called competence. This process promotes genome plasticity and adaptability in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Transformation requires the binding and internalization of exogenous DNA, the mechanisms of which are unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a transformation pilus at the surface of competent Streptococcus pneumoniae cells. This Type IV-like pilus, which is primarily composed of the ComGC pilin, is required for transformation. We provide evidence that it directly binds DNA and propose that the transformation pilus is the primary DNA receptor on the bacterial cell during transformation in S. pneumoniae. Being a central component of the transformation apparatus, the transformation pilus enables S. pneumoniae, a major Gram-positive human pathogen, to acquire resistance to antibiotics and to escape vaccines through the binding and incorporation of new genetic material.

  19. Mixed Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes meningitis in an immunocompromised adult patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerle, Clémence; Ivanov, Vadim; Mercier, Cédric; Costello, Régis; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-11-29

    Community-acquired meningitis is a monomicrobial infection caused by either viruses or bacteria in the vast majority of patients. We report here one exceptional case of a patient with mixed bacterial meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. We report the case of a 68-year-old immunocompromised Caucasian man suffering from otitis and then meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. Bacteria were undistinguishable by direct microscopic examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. He responded well to treatment with cefotaxime and dexamethasone, with no sequelae observed at the 4-month follow-up. This first reported case of mixed S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes meningitis illustrates the life-threatening consequences of barotrauma in immunocompromised patients suffering from otorhinolaryngeal infections.

  20. Host Immune Response to Bacterial Cyclic Diguanylic Acid (c-di-GMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Immunostimulatory Molecule Against Pneumococcal Infection Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, meningitis, and otitis media in...biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus, including human methicillin- resistant S. aureus strains and animal clinical isolates (6,19). We have also...immunostimulation does not involve any known TLR or Nod. We propose that cyclic dinucleotides like c-di-GMP can be used clinically in humans and animals as

  1. Clinical Characteristics of Influenza-Associated Pneumonia of Adults: Clinical Features and Factors Contributing to Severity and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Takashi; Kagiyama, Naho; Uozumi, Ryuji; Odashima, Kyuto; Takaku, Yotaro; Kurashima, Kazuyoshi; Morita, Satoshi; Takayanagi, Noboru

    2017-06-01

    Background : Pneumonia is a major complication of influenza that contributes to mortality. Clinical characteristics and factors of influenza virus contributing to the severity and mortality of pneumonia have not been fully elucidated. Objective : The objective was to clarify clinical characteristics and factors contributing to the severity and mortality of influenza-associated pneumonia ( flu-p ). Methods : We retrospectively analyzed patients with flu-p . Results : From December 1999 to March 2016, 210 patients with a median age of 69 (range, 17 to 92) years with flu-p based on positive rapid antigen tests, increased antibody titers of paired sera, or positive results of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were admitted to our institution. A multivariate analysis found that advanced age (≥ 65 years), pneumonia subtypes (unclassified), diabetes mellitus, and acute kidney injury complicated with flu-p were independent factors associated with disease severity, whereas pneumonia subtypes (mixed viral and bacterial pneumonia and unclassified), healthcare-associated pneumonia, acute kidney injury complicated with flu-p , and severity on admission (severe) were independent factors associated with non-survival. Conclusion : The clinical characteristics of flu-p are varied, and the contribution of several factors to the severity and mortality of flu-p suggest their importance in either preventing flu-p or managing flu-p after it develops.

  2. Atypical Pneumonia: Updates on Legionella, Chlamydophila, and Mycoplasma Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lokesh; Losier, Ashley; Tolbert, Thomas; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Marion, Chad R

    2017-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has multiple causes and is associated with illness that requires admission to the hospital and mortality. The causes of atypical CAP include Legionella species, Chlamydophila, and Mycoplasma. Atypical CAP remains a diagnostic challenge and, therefore, likely is undertreated. This article reviews the advancements in the evaluation and treatment of patients and discusses current conflicts and controversies of atypical CAP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pneumonia aguda fibrinosa e organizante

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    C. Damas

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A designação acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP foi proposta por Beasley et al para os casos em que as características histopatológicas das lesões não se enquadravam em outras situações clínicas (agu-das ou subagudas conhecidas. A presença de fibrina intra alveolar e de pneumonia organizativa, com distribuição difusa, é a principal alteração histológica associada a esta entidade.Os autores descrevem o caso de um doente do sexo masculino, com o diagnóstico de AFOP, por bióp-sia pulmonar cirúrgica. O doente teve uma apresentação subaguda, apresentando por queixas principais tosse, dor torácica e febre. TAC torácica mostrou infiltrados bilaterais, difusos. Após início de corticoterapia sistémica e ciclofosfamida, o doente apresentou melhoria clínica significativa. Ao elaborar este caso, os autores esperam acrescentar mais alguns dados sobre esta nova entidade.Rev Port Pneumol 2006; XII (5: 615-620 Abstract: The term Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia (AFOP has been proposed by Beasley et al for cases that not fit into the histopathologic criteria of the recognized entities described as acute or subacute clinical presentations. The presence of intra-alveolar fibrin in the form of fibrin ‘balls’ and organizing pneumonia with patchy distribution are the main histological features of this entity. We describe the case of a male patient with the diagnostic of AFOP made by surgical lung biopsy. He had a subacute presentation of symptoms consisting of productive cough, chest pain and fever. Bilateral infiltrates with patchy and diffuse distribution were the predominant features in his chest HRCT scan. The patient had a good clinical course after a treatment with prednisone and cyclophosphamide. Our hope in reporting this case study is to add some more data to the discussion of this new entity.Rev Port Pneumol 2006; XII (5: 615-620 Palavras

  4. Community-onset Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia in Taiwan: clinical features of the disease and associated microbiological characteristics of isolates from pneumonia and nasopharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Wang, Yu-Ping; Wang, Fu-Der; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of community-onset pneumonia in Asian countries and South Africa. We investigated the clinical characteristics of K. pneumoniae causing community-onset pneumonia, and the associated microbiological features between K. pneumoniae isolates from pneumonia and those from the nasopharynx in Taiwan. This study was conducted at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital during July, 2012 to February, 2014. The clinical characteristics in patients with community-onset K. pneumoniae pneumonia were analyzed. K. pneumoniae isolates from the nasopharynx of adults attending otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinics were collected to compare their microbiological features with those from pneumonia. Capsular genotypes, antimicrobial susceptibility, and multilocus sequence type (MLST) were determined among these strains. Ninety-one patients with community-onset K. pneumoniae pneumonia were enrolled. We found a high mortality (29.7%) among these patients. Capsular types K1, K2, K5, K20, K54, and K57 accounted for ∼70% of the K. pneumoniae isolates causing pneumonia, and ∼70% of all the K. pneumoniae strains isolated from the nasopharynx of patients in outpatient clinics. The MLST profiles further demonstrated the genetic relatedness between most pneumonia isolates and those from the nasopharynx. In conclusion, our results show that community-onset pneumonia caused by K. pneumoniae was associated with high mortality and could have a reservoir in the nasopharynx. To tackle this high-mortality disease, the distribution of capsular types in the nasopharynx might have implications for future vaccine development.

  5. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-05-21

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2012. Endocarditis was identified in 24 of 1025 episodes (2%) of bacterial meningitis. Cultures yielded Streptococcus pneumoniae in 13 patients, Staphylococcus aureus in 8 patients, and Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus salivarius in 1 patient each. Clues leading to the diagnosis of endocarditis were cardiac murmurs, persistent or recurrent fever, a history of heart valve disease, and S aureus as the causative pathogen of bacterial meningitis. Treatment consisted of prolonged antibiotic therapy in all patients and surgical valve replacement in 10 patients (42%). Two patients were treated with oral anticoagulants, and both developed life-threatening intracerebral hemorrhage. Systemic (70%) and neurological (54%) complications occurred frequently, leading to a high proportion of patients with unfavorable outcome (63%). Seven of 24 patients (29%) with meningitis and endocarditis died. Endocarditis is an uncommon coexisting condition in bacterial meningitis but is associated with a high rate of unfavorable outcome.

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae Drugs Resistance in Acute Rhinosinusitis

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    Chong Jie Hao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute rhinosinusitis that usually caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes the reason why patients seek for medical care. Drugs resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasing worldwide. This study was conducted to determine drugs resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia from acute rhinosinusitis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. Methods: A descriptive laboratory study was conducted in June–October 2014 at the Laboratory of Microbiology Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran. The sample was taken using nasopharyngeal swabbing from 100 acute rhinosinusitis patients in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital and planted on tryptic soy agar containing 5% sheep blood and 5 μg/ml of gentamicin sulphate and then incubated in 5% CO2 incubator at 37°C for 24 hours. The identification of Streptococcus pneumonia was performed by optochin test. The susceptibility test against Streptococcus pneumoniae was done using disk diffusion method.The antibiotic disks were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, oxacillin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, and doxycycline. Results: Out of 100 samples, 8 of them were tested positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Three of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates died with unknown reason after it were stored at -80 .The drugs resistance test showed the resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim were 6, whereas levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4. Conclusions: Streptococcus pneumonia drugs resistance in acute rhinosinusitis shows the resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim are 6, whereas the resistance to levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4.

  7. Aspiration pneumonia: a review of modern trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBardino, David M; Wunderink, Richard G

    2015-02-01

    The purpose was to describe aspiration pneumonia in the context of other lung infections and aspiration syndromes and to distinguish between the main scenarios commonly implied when the terms aspiration or aspiration pneumonia are used. Finally, we aim to summarize current evidence surrounding the diagnosis, microbiology, treatment, risks, and prevention of aspiration pneumonia. Medline was searched from inception to November 2013. All descriptive or experimental studies that added to the understanding of aspiration pneumonia were reviewed. All studies that provided insight into the clinical aspiration syndromes, historical context, diagnosis, microbiology, risk factors, prevention, and treatment were summarized within the text. Despite the original teaching, aspiration pneumonia is difficult to distinguish from other pneumonia syndromes. The microbiology of pneumonia after a macroaspiration has changed over the last 60 years from an anaerobic infection to one of aerobic and nosocomial bacteria. Successful antibiotic therapy has been achieved with several antibiotics. Various risks for aspiration have been described leading to several proposed preventative measures. Aspiration pneumonia is a disease with a distinct pathophysiology. In the modern era, aspiration pneumonia is rarely solely an anaerobic infection. Antibiotic treatment is largely dependent on the clinical scenario. Several measures may help prevent aspiration pneumonia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bacterial mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...... movement is powered by insertional polymerization of ParM. Consistently, we find that segregating plasmids are positioned at the ends of extending ParM filaments. Thus, the process of R1 plasmid segregation in E. coli appears to be mechanistically analogous to the actin-based motility operating...

  9. Dynamics of Human Complement–Mediated Killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nypaver, Christina M.; Thornton, Margaret M.; Yin, Suellen M.; Bracho, David O.; Nelson, Patrick W.; Jones, Alan E.; Bortz, David M.; Younger, John G.

    2010-01-01

    With an in vitro system that used a luminescent strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae to assess bacterial metabolic activity in near-real-time, we investigated the dynamics of complement-mediated attack in healthy individuals and in patients presenting to the emergency department with community-acquired severe sepsis. A novel mathematical/statistical model was developed to simplify light output trajectories over time into two fitted parameters, the rate of complement activation and the delay from activation to the onset of killing. Using Factor B–depleted serum, the alternative pathway was found to be the primary bactericidal effector: In the absence of B, C3 opsonization as measured by flow cytometry did not progress and bacteria proliferated near exponentially. Defects in bacterial killing were easily demonstrable in patients with severe sepsis compared with healthy volunteers. In most patients with sepsis, the rate of activation was higher than in normal subjects but was associated with a prolonged delay between activation and bacterial killing (P < 0.05 for both). Theoretical modeling suggested that this combination of accentuated but delayed function should allow successful bacterial killing but with significantly greater complement activation. The use of luminescent bacteria allowed for the development of a novel and powerful tool for assessing complement immunology for the purposes of mechanistic study and patient evaluation. PMID:20008281

  10. Dynamics of human complement-mediated killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nypaver, Christina M; Thornton, Margaret M; Yin, Suellen M; Bracho, David O; Nelson, Patrick W; Jones, Alan E; Bortz, David M; Younger, John G

    2010-11-01

    With an in vitro system that used a luminescent strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae to assess bacterial metabolic activity in near-real-time, we investigated the dynamics of complement-mediated attack in healthy individuals and in patients presenting to the emergency department with community-acquired severe sepsis. A novel mathematical/statistical model was developed to simplify light output trajectories over time into two fitted parameters, the rate of complement activation and the delay from activation to the onset of killing. Using Factor B-depleted serum, the alternative pathway was found to be the primary bactericidal effector: In the absence of B, C3 opsonization as measured by flow cytometry did not progress and bacteria proliferated near exponentially. Defects in bacterial killing were easily demonstrable in patients with severe sepsis compared with healthy volunteers. In most patients with sepsis, the rate of activation was higher than in normal subjects but was associated with a prolonged delay between activation and bacterial killing (P < 0.05 for both). Theoretical modeling suggested that this combination of accentuated but delayed function should allow successful bacterial