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Sample records for bacterial overgrowth endotoxaemia

  1. Probiotic yogurt in the elderly with intestinal bacterial overgrowth: endotoxaemia and innate immune functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffrin, E.J.; Parlesak, Alexandr; Bode, C.;

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted in healthy elderly living independently in senior housing to assess the impact of a probiotic yoghurt supplement on small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Twenty-three participants with positive and thirteen participants with negative hydrogen breath test were studied before...

  2. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  3. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  4. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Comprehensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Dukowicz, Andrew C.; Lacy, Brian E.; Levine, Gary M

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, remains a poorly understood disease. Initially thought to occur in only a small number of patients, it is now apparent that this disorder is more prevalent than previously thought. Patients with SIBO vary in presentation, from being only mildly symptomatic to suffering from chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption. A number of diagnostic tests are currently available, although the optim...

  5. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Case-Based Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kristen H. Reynolds

    2015-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition of increased microbial load in the small intestine. The microbes feed on dietary carbohydrates and starches via fermentation, leading to gas production, inflammation and damage to the lining of the small intestine. Clinical presentation is varied, including abdominal pain, bloating, malabsorption and systemic symptoms. SIBO is associated with many challenging and chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and chronic pa...

  6. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Zhdanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate the frequency of detection of bacterial overgrowth syndrome in patients with chronic hepatitis C, find a possible relationship between development dysbiotic changes in the small intestine and over chronic hepatitis C were examined 80 patients (68 males and 12 females. In addition to standard laboratory tests for all patients was performed hydrogen breath test with a load of lactulose and fibrogastroduodenoscopy and hepatic biopsy with subsequent histological examination of biopsy. It was found that bacterial overgrowth syndrome, according to the hydrogen breath test detected 40% of patients with chronic hepatitis C, and the severity of it increases with the progression of the pathological process in the liver tissue. urthermore, in patients with endoscopic signs of catarrhal duodenitis according fibrogastroduodenoscopy, the level of molecular hydrogen when the hydrogen breath test at the appropriate stages of measurement was significantly lower, which may be due to the lack of saccharolytic and / or the predominance of proteolytic flora in the development of bacterial overgrowth syndrome.

  7. Breath Testing for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Should We Bother?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen breath test is based on following breath hydrogen levels after the administration of a carbohydrate (most commonly lactulose) to a patient with suspected small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. The test is based on the interaction between the administered carbohydrate and the intestinal bacteria. The resulting fermentation produces hydrogen. A positive breath test is based on a breath hydrogen rise prior to the expected arrival time in the highly microbial cecum. Despite renewed enthusiasm for breath testing in recent years due to associations with conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, breath testing poses many challenges. In this argument against breath testing, several pitfalls that complicate breath testing will be described. PMID:26902227

  8. Pediatric small intestine bacterial overgrowth in low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Petri, William A

    2015-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when colonic quantities of commensal bacteria are present in the small bowel. SIBO is associated with conditions of disrupted gastrointestinal (GI) motility leading to stasis of luminal contents. Recent data show that SIBO is also found in children living in unsanitary conditions who do not have access to clean water. SIBO leads to impaired micronutrient absorption and increased GI permeability, both of which may contribute to growth stunting in children. SIBO also disrupts mucosal immunity and has been implicated in oral vaccination underperformance and the development of celiac disease. SIBO in the setting of the impoverished human habitats may be an under-recognized cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality in the developing world.

  9. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant D Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered gastrointestinal (GI motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO.

  10. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Case-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen H. Reynolds

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is a condition of increased microbial load in the small intestine. The microbes feed on dietary carbohydrates and starches via fermentation, leading to gas production, inflammation and damage to the lining of the small intestine. Clinical presentation is varied, including abdominal pain, bloating, malabsorption and systemic symptoms. SIBO is associated with many challenging and chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and chronic pain syndromes, and has been shown to be a causative factor in two out of three cases of irritable bowel syndrome. Symptoms improve with antimicrobial treatment, but recurrence is common. Many providers may not be aware of SIBO. This narrative review highlights a clinical case and the most recent literature regarding SIBO, including history, clinical presentation, prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic workup, treatment and prevention. Integrative medicine approaches, including diet, supplements and manual therapies, are also reviewed. SIBO can be a challenging condition and requires an integrative, patient-centered approach. Further studies are needed to guide clinicians in the workup and treatment of SIBO.

  11. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and fat digestion and absorption in cystic fibrosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Lisowska; Andrzej Pogorzelski; Grzegorz Oracz; Wojciech Skorupa; Szczepan Cofta; Jerzy Socha; Jarosław Walkowiak

    2010-01-01

    Background. Available data suggests that small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may frequently occur in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. SIBO may result in synthesis of enterotoxic and unabsorbable metabolites which may cause mucosal damage and – additionally – interfere with digestion and absorption. Such a relationship was documented in CF mouse model. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to assess the influence of bacterial overgrowth in small intestine in CF pat...

  12. Bacterial overgrowth in the duodenum of dogs with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D A; Batt, R M; McLean, L

    1987-07-15

    Bacterial overgrowth (greater than 10(5) colony-forming units/ml duodenal juice) in the duodenum was demonstrated in 8 of 11 dogs with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). In 4 of these 8 dogs, the overgrowth included large numbers (greater than 10(4) colony-forming units/ml) of obligate anaerobic bacteria and was associated with decreased activities of several brush border marker enzymes and, in 2 dogs, with partial villous atrophy in the jejunum. Changes in the jejunal mucosa of the remaining dogs (with either no overgrowth or overgrowth of aerobic bacteria alone) were characterized by increased activities of some brush border disaccharides and of lysosomal hydrolases. One dog was euthanatized without treatment, at the owner's request. The response of 4 of the remaining 10 dogs treated with enzyme replacement alone was poor or suboptimal, and all of these 4 dogs had bacterial overgrowth. One of these dogs had an excellent clinical response when also given oxytetracycline orally for 14 days, but the other 3 dogs did not improve further in response to the same treatment. It was concluded that bacterial overgrowth in the duodenum is common in dogs with EPI and that, when such overgrowth includes large numbers of obligate anaerobes, there may be associated biochemical and morphologic abnormalities in jejunal mucosa. Functional disturbances related to abnormal intestinal microflora may be responsible for the failure of some dogs with EPI to respond fully to oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation without antibiotic therapy. PMID:3610795

  13. Evidence for peptidoglycan absorption in rats with experimental small bowel bacterial overgrowth.

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtman, S N; Keku, J; Schwab, J. H.; Sartor, R B

    1991-01-01

    Surgical creation of jejunal self-filling blind loops (SFBL) causes small bowel bacterial overgrowth which is associated with hepatobiliary inflammation in the susceptible Lewis and Wistar rat strains. Since hepatic injury occurs when small bowel anaerobic bacterial concentrations are increased 4 to 6 log10 units per ml and hepatic bacterial cultures are negative, we postulate that the inflammation is caused by absorption of phlogistic cell wall polymers originating from bacteria within the l...

  14. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: Experience with Rifaximin

    OpenAIRE

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio,Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO.

  15. Bacteria: a new player in gastrointestinal motility disorders--infections, bacterial overgrowth, and probiotics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may result from a dysfunctional interaction between the indigenous flora and the intestinal mucosa, which in turn leads to immune activation in the colonic mucosa. Some propose that bacterial overgrowth is a common causative factor in the pathogenesis of symptoms in IBS; others point to evidence suggesting that the cause stems from more subtle qualitative changes in the colonic flora. Bacterial overgrowth will probably prove not to be a major factor in what will eventually be defined as IBS. Nevertheless, short-term therapy with either antibiotics or probiotics seems to reduce symptoms among IBS patients. However, in the long term, safety issues will favor the probiotic approach; results of long-term studies with these agents are eagerly awaited.

  16. Gastrointestinal complaints in runners are not due to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärtsch Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal complaints are common among long distance runners. We hypothesised that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is present in long distance runners frequently afflicted with gastrointestinal complaints. Findings Seven long distance runners (5 female, mean age 29.1 years with gastrointestinal complaints during and immediately after exercise without known gastrointestinal diseases performed Glucose hydrogen breath tests for detection of SIBO one week after a lactose hydrogen breath test checking for lactose intolerance. The most frequent symptoms were diarrhea (5/7, 71% and flatulence (6/7, 86%. The study was conducted at a laboratory. In none of the subjects a pathological hydrogen production was observed after the intake of glucose. Only in one athlete a pathological hydrogen production was measured after the intake of lactose suggesting lactose intolerance. Conclusions Gastrointestinal disorders in the examined long distance runners were not associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

  17. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance contribute to irritable bowel syndrome symptomatology in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Javed Yakoob; Zaigham Abbas; Rustam Khan; Saeed Hamid; Safia Awan; Wasim Jafri

    2011-01-01

    Background /Aim: The symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome resemble those of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of SIBO and lactose intolerance (LI) occurrence in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) according to Rome III criteria. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective case-control study, patients over 18 years of age with altered bowel habit, bloating, and patients who had lactose Hydrogen bre...

  18. Partially responsive celiac disease resulting from small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Misra Asha; Ghoshal Ujjala; Ghoshal Uday C; Choudhuri Gourdas

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Celiac disease is a common cause of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption syndrome all over the world. Though it was considered uncommon in India in past, it is being described frequently recently. Some patients with celiac disease do not improve despite gluten free diet (GFD). A study described 15 cases of celiac disease unresponsive to GFD in whom small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or lactose intolerance was the cause for unresponsiveness. Case presentation During...

  19. Gastrointestinal complaints in runners are not due to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Bärtsch Peter; Reljic Dejan; Schommer Kai; Sauer Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Gastrointestinal complaints are common among long distance runners. We hypothesised that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is present in long distance runners frequently afflicted with gastrointestinal complaints. Findings Seven long distance runners (5 female, mean age 29.1 years) with gastrointestinal complaints during and immediately after exercise without known gastrointestinal diseases performed Glucose hydrogen breath tests for detection of SIBO one week a...

  20. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Refractory Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Shimura, Shino; Ishimura, Norihisa; Mikami, Hironobu; Okimoto, Eiko; Uno, Goichi; Tamagawa, Yuji; Aimi, Masahito; Oshima, Naoki; Sato, Shuichi; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). However, the prevalence and clinical conditions of SIBO in patients with FGID remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we examined the frequency of SIBO in patients with refractory FGID. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients with refractory FGID based on Rome III criteria. A glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT) was performed using a gas...

  1. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome: are there any predictors?

    OpenAIRE

    McCallum Richard W; Sostarich Sandra; Reddymasu Savio C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which excessive levels of bacteria, mainly the colonic-type species are present in the small intestine. Recent data suggest that SIBO may contribute to the pathophysiology of Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The purpose of this study was to identify potential predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Methods Adults with IBS based on Rome II criteria who had predominance of bloating and flatulence underwent a gluc...

  2. The Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome is Uncommon in Pernicious Anaemia: Results of a Follow-up Study

    OpenAIRE

    Stockbrügger, R. W.; Armbrecht, U.; Rode, J. W.; Teall, A J; Oberholzer, V. G.; Croker, J R; Cotton, P B

    2011-01-01

    It is still uncertain whether upper gastrointestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with permanent achlorhydria causes malassimilation in more than just the occasional case. In an attempt to clarify this, 19 patients with pernicious anaemia who had undergone a thorough investigation 6.6 y (mean) previously, were reinvestigated with clinical history, upper GI endoscopy including multiple duodenal biopsies, microbial cultures of gastric juice and duodenal mucosa, a xylose absorption test, and...

  3. THE ETHIOPATOGENESIS AND THE ANALYSIS OF AN ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT OF A SMALL INTESTINE BACTERIAL OVERGROWTH SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Martynov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is attempt of the critical analysis of modern approaches to treatment of a small intestine bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO. SIBO now is one of the major problems in gastroenterology. At the same time, the bacterial overgrowth is cause and consequence of many diseases of digestive system and extradigestive manifestations. Many researches testify to prevalence of SIBO in patients with digestive diseases. However, pathogenesis of a disease is studied insufficiently today. Nevertheless, the available data of scientific researches allow to belong to the offered ways of diagnostics and treatment critically.Data on physiology of microbiota of the digestive tract of the healthy person are provided in a review. Mechanisms of antimicrobic resistance of a microbiota of intestines are considered. Interrelations between an antibiotikassociated degeneration of normal flora and bacterial overgrowth are presented. The analysis of an antibiotiktherapi of SIBO indicates low efficiency and also possible ways became chronicle diseaseand frequent recurrence of an illness. The multiple-factors and complexity of pathogenesis of SIBO are leaded authors to a conclusion to use ethiopathogenesis approaches for solution of SIBO.

  4. Altered motility and duration of bacterial overgrowth in experimental blind loop syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, P G; Mcherron, L E; Ward, T T

    1984-07-01

    To better understand the pathogenesis of the increased motility previously described in the blind loop rat, we studied the relationship between duration of bacterial overgrowth and both myoelectric activity and bacterial flora in this model. Myoelectric studies and quantitative bacterial cultures were performed on self-filling and self-emptying (control) blind loop rats one, two, and three weeks postoperatively. All self-filling blind loop rats had greater random action potential activity and higher frequencies of migrating action potential complexes than controls (P less than 0.05). One-week self-filling blind loop rats had a higher frequency of migrating action potential complexes (P less than 0.05) and a higher ratio of counts of Escherichia coli to Bacteroides species (P less than 0.05) than the two- or three-week self-filling blind loop groups. Thus, qualitative changes in myoelectric activity occur during the development of bacterial overgrowth in the blind loop rat which may reflect evolving alterations in the bacterial flora.

  5. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and fat digestion and absorption in cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Lisowska

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Available data suggests that small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO may frequently occur in cystic fibrosis (CF subjects. SIBO may result in synthesis of enterotoxic and unabsorbable metabolites which may cause mucosal damage and – additionally – interfere with digestion and absorption. Such a relationship was documented in CF mouse model. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to assess the influence of bacterial overgrowth in small intestine in CF patients on lipid digestion and absorption. Material and methods. The study comprised 60 pancreatic insufficient CF patients, 30 children and 30 adults. All enrolled CF subjects were tested for the presence of SIBO using hydrogen/methane breath test with glucose loading. According to the obtained results CF patients were divided into SIBO positive and negative subgroups. Subsequently, 13C-labelled mixed triglyceride breath test was performed to assess lipid digestion and absorption. Cumulative percentage dose recovery (cPDR was considered to reflect digestion and absorption of lipids. Results. SIBO was detected in 12 (40.0% children and 11 (36.7% adults with CF. The cPDR did not differ between SIBO positive and negative subgroups, neither when assessed separately for children (mean ±SEM: 5.5 ±0.8 vs. 7.4 ±1.0% and adults (4.9 ±0.8 vs. 7.1 ±0.7% nor for the entire studied population. Conclusions. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth does not seem to play a key role in lipid digestion and absorption in cystic fibrosis patients.

  6. Prevalence of small bowel bacterial overgrowth and its association with nutrition intake in nonhospitalized older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Klein, B.; Schecher, K.;

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) in older adults and to assess whether SBBO is associated with abdominal complaints and nutrient intake. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Eight senior residence sites in Stuttgart, Germany. PARTICIPANTS: Older...... and nutritional status was recorded with a computer-aided diet history. RESULTS: The prevalence of a positive hydrogen breath test (>10 ppm increase) was 15.6% in older adults, compared with 5.9% in subjects aged 24 to 59. The intake of inhibitors of gastric acid production contributed significantly to the high...

  7. Comparison of two shampoos as sole treatment for canine bacterial overgrowth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaud, S; Maynard, L; Sanquer, A

    2012-06-30

    Two antibacterial shampoos for the treatment of canine bacterial overgrowth syndrome (BOGS) were compared in a prospective controlled clinical trial. Forty dogs with clinical signs (pruritus, erythema and excoriations without pustules and/or collarettes) and cytological findings compatible with bacterial overgrowth were treated twice weekly with 3 per cent chlorhexidine shampoo (3 per cent CHX) or 2.5 per cent benzoyl peroxide shampoo (2.5 per cent BPO) and evaluated every two weeks for up to six weeks until cytological cure. Pruritus, erythema, greasy seborrhoea, malodour, excoriations, secondary hair loss, lichenification, hyperpigmentation and lesion extent were each scored on a 0 to 3 severity scale and combined to calculate an aggregate score. Among the 34 dogs with good compliance to treatment, reduction of cocci counts of at least 90 per cent was recorded in 11 of 18 dogs after 3 per cent CHX and nine of 16 dogs after 2.5 per cent BPO, with no significant difference between the two products (P=0.98). Lesion score was significantly reduced in both groups (63.48 (34.45)) per cent with 3 per cent CHX v 54.45 (33.61) per cent with 2.5 per cent BPO, P=0.36) and time to cytological cure was not significantly different between groups (P=0.13), at the end of the treatment. In the present study, 3 per cent CHX and 2.5 per cent BPO were similarly effective in the treatment of canine BOGS.

  8. Questioning the bacterial overgrowth hypothesis of irritable bowel syndrome: an epidemiologic and evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2011-06-01

    Although studies indicate that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is prevalent in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), it remains unclear whether SIBO causes IBS. This review presents an epidemiologic and evolutionary inquiry that questions the bacterial overgrowth hypothesis of IBS, as follows. (1) Although the hypothesis may be biologically plausible, there is also a strong rationale for competing hypotheses; it is unlikely that SIBO is the predominant cause of IBS in all comers, because competing explanations are sensible and defensible. Moreover, data indicate that the test used to promulgate the SIBO hypothesis - the lactulose hydrogen breath test - may not have measured SIBO in the first place. (2) We do not have evidence of SIBO being absent before IBS symptoms, and present after IBS emerges. (3) There is not a dose-response relationship between small intestinal microbiota and IBS symptoms. (4) The relationship between SIBO and IBS is highly inconsistent among studies. (5) Many effective IBS therapies do not address SIBO at all, yet have a more favorable "number needed to treat" than antibiotics. (6) IBS does not behave like a traditional infectious disease, suggesting that microbes may not principally cause the syndrome. (7) Other factors may confound the relationship between SIBO and IBS, including proton pump inhibitors. (8) Whereas the brain-gut hypothesis is evolutionary sensible, the bacterial hypothesis is harder to defend from an evolutionary perspective. The article concludes that bacteria may contribute to some IBS symptoms, but that bacteria cannot be the only explanation, and a causal link between SIBO and IBS is not secure. PMID:21397724

  9. Methane production and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in children living in a slum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carolina Santos Mello; Soraia Tahan; Lígia Cristina FL Melli; Mirian Silva do Carmo Rodrigues; Ricardo Martin Pereira de Mello; Isabel Cristina Affonso Scaletsky; Mauro Batista de Morais

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To analyze small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in school-aged children and the relationship between hydrogen and methane production in breath tests.METHODS:This transversal study included 85 children residing in a slum and 43 children from a private school,all aged between 6 and 10 years,in Osasco,Brazil.For characterization of the groups,data regarding the socioeconomic status and basic housing sanitary conditions were collected.Anthropometric data was obtained in children from both groups.All children completed the hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) breath test in order to assess small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).SIBO was diagnosed when there was an increase in H2 ≥ 20 ppm or CH4 ≥ 10 ppm with regard to the fasting value until 60 min after lactulose ingestion.RESULTS:Children from the slum group had worse living conditions and lower nutritional indices than children from the private school.SIBO was found in 30.9% (26/84) of the children from the slum group and in 2.4% (1/41) from the private school group (P =0.0007).Greater hydrogen production in the small intestine was observed in children from the slum group when compared to children from the private school (P =0.007).A higher concentration of hydrogen in the small intestine (P < 0.001) and in the colon (P < 0.001) was observed among the children from the slum group with SIBO when compared to children from the slum group without SIBO.Methane production was observed in 63.1% (53/84) of the children from the slum group and in 19.5% (8/41) of the children from the private school group (P < 0.0001).Methane production was observed in 38/58 (65.5%) of the children without SIBO and in 15/26 (57.7%) of the children with SIBO from the slum.Colonic production of hydrogen was lower in methaneproducing children (P =0.017).CONCLUSION:Children who live in inadequate environmental conditions are at risk of bacterial overgrowth and methane production.Hydrogen is a substrate for methane

  10. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth among Chronic Pancreatitis Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Simon; Sidani, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) exhibit numerous risk factors for the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Objective. To determine the prevalence of SIBO in patients with CP. Methods. Prospective, single-centre case-control study conducted between January and September 2013. Inclusion criteria were age 18 to 75 years and clinical and radiological diagnosis of CP. Exclusion criteria included history of gastric, pancreatic, or intestinal surgery or significant clinical gastroparesis. SIBO was detected using a standard lactulose breath test (LBT). A healthy control group also underwent LBT. Results. Thirty-one patients and 40 controls were included. The patient group was significantly older (53.8 versus 38.7 years; P PERT), and severity of symptoms. Conclusion. The prevalence of SIBO detected using LBT was high among patients with CP. There was no association between clinical features and the risk for SIBO. PMID:27446865

  11. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth: An Underdiagnosed Cause of Diarrhea in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bustillo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir: Pancreatic cancer is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer related death in the United States, with an overall survival rate at five years of diagnosis of less than 5%. It affects more men than women, with slight preponderance for African Americans and 77% of patients are diagnosed after the age of 60 years [1]. The majority of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer report a poor quality of life, with special compromise in the areas of emotional and social functioning, presumably due to anxiety and depression [2]. Among the physical symptoms reported to affect quality of life, fatigue and pain were ranked the highest. However, we are yet to understand how other less commonly recognized symptoms such as diarrhea and weight loss affect the functioning and comfort level of these patients. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth is a frequent, yet unrecognized, cause of diarrhea in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  12. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: association with toll-like receptor 4 expression and plasma levels of interleukin 8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanab, Ahmed Abu

    2011-05-01

    Experimental and clinical studies suggest an association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Liver injury and fibrosis could be related to exposure to bacterial products of intestinal origin and, most notably, endotoxin, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

  13. Comparison of two shampoos as sole treatment for canine bacterial overgrowth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaud, S; Maynard, L; Sanquer, A

    2012-06-30

    Two antibacterial shampoos for the treatment of canine bacterial overgrowth syndrome (BOGS) were compared in a prospective controlled clinical trial. Forty dogs with clinical signs (pruritus, erythema and excoriations without pustules and/or collarettes) and cytological findings compatible with bacterial overgrowth were treated twice weekly with 3 per cent chlorhexidine shampoo (3 per cent CHX) or 2.5 per cent benzoyl peroxide shampoo (2.5 per cent BPO) and evaluated every two weeks for up to six weeks until cytological cure. Pruritus, erythema, greasy seborrhoea, malodour, excoriations, secondary hair loss, lichenification, hyperpigmentation and lesion extent were each scored on a 0 to 3 severity scale and combined to calculate an aggregate score. Among the 34 dogs with good compliance to treatment, reduction of cocci counts of at least 90 per cent was recorded in 11 of 18 dogs after 3 per cent CHX and nine of 16 dogs after 2.5 per cent BPO, with no significant difference between the two products (P=0.98). Lesion score was significantly reduced in both groups (63.48 (34.45)) per cent with 3 per cent CHX v 54.45 (33.61) per cent with 2.5 per cent BPO, P=0.36) and time to cytological cure was not significantly different between groups (P=0.13), at the end of the treatment. In the present study, 3 per cent CHX and 2.5 per cent BPO were similarly effective in the treatment of canine BOGS. PMID:22678617

  14. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome: are there any predictors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallum Richard W

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is a condition in which excessive levels of bacteria, mainly the colonic-type species are present in the small intestine. Recent data suggest that SIBO may contribute to the pathophysiology of Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. The purpose of this study was to identify potential predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Methods Adults with IBS based on Rome II criteria who had predominance of bloating and flatulence underwent a glucose breath test (GBT to determine the presence of SIBO. Breath samples were obtained at baseline and at 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes after ingestion of 50 g of glucose dissolved in 150 mL of water. Results of the glucose breath test, which measures hydrogen and methane levels in the breath, were considered positive for SIBO if 1 the hydrogen or methane peak was >20 ppm when the baseline was Results Ninety-eight patients were identified who underwent a GBT (mean age, 49 y; 78% female. Thirty-five patients (36% had a positive GBT result suggestive of SIBO. A positive GBT result was more likely in patients >55 years of age (odds ratio [OR], 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-9.0 and in females (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.1-14.5. Hydrogen was detected more frequently in patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (OR, 8; 95% CI, 1.4-45, and methane was the main gas detected in patients with constipation-predominant IBS (OR, 8; 95% CI, 1.3-44. There was no significant correlation between the presence of SIBO and the predominant bowel pattern or concurrent use of tegaserod, proton pump inhibitors, or opiate analgesics. Conclusions Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was present in a sizeable percentage of patients with IBS with predominance of bloating and flatulence. Older age and female sex were predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Identification of possible predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS could aid in the development of successful treatment plans.

  15. Reduced accuracy of 14C-D-xylose breath test for detecting bacterial overgrowth in gastrointestinal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of the 14C-D-xylose breath test in the diagnosis of small-bowel bacterial overgrowth was prospectively evaluated in 10 patients with motility disorders: 6 myopathic, 3 neuropathic, and 1 mechanical obstruction. 6 of 10 patients had small-bowel bacterial overgrowth on culture of small-bowel aspirate. Increased breath 14CO2 levels were documented in 3 of 6 patients with positive cultures and in 2 of 4 with negative cultures. 2 patients with positive results by both methods and 1 of 2 with positive breath 14CO2 but negative cultures had previously undergone gastric surgery. 3 patients with myopathic dysmotility had positive cultures but negative breath tests. Cultures of duodenal aspirates and the D-xylose test had sensitivities of 80% and 40%, respectively, for the finding of hypoalbuminemia. Compared with cultures, the sensitivity and specificity of the breath test were 60% and 40%, respectively. Impaired delivery of 14C-D-xylose for bacterial metabolism may result from postprandial antral hypomotility or low amplitude small-bowel motility, contributing to the false-negative breath tests. Thus, cultures is the optimal method to detect small-bowel bacterial overgrowth in patients with motility disorders. 25 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  16. Identification and Treatment of New Inflammatory Triggers for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Leonard B; Myers, Trisha L; Walters, Arthur S; Schwartz, Oscar A; Younger, Jarred W; Chopra, Pradeep J; Guarino, Anthony H

    2016-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is evoked by conditions that may be associated with local and/or systemic inflammation. We present a case of long-standing CRPS in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in which prolonged remission was attained by directing therapy toward concomitant small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, obstructive sleep apnea, and potential increased microglia activity. We theorize that cytokine production produced by small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and obstructive sleep apnea may act as stimuli for ongoing CRPS symptoms. CRPS may also benefit from the properties of low-dose naltrexone that blocks microglia Toll-like receptors and induces production of endorphins that regulate and reduce inflammation. PMID:26867023

  17. Partially responsive celiac disease resulting from small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Asha

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease is a common cause of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption syndrome all over the world. Though it was considered uncommon in India in past, it is being described frequently recently. Some patients with celiac disease do not improve despite gluten free diet (GFD. A study described 15 cases of celiac disease unresponsive to GFD in whom small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO or lactose intolerance was the cause for unresponsiveness. Case presentation During a three-year period, 12 adult patients with celiac disease were seen in the Luminal Gastroenterology Clinic in a tertiary referral center in northern India. Two of these 12 patients (16.6%, who did not fully respond to GFD initially, are presented here. Unresponsiveness resulted from SIBO in one and lactose intolerance in the other. The former patient responded to antibiotics and the latter to lactose withdrawal in addition to standard GFD. Conclusion In patients with celiac disease partially responsive or unresponsive to GFD, SIBO and lactose intolerance should be suspected; appropriate investigations and treatment for these may result in complete recovery.

  18. Systematic review and meta-analysis: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signoretti, Marianna; Archibugi, Livia; Stigliano, Serena; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence on small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) is conflicting. Aim The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the prevalence of SIBO in CP and to examine the relationship of SIBO with symptoms and nutritional status. Methods Case-control and cross-sectional studies investigating SIBO in CP patients were analysed. The prevalence of positive tests was pooled across studies, and the rate of positivity between CP cases and controls was calculated. Results In nine studies containing 336 CP patients, the pooled prevalence of SIBO was 36% (95% confidence interval (CI) 17–60%) with considerable heterogeneity (I2 = 91%). A sensitivity analysis excluding studies employing lactulose breath test gave a pooled prevalence of 21.7% (95% CI 12.7–34.5%) with lower heterogeneity (I2 = 56%). The odds ratio for a positive test in CP vs controls was 4.1 (95% CI 1.6–10.4) (I2 = 59.7%). The relationship between symptoms and SIBO in CP patients varied across studies, and the treatment of SIBO was associated with clinical improvement. Conclusions One-third of CP patients have SIBO, with a significantly increased risk over controls, although results are heterogeneous, and studies carry several limitations. The impact of SIBO and its treatment in CP patients deserve further investigation.

  19. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth among Chronic Pancreatitis Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Therrien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP exhibit numerous risk factors for the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. Objective. To determine the prevalence of SIBO in patients with CP. Methods. Prospective, single-centre case-control study conducted between January and September 2013. Inclusion criteria were age 18 to 75 years and clinical and radiological diagnosis of CP. Exclusion criteria included history of gastric, pancreatic, or intestinal surgery or significant clinical gastroparesis. SIBO was detected using a standard lactulose breath test (LBT. A healthy control group also underwent LBT. Results. Thirty-one patients and 40 controls were included. The patient group was significantly older (53.8 versus 38.7 years; P < 0.01. The proportion of positive LBTs was significantly higher in CP patients (38.7 versus 2.5%: P < 0.01. A trend toward a higher proportion of positive LBTs in women compared with men was observed (66.6 versus 27.3%; P = 0.056. The subgroups with positive and negative LBTs were comparable in demographic and clinical characteristics, use of opiates, pancreatic enzymes replacement therapy (PERT, and severity of symptoms. Conclusion. The prevalence of SIBO detected using LBT was high among patients with CP. There was no association between clinical features and the risk for SIBO.

  20. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Refractory Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Shino; Ishimura, Norihisa; Mikami, Hironobu; Okimoto, Eiko; Uno, Goichi; Tamagawa, Yuji; Aimi, Masahito; Oshima, Naoki; Sato, Shuichi; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). However, the prevalence and clinical conditions of SIBO in patients with FGID remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we examined the frequency of SIBO in patients with refractory FGID. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients with refractory FGID based on Rome III criteria. A glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT) was performed using a gas analyzer after an overnight fast, with breath hydrogen concentration measured at baseline and every 15 minutes after administration of glucose for a total of 3 hours. A peak hydrogen value ≥ 10 ppm above the basal value between 60 and 120 minutes after administration of glucose was diagnosed as SIBO. Results A total of 38 FGID patients, including 11 with functional dyspepsia (FD), 10 with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and 17 with overlapping with FD and IBS, were enrolled. Of those, 2 (5.3%) were diagnosed with SIBO (one patient diagnosed with FD; the other with overlapping FD and IBS). Their symptoms were clearly improved and breath hydrogen levels decreased to normal following levofloxacin administration for 7 days. Conclusions Two patients initially diagnosed with FD and IBS were also diagnosed with SIBO as assessed by GHBT. Although the frequency of SIBO is low among patients with FGID, it may be important to be aware of SIBO as differential diagnosis when examining patients with refractory gastrointestinal symptoms, especially bloating, as a part of routine clinical care. PMID:26554916

  1. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth mimicking acute flare as a pitfall in patients with Crohn's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinshagen Max

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is characterized by excessive proliferation of colonic bacterial species in the small bowel. Potential causes of SIBO include fistulae, strictures or motility disturbances. Hence, patients with Crohn's Disease (CD are especially predisposed to develop SIBO. As result, CD patients may experience malabsorption and report symptoms such as weight loss, watery diarrhea, meteorism, flatulence and abdominal pain, mimicking acute flare in these patients. Methods One-hundred-fifty patients with CD reporting increased stool frequency, meteorism and/or abdominal pain were prospectively evaluated for SIBO with the Hydrogen Glucose Breath Test (HGBT. Results Thirty-eight patients (25.3% were diagnosed with SIBO based on positive findings at HGBT. SIBO patients reported a higher rate of abdominal complaints and exhibited increased stool frequency (5.9 vs. 3.7 bowel movements/day, p = 0.003 and lower body weight (63.6 vs 70.4 kg, p = 0.014. There was no correlation with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. SIBO was significantly more frequent in patients with partial resection of the colon or multiple intestinal surgeries; there was also a clear trend in patients with ileocecal resection that did not reach statistical significance. SIBO rate was also higher in patients with affection of both the colon and small bowel, while inflammation of the (neoterminal ileum again showed only tendential association with the development of SIBO. Conclusion SIBO represents a frequently ignored yet clinically relevant complication in CD, often mimicking acute flare. Because symptoms of SIBO are often difficult to differentiate from those caused by the underlying disease, targeted work-up is recommended in patients with corresponding clinical signs and predisposing factors.

  2. Effect of melatonin on human nighttime endotoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Bendtzen, Klaus; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin 0.3 ng/kg body weight intravenously at 24:00. One hour prior to induction of endotoxaemia, an 8-h infusion of melatonin 100 mg or placebo was initiated. Blood samples were drawn before and 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after induction of endotoxaemia and plasma was tested for pro...

  3. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance contribute to irritable bowel syndrome symptomatology in Pakistan

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    Javed Yakoob

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background /Aim: The symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome resemble those of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of SIBO and lactose intolerance (LI occurrence in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D according to Rome III criteria. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective case-control study, patients over 18 years of age with altered bowel habit, bloating, and patients who had lactose Hydrogen breath test (H 2 BT done were included. The "cases" were defined as patients who fulfill Rome III criteria for IBS-D, while "controls" were those having chronic nonspecific diarrhea (CNSD who did not fulfill Rome III criteria for IBS-D. Demographic data, predominant bowel habit pattern, concurrent use of medications, etc., were noted. Results: Patients with IBS-D were 119 (51% with a mean age of 35 ± 13 years, while those with CNSD were 115 (49% with mean age 36 ± 15 years. Patients in both IBS-D and CNSD were comparable in gender, with male 87 (74% and female 77 (64%. SIBO was documented by lactose H 2 BT in 32/234 (14% cases. It was positive in 22/119 (19% cases with IBS-D, while 10/115 (9% cases had CNSD (P = 0.03. LI was positive in 43/234 (18% cases. Of these, 25/119 (21% cases had IBS-D and 18/115 (16% cases had CNSD (P = 0.29. Conclusion: SIBO was seen in a significant number of our patients with IBS-D. There was no significant age or gender difference in patients with or without SIBO.

  4. In vitro activity of rifaximin against isolates from patients with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistiki, Aikaterini; Galani, Irene; Pyleris, Emmanouel; Barbatzas, Charalambos; Pimentel, Mark; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2014-03-01

    Rifaximin, a non-absorbable rifamycin derivative, has published clinical efficacy in the alleviation of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is associated with the pathogenesis of IBS. This study describes for the first time the antimicrobial effect of rifaximin against SIBO micro-organisms from humans. Fluid was aspirated from the third part of the duodenum from 567 consecutive patients; quantitative cultures diagnosed SIBO in 117 patients (20.6%). A total of 170 aerobic micro-organisms were isolated and the in vitro efficacy of rifaximin was studied by (i) minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing by a microdilution technique and (ii) time-kill assays using bile to simulate the small intestinal environment. At a breakpoint of 32 μg/mL, rifaximin inhibited in vitro 85.4% of Escherichia coli, 43.6% of Klebsiella spp., 34.8% of Enterobacter spp., 54.5% of other Enterobacteriaceae spp., 82.6% of non-Enterobacteriaceae Gram-negative spp., 100% of Enterococcus faecalis, 100% of Enterococcus faecium and 100% of Staphylococcus aureus. For the time-kill assays, 11 E. coli, 15 non-E. coli Gram-negative enterobacteria and three E. faecalis isolates were studied. Rifaximin produced a >3 log10 decrease in the starting inoculum against most of the tested isolates at 500 μg/mL after 24h of growth. The results indicate that rifaximin has a potent effect on specific small bowel flora associated with SIBO. This conclusion should be regarded in light of the considerable time-kill effect at concentrations lower than those achieved in the bowel lumen after administration of conventional doses in humans. PMID:24461710

  5. Seventy-five gram glucose tolerance test to assess carbohydrate malabsorption and small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshihisa Urita; Motonobu Sugimoto; Kazumasa Miki; Susumu Ishihara; Tatsuo Akimoto; Hiroto Kato; Noriko Hara; Yoshiko Honda; Yoko Nagai; Kazushige Nakanishi; Nagato Shimada

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate non-invasively the incidence of absorption of carbohydrates in diabetic patients during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to determine whether malabsorption may be associated with insulin secretion and insulin resistance.METHODS: A standard 75-g OGTT was performed in 82 diabetic patients. The patients received 75 g of anhydrous glucose in 225 mL of water after an overnight fasting and breath samples were collected at baseline and up to 120 min afler ingestion. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations were measured. Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations were measured before ingestion and at 30, 60, g0, 120 min post-ingestion.RESULTS: When carbohydrate malabsorption was defined as subjects with an increase of at least 10 ppm (parts per million) in hydrogen or methane excretion within a 2-h period, 28 (34%) had carbohydrate malabsorption. According to the result of increased breath test, 21 (75%) patients were classified as small bowel bacterial overgrowth and 7 (25%) as glucose malabsorption. Patients with carbohydrate malabsorption were older and had poor glycemic control as compared with those without carbohydrate malabsorption. The HOMA value, the sum of serum insulin during the test and the Ainsulin/Aglucose ratio were greater in patients with carbohydrate malabsorption.CONCLUSION: Insulin resistance may be overestimated by using these markers if the patient has carbohydrate malabsorption, or that carbohydrate malabsorption may be present prior to the development of insulin resistance.Hence carbohydrate malabsorption should be taken into account for estimating insulin resistance and β-cell function.

  6. Pronounced inflammatory response to endotoxaemia during nighttime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Bendtzen, Klaus; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    endotoxaemia model. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-over study, where 12 healthy young men received E. coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) 0.3 ng/kg at 12 noon and, on another day, at 12 midnight. Blood samples were analysed for pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, soluble......-night difference in the acute phase response to endotoxaemia exists in healthy volunteers with a more pronounced inflammatory response during the night time. This circadian difference in the response to endotoxaemia may play an important role in the clinical setting and should be investigated further....

  7. The Relationship between Small-Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Intestinal Permeability in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Won, Kyoung Hee; Park, Soon Min

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a frequent finding in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Many patients with IBS also have abnormal intestinal permeability, which is probably due to low-grade inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Our aim was to verify the relationship between SIBO and small-intestinal permeability in IBS patients. Methods A cohort of 38 IBS patients (20 women and 18 men; age range 16-70 years; mean age 40.2 years) with symptoms that ...

  8. Diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Comparison of the 14C-D-xylose breath test and jejunal cultures in 60 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E; Bachmann, E;

    1985-01-01

    Sixty consecutive patients suspected of having bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine (BOG) had aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures made of fasting upper jejunal fluid and also a 14C-D-xylose breath test (XBT). Culture-proven BOG was present in 23 patients. In another 15 patients the pr...

  9. Ileocecal valve dysfunction in small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Larry S Miller; Anil K Vegesna; Aiswerya Madanam Sampath; Shital Prabhu; Sesha Krishna Kotapati; Kian Makipour

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To explore whether patients with a defective ileocecal valve (ICV)/cecal distension reflex have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.METHODS:Using a colonoscope,under conscious sedation,the ICV was intubated and the colonoscope was placed within the terminal ileum (TI).A manometry catheter with 4 pressure channels,spaced 1 cm apart,was passed through the biopsy channel of the colonoscope into the TI.The colonoscope was slowly withdrawn from the TI while the manometry catheter was advanced.The catheter was placed across the ICV so that at least one pressure port was within the TI,ICV and the cecum respectively.Pressures were continuously measured during air insufflation into the cecum,under direct endoscopic visualization,in 19 volunteers.Air was insufflated to a maximum of 40 mmHg to prevent barotrauma.All subjects underwent lactulose breath testing one month after the colonoscopy.The results of the breath tests were compared with the results of the pressures within the ICV during air insufflation.RESULTS:Nineteen subjects underwent colonoscopy with measurements of the ICV pressures after intubation of the ICV with a colonoscope.Initial baseline readings showed no statistical difference in the pressures of the TI and ICV,between subjects with positive lactulose breath tests and normal lactulose breath tests.The average peak ICV pressure during air insufflation into the cecum in subjects with normal lactulose breath tests was significantly higher than cecal pressures during air insufflation (49.33 ± 7.99 mmHg vs 16.40 ± 2.14 mmHg,P =0.0011).The average percentage difference of the area under the pressure curve of the ICV from the cecum during air insufflations in subjects with normal lactulose breath tests was significantly higher (280.72% ± 43.29% vs 100% ± 0%,P =0.0006).The average peak ICV pressure during air insufflation into the cecum in subjects with positive lactulose breath tests was not significantly different than cecal pressures during

  10. Bile acid malabsorption or disturbed intestinal permeability in patients treated with enzyme substitution for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is not caused by bacterial overgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Graff, Jesper; Philipsen, Else Kirstine;

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In some patients with severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, enzyme replacement therapy will not lead to clinical improvement or reduction of steatorrhea. Therefore, other mechanisms separately or in interplay with reduced enzyme secretion might be responsible for malabsorption...... in patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency who receive treatment with enzyme supplementation. The prevalence of bacterial overgrowth seems to be low among these patients and does not explain the findings....... in these patients. AIMS: To evaluate the prevalence of bacterial overgrowth, bile acid absorption capacity, and intestinal permeability in a group of patients with well-characterized exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. METHODOLOGY: Eleven men with severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, of whom 10 were receiving...

  11. SMALL INTESTINE BACTERIAL OVERGROWTH IN PATIENTS WITH FAILURE OF THE VALVE BAUHINIAS AND AFTER ITS SURGICAL TREATMENTS (THE FIRST RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Martvnov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Оbjective: diagnosis of the a small intestine of bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO in patients with the failure of the bauginias valve (FBV and after its surgical correction.Material and methods. Patients of the studied groups were examined by means of direct and indirect methods of diagnostics of SIBO. Bacteriological research of an aspirate of aillium gut and other operational material was conducted. To all patients the hydrogen respiratory test was carried out and highquality reaction of urine to an indican was carried out. 50 patients are examined, from them 30 are inclu ded in the main group by which surgical correction of FBV – a bauginoplastik is made; 20 patients are included in group of control at which the illeocecal valve is well-founded. Patients of the main group were examined before operation and for the 7th and 45th days after a bauginoplastik.Results. At all patients of the main group SIBO of varying severity is defined, at 80% of patients of SIBO was localized in distal part of the small intestine. Patients with normal function of the ileocecal valve a SIBO did not suffer. At 76% of patients revealed signs of a mezadenitisof a small intestine, the fact of a bacterial translocation at SIBO is confirmed. In 7 days after surgical correction of the bauginiasvalve normalization of a peak and background excretion of hydrogen was noted at 37% of patients. For the 45th days at all patients the hydrogen digram met standard.Conclusions. The failure of the bauginiasvalveis obligatory followed by a small intestine of bacterial overgrowth syndrome, surgical correction is an effective method of correction of a SIBO at patients with FBV.

  12. Phytohemagglutinin derived from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): a cause for intestinal malabsorption associated with bacterial overgrowth in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwell, J G; Boldt, D H; Meyers, J; Weber, F L

    1983-03-01

    Plant lectins or carbohydrate binding proteins interact with membrane receptors on cellular surfaces but their antinutritional effects are poorly defined. Studies were conducted to determine the effects of phytohemagglutinin, a lectin derived from raw red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), on small intestinal absorptive function and morphology, and on the intestinal microflora. Phytohemagglutinin was isolated in purified form by thyroglobulin-sepharose 4B affinity chromatography. Red kidney bean and phytohemagglutinin (6% and 0.5%, respectively, of dietary protein) were fed in a purified casein diet to weanling rats for up to 21 days. Weight loss, associated with malabsorption of lipid, nitrogen, and vitamin B12, developed in comparison with animals pair-fed isonitrogenous casein diets. Antinutritional effects of red kidney bean were reversible on reinstitution of a purified casein diet. An increase in bacterial colonization of the jejunum and ileum occurred in red kidney bean- and phytohemagglutin-fed animals. When antibiotics were included in the diet, malabsorption of [3H]triolein and 57Co-vitamin B12 in red kidney bean-fed animals was partially reversed and, in germ-free animals, purified phytohemagglutinin had no demonstrable antinutritional effect. Mucosal disaccharidase activity was reduced in red kidney bean- and phytohemagglutinin-fed animals, but intestinal mucosal morphology was unchanged. Dietary administration of phytohemagglutinin, alone or as a component of red kidney bean, caused intestinal dysfunction, which was associated with, and dependent upon, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Adherence of enteric bacteria to the mucosal surface was enhanced by phytohemagglutinin which may have facilitated small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. PMID:6822324

  13. Endogenous ethanol production in a patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinucci, Giulio; Guidetti, Mariacristina; Lanzoni, Elisabetta; Pironi, Loris

    2006-07-01

    The case of the gastrointestinal production of ethanol from Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a Caucasian man with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is reported. The patient, who declared to have always abstained from alcohol, was hospitalized for abdominal pain, belching and mental confusion. The laboratory findings showed the presence of ethanol in the blood. Gastric juice and faecal microbiological cultures were positive for C. albicans and S. cerevisiae. At home, he was on oral antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid for a small bowel bacterial overgrowth, associated with a simple sugar-rich diet. Twenty-four hours after stopping both the antibiotic therapy and the simple sugar-rich diet, the blood ethanol disappeared. A provocative test, performed by giving amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid associated with the simple sugar-rich diet was followed by the reappearance of ethanol in the blood. A review of the literature is reported.

  14. Evaluating the efficacy of probiotic on treatment in patients with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO - A pilot study

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    A R Khalighi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO leads to several gastrointestinal (GI problems and complications leading to malabsorption. The effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment of SIBO syndrome has not been well studied. This pilot study was aimed to assess the efficacy of a probiotic consisting of lactobacilli in the treatment of SIBO. Methods: In this study, 30 cases suffering from chronic abdominal pain or diarrhoea and with a positive hydrogen breath test were randomized in a double-blind manner into two groups: probiotic drug user and control group. After an initial 3-week aggressive therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics, a 15-day maintenance antibiotic therapy with lactol was administered for the study group and the same regimen without lactol for the control group. After six months the HBT result and the GI symptoms were analyzed and compared between the two groups. Results: The result of hydrogen breath test and the clinical symptoms in patients receiving the maintenance regimen with lactol probiotic showed a better response. The hydrogen breath test turned negative in 93.3 per cent of those receiving lactol compared to 66.7 per cent of the controls. In all the cases receiving lactol, the abdominal pain disappeared completely ( p =0.002. In addition, other GI problems including flatulence, belching and diarrhoea significantly improved in the study group ( p <0.05. Interpretation & conclusions: Based on the preliminary data it seems that adding lactol probiotic to the maintenance therapy of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth patients on routine antibiotic therapy will be beneficial in preventing the complications of this syndrome.

  15. A Case of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth with Peripheral Edema Caused by Intestinal Bypass Surgery and Relieved by Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Young Kyung; Gwak, Geum Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Koh, Kwang Chul; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul; Lee, Joon Hyeok

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal bypass surgery, particularly jejuno-ileal bypass surgery, performed for the purpose of weight reduction may cause an unexpected exacerbation of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Here, we report a case of NASH caused by small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, which developed after jejuno-colic bypass surgery and resolved dramatically after surgical correction.

  16. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Characteristics, Psychological Factors, and Peripheral Cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hua; Fox, Mark; Zheng, Xia; Deng, Yanyong; Long, Yanqin; Huang, Zhihui; Du, Lijun; Xu, Fei; Dai, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Psychosocial factors and low-grade colonic mucosal immune activation have been suggested to play important roles in the pathophysiology of IBS. In total, 94 patients with IBS and 13 healthy volunteers underwent a 10 g lactulose hydrogen breath test (HBT) with concurrent 99mTc scintigraphy. All participants also completed a face-to-face questionnaire survey, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Life Event Stress (LES), and general information. Serum tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, and IL-10 levels were measured. The 89 enrolled patients with IBS and 13 healthy controls had no differences in baseline characteristics. The prevalence of SIBO in patients with IBS was higher than that in healthy controls (39% versus 8%, resp.; p = 0.026). Patients with IBS had higher anxiety, depression, and LES scores, but anxiety, depression, and LES scores were similar between the SIBO-positive and SIBO-negative groups. Psychological disorders were not associated with SIBO in patients with IBS. The serum IL-10 level was significantly lower in SIBO-positive than SIBO-negative patients with IBS. PMID:27379166

  17. Duodenal Aspirates for Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth: Yield, PPIs, and Outcomes after Treatment at a Tertiary Academic Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana L. Franco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal aspirates are not commonly collected, but they can be easily used in detection of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI use has been proposed to contribute to the development of SIBO. We aimed to determine the yield of SIBO-positive cultures detected in duodenal aspirates, the relationship between SIBO and PPI use, and the clinical outcomes of patients identified by this method. In a retrospective study, we analyzed electronic medical records from 1263 consecutive patients undergoing upper endoscopy at a tertiary medical center. Aspirates were collected thought out the third and fourth portions of the duodenum, and cultures were considered to be positive for SIBO if they produced more than 100,000 cfu/mL. Culture analysis of duodenal aspirates identified SIBO in one-third of patients. A significantly higher percentage of patients with SIBO use PPIs than patients without SIBO, indicating a possible association. Similar proportions of patients with SIBO improved whether or not they received antibiotic treatment, calling into question the use of this expensive therapy for this disorder.

  18. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgical procedures that create a loop of small intestine where excess bacteria can grow. An example is a Billroth II type of stomach removal ( gastrectomy ). Some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Symptoms The most common symptoms are: Abdominal ...

  19. Bovine colostrum in oral treatment of enterogenic endotoxaemia in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhler, J Rüdiger; Nebermann, Lars

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Under conditions of shock, bacteria and endotoxins in the intestines can traverse the mucosal barrier by translocation and enter the blood and lymphatic system. Immunoglobulins and lactoferrin have been reported to neutralize endotoxins and bacteria. We studied the essential therapeutic factors of colostrum products in an animal experiment. Method We simulated endotoxaemia by per-oral administration of a suspension of Escherichia coli and antibiotics into the duodenum of anaesthetized rats after giving intraperitoneal carrageenan. At the same time, pure bovine colostrum or lactoferrin-enriched bovine colostrum was given. Therapeutic effects were studied by examining plasma endotoxin activity and bacterial contamination of mesenterial lymph nodes and peritoneal lavages. Albumin was used in a control group. Results The most effective bovine colostrum was able to reduce the maximum plasma endotoxin value by 67% as compared with the albumin group. The combination of this colostrum with lactoferrin brought about a reduction by 80%. The reduction in bacterial contamination of lymph nodes and peritoneal lavages was also evident. Conclusion Both gammaglobulin and lactoferrin may help to eliminate endotoxins when bovine colostrum is administered into the gut in conditions of septic shock. PMID:12493077

  20. Increased accuracy of the carbon-14 D-xylose breath test in detecting small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth by correction with the gastric emptying rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the accuracy of 14C-D-xylose breath test for detecting bacterial overgrowth can be increased by correction with the gastric emptying rate of 14C-D-xylose. Ten culture-positive patients and ten culture-negative controls were included in the study. Small-intestinal aspirates for bacteriological culture were obtained endoscopically. A liquid-phase gastric emptying study was performed simultaneously to assess the amount of 14C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. The results of the percentage of expired 14CO2 at 30 min were corrected with the amount of 14C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. There were six patients in the culture-positive group with a 14CO2 concentration above the normal limit. Three out of four patients with initially negative results using the uncorrected method proved to be positive after correction. All these three patients had prolonged gastric emptying of 14C-D-xylose. When compared with cultures of small-intestine aspirates, the sensitivity and specificity of the uncorrected 14C-D-xylose breath test were 60% and 90%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of the corrected 14C-D-xylose breath test improved to 90% and 100%, respectively. (orig./MG)

  1. Current treatment of sepsis and endotoxaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periti, P

    2000-09-01

    This article reviews the new criteria for selecting the proper antimicrobial agent and dosage regimen for standard treatment of severe sepsis, with the intention of preventing septic shock. After introducing new concepts on the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock, the authors analyse the parameters of beta-lactam antibacterial activity, the antibiotic-induced release of bacterial endotoxin and the interrelationships between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in the search for an optimum dosage regimen of antimicrobial mono- or polytherapy for severely ill septic patients admitted to the intensive care unit. The mortality rate resulting from severe bacterial sepsis, particularly that associated with shock, still approaches 50% in spite of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and optimum supportive care. Bacterial endotoxins that are part of the cell wall are one of the cofactors in the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock and are often induced by antimicrobial chemotherapy, even if administered rationally. Not all antimicrobial agents are equally capable of inducing septic shock; this is dependent on their mechanism of action rather than on the causative pathogen species. The quantity of endotoxin released depends on the drug dose and whether filaments or spheroplast formation predominate. Some antibiotics, such as carbapenems, ceftriaxone, cefepime, glycopeptides, aminoglycosides and quinolones, do not have the propensity to provoke septic shock because their rapid bacterial activity induces mainly spheroplast or fragile spheroplast-like bacterial forms.

  2. Leukocyte-subset counts in idiopathic parkinsonism provide clues to a pathogenic pathway involving small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. A surveillance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobbs R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following Helicobacter pylori eradication in idiopathic parkinsonism (IP, hypokinesia improved but flexor-rigidity increased. Small intestinal bacterial-overgrowth (SIBO is a candidate driver of the rigidity: hydrogen-breath-test-positivity is common in IP and case histories suggest that Helicobacter keeps SIBO at bay. Methods In a surveillance study, we explore relationships of IP-facets to peripheral immune/inflammatory-activation, in light of presence/absence of Helicobacter infection (urea-breath- and/or stool-antigen-test: positivity confirmed by gastric-biopsy and hydrogen-breath-test status for SIBO (positivity: >20 ppm increment, 2 consecutive 15-min readings, within 2h of 25G lactulose. We question whether any relationships found between facets and blood leukocyte subset counts stand in patients free from anti-parkinsonian drugs, and are robust enough to defy fluctuations in performance consequent on short t½ therapy. Results Of 51 IP-probands, 36 had current or past Helicobacter infection on entry, 25 having undergone successful eradication (median 3.4 years before. Thirty-four were hydrogen-breath-test-positive initially, 42 at sometime (343 tests during surveillance (2.8 years. Hydrogen-breath-test-positivity was associated inversely with Helicobacter-positivity (OR 0.20 (95% CI 0.04, 0.99, p In 38 patients (untreated (17 or on stable long-t½ IP-medication, the higher the natural-killer count, the shorter stride, slower gait and greater flexor-rigidity (by mean 49 (14, 85 mm, 54 (3, 104 mm.s-1, 89 (2, 177 Nm.10-3, per 100 cells.μl-1 increment, p=0.007, 0.04 & 0.04 respectively, adjusted for patient characteristics. T-helper count was inversely associated with flexor-rigidity before (p=0.01 and after adjustment for natural-killer count (-36(-63, -10 Nm.10-3 per 100 cells.μl-1, p=0.007. Neutrophil count was inversely associated with tremor (visual analogue scale, p=0.01. Effect-sizes were independent of IP

  3. Day-night variation in heart rate variability changes induced by endotoxaemia in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, M.; Rosenberg, J; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    /night variation in endotoxaemia-induced changes in HRV. METHODS: A randomized, crossover study with 12 healthy men (age 18-31) was conducted. Endotoxaemia were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin 0.3 ng/kg b.w. in two visits (day visit and night visit). At the day visit, endotoxaemia were induced at 12...... at both night and day resulted in a significant depression in HRV parameters high-frequency power (HF), low-frequency power (LF), standard deviation of normal-to-normal (NN) intervals, root mean square of successive differences and proportion of NN50 divided by total number of NNs (P

  4. Endotoxaemia in haemodialysis: a novel factor in erythropoetin resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E A Harrison

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Translocated endotoxin derived from intestinal bacteria is a driver of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. Severe endotoxaemia is an underappreciated, but characteristic finding in haemodialysis (HD patients, and appears to be driven by acute repetitive dialysis induced circulatory stress. Resistance to erythropoietin (EPO has been identified as a predictor of mortality risk, and associated with inflammation and malnutrition. This study aims to explore the potential link between previously unrecognised endotoxaemia and EPO Resistance Index (ERI in HD patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 50 established HD patients were studied at a routine dialysis session. Data collection included weight, BMI, ultrafiltration volume, weekly EPO dose, and blood sampling pre and post HD. ERI was calculated as ratio of total weekly EPO dose to body weight (U/kg to haemoglobin level (g/dL. Mean haemoglobin (Hb was 11.3±1.3 g/dL with a median EPO dose of 10,000 [IQR 7,500-20,000] u/wk and ERI of 13.7 [IQR 6.9-23.3] ((U/Kg/(g/dL. Mean pre-HD serum ET levels were significantly elevated at 0.69±0.30 EU/ml. Natural logarithm (Ln of ERI correlated to predialysis ET levels (r = 0.324, p = 0.03 with a trend towards association with hsCRP (r = 0.280, p = 0.07. Ln ERI correlated with ultrafiltration volume, a driver of circulatory stress (r = 0.295, p = 0.046, previously identified to be associated with increased intradialytic endotoxin translocation. Both serum ET and ultrafiltration volume corrected for body weight were independently associated with Ln ERI in multivariable analysis. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that endotoxaemia is a significant factor in setting levels of EPO requirement. It raises the possibility that elevated EPO doses may in part merely be identifying patients subjected to significant circulatory stress and suffering the myriad of negative biological consequences arising from sustained

  5. Possible in vivo tolerance of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil to low-grade exercise-induced endotoxaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Camus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the question of whether translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the blood could be involved in the process of exercise-induced polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN activation, 12 healthy male subjects who took part in a sprint triathlon (1.5 km river swim, 40 km bicycle race, 10 km road race were studied. While there was no detectable amount of endotoxin in the blood samples drawn at rest, exercise was followed by the appearance of circulating endotoxin molecules at the end of competition in four subjects, and after one and 24 h recovery in three and seven athletes, respectively. The concentrations of plasma granulocyte myeloperoxidase ([MPO], were significantly higher immediately after exercise and one hour later than baseline values (P<0.001. This variable returned to pre-race levels the day after exercise, despite the presence of detectable amounts of LPS, at that time, in seven athletes. The absence of significant correlation (r=0.26;P=0.383 and temporal association between [MPO]and plasma endotoxin levels led us to conclude that endotoxaemia was not involved in the process of exercise-induced PMN degranulation observed in our subjects.

  6. Malassezia spp. overgrowth in allergic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordeix, Laura; Galeotti, Franca; Scarampella, Fabia; Dedola, Carla; Bardagí, Mar; Romano, Erica; Fondati, Alessandra

    2007-10-01

    A series of 18 allergic cats with multifocal Malassezia spp. overgrowth is reported: atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 16, an adverse food reaction in another and one was euthanized 2 months after diagnosis of Malassezia overgrowth. All the cats were otherwise healthy and those tested (16 out of 18) for feline leukaemia or feline immunodeficiency virus infections were all negative. At dermatological examination, multifocal alopecia, erythema, crusting and greasy adherent brownish scales were variably distributed on all cats. Cytological examination revealed Malassezia spp. overgrowth with/without bacterial infection in facial skin (n = 11), ventral neck (n = 6), abdomen (n = 6), ear canal (n = 4), chin (n = 2), ear pinnae (n = 2), interdigital (n = 1) and claw folds skin (n = 1). Moreover, in two cats Malassezia pachydermatis was isolated in fungal cultures from lesional skin. Azoles therapy alone was prescribed in seven, azoles and antibacterial therapy in eight and azoles with both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory therapy in three of the cats. After 3-4 weeks of treatment, substantial reduction of pruritus and skin lesions was observed in all 11 cats treated with a combined therapy and in five of seven treated solely with azoles. Malassezia spp. overgrowth may represent a secondary cutaneous problem in allergic cats particularly in those presented for dermatological examination displaying greasy adherent brownish scales. The favourable response to treatment with antifungal treatments alone suggests that, as in dogs, Malassezia spp. may be partly responsible for both pruritus and cutaneous lesions in allergic cats. PMID:17845619

  7. Effects of Endotoxaemia on Protein Metabolism in Rat Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscle and Myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew J Murton; Nima Alamdari; Gardiner, Sheila M.; Dumitru Constantin-Teodosiu; Robert Layfield; Terence Bennett; Greenhaff, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear if the rat myocardium undergoes the same rapid reductions in protein content that are classically observed in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during endotoxaemia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate this further, and to determine if there is any divergence in the response of skeletal muscle and myocardium in the mechanisms that are thought to be largely responsible for eliciting changes in protein content, Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with vascular cathe...

  8. Prevention of Endotoxaemia in Obstructive Jaundice — a Comparative Study of Bile Salts

    OpenAIRE

    Pain, J A; Bailey, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Systemic endotoxaemia is associated with postoperative renal dysfunction in obstructive jaundice, and can be prevented by the pre-operative administration of certain bile salts. In order to find the most effective bile salt for use in this condition, a comparison of the anti-endotoxic activities of different bile salts was performed. Bile salts were incubated in vitro with endotoxin and the resultant endotoxin level was measured with a quantitative limulus assay. The in vivo effec...

  9. In vivo measurement of nitric oxide production in porcine gut, liver and muscle during hyperdynamic endotoxaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruins, Maaike J; Lamers, Wouter H; Meijer, Alfred J; Soeters, Peter B; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2002-01-01

    During prolonged endotoxaemia, an increase in arginine catabolism may result in limiting substrate availability for nitric oxide (NO) production. These effects were quantitated in a chronically instrumented porcine endotoxaemia model. Ten days prior to the beginning of the experiments, pigs were catheterized. On day 0, pigs received a continuous infusion of endotoxin (3 μg kg−1 h−1) over 24 h and were saline resuscitated. Blood was drawn from the catheters at 0 and 24 h during primed-infusion of 15N2-arginine and P-aminohippurate to assess 15N2-arginine to 15N-citrulline conversion and plasma flow rates, respectively, across the portal-drained viscera, liver and hindquarter. During endotoxin infusion a hyperdynamic circulation with elevated heart rate, cardiac index and decreased mean arterial pressure was achieved, characteristic of the human septic condition. Endotoxin induced NO production by the portal-drained viscera and the liver. The increased NO production was quantitatively matched by an increase in arginine disposal. Nitrite/nitrate levels remained unchanged during endotoxaemia. Despite an increased arginine production from the hindquarter and an increased whole-body arginine appearance rate during endotoxin infusion, the plasma arginine concentration was lower in endotoxin-treated animals than in controls. On a whole-body level, the muscle was found to serve as a major arginine supplier and, considering the lowered arginine plasma levels, seems critical in providing arginine as precursor for NO synthesis in the splanchnic region. PMID:12466232

  10. INITIAL METABOLIC STATE AND EXERCISE-INDUCED ENDOTOXAEMIA ARE UNRELATED TO GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS DURING EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moncada-Jiménez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the initial metabolic state and exercise-induced endotoxaemia on the appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS during exercise. Eleven males (36.6 ± 4.9 yrs, 1.7 ± 0.1 m, 74.5 ± 7.7 kg, DEXA body fat % 17.2 ± 6.6, VO2max 57.4 ± 7.4 ml·kg-1·min-1 underwent two isoenergetic diets designed to change their initial metabolic status by either depleting or maintaining their hepatic and muscular glycogen content. These diets and accompanying exercise sessions were performed by each participant in the days before completing a laboratory-based duathlon (5-km run, 30-km cycling, 10-km run. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately and 1- and 2-h following the duathlon for determination of insulin (IN, glucagon (GL, endotoxin, aspartic aminotransferase (AST, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT markers. GIS were assessed by survey before and after exercise. Diet content produced a different energy status as determined by macronutrient content and the IN/GL ratio (p < 0.05, and mild exercise-induced endotoxaemia was observed in both experimental duathlons. Regardless of the diet, the AST/ALT ratio following exercise and in the recovery phase indicated hepatocyte and liver parenchyma structural damage. In spite of GIS, no significant correlations between endotoxin levels and GIS were found. In conclusion, increased markers of endotoxaemia observed with the high-intensity exercise were unrelated to hepatic function and/or GIS before and after exercise

  11. Síndrome de intestino corto: definición, causas, adaptación intestinal y sobrecrecimiento bacteriano Short bowel syndrome: definition, causes, intestinal adaptation and bacterial overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ballesteros Pomar

    2007-05-01

    ón parenteral.The short bowel syndrome (SBS is a complex entity due to anatomical or functional loss of part of the small bowel originating a clinical picture with severe metabolic and nutritional impairments due to reduction of the effective absorptive surface area of the gut. SBS is one of the causes of a larger entity known as "intestinal failure". Currently, mesenteric vascular accidents are the main cause in adults, followed by inflammatory bowel disease, and radiation enteritis, whereas in children, the main causes are congenital and perinatal diseases. The clinical picture associated with SBS varies according to the length and location of affected small bowel, the presence of underlying disease, the presence or absence of the large bowel and ileocecal valve, and the nature of the underlying disease. Intestinal adaptation is the process by which, throughout 1-2 years, intestinal absorption is reestablished to the situation prior to intestinal resection, and is a key factor determining whether a patient with SBS will progress to intestinal failure and depend on DPN. Intestinal adaptation may take place if the patient does oral intake higher than the usual one (hyperphagia; besides, the bowel may also adapt to secure a more effective absorption per surface area unit, either by increasing the absorptive surface area (structural adaptation and/or slowing intestinal transit (functional adaptation. These changes are not still clearly established in humans, but there are so in animal models. The presence of nutrients within the intestinal lumen and certain gastrointestinal hormones, particularly GLP-2, have an influence on a successful adaptation process. Patients with SBS are prone to the occurrence of bacterial overgrowth that makes adaptation difficult and worsens the symptoms, besides being a factor for dependence on parenteral nutrition.

  12. Influence of different breathing patterns on heart rate variability indices and reproducibility during experimental endotoxaemia in human subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Kox, Matthijs; Pompe, Jan C.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W.; Pickkers, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Different breathing patterns may influence heart rate variability (HRV). Previous results obtained under static conditions, when HRV does not vary to a great extent, are conflicting. HRV indices decrease considerably during systemic inflammation evoked by experimental endotoxaemia, enabling the determination of the effects of different breathing patterns on HRV in a dynamic setting. We investigated the impact of different breathing patterns on short-term HRV measurements d...

  13. Genetic syndromes associated with overgrowth in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2013-09-01

    Overgrowth syndromes comprise a diverse group of conditions with unique clinical, behavioral and molecular genetic features. While considerable overlap in presentation sometimes exists, advances in identification of the precise etiology of specific overgrowth disorders continue to improve clinicians' ability to make an accurate diagnosis. Among them, this paper introduces two classic genetic overgrowth syndromes: Sotos syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Historically, the diagnosis was based entirely on clinical findings. However, it is now understood that Sotos syndrome is caused by a variety of molecular genetic alterations resulting in haploinsufficiency of the NSD1 gene at chromosome 5q35 and that Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is caused by heterogeneous abnormalities in the imprinting of a number of growth regulatory genes within chromosome 11p15 in the majority of cases. Interestingly, the 11p15 imprinting region is also associated with Russell-Silver syndrome which is a typical growth retardation syndrome. Opposite epigenetic alterations in 11p15 result in opposite clinical features shown in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Russell-Silver syndrome. Although the exact functions of the causing genes have not yet been completely understood, these overgrowth syndromes can be good models to clarify the complex basis of human growth and help to develop better-directed therapies in the future.

  14. Antimicrobial-induced endotoxaemia in patients with sepsis in the field of acute pyelonephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giamarellos-Bourboulis E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vitro results have shown that antimicrobial agents may induce the Gram-negative bacteria to release endotoxins (LPS, which in turn, could trigger the secretion of cytokines from monocytes. AIMS: To compare the effect of cefuroxime, netilmicin or ciprofloxacin on serum levels of LPS and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha. METHODS: Seventy-four patients with acute pyelonephritis caused by Gram-negative bacteria and signs of sepsis were randomly assigned to receive one of three intravenous regimens of cefuroxime, netilmicin or ciprofloxacin. Blood samples were collected before therapy and at specified time intervals for 96 hours after the initiation of treatment for the determination of serum levels of LPS and of TNFalpha. RESULTS: Patients treated with cefuroxime presented an early peak of LPS and of TNFalpha in serum two hours after the initiation of treatment compared to the other study groups. After that time interval, concentrations of LPS and TNFalpha were similar in all the study groups. Fever accompanied by endotoxaemia was still detected for 48 hours after the start of therapy in 36, 37.5 and 36% of patients treated with cefuroxime, netilmicin and ciprofloxacin respectively. The corresponding figures for these agents at 72 hours were 28, 12.5 and 24%, respective and 12, 4.2 and 4% at 96 hours (P value not significant. CONCLUSIONS: With the exception of an early peak in the serum levels of LPS and TNFalpha in patients treated with cefuroxime, no significant difference could be detected amongst the study groups as far as their effect on serum levels of LPS and TNFalpha were concerned. This suggests that these three antimicrobial agents may be administered safely at the early stages of sepsis.

  15. Nonsurgical Management of Nifedipine Induced Gingival Overgrowth

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    George Sam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is frequently associated with three particular drugs: phenytoin, cyclosporin, and nifedipine. As gingival enlargement develops, it affects the normal oral hygiene practice and may interfere with masticatory functions. The awareness in the medical community about this possible side effect of nifedipine is less when compared to the effects of phenytoin and cyclosporin. The frequency of gingival enlargement associated with chronic nifedipine therapy remains controversial. Within the group of patients that develop this unwanted effect, there appears to be variability in the extent and severity of the gingival changes. Although gingival inflammation is considered a primary requisite in their development, few cases with minimal or no plaque induced gingival inflammation have also been reported. A case report of gingival overgrowth induced by nifedipine in a patient with good oral hygiene and its nonsurgical management with drug substitution is discussed in this case report.

  16. Efficacy of AZM therapy in patients with gingival overgrowth induced by Cyclosporine A: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deli Giorgio

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In daily clinical practice of a dental department it's common to find gingival overgrowth (GO in periodontal patients under treatment with Cyclosporine A (CsA. The pathogenesis of GO and the mechanism of action of Azithromycin (AZM are unclear. A systematic review was conducted in order to evaluate the efficacy of Azithromycin in patients with gingival overgrowth induced by assumption of Cyclosporine A. Methods A bibliographic search was performed using the online databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central of Register Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in the time period between 1966 and September 2008. Results The literature search retrieved 24 articles; only 5 were Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs, published in English, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A great heterogeneity between proposed treatments and outcomes was found, and this did not allow to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis. The systematic review revealed that a 5-day course of Azithromycin with Scaling and Root Planing reduces the degree of gingival overgrowth, while a 7-day course of metronidazole is only effective on concomitant bacterial over-infection. Conclusion Few RCTs on the efficacy of systemic antibiotic therapy in case of GO were found in the literature review. A systemic antibiotic therapy without plaque and calculus removal is not able to reduce gingival overgrowth. The great heterogeneity of diagnostic data and outcomes is due to the lack of precise diagnostic methods and protocols about GO. Future studies need to improve both diagnostic methods and tools and adequate classification aimed to determine a correct prognosis and an appropriate therapy for gingival overgrowth.

  17. PROTEUS SYNDROME - SEGMENTAL OVERGROWTH WITH MULTIPLE NEVI

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    Ramasamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a rare hamartomatous disorder characterized by various cutaneous and subcutaneous lesions , including vascular malformations , lipomas , hyperpigmentation , and several types of nevi. Partial gigantism with limb or digital overgrowth is pathognomonic of Proteus syndrome. We report a case of proteus syndrome in a 45 year old man , who presented with hypertrophy of index finger of both hands and middle , ring fing er of left hand , verrucous lesions over left axilla and two firm swellings over left palm for the past 15 years. Clinical findings , histopathology and imaging studies fulfilled the criteria of proteus syndrome which is rarely reported in literature.

  18. Intragastric nitrites, nitrosamines, and bacterial overgrowth during cimetidine treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Stockbrugger, R W; Cotton, P B; Eugenides, N; Bartholomew, B. A.; Hill, M.J.; Walters, C L

    1982-01-01

    A six week course of cimetidine (1 g/day) healed peptic ulcers in 20 of 23 patients (14 with duodenal ulcer, nine with gastric ulcer). Reduction of basal acid output by 73% and peak acid output by 36% led to a rise in concentrations of intragastric aerobic bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria. While the mean intragastric concentration of nitrate was unchanged by treatment, there were statistically significant rises in nitrite and N-nitrosamine concentrations. The conversion from nitrates to...

  19. EED-associated overgrowth in a second male patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ana Sa; Gibson, William T

    2016-09-01

    Following our discovery that constitutional mutations in EED can cause overgrowth, we screened our cohort of patients with Weaver-like features for mutations in this gene. Here we describe a second patient with a different, rare and de novo mutation in EED. Phenotypic overlap with our first case of EED-associated overgrowth is significant. Now that we have found two unrelated families of different ethnicities, with a similar rare phenotype, both associated with de novo mutations in this member of the PRC2 complex, we are confident that EED is indeed a novel overgrowth gene.

  20. Cortical overgrowth in fetuses with isolated ventriculomegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakopoulou, Vanessa; Vatansever, Deniz; Elkommos, Samia; Dawson, Sarah; McGuinness, Amy; Allsop, Joanna; Molnár, Zoltán; Hajnal, Joseph; Rutherford, Mary

    2014-08-01

    Mild cerebral ventricular enlargement is associated with schizophrenia, autism, epilepsy, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Fetal ventriculomegaly is the most common central nervous system (CNS) abnormality affecting 1% of fetuses and is associated with cognitive, language, and behavioral impairments in childhood. Neurodevelopmental outcome is partially predictable by the 2-dimensional size of the ventricles in the absence of other abnormalities. We hypothesized that isolated fetal ventriculomegaly is a marker of altered brain development characterized by relative overgrowth and aimed to quantify brain growth using volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in fetuses with isolated ventriculomegaly. Fetal brain MRI (1.5 T) was performed in 60 normal fetuses and 65 with isolated ventriculomegaly, across a gestational age range of 22-38 weeks. Volumetric analysis of the ventricles and supratentorial brain structures was performed on 3-dimensional reconstructed datasets. Fetuses with isolated ventriculomegaly had increased brain parenchyma volumes when compared with the control cohort (9.6%, P ventriculomegaly may represent the neurobiological substrate for cognitive, language, and behavioral deficits in these children.

  1. Isolated gingival overgrowths: A review of case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizada, Shruti; Varghese, Jothi M; Bhat, K M; Gupta, Kanishk

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians are often intrigued by the varied manifestations of the gingival tissue. Gingival overgrowth is a common clinical finding and most of them represent a reactive hyperplasia as a direct result of plaque-related inflammatory gingival disease. These types of growth generally respond to good plaque control, removal of the causative irritants, and conservative tissue management. This case series highlights three different cases of localized gingival overgrowth and its management with emphasis on the importance of patient awareness and motivation.

  2. Isolated gingival overgrowths: A review of case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Raizada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians are often intrigued by the varied manifestations of the gingival tissue. Gingival overgrowth is a common clinical finding and most of them represent a reactive hyperplasia as a direct result of plaque-related inflammatory gingival disease. These types of growth generally respond to good plaque control, removal of the causative irritants, and conservative tissue management. This case series highlights three different cases of localized gingival overgrowth and its management with emphasis on the importance of patient awareness and motivation.

  3. Size and shape control in the overgrowth of gold nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, Fulvio; Matteini, Paolo; Rossi, Francesca; Pini, Roberto, E-mail: r.pini@ifac.cnr.i [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    We report on a new sustainable approach to manipulate the optical behaviour and geometrical properties of gold nanorods in aqueous solutions by fine control of their overgrowth. In our approach, the overgrowth is realized by modulation of the reduction of the gold ions which are left as Au{sup 1+} after the primary step of the synthesis (typically as much as {approx}80% of the gold ions available in the growth solution). The progress of the reduction requires the gradual addition of ascorbic acid, which transforms the Au{sup 1+} into Au{sup 0} and may be performed in the original growth solution with no need for any further manipulation. By control of the total amount and rate of administration of the ascorbic acid, we prove the possibility to realize a systematic modulation of the average lengths, diameters, shapes (rod or dog-bone like), and light extinction of the nanoparticles. A slow overgrowth leads to a gradual enlargement of the lengths and diameters at almost constant shape. In contrast, a faster overgrowth results into a more complex modification of the overall shape of the gold nanorods.

  4. The Role of Intestinal Bacteria Overgrowth in Obesity-Related Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia M. Ferolla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. It is a progressive disorder involving a spectrum of conditions that include pure steatosis without inflammation, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, fibrosis and cirrhosis. The key factor in the pathophysiology of NAFLD is insulin resistance that determines lipid accumulation in the hepatocytes, which may be followed by lipid peroxidation, production of reactive oxygen species and consequent inflammation. Recent studies suggest that the characteristics of the gut microbiota are altered in NAFLD, and also, that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO contributes to the pathogenesis of this condition. This review presents the chief findings from all the controlled studies that evaluated SIBO, gut permeability and endotoxemia in human NAFLD. We also discuss the possible mechanisms involving SIBO, lipid accumulation and development of NASH. The understanding of these mechanisms may allow the development of new targets for NASH treatment in the future.

  5. 肠易激综合征患者合并小肠细菌过度生长的临床特征及利福昔明治疗效果初探%Clinical features of irritable bowel syndrome with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and a preliminary study of effectiveness of Rifaximin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘作静; 魏慧; 段丽萍; 朱诗玮; 张璐; 王琨

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and clinical features of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) patients detected by hydrogen and methane in lactulose breath test (LBT),and to study the effects of rifaximin in IBS-D paticnts.Methods Consecutive patients with IBS-D who met Rome Ⅲ criteria,and gender-and agematched healthy volunteers were enrolled from March 2015 to January 2016 in Peking University Third Hospital.All the ISB-D patients underwent LBT to detect the prevalence of SIBO.The clinical and LBT features of IBS with SIBO (IBS-P group) and without SIBO (IBS-N group) were analyzed.The effects of rifaximin therapy (0.4g,twice per day for 4 weeks) in IBS-D patients were evaluated by comparing changes in clinical features and LBT results after treatment.Results (1) Eighty-four IBS-D patients and 22 healthy controls were enrolled.The prevalence of SIBO in IBS-D patients was 41.67% (35/84),with 27 (77.14%) only hydrogen-positive,5 (14.29%) methane-positive,and 3 (8.57%) both methane-and hydrogen-positive.(2) The body mass index (BMI) in the IBS-P group was lower than in the IBS-N group [(21.61 ±0.57) vs (23.44 ±0.54) kg/m2,P <0.05],the maximum stool frequency was also less than in the IBS-N group [(3.85 ±0.23) vs (4.88 ±0.35) times/day,P <0.05].(3) No significant difference was found in oro-cecal transit time (OCTT) among IBS-P,IBS-N and healthy controls.The hydrogen concentration in small intestinal and colonic sections in breath of the IBS-P group was higher than that of both healthy controls and the IBS-N group,while methane concentration in small intestinal and colonic sections (160 min) was higher than that of the IBS-N group (all P < 0.05).(4) There was no linear relationship between mean hydrogen and methane concentrations in LBT among the IBS-P,the IBS-N and healthy control groups (all r < 0.35,P > 0.05).(5) Totally 13 IBS-P patients received rifaximin therapy

  6. Concentrations of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, soluble CD14 and plasma lipids in relation to endotoxaemia in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, C.; Parlesak, Alexandr; Schütt, C.;

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that gut leakage in persons with chronic alcohol misuse leads to endotoxaemia, which might contribute to the development of alcoholic hepatitis or cirrhosis. In addition, it was recently shown that the endotoxin-binding capacity of whole blood is reduced...... in these patients. To analyse this phenomenon, we measured the concentration of functionally important endotoxin-binding plasma components which modify the action of endotoxin. In patients with minimal (n = 10), intermediate (n = 9), and cirrhotic alcoholic liver disease (n = 11), and healthy controls (n = 11......), plasma endotoxin was determined in a limulus assay. The concentration of lipoproteins was assessed by measuring apolipoproteins, the other factors were directly measured in immunoassays. In the entire group of alcoholics, endotoxin and the concentration of binding factors that are involved in the action...

  7. MOVPE overgrowth of InN quantum dot like structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium nitride (InN) quantum dots could be used an alternative material for applications at the standard telecommunication wavelength of 1.55 μm. We showed that the density and size of InN quantum dots grown in Volmer-Weber growth mode can be controlled by growth temperature and total amount of InN on the surface. For light emitting devices those quantum dot like structures need to be overgrown. Therefore, we studied systematically the overgrowth process by MOVPE of InN quantum dots on GaN/sapphire with a density of 1010 cm-2. Different capping strategies were monitored by in-situ ellipsometry which allows investigations on a submonolayer scale of the InN/GaN system with 11% lattice mismatch. Additional characterisation was done by atomic force microscopy, x-ray and photoluminescence measurements. The main problem of indium segregation from InN QDs into the first capping layers and the formation of InGaN is observed by XRD with a gallium content of less than 20%. Thus for overgrowth a high growth rate is needed, but the material quality must still be maintained. Further investigations with InGaN capping layers to reduce the strain during overgrowth have been done.

  8. Stromal myofibroblasts in focal reactive overgrowths of the gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Leonardo Silveira; Gonçalves, Fernanda da Silva; Costa e Silva, Edson; Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Souza, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello

    2012-01-01

    Focal reactive overgrowths are among the most common oral mucosal lesions. The gingiva is a significant site affected by these lesions, when triggered by chronic inflammation in response to microorganisms in dental plaque. Myofibroblasts are differentiated fibroblasts that actively participate in diseases characterized by tissue fibrosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of stromal myofibroblasts in the main focal reactive overgrowths of the gingiva: focal fibrous hyperplasia (FFH), peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF), pyogenic granuloma (PG), and peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG). A total of 10 FFHs, 10 POFs, 10 PGs, and 10 PGCGs from archival specimens were evaluated. Samples of gingival mucosa were used as negative controls for stromal myofibroblasts. Oral squamous cell carcinoma samples, in which stromal myofibroblasts have been previously detected, were used as positive controls. Myofibroblasts were identified by immunohistochemical detection of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-sma). Myofibroblast immunostaining was qualitatively classified as negative, scanty, or dense. Differences in the presence of myofibroblasts among FFH, POF, PG, and PGCG were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Stromal myofibroblasts were not detected in FFH, POF, PG, or PGCG. Consequently, no differences were observed in the presence of myofibroblasts among FFH, POF, PG, or PGCG (p > 0.05). In conclusion, stromal myofibroblasts were not detected in the focal reactive overgrowths of the gingiva that were evaluated, suggesting that these cells do not play a significant role in their pathogenesis.

  9. Stromal myofibroblasts in focal reactive overgrowths of the gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Silveira Damasceno

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Focal reactive overgrowths are among the most common oral mucosal lesions. The gingiva is a significant site affected by these lesions, when triggered by chronic inflammation in response to microorganisms in dental plaque. Myofibroblasts are differentiated fibroblasts that actively participate in diseases characterized by tissue fibrosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of stromal myofibroblasts in the main focal reactive overgrowths of the gingiva: focal fibrous hyperplasia (FFH, peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF, pyogenic granuloma (PG, and peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG. A total of 10 FFHs, 10 POFs, 10 PGs, and 10 PGCGs from archival specimens were evaluated. Samples of gingival mucosa were used as negative controls for stromal myofibroblasts. Oral squamous cell carcinoma samples, in which stromal myofibroblasts have been previously detected, were used as positive controls. Myofibroblasts were identified by immunohistochemical detection of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-sma. Myofibroblast immunostaining was qualitatively classified as negative, scanty, or dense. Differences in the presence of myofibroblasts among FFH, POF, PG, and PGCG were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Stromal myofibroblasts were not detected in FFH, POF, PG, or PGCG. Consequently, no differences were observed in the presence of myofibroblasts among FFH, POF, PG, or PGCG (p > 0.05. In conclusion, stromal myofibroblasts were not detected in the focal reactive overgrowths of the gingiva that were evaluated, suggesting that these cells do not play a significant role in their pathogenesis.

  10. Indomethacin injury to the rat small intestine is dependent upon biliary secretion and is associated with overgrowth of enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Sara A; Song, Ye K; Cruz, Melissa R; Phan, Tri M; Singh, Kavindra V; Garsin, Danielle A; Murray, Barbara E; Dial, Elizabeth J; Lichtenberger, Lenard M

    2016-03-01

    NSAIDuse is limited due to the drugs' toxicity to the gastrointestinal mucosa, an action incompletely understood. Lower gut injury induced byNSAIDs is dependent on bile secretion and is reported to increase the growth of a number of bacterial species, including an enterococcal species,Enterococcus faecalis This study examined the relationships between indomethacin (INDO)-induced intestinal injury/bleeding, small bowel overgrowth (SBO) and dissemination of enterococci, and the contribution of bile secretion to these pathological responses. Rats received either a sham operation (SO) or bile duct ligation (BDL) prior to administration of two daily subcutaneous doses of saline orINDO, and 24 h later, biopsies of ileum and liver were collected for plating on selective bacterial media. Fecal hemoglobin (Hb) and blood hematocrit (Hct) were measured to assess intestinal bleeding. Of the four treatment groups, onlySO/INDOrats experienced a significant 10- to 30-fold increase in fecal Hb and reduction in Hct, indicating thatBDLattenuatedINDO-induced intestinal injury/bleeding. Ileal enterococcal colony-forming units were significantly increased (500- to 1000-fold) inSO/INDOrats. Of all groups, only theSO/INDOrats demonstrated gut injury, and this was associated with enterococcal overgrowth of the gut and dissemination to the liver. We also demonstrated thatINDO-induced intestinal injury andE. faecalisovergrowth was independent of the route of administration of the drug, as similar findings were observed in rats orally dosed with theNSAID Bile secretion plays an important role inINDO-induced gut injury and appears to support enterococcal overgrowth of the intestine.NSAID-induced enterococcalSBOmay be involved either as a compensatory response to gut injury or with the pathogenic process itself and the subsequent development of sepsis.

  11. Bacterial colonization and gut development in preterm neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cilieborg, Malene S.; Boye, Mette; Sangild, Per Torp

    2012-01-01

    with no consistent effects of gestational age, delivery mode, diet or probiotic administration, while low bacterial diversity and bacterial overgrowth are commonly associated with NEC. A series of recent studies in preterm pigs show that the mucosa-associated microbiota is affected by delivery method, prematurity...... and NEC progression and that diet has limited effects. Overgrowth of specific groups (e.g. Clostridia) appears to be a consequence of NEC, rather than the cause of NEC. Administration of probiotics either decreases or increases NEC sensitivity in preterm pigs, while in preterm infants probiotics have...

  12. Incidence of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth in the rural population of Loni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avneesh Tejnani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Since the incidence of gingival overgrowth induced by amlodipine remains poorly defined, this study was carried out with an aim to determine the incidence. Materials and Methods: Dental patients who received amlodipine (N = 115, for more than 3 months were studied to determine the drug-induced gingival overgrowth. Clinical diagnosis of drug-induced overgrowth was verified by disappearance or decreased severity of gingival overgrowth after withdrawal of the causative drug. Results: The prevalence rate of amlodipine-induced gingival hyperplasia among experimental patients was 3.4%, while it was not observed among the control subjects. Oral examination revealed gingival overgrowth as a lobular or nodular enlargement on interdental papilla located in the anterior interproximal regions. Conclusions: In this study, there was a significant relationship between gingival inflammation resulting from dental plaque and drug dosage, and hyperplasia.

  13. Atomically precise, coupled quantum dots fabricated by cleaved edge overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegscheider, W.; Schedelbeck, G.; Bichler, M.; Abstreiter, G.

    Recent progress in the fabrication of quantum dots by molecular beam epitaxy along three directions in space is reviewed. The optical properties of different sample structures consisting of individual quantum dots, pairs of coupled dots as well as of linear arrays of dots are studied by microscopic photoluminescence spectroscopy. The high degree of control over shape, composition and position of the 7×7×7 nm3 size GaAs quantum dots, which form at the intesection of three orthogonal quantum wells, allows a detailed investigation of the influence of coupling between almost identical zero-dimensional objects. In contrast to the inhomogeneously broadened quantum well and quantum wire signals originating from the complex twofold cleaved edge overgrowth structure, the photoluminescence spetrum of an individual quantum dot exhibits a single sharp line (full width at half maximum denomination "artificial atoms" for the quantum dots. It is further demonstrated that an "artifical molecule", characterized by the existence of bonding and antibonding states can be assembled from two of such "artificial atoms". The coupling strength between the "artificial atoms" is adjusted by the "interatomic" distance and is reflected in the energetic separation of the bonding and antibonding levels and the linewidths of the corresponding interband transitions.

  14. Mutations in the DNA methyltransferase gene DNMT3A cause an overgrowth syndrome with intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Seal, Sheila; Ruark, Elise;

    2014-01-01

    Overgrowth disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by increased growth parameters and other variable clinical features such as intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. To identify new causes of human overgrowth, we performed exome sequencing in ten proband...... and histone binding. Similar mutations were not present in 1,000 UK population controls (13/152 cases versus 0/1,000 controls; P intellectual disability and greater height. DNMT3A encodes a DNA methyltransferase essential for establishing...

  15. Pre-transplant gingival hyperplasia predicts severe cyclosporin-induced gingival overgrowth in renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, E; Lennon, M A; Mair, L H

    1998-03-01

    The relationship between the pre-transplant periodontal status and the development of post-transplant gingival overgrowth was investigated in a longitudinal study. The periodontal condition of 35 patients was examined on 2 occasions while they were on the transplant waiting list and then at 4-6, 10-12, 16 and 20 weeks post-transplant. At each visit the plaque index, the bleeding index and a pocket index (CPITN) were measured. Dental impressions were taken of the pre- and post-transplant gingival condition and used to make stone models which were used to score the gingival overgrowth index (GOI). The patients divided into 3 distinct groups having severe (n=13), mild (n=16) or no post-transplant gingival overgrowth (n=6). Only 1 of the patients had taken cyclosporin prior to inclusion into the study. All the patients who developed severe overgrowth had evidence of gingival hyperplasia before the transplant. There was no difference in the serum cyclosporin levels between the three groups (chi20.319). Furthermore, there was no statistical difference for any of the periodontal indices. This study indicates that the hyperplastic gingival inflammatory response of some individuals appears to be potentiated by cyclosporin resulting in severe post-transplant overgrowth. In other patients the same reaction may allow the fibroblastic activity to occur to an extent where it produces a mild clinically apparent overgrowth.

  16. Seventy-five gram glucose tolerance test to assess carbohydrate malabsorption and small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    URITA, Yoshihisa; Ishihara, Susumu; Akimoto, Tatsuo; Kato, Hiroto; HARA, Noriko; Honda, Yoshiko; Nagai, Yoko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Shimada, Nagato; Sugimoto, Motonobu; Miki, Kazumasa

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate non-invasively the incidence of absorption of carbohydrates in diabetic patients during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to determine whether malabsorption may be associated with insulin secretion and insulin resistance.

  17. ICC density predicts bacterial overgrowth in a rat model of post-infectious IBS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam-Ryong; Jee; Walter; Morales; Kimberly; Low; Christopher; Chang; Amy; Zhu; Venkata; Pokkunuri; Soumya; Chatterjee; Edy; Soffer; Jeffrey; L; Conklin; Mark; Pimentel

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the interstitial cells of Cajal(ICC) number using a new rat model.METHODS:Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to two groups.The first group received gavage with Campylobacter jejuni(C.jejuni) 81-176.The second group was gavaged with placebo.Three months after clearance of Campylobacter from the stool,precise segments of duodenum,jejunum,and ileum were ligated in self-contained loops of bowel that were preserved in anaerobic bags.Deep muscular plexus ICC(DMP-ICC) were quantified by two blind...

  18. Drug-Induced gingival overgrowth: The genetic dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noronha Shyam Curtis Charles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, the etiology of drug-induced gingival overgrowth is not entirely understood but is clearly multifactorial. Phenytoin, one of the common drugs implicated in gingival enlargement, is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP2C9 and partly by CYP2C19. The CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes are polymorphically expressed and most of the variants result in decreased metabolism of the respective substrates. Aims: The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of the CYP2C9FNx012 and FNx013 variant genotypes on phenytoin hydroxylation in subjects diagnosed with epilepsy from South India, thus establishing the genetic polymorphisms leading to its defective hydroxylation process. Materials and Methods: Fifteen epileptic subjects, age 9 to 60 years were included in the study. Among the study subjects, 8 were males and 7 were females. Genomic DNA was extracted from patients′ blood using Phenol-chloroform method and genotyping was done for CYP2C9 using customized TaqMan genotyping assays on a real time thermocycler, by allelic discrimination method. The genetic polymorphisms FNx011, FNx012 and FNx013 on CYP2C9 were selected based on their function and respective allele frequencies in Asian subcontinent among the Asian populations. Results: CYP2C9FNx011FNx012 and CYP2C9FNx013/FNx013 were identified with equal frequency in the study population. There were seven subjects with CYP2C9FNx011/FNx012 genotype (heterozygous mutant, one subject with CYP2C9FNx011/FNx011 (wild type and seven study subjects with CYP2C9FNx013/FNx013 (homozygous mutant. Conclusion: The results obtained in the present study will be helpful in the medical prescription purposes of phenytoin, and a more personalized patient approach with its administration can be advocated.

  19. Overgrowth of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Franco) stumps with regenerative tissue as an example of cell ordering and tissue reorganization

    OpenAIRE

    Zajączkowska, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Main conclusion Stump overgrowth may serve as a unique model for studying cellular reorganization and mechanisms responsible for cell polarity changes during the process of vascular tissue differentiation from initially unorganized parenchymatous cells. Cellular ordering and tissue reorganization during the overgrowth process of the transverse surfaces of Douglas fir stumps in forest stand was studied. At the beginning of stump overgrowth, the produced parenchymatous cells form an un...

  20. Segmental overgrowth syndrome due to an activating PIK3CA mutation identified in affected muscle tissue by exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Maria; Sunde, Lone; Weigert, Karen Petra;

    2014-01-01

    Mosaic PIK3CA-mutations have been described in an increasing number of overgrowth syndromes. We describe a patient with a previously unreported segmental overgrowth syndrome with the mutation, PIKCA3 c.3140A>G (p.His1047Arg) in affected tissue diagnosed by exome sequencing. This PIK3CA-associated......Mosaic PIK3CA-mutations have been described in an increasing number of overgrowth syndromes. We describe a patient with a previously unreported segmental overgrowth syndrome with the mutation, PIKCA3 c.3140A>G (p.His1047Arg) in affected tissue diagnosed by exome sequencing. This PIK3CA...

  1. [Overgrowth and DNA synthesis of neuroepithelium in embryonic stages of induced Long-Evans rat myeloschisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Y

    1993-01-01

    Overgrowth of the myeloschisis, namely the excessive amount of the neural plate tissue, has been reported in the human myeloschisis. However, it is still debatable how the overgrowth develops and whether the overgrowth is the cause, or the secondary effect of spinal dysraphism. The author induced myeloschisis in the fetuses of Long-Evans rats by the administration of ethylenethiourea (ETU) to pregnant rats on day 10 of gestation. The fetuses were removed 1 hour after the treatment with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to the dams on day 14 and 21. The fetuses were fixed in alcohol and embedded in paraffin. H-E staining and the immunohistologic examination were performed on the staining patterns to anti-neurofilament (NFP), anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and anti-BrdU antibody by ABC method. On day 14, the lateral portion of everted neural plate showed a loose arrangement of cells and there was rosette formation in the mesoderm. On day 21, cell necrosis was observed at the dorsolateral portion of myeloschisis, although the ventral portion showed almost normal cytoarchitecture and was positive to NFP and GFAP. The cause of myeloschisis in this model is supposed to be the local and direct cytotoxic effect of ETU to neuro-ectodermal junction. On day 14, control animals contained few BrdU-incorporated cells at the basal plate of neural tube. In contrast, everted neural plate showed an active uptake of BrdU diffusely in the subependymal matrix layer cells. Overgrowth was not yet identified. On day 21, overgrowth of myeloschisis was found in spite of a few positive cells to BrdU which was identical to the control animals. These findings seem to suggest that cells in the myeloschisis retain their ability of DNA synthesis for longer periods of development and overgrowth found on day 21 is possibly a secondary effect of spinal dysraphism in this model.

  2. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  3. Using saliva nitrite and nitrate levels as a biomarker for drug induced gingival overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan eSukuroglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Drug-induced gingival overgrowth has a multifactorial nature and the pathogenesis is still uncertain. It has been suggested that Nitric Oxide (NO might play a role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth due to the contribution of NO to immune response and matrix degradation. NO levels in biological fluids have been used as a diagnostic biomarker in many diseases. The aim of this study is to determine whether NO levels in plasma, saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF can serve as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of drug-induced gingival overgrowth risk. Material and Methods: A total of 104 patients, receiving cyclosporine A (n=35, phenytoin (n=25, nifedipine (n=26 or diltiazem (n=18 participated in the study. The amount of gingival overgrowth was evaluated with two indices and was given as percentage. Periodontal clinical parameters including plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, gingival bleeding time index (GBTI and probing depth (PD were also assessed. Saliva, GCF and plasma samples were obtained from each participants. Nitrite and nitrate levels in saliva, GCF and plasma were analyzed by Griess reagent. Results: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels in responders were significantly higher than those in non-responders in only phenytoin group (p˂0.05. Nitrite and nitrate levels of gingival crevicular fluid and plasma did not significantly differ between responders and non-responders in all study groups (p˃0.05. Salivary nitrite levels exhibited a significant correlation with PD, GBTI, severity of gingival overgrowth (%GO and GCF volume (p˂0.05. Additionally, a strong positive correlation was detected between saliva and plasma nitrate levels (p˂0.005. However, both nitrite and nitrate levels in GCF and plasma demonstrated no significant correlation with clinical parameters, GO severity and GCF volume (p˃0.05.Conclusion: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels could be used as periodontal disease biomarkers in

  4. Using Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Levels as a Biomarker for Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukuroglu, Erkan; Güncü, Güliz N.; Kilinc, Kamer; Caglayan, Feriha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Drug-induced gingival overgrowth has a multifactorial nature and the pathogenesis is still uncertain. It has been suggested that Nitric Oxide (NO) might play a role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth due to the contribution of NO to immune response and matrix degradation. NO levels in biological fluids have been used as a diagnostic biomarker in many diseases. The aim of this study is to determine whether NO levels in plasma, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) can serve as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of drug-induced gingival overgrowth risk. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 patients, receiving cyclosporine A (n = 35), phenytoin (n = 25), nifedipine (n = 26), or diltiazem (n = 18) participated in the study. The amount of gingival overgrowth was evaluated with two indices and was given as percentage. Periodontal clinical parameters including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding time index (GBTI), and probing depth (PD) were also assessed. Saliva, GCF, and plasma samples were obtained from each participants. Nitrite and nitrate levels in saliva, GCF, and plasma were analyzed by Griess reagent. Results: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels in responders were significantly higher than those in non-responders in only phenytoin group (p Nitrite and nitrate levels of gingival crevicular fluid and plasma did not significantly differ between responders and non-responders in all study groups (p > 0.05). Salivary nitrite levels exhibited a significant correlation with PD, GBTI, severity of gingival overgrowth (%GO), and GCF volume (p nitrate levels (p nitrite and nitrate levels in GCF and plasma demonstrated no significant correlation with clinical parameters, GO severity, and GCF volume (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels could be used as periodontal disease biomarkers in phenytoin induced gingival overgrowth, and that saliva seems to have a better diagnostic potential than GCF

  5. GENERAL OVERGROWTH IN THE FRAGILE-X SYNDROME - VARIABILITY IN THE PHENOTYPIC-EXPRESSION OF THE FMR1 GENE MUTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, BBA; ROBINSON, H; STOLTEDIJKSTRA, [No Value; GI, CVTP; DIJKSTRA, PF; VANDOOM, J; HALLEY, DJJ; OOSTRA, BA; TURNER, G; NIERMEIJER, MF

    1995-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome, which often presents in childhood with overgrowth, may in some cases show some diagnostic overlap with classical Sotos syndrome. We describe four fragile X patients with general overgrowth, all of whom are from families with other affected relatives who show the classic Marti

  6. Laser-Assisted Periodontal Management of Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth under General Anesthesia: A Viable Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralikrishna, Tupili; Kalakonda, Butchibabu; Gunupati, Sumanth; Koppolu, Pradeep

    2013-01-01

    Gingival overgrowth/hyperplasia can be attributed to several causes, but drug-induced gingival overgrowth/hyperplasia arises secondarily to prolonged use of antihypertensive drugs, anticonvulsants and immunosuppressants. The management is complex in nature considering the multitude of factors involved such as substitution of drug strict plaque control along with excision of the tissue to be performed under local anesthesia as outpatient. In the recent times, the patient's psychological fear of the treatment with the use of surgical blade and multiple visits has developed the concept of single visit treatment under general anesthesia incorporating a laser as viable option. The present case highlights the new method of management of gingival overgrowth.

  7. Selective silicification of fossils by syntaxial overgrowths on quartz sand, Oriskany Sandstone (Lower Devonian), New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliva, Robert G.

    1992-07-01

    Some fossil fragments in the Oriskany Sandstone (Lower Devonian) of New York were partially replaced by syntaxial quartz overgrowths. These replacive overgrowths are significant in that they provide insights into the mechanism and controls of quartz replacement of calcite. The susceptibility of the different calcite types of quartz replacement was governed by their microstructural complexity. Fossil fragments with finely crystalline microstructures, such as brachiopods, ostracods, and bryozoans, were partially replaced by quartz, whereas echinoderm ossicles, which consist of single large calcite crystals, were not replaced. Calcite cement was also immune to replacement. Brachiopod, bryozoan, and ostracod bioclasts (with minor exceptions) underwent partial replacement by quartz (with its concomitant shell calcite dissolution) only where the shell fragments were in contact with detrital quartz grains. Proximity to authigenic crystal nucleation sites (i.e., quartz sand grains) was thus the prime control over whether host mineral dissolution occurred, which is a situation unique to the force of crystallization-driven replacement mechanism.

  8. Metal dendrimers: synthesis of hierarchically stellated nanocrystals by sequential seed-directed overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rebecca G; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2015-01-19

    Hierarchically organized structures are prevalent in nature, where such features account for the adhesion properties of gecko feet and the brilliant color variation of butterfly wings. Achieving artificial structures with multiscale features is of interest for metamaterials and biomimetic applications. However, the fabrication of such structures relies heavily on lithographic approaches, although self-assembly routes to superstructures are promising. Sequential seed-directed overgrowth is now demonstrated as a route to metal dendrimers, which are hierarchically branched nanocrystals (NCs) with a three-dimensional order analogous to that of molecular dendrimers. This method was applied to a model Au/Pd NC system; in general, the principle of sequential seed-directed overgrowth should enable the synthesis of new hierarchical inorganic structures with high symmetry.

  9. Generalized dermatitis associated with Malassezia overgrowth in cats: A report of six cases in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosaz, Odile; Legras, Audrey; Vilaplana-Grosso, Federico; Debeaupuits, Julien; Chermette, René; Hubert, Blaise; Guillot, Jacques

    2013-02-13

    We recently observed six cases of generalized dermatitis associated with Malassezia overgrowth in cats presented to the Veterinary College of Alfort, France. Elevated numbers of yeasts were observed in lesional skin by cytology and culture. Skin lesions occurred on the face, ventral neck, abdomen and ear canals and were characterized by some degree of alopecia, erythema and crusting. In most cases, pruritus was intense. The species M. pachydermatis was systematically isolated.

  10. Combination of inflammatory and amlodipine induced gingival overgrowth in a patient with cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pasupuleti, Mohan Kumar; Musalaiah, S. V. V. S.; Nagasree, M.; Kumar, P. Aravind

    2013-01-01

    Gingival overgrowth (GO) is among one of the most important clinical features of gingival pathology frequently seen in periodontal clinic. Amlodipine is a comparatively new calcium channel blocker and is being used with increasing frequency in the management of hypertension and angina. A 48-year-old Indian woman who was on amlodipine for 3 years for hypertension reported to the department of periodontics with the complaint of swollen, un esthetic gums. The patient developed GO 6 months before...

  11. Is periodontal health a predictor of drug-induced gingival overgrowth? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Banthia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gingival overgrowth is a common side-effect of amlodipine regimen on the oral cavity. There is controversy regarding the cause and effect relationship of periodontal health and drug induced gingival overgrowth. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate and to assess the relationship between the periodontal health and the onset and severity of gingival overgrowth in hypertensive patients receiving amlodipine. Materials and Methods: A total of 99 known hypertensive patients on amlodipine regimen were included in this study. Probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment loss (CAL were noted on four sites of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. Gingival enlargement scores were assessed for each patient by employing the hyperplastic index. Oral hygiene status was evaluated using the calculus index (CI. Patients were divided into H, E and L groups based on their periodontal status and responders and non-responders based on their hyperplastic index scores. Differences in means of different periodontal variables in different groups were tested for significance by using ANOVA and unpaired Student t-test. Pearson′s correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between different variables. For all analyses, P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: All the periodontal parameters were statistically highly significant (P = 0.00 amongst H, E and L groups and between responders and non-responders. Statistically highly significant Pearson correlation coefficients were found between mean PPD and mean hyperplastic score, mean CAL and mean hyperplastic score and mean calculus and mean hyperplastic score. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated a definite association between periodontal health and development and severity of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth

  12. Generalized dermatitis associated with Malassezia overgrowth in cats: A report of six cases in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosaz, Odile; Legras, Audrey; Vilaplana-Grosso, Federico; Debeaupuits, Julien; Chermette, René; Hubert, Blaise; Guillot, Jacques

    2013-02-13

    We recently observed six cases of generalized dermatitis associated with Malassezia overgrowth in cats presented to the Veterinary College of Alfort, France. Elevated numbers of yeasts were observed in lesional skin by cytology and culture. Skin lesions occurred on the face, ventral neck, abdomen and ear canals and were characterized by some degree of alopecia, erythema and crusting. In most cases, pruritus was intense. The species M. pachydermatis was systematically isolated. PMID:24432218

  13. Immunoexpression of interleukin-6 in drug-induced gingival overgrowth patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To analyze the role of proinflammatory cytokines in drug-induced gingival enlargement in Indian population. Aim: To evaluate for the presence of interleukin-6 (IL-6 in drug-induced gingival enlargement and to compare it with healthy control in the absence of enlargement. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients selected for the study and divided into control group (10 and study group (25 consisting of phenytoin (10; cyclosporin (10 and nifedipine (5 induced gingival enlargement. Gingival overgrowth index of Seymour was used to assess overgrowth and allot groups. Under LA, incisional biopsy done, tissue sample fixed in 10% formalin and immunohistochemically evaluated for the presence of IL-6 using LAB-SA method, Labeled- Streptavidin-Biotin Method (LAB-SA kit from Zymed- 2nd generation LAB-SA detection system, Zymed Laboratories, CA. The results of immunohistochemistry were statistically analyzed using Kruskaal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney test. Results: The data obtained from immunohistochemistry assessment shows that drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO samples express more IL-6 than control group and cyclosporin expresses more IL-6 followed by phenytoin and nifedipine. Conclusion: Increased IL-6 expression was noticed in all three DIGO groups in comparison with control group. Among the study group, cyclosporin expressed maximum IL-6 expression followed by phenytoin and nifedipine.

  14. Laser-Assisted Periodontal Management of Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth under General Anesthesia: A Viable Option

    OpenAIRE

    Tupili Muralikrishna; Butchibabu Kalakonda; Sumanth Gunupati; Pradeep Koppolu

    2013-01-01

    Gingival overgrowth/hyperplasia can be attributed to several causes, but drug-induced gingival overgrowth/hyperplasia arises secondarily to prolonged use of antihypertensive drugs, anticonvulsants and immunosuppressants. The management is complex in nature considering the multitude of factors involved such as substitution of drug strict plaque control along with excision of the tissue to be performed under local anesthesia as outpatient. In the recent times, the patient’s psychological fear o...

  15. Liver Cirrhosis and Intestinal Bacterial Translocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction, facilitating translocation of bacteria and bacterial products, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Intestinal defense system including microbial barrier, immunologic barrier, mechanical barrier, chemical barrier, plays an important role in the maintenance of intestinal function. Under normal circumstances, the intestinal barrier can prevent intestinal bacteria through the intestinal wall from spreading to the body. Severe infection, trauma, shock, cirrhosis, malnutrition, immune suppression conditions, intestinal bacteria and endotoxin translocation, can lead to multiple organ dysfunction. The intestinal microlfora is not only involved in the digestion of nutrients, but also in local immunity, forming a barrier against pathogenic microorganisms. The derangement of the gut microlfora may lead to microbial translocation, deifned as the passage of viable microorganisms or bacterial products from the intestinal lumen to the mesenteric lymph nodes and other extraintestinal sites. In patients with cirrhosis, primary and intestinal lfora imbalance, intestinal bacterial overgrowth, intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction, endotoxemia is associated with weakened immunity.

  16. Gut flora and bacterial translocation in chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Almeida; Sumedha Galhenage; Jennifer Yu; Jelica Kurtovic; Stephen M Riordan

    2006-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that derangement of gut flora is of substantial clinical relevance to patients with cirrhosis. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased bacterial translocation of gut flora from the intestinal lumen, in particular, predispose to an increased potential for bacterial infection in this group. Recent studies suggest that, in addition to their role in the pathogenesis of overt infective episodes and the clinical consequences of sepsis, gut flora contributes to the pro-inflammatory state of cirrhosis even in the absence of overt infection.Furthermore, manipulation of gut flora to augment the intestinal content of lactic acid-type bacteria at the expense of other gut flora species with more pathogenic potential may favourably influence liver function in cirrhotic patients. Here we review current concepts of the various inter-relationships between gut flora, bacterial translocation, bacterial infection, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and liver function in this group.

  17. Müllerian adenosarcoma of the uterus with sarcomatous overgrowth following tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Filomena Marino

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Müllerian adenosarcoma with sarcomatous overgrowth presented by a 52-year-old female patient after adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast carcinoma is described. The diagnosis was made on histological basis after curettage and complementary total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The immunohistochemical study showed high expression of estrogen receptors in the epithelial component of the lesion and irregularly positive findings in the stroma. The proliferative activity evaluated by Ki-67 immunoexpression was higher in the stroma than the epithelium. Some of the stromal cells showed rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. The association of tamoxifen use and development of mesenchymal neoplasms is discussed.

  18. Maternal Inflammation Contributes to Brain Overgrowth and Autism-Associated Behaviors through Altered Redox Signaling in Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janel E. Le Belle

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A period of mild brain overgrowth with an unknown etiology has been identified as one of the most common phenotypes in autism. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal inflammation during critical periods of embryonic development can cause brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors as a result of altered neural stem cell function. Pregnant mice treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide at embryonic day 9 had offspring with brain overgrowth, with a more pronounced effect in PTEN heterozygotes. Exposure to maternal inflammation also enhanced NADPH oxidase (NOX-PI3K pathway signaling, stimulated the hyperproliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells, increased forebrain microglia, and produced abnormal autism-associated behaviors in affected pups. Our evidence supports the idea that a prenatal neuroinflammatory dysregulation in neural stem cell redox signaling can act in concert with underlying genetic susceptibilities to affect cellular responses to environmentally altered cellular levels of reactive oxygen species.

  19. Maternal inflammation contributes to brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors through altered redox signaling in stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Belle, Janel E; Sperry, Jantzen; Ngo, Amy; Ghochani, Yasmin; Laks, Dan R; López-Aranda, Manuel; Silva, Alcino J; Kornblum, Harley I

    2014-11-11

    A period of mild brain overgrowth with an unknown etiology has been identified as one of the most common phenotypes in autism. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal inflammation during critical periods of embryonic development can cause brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors as a result of altered neural stem cell function. Pregnant mice treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide at embryonic day 9 had offspring with brain overgrowth, with a more pronounced effect in PTEN heterozygotes. Exposure to maternal inflammation also enhanced NADPH oxidase (NOX)-PI3K pathway signaling, stimulated the hyperproliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells, increased forebrain microglia, and produced abnormal autism-associated behaviors in affected pups. Our evidence supports the idea that a prenatal neuroinflammatory dysregulation in neural stem cell redox signaling can act in concert with underlying genetic susceptibilities to affect cellular responses to environmentally altered cellular levels of reactive oxygen species.

  20. Laser-Assisted Periodontal Management of Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth under General Anesthesia: A Viable Option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tupili Muralikrishna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival overgrowth/hyperplasia can be attributed to several causes, but drug-induced gingival overgrowth/hyperplasia arises secondarily to prolonged use of antihypertensive drugs, anticonvulsants and immunosuppressants. The management is complex in nature considering the multitude of factors involved such as substitution of drug strict plaque control along with excision of the tissue to be performed under local anesthesia as outpatient. In the recent times, the patient’s psychological fear of the treatment with the use of surgical blade and multiple visits has developed the concept of single visit treatment under general anesthesia incorporating a laser as viable option. The present case highlights the new method of management of gingival overgrowth.

  1. Effect of Electroacupuncture of Auricular Concha on Inflammatory Reaction in Endotoxaemia Rats%电针耳甲区对内毒素血症模型大鼠的抗炎保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玉雪; 何伟; 高昕妍; 荣培晶; 朱兵

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) of the auricular concha (EA-AC) on serum cytokines contents and pulmonary transcription factor nuclear factor-KB (NF-KB) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced endotoxaemia rats so as to study its mechanism underlying cholinergic anti-inflammatory efficacy. Methods Male SD rats were randomized into normal control , model (LPS), simple EA-AC, EA-AC+ LPS, vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) + LPS, and EA-Zusanli (ST 36) + LPS groups (n = 12/group). Endotoxaemia model was duplicated by intravenous (tail vein) injection of LPS (0.5 mL/kg). Two intradermal needles were inserted into the central sites of the cavity of concha and cymba of auricular concha respectively on each side and stimulated electrically by using an electrical stimulator (i. e., EA-AC). VNS was applied to the left cervical vagal nerve, and EA (1 mA, 10 Hz, pulse-width 1 ms) was also applied to bilateral "Zusanli" (ST 36). Serum cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) contents 2 h after modeling were determined by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and pulmonary NF-κB p 65 expression 2 h after modeling was detected by using western blotting. Results Compared with the normal control group, serum TNF-α and IL-6 contents, and pulmonary NF-KB p 65 expression level in the model group were increased significantly (P<0.01). In comparison with the model group, serum TNF-α contents in the simple EA-AC, EA-AC+ LPS, VNS+ LPS and ST 36+ LPS groups, and serum IL-6 contents and pulmonary NF-KB p 65 expression levels in the simple EA-AC, EA-AC+ LPS and VNS + LPS groups were down-regulated considerably ( P<0.05, P<0.01). Compared with the VNS+ LPS group, serum TNF-αand IL-6 contents, and pulmonary NF-KB p 65 expression level in the ST 36+LPS group were increased significantly (P<0.05,P<0. 01). In comparison with the EA-AC+LPS group, pulmonary NF-κB p65 expression level in the ST36+LPS group was increased remarkably (P<0.05). Conclusion

  2. Immunolocalization of Bcl-2 oncoprotein in amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth

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    Lalitha Tanjore Arunachalam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO is one of the unwanted side effects of amlodipine therapy, but the pathogenesis still remains unclear. Apoptosis, which plays a ubiquitous role in tissue homeostasis, including gingiva, may be involved in the development of gingival enlargement. Aims and Objectives: (i To study the distribution of Bcl-2 in healthy and overgrown gingival tissues. (ii To compare and correlate the Bcl-2 expression in gingival samples from subjects on amlodipine therapy to the findings in healthy controls. Materials and Methods: A total of 25 subjects were recruited for the study - 15 hypertensive patients and 10 systemically healthy subjects. Both the groups were analyzed for Bcl-2 expression using immunohistochemistry. Results: Few of the control specimens showed weak positivity to Bcl-2 antibody, with the distribution limited to the basal cell layers alone, whereas 10 hyperplastic specimens expressed Bcl-2 and, unlike the control group, the distribution pattern was seen in both basal and suprabasal layers. Conclusion: The results indicate that the pathogenesis of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth might involve inhibition of apoptosis, especially with morphogenesis of hyperplastic gingival epithelia.

  3. Mouse models of human PIK3CA-related brain overgrowth have acutely treatable epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Achira; Skibo, Jonathan; Kalume, Franck; Ni, Jing; Rankin, Sherri; Lu, Yiling; Dobyns, William B; Mills, Gordon B; Zhao, Jean J; Baker, Suzanne J; Millen, Kathleen J

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PIK3CA) and other PI3K-AKT pathway components have been associated with cancer and a wide spectrum of brain and body overgrowth. In the brain, the phenotypic spectrum of PIK3CA-related segmental overgrowth includes bilateral dysplastic megalencephaly, hemimegalencephaly and focal cortical dysplasia, the most common cause of intractable pediatric epilepsy. We generated mouse models expressing the most common activating Pik3ca mutations (H1047R and E545K) in developing neural progenitors. These accurately recapitulate all the key human pathological features including brain enlargement, cortical malformation, hydrocephalus and epilepsy, with phenotypic severity dependent on the mutant allele and its time of activation. Underlying mechanisms include increased proliferation, cell size and altered white matter. Notably, we demonstrate that acute 1 hr-suppression of PI3K signaling despite the ongoing presence of dysplasia has dramatic anti-epileptic benefit. Thus PI3K inhibitors offer a promising new avenue for effective anti-epileptic therapy for intractable pediatric epilepsy patients. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12703.001 PMID:26633882

  4. A novel aromatic oil compound inhibits microbial overgrowth on feet: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misner Bill D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Athlete's Foot (Tinea pedis is a form of ringworm associated with highly contagious yeast-fungi colonies, although they look like bacteria. Foot bacteria overgrowth produces a harmless pungent odor, however, uncontrolled proliferation of yeast-fungi produces small vesicles, fissures, scaling, and maceration with eroded areas between the toes and the plantar surface of the foot, resulting in intense itching, blisters, and cracking. Painful microbial foot infection may prevent athletic participation. Keeping the feet clean and dry with the toenails trimmed reduces the incidence of skin disease of the feet. Wearing sandals in locker and shower rooms prevents intimate contact with the infecting organisms and alleviates most foot-sensitive infections. Enclosing feet in socks and shoes generates a moisture-rich environment that stimulates overgrowth of pungent both aerobic bacteria and infectious yeast-fungi. Suppression of microbial growth may be accomplished by exposing the feet to air to enhance evaporation to reduce moistures' growth-stimulating effect and is often neglected. There is an association between yeast-fungi overgrowths and disabling foot infections. Potent agents virtually exterminate some microbial growth, but the inevitable presence of infection under the nails predicts future infection. Topical antibiotics present a potent approach with the ideal agent being one that removes moisture producing antibacterial-antifungal activity. Severe infection may require costly prescription drugs, salves, and repeated treatment. Methods A 63-y female volunteered to enclose feet in shoes and socks for 48 hours. Aerobic bacteria and yeast-fungi counts were determined by swab sample incubation technique (1 after 48-hours feet enclosure, (2 after washing feet, and (3 after 8-hours socks-shoes exposure to a aromatic oil powder-compound consisting of arrowroot, baking soda, basil oil, tea tree oil, sage oil, and clove oil. Conclusion

  5. Germline mutations in DIS3L2 cause the Perlman syndrome of overgrowth and Wilms tumor susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astuti, Dewi; Morris, Mark R.; Cooper, Wendy N.; Staals, Raymond H. J.; Wake, Naomi C.; Fews, Graham A.; Gill, Harmeet; Gentle, Dean; Shuib, Salwati; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Cole, Trevor; van Essen, Anthonie J.; van Lingen, Richard A.; Neri, Giovanni; Opitz, John M.; Rump, Patrick; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Mueller, Ferenc; Pruijn, Ger J. M.; Latif, Farida; Maher, Eamonn R.

    2012-01-01

    Perlman syndrome is a congenital overgrowth syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive manner that is associated with Wilms tumor susceptibility. We mapped a previously unknown susceptibility locus to 2q37.1 and identified germline mutations in DIS3L2, a homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe di

  6. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel frameshift mutation in GPC3 gene in a patient with overgrowth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Bhowmik, Aneek; Dalal, Ashwin

    2015-11-10

    Overgrowth syndromes are a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by focal or generalized overgrowth. Many of the syndromes have overlapping clinical features and it is difficult to diagnose the condition based on clinical features alone. In the present study we report on a patient with overgrowth syndrome where extensive investigation did not reveal the cause of disease. Finally exome sequencing revealed a novel hemizygous single base pair deletion in exon 8 of GPC3 gene (chrX:132670203delA) resulting in a frameshift and creating a new stop codon at 62 amino acids downstream to codon 564 (c.1692delT; p.Leu565SerfsTer63) of the protein. The mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was found to be heterozygous for the mutation. This variation is not reported in the 1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server (EVS), Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) and dbSNP databases and the region is conserved across primates. Exome sequencing was helpful in establishing diagnosis of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1 (SGBS1) in a patient with unknown overgrowth syndrome.

  7. Gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Kazuhiro; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Naruishi, Koji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Fumio; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin C deficiency/scurvy is associated with gingival inflammatory changes; however, the disorder is very infrequently encountered in the modern era. Here, we report a case of extensive gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection. PMID:25548632

  8. Gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Omori, Kazuhiro; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Naruishi, Koji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Fumio; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin C deficiency/scurvy is associated with gingival inflammatory changes; however, the disorder is very infrequently encountered in the modern era. Here, we report a case of extensive gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection.

  9. Mullerian adenosarcoma (heterologous) of the cervix with sarcomatous overgrowth: a case report with review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Raje; Aggarwal, Neelam; Sikka, Pooja

    2010-01-01

    Mullerian adenosarcoma is a rare biphasic malignant neoplasm of the cervix characterized by an admixture of benign epithelial elements and a malignant sarcomatous stromal component, which may be either homologous or heterologous. An aggressive variant of adenosarcoma, mullerian adenosarcoma with sarcomatous overgrowth (MASO) is extremely rare, with only two such cases being reported in the English literature to date. In this report we present a case of MASO of uterine cervix with heterologous elements in a 15-year-old unmarried girl presenting with foul smelling menstrual bleeding and passage of fleshy masses. Because MASO with heterologous elements seems to appear at the earliest stages of reproductive lifespan in women, and have an uncertain malignant potential, gynecologists and pathologists should be aware and think about the possibility of this tumor. PMID:20613904

  10. Poly-epiphyseal overgrowth: description of a previously unreported skeletal dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazzaglia, Ugo E.; Bonaspetti, Giovanni [University of Brescia, Orthopaedic Clinic, Brescia (Italy); Beluffi, Giampiero [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Pavia (Italy); Marchi, Antonietta; Bozzola, Mauro; Savasta, Salvatore [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Paediatric Clinic, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    A skeletal dysplasia with previously unreported features is presented. Its evolution was characterized by growth abnormalities of bones without involvement of other organs. Advanced bone age, increased stature and irregular epiphyseal ossification with stippling of the main long bones were documented. Physeal overgrowth was massive in the left proximal humerus and femur. Furthermore, the hip joint appeared fused with an abundant mass of pathological calcific tissue extending from the femur to the ilium. Pathological epiphyses were characterized by anarchic cartilaginous proliferation with multiple ossification centres, while lamellar bone apposition and remodelling were normal. The observed bone changes were different from those in any previously reported syndrome, metabolic defect or bone dysplasia. However, they clearly indicated a defect of endochondral ossification with some resemblance to phenotypes observed in dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica. (orig.)

  11. [Qualitative and quantitative detection of bacterial flora in experimental blind loop syndrome of the rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menge, H; Simes, G; Germer, C T; Wagner, J; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1985-08-01

    In the blind loop syndrome bacterial overgrowth--accompanied by an increase in bile acid deconjugation--is thought to be responsible for the observed morphological alterations of the small intestinal mucosa with its concomitant malabsorption syndrome. Since in this chain of events the bacterial overgrowth is of primary importance, we have performed a complete qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the intraluminal flora in rats with surgically created self-filling blind loops. The results show a significant increase in bacteria of the aerobic growing genera E. coli and Streptococcus (Enterococcus), and of the anaerobic growing genus Bacteroides, in one single rat also of the genera Lactobacillus/Bifidobacterium. In order to elucidate which strains of bacteria are predominantly responsible for the morphological and functional alterations observed in the stagnant loop syndrome, germ-free rats with self-filling blind loops should be contaminated selectively with bacteria of these genera.

  12. Anterior Overgrowth in Primary Curves, Compensatory Curves and Junctional Segments in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stralen, Marijn; Chu, Winnie C. W.; Lam, Tsz-Ping; Ng, Bobby K. W.; Vincken, Koen L.; Cheng, Jack C. Y.; Castelein, René M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although much attention has been given to the global three-dimensional aspect of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the accurate three-dimensional morphology of the primary and compensatory curves, as well as the intervening junctional segments, in the scoliotic spine has not been described before. Methods A unique series of 77 AIS patients with high-resolution CT scans of the spine, acquired for surgical planning purposes, were included and compared to 22 healthy controls. Non-idiopathic curves were excluded. Endplate segmentation and local longitudinal axis in endplate plane enabled semi-automatic geometric analysis of the complete three-dimensional morphology of the spine, taking inter-vertebral rotation, intra-vertebral torsion and coronal and sagittal tilt into account. Intraclass correlation coefficients for interobserver reliability were 0.98–1.00. Coronal deviation, axial rotation and the exact length discrepancies in the reconstructed sagittal plane, as defined per vertebra and disc, were analyzed for each primary and compensatory curve as well as for the junctional segments in-between. Results The anterior-posterior difference of spinal length, based on “true” anterior and posterior points on endplates, was +3.8% for thoracic and +9.4% for (thoraco)lumbar curves, while the junctional segments were almost straight. This differed significantly from control group thoracic kyphosis (-4.1%; Plumbar lordosis (+7.8%; Plumbar curves). Conclusions Excess anterior length of the spine in AIS has been described as a generalized growth disturbance, causing relative anterior spinal overgrowth. This study is the first to demonstrate that this anterior overgrowth is not a generalized phenomenon. It is confined to the primary as well as the compensatory curves, the junctional zones do not exhibit this growth discrepancy, however, they are straight. PMID:27467745

  13. Leaky gut and the liver: A role for bacterial translocation in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaron Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Gut flora and bacterial translocation (BT) play important roles in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease,including cirrhosis and its complications.Intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased bacterial translocation of gut flora from the intestinal lumen predispose patients to bacterial infections,major complications and also play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disorders.Levels of bacterial lipopolysaccharide,a component of gram-negative bacteria,are increased in the portal and/or systemic circulation in several types of chronic liver disease.Impaired gut epithelial integrity due to alterations in tight junction proteins may be the pathological mechanism underlying bacterial translocation.Preclinical and clinical studies over the last decade have suggested a role for BT in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).Bacterial overgrowth,immune dysfunction,alteration of the luminal factors,and altered intestinal permeability are all involved in the pathogenesis of NASH and its complications.A better understanding of the cell-specific recognition and intracellular signaling events involved in sensing gut-derived microbes will help in the development of means to achieve an optimal balance in the gut-liver axis and ameliorate liver diseases.These may suggest new targets for potential therapeutic interventions for the treatment of NASH.Here,we review some of the mechanisms connecting BT and NASH and potential therapeutic developments.

  14. Effect of cisapride on intestinal bacterial and endotoxin translocation in cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Cai Zhang; Wei Wang; Wei-Ying Ren; Bo-Ming He; Kang Zhou; Wu-Nan Zhu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of cisapride on intestinal bacterial overgrowth (IBO), bacterial and endotoxin translocation, intestinal transit and permeability in cirrhotic rats.METHODS: All animals were assessed with variables including bacterial and endotoxin translocation, intestinal bacterial overgrowth, intestinal transit and permeability.Bacterial translocation (BT) was assessed by bacterial culture of MLN, liver and spleen, IBO by a jejunal bacterial count of the specific organism, intestinal permeability by determination of the 24-hour urinary 99mTc-DTPA excretion and intestinal transit by measurement of the distribution of 51Cr in the intestine.RESULTS: Bacterial translocation (BT) and IBO was found in 48 % and 80 % cirrhotic rats respectively and none in control rats. Urinary excretion of 99mTc-DTPA in cirrhotic rats with BT (22.2±7.8) was greater than these without BT (10.5±2.9). Intestinal transit (geometric center ratio) was significantly delayed in cirrhotic rats (0.31±0.06) and further more delayed in cirrhotic rats with BT (0.24±0.06) than these without BT (0.38±0.11). Cirrhotic rats with IBO had significantly higher rates of intestinal bacterial and endotoxin translocation, slower intestinal transit time and higher intestinal permeability than those without IBO. It was also found that BT was closely associated with IBO and the injury of intestinal barrier. Compared with the placebo group,cisapride-treated rats had lower rates of bacterial/endotoxin translocation and IBO, which was closely associated with increased intestinal transit and improved intestinal permeability by cisapride.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that endotoxin and bacterial translocation in cirrhotic rats may be attributed to IBO and increased intestinal permeability. Cisapride that accelerates intestinal transit and improve intestinal permeability might be helpful in preventing intestinal bacterial and endotoxin translocation.

  15. High-fat diet before and during pregnancy causes marked up-regulation of placental nutrient transport and fetal overgrowth in C57/BL6 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Helen N.; Woollett, Laura A.; Barbour, Nicolette; Prasad, Puttur D; Powell, Theresa L.; Jansson, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Maternal overweight and obesity in pregnancy often result in fetal overgrowth, which increases the risk for the baby to develop metabolic syndrome later in life. However, the mechanisms underlying fetal overgrowth are not established. We developed a mouse model and hypothesized that a maternal high-fat (HF) diet causes up-regulation of placental nutrient transport, resulting in fetal overgrowth. C57BL/6J female mice were fed a control (11% energy from fat) or HF (32% energy from fat) diet for...

  16. CORRELATION OF BLOOD LEVELS OF CYCLOSPORINE AND IT'S METABOLITES AND LOCAL FACTORS WITH GINGIVAL OVERGROWTH IN IRANIAN RENAL ALLOGRAFT PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sahebjamee .

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Forty renal allograft patients with three months under immunosuppression by cycloserine were examined for their gingival overgrowth and it's correlation with several parameters including the trough levels of blood cyclosporine and it's metabolites measured by the fluorescence polarization immunoassay technique. No correlation was found between the scores of gingival overgrowth and both the age of patients and duration of cyclosporine therapy. Also, there was no correlation between the scores of gingival overgrowth and the levels of dental plaque. Our findings confirm the effective role of gingival inflammation as a local predisposing factor and also suggest the potential toxic action of cyclosporine metabolites on development of gingival overgrowth or it's accentuation.

  17. How Many Sonograms Are Needed to Reliably Predict the Absence of Fetal Overgrowth in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Pregnancies?

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer-Graf, Ute M.; Wendt, Luise; Sacks, David A.; Kilavuz, Öemer; Gaber, Bettina; Metzner, Sabine; Vetter, Klaus; Abou-Dakn, Michael

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Serial measurements of the fetal abdominal circumference have been used to guide metabolic management of pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). A reduction in the number of repeat ultrasound examinations would save resources. Our purpose was to determine the number of serial abdominal circumference measurements per patient necessary to reliably predict the absence of fetal overgrowth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Women who had GDM were asked to return for rep...

  18. Macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly and ocular abnormalities (MOMO syndrome) in two unrelated patients: delineation of a newly recognized overgrowth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti-Ferreira, D; Koiffmann, C P; Listik, M; Setian, N; Wajntal, A

    1993-06-15

    We describe 2 unrelated patients, a boy and a girl, with an overgrowth syndrome and the following common characteristics: macrocrania, obesity, ocular abnormalities (retinal coloboma and nystagmus), downward slant of palpebral fissures, mental retardation, and delayed bone maturation. Both cases are of sporadic occurrence with no consanguinity between the parents. We suggest that this syndrome is due to a new autosomal dominant mutation and propose to designate it with the acronym of "MOMO syndrome" (Macrosomia, Obesity, Macrocrania, Ocular anomalities.

  19. Study of the optical effects of nanostructure embedded GaN light emitting diodes formed by nanorod template overgrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we used the finite difference time domain method to study the optical effect of nanostructures produced by the nanorod epitaxial lateral overgrowth (NELO) process on the light extraction of GaN Light Emitting Diode (LED). It was found that these nanostructures produced by NELO served as buffer layers for reducing stress and dislocations, as well as photon blocking layers for reducing the light penetrating sapphire substrates. We studied the effect of the nanostructure shape and density distribution on the light extraction efficiency of GaN LED because various overgrowth conditions can lead to different shapes and distributions of nanostructures. Simulation results showed that curved surface nanopores and dual-sized nanorod structures formed during overgrowth on the nanorod template have an extraction efficiency that is almost 100% higher than that of conventional LEDs, and 30% higher than that of original nanorod embedded LEDs. This is because of the higher probability of photon reflection and the strong surface scattering from the curved surface of nanopores and extra air gap of dual-sized nanorod structures. It was also shown that the density of the nanostructure occupied area affects light extraction. The simulation analysis shows that the light intensity peaks coincide in the locations of the nanopore gathered region, indicating that photon reflection is enhanced by nanopores. Experiments also showed that the electro luminescence emission from LEDs with 12.5% nanostructure density is 30% stronger than that of conventional LED. - Highlights: • Nanostructures produced by NELO served as photon blocking layers. • Use the finite difference time domain method to study the nanostructures. • The nanostructures produced by the nanorod epitaxial lateral overgrowth (NELO)

  20. Growth of very large InN microcrystals by molecular beam epitaxy using epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamimura, J., E-mail: kamimura@pdi-berlin.de [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Kishino, K.; Kikuchi, A. [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Sophia Nanotechnology Research Center, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2015-02-28

    Very thick InN (∼40 μm) was grown by molecular beam epitaxy using the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) technique. In some regions, the ELO of InN was observed as expected, indicating an important step toward fabricating quasi-bulk InN substrates. Interestingly, most parts of the sample consist of large flat-topped microcrystals and well-faceted microstructures. This is likely due to local growth condition variations during ELO, which is supported by an experiment where ELO of InN was performed on a substrate with various stripe mask patterns. TEM characterization of a flat top InN microcrystal revealed few stacking faults and only related threading dislocations. Defect-free small faceted microcrystals were also observed. The thick InN crystals show a narrow photoluminescence spectrum with a peak at 0.679 eV and linewidth of 16.8 meV at 4 K.

  1. Crystallographic tilt in GaN layers grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯淦; 郑新和; 朱建军; 沈晓明; 张宝顺; 赵德刚; 孙元平; 张泽洪; 王玉田; 杨辉; 梁骏吾

    2002-01-01

    The crystallographic tilt in GaN layers grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) onsapphire (0001) substrates was investigated by using double crystal X-ray diffraction (DC-XRD). Itwas found that ELO GaN stripes bent towards the SiNx mask in the direction perpendicular toseeding lines. Each side of GaN (0002) peak in DC-XRD rocking curves was a broad peak relatedwith the crystallographic tilt. This broad peak split into two peaks (denoted as A and B), and peak Bdisappeared gradually when the mask began to be removed by selective etching. Only narrowpeak A remained when the SiNx mask was removed completely. A model based on these resultshas been developed to show that there are two factors responsible for the crystallographic tilt: Oneis the non-uniformity elastic deformation caused by the interphase force between the ELO GaNlayer and the SiNx mask. The other is the plastic deformation, which is attributed to the change ofthe threading dislocations (TDs) from vertical in the window regions to the lateral in the regionsover the mask.

  2. Prevalence of gingival overgrowth induced by antihypertensive drugs: A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumiya Gopal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gingival overgrowth (GO is a known side-effect of calcium channel blockers. Although there have been several case reports, few studies have examined the prevalence of nifedipine, diltiazem, and amlodipine. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and risk factors for GO in patients treated with calcium channel blockers. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in out patient Department of Medicine, Government Medical College, Calicut. 133 patients taking antihypertensives were examined for the presence of GO using two different indices: Vertical GO in 6 points around each tooth and horizontal Miranda-Brunet index in the interdental area. Gingival index (GI, plaque index, and probing depth were also evaluated. Results: The frequency of GO was significantly higher in nifedipine-treated cases than other drug groups. Frequency of GO was 75% for nifedipine, 31.4% for amlodipine and 25% for amlodipine + metoprolol. Higher gingival, plaque and calculus were observed in patients taking calcium channel blockers. Among the possible risk factors, only the GI showed a significant correlation with GO. Conclusions: Patients taking antihypertensives had poor oral hygiene. Patients taking nifedipine showed a higher frequency of GO. Gingival inflammation acts as a predisposing factor.

  3. [Significance of deficient bacterial colonization in the pathogenesis of mucosal lesions in experimental blind loop syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menge, H; Germer, C T; Stössel, R; Simes, G; Wagner, J; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1985-07-20

    A complete evaluation of the bacterial flora in jejunal self-filling blind loops was performed. The results show a significant increase in bacteria of the genera E. coli, Streptococcus and Bacteroides. In further experiments, jejunal self-filling blind loops were created in germ-free animals. In spite of the germ-free state the mucosa displayed marked hyperplasia. The same was true when the blind loops had been contaminated with aerobic bacteria. These results demonstrate that other factors in addition to bacterial overgrowth contribute to the mucosal damage observed in self-filling blind loops.

  4. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  5. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  6. Liquid enteral diets induce bacterial translocation by increasing cecal flora without changing intestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskel, Y; Udassin, R; Freund, H R; Zhang, J M; Hanani, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of intestinal motility and cecal bacterial overgrowth to liquid diet-induced bacterial translocation (BT). Three different commercially available liquid diets were offered to mice for 1 week. BT to the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), spleen, and liver were examined as well as cecal bacterial counts and populations, small bowel length and weight, and histopathologic changes in the ileal and jejunal mucosa. In addition, the effect of the various diets on intestinal motility was measured by the transit index of a charcoal mixture introduced into the stomach. The incidence of BT to the mesenteric lymph nodes was significantly and similarly increased (p Vivonex (30%), Ensure (30%), and Osmolite (33%) compared with chow-fed controls (0%). Compared with chow-fed controls, all three liquid diets were associated with the development of cecal bacterial overgrowth (p < .01). There were no significant changes in the transit index for the three liquid diet groups compared with the chow-fed controls. BT to the MLN was induced by all three liquid diets tested, casting some doubts as to their role in preventing BT in clinical use. BT was associated with a statistically significant increase in cecal bacterial count but was not associated with gut motility changes in this model. In fact, no significant changes in intestinal motility were noted in all groups tested. PMID:11284471

  7. An InP/Si heterojunction photodiode fabricated by self-aligned corrugated epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y. T., E-mail: yasun@kth.se; Omanakuttan, G.; Lourdudoss, S. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials, Department of Materials and Nano Physics, School of Information and Communication Technology, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, Kista S-164 40 (Sweden)

    2015-05-25

    An n-InP/p-Si heterojunction photodiode fabricated by corrugated epitaxial lateral overgrowth (CELOG) method is presented. N-InP/p-Si heterojunction has been achieved from a suitable pattern containing circular shaped openings in a triangular lattice on the InP seed layer on p-Si substrate and subsequent CELOG of completely coalesced n-InP. To avoid current path through the seed layer in the final photodiode, semi-insulating InP:Fe was grown with adequate thickness prior to n-InP growth in a low pressure hydride vapor phase epitaxy reactor. The n-InP/p-Si heterointerface was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Room temperature cross-sectional photoluminescence (PL) mapping illustrates the defect reduction effect in InP grown on Si by CELOG method. The InP PL intensity measured above the InP/Si heterojunction is comparable to that of InP grown on a native planar substrate indicating low interface defect density of CELOG InP despite of 8% lattice mismatch with Si. The processed n-InP/p-Si heterojunction photodiodes show diode characteristics from the current-voltage (I-V) measurements with a dark current density of 0.324 mA/cm{sup 2} at a reverse voltage of −1 V. Under the illumination of AM1.5 conditions, the InP/Si heterojunction photodiode exhibited photovoltaic effect with an open circuit voltage of 180 mV, a short circuit current density of 1.89 mA/cm{sup 2}, an external quantum efficiency of 4.3%, and an internal quantum efficiency of 6.4%. This demonstration of epitaxially grown InP/Si heterojunction photodiode will open the door for low cost and high efficiency solar cells and photonic integration of III-Vs on silicon.

  8. Doom and boom on a resilient reef: climate change, algal overgrowth and coral recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Diaz-Pulido

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral reefs around the world are experiencing large-scale degradation, largely due to global climate change, overfishing, diseases and eutrophication. Climate change models suggest increasing frequency and severity of warming-induced coral bleaching events, with consequent increases in coral mortality and algal overgrowth. Critically, the recovery of damaged reefs will depend on the reversibility of seaweed blooms, generally considered to depend on grazing of the seaweed, and replenishment of corals by larvae that successfully recruit to damaged reefs. These processes usually take years to decades to bring a reef back to coral dominance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 2006, mass bleaching of corals on inshore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef caused high coral mortality. Here we show that this coral mortality was followed by an unprecedented bloom of a single species of unpalatable seaweed (Lobophora variegata, colonizing dead coral skeletons, but that corals on these reefs recovered dramatically, in less than a year. Unexpectedly, this rapid reversal did not involve reestablishment of corals by recruitment of coral larvae, as often assumed, but depended on several ecological mechanisms previously underestimated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These mechanisms of ecological recovery included rapid regeneration rates of remnant coral tissue, very high competitive ability of the corals allowing them to out-compete the seaweed, a natural seasonal decline in the particular species of dominant seaweed, and an effective marine protected area system. Our study provides a key example of the doom and boom of a highly resilient reef, and new insights into the variability and mechanisms of reef resilience under rapid climate change.

  9. Total Hemi-overgrowth in Pigmentary Mosaicism of the (Hypomelanosis of) Ito Type: Eight Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Vito; Signorelli, Salvatore Santo; Praticò, Andrea Domenico; Corsello, Giovanni; Savasta, Salvatore; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Pavone, Piero; Sessa, Giuseppe; Ruggieri, Martino; Ba, Martino Ruggieri

    2016-03-01

    Pigmentary mosaicism of the (hypomelanosis of) Ito type is an umbrella term, which includes phenotypes characterized by mosaic hypopigmentation in the form of streaks, whorls, patchy, or more bizarre skin configurations (running along the lines of Blaschko): these cutaneous patterns can manifest as an isolated skin disorder (pigmentary mosaicism of the Ito type) or as a complex malformation syndrome in association with extracutaneous anomalies (most often of the musculoskeletal and/or nervous systems) (hypomelanosis of Ito). Affected individuals are anecdotally reported to have also partial or total body hemi-overgrowth (HOG), which often causes moderate to severe complications.We studied the occurrence and features of HOG in the 114 children and adults with mosaic pigmentary disorders of the Ito type diagnosed and followed up (from 2 to 22 years; average follow-up 16 years) at our Institutions.Eight patients (5 M, 3 F; aged 4 to 25 years; median age 16 years) out of the 114 analyzed (7%) fulfilled the criteria for unilateral HOG, with differences in diameter ranging from 0.4 to 4.0 cm (upper limbs) and 1.0 to 9.0 cm (lower limbs). Moreover, among these 8 patients, 5/8 filled in the 75th to 90th percentile for height; 6/8 had associated kyphoscoliosis; and 5/8 showed cognitive delays. No tumour complications were recorded. Overall, 6/8 HOG patients presented with additional (extracutaneous) syndromic manifestations, apart from the HOG (ie, with a clinical phenotype of hypomelanosis of Ito).The present study, which includes children and adults with the longest follow-up so far recorded, confirms the association between pigmentary mosaicism of the Ito type and HOG lowering previous estimates (7% vs 16%) for HOG in the context of mosaic hypopigmentation. A careful examination, looking at subtle to moderate asymmetries and associated complications within the spectrum of these mosaic pigmentary disorders, is recommended. PMID:26962770

  10. A recessive syndrome of intellectual disability, moderate overgrowth, and renal dysplasia predisposing to Wilms tumor is caused by a mutation in FIBP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akawi, Nadia; Ben-Salem, Salma; Lahti, Laura; Partanen, Juha; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2016-08-01

    Clinical classification of overgrowth syndromes represents a challenge since a wide spectrum of disorders result in marked overgrowth. Therefore, there is a continuous effort to identify the genetic basis of these disorders that will eventually facilitate their molecular classification. Here, we have identified the genetic etiology and the pathogenetic mechanism underlying a rare autosomal recessive overgrowth syndrome in three affected siblings. The overgrowth phenotype in the patients was accompanied by developmental delay, learning disabilities, and variable congenital abnormalities. To elucidate the genetic etiology of the disorder, whole-genome genotyping and whole-exome sequencing were used. The disease was mapped to 3p21.1-p14.2 and 11q13.1-q13.4, where an in-frame insertion (c.175_176insTAA) in FIBP gene was revealed. The resulting indel (p.H59LN) was predicted to change the protein conformation with likely deleterious effect on its function as one of the fibroblast growth factor signaling mediators. In vitro cellular proliferation assay and in situ hypridization in vivo were then performed to understand the pathophysiology of the disease. The patients' skin fibroblasts showed an increased proliferation capacity compared to the controls' explaining the observed overgrowth phenotype. In addition, we detected Fibp expression most notably in the brains of mice embryos suggesting a possible effect on cognitive functions early in development. To date, only one patient has been reported with a homozygous nonsense mutation in FIBP exhibiting an overgrowth syndrome with multiple congenital abnormalities. Taken all together, these findings provide convincing evidence implicating FIBP aberrations in the newly recognized overgrowth syndrome and expand the associated phenotypes to include possible Wilms tumor predisposition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27183861

  11. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  12. Basal but not luminal mammary epithelial cells require PI3K/mTOR signaling for Ras-driven overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichta, Kristin A; Mathers, Jessica L; Gestl, Shelley A; Glick, Adam B; Gunther, Edward J

    2012-11-15

    The mammary ducts of humans and mice are comprised of two main mammary epithelial cell (MEC) subtypes: a surrounding layer of basal MECs and an inner layer of luminal MECs. Breast cancer subtypes show divergent clinical behavior that may reflect properties inherent in their MEC compartment of origin. How the response to a cancer-initiating genetic event is shaped by MEC subtype remains largely unexplored. Using the mouse mammary gland, we designed organotypic three-dimensional culture models that permit challenge of discrete MEC compartments with the same oncogenic insult. Mammary organoids were prepared from mice engineered for compartment-restricted coexpression of oncogenic H-RAS(G12V) together with a nuclear fluorescent reporter. Monitoring of H-RAS(G12V)-expressing MECs during extended live cell imaging permitted visualization of Ras-driven phenotypes via video microscopy. Challenging either basal or luminal MECs with H-RAS(G12V) drove MEC proliferation and survival, culminating in aberrant organoid overgrowth. In each compartment, Ras activation triggered modes of collective MEC migration and invasion that contrasted with physiologic modes used during growth factor-initiated branching morphogenesis. Although basal and luminal Ras activation produced similar overgrowth phenotypes, inhibitor studies revealed divergent use of Ras effector pathways. Blocking either the phosphoinositide 3-kinase or the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway completely suppressed Ras-driven invasion and overgrowth of basal MECs, but only modestly attenuated Ras-driven phenotypes in luminal MECs. We show that MEC subtype defines signaling pathway dependencies downstream of Ras. Thus, cells-of-origin may critically determine the drug sensitivity profiles of mammary neoplasia. PMID:23010075

  13. Lateral epitaxial overgrowth of aluminum nitride and near ultraviolet LEDs for white lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Scott A.

    In recent years, substantial efforts have been made to develop deep ultraviolet AlGaN-based LEDs (200-280 nm) for specialized applications such as bio-detection and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communications. One of several factors limiting the performance of these devices is the high threading dislocation (TD) density of ˜5x109 cm-2 that results from growing the required AlN base layer on either a SiC or sapphire substrate. Lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) of AlN, the first topic of this dissertation, is a promising technology for growing low TD density AlN templates. Conventional LEO methods relying on selective area growth (SAG) have not been effective for AlxGa1-xN with x > 0.2, because of the high aluminum sticking coefficient for the mask materials and/or contamination of the film by the mask. Therefore, maskless AlN LEO was investigated using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). Cracked AlN films with TD densities of color temperatures (CCTs) of ˜5,500 K and poor color rendering indices (CRIs) of ˜75. The alternative approach of combining a NUV LED with suitable NUV-excitation phosphors (e.g., red, green, and blue phosphors) can theoretically allow for high CRI white lighting with relatively good efficacy and a variety of CCTs. When this project began in late 2007, the lack of suitable blue-excitation phosphors suggested that this was the only viable approach to attaining very high CRI white lighting. NUV LEDs with AlN buffers on 6H-SiC substrates and AlGaN/InGaN active regions were first developed to target white phosphors with excitation peaks near 365 nm. Later, NUV LEDs with GaN buffers on sapphire substrates and GaN/InGaN active regions were developed to diagnose problems with the AlGaN/InGaN LEDs and to target white phosphors with excitation peaks near 400 nm. The best device produced in this study was a 410 nm GaN/InGaN LED which emitted 7.4 mW at 20 mA, with a maximum external quantum efficiency

  14. Small intestinal bacteria overgrowth decreases small intestinal motility in the NASH rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-Chun Wu; Wei Zhao; Sheng Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the relationship between small intestinal motility and small intestinal bacteria overgrowth (SIBO) in Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and to investigate the effect of SIBO on the pathogenesis of NASH in rats. The effect of cidomycin in alleviating severity of NASH is also studied.METHODS: Forty eight rats were randomly divided into NASH group (n = 16), cidomycin group (n = 16)and control group (n = 16). Then each group were subdivided into small intestinal motility group (n = 8),bacteria group (n = 8) respectively. A semi-solid colored marker was used for monitoring small intestinal transit.The proximal small intestine was harvested under sterile condition and processed for quantitation for aerobes (E. coli) and anaerobes (Lactobacilli). Liver pathologic score was calculated to qualify the severity of hepatitis.Serum ALT, AST levels were detected to evaluate the severity of hepatitis.RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited in NASH group (P < 0.01). Rats treated with cidomycin had higher small intestine transit rate than rats in NASH group (P < 0.01). High fat diet resulted in quantitative alterations in the aerobes (E. coli) but not in the anoerobics (Lactobacill). There was an increase in the number of E. coli in the proximal small intestinal flora in NASH group than in control group (1.70 ± 0.12 log10 (CFU/g) vs 1.28 ± 0.07 log10 (CFU/g), P < 0.01). TNF-a concentration was significantly higher in NASH group than in control group (1.13±0.15 mmol/L vs 0.57±0.09 mmol/L, P < 0.01). TNF-α concentration was lower in cidomycin group than in NASH group (0.63±0.09 mmol/L vs 1.13 ± 0.15 mmol/L, P < 0.01). Treatment with cidomycin showed its effect by significantly lowering serum ALT, AST and TNF-α levels of NASH rats.CONCLUSION: SIBO may decrease small intestinal movement in NASH rats. SIBO may be an important pathogenesis of Nash. And treatment with cidomycin by mouth can alleviate the severity of NASH.

  15. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  16. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  17. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...... biogeochemical processes are carried exclusively by bacteria. * Bacteria play an important role in all types of habitats including some that cannot support eukaryotic life....

  18. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  19. Two-step epitaxial lateral overgrowth of a-plane GaN by MOCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, X.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Baski, A. A.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Everitt, H. O.

    2007-02-01

    -plane epitaxial layers (<45 ps), and ratio of the slow decaying component magnitude to the fast decaying one was more than 1.5, showing considerable reduction of nonradiative centers by lateral overgrowth. In addition, room temperature near-field optical microscopy studies revealed the improved optical quality in the wing regions of the overgrown GaN. As revealed from far-field PL, the band edge luminescence at room temperature was more than two orders of magnitude weaker than the yellow luminescence. Therefore, the overall spectrally integrated near field PL was collected, and its intensity was noticeably stronger in the wing areas with both Ga and N polarity. The much weaker emission at the windows and meeting fronts of the two opposite wings were consistent with the observations of high density of dislocations in the window regions and new defects originating at the meeting boundaries from TEM.

  20. Müllerian adenosarcoma of the uterine cervix with sarcomatous overgrowth: A case report of aggressive disease in a young patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Morales F.

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: A young woman with Müllerian adenosarcoma of the cervix with sarcomatous overgrowth presenting the risk factors for its recurrence experienced a rapid relapse after receiving radical surgery but not adjuvant therapy. Control of this aggressive disease via sequential radiotherapy and chemotherapy are recommended.

  1. High-fat diet before and during pregnancy causes marked up-regulation of placental nutrient transport and fetal overgrowth in C57/BL6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Helen N; Woollett, Laura A; Barbour, Nicolette; Prasad, Puttur D; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Maternal overweight and obesity in pregnancy often result in fetal overgrowth, which increases the risk for the baby to develop metabolic syndrome later in life. However, the mechanisms underlying fetal overgrowth are not established. We developed a mouse model and hypothesized that a maternal high-fat (HF) diet causes up-regulation of placental nutrient transport, resulting in fetal overgrowth. C57BL/6J female mice were fed a control (11% energy from fat) or HF (32% energy from fat) diet for 8 wk before mating and throughout gestation and were studied at embryonic day 18.5. The HF diet increased maternal adiposity, as assessed by fat pad weight, and circulating maternal leptin, decreased serum adiponectin concentrations, and caused a marked increase in fetal growth (+43%). The HF diet also increased transplacental transport of glucose (5-fold) and neutral amino acids (10-fold) in vivo. In microvillous plasma membranes (MVMs) isolated from placentas of HF-fed animals, protein expression of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) was increased 5-fold, and protein expression of sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter (SNAT) 2 was elevated 9-fold. In contrast, MVM protein expression of GLUT 3 or SNAT4 was unaltered. These data suggest that up-regulation of specific placental nutrient transporter isoforms constitute a mechanism linking maternal high-fat diet and obesity to fetal overgrowth. PMID:18827021

  2. Markers of bacterial translocation in end-stage liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ioannis; Koutsounas; Garyfallia; Kaltsa; Spyros; I; Siakavellas; Giorgos; Bamias

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial translocation(BT) refers to the passage of viable bacteria or bacterial products from the intestinal lumen, through the intestinal epithelium, into the systemic circulation and extraintestinal locations. The three principal mechanisms that are thought to be involved in BT include bacterial overgrowth, disruption of the gut mucosal barrier and an impaired host defence.BT is commonly observed in liver cirrhosis and has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the complications of end stage liver disease, including infections as well as hepatic encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome. Due to the importance of BT in the natural history of cirrhosis, there is intense interest for the discovery of biomarkers of BT. To date, several such candidates have been proposed, which include bacterial DNA, soluble CD14, lipopolysaccharides endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, calprotectin and procalcitonin. Studies on the association of these markers with BT have demonstrated not only promising data but, oftentimes, contradictory results. As a consequence, currently, there is no optimal marker that may be used in clinical practice as a surrogate for the presence of BT.

  3. Normal flora and bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelinghuys, Mathys Jacobus; Ehlers, Marthie Magdaleen; Dreyer, Andries William; Kock, Marleen Magdalena

    2016-05-01

    The female genital tract is an intricate, yet balanced ecosystem that hosts a variety of different residential microflora. The physiological changes that occur during pregnancy may disrupt this balanced ecosystem and predispose women to a potentially pathogenic microbiota. Bacteria that are associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) are opportunistic pathogens that frequently form part of this microbiota. The overgrowth of and infections with these bacteria are linked to poor obstetric outcomes and increased transmission of other reproductive tract infections (RTIs). These infections increase women's susceptibility of acquiring HIV, the rates of HIV shedding and the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in HIV-infected patients. It is unknown how the plethora of bacterial species associated with BV contributes to the dynamics of this condition. The use of high-throughput methods have led to the in-depth investigation of different BV-related bacterial species and the functional capabilities of these species. However, the pathogenesis of BV is still poorly defined and the role of individual BV-related bacterial species in specific pregnancy complications is unclear and controversial. The majority of BV infections are asymptomatic and successful diagnosis is complicated by the lack of reliable and standardized diagnostic tests. PMID:25834920

  4. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  5. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  6. Silver-nanoparticle-coated biliary stent inhibits bacterial adhesion in bacterial cholangitis in swine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wen; Li-Mei Ma; Wei He; Xiao-Wei Tang; Yin Zhang; Xiang Wang; Li Liu; Zhi-Ning Fan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the major limitations of biliary stents is the stent occlusion, which is closely related to the over-growth of bacteria. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a novel silver-nanoparticle-coated polyurethane (Ag/PU) stent in bacterial cholangitis model in swine. METHODS: Ag/PU was designed by coating silver nanopar-ticles on polyurethane (PU) stent. Twenty-four healthy pigs with bacterial cholangitis using Ag/PU and PU stents were ran-domly divided into an Ag/PU stent group (n=12) and a PU stent group (n=12), respectively. The stents were inserted by standard endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Laboratory assay was performed for white blood cell (WBC) count, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at baseline time, 8 hours, 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after stent placements. The segment of bile duct containing the stent was examined histologically ex vivo. Implanted bili-ary stents were examined by a scan electron microscope. The amount of silver release was also measured in vitro. RESULTS: The number of inflammatory cells and level of ALT, IL-1β and TNF-α were significantly lower in the Ag/PU stent group than in the PU stent group. Hyperplasia of the mucosa was more severe in the PU stent group than in the Ag/PU stent group. In contrast to the biofilm of bacteria on the PU stent, fewer bacteria adhered to the Ag/PU stent. CONCLUSIONS: PU biliary stents modified with silver nanoparticles are able to alleviate the inflammation of pigs with bacterial cholangitis. Silver-nanoparticle-coated stents are resistant to bacterial adhesion.

  7. Effects of lactulose on intestinal endotoxin and bacterial translocation in cirrhotic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张顺财; 王唯; 任卫英; 戴茜; 贺伯明; 周康

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of lactulose on intestinal bacterial overgrowth (IBO), bacterial translocation (BT), intestinal transit and permeability in cirrhotic rats. Methods BT in all animals was assessed by bacterial culture of mesenteric lymph node (MLN), liver and spleen, and IBO was assessed by a jejunal bacterial count of the specific organism. Intestinal permeability was determined by the 24-hour urinary 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA) excretion, and intestinal transit was determined by measuring the distribution of 51 Cr in the intestine. Results BT and IBO were found in 48% and 80% of the cirrhotic rats, respectively, while not in the control rats. Cirrhotic rats with IBO had significantly higher levels of intestinal endotoxin higher rates of bacterial translocation, shorter intestinal transit time and higher intestinal permeability than those without IBO. It was also found that BT was closely associated with IBO and injury of the intestinal barrier. Compared with the placebo group, lactulose-treated rats had lower rates of BT and IBO, which was closely associated with increased intestinal transit and improved intestinal permeability by lactulose. Conclusions Our study indicate that endotoxin and bacterial translocation in cirrhotic rats may attribute to IBO and increased intestinal permeability. Lactulose that accelerates intestinal transit and improves intestinal permeability might be helpful in preventing intestinal bacterial and endotoxin translocation.

  8. Disrupted bone remodeling leads to cochlear overgrowth and hearing loss in a mouse model of fibrous dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Akil

    Full Text Available Normal hearing requires exquisite cooperation between bony and sensorineural structures within the cochlea. For example, the inner ear secretes proteins such as osteoprotegrin (OPG that can prevent cochlear bone remodeling. Accordingly, diseases that affect bone regulation can also result in hearing loss. Patients with fibrous dysplasia develop trabecular bone overgrowth resulting in hearing loss if the lesions affect the temporal bones. Unfortunately, the mechanisms responsible for this hearing loss, which could be sensorineural and/or conductive, remain unclear. In this study, we used a unique transgenic mouse model of increased Gs G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR signaling induced by expression of an engineered receptor, Rs1, in osteoblastic cells. These ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ mice showed dramatic bone lesions that histologically and radiologically resembled fibrous dysplasia. We found that ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ mice showed progressive and severe conductive hearing loss. Ossicular chain impingement increased with the size and number of dysplastic lesions. While sensorineural structures were unaffected, ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ cochleae had abnormally high osteoclast activity, together with elevated tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP activity and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (Rankl mRNA expression. ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ cochleae also showed decreased expression of Sclerostin (Sost, an antagonist of the Wnt signaling pathway that normally increases bone formation. The osteocyte canalicular networks of ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ cochleae were disrupted and showed abnormal osteocyte morphology. The osteocytes in the ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ cochleae showed increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13 and TRAP, both of which can support osteocyte-mediated peri-lacunar remodeling. Thus, while the ossicular chain impingement is sufficient to account for the progressive hearing loss in fibrous dysplasia, the deregulation of bone remodeling extends to the

  9. Bile acid malabsorption or disturbed intestinal permeability in patients treated with enzyme substitution for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is not caused by bacterial overgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Graff, Jesper; Philipsen, Else Kirstine;

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In some patients with severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, enzyme replacement therapy will not lead to clinical improvement or reduction of steatorrhea. Therefore, other mechanisms separately or in interplay with reduced enzyme secretion might be responsible for malabsorption...

  10. 小肠细菌过度繁殖所致吸收不良%Malabsorption caused by intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李方儒

    2002-01-01

    @@ 0引言 小肠细菌过度繁殖也是吸收不良综合征的一个重要病因[1].众所周知,胃肠道正常菌群的数量大,种类多,繁殖快,各部位的菌种、数量保持相对稳定,组成一个庞大的生态系统[2-4].

  11. Viral and bacterial interactions in the upper respiratory tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid A T M Bosch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory infectious diseases are mainly caused by viruses or bacteria that often interact with one another. Although their presence is a prerequisite for subsequent infections, viruses and bacteria may be present in the nasopharynx without causing any respiratory symptoms. The upper respiratory tract hosts a vast range of commensals and potential pathogenic bacteria, which form a complex microbial community. This community is assumed to be constantly subject to synergistic and competitive interspecies interactions. Disturbances in the equilibrium, for instance due to the acquisition of new bacteria or viruses, may lead to overgrowth and invasion. A better understanding of the dynamics between commensals and pathogens in the upper respiratory tract may provide better insight into the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases. Here we review the current knowledge regarding specific bacterial-bacterial and viral-bacterial interactions that occur in the upper respiratory niche, and discuss mechanisms by which these interactions might be mediated. Finally, we propose a theoretical model to summarize and illustrate these mechanisms.

  12. Quantitative estimation of AgNORs in inflammatory gingival overgrowth in pediatric patients and its correlation with the dental plaque status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Nucleolar organizer Regions (NORs are situated within the nucleolus of a cell. The proteins are selectively stained by the silver colloid technique that is known as the AgNOR technique. AgNOR stain can be visualized as a black dot under the optical microscope. The present study aimed to evaluate the cases for quantitative estimation of AgNORs in the epithelial cells in various grades of gingival overgrowth to that of normal gingival tissues. Materials and Methods: Only preadolescent and adolescent groups aged up to 14 years were selected. Twenty normal and 31 disease cases of gingival overgrowth were selected. The tissue sections were stained by the hematoxylin and eosin (HandE technique for the routine histological evaluation, while the AgNOR counts were performed through the improved one-step method of Ploton et al. Results: HandE staining revealed five different types of gingival overgrowth. The plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, and AgNOR count were not significantly (P> 0.05 higher than that of control cases in pyogenic granuloma, puberty gingivitis, and in drug-induced gingival overgrowth cases. In gingival fibromatosis cases, for comparison of different indices t-tests were done. The PI when compared with AgNOR count was found significant at 5% level and 0.1% level for mixed and permanent dentition, respectively. The GI when compared with AgNOR count was found significant at 1% level and 0.1% level in mixed and permanent dentitions, respectively.

  13. Temporal and spatial variation of habitat conditions in the zonation of vegetation in the late stages of lake overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Kłosowski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The water and substrate properties in the vegetation zones characteristic of the late stages of lake overgrowth were determined. It was demonstrated that the spatial distribution of plant communities conformed with the spatial gradient of habitat conditions. With regard to water properties the largest differences between the zones were found in Mg2+, Ca2+, electrolytic conductivity and NH4+. In the case of substrate the zones differed significantly in Ca2+, total Fe and organic matter content. The water properties varied greatly during the vegetative season in the successive zones. The temporal changes often proceeded at a different level of a given component or factor in most zones. The differences between the zones were, however, maintained. It appears that the plant communities can alter their habitats to a large extent. In the lake studied, the invasion of raised and transitional bog vegetation was observed. The process of dystrophy proceeded from the terrestrialized peripheral parts of the lake to the centre of the lake.

  14. Defect reduction in (112_O) a-plane GaN by two-stage epitaxiallateral overgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, X.; Ozgur, U.; Fu, Y.; Biyikli, N.; Xie, J.; Baski, A.A.; Morkoc, H.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2006-10-20

    In the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) of (11{bar 2}0) a-plane GaN, the uneven growth rates of two opposing wings, Ga- and N-wings, makes the coalescence of two neighboring wings more difficult than that in c-plane GaN. We report a two-stage growth method to get uniformly coalesced epitaxial lateral overgrown a-plane GaN using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) by employing relatively lower growth temperature in the first step followed by enhanced lateral growth in the second. Using this method, the height differences between Ga-polar and N-polar wings at the coalescence front could be reduced, thereby making the coalescence of two wings much easier. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the threading dislocation density in the wing areas was 1.0x10{sup 8}cm{sup -2}, more than two orders of magnitude lower than that in the window areas (4.2x10{sup 10}cm{sup -2}). However, high density of basal stacking faults of 1.2x104 cm-1 was still observed in the wing areas as compared to c-plane GaN. Atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence measurements on the coalesced ELO a-GaN sample also indicated improved material quality.

  15. GINGIVAL OVERGROWTH INDUCED BY IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE TREATMENT WITH CYCLOSPORINE A AND MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL IN A PATIENT WITH KIDNEY TRANSPLANT – A CASE REPORT AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Trandafir

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporine A, a drug that inhibits the immuneresponse, has been widely used for over 30 years in immunosuppressivetherapy protocols for patient‑recipients ofthe transplanted organs. One of the commonly reportedside effects of Cyclosporine A is gingival overgrowth, withvarying degrees of severity, which may interfere with theaesthetics and normal functions of the oral cavity. Combinationwith other drugs that can recognize the gum tissueas a secondary target organ increases the risk ofdrug‑induced gingival overgrowth. In cases where a lowerdose of Cyclosporine A or conversion to another immunosuppressiveagent (a drug not assigned to such a sideeffect are not possible, the management of severe gingivalovergrowth focuses on surgical excision of the excessivelyproliferated gingival tissue. We report the case of a youngadult with moderate drug‑induced gingival overgrowth,the beneficiary of a functional transplanted kidney about9 years ago, treated with two immunosuppressives, whohas undergone gingivectomy with electrocautery, as a necessaryintervention to improve the oral hygiene and toavoid worsening of malfunctions in the oral cavity.

  16. Association of sexually transmitted infections, Candida species, gram-positive flora and perianal flora with bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidnia, Ali; Tuin, Hellen; Bliekendaal, Harry; Spaargaren, Joke

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterised by depletion of the normal Lactobacillus spp. and overgrowth of commensal anaerobic bacteria. We investigated the composition of vaginal microbiota and their association with BV in women of reproductive age. Vaginal samples from 1197 women were analysed, whereby n=451 patients had normal flora and n=614 were diagnosed with BV, the remaining patients were diagnosed with having either intermediate flora (n=42) or dysbacteriosis (n=90). The reported results show that pathogens are associated with BV. This knowledge will further expand our understanding of events leading to BV, which may lead to more effective prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:26485014

  17. Loss of the Drosophila cell polarity regulator Scribbled promotes epithelial tissue overgrowth and cooperation with oncogenic Ras-Raf through impaired Hippo pathway signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grusche Felix A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial neoplasias are associated with alterations in cell polarity and excessive cell proliferation, yet how these neoplastic properties are related to one another is still poorly understood. The study of Drosophila genes that function as neoplastic tumor suppressors by regulating both of these properties has significant potential to clarify this relationship. Results Here we show in Drosophila that loss of Scribbled (Scrib, a cell polarity regulator and neoplastic tumor suppressor, results in impaired Hippo pathway signaling in the epithelial tissues of both the eye and wing imaginal disc. scrib mutant tissue overgrowth, but not the loss of cell polarity, is dependent upon defective Hippo signaling and can be rescued by knockdown of either the TEAD/TEF family transcription factor Scalloped or the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie in the eye disc, or reducing levels of Yorkie in the wing disc. Furthermore, loss of Scrib sensitizes tissue to transformation by oncogenic Ras-Raf signaling, and Yorkie-Scalloped activity is required to promote this cooperative tumor overgrowth. The inhibition of Hippo signaling in scrib mutant eye disc clones is not dependent upon JNK activity, but can be significantly rescued by reducing aPKC kinase activity, and ectopic aPKC activity is sufficient to impair Hippo signaling in the eye disc, even when JNK signaling is blocked. In contrast, warts mutant overgrowth does not require aPKC activity. Moreover, reducing endogenous levels of aPKC or increasing Scrib or Lethal giant larvae levels does not promote increased Hippo signaling, suggesting that aPKC activity is not normally rate limiting for Hippo pathway activity. Epistasis experiments suggest that Hippo pathway inhibition in scrib mutants occurs, at least in part, downstream or in parallel to both the Expanded and Fat arms of Hippo pathway regulation. Conclusions Loss of Scrib promotes Yorkie/Scalloped-dependent epithelial tissue

  18. Effects of laxative and N-acetylcysteine on mucus accumulation, bacterial load, transit, and inflammation in the cystic fibrosis mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisle, Robert C; Roach, Eileen; Jansson, Kyle

    2007-09-01

    The accumulation of mucus in affected organs is characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF). The CF mouse small intestine has dramatic mucus accumulation and exhibits slower interdigestive intestinal transit. These factors are proposed to play cooperative roles that foster small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and contribute to the innate immune response of the CF intestine. It was hypothesized that decreasing the mucus accumulation would reduce SIBO and might improve other aspects of the CF intestinal phenotype. To test this, solid chow-fed CF mice were treated with an osmotic laxative to improve gut hydration or liquid-fed mice were treated orally with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to break mucin disulfide bonds. Treatment with laxative or NAC reduced mucus accumulation by 43% and 50%, respectively, as measured histologically as dilation of the intestinal crypts. Laxative and NAC also reduced bacterial overgrowth in the CF intestine by 92% and 63%, respectively. Treatment with laxative normalized small intestinal transit in CF mice, whereas NAC did not. The expression of innate immune response-related genes was significantly reduced in laxative-treated CF mice, whereas there was no significant effect in NAC-treated CF mice. In summary, laxative and NAC treatments of CF mice reduced mucus accumulation to a similar extent, but laxative was more effective than NAC at reducing bacterial load. Eradication of bacterial overgrowth by laxative treatment was associated with normalized intestinal transit and a reduction in the innate immune response. These results suggest that both mucus accumulation and slowed interdigestive small intestinal transit contribute to SIBO in the CF intestine.

  19. Effects of laxative and N-acetylcysteine on mucus accumulation, bacterial load, transit, and inflammation in the cystic fibrosis mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisle, Robert C; Roach, Eileen; Jansson, Kyle

    2007-09-01

    The accumulation of mucus in affected organs is characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF). The CF mouse small intestine has dramatic mucus accumulation and exhibits slower interdigestive intestinal transit. These factors are proposed to play cooperative roles that foster small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and contribute to the innate immune response of the CF intestine. It was hypothesized that decreasing the mucus accumulation would reduce SIBO and might improve other aspects of the CF intestinal phenotype. To test this, solid chow-fed CF mice were treated with an osmotic laxative to improve gut hydration or liquid-fed mice were treated orally with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to break mucin disulfide bonds. Treatment with laxative or NAC reduced mucus accumulation by 43% and 50%, respectively, as measured histologically as dilation of the intestinal crypts. Laxative and NAC also reduced bacterial overgrowth in the CF intestine by 92% and 63%, respectively. Treatment with laxative normalized small intestinal transit in CF mice, whereas NAC did not. The expression of innate immune response-related genes was significantly reduced in laxative-treated CF mice, whereas there was no significant effect in NAC-treated CF mice. In summary, laxative and NAC treatments of CF mice reduced mucus accumulation to a similar extent, but laxative was more effective than NAC at reducing bacterial load. Eradication of bacterial overgrowth by laxative treatment was associated with normalized intestinal transit and a reduction in the innate immune response. These results suggest that both mucus accumulation and slowed interdigestive small intestinal transit contribute to SIBO in the CF intestine. PMID:17615175

  20. Groundwater geochemistry observations in littoral caves of Mallorca (western Mediterranean: implications for deposition of phreatic overgrowths on speleothems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan P. Onac

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Phreatic overgrowths on speleothems (POS precipitate at the air-water interface in the littoral caves of Mallorca, Spain. Mainly composed of calcite, aragonite POS are also observed in specific locations. To characterize the geochemical environment of the brackish upper water column, water samples and salinity values were collected from water profiles (0-2.9 m in April 2012 and March 2013 near aragonite POS in Cova des Pas de Vallgornera and calcite POS in Coves del Drac (hereafter, Vallgornera and Drac. Degassing of CO2 from the water was evidenced by the existence of lower dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC concentration and enriched δ13CDIC values in a thin surface layer (the uppermost 0.4 m, which was observed in both profiles from Drac. This process is facilitated by the efficient exchange of cave air with the atmosphere, creating a CO2 partial pressure (pCO2 disparity between the cave water and air, resulting in the precipitation of calcite POS as CO2 degasses from the water. The degassed upper layer was not observed in either profile from Vallgornera, suggesting that less efficient cave ventilation restricts outgassing of CO2, which also results in accumulation of CO2 in the cave atmosphere. The presence of an existing uncorroded POS horizon, as well as higher concentrations and large amplitude fluctuations of cave air pCO2, may indicate that aragonite POS deposition is currently episodic in Vallgornera. Ion concentration data from monthly water samples collected in each cave between October 2012 and March 2013 indicate higher Mg:Ca, Sr:Ca, Ba:Ca and Sr:Mg ratios in Vallgornera. Salinity alone does not appear to be a viable proxy for ions that may promote aragonite precipitation or inhibit calcite precipitation. Instead, these ions may be contributed by more intense bedrock weathering or deep groundwater flow.

  1. 蓝宝石上横向外延GaN薄膜%Epitaxial Lateral Overgrowth of Gallium Nitride on Sapphire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张帷; 郝秋艳; 景微娜; 刘彩池; 冯玉春

    2007-01-01

    The effect of growth conditions on GaN layer growth in the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) process by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was investigated. Sapphire wafer was used as the substrate, which was chemically etched to make pattern on it. Then a GaN buffer layer was deposited at low temperature (LT) as the seeding layer to alleviate the lattice mismatch and difference in thermal conductivity between GaN and the substrate to grow a high quality layer with a low density of screw and mixed threading dislocations. Finally the GaN epilayer was deposited on the seeding Jayer by ELO. The properties of the GaN layer were then investigated by double-crystal X-ray diffraction,atomic force microscopy,and wet chemical etching.%在蓝宝石衬底上利用金属有机物气相外延(MOCVD)方法对横向外延(ELO)GaN薄膜的生长条件进行了研究.在蓝宝石衬底上利用化学腐蚀的方法刻饰出图案,再沉积低温GaN缓冲层作为外延层的子晶层,以降低外延层与衬底的晶格失配与热失配,制备出低位错密度的GaN外延层.分别利用X射线衍射、原子力显微镜及湿法腐蚀对外延层进行检测.

  2. Polymer Coatings of Cochlear Implant Electrode Surface - An Option for Improving Electrode-Nerve-Interface by Blocking Fibroblast Overgrowth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Hadler

    Full Text Available Overgrowth of connective tissue and scar formation induced by the electrode array insertion increase the impedance and, thus, diminish the interactions between neural probes as like cochlear implants (CI and the target tissue. Therefore, it is of great clinical interest to modify the carrier material of the electrodes to improve the electrode nerve interface for selective cell adhesion. On one side connective tissue growth needs to be reduced to avoid electrode array encapsulation, on the other side the carrier material should not compromise the interaction with neuronal cells. The present in vitro-study qualitatively and quantitatively characterises the interaction of fibroblasts, glial cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN with ultrathin poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide (PDMAA, poly(2-ethyloxazoline (PEtOx and poly([2-methacryloyloxyethyl]trimethylammoniumchlorid (PMTA films immobilised onto glass surfaces using a photoreactive anchor layer. The layer thickness and hydrophilicity of the polymer films were characterised by ellipsometric and water contact angle measurement. Moreover the topography of the surfaces was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM. The neuronal and non-neuronal cells were dissociated from spiral ganglions of postnatal rats and cultivated for 48 h on top of the polymer coatings. Immunocytochemical staining of neuronal and intermediary filaments revealed that glial cells predominantly attached on PMTA films, but not on PDMAA and PEtOx monolayers. Hereby, strong survival rates and neurite outgrowth were only found on PMTA, whereas PDMAA and PEtOx coatings significantly reduced the SG neuron survival and neuritogenesis. As also shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM SGN strongly survived and retained their differentiated phenotype only on PMTA. In conclusion, survival and neuritogenesis of SGN may be associated with the extent of the glial cell growth. Since PMTA was the only of the polar polymers used in this study

  3. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...

  4. Bacterial pneumonias--evaluation of various sputum culture methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verenkar M

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available With an objective of improving diagnostic value of sputum in bacterial pneumonias, 50 uncomplicated ′community′ acquired cases were studied using Gram staining of sputum along with bedside inoculation with/without dilution of the specimen. Gram staining of sputum samples collected before treatment revealed pneumococcal infection in 46% cases. The results were however inconclusive on samples sent by routine procedure involving logistic delay. Cultural analysis of sputum processed by three different techniques showed that bedside inoculation of sputum after dilution to be the most efficient technique yielding Streptococcus pneumoniae in 34% cases, Gram positive cocci in lesser number (20%, Gram negative rods (GNR in 18% cases. Sputum samples processed bedside without dilution yielded a lower number of pneumococci and other Gram positive cocci (24% & 16% cases respectively. Routine processing of sputum, involving logistic delay yielded a high number of Gram negative rods (62%, indicating their overgrowth. Thus bedside inoculation of sputum after dilution coupled with direct Gram staining serves as a simple and yet valuable laboratory aid in the diagnosis of uncomplicated ′community′ acquired bacterial pneumonias.

  5. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  6. Bacterial Colonization of Cod (Gadus morhua L.) and Halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) Eggs in Marine Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Geir Høvik; Olafsen, Jan A.

    1989-01-01

    Aquaculture has brought about increased interest in mass production of marine fish larvae. Problems such as poor egg quality and mass mortality of fish larvae have been prevalent. The intensive incubation techniques that often result in bacterial overgrowth on fish eggs could affect the commensal relationship between the indigenous microflora and opportunistic pathogens and subsequently hamper egg development, hatching, larval health, and ongrowth. Little information about the adherent microflora on fish eggs is available, and the present study was undertaken to describe the microbial ecology during egg development and hatching of two fish species of potential commercial importance in marine aquaculture. Attachment and development of the bacterial flora on cod (Gadus morhua L.) eggs from fertilization until hatching was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The adherent microflora on cod (G. morhua L.) and halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) eggs during incubation was characterized and grouped by cluster analysis. Marked bacterial growth could be demonstrated 2 h after fertilization, and at hatching eggs were heavily overgrown. Members of the genera Pseudomonas, Alteromonas, Aeromonas, and Flavobacterium were found to dominate on the surface of both cod and halibut eggs. The filamentous bacterium Leucothrix mucor was found on eggs from both species. While growth of L. mucor on halibut eggs was sparse, cod eggs with a hairy appearance due to overgrowth by this bacterium close to hatching were frequently observed. Vibrio fischeri could be detected on cod eggs only, and pathogenic vibrios were not detected. Members of the genera Moraxella and Alcaligenes were found only on halibut eggs. Caulobacter and Seliberia spp. were observed attached to eggs dissected from cod ovaries under sterile conditions, indicating the presence of these bacteria in ovaries before spawning. Adherent strains did not demonstrate antibiotic resistance above a normal level. Attempts to

  7. Dimethylesculetin ameliorates maternal glucose intolerance and fetal overgrowth in high-fat diet-fed pregnant mice via constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Hisashi; Mitsui, Takashi; Maki, Jota; Tani, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) has been reported to decrease insulin resistance along with obesity. 6,7-dimethylesculetin (DE) is an active component of Yin Zhi Huang which is a traditional Asian medicine used to treat neonatal jaundice via CAR. In this study, we examined whether DE could affect the expression of gluconeogenic and lipogenic genes via human CAR pathway using human HepG2 cells in vitro. We also studied whether DE treatment during pregnancy could prevent maternal hypertension, glucose intolerance and hyperlipidemia, and fetal overgrowth in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese pregnant mice. Dimethylesculetin suppressed the mRNA expression of gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase, and lipogenic genes, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, and enhanced CAR-mediated transcription. Blocking the CAR-mediated pathway abolished the effect of DE in vitro. DE treatment during pregnancy could prevent maternal hypertension, glucose intolerance and hyperlipidemia, and fetal overgrowth in HFD-induced obese pregnant mice in vivo. Our data indicate that DE might be a potential therapeutic agent for obese pregnant patients with insulin resistance through CAR to prevent the perinatal outcomes such as preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and macrosomia. Further analysis of possible complications and side effects using animal models is required. PMID:27426490

  8. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  9. Void Shapes Controlled by Using Interruption-Free Epitaxial Lateral Overgrowth of GaN Films on Patterned SiO2 AlN/Sapphire Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-An Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GaN epitaxial layers with embedded air voids grown on patterned SiO2 AlN/sapphire templates were proposed. Using interruption-free epitaxial lateral overgrowth technology, we realized uninterrupted growth and controlled the shape of embedded air voids. These layers showed improved crystal quality using X-ray diffraction and measurement of etching pits density. Compared with conventional undoped-GaN film, the full width at half-maximum of the GaN (0 0 2 and (1 0 2 peaks decreased from 485 arcsec to 376 arcsec and from 600 arcsec to 322 arcsec, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy results showed that the coalesced GaN growth led to bending threading dislocation. We also proposed a growth model based on results of scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation...

  11. Down-regulation of transforming growth factor beta-2 expression is associated with the reduction of cyclosporin induced gingival overgrowth in rats treated with roxithromycin: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarestrup Fernando

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gingival overgrowth (GO is a common side effect of the chronic use of cyclosporine (CsA, an immunosuppressant widely used to prevent rejection in transplant patients. Recent studies have reported elevated levels of specific cytokines in gingival overgrowth tissue, particularly TGF-beta, suggesting that this growth factor plays a role in the accumulation of extracellular matrix materials. The effectiveness of azithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, in the regression of this undesirable side effect has also been demonstrated. Methods In this study, we created an experimental model for assessing the therapeutic effect of roxithromycin in GO and the expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta2 through immunohistochemistry. We used four groups of rats totaling 32 individuals. GO was induced during five weeks and drug treatment was given on the 6th week as follows: group 1 received saline; group 2 received CsA and was treated with saline on the 6th week; group 3 received CsA and, on the 6th week, ampicilin; and group 4 received CsA during 5 weeks and, on the 6th week, was treated with roxithromycin. Results The results demonstrated that roxithromycin treatment was effective in reducing cyclosporine-induced GO in rats. Both epithelial and connective tissue showed a decrease in thickness and a significant reduction in TGF-beta2 expression, with a lower number of fibroblasts, reduction in fibrotic areas and decrease in inflammatory infiltrate. Conclusion The present data suggest that the down-regulation of TGF-beta2 expression may be an important mechanism of action by which roxithromycin inhibits GO.

  12. Formation of hollow and mesoporous structures in single-crystalline microcrystals of metal-organic frameworks via double-solvent mediated overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Lien-Yang; Hu, Pan; Zhuang, Jia; Morabito, Joseph V.; Ng, Ka Chon; Kao, Ya-Chuan; Wang, Shao-Chun; Shieh, Fa-Kuen; Kuo, Chun-Hong; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2015-11-01

    The creation of hierarchical porosity in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) could benefit various applications of MOFs such as gas storage and separation. Having single-crystalline microcrystals instead of poly-crystalline composites is critical for these potential applications of MOFs with hierarchical porosity. We developed a room temperature synthetic method to generate uniform hollow and mesoporous zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) microcrystals with a single-crystalline structure via overgrowing a ZIF-8 shell in methanol solution on a ZIF-8 core with water adsorbed in the pores. The cavities formed as a result of the different solvent micro-environment. This double-solvent mediated overgrowth method could be applied to prepare other MOFs with hierarchical porosity.The creation of hierarchical porosity in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) could benefit various applications of MOFs such as gas storage and separation. Having single-crystalline microcrystals instead of poly-crystalline composites is critical for these potential applications of MOFs with hierarchical porosity. We developed a room temperature synthetic method to generate uniform hollow and mesoporous zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) microcrystals with a single-crystalline structure via overgrowing a ZIF-8 shell in methanol solution on a ZIF-8 core with water adsorbed in the pores. The cavities formed as a result of the different solvent micro-environment. This double-solvent mediated overgrowth method could be applied to prepare other MOFs with hierarchical porosity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06532a

  13. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  14. Bacterial surface adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  15. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  16. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  17. The bacterial lipocalins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, R E

    2000-10-18

    The lipocalins were once regarded as a eukaryotic protein family, but new members have been recently discovered in bacteria. The first bacterial lipocalin (Blc) was identified in Escherichia coli as an outer membrane lipoprotein expressed under conditions of environmental stress. Blc is distinguished from most lipocalins by the absence of intramolecular disulfide bonds, but the presence of a membrane anchor is shared with two of its closest homologues, apolipoprotein D and lazarillo. Several common features of the membrane-anchored lipocalins suggest that each may play an important role in membrane biogenesis and repair. Additionally, Blc proteins are implicated in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and in the activation of immunity. Recent genome sequencing efforts reveal the existence of at least 20 bacterial lipocalins. The lipocalins appear to have originated in Gram-negative bacteria and were probably transferred horizontally to eukaryotes from the endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of the mitochondrion. The genome sequences also reveal that some bacterial lipocalins exhibit disulfide bonds and alternative modes of subcellular localization, which include targeting to the periplasmic space, the cytoplasmic membrane, and the cytosol. The relationships between bacterial lipocalin structure and function further illuminate the common biochemistry of bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  18. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  19. Seizures Complicating Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical data of 116 patients, 1 month to <5 years of age, admitted for bacterial meningitis, and grouped according to those with and without seizures during hospitalization, were compared in a study at Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and other centers in Taiwan.

  20. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  1. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or scraped, the injury should be washed with soap and water and covered with a sterile bandage. Petrolatum may be applied to open areas to keep the tissue moist and to try to prevent bacterial invasion. Doctors recommend that people do not use ...

  2. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  3. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  4. Modeling intraocular bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astley, Roger A; Coburn, Phillip S; Parkunan, Salai Madhumathi; Callegan, Michelle C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is an infection and inflammation of the posterior segment of the eye which can result in significant loss of visual acuity. Even with prompt antibiotic, anti-inflammatory and surgical intervention, vision and even the eye itself may be lost. For the past century, experimental animal models have been used to examine various aspects of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial endophthalmitis, to further the development of anti-inflammatory treatment strategies, and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and efficacies of antibiotics. Experimental models allow independent control of many parameters of infection and facilitate systematic examination of infection outcomes. While no single animal model perfectly reproduces the human pathology of bacterial endophthalmitis, investigators have successfully used these models to understand the infectious process and the host response, and have provided new information regarding therapeutic options for the treatment of bacterial endophthalmitis. This review highlights experimental animal models of endophthalmitis and correlates this information with the clinical setting. The goal is to identify knowledge gaps that may be addressed in future experimental and clinical studies focused on improvements in the therapeutic preservation of vision during and after this disease. PMID:27154427

  5. High current density GaAs/Si rectifying heterojunction by defect free Epitaxial Lateral overgrowth on Tunnel Oxide from nano-seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Charles; Molière, Timothée; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Alvarez, José; Vincent, Laetitia; Jaffré, Alexandre; Hallais, Géraldine; Connolly, James Patrick; Mencaraglia, Denis; Bouchier, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Interest in the heteroepitaxy of GaAs on Si has never failed in the last years due to the potential for monolithic integration of GaAs-based devices with Si integrated circuits. But in spite of this effort, devices fabricated from them still use homo-epitaxy only. Here we present an epitaxial technique based on the epitaxial lateral overgrowth of micrometer scale GaAs crystals on a thin SiO2 layer from nanoscale Si seeds. This method permits the integration of high quality and defect-free crystalline GaAs on Si substrate and provides active GaAs/Si heterojunctions with efficient carrier transport through the thin SiO2 layer. The nucleation from small width openings avoids the emission of misfit dislocations and the formation of antiphase domains. With this method, we have experimentally demonstrated for the first time a monolithically integrated GaAs/Si diode with high current densities of 10 kA.cm‑2 for a forward bias of 3.7 V. This epitaxial technique paves the way to hybrid III–V/Si devices that are free from lattice-matching restrictions, and where silicon not only behaves as a substrate but also as an active medium.

  6. Elevated expression of the V-ATPase C subunit triggers JNK-dependent cell invasion and overgrowth in a Drosophila epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid G. Petzoldt

    2013-05-01

    The C subunit of the vacuolar H+-ATPase or V-ATPase regulates the activity and assembly of the proton pump at cellular membranes. It has been shown to be strongly upregulated in oral squamous cell carcinoma, a highly metastatic epithelial cancer. In addition, increased V-ATPase activity appears to correlate with invasiveness of cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Using the Drosophila wing imaginal epithelium as an in vivo model system, we demonstrate that overexpression of Vha44, the Drosophila orthologue of the C subunit, causes a tumor-like tissue transformation in cells of the wing epithelium. Overexpressing cells are excluded from the epithelium and acquire invasive properties while displaying high apoptotic rates. Blocking apoptosis in these cells unmasks a strong proliferation stimulus, leading to overgrowth. Furthermore, we show that excess Vha44 greatly increases acidification of endocytic compartments and interferes with endosomal trafficking. As a result, cargoes such as GFP-Lamp1 and Notch accumulate in highly acidified enlarged endolysosomal compartments. Consistent with previous reports on the endocytic activation of Eiger/JNK signaling, we find that V-ATPase stimulation by Vha44 causes JNK signaling activation whereas downmodulation of JNK signaling rescues the invasive phenotypes. In summary, our in vivo-findings demonstrate that increased levels of V-ATPase C subunit induce a Eiger/JNK-dependent cell transformation within an epithelial organ that recapitulates early carcinoma stages.

  7. Spatially resolved and orientation dependent Raman mapping of epitaxial lateral overgrowth nonpolar a-plane GaN on r-plane sapphire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Teng; Xu, Sheng-Rui; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Xie, Yong; Hao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Uncoalesced a-plane GaN epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) structures have been synthesized along two mask stripe orientations on a-plane GaN template by MOCVD. The morphology of two ELO GaN structures is performed by Scanning electronic microscopy. The anisotropy of crystalline quality and stress are investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. According to the Raman mapping spectra, the variations on the intensity, peak shift and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of GaN E2 (high) peak indicate that the crystalline quality improvement occurs in the window region of the GaN stripes along [0001], which is caused by the dislocations bending towards the sidewalls. Conversely, the wing regions have better quality with less stress as the dislocations propagated upwards when the GaN stripes are along []. Spatial cathodoluminescence mapping results further support the explanation for the different dislocation growth mechanisms in the ELO processes with two different mask stripe orientations.

  8. Comparison of 14C and U-Th ages of two Holocene phreatic overgrowths on speleothems from Mallorca (Western Mediterranean: Environmental implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuccimei Paola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation reports on the comparison between ICP-MS U-Th and AMS 14C ages of Phreatic Overgrowths on Speleothems (POS from two different caves on the island of Mallorca (Spain. These speleothem encrustations form at the water table of coastal caves in a low-amplitude tide-controlled microenvironment and are used to reconstruct past sea level changes. The aim of this study is to evaluate if this particular type of speleothem is datable using 14C method and to investigate possible problems connected with the incorporation of dead carbon inherited from the dissolution of 14C-free limestone. The results show that 14C ages are strongly site dependent and appear related to local residence time of water infiltration through the soil and epikarst. When short transit time and limited interaction with soil and bedrock, as in Cova de Cala Varques A, the so-called “reservoir” effect is negligible and 14C and U-Th ages corresponds within the error range. When the residence time is longer, as in Cova des Pas de Vallgornera, 14C ages are steadily 2,300-2,400 years older than the U-Th data, as shown by the mean value (25% of estimated percent dead carbon proportions and by higher and better correlated contents of major and trace elements in the vadose support of this speleothem encrustation. The potential use of this multi-method approach to paleoenvironmental studies is also suggested.

  9. STUDIES ON THE BACTERIOPHAGE OF D'HERELLE : VI. ON THE VIRULENCE OF THE OVERGROWTH IN THE LYSED CULTURES OF BACILLUS PESTIS CAVIAE (M. T. II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J; Muckenfuss, R S; Korb, C

    1926-10-31

    Resistants isolated from the overgrowth of cultures of B. pestis caviae (M. T. II) lysed by various strains of specific bacteriophage proved to be avirulent when administered to mice by feeding, or by intraperitoneal injection. These cultures remained resistant to the action of bacteriophage so long as they were carried on agar. When transferred to broth, however, one group of resistants, namely, those isolated by means of "weak" phages, became susceptible to lysis after five to seven daily passages. The other group of resistants, isolated from the cultures lysed by one of the "strong" phages, failed to become susceptible to lysis even after nearly 200 passages in broth. Simultaneously with the recovery of susceptibility, the cultures of the first group regained a degree of virulence comparable to that of the parent culture of B. pestis caviae. The cultures of the second group of resistants have failed thus far to recover virulence (10 months after isolation). The latter cultures, apart from lack of both virulence and susceptibility to lysis, are identical with the parent culture of B. pestis caviae, as indicated by biochemical and antigenic properties. Our findings offer evidence in favor of the view that resistant strains result from selection among variants already existing in the parent culture and do not arise through the inheritance of specific immunity properties produced by the action of phage.

  10. Skeletal overgrowth syndrome caused by overexpression of C-type natriuretic peptide in a girl with balanced chromosomal translocation, t(1;2)(q41;q37.1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Jin Sun; Miura, Kohji; Lee, Hye Ran; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Kim, Nayoung K D; Oh, Sun Kyung; Ozono, Keiichi; Lee, Choon-Ki; Choi, In Ho; Park, Woong-Yang; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2015-05-01

    Chromosomal translocation of 2q37.1 just distal to the NPPC gene coding for C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and subsequent overproduction of CNP have been reported to cause a skeletal overgrowth syndrome. Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is one of marfanoid overgrowth syndromes, of which subtype IV is caused by haploinsufficiency of transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFB2). We report on a girl with clinical phenotypes of overgrowth syndrome, including long and slim body habitus, macrodactyly of the big toe, scoliosis, ankle valgus deformity, coxa valga, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and aortic root dilatation. Karyotyping revealed a balanced chromosomal translocation between 1q41 and 2q37.1, and the breakpoints could be mapped by targeted resequencing analysis. On chromosome 2q37.1, the translocation took place 200,365 bp downstream of NPPC, and serum level of the amino terminal of CNP was elevated. The contralateral site of translocation on chromosome 1q41 disrupted TGFB2 gene, presumed to cause its haploinsufficiency. This case supports the concept that NPPC is overexpressed because of the loss of a specific negative regulatory control in the normal chromosomal location, and demonstrates the effectiveness of targeted resequencing in the mapping of breakpoints. PMID:25728306

  11. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  12. Magnesium aminoclay enhances lipid production of mixotrophic Chlorella sp. KR-1 while reducing bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bohwa; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Lee, Jiye; Nam, Bora; Kim, Dong-Myung; Lee, Kyubock; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Improving lipid productivity and preventing overgrowth of contaminating bacteria are critical issues relevant to the commercialization of the mixotrophic microalgae cultivation process. In this paper, we report the use of magnesium aminoclay (MgAC) nanoparticles for enhanced lipid production from oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 with simultaneous control of KR-1-associated bacterial growth in mixotrophic cultures with glucose as the model substrate. Addition of 0.01-0.1g/L MgAC promoted microalgal biomass production better than the MgAC-less control, via differential biocidal effects on microalgal and bacterial cells (the latter being more sensitive to MgAC's bio-toxicity than the former). The inhibition effect of MgAC on co-existing bacteria was, as based on density-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, largely dosage-dependent and species-specific. MgAC also, by inducing an oxidative stress environment, increased both the cell size and lipid content of KR-1, resulting in a considerable, ∼25% improvement of mixotrophic algal lipid productivity (to ∼410mgFAME/L/d) compared with the untreated control. PMID:27543952

  13. Magnesium aminoclay enhances lipid production of mixotrophic Chlorella sp. KR-1 while reducing bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bohwa; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Lee, Jiye; Nam, Bora; Kim, Dong-Myung; Lee, Kyubock; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Improving lipid productivity and preventing overgrowth of contaminating bacteria are critical issues relevant to the commercialization of the mixotrophic microalgae cultivation process. In this paper, we report the use of magnesium aminoclay (MgAC) nanoparticles for enhanced lipid production from oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 with simultaneous control of KR-1-associated bacterial growth in mixotrophic cultures with glucose as the model substrate. Addition of 0.01-0.1g/L MgAC promoted microalgal biomass production better than the MgAC-less control, via differential biocidal effects on microalgal and bacterial cells (the latter being more sensitive to MgAC's bio-toxicity than the former). The inhibition effect of MgAC on co-existing bacteria was, as based on density-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, largely dosage-dependent and species-specific. MgAC also, by inducing an oxidative stress environment, increased both the cell size and lipid content of KR-1, resulting in a considerable, ∼25% improvement of mixotrophic algal lipid productivity (to ∼410mgFAME/L/d) compared with the untreated control.

  14. Bacterial chemoreceptors and chemoeffectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shuangyu; Lai, Luhua

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria use chemotaxis signaling pathways to sense environmental changes. Escherichia coli chemotaxis system represents an ideal model that illustrates fundamental principles of biological signaling processes. Chemoreceptors are crucial signaling proteins that mediate taxis toward a wide range of chemoeffectors. Recently, in deep study of the biochemical and structural features of chemoreceptors, the organization of higher-order clusters in native cells, and the signal transduction mechanisms related to the on-off signal output provides us with general insights to understand how chemotaxis performs high sensitivity, precise adaptation, signal amplification, and wide dynamic range. Along with the increasing knowledge, bacterial chemoreceptors can be engineered to sense novel chemoeffectors, which has extensive applications in therapeutics and industry. Here we mainly review recent advances in the E. coli chemotaxis system involving structure and organization of chemoreceptors, discovery, design, and characterization of chemoeffectors, and signal recognition and transduction mechanisms. Possible strategies for changing the specificity of bacterial chemoreceptors to sense novel chemoeffectors are also discussed.

  15. Bacterial Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Niu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the behaviors at different developmental stages in Escherichia coli (E. coli lifecycle and developing a new biologically inspired optimization algorithm named bacterial colony optimization (BCO. BCO is based on a lifecycle model that simulates some typical behaviors of E. coli bacteria during their whole lifecycle, including chemotaxis, communication, elimination, reproduction, and migration. A newly created chemotaxis strategy combined with communication mechanism is developed to simplify the bacterial optimization, which is spread over the whole optimization process. However, the other behaviors such as elimination, reproduction, and migration are implemented only when the given conditions are satisfied. Two types of interactive communication schemas: individuals exchange schema and group exchange schema are designed to improve the optimization efficiency. In the simulation studies, a set of 12 benchmark functions belonging to three classes (unimodal, multimodal, and rotated problems are performed, and the performances of the proposed algorithms are compared with five recent evolutionary algorithms to demonstrate the superiority of BCO.

  16. [Bacterial diseases of rape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, O M; Mel'nychuk, M D; Dankevych, L A; Patyka, V P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial destruction of the culture was described and its agents identified in the spring and winter rape crops. Typical symptoms are the following: browning of stem tissue and its mucilagization, chlorosis of leaves, yellowing and beginning of soft rot in the place of leaf stalks affixion to stems, loss of pigmentation (violet). Pathogenic properties of the collection strains and morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties of the agents of rape's bacterial diseases isolated by the authors have been investigated. It was found that all the isolates selected by the authors are highly or moderately aggressive towards different varieties of rape. According to the complex of phenotypic properties 44% of the total number of isolates selected by the authors are related to representatives of the genus Pseudomonas, 37% - to Xanthomonas and 19% - to Pectobacterium. PMID:23293826

  17. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references

  18. Supramolecular bacterial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    For nearly over a decade, a wide variety of dynamic and responsive supramolecular architectures have been investigated and developed to address biological systems. Since the non-covalent interactions between individual molecular components in such architectures are similar to the interactions found in living systems, it was possible to integrate chemically-synthesized and naturally-occurring components to create platforms with interesting bioactive properties. Bacterial cells and recombinant ...

  19. Bacterial Colony Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Niu; Hong Wang

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the behaviors at different developmental stages in Escherichia coli (E. coli) lifecycle and developing a new biologically inspired optimization algorithm named bacterial colony optimization (BCO). BCO is based on a lifecycle model that simulates some typical behaviors of E. coli bacteria during their whole lifecycle, including chemotaxis, communication, elimination, reproduction, and migration. A newly created chemotaxis strategy combined with communication mechanism i...

  20. Hipercrescimento femoral no tratamento cirúrgico do quadril displásico inveterado Femoral overgrowth following surgical treatment of long-established dysplasia of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Freire Martins de Moura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Medir radiograficamente através de escanometria o hipercrescimento femoral em pacientes portadores de Displasia do Desenvolvimento do Quadril inveterada tratados cirurgicamente com encurtamento femoral, redução cruenta e acetabuloplastia. MÉTODOS: Avaliamos 30 crianças (33 quadris submetidas à redução cruenta pela técnica de Scaglietti e Calandriello, ostectomia para encurtamento femoral e acetabuloplastia de Salter. Haviam 29 do sexo feminino e 1 do sexo masculino, com idade média de 4 anos e 5 meses na ocasião da cirurgia. De acordo com a classificação de Zionts e MacEwen, 23 (69,6% quadris foram classificados como tipo III, 5 (15,2% como tipo I e 5 (15,2% como tipo II. O encurtamento femoral médio foi 45,12mm (variando de 30,00mm a 80,00mm. O tempo de seguimento médio foi de 10 anos e 2 meses. A discrepância femoral média mensurada nos escanogramas foi 13,48mm (variando de 0,00mm a 60,00mm após acompanhamento mínimo de 2 anos e 3 meses. RESULTADOS: Todos os pacientes evoluíram com hipercrescimento sendo que em 18 (54,6% casos a anisomelia observada foi 30mm. CONCLUSÃO: Observamos diminuição significante na diferença entre os comprimentos femorais após tratamento cirúrgico comparando com as medidas obtidas durante o seguimento ambulatorial.OBJECTIVE: To measure femoral overgrowth using radiographic scanning in patients with long-established Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip treated with femoral shaft shortening, open reduction and acetabuloplasty. METHODS: We studied 30 children (33 hips submitted to surgical treatment including femoral shaft shortening, open reduction according to Scaglietti & Calandriello's procedure and Salter acetabuloplasty without preliminary traction. There were 29 females and 1 male, with mean age = 4 years and 5 months at the time of operation. According to Zionts & MacEwen's classification, 23 hips were classified as type III (69.6%, 5 (15.2% as type I and 5 (15.2% as type II. The

  1. Characteristics of the epitaxy of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes grown by nanoscale epitaxial lateral overgrowth using a nitrided titanium buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a buffer layer of nitrided titanium (Ti) achieved through the nitridation of a Ti metal layer on a sapphire substrate was used for the epitaxial growth of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) achieved by low pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The effect of in-situ Ti metal nitridation on the performance of these InGaN-based LEDs was then investigated. It was very clear that the use of the nitrided Ti buffer layer (NTBL) induced the formation of a nanoscale epitaxial lateral overgrowth layer during the epitaxial growth. When evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, this epi-layer exhibited large in-plane compressive stress releasing with a Raman shift value of 567.9 cm-1. Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy results indicated that the InGaN-based LEDs with an NTBL have improved crystal quality, with a low threading dislocations density being yielded via the strain relaxation in the InGaN-based LEDs. Based on the results mentioned above, the electroluminescence results indicate that the light performance of InGaN-based LEDs with an NTBL can be enhanced by 45% and 42% at 20 mA and 100 mA, respectively. These results suggest that the strain relaxation and quality improvement in the GaN epilayer could be responsible for the enhancement of emission power. - Highlights: • The crystal-quality of InGaN-based LEDs with NTBL by NELOG was improved. • The InGaN-based LEDs with NTBL have strain releases by NELOG. • The optical properties of InGaN-based LEDs were shown by CL and EL measurements

  2. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anastasios Koulaouzidis; Shivaram Bhat; Athar A Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Since its initial description in 1964, research has transformed spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) from a feared disease (with reported mortality of 90%) to a treatable complication of decompensated cirrhosis,albeit with steady prevalence and a high recurrence rate. Bacterial translocation, the key mechanism in the pathogenesis of SBP, is only possible because of the concurrent failure of defensive mechanisms in cirrhosis.Variants of SBP should be treated. Leucocyte esterase reagent strips have managed to shorten the 'tap-toshot' time, while future studies should look into their combined use with ascitic fluid pH. Third generation cephalosporins are the antibiotic of choice because they have a number of advantages. Renal dysfunction has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with SBP. Albumin is felt to reduce the risk of renal impairment by improving effective intravascular volume, and by helping to bind proinflammatory molecules. Following a single episode of SBP, patients should have long-term antibiotic prophylaxis and be considered for liver transplantation.

  3. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of Pt-Pd nanoparticles with core-shell morphology: Nucleation and overgrowth of the Pd shells on the as-prepared and defined Pt seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Nguyen Viet, E-mail: nguyenvietlong@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Scienceand Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Posts and Telecommunications Institute of Technology, km 10 Nguyen Trai, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Vietnam National University at Ho Chi Minh, Linh Trung, Thu Duc, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Department of Molecular and Material Sciences, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, 6-1 Kasugakouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 861-8580 (Japan); Hien, Tong Duy [Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Vietnam National University at Ho Chi Minh, Linh Trung, Thu Duc, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Asaka, Toru [Department of Materials Scienceand Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ohtaki, Michitaka [Department of Molecular and Material Sciences, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, 6-1 Kasugakouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 861-8580 (Japan); Nogami, Masayuki, E-mail: nogami@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Materials Scienceand Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2011-07-21

    Highlights: > The Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles based on the as-prepared Pt cores are synthesized. > Not only the Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles are formed, but also the separate formation of Pd nanoparticles as well. > The Pt cores without the morphological changes are protected by the Pd-shell overgrowths. > There are the co-existence of the layer-by-layer and island-on-wetting-layer growth modes of the Pd shells and the latter becomes the favorable overgrowth in the formation of core-shell structures. - Abstract: In the present research, Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles based on the as-prepared and defined Pt-seed cores with well-controlled size and morphology were synthesized. Their characterizations were investigated by using UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high resolution (HR)TEM measurements. The high resolution elemental mappings were performed in the operation of high angle annular dark field (HAADF) in conjunction with scanning (S)TEM mode and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS). It is found that not only the Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles were formed, but also the nucleation, growth, and the separate formation of single Pd nanoparticles as well. Interestingly, the as-prepared Pt cores without the morphological changes were protected by the overgrowths of the Pd shells during the successive reduction of sodium tetrachloropalladate (II) hydrate. There were the co-existence of the Frank-van der Merwe (FM) layer-by-layer and Stranski-Krastanov (SK) island-on-wetting-layer growth modes of the Pd shells on the as-prepared Pt cores. It is predicted that the SK growth became the favorable growth mode in the formation of the Pd shells in the formation Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles.

  5. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...... the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the benefits...... and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial communities...

  6. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell...... signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated...

  7. Prostatic Inflammation is Determinant for Prostate Overgrowth and Luts Severity in Men with Metabolic Syndrome: Highlights from Two Recently Published Multicentre Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Gacci

    2013-12-01

    BPH oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL showed the highest secretion of IL-8 (>10-folds-a surrogate marker of prostate inflammation-as well as IL-6, and bFGF. Conclusions: MetS and dyslipidaemia are associated with prostate overgrowth and inflammation. In particular, with a selective increase of prostatic AP diameter, leading to a modification of prostatic shape. Hence, MetS can be regarded as a new determinant of prostate inflammation and BPH progression in men with severe LUTS.

  8. Síndrome de intestino corto: definición, causas, adaptación intestinal y sobrecrecimiento bacteriano Short bowel syndrome: definition, causes, intestinal adaptation and bacterial overgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    M. D. Ballesteros Pomar; A. Vidal Casariego

    2007-01-01

    El síndrome de intestino corto (SIC) es una entidad compleja debida a una pérdida anatómica o funcional de una parte del intestino delgado que ocasiona un cuadro clínico de graves alteraciones metabólicas y nutricionales debidas a la reducción de la superficie absortiva intestinal efectiva. El SIC es una causa de la condición más amplia de "fallo intestinal". Actualmente, los accidentes vasculares mesentéricos son la causa principal en adultos, seguidos de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestina...

  9. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten;

    2010-01-01

    in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... and highlighted their importance in bacterial physiology. Having no orthologues in Eukarya, BY-kinases are receiving a growing attention from the biomedical field, since they represent a particularly promising target for anti-bacterial drug design....

  10. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  11. Positioning of bacterial chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Armitage, Judith P

    2015-05-01

    For optimum growth, bacteria must adapt to their environment, and one way that many species do this is by moving towards favourable conditions. To do so requires mechanisms to both physically drive movement and provide directionality to this movement. The pathways that control this directionality comprise chemoreceptors, which, along with an adaptor protein (CheW) and kinase (CheA), form large hexagonal arrays. These arrays can be formed around transmembrane receptors, resulting in arrays embedded in the inner membrane, or they can comprise soluble receptors, forming arrays in the cytoplasm. Across bacterial species, chemoreceptor arrays (both transmembrane and soluble) are localised to a variety of positions within the cell; some species with multiple arrays demonstrate this variety within individual cells. In many cases, the positioning pattern of the arrays is linked to the need for segregation of arrays between daughter cells on division, ensuring the production of chemotactically competent progeny. Multiple mechanisms have evolved to drive this segregation, including stochastic self-assembly, cellular landmarks, and the utilisation of ParA homologues. The variety of mechanisms highlights the importance of chemotaxis to motile species.

  12. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  13. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  14. First genomic insights into members of a candidate bacterial phylum responsible for wastewater bulking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Sekiguchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous cells belonging to the candidate bacterial phylum KSB3 were previously identified as the causative agent of fatal filament overgrowth (bulking in a high-rate industrial anaerobic wastewater treatment bioreactor. Here, we obtained near complete genomes from two KSB3 populations in the bioreactor, including the dominant bulking filament, using differential coverage binning of metagenomic data. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with 16S rRNA-targeted probes specific for the two populations confirmed that both are filamentous organisms. Genome-based metabolic reconstruction and microscopic observation of the KSB3 filaments in the presence of sugar gradients indicate that both filament types are Gram-negative, strictly anaerobic fermenters capable of non-flagellar based gliding motility, and have a strikingly large number of sensory and response regulator genes. We propose that the KSB3 filaments are highly sensitive to their surroundings and that cellular processes, including those causing bulking, are controlled by external stimuli. The obtained genomes lay the foundation for a more detailed understanding of environmental cues used by KSB3 filaments, which may lead to more robust treatment options to prevent bulking.

  15. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  16. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed M. Stubbendieck

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities.

  17. Meningitis bacteriana Bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa Alvarado Guevara

    2006-03-01

    causales son virales lo cual conlleva a las diferentes sub-clasificaciones. También en ciertos casos puede ser ocasionada por hongos, bacterias atípicas, micobacterias y parásitos.In Costa Rica the bacterial meningitis had turn into a high-priority subject in which to monitoring epidemiologist. It had been talked about in the last months, to dice an increase in the attention is published of this subject, due to this phenomenon it becomes necessary to make a revision of topic. Meningitis is an inflammation of leptomeninges and colonization of the subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (LCR due to different agents, which produces meningeal symptoms (ex. migraine, neck rigidity, and photophobia and pleocytosis in LCR. De pending on the variables to take into account is possible to group it in different classifications, taking into account the time of evolution are possible to be divided in acute or chronic, to first with few hours or days of beginning of the symptoms, whereas the chronicle also presents a silence course but of the disease of approximately 4 weeks of instauration. There is a difference according to its etiologic agent; they can be infectious and non-infectious. Examples of common non-infectious causes include medications (ex, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and antibiotics and carcinomatosis. A classification exists as well according to the causal agent. The acute bacterial meningitis remarks a bacterial origin of the syndrome, which characterizes by the by an acute onset of meningeal symptoms and neutrophilic pleocytosis. Each one of the bacteriological agents, parasitic or fungus finishes by characterizing the different presentations of the clinical features (ex, meningocóccica meningitis, Cryptococcus meningitis. Finally, there is also the aseptic meningitis, denominated in this form because it’s nonpyogenic cellular response caused by many types of agents. The patients show an acute beginning of symptoms, fever and lymphocytic pleocytosis. After

  18. Bacterial Culture of Neonatal Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    AH Movahedian; R Moniri; Z Mosayebi

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal bacterial sepsis is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. This retrospective study was performed to determine the incidence of bacterial sepsis with focus on Gram negative organisms in neonates admitted at Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, during a 3-yr period, from September 2002 to September 2005. Blood culture was performed on all neonates with risk factors or signs of suggestive sepsis. Blood samples were cultured using brain heart infusion (BHI) broth accordi...

  19. Mast cells in bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Rönnberg, Elin

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are implicated in immunity towards bacterial infection, but the molecular mechanisms by which mast cells contribute to the host response are only partially understood. Previous studies have examined how mast cells react to purified bacterial cell wall components, such as peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide. To investigate how mast cells react to live bacteria we co-cultured mast cells and the gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus equi (S. equi) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)...

  20. Bacterial Alkaloids Prevent Amoebal Predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapper, Martin; Götze, Sebastian; Barnett, Robert; Willing, Karsten; Stallforth, Pierre

    2016-07-25

    Bacterial defense mechanisms have evolved to protect bacteria against predation by nematodes, predatory bacteria, or amoebae. We identified novel bacterial alkaloids (pyreudiones A-D) that protect the producer, Pseudomonas fluorescens HKI0770, against amoebal predation. Isolation, structure elucidation, total synthesis, and a proposed biosynthetic pathway for these structures are presented. The generation of P. fluorescens gene-deletion mutants unable to produce pyreudiones rendered the bacterium edible to a variety of soil-dwelling amoebae. PMID:27294402

  1. Bacterial cellulose/boehmite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composites based on bacterial cellulose membranes and boehmite were obtained. SEM results indicate that the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes are totally covered by boehmite and obtained XRD patterns suggest structural changes due to this boehmite addition. Thermal stability is accessed through TG curves and is dependent on boehmite content. Transparency is high comparing to pure BC as can be seen through UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  2. The Human Vaginal Bacterial Biota and Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Srinivasan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial biota of the human vagina can have a profound impact on the health of women and their neonates. Changes in the vaginal microbiota have been associated with several adverse health outcomes including premature birth, pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of HIV infection. Cultivation-independent molecular methods have provided new insights regarding bacterial diversity in this important niche, particularly in women with the common condition bacterial vaginosis (BV. PCR methods have shown that women with BV have complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include many fastidious species, particularly from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Healthy women are mostly colonized with lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus iners, though a variety of other bacteria may be present. The microbiology of BV is heterogeneous. The presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae coating the vaginal epithelium in some subjects with BV suggests that biofilms may contribute to this condition.

  3. Bacterial tactic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, J P

    1999-01-01

    Many, if not most, bacterial species swim. The synthesis and operation of the flagellum, the most complex organelle of a bacterium, takes a significant percentage of cellular energy, particularly in the nutrient limited environments in which many motile species are found. It is obvious that motility accords cells a survival advantage over non-motile mutants under normal, poorly mixed conditions and is an important determinant in the development of many associations between bacteria and other organisms, whether as pathogens or symbionts and in colonization of niches and the development of biofilms. This survival advantage is the result of sensory control of swimming behaviour. Although too small to sense a gradient along the length of the cell, and unable to swim great distances because of buffetting by Brownian motion and the curvature resulting from a rotating flagellum, bacteria can bias their random swimming direction towards a more favourable environment. The favourable environment will vary from species to species and there is now evidence that in many species this can change depending on the current physiological growth state of the cell. In general, bacteria sense changes in a range of nutrients and toxins, compounds altering electron transport, acceptors or donors into the electron transport chain, pH, temperature and even the magnetic field of the Earth. The sensory signals are balanced, and may be balanced with other sensory pathways such as quorum sensing, to identify the optimum current environment. The central sensory pathway in this process is common to most bacteria and most effectors. The environmental change is sensed by a sensory protein. In most species examined this is a transmembrane protein, sensing the external environment, but there is increasing evidence for additional cytoplasmic receptors in many species. All receptors, whether sensing sugars, amino acids or oxygen, share a cytoplasmic signalling domain that controls the activity of a

  4. New Treatments for Bacterial Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L. M. Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review the newer treatments for bacterial keratitis. Data Sources. PubMed literature search up to April 2012. Study Selection. Key words used for literature search: “infectious keratitis”, “microbial keratitis”, “infective keratitis”, “new treatments for infectious keratitis”, “fourth generation fluoroquinolones”, “moxifloxacin”, “gatifloxacin”, “collagen cross-linking”, and “photodynamic therapy”. Data Extraction. Over 2400 articles were retrieved. Large scale studies or publications at more recent dates were selected. Data Synthesis. Broad spectrum antibiotics have been the main stay of treatment for bacterial keratitis but with the emergence of bacterial resistance; there is a need for newer antimicrobial agents and treatment methods. Fourth-generation fluoroquinolones and corneal collagen cross-linking are amongst the new treatments. In vitro studies and prospective clinical trials have shown that fourth-generation fluoroquinolones are better than the older generation fluoroquinolones and are as potent as combined fortified antibiotics against common pathogens that cause bacterial keratitis. Collagen cross-linking was shown to improve healing of infectious corneal ulcer in treatment-resistant cases or as an adjunct to antibiotics treatment. Conclusion. Fourth-generation fluoroquinolones are good alternatives to standard treatment of bacterial keratitis using combined fortified topical antibiotics. Collagen cross-linking may be considered in treatment-resistant infectious keratitis or as an adjunct to antibiotics therapy.

  5. A combined study of SHRIMP U-Pb dating, trace element and mineral inclusions on high-pressure metamorphic overgrowth zircon in eclogite from Qinglongshan in the Sulu terrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiuli; LI Shuguang; HOU Zhenhui1; HONG Jian; YANG Wei1

    2005-01-01

    Methods recently advanced for discrimination on the genesis of metamorphic zircon, such as analysis of mineral inclusions and trace elements, provide us powerful means to distinguish zircon overgrowth during high-pressure metamorphism. Zircons in ultrahigh-pressure eclogite from Qinglongshan in the Sulu terrane were studied by the SHRIMP U-Pb method in combining with trace element and mineral inclusion analyses. No inherited core was identified in the analyzed zircons by means of cathodoluminescence images. The occurrence of high-pressure metamorphic mineral inclusions in zircon, such as garnet, omphacite, rutile, and the flat HREE pattern in zircon indicate that the zircon formed at high-pressure metamorphic conditions. Therefore, a weighted average U-Pb age of 227.4 ± 3.5 Ma obtained from such a kind of zircon is interpreted to represent the timing of peak metamorphism for the Qinglongshan eclogite.

  6. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.;

    2010-01-01

    A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and DNA. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and disinfectant chemicals as well as resisting phagocytosis...... and other components of the body's defence system. The persistence of, for example, staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation. Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains....... Characteristically, gradients of nutrients and oxygen exist from the top to the bottom of biofilms and these gradients are associated with decreased bacterial metabolic activity and increased doubling times of the bacterial cells; it is these more or less dormant cells that are responsible for some of the tolerance...

  7. Phylogenetic organization of bacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Ember M; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; Hayer, Michaela; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-09-01

    Phylogeny is an ecologically meaningful way to classify plants and animals, as closely related taxa frequently have similar ecological characteristics, functional traits and effects on ecosystem processes. For bacteria, however, phylogeny has been argued to be an unreliable indicator of an organism's ecology owing to evolutionary processes more common to microbes such as gene loss and lateral gene transfer, as well as convergent evolution. Here we use advanced stable isotope probing with (13)C and (18)O to show that evolutionary history has ecological significance for in situ bacterial activity. Phylogenetic organization in the activity of bacteria sets the stage for characterizing the functional attributes of bacterial taxonomic groups. Connecting identity with function in this way will allow scientists to begin building a mechanistic understanding of how bacterial community composition regulates critical ecosystem functions. PMID:26943624

  8. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  9. Clinical applications of bacterial glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Kelly M; Smith, Jeffrey C; Twine, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    There is an ongoing race between bacterial evolution and medical advances. Pathogens have the advantages of short generation times and horizontal gene transfer that enable rapid adaptation to new host environments and therapeutics that currently outpaces clinical research. Antibiotic resistance, the growing impact of nosocomial infections, cancer-causing bacteria, the risk of zoonosis, and the possibility of biowarfare all emphasize the increasingly urgent need for medical research focussed on bacterial pathogens. Bacterial glycoproteins are promising targets for alternative therapeutic intervention since they are often surface exposed, involved in host-pathogen interactions, required for virulence, and contain distinctive glycan structures. The potential exists to exploit these unique structures to improve clinical prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies. Translation of the potential in this field to actual clinical impact is an exciting prospect for fighting infectious diseases. PMID:26971465

  10. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  11. Biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Menendez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cellulases have numerous applications in several industries, including biofuel production, food and feed industry, brewing, pulp and paper, textile, laundry, and agriculture.Cellulose-degrading bacteria are widely spread in nature, being isolated from quite different environments. Cellulose degradation is the result of a synergic process between an endoglucanase, an exoglucanase and a,β-glucosidase. Bacterial endoglucanases degrade ß-1,4-glucan linkages of cellulose amorphous zones, meanwhile exoglucanases cleave the remaining oligosaccharide chains, originating cellobiose, which is hydrolyzed by ß-glucanases. Bacterial cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4 are comprised in fourteen Glycosil Hydrolase families. Several advantages, such as higher growth rates and genetic versatility, emphasize the suitability and advantages of bacterial cellulases over other sources for this group of enzymes. This review summarizes the main known cellulolytic bacteria and the best strategies to optimize their cellulase production, focusing on endoglucanases, as well as it reviews the main biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases in several industries, medicine and agriculture.

  12. A Program Against Bacterial Bioterrorism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Michael; Dargis, Rimtas; Andresen, Keld;

    2012-01-01

    In 2002 it was decided to establish laboratory facilities in Denmark for diagnosing agents associated with bioterrorism in order to make an immediate appropriate response to the release of such agents possible. Molecular assays for detection of specific agents and molecular and proteomic techniques...... for bacterial infections not associated with bioterrorism that are difficult to culture or identify....

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Bacterial Persisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Gerdes, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    technological advances in microfluidics and reporter genes have improved this scenario. Here, we summarize recent progress in the field, revealing the ubiquitous bacterial stress alarmone ppGpp as an emerging central regulator of multidrug tolerance and persistence, both in stochastically and environmentally...

  14. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, M.; Beek, D. van de; Weisfelt, M.; Gans, J. de; Schmand, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy c

  15. Conjuntivite bacteriana secundária à doença dentária em chinchilas (Chinchilla lanigera Bacterial conjunctivitis secondary to dental disease in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Barbosa Lucena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available São relatados três casos de conjuntivite bacteriana associada à doença dentária grave em chinchilas. Todas as chinchilas afetadas tinham histórico de emagrecimento, hipersalivação e epífora, que progrediu para exsudação ocular purulenta. Durante a necropsia, foi constatado marcado alongamento da coroa clínica dos incisivos e molares, e crescimento do ápice dentário, causando deformação óssea e compressão do canal lacrimal. Histologicamente, observou-se infiltrado de neutrófilos na conjuntiva e pálpebras. Cultivo microbiológico do exsudato ocular revelou crescimento de Staphylococcus coagulase-positiva . Uma compressão do canal lacrimal pelo crescimento dentário excessivo impediu a drenagem das lágrimas, resultando em epífora. Esse é um importante fator predisponente para infecção bacteriana ocular em chinchilas.Three cases of bacterial conjunctivitis associated with severe dental disease in chinchillas are described. All affected chinchillas had a history of weight loss, ptyalism, and epiphora which progressed to suppurative ocular exsudation. At necropsy incisor and molar teeth revealed marked elongation of the clinical crown and overgrowth of the dental apexes resulting in deformation of the tear ducts. Histologically, there was neutrophilic infiltrate in the conjunctiva and eyelid skin. Microbiological culture carried out in samples from the ocular exsudate yielded Staphylococcus coagulase-positive. Compression of the lacrimal duct by dental overgrowth compromised tear draining and resulting in epiphora. This is a major predisposing factor inducing bacterial ocular infection in chinchillas.

  16. Filtration properties of bacterial cellulose membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtonen, Janika

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose has the same molecular formula as cellulose from plant origin, but it is characterized by several unique properties including high purity, crystallinity and mechanical strength. These properties are dependent on parameters such as the bacterial strain used, the cultivation conditions and post-growth processing. The possibility to achieve bacterial cellulose membranes with different properties by varying these parameters could make bacterial cellulose an interesting materi...

  17. Distribution of Triplet Separators in Bacterial Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Rui; ZHENG Wei-Mou

    2001-01-01

    Distributions of triplet separator lengths for two bacterial complete genomes are analyzed. The theoretical distributions for the independent random sequence and the first-order Markov chain are derived and compared with the distributions of the bacterial genomes. A prominent double band structure, which does not exist in the theoretical distributions, is observed in the bacterial distributions for most triplets.``

  18. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  19. Bacterial streamers in curved microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Biofilms, generally identified as microbial communities embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, are involved in a wide variety of health-related problems ranging from implant-associated infections to disease transmissions and dental plaque. The usual picture of these bacterial films is that they grow and develop on surfaces. However, suspended biofilm structures, or streamers, have been found in natural environments (e.g., rivers, acid mines, hydrothermal hot springs) and are always suggested to stem from a turbulent flow. We report the formation of bacterial streamers in curved microfluidic channels. By using confocal laser microscopy we are able to directly image and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of these filamentous structures. Such streamers, which always connect the inner corners of opposite sides of the channel, are always located in the middle plane. Numerical simulations of the flow provide evidences for an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism behind the formation of the streamers.

  20. Bacterial survival in Martian conditions

    CERN Document Server

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppe Galletta; Giulio Bertoloni; Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    We shortly discuss the observable consequences of the two hypotheses about the origin of life on Earth and Mars: the Lithopanspermia (Mars to Earth or viceversa) and the origin from a unique progenitor, that for Earth is called LUCA (the LUCA hypothesis). To test the possibility that some lifeforms similar to the terrestrial ones may survive on Mars, we designed and built two simulators of Martian environments where to perform experiments with different bacterial strains: LISA and mini-LISA. Our LISA environmental chambers can reproduce the conditions of many Martian locations near the surface trough changes of temperature, pressure, UV fluence and atmospheric composition. Both simulators are open to collaboration with other laboratories interested in performing experiments on many kind of samples (biological, minerals, electronic) in situations similar to that of the red planet. Inside LISA we have studied the survival of several bacterial strains and endospores. We verified that the UV light is the major re...

  1. Collective Functionality through Bacterial Individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Martin

    According to the conventional view, the properties of an organism are a product of nature and nurture - of its genes and the environment it lives in. Recent experiments with unicellular organisms have challenged this view: several molecular mechanisms generate phenotypic variation independently of environmental signals, leading to variation in clonal groups. My presentation will focus on the causes and consequences of this microbial individuality. Using examples from bacterial genetic model systems, I will first discuss different molecular and cellular mechanisms that give rise to bacterial individuality. Then, I will discuss the consequences of individuality, and focus on how phenotypic variation in clonal populations of bacteria can promote interactions between individuals, lead to the division of labor, and allow clonal groups of bacteria to cope with environmental uncertainty. Variation between individuals thus provides clonal groups with collective functionality.

  2. Bacterial communication and group behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, E. Peter

    2003-01-01

    The existence of species-specific and interspecies bacterial cell-cell communication and group organization was only recently accepted. Researchers are now realizing that the ability of these microbial teams to communicate and form structures, known as biofilms, at key times during the establishment of infection significantly increases their ability to evade both host defenses and antibiotics. This Perspective series discusses the known signaling mechanisms, the roles they play in both chroni...

  3. The problem of bacterial diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, J T

    1976-01-01

    The reported incidence of "pathogenic" bacteria, as judged by serotype, in the stools of children with acute diarrhoea has varied from 4 to 33% over the last twenty years. Techniques such as tissue culture provide a means for detecting enterotoxin-producing strains of bacteria, strains which often do not possess "pathogenic" serotypes. "Pathogenicity" requires redefinition, and the aetiological importance of bacteria in diarrhoea is probably considerably greater than previous reports have indicated. Colonization of the bowel by a pathogen will result in structural and/or mucosal abnormalities, and will depend on a series of complex interactions between the external environment, the pathogen, and the host and its resident bacterial flora. Enteropathogenic bacteria may be broadly classified as (i) invasive (e.g. Shigella, Salmonella and some Escherichia coli) which predominantly affect the distal bowel, or (ii) non-invasive (e.g. Vibrio cholerae and E. coli) which affect the proximal bowel. V. cholerae and E. coli elaborate heat-labile enterotoxins which activate adenylate cyclase and induce small intestinal secretion; the secretory effects of heat-stable E. coli and heat-labile Shigella dysenteriae enterotoxins are not accompanied by cyclase activation. The two major complications of acute diarrhoea are (i) hypernatraemic dehydration with its attendant neurological, renal and vascular lesions, and (ii) protracted diarrhoea which may lead to severe malnutrition. Deconjugation of bile salts and colonization of the small bowel with toxigenic strains of E. coli may be important in the pathophysiology of the protracted diarrhoea syndrome. The control of bacterial diarrhoea requires a corrdinated political, educational, social, public health and scientific attack. Bacterial diarrhoea is a major health problem throughout the world, and carries an appreciable morbidity and mortality. This is particularly the case during infancy, and in those developing parts of the world

  4. Bacterial survival in Martian conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Galletta, Giuseppe; Bertoloni, Giulio; D'Alessandro, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    We shortly discuss the observable consequences of the two hypotheses about the origin of life on Earth and Mars: the Lithopanspermia (Mars to Earth or viceversa) and the origin from a unique progenitor, that for Earth is called LUCA (the LUCA hypothesis). To test the possibility that some lifeforms similar to the terrestrial ones may survive on Mars, we designed and built two simulators of Martian environments where to perform experiments with different bacterial strains: LISA and mini-LISA. ...

  5. Population dynamics of bacterial persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Patra, Pintu

    2014-01-01

    The life of microorganisms is characterized by two main tasks, rapid growth under conditions permitting growth and survival under stressful conditions. The environments, in which microorganisms dwell, vary in space and time. The microorganisms innovate diverse strategies to readily adapt to the regularly fluctuating environments. Phenotypic heterogeneity is one such strategy, where an isogenic population splits into subpopulations that respond differently under identical environments. Bacteri...

  6. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; DeRousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R.; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P. Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-01-01

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried “nanomicroparticle” vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the form...

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    N L Prokopjeva; N N Vesikova; I M Marusenko; V A Ryabkov

    2008-01-01

    To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl) detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to ass...

  8. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    OpenAIRE

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-01-01

    Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N-) in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study...

  9. Bacterial meningitis by streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Villarreal-Velásquez Tatiana Paola; Cortés-Daza César Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: bacterial meningitis is an infectious disease considered a medicalemergency. The timely management has an important impact on the evolution of thedisease. Streptococcus agalactiae, a major causative agent of severe infections innewborns can colonize different tissues, including the central nervous system.Case report: Male patient 47 years old from rural areas, with work activity as amilker of cattle, referred to tertiary care, with disorientation, neck stiffness, and grandmal se...

  10. Superinfecting microorganisms in patients under treatment with cyclosporin-A and its correlation to gingival overgrowth Microrganismos superinfectantes em pacientes submetidos a terapia com ciclosporina-A e sua correlação com crescimento gengival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Alexandre Romito

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the presence of superinfecting microorganisms (Gram-negative enteric rods and Candida sp. in heart transplant patients and correlate this with gingival overgrowth. Thirty patients (10 females, 20 males - mean age 45 years were examined. All were under cyclosporin-A (CsA therapy. Patients who had taken any antibiotics 3 months prior the study or had been submitted to periodontal therapy were not enrolled. Patients were required to have at least 6 teeth. The plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, pocket depth (PD and clinical attachment level (CAL were recorded. Microbiological samples were taken from sulcus/pocket (s/p and from stimulated saliva (ss and submitted to analysis. Patients were divided into two groups: the ones with gingival overgrowth (GO and those without gingival overgrowth (WGO. After statistical analysis (chi-square test, Student's t-test, Fisher test, p A proposta deste trabalho foi identificar a presença de microrganismos superinfectantes (bastonetes entéricos Gram-negativos e Candida sp. em pacientes transplantados cardíacos e correlacioná-la com a presença de crescimento gengival. Foram examinados 30 pacientes (10 mulheres e 20 homens - média de idade: 45 anos. Todos os pacientes estavam sob terapia com ciclosporina-A (CsA sem terem sido submetidos a antibioticoterapia e nem a tratamento periodontal prévio, por pelo menos três meses antes do início do estudo. O paciente deveria ter, no mínimo, seis dentes. Foram registrados os índices de placa bacteriana (IP, índice gengival (IG, valores de profundidade clínica de sondagem (PCS e nível clínico de inserção (NCI. Análise microbiológica foi realizada a partir de amostras coletadas de sulco/bolsa gengival (s/b e da saliva estimulada (se. Os pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos: com crescimento gengival (CCG e sem crescimento gengival (SCG. Após análise estatística (teste do qui-quadrado; teste t de Student; prova

  11. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it affects a number of the major genera present. It has been estimated that new sequences in genomes established through horizontal gene transfer can constitute up to 30% of bacterial genomes. Gene transfer can be both inter- and intrageneric, and it can also affect transient organisms. The transferred DNA can be integrated or recombined in the recipient's chromosome or remain as an extrachromosomal inheritable element. This can make dental plaque a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. The ability to transfer DNA is important for bacteria, making them better adapted to the harsh environment of the human mouth, and promoting their survival, virulence, and pathogenicity.

  12. Cytochemical Differences in Bacterial Glycocalyx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautgartner, Wolf Dietrich; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Hannig, Matthias; Pelz, Klaus; Stoiber, Walter

    2005-02-01

    To examine new cytochemical aspects of the bacterial adhesion, a strain 41452/01 of the oral commensal Streptococcus sanguis and a wild strain of Staphylococcus aureus were grown with and without sucrose supplementation for 6 days. Osmiumtetraoxyde (OsO4), uranyl acetate (UA), ruthenium red (RR), cupromeronic blue (CB) staining with critical electrolytic concentrations (CECs), and the tannic acid-metal salt technique (TAMST) were applied for electron microscopy. Cytochemically, only RR-positive fimbriae in S. sanguis were visualized. By contrast, some types of fimbriae staining were observed in S. aureus glycocalyx: RR-positive, OsO4-positive, tannophilic and CB-positive with ceasing point at 0.3 M MgCl2. The CB staining with CEC, used for the first time for visualization of glycoproteins of bacterial glycocalyx, also reveals intacellular CB-positive substances-probably the monomeric molecules, that is, subunits forming the fimbriae via extracellular assembly. Thus, glycosylated components of the biofilm matrix can be reliably related to single cells. The visualization of intracellular components by CB with CEC enables clear distinction between S. aureus and other bacteria, which do not produce CB-positive substances. The small quantities of tannophilic substances found in S. aureus makes the use of TAMST for the same purpose difficult. The present work protocol enables, for the first time, a partial cytochemical differentiation of the bacterial glycocalyx.

  13. Bacterial adhesion and biofilms on surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trevor Roger Garrett; Manmohan Bhakoo; Zhibing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion has become a significant problem in industry and in the domicile,and much research has been done for deeper understanding of the processes involved.A generic biological model of bacterial adhesion and population growth called the bacterial biofilm growth cycle,has been described and modified many times.The biofilm growth cycle encompasses bacterial adhesion at all levels,starting with the initial physical attraction of bacteria to a substrate,and ending with the eventual liberation of cell dusters from the biofilm matrix.When describing bacterial adhesion one is simply describing one or more stages of biofilm development,neglecting the fact that the population may not reach maturity.This article provides an overview of bacterial adhesion.cites examples of how bac-terial adhesion affects industry and summarises methods and instrumentation used to improve our understanding of the adhesive prop-erties of bacteria.

  14. Propionibacterium acnes CAMP factor and host acid sphingomyelinase contribute to bacterial virulence: potential targets for inflammatory acne treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruaki Nakatsuji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the progression of acne vulgaris, the disruption of follicular epithelia by an over-growth of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes permits the bacteria to spread and become in contact with various skin and immune cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated in the present study that the Christie, Atkins, Munch-Peterson (CAMP factor of P. acnes is a secretory protein with co-hemolytic activity with sphingomyelinase that can confer cytotoxicity to HaCaT keratinocytes and RAW264.7 macrophages. The CAMP factor from bacteria and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase from the host cells were simultaneously present in the culture supernatant only when the cells were co-cultured with P. acnes. Either anti-CAMP factor serum or desipramine, a selective ASMase inhibitor, significantly abrogated the P. acnes-induced cell death of HaCaT and RAW264.7 cells. Intradermal injection of ICR mouse ears with live P. acnes induced considerable ear inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and an increase in cellular soluble ASMase. Suppression of ASMase by systemic treatment with desipramine significantly reduced inflammatory reaction induced by intradermal injection with P. acnes, suggesting the contribution of host ASMase in P. acnes-induced inflammatory reaction in vivo. Vaccination of mice with CAMP factor elicited a protective immunity against P. acnes-induced ear inflammation, indicating the involvement of CAMP factor in P. acnes-induced inflammation. Most notably, suppression of both bacterial CAMP factor and host ASMase using vaccination and specific antibody injection, respectively, cooperatively alleviated P. acnes-induced inflammation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings envision a novel infectious mechanism by which P. acnes CAMP factor may hijack host ASMase to amplify bacterial virulence to degrade and invade host cells. This work has identified both CAMP factor and ASMase as potential molecular targets for the development of drugs

  15. Periodontal diseases as bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bascones Martínez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The periodontal disease is conformed by a group of illnesses affecting the gums and dental support structures. They are caused by certain bacteria found in the bacterial plaque. These bacteria are essential to the onset of illness; however, there are predisposing factors in both the host and the microorganisms that will have an effect on the pathogenesis of the illness. Periodontopathogenic bacterial microbiota is needed, but by itself, it is not enough to cause the illness, requiring the presence of a susceptible host. These diseases have been classified as gingivitis, when limited to the gums, and periodontitis, when they spread to deeper tissues. Classification of periodontal disease has varied over the years.The one used in this work was approved at the International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, held in 1999. This study is an overview of the different periodontal disease syndromes. Later, the systematic use of antibiotic treatment consisting of amoxicillin, amoxicillinclavulanic acid, and metronidazole as first line coadjuvant treatment of these illnesses will be reviewed.

  16. Bacterial mutagenicity assays: test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatehouse, David

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used assays for detecting chemically induced gene mutations are those employing bacteria. The plate incorporation assay using various Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and E. coli WP2 strains is a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay specifically designed to detect a wide range of chemical substances capable of causing DNA damage leading to gene mutations. The test is used worldwide as an initial screen to determine the mutagenic potential of new chemicals and drugs.The test uses several strains of S. typhimurium which carry different mutations in various genes of the histidine operon, and E. coli which carry the same AT base pair at the critical mutation site within the trpE gene. These mutations act as hot spots for mutagens that cause DNA damage via different mechanisms. When these auxotrophic bacterial strains are grown on a minimal media agar plates containing a trace of the required amino-acid (histidine or tryptophan), only those bacteria that revert to amino-acid independence (His(+) or Tryp(+)) will grow to form visible colonies. The number of spontaneously induced revertant colonies per plate is relatively constant. However, when a mutagen is added to the plate, the number of revertant colonies per plate is increased, usually in a dose-related manner.This chapter provides detailed procedures for performing the test in the presence and absence of a metabolic activation system (S9-mix), including advice on specific assay variations and any technical problems. PMID:22147566

  17. BACTERIAL DESEASES IN SEA FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivančica Strunjak-Perović

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available With development of the fish culturing in the sea, the interest in their health also increased. The reason for this are diseases or rather mortality that occur in such controlled cultures and cause great economic losses. By growing large quantities of fish in rather small species, natural conditions are changed, so fish is more sensitive and prone to infection agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites. Besides, a large fish density in the cultural process accelerates spreading if the diseases, but also enables a better perception of them. In wild populations sick specimen very quickly become predator’s prey, witch makes it difficult to note any pathological changes in such fish. There are lots of articles on viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases nowdays, but this work deals exclusively with bacterial deseases that occur in the controlled sea cultures (vibriosis, furunculosis, pastherelosis, nocardiosis, mycobaceriosis, edwardsielosis, yersiniosis, deseases caused by bacteria of genera Flexibacter, Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Streptococus and bacteria nephryithis. Yet, the knowledge of these deseases vary, depending on wether a fish species is being cultured for a longer period of time or is only being introduced in the controlled culture.

  18. Bioinformatic Comparison of Bacterial Secretomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Catharine Song; Aseem Kumar; Mazen Saleh

    2009-01-01

    The rapid increasing number of completed bacterial genomes provides a good op-portunity to compare their proteomes. This study was undertaken to specifically compare and contrast their secretomes-the fraction of the proteome with pre-dicted N-terminal signal sequences, both type Ⅰ and type Ⅱ. A total of 176 theoreti-cal bacterial proteomes were examined using the ExProt program. Compared with the Gram-positives, the Gram-negative bacteria were found, on average, to con-tain a larger number of potential Sec-dependent sequences. In the Gram-negative bacteria but not in the others, there was a positive correlation between proteome size and secretome size, while there was no correlation between secretome size and pathogenicity. Within the Gram-negative bacteria, intracellular pathogens were found to have the smallest secretomes. However, the secretomes of certain bacte-ria did not fit into the observed pattern. Specifically, the secretome of Borrelia burgdoferi has an unusually large number of putative lipoproteins, and the signal peptides of mycoplasmas show closer sequence similarity to those of the Gram-negative bacteria. Our analysis also suggests that even for a theoretical minimal genome of 300 open reading frames, a fraction of this gene pool (up to a maximum of 20%) may code for proteins with Sec-dependent signal sequences.

  19. Bacterial Culture of Neonatal Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Movahedian

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal bacterial sepsis is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. This retrospective study was performed to determine the incidence of bacterial sepsis with focus on Gram negative organisms in neonates admitted at Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, during a 3-yr period, from September 2002 to September 2005. Blood culture was performed on all neonates with risk factors or signs of suggestive sepsis. Blood samples were cultured using brain heart infusion (BHI broth according to standard method. From the 1680 neonates 36% had positive blood culture for Pseudomans aeruginosa, 20.7% for Coagulase negative Staphylococci, and 17% for Klebsiella spp. Gram-negative organisms accounted for 72.1% of all positive cultures. The overall mortality rate was 19.8% (22 /111 of whom 63.6% (14 /22 were preterm. Pseudomona aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. showed a high degree of resistance to commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin, gentamicin as well as third generation cephalosporins. Continued local surveillance studies are urged to monitor emerging antimicrobial resistance and to guide interventions to minimize its occurrence.

  20. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; Derousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-03-25

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried "nanomicroparticle" vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the former provides alignment of the principal nanodimension particle axes with the direction of airflow. Particles formed with this combination of nano- and micrometer-scale dimensions possess a greater ability to aerosolize than particles of standard spherical isotropic shape and of similar geometric diameter. Here, we demonstrate effective application of this biomaterial by using the live attenuated tuberculosis vaccine bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Prepared as a spray-dried nanomicroparticle aerosol, BCG vaccine exhibited high-efficiency delivery and peripheral lung targeting capacity from a low-cost and technically simple delivery system. Aerosol delivery of the BCG nanomicroparticle to normal guinea pigs subsequently challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis significantly reduced bacterial burden and lung pathology both relative to untreated animals and to control animals immunized with the standard parenteral BCG. PMID:18344320

  1. Remodeling bacterial polysaccharides by metabolic pathway engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Wen; Liu, Xianwei; Li, Yanhong; Li, Jianjun; Xia, Chengfeng; Zhou, Guangyan; Zhang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xi; Wang, Peng George

    2009-01-01

    Introducing structural modifications into biomolecules represents a powerful approach to dissect their functions and roles in biological processes. Bacterial polysaccharides, despite their rich structural information and essential roles in bacterium-host interactions and bacterial virulence, have largely been unexplored for in vivo structural modifications. In this study, we demonstrate the incorporation of a panel of monosaccharide analogs into bacterial polysaccharides in a highly homogenou...

  2. Effect of aerosolization on subsequent bacterial survival.

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, M V; Marthi, B; Fieland, V P; Ganio, L M

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether aerosolization could impair bacterial survival, Pseudomonas syringae and Erwinia herbicola were aerosolized in a greenhouse, the aerosol was sampled at various distances from the site of release by using all-glass impingers, and bacterial survival was followed in the impingers for 6 h. Bacterial survival subsequent to aerosolization of P. syringae and E. herbicola was not impaired 1 m from the site of release. P. syringae aerosolized at 3 to 15 m from the site of release ...

  3. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Satoshi; Numakawa, Tetsuya; Kubo, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechani...

  4. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Satoshi Ogata; Tetsuya Numakawa; Takuya Kubo

    2011-01-01

    Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechani...

  5. Bacterial successions in the Broiler Gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjitkar, Samir; Lawley, Blair; Tannock, Gerald;

    2016-01-01

    of crop, gizzard, ileum and ceca in relation to the feeding strategy and age (8, 15, 22, 25, 29 and 36 days). Of the four dietary treatments, bacterial diversity was analyzed for MBF and CKMS-30 by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene. Since there was no significant influence of diets on bacterial...... diversity, data were pooled for downstream analysis. With increasing age, a clear succession of bacterial communities and an increased bacterial diversity was observed. Lactobacillaceae (mainly Lactobacillus) represented most of the Firmicutes at all ages and in all segments of the gut except the ceca...

  6. Composition of the vaginal microbiota in women of reproductive age--sensitive and specific molecular diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis is possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Shipitsyna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Bacterial vaginosis (BV is the most common vaginal disorder, characterized by depletion of the normal lactobacillus-dominant microbiota and overgrowth of commensal anaerobic bacteria. This study aimed to investigate the composition of the vaginal microbiota in women of reproductive age (healthy women and women with BV, with the view of developing molecular criteria for BV diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Vaginal samples from 163 women (79 control, 73 BV and 11 intermediate (Lactobacillary grade II flora cases were analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing of the hypervariable regions V3-V4 of the 16S rRNA gene and 16 quantitative bacterial species/genus-specific real-time PCR assays. Sensitivities and specificities of potential BV markers were computed using the Amsel criteria as reference standard for BV. The use of quantitative thresholds for prediction of BV, determined for both relative abundance measured with 454 pyrosequencing and bacterial load measured with qPCR, was evaluated. RESULTS: Relative to the healthy women, the BV patients had in their vaginal microbiota significantly higher prevalence, loads and relative abundances of the majority of BV associated bacteria. However, only Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Eggerthella, Prevotella, BVAB2 and Megasphaera type 1 detected at or above optimal thresholds were highly predictable for BV, with the best diagnostic accuracy shown for A. vaginae. The depletion of Lactobacillus species combined with the presence of either G. vaginalis or A. vaginae at diagnostic levels was a highly accurate BV predictor. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative determination of the presence of G. vaginalis, A. vaginae, Eggerthella, Prevotella, BVAB2 and Megasphaera type 1 as well as the depletion of Lactobacillus was highly accurate for BV diagnosis. Measurements of abundance of normal and BV microbiota relative to total bacteria in vaginal fluid may provide more accurate BV diagnosis, and be

  7. Effect of heavy metals on bacterial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Olson, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    Adsorption of metals onto bacteria and soil takes place as stormwater runoff infiltrates into the subsurface. Changes in both bacterial surfaces and soil elemental content have been observed, and may alter the attachment of bacteria to soil surfaces. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) analyses were performed on soil samples equilibrated with synthetic stormwater amended with copper, lead and zinc. The results demonstrate the presence of copper and zinc on soil surfaces. To investigate bacterial attachment behavior, sets of batch sorption experiments were conducted on Escherichia Coli (E. coli) under different chemical conditions by varying solution compositions (nutrient solution vs synthetic stormwater). The adsorption data is best described using theoretical linear isotherms. The equilibrium coefficient (Kd) of E. coli is higher in synthetic stormwater than in nutrient solution without heavy metals. The adsorption of heavy metals onto bacterial surfaces significantly decreases their negative surface charge as determined via zeta potential measurements (-17.0±5.96mv for E. coli equilibrated with synthetic stormwater vs -21.6±5.45mv for E. coli equilibrated with nutrient solution), indicating that bacterial attachment may increase due to the attachment of metals onto bacterial surfaces and their subsequent change in surface charge. The attachment efficiency (α) of bacteria was also calculated and compared for both solution chemistries. Bacterial attachment efficiency (α) in synthetic stormwater is 0.997, which is twice as high as that in nutrient solution(α 0.465). The ratio of bacterial diameter : collector diameter suggests minimal soil straining during bacterial transport. Results suggest that the presence of metals in synthetic stormwater leads to an increase in bacterial attachment to soil surfaces. In terms of designing stormwater infiltration basins, the presence of heavy metals seems to

  8. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6, which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  9. Cooperative Model of Bacterial Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Y; Shi, Yu; Duke, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is controlled by the signalling of a cluster of receptors. A cooperative model is presented, in which coupling between neighbouring receptor dimers enhances the sensitivity with which stimuli can be detected, without diminishing the range of chemoeffector concentration over which chemotaxis can operate. Individual receptor dimers have two stable conformational states: one active, one inactive. Noise gives rise to a distribution between these states, with the probability influenced by ligand binding, and also by the conformational states of adjacent receptor dimers. The two-state model is solved, based on an equivalence with the Ising model in a randomly distributed magnetic field. The model has only two effective parameters, and unifies a number of experimental findings. According to the value of the parameter comparing coupling and noise, the signal can be arbitrarily sensitive to changes in the fraction of receptor dimers to which ligand is bound. The counteracting effect of a change of...

  10. Bacterial ice crystal controlling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Janet S H; Rose, David R; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  11. Unexpected versatility in bacterial riboswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellin, J R; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial riboswitches are elements present in the 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNA molecules that bind to ligands and regulate the expression of downstream genes. Riboswitches typically regulate the expression of protein-coding genes. However, mechanisms of riboswitch-mediated regulation have recently been shown to be more diverse than originally thought, with reports showing that riboswitches can regulate the expression of noncoding RNAs and control the access of proteins, such as transcription termination factor Rho and RNase E, to a nascent RNA. Riboswitches are also increasingly used in biotechnology, with advances in the engineering of synthetic riboswitches and the development of riboswitch-based sensors. In this review we address the emerging roles and mechanisms of riboswitch-mediated regulation in natura and recent progress in the development of riboswitch-based technology. PMID:25708284

  12. Use of Bacteriophages to control bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytic bacteriophages can provide a natural method and an effective alternative to antibiotics to reduce bacterial pathogens in animals, foods, and other environments. Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses which infect bacterial cells and eventually kill them through lysis, and represent the most abun...

  13. Plant Natural Products Targeting Bacterial Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laura Nunes; Zimmer, Karine Rigon; Macedo, Alexandre José; Trentin, Danielle Silva

    2016-08-24

    Decreased antimicrobial efficiency has become a global public health issue. The paucity of new antibacterial drugs is evident, and the arsenal against infectious diseases needs to be improved urgently. The selection of plants as a source of prototype compounds is appropriate, since plant species naturally produce a wide range of secondary metabolites that act as a chemical line of defense against microorganisms in the environment. Although traditional approaches to combat microbial infections remain effective, targeting microbial virulence rather than survival seems to be an exciting strategy, since the modulation of virulence factors might lead to a milder evolutionary pressure for the development of resistance. Additionally, anti-infective chemotherapies may be successfully achieved by combining antivirulence and conventional antimicrobials, extending the lifespan of these drugs. This review presents an updated discussion of natural compounds isolated from plants with chemically characterized structures and activity against the major bacterial virulence factors: quorum sensing, bacterial biofilms, bacterial motility, bacterial toxins, bacterial pigments, bacterial enzymes, and bacterial surfactants. Moreover, a critical analysis of the most promising virulence factors is presented, highlighting their potential as targets to attenuate bacterial virulence. The ongoing progress in the field of antivirulence therapy may therefore help to translate this promising concept into real intervention strategies in clinical areas. PMID:27437994

  14. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Blaauwen; J.M. Andreu; O. Monasterio

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of protein

  15. Recent advances in bacterial heme protein biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mayfield, Jeffery A.; Dehner, Carolyn A.; Dubois, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in genetics, fed by the burst in genome sequence data, has led to the identification of a host of novel bacterial heme proteins that are now being characterized in structural and mechanistic terms. The following short review highlights very recent work with bacterial heme proteins involved in the uptake, biosynthesis, degradation, and use of heme in respiration and sensing.

  16. Multiple bacterial species reside in chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjødsbøl, Kristine; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Karlsmark, Tonny;

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the bacterial profile of chronic venous leg ulcers and the importance of the profile to ulcer development. Patients with persisting venous leg ulcers were included and followed for 8 weeks. Every second week, ulcer samples were collected and the bacterial s...

  17. Bacterial biofilms: prokaryotic adventures in multicellularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kjelleberg, S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms includes both the initial social behavior of undifferentiated cells, as well as cell death and differentiation in the mature biofilm, and displays several striking similarities with higher organisms. Recent advances in the field provide new insight...... into differentiation and cell death events in bacterial biofilm development and propose that biofilms have an unexpected level of multicellularity....

  18. Barriers to bacterial motility on unsaturated surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    and their isogenic mutants unable to express various type of motility we aimed to quantify the physical limits of bacterial motility. Our results demonstrate how hydration controls bacterial motility under unsaturated conditions. They can form the base of improved biodegradation models that include microbial...

  19. Sustainable strategies for treatment of bacterial infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren

    2014-01-01

    not in a foreseeable future develop novel approaches and strategies to combat bacterial infections, many people will be at risk of dying from even trivial infections for which we until recently had highly effective antibiotics. We have for a number of years investigated chronic bacterial lung infections in patients...

  20. 钙离子拮抗剂致药物性牙龈增生的危险因素分析%Analysis of the risk factors for drug-induced gingival overgrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘卓; 高津福

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To explore the relationship between calcium channel blockers and gingival hyperplasia. METHODS:459 subjects with high blood pressure were included.262 of them taking calcium channel blockers (CCB)were in CCB group,197 without use of CCB were in control group.All the subjects were investigated by a questionnaire and oral examination.Gingiva hyperplasia was assessed according to the diagnostic criteria of periodontal hperplasia index(HI).RESULTS:Gingival overgrowth was found in 20.23% of the subjects in CCB group and in 2.54% in control group(χ2 =32.276,P<0.05).Single factor analysis showed that age,dosage and duration of the drug use were the risk factors of gingival hyperplasia (P<0.05).There was a negative correlation between prevalence rate of gingival hyperplasia and the age of patients who took CCB(r=-0.155,P=0.012).There is close relationship between gingival overgrowth and periodontal local factors.CONCLUSION:The gingival hyperplasia is associated with the factors of CCB age,duration,administration method ,dosage of CCB and oral hygiene.%目的:探讨高血压患者服用钙离子拮抗剂后出现牙龈增生的患病率。方法:对我院查体中心和心血管内科门诊服用钙离子拮抗剂抗高血压类药物的262和未服用钙离子拮抗剂的197例患者进行横断面调查。方法包括问卷调查和口腔牙周检查,其中牙龈增生的判定以牙龈增生指数(HI )为诊断标准。对调查结果进行统计学分析。结果:服用钙离子拮抗剂类药物患者的牙龈增生患病率为20.23%,显著高于对照组的2.54%(χ2=32.276,P<0.05)。随年龄增大,药物性牙龈增生的患病率降低(r=-0.155,P<0.05);单一用药者较联合用药者患病率高;服药时间越长患病率降低;随服药剂量的增加,患病率明显增长;口腔卫生状况差者可加重牙龈增生程度。结论:药物性牙龈增生是多方面作用的结果,其主

  1. A Replisome's journey through the bacterial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Thomas R; Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Genome duplication requires the coordinated activity of a multi-component machine, the replisome. In contrast to the background of metabolic diversity across the bacterial domain, the composition and architecture of the bacterial replisome seem to have suffered few changes during evolution. This immutability underlines the replisome's efficiency in copying the genome. It also highlights the success of various strategies inherent to the replisome for responding to stress and avoiding problems during critical stages of DNA synthesis. Here we summarize current understanding of bacterial replisome architecture and highlight the known variations in different bacterial taxa. We then look at the mechanisms in place to ensure that the bacterial replisome is assembled appropriately on DNA, kept together during elongation, and disassembled upon termination. We put forward the idea that the architecture of the replisome may be more flexible that previously thought and speculate on elements of the replisome that maintain its stability to ensure a safe journey from origin to terminus. PMID:26097470

  2. Structural biology of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2015-05-11

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477-42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  3. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko S. Murakami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485, an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP. In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank, describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  4. The effect of glutamine infusion on the inflammatory response and HSP70 during human experimental endotoxaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis; Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; van Hall, Gerrit; Moseley, Pope Lloyd; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Glutamine supplementation has beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, possibly in part through an attenuation of the proinflammatory cytokine response and a stimulation of heat shock protein (HSP)70. We infused either alanine-glutamine or saline during endotoxin challenge and measured plasma cytokines and HSP70 protein expression. Methods This crossover study, conducted in eight healthy young men, was double-blind, randomized and placebo-controll...

  5. The effect of glutamine infusion on the inflammatory response and HSP70 during human experimental endotoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis; Mortensen, Ole Hartvig;

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Glutamine supplementation has beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, possibly in part through an attenuation of the proinflammatory cytokine response and a stimulation of heat shock protein (HSP)70. We infused either alanine-glutamine or saline...... mononuclear cells (BMNCs) was measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: Plasma glutamine increased during alanine-glutamine infusion. Endotoxin reduced plasma glutamine during both trials, but plasma glutamine levels remained above baseline with alanine-glutamine supplementation. Endotoxin injection...

  6. The Role of Endotoxaemia in the development of Renal Disorders Experimental Obstructive Jaundice in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Janusz Dawiskiba

    1996-01-01

    In rats with 2-week obstructive jaundice the sensitivity to endotoxin was studied and the effect of a single dose of endotoxin on histological development in the kidney, liver and spleen was also investigated. We were tested the effect on accumulation and distribution within organs, of fibrinogen labelled with radioactive iodine 125. We showed an increased sensitivity to endotoxin in obstructive jaundice. The cause of death in most rats was acute circulatory failure during the course of endot...

  7. Microfluidic Approaches to Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Deung Park

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms—aggregations of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substrates (EPS—are an important subject of research in the fields of biology and medical science. Under aquatic conditions, bacterial cells form biofilms as a mechanism for improving survival and dispersion. In this review, we discuss bacterial biofilm development as a structurally and dynamically complex biological system and propose microfluidic approaches for the study of bacterial biofilms. Biofilms develop through a series of steps as bacteria interact with their environment. Gene expression and environmental conditions, including surface properties, hydrodynamic conditions, quorum sensing signals, and the characteristics of the medium, can have positive or negative influences on bacterial biofilm formation. The influences of each factor and the combined effects of multiple factors may be addressed using microfluidic approaches, which provide a promising means for controlling the hydrodynamic conditions, establishing stable chemical gradients, performing measurement in a high-throughput manner, providing real-time monitoring, and providing in vivo-like in vitro culture devices. An increased understanding of biofilms derived from microfluidic approaches may be relevant to improving our understanding of the contributions of determinants to bacterial biofilm development.

  8. EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS ON PERINATAL OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshree

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Bacterial vaginosis is a condition in which the normal lactobacillus ( predominant vaginal flora is replaced with anaerobic bacteria , gardnerella vaginalis and mycoplasma hominis . Our study was designed to find out the effects of bacterial vaginosis on fetomaternal outcome in pregnant women . MATERIAL & METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in MGMCH , Jaipur from S eptember’12 to February ’13 . 100 women attending the antenatal clinic were recruited during their antenatal visit after 20 weeks of gestation and obs erved for presence of bacterial vaginosis and followed till pregnancy outcome . Prevalence of bacterial vaginosis was determined by Nugent and Amsel criteria . Maternal and neonatal morbidity were studied accordingly . RESULT: Prevalence of bacterial vagino sis by Nugent criteria was 19% . There was a significant association between the period of gestation at which the patient delivers and Nugent scoring of her gram stain picture (p=0 . 01 . Relationship between nursery admissions of baby and bacterial vaginosi s was found to be highly significant (p=0 . 01 . Out of the 100 babies delivered , 20% had low birth weight , 2% had birth asphyxia & Apgar score < 5 , 7% delivered prematurely & 14% babies had to be transferred to neonatal care units for various causes . CONCL USION: Bacterial vaginosis was found to be significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome in the form of increased risk of preterm delivery , low birth weight , birth asphyxia in neonate . It was also concluded that there was a definite role of trea tment because it can prevent a considerable number of preterm deliveries .

  9. Bacterial microleakage of aged adhesive restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevin Cobanoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the marginal bacterial leakage of two self-etch adhesive systems after long-term water storage. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of extracted premolar teeth. After the sterilization of the teeth, four cavities were not restored for control purposes, whereas the other teeth were divided into two groups (n = 16 cavities each: Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE. After the application of the bonding agent, cavities were restored with a composite resin. Then, the teeth were thermo cycled, stored in saline solution for 6 months and put into a broth culture of Streptococcus mutans. The teeth were fixed, sectioned and stained using the Gram-Colour modified method. The stained sections were then evaluated under a light microscope. The bacterial leakage was scored as: 0 - absence of stained bacteria, 1 - bacterial staining along the cavity walls, 2 - bacterial staining within the cut dentinal tubules. The data were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-test (P = 0.05. Results: The bacterial staining was detected within the cut dentinal tubules in all control cavities, in three cavities in the CSE group and one cavity in the CPB group. There were no observed statistically significant differences between the bacterial penetrations of the two bonding systems (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Both bonding systems provided acceptable prevention of marginal bacterial leakage after long-term water storage.

  10. BACTERIAL FLORA IN DIABETIC ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Lavanya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Diabetic foot infections are one of the most feared complications of diabetes. This study was undertaken to determine the common etiological agents of diabetic foot infections and their in vitro antibiotic susceptibility. METHODS : A prospective study was p erformed over a period of two years in a tertiary care hospital. The aerobic and anaerobic bacterial agents were isolated and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined . RESULTS : One hundred patients with Diabetic ulcer were studied, of which 6 5 were males and 35 were females. Majority of patients were in the age group of 51 to 60 years (37% and polymicrobial etiology was 64 % and monomicrobial etiology was 36%. A total of 187 organisms were isolated of which 165 were aerobic and 22 were anaero bic. Most frequently isolated aerobic organisms were Pseudomonas Sp., Klebsiella Sp., E coli Sp., and Staphylococcus aureus. The common anaerobic organisms isolated were Peptostreptococcus Sp. And Bacterioids Sp. CONCLUSION : High prevalence of multi - drug r esistant pathogens was observed. Amikacin, Imipenem were active against gram - negative bacilli, while vancomycin was found to be active against gram - positive bacteria.

  11. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Prokopjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to assess its efficacy. Hemogram, serum fibrinogen, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes (CIC, C-reactive protein levels were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL 1(3, IL6 and neopterin concentrations were examined by immune-enzyme assay in a part of pts. Typical clinical features of Cl were present in only 28 (60,9% pts. 13 (28,3% pts had fever, 12 (26,0% — leukocytosis, 15 (32,6% — changes of leucocyte populations. Some laboratory measures (thrombocytes, fibrinogen, CIC, neopterin levels significantly decreased (p<0,05 after infection focus sanation without correction of disease modifying therapy. Cl quite often develop as asymptomatic processes most often in pts with high activity and can induce disturbances promoting appearance of endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and reduction of life duration. So timely detection and proper sanation of infection focuses should be performed in pts with RA

  13. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  14. Biochemistry of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanath Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens that are multi-drug resistant compromise the effectiveness of treatment when they are the causative agents of infectious disease. These multi-drug resistance mechanisms allow bacteria to survive in the presence of clinically useful antimicrobial agents, thus reducing the efficacy of chemotherapy towards infectious disease. Importantly, active multi-drug efflux is a major mechanism for bacterial pathogen drug resistance. Therefore, because of their overwhelming presence in bacterial pathogens, these active multi-drug efflux mechanisms remain a major area of intense study, so that ultimately measures may be discovered to inhibit these active multi-drug efflux pumps.

  15. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demuth Donald R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacterial function of leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, T cells and B cells, providing a mechanistic explanation for increased infection risk. Further epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic research into this important area is warranted.

  16. Bacterial gasotransmitters: an innate defense against antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhachack, Lyly; Nudler, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    In recent decades, there has been growing interest in the field of gasotransmitters, endogenous gaseous signaling molecules (NO, H2S, and CO), as regulators of a multitude of biochemical pathways and physiological processes. Most of the concerted effort has been on eukaryotic gasotransmitters until the subsequent discovery of bacterial counterparts. While the fundamental aspects of bacterial gasotransmitters remain undefined and necessitate further research, we will discuss a known specific role they play in defense against antibiotics. Considering the current dilemma of multidrug-resistant bacteria we consider it particularly prudent to exploring novel targets and approaches, of which the bacterial gasotransmitters, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide represent.

  17. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis in Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalip Gupta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypothyroidism is an uncommon cause of ascites. Here we describe a case of a 75 year-old female patient with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and subclinical hypothyroidism that resolved with thyroid replacement and antibiotic therapy respectively. Ascitic fluid analysis revealed a gram-positive bacterium on gram staining. A review of the literature revealed just one other reported case of myxoedema ascites with concomitant spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and no case has till been reported of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in subclinical hypothyroidism.

  18. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high-level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC-XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone-related compounds, ε-caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC-XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/P(BAD), RhaR-RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications.

  19. Bacterial diversity associated with freshwater zooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Dziallas, Claudia; Tang, Kam W.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial community compositions (BCC) associated with the cladoceran Bosmina coregoni and the cyclopoid copepod Thermocyclops oithonoides in oligotrophic Lake Stechlin versus eutrophic Lake Dagow (northeastern Germany) were compared using molecular techniques. We also transplanted the zooplankton...

  20. Bacterial bioluminescence in marine pollution assessment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Chandramohan, D.

    Warm water marine luminous bacterial species, particularly Vibrio harveyi, V. fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi, are easy to isolate, maintain and handle in the laboratories without strict temperature requirements, which is an important...

  1. The Bacterial Microbiota in Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffnagle, Gary B.; Dickson, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920's, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined. PMID:26122174

  2. Bacterie oorzaak van woekerziekte in lelie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van J.; Pham, K.T.K.; Hollinger, T.C.

    2003-01-01

    PPO heeft onderzoek gedaan naar achtergronden en het optreden van bacterie in lelies. Onderzoek heeft vastgesteld dat Rhodococcus fascians verantwoordelijk is voor deze ziekte. Toetsen zijn ontwikkeld die de woekerziekte snel kunnen aantonen

  3. Rho-modifying bacterial protein toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Rho proteins are targets of numerous bacterial protein toxins, which manipulate the GTP-binding proteins by covalent modifications, including ADP ribosylation, glycosylation, adenylylation, proteolytic cleavage and deamidation. Bacterial toxins are important virulence factors but are also potent and efficient pharmacological tools to study the physiological functions of their eukaryotic targets. Recent studies indicate that amazing variations exist in the molecular mechanisms by which toxins attack Rho proteins, which are discussed here.

  4. Bacterial volatiles promote growth in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Mohamed A. Farag; Hu, Chia-Hui; Reddy, Munagala S.; Wei, Han-Xun; Paré, Paul W.; Kloepper, Joseph W.

    2003-01-01

    Several chemical changes in soil are associated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Some bacterial strains directly regulate plant physiology by mimicking synthesis of plant hormones, whereas others increase mineral and nitrogen availability in the soil as a way to augment growth. Identification of bacterial chemical messengers that trigger growth promotion has been limited in part by the understanding of how plants respond to external stimuli. With an increasing appreciation of...

  5. Biochemistry of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Sanath Kumar; Varela, Manuel F.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens that are multi-drug resistant compromise the effectiveness of treatment when they are the causative agents of infectious disease. These multi-drug resistance mechanisms allow bacteria to survive in the presence of clinically useful antimicrobial agents, thus reducing the efficacy of chemotherapy towards infectious disease. Importantly, active multi-drug efflux is a major mechanism for bacterial pathogen drug resistance. Therefore, because of their overwhelming presence in ...

  6. Bacterial Evolution and Bak-Sneppen Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Indrani; Chaudhuri, Indranath

    2002-01-01

    Recently, Lenski et al [Elena,Lenski,Travisano] have carried out several experiments on bacterial evolution. Their findings support the theory of punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution. They have further quantified the relative contributions of adaptation, chance and history to bacterial evolution. In this paper, we show that a modified $M$-trait Bak-Sneppen model can explain many of the experimental results in a qualitative manner.

  7. Enteral nutrient solutions. Limiting bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paauw, J D; Fagerman, K E; McCamish, M A; Dean, R E

    1984-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of enteral nutrient solutions ( ENS ) in FFcess of food product standards is known to occur in the hospital setting. The large amounts of bacteria often given with ENS have been shown to create a reservoir for nosocomial infections, and nonpathogenic bacteria have been implicated. Patient tolerance is dependent on immune status and the bacterial load delivered to the gut. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bacterial growth-sustaining properties of various ENS and to devise methods to limit bacterial growth. Five commercial products were prepared under sterile conditions. After inoculation with approximately 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm3 of Enterobacter cloacae, each solution was hung at room temperature for 24 hours with samples drawn at fixed intervals and plated for bacterial counts. Bacterial growth rates in Ensure, Travasorb , and Vital were markedly higher than those in Precision and Vivonex. Vivonex was noted to contain potassium sorbate (KS) used as a fungistatic agent. Recent studies have identified KS as a broad-spectrum bacteriostatic food preservative that is federally approved for this use. KS (0.03%) was added to Travasorb inoculated with 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm(3) of E. cloacae. The bacterial growth rate was reduced by 75 per cent, and the final count of 2-3 X 10(4) organisms/ml was within the federally regulated limit for milk. This study suggests that initial inoculum, growth rate, and hang time can be altered to provide a significant reduction in final bacterial counts in ENS . PMID:6428286

  8. Asynchronous exponential growth of a bacterial population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Boulanouar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we complete a study started earlier in [1,2] wherein a model of growing bacterial population has been the matter of a mathematical analysis. We show that the full model is governed by a strongly continuous semigroup. Beside the positivity and the irreducibility of the generated semigroup, we describe its asymptotic behavior in the uniform topology which leads to the asynchronous exponential growth of the bacterial population.

  9. Pattern Formation in a Bacterial Colony Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinze Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a bacterial colony model. Based on the stability analysis, we derive the conditions for Hopf and Turing bifurcations. Furthermore, we present novel numerical evidence of time evolution of patterns controlled by parameters in the model and find that the model dynamics exhibit a diffusion controlled formation growth to spots, holes and stripes pattern replication, which show that the bacterial colony model is useful in revealing the spatial predation dynamics in the real world.

  10. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  11. Bacterial Probiotic Modulation of Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Drakes, Maureen; Blanchard, Thomas; Czinn, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal dendritic cells are continually exposed to ingested microorganisms and high concentrations of endogenous bacterial flora. These cells can be activated by infectious agents and other stimuli to induce T-cell responses and to produce chemokines which recruit other cells to the local environment. Bacterial probiotics are of increasing use against intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. They act as nonpathogenic stimuli within the gut to regain immunologic quiescence. ...

  12. 唾液中IL-6与硝苯地平所致药物性牙龈增生的关系%Association between IL-6 in saliva and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱鋆; 栾庆先; 李蓬; 李晓

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨硝苯地平所致药物性牙龈增生程度与非刺激性全唾中IL-6水平之间的关系.方法 从北京石景山社区服用硝苯地平6个月以上的205名个体中,按照增生指数分层,随机抽取66名个体作为本研究的评价对象,并完成以下检查:一般检查包括身高,体重;牙周临床检查包括菌斑指数(Plaque index,PLI),探诊深度(Probing Depth,PD),探诊出血指数(Bleeding index,BI),附着丧失(Attachment Loss,AL).实验室检查:抽取受检者空腹前臂静脉血,采用全自动分析仪检测空腹血糖(Fasting Plasma Glucose,FPG),并收集非刺激性全唾,用ELISA法检测唾液中IL-6水平.拍摄每位受检者前牙区数码相,评价每位受检者的牙龈增生指数(Gingival Overgrowth Score,GOS).结果 牙龈增生程度由低到高分为五组,各组IL-6水平(x±SD)分别为4.72±1.20 pg/ml,10.77±2.79 pg/ml,11.21±2.83 pg/ml,15.42±3.12 pg/ml,29.82±12.61 pg/ml.Pearson检验显示非刺激性全唾中的IL-6水平与牙龈增生指数显著相关(P<0.05,r=0.604).应用SPSS13.0分析软件控制BI,PD,BMI,Glu,PLI,AL后,偏相关分析显示,非刺激性全唾中IL-6水平仍与牙龈增生指数正相关(P<0.05,r=0.379).结论 非刺激性全唾中IL-6水平与硝苯地平所致的牙龈增生有关.

  13. The intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Andrés Olivares Pacheco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically resistant bacteria have emerged as a relevant health problem in the last years. Those bacterial species, several of them with an environmental origin, present naturally a low-level susceptibility to several drugs. It has been proposed that intrinsic resistance is mainly the consequence of the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or the lack of appropriate targets for a given family of drugs. However, recently published articles indicate that the characteristic phenotype of susceptibility to antibiotics of a given bacterial species depends on the concerted activity of several elements, what has been named as intrinsic resistome. These determinants comprise not just classical resistance genes. Other elements, several of them involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes, are of relevance for the intrinsic resistance of bacterial pathogens. In the present review we analyse recent publications on the intrinsic resistomes of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present as well information on the role that global regulators of bacterial metabolism, as Crc from P. aeruginosa, may have on modulating bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, we discuss the possibility of searching inhibitors of the intrinsic resistome in the aim of improving the activity of drugs currently in use for clinical practice.

  14. Bacterial carbon cycling in a subarctic fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelboe, Mathias; Glud, Ronnie Nøhr; Sejr, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    and BGE were positively correlated with BDOC concentration, suggesting that organic carbon availability was limiting bacterial activity and carbon conversion efficiency. Viral production was low (0.8–1.8 × 104 viruses mL−1 h−1) as compared to low-latitude environments, suggesting a relatively small effect......In this seasonal study, we examined the environmental controls and quantitative importance of bacterial carbon consumption in the water column and the sediment in the subarctic Kobbefjord, Greenland. Depth-integrated bacterial production in the photic zone varied from 5.0 ± 2.7 mg C m−2 d−1...... in February to 42 ± 28 mg C m−2 d−1 in May and 34 ± 7 mg C m−2 d−1 in September, corresponding to a bacterial production to primary production ratio of 0.34 ± 0.14, 0.07 ± 0.04, and 0.08 ± 0.06, respectively. Based on measured bacterial growth efficiencies (BGEs) of 0.09–0.10, pelagic bacterial carbon...

  15. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Roberta J; Richards, Justin J; Melander, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: (1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, (2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and (3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

  16. Proteomics in the Study of Bacterial Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachida Bouhenni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial keratitis is a serious ocular infection that can cause severe visual loss if treatment is not initiated at an early stage. It is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Serratia species. Depending on the invading organism, bacterial keratitis can progress rapidly, leading to corneal destruction and potential blindness. Common risk factors for bacterial keratitis include contact lens wear, ocular trauma, ocular surface disease, ocular surgery, lid deformity, chronic use of topical steroids, contaminated ocular medications or solutions, and systemic immunosuppression. The pathogenesis of bacterial keratitis, which depends on the bacterium-host interaction and the virulence of the invading bacterium, is complicated and not completely understood. This review highlights some of the proteomic technologies that have been used to identify virulence factors and the host response to infections of bacterial keratitis in order to understand the disease process and develop improved methods of diagnosis and treatment. Although work in this field is not abundant, proteomic technologies have provided valuable information toward our current knowledge of bacterial keratitis. More studies using global proteomic approaches are warranted because it is an important tool to identify novel targets for intervention and prevention of corneal damage caused by these virulent microorganisms.

  17. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bacterial reverse transcriptases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Toro

    Full Text Available Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs, Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L, and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology.

  18. Expression of IL-6 in cyclosporin A-induced gingival overgrowth%环孢素A引发牙龈过度生长过程中IL-6的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施元洁; 尹元正; 李俐俐; 黎雪

    2011-01-01

    目的:对体外培养的牙龈上皮细胞和成纤维细胞施加环孢素A(cydosporin,CsA)刺激,应用免疫组化方法探讨CsA引发药物性牙龈过度生长傅(gingival overgrowth,GO)的病理机制.方法:对体外培养的牙龈上皮细胞和成纤维细胞分别施加浓度为600、800和1000ng/mL,作用时间为48、72h的CsA刺激.在观察细胞生长曲线及其变化的基础上,通过对细胞铺片的免疫酶染色(ABC法)定量分析和对细胞培养液的酶联免疫吸附检测(ELISA法),分别对牙龈组织细胞IL-6的表达和分泌进行测定,应用SAS 6.0软件包对数据进行统计学分析.结果:牙龈上皮细胞接受CsA刺激后,细胞数量明显增加,与对照组相比具有显著差异(P0.05);牙龈成纤维细胞接受刺激超过24h后,CsA浓度为1000ng/mL的实验组与对照组间在细胞分泌IL-6总量上有显著增加(P<0.05).牙龈上皮细胞各实验组的IL-6分泌总量极低且无显著差异.结论:在CsA引发GO的过程中,产生的IL-6可能多源自牙龈结缔组织的成纤维细胞;牙龈成纤维细胞接受CsA刺激后,产生促进IL-6生成的作用与之存在浓度和时间相关性.%PURPOSE: To estimate the role of IL-6 in cyclosporin A (CsA)-induced gingival overgrowth (GO) and collect the evidence of pathomechanistn for CsA-induced GO. METHODS: Gingival fibroblasts and epithelial cells were treated with CsA of three different concentrations (600ng/Ml, 800ng/Ml, and 1000ng/Ml) with different time (48h, 72h). After cell stretched preparation, the secretion of IL-6 was analyzed by ELISA while expression of IL-6 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (ABC). SAS 6.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The growth speed of gingival epithelial cells in the group treated with CsA was significantly faster than the control group (P<0.05). The IL-6 expression of gingival epithelial cells and fibroblasts had no significance difference, but changed depending on the concentration

  19. 环孢素A所致牙龈增生的治疗以及增生牙龈组织的病理观察%Clinical therapy and pathological observation of cyclosporine A-induced gingival overgrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马净植; 李明; 曹颖光

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical therapy for cyclosporine A(CsA)-induced gingival overgrowth (GO) and the pathological changes in gingival overgrowth tissues.Methods Nine cases of CsA-induced GO after renal transplantation were subjected to periodontal non-surgical treatment and surgical treatment.Under light and electron microscopy,the pathological changes in CO tissues were observed.Results The bleeding index(BI) and the plaque index(PLI) of patients were declined after periodontal treatment.GO recurred in 2 patients 6 months later and happened to recur in all 9 patients 12 months later(GOD≤1).At 18th month after transplantation,an obvioUS GO(GOD≥2)occurred in one patient,and re-operation was done to cut hyperplastic gingiva.At 48th month during the observation period,GO existed continuously but no more than 2 in GOD.There were 3 other patients who had their GO(GOD≥2)at 24th month after peridental treatment and re-operation was carried out to remove the hyperplasic gingivaL Under a light microscope,epithelial pegs constituted of basal cells and prickle cells elongated and presented as cancellation structure;spinus layer thickened:hyperkeratosis or parakeratosis occurred in cuticular layer where inflammatory cells infiltrated:collagen increased in proper layer.Under the transmission electron microscopy,the volume of fibroblasts in hyperplastic gingival tissues was increased,rough endoplansmic reticula in the intracytoplasm were abundant and expanded slightly,and there were a few of the apoptotic fibroblasts in the early stage.Conclusion BI and PLl were declined in patients taking CyA for a long-term who were subjected to periodontal and surgical treatments.GO recurred in some patients.The proliferation and differentiation of fibroblasts was not observed in hyperplastic gingival tissues.%目的 探讨环孢素A(CsA)所致牙龈增生(GO)的临床治疗方法以及增生牙龈的组织学变化.方法 9例肾移植患者因服用CsA导致GO,采取牙周基

  20. Nest Material Shapes Eggs Bacterial Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Castellano, Cristina; Tomás, Gustavo; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Martín-Gálvez, David; Soler, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Selective pressures imposed by pathogenic microorganisms to embryos have selected in hosts for a battery of antimicrobial lines of defenses that includes physical and chemical barriers. Due to the antimicrobial properties of volatile compounds of green plants and of chemicals of feather degrading bacteria, the use of aromatic plants and feathers for nest building has been suggested as one of these barriers. However, experimental evidence suggesting such effects is scarce in the literature. During two consecutive years, we explored experimentally the effects of these nest materials on loads of different groups of bacteria (mesophilic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus) of eggshells in nests of spotless starlings (Sturnus unicolor) at the beginning and at the end of the incubation period. This was also explored in artificial nests without incubation activity. We also experimentally increased bacterial density of eggs in natural and artificial nests and explored the effects of nest lining treatments on eggshell bacterial load. Support for the hypothetical antimicrobial function of nest materials was mainly detected for the year and location with larger average values of eggshell bacterial density. The beneficial effects of feathers and plants were more easily detected in artificial nests with no incubation activity, suggesting an active role of incubation against bacterial colonization of eggshells. Pigmented and unpigmented feathers reduced eggshell bacterial load in starling nests and artificial nest boxes. Results from artificial nests allowed us to discuss and discard alternative scenarios explaining the detected association, particularly those related to the possible sexual role of feathers and aromatic plants in starling nests. All these results considered together confirm the antimicrobial functionality mainly of feathers but also of plants used as nest materials, and highlight the importance of temporally and geographically

  1. Acute Bacterial Prostatitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Timothy J; Dierfeldt, Daniel M

    2016-01-15

    Acute bacterial prostatitis is an acute infection of the prostate gland that causes pelvic pain and urinary tract symptoms, such as dysuria, urinary frequency, and urinary retention, and may lead to systemic symptoms, such as fevers, chills, nausea, emesis, and malaise. Although the true incidence is unknown, acute bacterial prostatitis is estimated to comprise approximately 10% of all cases of prostatitis. Most acute bacterial prostatitis infections are community acquired, but some occur after transurethral manipulation procedures, such as urethral catheterization and cystoscopy, or after transrectal prostate biopsy. The physical examination should include abdominal, genital, and digital rectal examination to assess for a tender, enlarged, or boggy prostate. Diagnosis is predominantly made based on history and physical examination, but may be aided by urinalysis. Urine cultures should be obtained in all patients who are suspected of having acute bacterial prostatitis to determine the responsible bacteria and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Additional laboratory studies can be obtained based on risk factors and severity of illness. Radiography is typically unnecessary. Most patients can be treated as outpatients with oral antibiotics and supportive measures. Hospitalization and broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics should be considered in patients who are systemically ill, unable to voluntarily urinate, unable to tolerate oral intake, or have risk factors for antibiotic resistance. Typical antibiotic regimens include ceftriaxone and doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. The risk of nosocomial bacterial prostatitis can be reduced by using antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin, before transrectal prostate biopsy. PMID:26926407

  2. Microbial Degradation of Aniline by Bacterial Consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-LONG WANG; ZE-YU MAO; WEI-ZHONG WU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of microbial degradation of aniline by a stable bacterial consortium. Methods The bacterial consortium was isolated from activated sludge treating chemical wastewater using aniline as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen by enrichment and isolation technique. The biomass was measured as optical density (OD) at 510 nm using a spectrophotometer. Aniline concentrations were determined by spectrophotometer. The intermediates of aniline degradation were identified by GC/MS method. Results The bacterial consortium could grow at a range of aniline concentrations between 50 and 500 mg/L. The optimal pH and temperature for aniline degradation were determined to be 7.0 and 30, respectively. The presence of NH4NO3 as an additional nitrogen source (100-500 mg/L) had no adverse effect on bacterial growth and aniline degradation. The presence of heavy metal ions, such as Co2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+ had an inhibitory effect on aniline degradation. Conclusions The isolated bacterial consortium candegrade aniline up to 500 mg/L effectively and tolerate some heavy metal ions that commonly exist in chemical wastewater. It has a potential to be applied in the practical treatment of aniline-containingwastewater.

  3. Bacterial coinfections in children with viral wheezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, P; Jartti, T; Virkki, R; Vuorinen, T; Leinonen, M; Peltola, V; Ruohola, A; Ruuskanen, O

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial coinfections occur in respiratory viral infections, but the attack rates and the clinical profile are not clear. The aim of this study was to determine bacterial coinfections in children hospitalized for acute expiratory wheezing with defined viral etiology. A total of 220 children aged 3 months to 16 years were investigated. The viral etiology of wheezing was confirmed by viral culture, antigen detection, serologic investigation, and/or PCR. Specific antibodies to common respiratory bacteria were measured from acute and convalescent serum samples. All children were examined clinically for acute otitis media, and subgroups of children were examined radiologically for sinusitis and pneumonia. Rhinovirus (32%), respiratory syncytial virus (31%), and enteroviruses (31%) were the most common causative viruses. Serologic evidence of bacterial coinfection was found in 18% of the children. Streptococcus pneumoniae (8%) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (5%) were the most common causative bacteria. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 44% of the children. Chest radiographs showed alveolar infiltrates in 10%, and paranasal radiographs and clinical signs showed sinusitis in 17% of the older children studied. Leukocyte counts and serum C-reactive protein levels were low in a great majority of patients. Viral lower respiratory tract infection in children is often associated with bacterial-type upper respiratory tract infections. However, coexisting bacterial lower respiratory tract infections that induce systemic inflammatory response are seldom detected.

  4. Emerging bacterial pathogens: the past and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouga, M; Greub, G

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1950s, medical communities have been facing with emerging and reemerging infectious diseases, and emerging pathogens are now considered to be a major microbiologic public health threat. In this review, we focus on bacterial emerging diseases and explore factors involved in their emergence as well as future challenges. We identified 26 major emerging and reemerging infectious diseases of bacterial origin; most of them originated either from an animal and are considered to be zoonoses or from water sources. Major contributing factors in the emergence of these bacterial infections are: (1) development of new diagnostic tools, such as improvements in culture methods, development of molecular techniques and implementation of mass spectrometry in microbiology; (2) increase in human exposure to bacterial pathogens as a result of sociodemographic and environmental changes; and (3) emergence of more virulent bacterial strains and opportunistic infections, especially affecting immunocompromised populations. A precise definition of their implications in human disease is challenging and requires the comprehensive integration of microbiological, clinical and epidemiologic aspects as well as the use of experimental models. It is now urgent to allocate financial resources to gather international data to provide a better understanding of the clinical relevance of these waterborne and zoonotic emerging diseases.

  5. Mesoscopic modeling of bacterial flagellar microhydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremichael, Yeshitila; Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2006-11-15

    A particle-based hybrid method of elastic network model and smooth-particle hydrodynamics has been employed to describe the propulsion of bacterial flagella in a viscous hydrodynamic environment. The method explicitly models the two aspects of bacterial propulsion that involve flagellar flexibility and long-range hydrodynamic interaction of low-Reynolds-number flow. The model further incorporates the molecular organization of the flagellar filament at a coarse-grained level in terms of the 11 protofilaments. Each of these protofilaments is represented by a collection of material points that represent the flagellin proteins. A computational model of a single flexible helical segment representing the filament of a bacterial flagellum is presented. The propulsive dynamics and the flow fields generated by the motion of the model filament are examined. The nature of flagellar deformation and the influence of hydrodynamics in determining the shape of deformations are examined based on the helical filament.

  6. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Lind, I

    1977-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) would facilitate the rapid, etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis when used in parallel with other routine methods in a medical bacteriological laboratory. Of 3,674 consecutive specimens of cerebros......The aim of the present study was to investigate whether counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) would facilitate the rapid, etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis when used in parallel with other routine methods in a medical bacteriological laboratory. Of 3,674 consecutive specimens....../139) of the culture-negative specimens. CSF specimens from 21 patients with bacterial meningitis caused by other species were all negative in CIE, except four, three of which contained Escherichia coli antigen reacting with antiserum to N. meningitidis group B and one E. coli antigen reacting with antiserum to H...

  7. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    The commonest sequelae of bacterial meningitis are related to the inner ear. Little is known about the inner ear immune defense. Evidence suggests that the endolymphatic sac provides some protection against infection. A potential involvement of the endolymphatic sac in bacterial meningitis...... is largely unaccounted for, and thus the object of the present study. A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was employed. Thirty adult rats were inoculated intrathecally with Streptococcus pneumoniae and received no additional treatment. Six rats were sham...... days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges...

  8. Evaluation of silicon oil on bacterial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Adams

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze the antimicrobial properties of silicon oil (Óleo de Silicone®, Ophthalmos, Brazil on in vitro bacterial growth of different microorganisms related to endophthalmitis. METHODS: The following microorganisms were analyzed: (1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27583; (2 Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922; (3 Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923; (4 Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228; (5 Candida albicans (ATCC 10231; (6 Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 13883; and (7 Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 49619. The plates were incubated at 35 ± 2ºC and its growth examined after 24 hours. An empty disk was placed in the center of each plate as a control. RESULTS: No inhibition halos were verified in any of the plates containing the four different concentrations of the bacterial inocula. CONCLUSIONS: The silicon oil 1000 cps does not have any effect on bacterial growth of any of the studied microrganisms.

  9. Citrobacter rodentium mouse model of bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepin, Valerie F; Collins, James W; Habibzay, Maryam; Frankel, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium is a robust model to study bacterial pathogenesis, mucosal immunology, the health benefits of probiotics and the role of the microbiota during infection. C. rodentium was first isolated by Barthold from an outbreak of mouse diarrhea in Yale University in 1972 and was 'rediscovered' by Falkow and Schauer in 1993. Since then the use of the model has proliferated, and it is now the gold standard for studying virulence of the closely related human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Here we provide a detailed protocol for various applications of the model, including bacterial growth, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse inoculation (from cultured cells and after cohabitation), monitoring of bacterial colonization, tissue extraction and analysis, immune responses, probiotic treatment and microbiota analysis. The main protocol, from mouse infection to clearance and analysis of tissues and host responses, takes ∼5 weeks to complete. PMID:27606775

  10. Comprehensive characterization of indoor airborne bacterial profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.L.Chan; P.H.F.Yu; Y.W.Cheng; C.Y.Chan; P.K.Wong

    2009-01-01

    This is the first detailed characterization of the air-borne bacterial profiles in indoor environments and two restaurants were selected for this study.Fifteen genera of bacteria were isolated from each restaurant and identified by three different bacterial identification systems including MIDI, Biolog and Riboprinter?.The dominant bacteria of both restaurants were Gram-positive bacteria in which Micrococcus and Bacillus species were the most abundant species.Most bacteria identified were representative species of skin and respiratory tract of human, and soil.Although the bacterial levels in these restaurants were below the limit of the Hong Kong Indoor Air Quality Objective (HKIAQO) Level 1 standard (i.e., < 500 cfu/m3), the majority of these bacteria were opportunistic pathogens.These results suggested that the identity of airborne bacteria should also be included in the IAQ to ensure there is a safety guideline for the public.

  11. Strategy of control for bacterial biofilm processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Mayansky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Main directions of the modern search of the antibiofilm preparations aimed at adhesive bacterial reactions, control of QS-systems, influence over bis-(3’-5’-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (cdi-GMP, and secretory bacterial processes are analysed. Approaches for biofilm dispersal and increasing the sensitivity of biofilm bacteria to antimicrobial drugs are discussed. It is underlined that the majority of inhibitor molecules were studied in vitro or in infected mice experiments. It is prognosed that in future there will appear medical preparations which will help for fighting bacterial biofilms preventing their development and spreading in the host organism.

  12. Biofilms: an emergent form of bacterial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Steinberg, Peter; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2016-08-11

    Bacterial biofilms are formed by communities that are embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Importantly, bacteria in biofilms exhibit a set of 'emergent properties' that differ substantially from free-living bacterial cells. In this Review, we consider the fundamental role of the biofilm matrix in establishing the emergent properties of biofilms, describing how the characteristic features of biofilms - such as social cooperation, resource capture and enhanced survival of exposure to antimicrobials - all rely on the structural and functional properties of the matrix. Finally, we highlight the value of an ecological perspective in the study of the emergent properties of biofilms, which enables an appreciation of the ecological success of biofilms as habitat formers and, more generally, as a bacterial lifestyle. PMID:27510863

  13. Bacterial responses to reactive chlorine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research. PMID:23768204

  14. Bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar Arora

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic amines are an important group of industrial chemicals, which are widely used for manufacturing of dyes, pesticides, drugs, pigments, and other industrial products. These compounds have been considered highly toxic to human beings due to their carcinogenic nature. Three groups of aromatic amines have been recognized: monocyclic, polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic amines. Bacterial degradation of several monocyclic aromatic compounds has been studied in a variety of bacteria, which utilizes monocyclic aromatic amines as their sole source of carbon and energy. Several degradation pathways have been proposed and the related enzymes and genes have also been characterized. Many reviews have been reviewed toxicity of monocyclic aromatic amines; however, there is lack of review on biodegradation of monocyclic aromatic amines. The aim of this review is to summarize bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines. This review will increase our current understanding of biochemical and molecular basis of bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines.

  15. [Chemotherapy of severe bacterial infections in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenbichler, J P

    1983-01-01

    Bacterial infections are frequent events in premature and newborn infants. The reason is a defective specific and nonspecific defence of bacterial organisms. Some immunoglobulins like IgM and IgA including secretory IgA are absent. Premature infants also show a decreased level of IgG. Cellular immunity is anatomically intact but functionally defective. A number of complement factors are lacking, the activation of the alternative pathway is impaired. Newborn infants with perinatal problems like asphyxia or difficult delivery, show defects of leucocyte function like decreased deformability, defective chemotaxis and defective killing of ingested bacteria. Certain diseases, like hypoxia and malformations of immature organ functions in this age group (decreased acid production in the stomach), facilitate bacterial colonization of surface epithelia and the invasion of tissues. Consequences of these pathogenetic mechanisms are an unimpaired propagation of bacterial organisms into the blood and meninges without localization of the infecting organisms at the entry site. Bacterial meningitis is not considered a separate disease entity but a complication of bacteremia and sepsis. Clinical symptoms are nonspecific at the onset of the infection. Fever is frequently absent; decreased appetite, vomiting, a bloated abdomen, diarrhea, tachycardia, tachypnea are early signs of a bacterial infection, a grey mottled appearance, cyanosis, jaundice, petechiae, apneic spells, seizure activity and a metabolic acidosis are symptoms of advanced infection. Successful treatment at this stage is often not possible. Every sign of a decreased well being of a newborn of premature infant warrants laboratory and bacteriologic work up for septicemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6316669

  16. Inhibiting bacterial toxins by channel blockage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M

    2016-03-01

    Emergent rational drug design techniques explore individual properties of target biomolecules, small and macromolecule drug candidates, and the physical forces governing their interactions. In this minireview, we focus on the single-molecule biophysical studies of channel-forming bacterial toxins that suggest new approaches for their inhibition. We discuss several examples of blockage of bacterial pore-forming and AB-type toxins by the tailor-made compounds. In the concluding remarks, the most effective rationally designed pore-blocking antitoxins are compared with the small-molecule inhibitors of ion-selective channels of neurophysiology.

  17. Glucocorticosteroids: as Adjuvant Therapy for Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WONDIM MELKAM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs, synthetic analogues of the natural steroid hormones, are well known for their antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive properties in the periphery. They are widely and successfully used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, and transplant rejection. Nowadays, GCs are claimed to have a beneficial role being as adjunct therapy in various infections. Different studies have been conducted to investigate their use as adjuvant therapy for different bacterial infection. This review, therefore, summarizes various bacterial infections for which glucocorticoids are reported to be used as adjuvant therapy, strategies for administration of glucocorticoids, and challenges of using glucocorticoids as adjuvant therapy.

  18. Bacterial Association with Particles: Aggregation to Dissolution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, M.J.B.D.

    , G.H., Hamilton, I.R., 1989. Competition between Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus caseii in mixed continuous culture. Oral Microbiol. Immunol. 4, 57-64. Bowen, J.D., Stolzenbach, D., Chisholm, S.W., 1993. Simulating bacterial clustering around... stream_size 68898 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Judith_chap06.pdf.txt stream_source_info Judith_chap06.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 6. Bacterial Association...

  19. Production of bacterial cellulose from alternate feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. N. Thompson; M. A. Hamilton

    2000-05-07

    Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS and HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

  20. Production of Bacterial Cellulose from Alternate Feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David Neil; Hamilton, Melinda Ann

    2000-05-01

    Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS & HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

  1. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Dutta; Archana Pan

    2002-02-01

    Bacterial genomes are extremely dynamic and mosaic in nature. A substantial amount of genetic information is inserted into or deleted from such genomes through the process of horizontal transfer. Through the introduction of novel physiological traits from distantly related organisms, horizontal gene transfer often causes drastic changes in the ecological and pathogenic character of bacterial species and thereby promotes microbial diversification and speciation. This review discusses how the recent influx of complete chromosomal sequences of various microorganisms has allowed for a quantitative assessment of the scope, rate and impact of horizontally transmitted information on microbial evolution.

  2. Neurosonographic findings of bacterial meningitis in Infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Chul; Lee, Sung Sik; Lee, Hong Kue; Lee, Soon Il [Sowa Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-02-15

    44 infants under 1 year were studied retrospectively during these illness and follow up after 1 week intervals. The spectrum of sonographic features of bacterial meningitis in acute stage included normal scan (20 patients), echogenic sulci (10 patients), echogenic lining of epandymas (8 patients), Abnormal parenchymal echogenecity (6 patients). On follow up examination with 1 week intervals, variety of complications was found in 14 patients (32%) of the infants. There were ventriculomegaly in 7 patients, extraaxial fluid collection in 4 patients, brain abscess in 2 patients and poor encephalic cyst in 1 patient. We conclude that ultrasound was an effective method for evaluation of progression and complications of bacterial meningitis.

  3. CT scan of bacterial and aseptic meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Kazumasa; Saiwai, Shigeo; Tamaoka, Koichi (Kobe Central Municipal Hospital (Japan))

    1983-01-01

    CT scans of the patients with aseptic and bacterial meningitis were reviewed and compared to previous reports. In aseptic meningitis, no abnormal CT findings were observed. In bacterial meningitis, CT findings were ventricular dilatation, subdural fluid collection, parenchymal low density, intracerebral hematoma and meningeal enhancement after contrast injection. Three patients among 48 suffered from status epileptics during the course of the illness. All of the 3 patients developed parenchymal inhomogeneous low density and progressive ventricular dilatation which did not improve after ventricular peritoneal shunt surgery. We believe that these changes are most likely due to hypoxic hypoxemia during epileptic seizure and meningitis itself seems to play a little role.

  4. Effect of isolate of ruminal fibrolytic bacterial culture supplementation on fibrolytic bacterial population and survivability of inoculated bacterial strain in lactating Murrah buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brishketu Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of bacterial culture supplementation on ruminal fibrolytic bacterial population as well as on survivability of inoculated bacterial strain in lactating Murrah buffaloes kept on high fibre diet. Materials and Methods: Fibrolytic bacterial strains were isolated from rumen liquor of fistulated Murrah buffaloes and live bacterial culture were supplemented orally in treatment group of lactating Murrah buffaloes fed on high fibre diet to see it's effect on ruminal fibrolytic bacterial population as well as to see the effect of survivability of the inoculated bacterial strain at three different time interval in comparison to control group. Results: It has been shown by real time quantification study that supplementation of bacterial culture orally increases the population of major fibre degrading bacteria i.e. Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Ruminococcus albus as well as Fibrobacter succinogenes whereas there was decrease in secondary fibre degrading bacterial population i.e. Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens over the different time periods. However, the inoculated strain of Ruminococcus flavefaciens survived significantly over the period of time, which was shown in stability of increased inoculated bacterial population. Conclusion: The isolates of fibrolytic bacterial strains are found to be useful in increasing the number of major ruminal fibre degrading bacteria in lactating buffaloes and may act as probiotic in large ruminants on fibre-based diets. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 14-17

  5. The 'Swiss cheese' instability of bacterial biofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Hongchul; Stocker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel pattern that results in bacterial biofilms as a result of the competition between hydrodynamic forces and adhesion forces. After the passage of an air plug, the break up of the residual thin liquid film scrapes and rearranges bacteria on the surface, such that a Swiss cheese pattern of holes is left in the residual biofilm.

  6. Bacterial proteases: targets for diagnostics and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. Kaman; J.P. Hays; H.P. Endtz; F.J. Bikker

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are essential for the proliferation and growth of bacteria, and are also known to contribute to bacterial virulence. This makes them interesting candidates as diagnostic and therapeutic targets for infectious diseases. In this review, the authors discuss the most recent developments and po

  7. Bacterial community reconstruction using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Amnon; Zuk, Or

    2011-11-01

    Bacteria are the unseen majority on our planet, with millions of species and comprising most of the living protoplasm. We propose a novel approach for reconstruction of the composition of an unknown mixture of bacteria using a single Sanger-sequencing reaction of the mixture. Our method is based on compressive sensing theory, which deals with reconstruction of a sparse signal using a small number of measurements. Utilizing the fact that in many cases each bacterial community is comprised of a small subset of all known bacterial species, we show the feasibility of this approach for determining the composition of a bacterial mixture. Using simulations, we show that sequencing a few hundred base-pairs of the 16S rRNA gene sequence may provide enough information for reconstruction of mixtures containing tens of species, out of tens of thousands, even in the presence of realistic measurement noise. Finally, we show initial promising results when applying our method for the reconstruction of a toy experimental mixture with five species. Our approach may have a potential for a simple and efficient way for identifying bacterial species compositions in biological samples. All supplementary data and the MATLAB code are available at www.broadinstitute.org/?orzuk/publications/BCS/.

  8. Multiple bacterial species reside in chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjødsbøl, Kristine; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Karlsmark, Tonny;

    2006-01-01

    species present were identified. More than one bacterial species were detected in all the ulcers. The most common bacteria found were Staphylococcus aureus (found in 93.5% of the ulcers), Enterococcus faecalis (71.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (52.2%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (45.7%), Proteus...

  9. Respiratory bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Hansen, Christine R; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Bacterial respiratory infections are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains the main pathogen in adults, but other Gram-negative bacteria such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia...... respiratory tract (nasal sampling) should be investigated and both infection sites should be treated....

  10. Model for Mutation in Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donangelo, R.; Fort, H.

    2002-07-01

    We describe the evolution of E. coli populations through a Bak-Sneppen-type model which incorporates random mutations. We show that, for a value of the mutation level which coincides with the one estimated from experiments, this model reproduces the measures of mean fitness relative to that of a common ancestor, performed for over 10 000 bacterial generations.

  11. A model for mutation in bacterial populations

    OpenAIRE

    Donangelo, R.; Fort, H.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the evolution of $E.coli$ populations through a Bak-Sneppen type model which incorporates random mutations. We show that, for a value of the mutation level which coincides with the one estimated from experiments, this model reproduces the measures of mean fitness relative to that of a common ancestor, performed for over 10,000 bacterial generations.

  12. Punctuated equilibrium in an evolving bacterial population

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhuri, Indranath; Bose, Indrani

    1999-01-01

    Recently, Lenski et al have carried out an experiment on bacterial evolution. Their findings support the theory of punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution. We show that the M=2 Bak-Sneppen model can explain some of the experimental results in a qualitative manner.

  13. Bacterial cell biology outside the streetlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    As much as vertical transmission of microbial symbionts requires their deep integration into the host reproductive and developmental biology, symbiotic lifestyle might profoundly affect bacterial growth and proliferation. This review describes the reproductive oddities displayed by bacteria associated - more or less intimately - with multicellular eukaryotes.

  14. A study of bacterial gene regulatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sabine

    of GRNs this thesis also provided the first evidence of the sensor histidine kinase VC1831 being an additional player in the Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing (QS) GRN. Bacteria use a process of cell-cell communication called QS which enable the bacterial cells to collectively control their gene expression...

  15. Removal of triphenylmethane dyes by bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  16. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-10-20

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the (bio)processing of lignocellulosic feedstocks, more effective degradation methods of lignin are in demand. Nature has found ways to fully degrade lignin through the production of dedicated ligninolytic enzyme systems. While such enzymes have been well thoroughly studied for ligninolytic fungi, only in recent years biochemical studies on bacterial enzymes capable of lignin modification have intensified. This has revealed several types of enzymes available to bacteria that enable them to act on lignin. Two major classes of bacterial lignin-modifying enzymes are DyP-type peroxidases and laccases. Yet, recently also several other bacterial enzymes have been discovered that seem to play a role in lignin modifications. In the present review, we provide an overview of recent advances in the identification and use of bacterial enzymes acting on lignin or lignin-derived products. PMID:27544286

  17. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining that ...

  18. Bacterial flora of the sigmoid neovagina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Toolenaar; I. Freundt (Ingrid); J.H. Wagenvoort; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); M. Vogel; J. Jeekel (Hans); A.C. Drogendijk

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe bacterial microbiota of 15 sigmoid neovaginas, created in patients with congenital vaginal aplasia or male transsexualism, was studied. No specimen was sterile, and only normal inhabitants of the colon were cultured. The total counts of bacteria were low

  19. Bacterial vaginosis with special reference to anaerobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumati A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV and to estimate the prevalence of anaerobic organisms in vaginal discharge of women suffering from bacterial vaginosis. Settings and Design: Patients attending the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of a Medical College Hospital. A one year cross-sectional study. Methods and Materials: High vaginal swabs taken from 174 female patients complaining of abnormal vaginal discharge. BV was diagnosed by clinical composite criteria and by gram stain. Anaerobes were isolated and identified from the discharge. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi square test, with level of significance set at a value of P< 0.05. Results: BV was diagnosed in 68.39% of the cases by using clinical composite criteria and in 58.4% of the cases by gram stain. Anaerobic culture isolation of vaginal swabs revealed that out of 174 cases 143 (82.65% were culture positive for anaerobes. Bacteroides were significantly raised in BV as compared with non bacterial vaginosis (NBV; < 0.05%. Conclusions: Anaerobic bacteria are important pathogens in the causation of bacterial vaginosis along with other aerobic organisms. Bacteroides and peptostreptococci are significantly raised in BV.

  20. Bacterial ice nucleation: significance and molecular basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurian-Sherman, D; Lindow, S E

    1993-11-01

    Several bacterial species are able to catalyze ice formation at temperatures as warm as -2 degrees C. These microorganisms efficiently catalyze ice formation at temperatures much higher than most organic or inorganic substances. Because of their ubiquity on the surfaces of frost-sensitive plants, they are responsible for initiating ice formation, which results in frost injury. The high temperature of ice catalysis conferred by bacterial ice nuclei makes them useful in ice nucleation-limited processes such as artificial snow production, the freezing of some food products, and possibly in future whether modification schemes. The rarity of other ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperature, and the ease and sensitivity with which ice nuclei can be quantified, have made the use of a promoterless bacterial ice nucleation gene valuable as a reporter of transcription. Target genes to which this promoter is fused can be used in cells in natural habitats. Warm-temperature ice nucleation sites have also been extensively studied at a molecular level. Nucleation sites active at high temperatures (above -5 degrees C) are probably composed of bacterial ice nucleation protein molecules that form functionally aligned aggregates. Models of ice nucleation proteins predict that they form a planar array of hydrogen binding groups that closely complement that of an ice crystal face. Moreover, interdigitation of these molecules may produce a large contiguous template for ice formation.

  1. Bacterial cell biology outside the streetlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    As much as vertical transmission of microbial symbionts requires their deep integration into the host reproductive and developmental biology, symbiotic lifestyle might profoundly affect bacterial growth and proliferation. This review describes the reproductive oddities displayed by bacteria associated - more or less intimately - with multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:27306428

  2. Corticosteroids for acute adult bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van de Beek

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis in adults is a severe disease, with high fatality and morbidity rates. Experimental studies showed that the inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space is associated with unfavorable outcome. In these experiments, corticosteroids, and in particular dexamethasone, were able t

  3. Bacterial meningitis: Mechanisms of disease and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.F. Kornelisse (René); R. de Groot (Ronald); H.J. Neijens (Herman)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBacterial meningitis continues to be a serious infectious disease with a high morbidity and mortality in young children. Early recognition and initiation of adequate treatment are the major determinants for a good outcome. Recent advances in our understanding of the host inflammatory res

  4. Field determination of bacterial disappearance in seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoës, Poul

    1970-01-01

    The article presents two approaches to field determination of disappearance of viable, fecal bacteria after discharge with sewage into a marine environment. The first approach is based on simultaneous sampling for bacterial counting and monitoring of dilution using a conservative tracer, which...

  5. Bacterial ice nucleation: significance and molecular basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurian-Sherman, D; Lindow, S E

    1993-11-01

    Several bacterial species are able to catalyze ice formation at temperatures as warm as -2 degrees C. These microorganisms efficiently catalyze ice formation at temperatures much higher than most organic or inorganic substances. Because of their ubiquity on the surfaces of frost-sensitive plants, they are responsible for initiating ice formation, which results in frost injury. The high temperature of ice catalysis conferred by bacterial ice nuclei makes them useful in ice nucleation-limited processes such as artificial snow production, the freezing of some food products, and possibly in future whether modification schemes. The rarity of other ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperature, and the ease and sensitivity with which ice nuclei can be quantified, have made the use of a promoterless bacterial ice nucleation gene valuable as a reporter of transcription. Target genes to which this promoter is fused can be used in cells in natural habitats. Warm-temperature ice nucleation sites have also been extensively studied at a molecular level. Nucleation sites active at high temperatures (above -5 degrees C) are probably composed of bacterial ice nucleation protein molecules that form functionally aligned aggregates. Models of ice nucleation proteins predict that they form a planar array of hydrogen binding groups that closely complement that of an ice crystal face. Moreover, interdigitation of these molecules may produce a large contiguous template for ice formation. PMID:8224607

  6. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    -coated hydroxyapatite. The activity of enzymes against bacterial cells in biofilm was measured by fluorescence microscopy and an indirect conductance test in which evolution of carbon dioxide was measured. Glucose oxidase combined with lactoperoxidase was bactericidal against biofilm bacteria but did not remove...

  7. Bacterial Acclimation Inside an Aqueous Battery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexian Dong

    Full Text Available Specific environmental stresses may lead to induced genomic instability in bacteria, generating beneficial mutants and potentially accelerating the breeding of industrial microorganisms. The environmental stresses inside the aqueous battery may be derived from such conditions as ion shuttle, pH gradient, free radical reaction and electric field. In most industrial and medical applications, electric fields and direct currents are used to kill bacteria and yeast. However, the present study focused on increasing bacterial survival inside an operating battery. Using a bacterial acclimation strategy, both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were acclimated for 10 battery operation cycles and survived in the battery for over 3 days. The acclimated bacteria changed in cell shape, growth rate and colony color. Further analysis indicated that electrolyte concentration could be one of the major factors determining bacterial survival inside an aqueous battery. The acclimation process significantly improved the viability of both bacteria E. coli and B. subtilis. The viability of acclimated strains was not affected under battery cycle conditions of 0.18-0.80 mA cm(-2 and 1.4-2.1 V. Bacterial addition within 1.0×10(10 cells mL(-1 did not significantly affect battery performance. Because the environmental stress inside the aqueous battery is specific, the use of this battery acclimation strategy may be of great potential for the breeding of industrial microorganisms.

  8. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihane Cheriaa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila-(CM-4 was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L and malachite green (50 mg/L dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  9. Discovery of inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Inhibitors of Bacterial Histidine Kinases

    Summary

    The thesis is on novel antibacterial drug discovery (http://youtu.be/NRMWOGgeysM). Using structure-based and fragment-based dru

  10. Bacterial Sphingomyelinases and Phospholipases as Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Naylor, Claire; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Flieger, Antje

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases are a heterogeneous group of esterases which are usually surface associated or secreted by a wide variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These enzymes hydrolyze sphingomyelin and glycerophospholipids, respectively, generating products identical to the ones produced by eukaryotic enzymes which play crucial roles in distinct physiological processes, including membrane dynamics, cellular signaling, migration, growth, and death. Several bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases are essential for virulence of extracellular, facultative, or obligate intracellular pathogens, as these enzymes contribute to phagosomal escape or phagosomal maturation avoidance, favoring tissue colonization, infection establishment and progression, or immune response evasion. This work presents a classification proposal for bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases that considers not only their enzymatic activities but also their structural aspects. An overview of the main physiopathological activities is provided for each enzyme type, as are examples in which inactivation of a sphingomyelinase- or a phospholipase-encoding gene impairs the virulence of a pathogen. The identification of sphingomyelinases and phospholipases important for bacterial pathogenesis and the development of inhibitors for these enzymes could generate candidate vaccines and therapeutic agents, which will diminish the impacts of the associated human and animal diseases. PMID:27307578

  11. Bacterial DNA delays human eosinophil apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Hasala, Hannele; Sareila, Outi; Moilanen, Eeva; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial DNA delays human eosinophil apoptosis correspondance: Corresponding author. Tel.: +358 3 3551 6687; fax: +358 3 3551 8082. (Ilmarinen, Pinja) (Ilmarinen, Pinja) The Immunopharmacology Research Group--> , Medical School--> , University of Tampere and Research Unit--> , Tampere University Hospital--> , Tampere--> - FINLAND (Ilmarinen, Pinja) The Immunopharmacology ...

  12. Vancomycin prophylaxis of experimental Streptococcus sanguis. Inhibition of bacterial adherence rather than bacterial killing.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, J. P.; Francioli, P.; Glauser, M P

    1981-01-01

    Using a strain of Streptococcus sanguis tolerant to vancomycin to infect aortic vegetations in rats, we found that prophylactic intravenous vancomycin given 30 min before bacterial challenge decreased the incidence of endocarditis from 88 to 8% (P less than 10(-5)). Because peak vancomycin serum levels were below the minimal bactericidal concentration, mechanisms of protection other than bacterial killing were investigated. S. sanguis were incubated with inhibitory concentration of vancomycin...

  13. Biomechanics of bacterial walls: studies of bacterial thread made from Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Thwaites, J J; Mendelson, N H

    1985-01-01

    Bacterial threads of up to 1 m in length have been produced from filaments of separation-suppressed mutants of Bacillus subtilis. Individual threads may contain 20,000 cellular filaments in parallel alignment. The tensile properties of bacterial threads have been examined by using conventional textile engineering techniques. The kinetics of elongation at constant load are indicative of a viscoelastic material. Both Young's modulus and breaking stress are highly dependent upon relative humidit...

  14. A study of bacterial contamination of rattlesnake venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Garcia-Lima

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied the bacterial contamination of rattlesnake venom isolated from snakes in captivity and wild snakes caught recently. The captive snakes showed a relatively high incidence of bacterial contamination of their venom.

  15. Bacterial adhesion of porphyromonas gingivalis on provisional fixed prosthetic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zortuk

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion : The quantity of bacterial adhesion and surface roughness differed among the assessed provisional fixed prosthodontic materials. The light-polymerized provisional material Revotek LC had rougher surface and more bacterial adhesion compared with the others.

  16. A simple technique to assess bacterial attachment to metal surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sonak, S.; Bhosle, N.B.

    There are several methods to assess bacterial adhesion to metal surfaces. Although these methods are sensitive, they are time consuming and need expensive chemicals and instruments. Hence, their use in assessing bacterial adhesion is limited...

  17. Cholinesterase modulations in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Ofek, Keren; Qvist, Tavs;

    2011-01-01

    The circulating cholinesterases acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase may be suppressed and subsequently released from the brain in acute bacterial meningitis.......The circulating cholinesterases acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase may be suppressed and subsequently released from the brain in acute bacterial meningitis....

  18. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Language: English Español ( ... Compartir 2002 Study of the Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Many people have ...

  19. Targeted imaging of bacterial infections : advances, hurdles and hopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, Marleen; Hahn, Markus; Crane, Lucia M. A.; Pleijhuis, Rick G.; Francis, Kevin P.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; van Dam, Gooitzen M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections represent an increasing problem in modern health care, in particular due to ageing populations and accumulating bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Diagnosis is rarely straightforward and consequently treatment is often delayed or indefinite. Therefore, novel tools that can be

  20. Hyperglycemia in bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.S. Schut; W.F. Westendorp; J. de Gans; N.D. Kruyt; L. Spanjaard; J.B. Reitsma; D. van de Beek

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hyperglycemia has been associated with unfavorable outcome in several disorders, but few data are available in bacterial meningitis. We assessed the incidence and significance of hyperglycemia in adults with bacterial meningitis. METHODS: We collected data prospectively between

  1. New methods to assess bacterial injury in water.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaske, S K; Dockins, W S; Schillinger, J. E.; McFeters, G A

    1980-01-01

    Two methods are described for measurement of bacterial injury in water. Laboratory time preceding cell division measured with slide cultures and spheroplast formation after lysozyme treatment were accurate and rapid measurements of bacterial damage.

  2. Bacterial melanin promotes recovery after sciatic nerve injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gevorkyan, Olga. V.; Meliksetyan, Irina B.; Petrosyan, Tigran R.; Hovsepyan, Anichka S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial melanin, obtained from the mutant strain of Bacillus Thuringiensis, has been shown to promote recovery after central nervous system injury. It is hypothesized, in this study, that bacterial melanin can promote structural and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Rats subjected to sciatic nerve transection were intramuscularly administered bacterial melanin. The sciatic nerve transected rats that did not receive intramuscular administration of bacterial melanin served as...

  3. Estimating Bacterial Loadings to Surface Waters from Agricultural Watersheds

    OpenAIRE

    Panhorst, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    Fecal bacteria and pathogens are a major source of surface water impairment. In Virginia alone, approximately 73% of impaired waters are impaired due to fecal coliforms (FC). Because bacteria are a significant cause of water body impairment and existing bacterial models are predominantly based upon laboratory-derived information, bacterial models are needed that describe bacterial die-off and transport processes under field conditions. Before these bacterial models can be developed, more f...

  4. New Class of Competitive Inhibitor of Bacterial Histidine Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmour, Raymond; Foster, J. Estelle; Sheng, Qin; McClain, Jonathan R.; Riley, Anna; Sun, Pei-Ming; Ng, Wai-Leung; Yan, Dalai; Nicas, Thalia I.; Henry, Kenneth; Winkler, Malcolm E.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial histidine kinases have been proposed as targets for the discovery of new antibiotics, yet few specific inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases have been reported. We report here a novel thienopyridine (TEP) compound that inhibits bacterial histidine kinases competitively with respect to ATP but does not comparably inhibit mammalian serine/threonine kinases. Although it partitions into membranes and does not inhibit the growth of bacterial or mammalian cells, TEP could serve as a s...

  5. Discovery of New Substrates for LuxAB Bacterial Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Weishan; Wu, Xingkang; Wu, Wenxiao; Bai, Haixiu; Ma, Zhao; Shen, Yuemao; Yang, Keqian; Li, Minyong

    2016-08-01

    In this article, four novel substrates with long halftime have been designed and synthesized successfully for luxAB bacterial bioluminescence. After in vitro and in vivo biological evaluation, these molecules can emit obvious bioluminescence emission with known bacterial luciferase, thus indicating a new promising approach to developing the bacterial bioluminescent system. PMID:26896339

  6. Discovery of New Substrates for LuxAB Bacterial Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Weishan; Wu, Xingkang; Wu, Wenxiao; Bai, Haixiu; Ma, Zhao; Shen, Yuemao; Yang, Keqian; Li, Minyong

    2016-08-01

    In this article, four novel substrates with long halftime have been designed and synthesized successfully for luxAB bacterial bioluminescence. After in vitro and in vivo biological evaluation, these molecules can emit obvious bioluminescence emission with known bacterial luciferase, thus indicating a new promising approach to developing the bacterial bioluminescent system.

  7. Bacterial pathogens modulate an apoptosis differentiation program in human neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Scott D.; Braughton, Kevin R.; Whitney, Adeline R.; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Schwan, Tom G.; Musser, James M.; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2003-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs or neutrophils) are essential to the innate immune response against bacterial pathogens. Recent evidence suggests that PMN apoptosis facilitates resolution of inflammation during bacterial infection. Although progress has been made toward understanding apoptosis in neutrophils, very little is known about transcriptional regulation of this process during bacterial infection. To gain insight into the molecular processes that facilitate resolution of infe...

  8. Bacterial protein toxins : tools to study mammalian molecular cell biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wüthrich, I.W.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial protein toxins are genetically encoded proteinaceous macromolecules that upon exposure causes perturbation of cellular metabolism in a susceptible host. A bacterial toxin can work at a distance from the site of infection, and has direct and quantifiable actions. Bacterial protein toxins ca

  9. Electrical conductivity measurements of bacterial nanowires from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthupandy, Muthusamy; Anand, Muthusamy; Maduraiveeran, Govindhan; Sait Hameedha Beevi, Akbar; Jeeva Priya, Radhakrishnan

    2015-12-01

    The extracellular appendages of bacteria (flagella) that transfer electrons to electrodes are called bacterial nanowires. This study focuses on the isolation and separation of nanowires that are attached via Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial culture. The size and roughness of separated nanowires were measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The obtained bacterial nanowires indicated a clear image of bacterial nanowires measuring 16 nm in diameter. The formation of bacterial nanowires was confirmed by microscopic studies (AFM and TEM) and the conductivity nature of bacterial nanowire was investigated by electrochemical techniques. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which are nondestructive voltammetry techniques, suggest that bacterial nanowires could be the source of electrons—which may be used in various applications, for example, microbial fuel cells, biosensors, organic solar cells, and bioelectronic devices. Routine analysis of electron transfer between bacterial nanowires and the electrode was performed, providing insight into the extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the electrode. CV revealed the catalytic electron transferability of bacterial nanowires and electrodes and showed excellent redox activities. CV and EIS studies showed that bacterial nanowires can charge the surface by producing and storing sufficient electrons, behave as a capacitor, and have features consistent with EET. Finally, electrochemical studies confirmed the development of bacterial nanowires with EET. This study suggests that bacterial nanowires can be used to fabricate biomolecular sensors and nanoelectronic devices.

  10. 21 CFR 1210.16 - Method of bacterial count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Inspection and Testing § 1210.16 Method of bacterial count. The bacterial count of milk and cream refers to the number of viable bacteria as determined by the standard plate method of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Method of bacterial count. 1210.16 Section...

  11. Bacterial protein toxins in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosadi, Francesca; Fiorentini, Carla; Fabbri, Alessia

    2016-02-01

    Many bacteria causing persistent infections produce toxins whose mechanisms of action indicate that they could have a role in carcinogenesis. Some toxins, like CDT and colibactin, directly attack the genome by damaging DNA whereas others, as for example CNF1, CagA and BFT, impinge on key eukaryotic processes, such as cellular signalling and cell death. These bacterial toxins, together with other less known toxins, mimic carcinogens and tumour promoters. The aim of this review is to fulfil an up-to-date analysis of toxins with carcinogenic potential that have been already correlated to human cancers. Bacterial toxins-induced carcinogenesis represents an emerging aspect in bacteriology, and its significance is increasingly recognized.

  12. Discrete modelling of bacterial conjugation dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goni-Moreno, Angel

    2012-01-01

    In bacterial populations, cells are able to cooperate in order to yield complex collective functionalities. Interest in population-level cellular behaviour is increasing, due to both our expanding knowledge of the underlying biological principles, and the growing range of possible applications for engineered microbial consortia. Researchers in the field of synthetic biology - the application of engineering principles to living systems - have, for example, recently shown how useful decision-making circuits may be distributed across a bacterial population. The ability of cells to interact through small signalling molecules (a mechanism known as it quorum sensing) is the basis for the majority of existing engineered systems. However, horizontal gene transfer (or conjugation) offers the possibility of cells exchanging messages (using DNA) that are much more information-rich. The potential of engineering this conjugation mechanism to suit specific goals will guide future developments in this area. Motivated by a l...

  13. Bacterial Zoonoses Transmitted by Household Pets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter Panduro; Broens, E.M.; Chomel, B.B.;

    2016-01-01

    The close contact between household pets and people offers favourable conditions for bacterial transmission. In this article, the aetiology, prevalence, transmission, impact on human health and preventative measures are summarized for selected bacterial zoonoses transmissible by household pets. Six...... zoonoses representing distinct transmission routes were selected arbitrarily based on the available information on incidence and severity of pet-associated disease caused by zoonotic bacteria: bite infections and cat scratch disease (physical injuries), psittacosis (inhalation), leptospirosis (contact...... with urine), and campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis (faecal–oral ingestion). Antimicrobial resistance was also included due to the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria of zoonotic potential in dogs and cats. There is a general lack of data on pathogen prevalence in the relevant pet population...

  14. Bursting the bubble on bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crusz, Shanika A; Popat, Roman; Rybtke, Morten Theil;

    2012-01-01

    The flow cell biofilm system is an important and widely used tool for the in vitro cultivation and evaluation of bacterial biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions of flow. This paper provides an introduction to the background and use of such systems, accompanied by a detailed guide to the assembly...... of the apparatus including the description of new modifications which enhance its performance. As such, this is an essential guide for the novice biofilm researcher as well as providing valuable trouble-shooting techniques for even the most experienced laboratories. The adoption of a common and reliable...... methodology amongst researchers would enable findings to be shared and replicated amongst the biofilm research community, with the overall aim of advancing understanding and management of these complex and widespread bacterial communities....

  15. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  16. The clinical impact of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria survive in nature by forming biofilms on surfaces and probably most, if not all, bacteria (and fungi) are capable of forming biofilms. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and extracellular DNA....... Bacterial biofilms are resistant to antibiotics, disinfectant chemicals and to phagocytosis and other components of the innate and adaptive inflammatory defense system of the body. It is known, for example, that persistence of staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation....... Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients are caused by biofilm growing mucoid strains. Gradients of nutrients and oxygen exist from the top to the bottom of biofilms and the bacterial cells located in nutrient poor areas have decreased metabolic activity...

  17. Procalcitonin in sepsis and bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Chaudhury

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of sepsis and systemic bacterial infections from other causes of systemic inflammatory response is crucial from the therapeutic point of view. The clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific and traditional biomarkers like white cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are not sufficiently sensitive or specific to guide therapeutic decisions. Procalcitonin (PCT is considered a reliable marker for the diagnosis and prognosis of moderate to severe bacterial infections, and it has also been evaluated to guide the clinicians in the rational usage of antibiotics. This review describes the diagnostic and prognostic role of PCT as a biomarker in various clinical settings along with the laboratory aspects and its usefulness in risk stratification and antibiotic stewardship.

  18. Effects of hydrodynamic interactions in bacterial swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Lun Wu, Xiao

    2008-03-01

    The lack of precise experimental data has prevented the investigation of the effects of long range hydrodynamic interactions in bacterial swimming. We perform measurements on various strains of bacteria with the aid of optical tweezers to shed light on this aspect of bacterial motility. Geometrical parameters recorded by fluorescence microscopy are used with theories which model flagella propulsion (Resistive force theory & Lighthill's formulation which includes long range interactions). Comparison of the predictions of these theories with experimental data, observed directly from swimming bacterium, led to the conclusion that while long range inetractions were important for single polar flagellated strains (Vibrio Alginolyticus & Caulobacter Crescentus), local force theory was adequate to describe the swimming of multi-flagellated Esherichia Coli. We performed additional measurements on E. Coli minicells (miniature cells with single polar flagellum) to try and determine the cause of this apparent effect of shielding of long range interactions in multiple flagellated bacteria.

  19. Bacterial Toxins as Pathogen Weapons Against Phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Vale, Ana; Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxins are virulence factors that manipulate host cell functions and take over the control of vital processes of living organisms to favor microbial infection. Some toxins directly target innate immune cells, thereby annihilating a major branch of the host immune response. In this review we will focus on bacterial toxins that act from the extracellular milieu and hinder the function of macrophages and neutrophils. In particular, we will concentrate on toxins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that manipulate cell signaling or induce cell death by either imposing direct damage to the host cells cytoplasmic membrane or enzymatically modifying key eukaryotic targets. Outcomes regarding pathogen dissemination, host damage and disease progression will be discussed.

  20. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkarsha S. Shivsharan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Micro-organisms have tendency to produce antimicrobial substances which show biological activity against other kind of micro-organisms. This phenomenon of bacterial antagonism is observed in lactic acid bacteria with competitive advantages. The lactic acid bacteria are commonly present in many fermented products, fruits and milk products. The variety of antimicrobial substances produced by lactic acid bacteria showing good inhibition capacity include production of lactic acid, acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, carbon dioxide, diacetyl and bacteriocin. Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria are the subject of intense research because of their antimicrobial activity against food born bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes, staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium botulinum and several others .Bacteriocins may be bacteriostatic or bactericidal with narrow or broad range of activity. The main of the study was to study the antimicrobial activity of such lactic acid bacterial isolates.

  1. Bacterial microbiome of lungs in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Marc A; Hogg, James C; Sin, Don D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the third leading cause of death in the world. Although smoking is the main risk factor for this disease, only a minority of smokers develop COPD. Why this happens is largely unknown. Recent discoveries by the human microbiome project have shed new light on the importance and richness of the bacterial microbiota at different body sites in human beings. The microbiota plays a particularly important role in the development and functional integrity of the immune system. Shifts or perturbations in the microbiota can lead to disease. COPD is in part mediated by dysregulated immune responses to cigarette smoke and other environmental insults. Although traditionally the lung has been viewed as a sterile organ, by using highly sensitive genomic techniques, recent reports have identified diverse bacterial communities in the human lung that may change in COPD. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the lung microbiota in COPD and its potential implications for pathogenesis of the disease.

  2. Bacterial toxins as pathogen weapons against phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana edo Vale

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxins are virulence factors that manipulate host cell functions and take over the control of vital processes of living organisms to favour microbial infection. Some toxins directly target innate immune cells, thereby annihilating a major branch of the host immune response. In this review we will focus on bacterial toxins that act from the extracellular milieu and hinder the function of macrophages and neutrophils. In particular, we will concentrate on toxins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that manipulate cell signalling or induce cell death by either imposing direct damage to the host cells cytoplasmic membrane or enzymatically modifying key eukaryotic targets. Outcomes regarding pathogen dissemination, host damage and disease progression will be discussed.

  3. Future of Bacterial Therapy of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial therapy of cancer has a centuries-long history and was first-line therapy at the hospital in New York City that would become Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, under Dr. William B. Coley. However, after Coley's death in 1936, bacterial therapy of cancer ceased in the clinic until the present century. Clinical trials have been recently carried out for strains of the obligate anaerobe Clostridium novyi with the toxin gene deleted, and on an attenuated strain of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), which is a facultative anaerobe that can grow in viable, as well as necrotic, areas of tumors, unlike Clostridium, which can only grow in the hypoxic areas. Our laboratory has developed the novel strain S. typhimurium A1-R that is effective against all tumor types in clinically-relevant mouse models, including patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse models. This chapter suggests future clinical applications for S. typhimurium A1-R.

  4. Within-host evolution of bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, Xavier; Walker, A. Sarah; Peto, Tim E.; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing has opened the way to investigating the dynamics and genomic evolution of bacterial pathogens during colonization and infection of humans. The application of this technology to the longitudinal study of adaptation in the infected host — in particular, the evolution of drug resistance and host adaptation in patients chronically infected with opportunistic pathogens — has revealed remarkable patterns of convergent evolution, pointing to an inherent repeatability of evolution. In this Review, we describe how these studies have advanced our understanding of the mechanisms and principles of within-host genome evolution, and we consider the consequences of findings such as a potent adaptive potential for pathogenicity. Finally, we discuss the possibility that genomics may be used in the future to predict the clinical progression of bacterial infections, and to suggest the best treatment option. PMID:26806595

  5. Structure and operation of bacterial tripartite pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Symmons, Martyn F; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, tripartite membrane machineries, or pumps, determine the efflux of small noxious molecules, such as detergents, heavy metals, and antibiotics, and the export of large proteins including toxins. They are therefore influential in bacterial survival, particularly during infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. In these tripartite pumps an inner membrane transporter, typically an ATPase or proton antiporter, binds and translocates export or efflux substrates. In cooperation with a periplasmic adaptor protein it recruits and opens a TolC family cell exit duct, which is anchored in the outer membrane and projects across the periplasmic space between inner and outer membranes. Assembled tripartite pumps thus span the entire bacterial cell envelope. We review the atomic structures of each of the three pump components and discuss how these have allowed high-resolution views of tripartite pump assembly, operation, and possible inhibition. PMID:23808339

  6. Formaldehyde stress responses in bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Houqian Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is the simplest of all aldehydes and is highly cytotoxic. Its use and associated dangers from environmental exposure have been well documented. Detoxification systems for formaldehyde are found throughout the biological world and they are especially important in methylotrophic bacteria, which generate this compound as part of their metabolism of methanol. Formaldehyde metabolizing systems can be divided into those dependent upon pterin cofactors, sugar phosphates and those dependent upon glutathione. The more prevalent thiol-dependent formaldehyde detoxification system is found in many bacterial pathogens, almost all of which do not metabolize methane or methanol. This review describes the endogenous and exogenous sources of formaldehyde, its toxic effects and mechanisms of detoxification. The methods of formaldehyde sensing are also described with a focus on the formaldehyde responsive transcription factors HxlR, FrmR and NmlR. Finally, the physiological relevance of detoxification systems for formaldehyde in bacterial pathogens is discussed.

  7. Novel Nitrocellulose Made from Bacterial Cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dong-Ping; Ma, Bo; Zhu, Chun-Lin; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Yang, Jia-Zhi

    2010-04-01

    Nitrocellulose (NC) is useful in several industrial segments, especially in the production of gun, rocket, and missile propellants. The conventional way to prepare NC is done through the nitration of plant cellulose with nitric acid. In this work, bacterial cellulose nitrate (NBC) is synthesized by bacterial cellulose (BC) and nitro-sulfric acid under heterogeneous conditions. NBC with the degree of substitution (DS) of 1-2.85 was obtained, and the effects of sulfuric to nitric ratio, reaction temperature, and reaction time on the value of DS of NBC are discussed. The samples are also characterized by elemental analysis, thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction.

  8. Immunization of newborns with bacterial conjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Biggelaar, Anita H J; Pomat, William S

    2013-05-17

    Bacterial conjugate vaccines are based on the principle of coupling immunogenic bacterial capsular polysaccharides to a carrier protein to facilitate the induction of memory T-cell responses. Following the success of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines in the 1980s, conjugate vaccines for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis infections were developed and proven to be effective in protecting children against invasive disease. In this review, the use of conjugate vaccines in human newborns is discussed. Neonatal Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal conjugate vaccination schedules have been trialed and proven to be safe, with the majority of studies demonstrating no evidence for the induction of immune tolerance. Whether their neonatal administration also results in an earlier induction of clinical protection in the first 2-3 critical months of life is still to be demonstrated. PMID:22728221

  9. Bacterial consortia for crude oil spill remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil spills generate enormous public concern and highlight the need for cost effective ad environmentally acceptable mitigation technologies. Physico-chemical methods are not completely effective after a spill. Hence, there is a need for improved and alternative technologies. Bioremediation is the most environmentally sound technology for clean up. This report intends to determine the potential of a bacterial consortium for degradation of Gulf and Bombay High crude oil. A four membered consortium was designed that could degrade 70% of the crude oil. A member of consortium produced a biosurfactant, rhamnolipid, that emulsified crude oil efficiently for effective degradation by the other members of consortium. The wide range of hydrocarbonoclastic capabilities of the selected members of bacterial consortium leads to the degradation of both aromatic and aliphatic fractions of crude oil in 72 hours. (Author)

  10. The Bacterial Microflora of Fish, Revised

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Austin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of numerous studies indicate that fish possess bacterial populations on or in their skin, gills, digestive tract, and light-emitting organs. In addition, the internal organs (kidney, liver, and spleen of healthy fish may contain bacteria, but there is debate about whether or not muscle is actually sterile. Using traditional culture-dependent techniques, the numbers and taxonomic composition of the bacterial populations generally reflect those of the surrounding water. More modern culture-independent approaches have permitted the recognition of previously uncultured bacteria. The role of the organisms includes the ability to degrade complex molecules (therefore exercising a potential benefit in nutrition, to produce vitamins and polymers, and to be responsible for the emission of light by the light-emitting organs of deep-sea fish. Taxa, including Pseudomonas, may contribute to spoilage by the production of histamines in fish tissue.

  11. Bacterial Modulation of Plant Ethylene Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamalero, Elisa; Glick, Bernard R

    2015-09-01

    A focus on the mechanisms by which ACC deaminase-containing bacteria facilitate plant growth.Bacteria that produce the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, when present either on the surface of plant roots (rhizospheric) or within plant tissues (endophytic), play an active role in modulating ethylene levels in plants. This enzyme activity facilitates plant growth especially in the presence of various environmental stresses. Thus, plant growth-promoting bacteria that express ACC deaminase activity protect plants from growth inhibition by flooding and anoxia, drought, high salt, the presence of fungal and bacterial pathogens, nematodes, and the presence of metals and organic contaminants. Bacteria that express ACC deaminase activity also decrease the rate of flower wilting, promote the rooting of cuttings, and facilitate the nodulation of legumes. Here, the mechanisms behind bacterial ACC deaminase facilitation of plant growth and development are discussed, and numerous examples of the use of bacteria with this activity are summarized. PMID:25897004

  12. Formaldehyde Stress Responses in Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nathan H; Djoko, Karrera Y; Veyrier, Frédéric J; McEwan, Alastair G

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde is the simplest of all aldehydes and is highly cytotoxic. Its use and associated dangers from environmental exposure have been well documented. Detoxification systems for formaldehyde are found throughout the biological world and they are especially important in methylotrophic bacteria, which generate this compound as part of their metabolism of methanol. Formaldehyde metabolizing systems can be divided into those dependent upon pterin cofactors, sugar phosphates and those dependent upon glutathione. The more prevalent thiol-dependent formaldehyde detoxification system is found in many bacterial pathogens, almost all of which do not metabolize methane or methanol. This review describes the endogenous and exogenous sources of formaldehyde, its toxic effects and mechanisms of detoxification. The methods of formaldehyde sensing are also described with a focus on the formaldehyde responsive transcription factors HxlR, FrmR, and NmlR. Finally, the physiological relevance of detoxification systems for formaldehyde in bacterial pathogens is discussed. PMID:26973631

  13. Influenza and bacterial pneumonia - constant companions

    OpenAIRE

    Wunderink, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Sequential or concomitant influenza and bacterial pneumonia are two common syndromes seen in community-acquired pneumonia. Inadequacies of diagnostic testing make separating simple pneumonia with either bacteria or influenza from concomitant or sequential influenza with both microorganisms difficult, although the novel 2009 H1N1 epidemic may improve the availability of molecular testing for viruses. Given the frequency of viral pneumonia and diagnostic limitations, empirical antivirals may be...

  14. Diffusion of an ellipsoid in bacterial suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yi; Lai, Lipeng; Tai, Yi-Shu; Zhang, Kechun; Xu, Xinliang; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Active matter such as swarming bacteria and motile colloids exhibits exotic properties different from conventional equilibrium materials. Among these properties, the enhanced diffusion of tracer particles is generally deemed as a hallmark of active matter. Here, rather than spherical tracers, we investigate the diffusion of isolated ellipsoids in quasi-two-dimensional bacterial bath. Our study reveals a nonlinear enhancement of both translational and rotational diffusions. More importantly, w...

  15. Bacterial Plasmids in Antarctic Natural Microbial Assemblages

    OpenAIRE

    Kobori, Hiromi; Sullivan, Cornelius W.; Shizuya, Hiroaki

    1984-01-01

    Samples of psychrophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria were collected from sea ice, seawater, sediments, and benthic or ice-associated animals in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. A total of 155 strains were isolated and tested for the presence of plasmids by DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. Thirty-one percent of the isolates carried at least one kind of plasmid. Bacterial isolates taken from sediments showed the highest plasmid incidence (42%), and isolates from seawater showed the lowest plasmid inc...

  16. Bacterial small RNAs in the Genus Rickettsia

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Casey L. C.; Narra, Hema P.; Rojas, Mark; Sahni, Abha; Patel, Jignesh; Khanipov, Kamil; Wood, Thomas G.; Fofanov, Yuriy; Sahni, Sanjeev K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rickettsia species are obligate intracellular Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria and the etiologic agents of diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), Mediterranean spotted fever, epidemic typhus, and murine typhus. Genome sequencing revealed that R. prowazekii has ~25 % non-coding DNA, the majority of which is thought to be either “junk DNA” or pseudogenes resulting from genomic reduction. These characteristics also define other Rickettsia genomes. Bacterial small RNAs,...

  17. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis: Few additional points

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pankaj Jain

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a treatable complication of decompensated cirrhosis. Coagulopathy with evidence of hyperfibrinolysis or clinically evident disseminated intravascular coagulation precludes paracentesis. Alcoholic hepatitis with fever, leucocytosis and abdominal pain should be evaluated for SBP. Oral ofloxacin is as effective as parenteral cefotaxime in treatment of SBP except for inpatients with vomiting,encephalopathy, or renal failure. Albumin is superior to hydroxyethyl starch in treatment of SBP.

  18. Intermittency measurement in two dimensional bacterial turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Xiang; Huang, Yongxiang; Chen, Ming; Lu, Zhiming; Liu, Yulu; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental velocity database of a bacterial collective motion , e.g., \\textit{B. subtilis}, in turbulent phase with volume filling fraction $84\\%$ provided by Professor Goldstein at the Cambridge University UK, was analyzed to emphasize the scaling behavior of this active turbulence system. This was accomplished by performing a Hilbert-based methodology analysis to retrieve the scaling property without the $\\beta-$limitation. A dual-power-law behavior separated by the viscosity scale $\\ell_{\

  19. Factors influencing bacterial adhesion to contact lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Debarun; Cole, Nerida; Willcox, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The process of any contact lens related keratitis generally starts with the adhesion of opportunistic pathogens to contact lens surface. This article focuses on identifying the factors which have been reported to affect bacterial adhesion to contact lenses. Adhesion to lenses differs between various genera/species/strains of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is the predominant causative organism, adheres in the highest numbers to both hydrogel and silicone hydrogel lenses in vitro. The ...

  20. Dielectrophoretic assay of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johari, Juliana [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom); Huebner, Yvonne [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom); Hull, Judith C [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom); Dale, Jeremy W [School of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom); Hughes, Michael P [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-21

    The dielectrophoretic collection spectra of antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis have been determined. These indicate that in the absence of antibiotic treatment there is a strong similarity between the dielectric properties of sensitive and resistant strains, and that there is a significant difference between the sensitive strains before and after treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin after 24 h exposure. This method offers possibilities for the assessment of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. (note)

  1. Mathematical description of bacterial traveling pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Bournaveas, Nikolaos; Buguin, Axel; Calvez, Vincent; Perthame, Benoît; Saragosti, Jonathan; Silberzan, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    The Keller-Segel system has been widely proposed as a model for bacterial waves driven by chemotactic processes. Current experiments on {\\em E. coli} have shown precise structure of traveling pulses. We present here an alternative mathematical description of traveling pulses at a macroscopic scale. This modeling task is complemented with numerical simulations in accordance with the experimental observations. Our model is derived from an accurate kinetic description of the mesoscopic run-and-t...

  2. Mathematical Description of Bacterial Traveling Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Saragosti, Jonathan; Calvez, Vincent; Bournaveas, Nikolaos; Buguin, Axel; Silberzan, Pascal; Perthame, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    The Keller-Segel system has been widely proposed as a model for bacterial waves driven by chemotactic processes. Current experiments on Escherichia coli have shown the precise structure of traveling pulses. We present here an alternative mathematical description of traveling pulses at the macroscopic scale. This modeling task is complemented with numerical simulations in accordance with the experimental observations. Our model is derived from an accurate kinetic description of the mesoscopic ...

  3. Mathematical description of bacterial traveling pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Bournaveas, Nikolaos; Buguin, Axel; Calvez, Vincent; Perthame, Benoît; Saragosti, Jonathan; Silberzan, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    The Keller-Segel system has been widely proposed as a model for bacterial waves driven by chemotactic processes. Current experiments on E. coli have shown precise structure of traveling pulses. We present here an alternative mathematical description of traveling pulses at a macroscopic scale. This modeling task is complemented with numerical simulations in accordance with the experimental observations. Our model is derived from an accurate kinetic description of the mesoscopic run-and-tumble ...

  4. Xylella Genomics and Bacterial Pathogenicity to Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Dow, J. M.; Daniels, M J

    2000-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, a pathogen of citrus, is the first plant pathogenic bacterium for which the complete genome sequence has been published. Inspection of the sequence reveals high relatedness to many genes of other pathogens, notably Xanthomonas campestris. Based on this, we suggest that Xylella possesses certain easily testable properties that contribute to pathogenicity. We also present some general considerations for deriving information on pathogenicity from bacterial genomics.

  5. Biomineralization and magnetism of bacterial magnetosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yongxin; DENG Chenglong; LIU Qingsong; Nikolai Petersen; ZHU Rixiang

    2004-01-01

    Magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria are of great interest in understanding biomineralization and possible links between organisms and geomagnetic field. Fossil magnetosomes are ubiquitous in marine and lake sediments and may significantly contribute to magnetic signals. In this review, we firstly introduce some characteristics of magnetotactic bacteria, followed by considering recent progress in magnetosome formation, magnetic measurements, and identification of bacterial magnetites in bulk sediments as well as their paleoenvironmental implications. Finally, we briefly discuss potential future breakthroughs in magnetosome studies and its applications.

  6. BACTERIAL INFECTIONS IN RECIPIENTS OF RENAL ALLOGRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vatazin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to analysis of microflora spectrum in various biological materials in patients after renal transplantation. The character of the flora is strongly dependent on the infectious process localization. Gram- positive and gram-negative bacteria are found in approximately equal proportions with a slight predominance of gram-positive flora. Isolated bacteria in most cases had pronounced polyvalent antibiotic resistance. The performed analysis substantiated recommendations for rational antibiotic therapy of various bacterial infections. 

  7. Bacterial Enhancement of Vinyl Fouling by Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Paul E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of bacteria in the development of algae on low-density vinyl was investigated. Unidentified bacterial contaminants in unialgal stock cultures of Phormidium faveolarum and Pleurochloris pyrenoidosa enhanced, by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, colonization of vinyl by these algae, as determined by epifluorescence microscopy counts and chlorophyll a in extracts of colonized vinyl. Colonization by bacteria always preceded that by algae. Scanning electron microscopy of the colonized Phormidiu...

  8. Bacterial Community Development in Experimental Gingivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kistler, James O; Veronica Booth; Bradshaw, David J.; Wade, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygi...

  9. Biocompatibility of Bacterial Cellulose Based Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Omar P. Troncoso; Solene Commeaux; Torres, Fernando G.

    2012-01-01

    Some bacteria can synthesize cellulose when they are cultivated under adequate conditions. These bacteria produce a mat of cellulose on the top of the culture medium, which is formed by a three-dimensional coherent network of pure cellulose nanofibers. Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been widely used in different fields, such as the paper industry, electronics and tissue engineering due to its remarkable mechanical properties, conformability and porosity. Nanocomposites based on BC have received...

  10. PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ECONOMICAL BACTERIAL CELLULOSE

    OpenAIRE

    Houssni El-Saied; Ahmed I. El-Diwany; Altaf H. Bast; Nagwa A. Atwa; Dina E. El-Ghwas

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigates the economical production of bacterial cellulose (BC) by Gluconacetobacter subsp. Xylinus (ATCC 10245) in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks cultivated under static conditions. The fermentation media used contained food industrial by-product liquors, such as black strap molasses solution and corn steep liquor (CSL), which represents some of the most economical carbon and nitrogen sources. However, because of the presence of undesirable components in molasses (such as colo...

  11. Diagnosis of bacterial hepatic abscess by CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Lin Wang; Xue-Jun Guo; Shui-Bo Qiu; Yi Lei; Zhi-Dong Yuan; Han-Bin Dong; Hui-An Liu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial hepatic abscess usually is acute and progressive, often resulting in sepsis, impairment of liver function and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The mortality rate was as high as 80%in the past. For the purpose of early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this disease, we probed the imaging manifestations and their characteristics in bacterial hepatic abscesses by CT scan. METHODS:Twenty-four lesions from 21 patients with bacterial hepatic abscesses that were conifrmed by clinical features, puncture and culture were reviewed for CT manifestations. Fourteen patients were male and 7 were female, with an average age of 56.2 years. All lesions underwent CT plain scan and three-phase enhanced scan and 15 patients underwent delayed-phase imaging. Three senior radiologists read the iflms in accordance with a standard. RESULTS: Among 24 lesions, 18 (75%) were situated in the right liver with diameters of 1.4-9.3 cm (average 4.5 cm). Nineteen (79.2%) lesions were round or sub-round in shape, and 22 (91.7%) had smooth, uninterrupted and sharp edges. All lesions showed low attenuation of less than 20 Hu. Twenty-two enhanced lesions (91.7%) had rim-shaped enhancement in the abscess wall, and 13 (54.2%) showed single or double-ring signs. Eighteen (75%) displayed honeycomb-like, grid-like or strip-like enhancement. Eighteen (75%) were regionally enhanced in the surroundings or upper or lower layers. Only 2 (8.3%) displayed a gas-liquid surface sign. CONCLUSIONS:  The CT ifndings of bacterial hepatic abscess are usually typical, and the diagnosis of the abscess is not dififcult. To precisely diagnose atypical cases, it is necessary to combine CT with clinical observations and follow-up.

  12. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Mutagenesis Using Recombineering

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaran Narayanan; Qingwen Chen

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones has been demonstrated to facilitate physiologically relevant levels compared to viral and nonviral cDNA vectors. BACs are large enough to transfer intact genes in their native chromosomal setting together with flanking regulatory elements to provide all the signals for correct spatiotemporal gene expression. Until recently, the use of BACs for functional studies has been limited because their large size has inherently presented...

  13. Collective decision making in bacterial viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Joshua S; Mileyko, Yuriy; Joh, Richard I; Voit, Eberhard O

    2008-09-15

    For many bacterial viruses, the choice of whether to kill host cells or enter a latent state depends on the multiplicity of coinfection. Here, we present a mathematical theory of how bacterial viruses can make collective decisions concerning the fate of infected cells. We base our theory on mechanistic models of gene regulatory dynamics. Unlike most previous work, we treat the copy number of viral genes as variable. Increasing the viral copy number increases the rate of transcription of viral mRNAs. When viral regulation of cell fate includes nonlinear feedback loops, very small changes in transcriptional rates can lead to dramatic changes in steady-state gene expression. Hence, we prove that deterministic decisions can be reached, e.g., lysis or latency, depending on the cellular multiplicity of infection within a broad class of gene regulatory models of viral decision-making. Comparisons of a parameterized version of the model with molecular studies of the decision structure in the temperate bacteriophage lambda are consistent with our conclusions. Because the model is general, it suggests that bacterial viruses can respond adaptively to changes in population dynamics, and that features of collective decision-making in viruses are evolvable life history traits.

  14. Patterning bacterial communities on epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Dwidar

    Full Text Available Micropatterning of bacteria using aqueous two phase system (ATPS enables the localized culture and formation of physically separated bacterial communities on human epithelial cell sheets. This method was used to compare the effects of Escherichia coli strain MG1655 and an isogenic invasive counterpart that expresses the invasin (inv gene from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis on the underlying epithelial cell layer. Large portions of the cell layer beneath the invasive strain were killed or detached while the non-invasive E. coli had no apparent effect on the epithelial cell layer over a 24 h observation period. In addition, simultaneous testing of the localized effects of three different bacterial species; E. coli MG1655, Shigella boydii KACC 10792 and Pseudomonas sp DSM 50906 on an epithelial cell layer is also demonstrated. The paper further shows the ability to use a bacterial predator, Bdellovibriobacteriovorus HD 100, to selectively remove the E. coli, S. boydii and P. sp communities from this bacteria-patterned epithelial cell layer. Importantly, predation and removal of the P. Sp was critical for maintaining viability of the underlying epithelial cells. Although this paper focuses on a few specific cell types, the technique should be broadly applicable to understand a variety of bacteria-epithelial cell interactions.

  15. Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Ellen R

    2011-05-01

    Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis are 2 of the most common indications for antimicrobial agents in children. Together, they are responsible for billions of dollars of health care expenditures. The pathogenesis of the 2 conditions is identical. In the majority of children with each condition, a preceding viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of the acute bacterial complication. It has been shown that viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of acute otitis media in 37% of cases. Currently, precise microbiologic diagnosis of acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis requires performance of tympanocentesis in the former and sinus aspiration in the latter. The identification of a virus from the nasopharynx in either case does not obviate the need for antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, nasal and nasopharyngeal swabs are not useful in predicting the results of culture of the middle ear or paranasal sinus. However, it is possible that a combination of information regarding nasopharyngeal colonization with bacteria and infection with specific viruses may inform treatment decisions in the future.

  16. Carbon nanotubes as in vivo bacterial probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Neelkanth M.; Ghosh, Debadyuti; Belcher, Angela M.

    2014-09-01

    With the rise in antibiotic-resistant infections, non-invasive sensing of infectious diseases is increasingly important. Optical imaging, although safer and simpler, is less developed than other modalities such as radioimaging, due to low availability of target-specific molecular probes. Here we report carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as bacterial probes for fluorescence imaging of pathogenic infections. We demonstrate that SWNTs functionalized using M13 bacteriophage (M13-SWNT) can distinguish between F‧-positive and F‧-negative bacterial strains. Moreover, through one-step modification, we attach an anti-bacterial antibody on M13-SWNT, making it easily tunable for sensing specific F‧-negative bacteria. We illustrate detection of Staphylococcus aureus intramuscular infections, with ~3.4 × enhancement in fluorescence intensity over background. SWNT imaging presents lower signal spread ~0.08 × and higher signal amplification ~1.4 × , compared with conventional dyes. We show the probe offers greater ~5.7 × enhancement in imaging of S. aureus infective endocarditis. These biologically functionalized, aqueous-dispersed, actively targeted, modularly tunable SWNT probes offer new avenues for exploration of deeply buried infections.

  17. Bacterial Chemotaxis with a Moving Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Corey

    2015-03-01

    Most chemotaxis studies so far have been conducted in a quiescent fluid with a well-defined chemical gradient. Such experiments may be appropriate for studying enteric bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, but the environment it provides is very different from that typically encountered by marine bacteria. Herein we describe an experiment in which marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticusis subject to stimulation by a small moving target. A micropipette of the tip size <1 ?m is used to slowly release a chemoattractant, serine, at different concentrations. The pipette is made to move with different patterns and speeds, ranging from 0 to 100 ?m/s; the latter is about twice the bacterial swimming speed. We found that if the pipette is moved slowly, with 1/4 of bacterial swimming speed, cells accumulate near the tip region but when it is moved with speed greater than 1/2 the bacterial swimming speed, cells trail behind the pipette over a large distance. The behaviors observed in V. alginolyticusare significantly different from E. coli, suggesting that the former is a better chemotaxer in a changing environment.

  18. Bacterial Contamination of Iranian Paper Currency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-Hassan Moosavy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transmission of human pathogens can be occurred via inert objects. Paper currency is a further common contact surface whereby pathogens can be transferred within a population although the significance remains unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to investigate microbial populations associated with Iranian paper currency.Methods: This study was carried out by getting 108 samples of the Iranian currency notes (1000, 2000, 5000, 10000, 20000 and 50000 RIALS from food-related shops that included food service outlets, greengrocery, supermarket, bakery, confectionary and poultry meat retail outlets. All currency notes were examined for total bacterial count and identification of pathogenic bacteria.Results: The average total bacterial count that was recovered from currency notes was found to be 3.27±0.31 colony forming unites. 2000R had the highest total bacterial count, followed by 5000R, 10000R and the lowest in 50000R. In this study, the isolated bacteria recovered were Bacillus cereus (8.33%, E. coli (48.14%, Staphylococcus aureus (28.7%, Salmonella (0.92%, Listeria monocytogenes (0.92%, Yersinia entrocolitica (6.48%. It was revealed that all the pathogens screened for where encountered on currency notes were recovered from one sample. There were no significant (P>0.05 correlations between the carriage of pathogens/fecal indicator bacteria and currency note condition.Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that Iranian currency notes represent a significant vehicle for human pathogens.

  19. Bacterial microbiome of lungs in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze MA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marc A Sze,1 James C Hogg,2 Don D Sin1 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The James Hogg Research Centre, Providence Heart-Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is currently the third leading cause of death in the world. Although smoking is the main risk factor for this disease, only a minority of smokers develop COPD. Why this happens is largely unknown. Recent discoveries by the human microbiome project have shed new light on the importance and richness of the bacterial microbiota at different body sites in human beings. The microbiota plays a particularly important role in the development and functional integrity of the immune system. Shifts or perturbations in the microbiota can lead to disease. COPD is in part mediated by dysregulated immune responses to cigarette smoke and other environmental insults. Although traditionally the lung has been viewed as a sterile organ, by using highly sensitive genomic techniques, recent reports have identified diverse bacterial communities in the human lung that may change in COPD. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the lung microbiota in COPD and its potential implications for pathogenesis of the disease. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bacterial microbiome, lungs

  20. Insights from genomics into bacterial pathogen populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens impose a heavy burden of disease on human populations worldwide. The gravest threats are posed by highly virulent respiratory pathogens, enteric pathogens, and HIV-associated infections. Tuberculosis alone is responsible for the deaths of 1.5 million people annually. Treatment options for bacterial pathogens are being steadily eroded by the evolution and spread of drug resistance. However, population-level whole genome sequencing offers new hope in the fight against pathogenic bacteria. By providing insights into bacterial evolution and disease etiology, these approaches pave the way for novel interventions and therapeutic targets. Sequencing populations of bacteria across the whole genome provides unprecedented resolution to investigate (i within-host evolution, (ii transmission history, and (iii population structure. Moreover, advances in rapid benchtop sequencing herald a new era of real-time genomics in which sequencing and analysis can be deployed within hours in response to rapidly changing public health emergencies. The purpose of this review is to highlight the transformative effect of population genomics on bacteriology, and to consider the prospects for answering abiding questions such as why bacteria cause disease.

  1. Carbon and phosphorus regulating bacterial metabolism in oligotrophic boreal lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, L. O.; Graneli, W.; Daniel, C. B.;

    2011-01-01

    -P and glucose-C alone or in combination (0.01 and 0.3 mg L(-1), respectively) was added to 1.0 mu m filtered lake water and incubated in darkness at 20 degrees C. Additions of glucose (C) and phosphorus (P) alone did not lead to changes in the rates of bacterial metabolic processes, whereas bacterial...... respiration and bacterial production responded positively to C + P enrichment for most of the lakes sampled. Bacterial growth efficiency showed a wide range (2.5-28.7%) and low mean value (12%). These variations were not correlated with the DOC concentration. Our results show that heterotrophic bacterial...

  2. Bacterial melanin promotes recovery after sciatic nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olga V Gevorkyan; Irina B Meliksetyan; Tigran R Petrosyan; Anichka S Hovsepyan

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial melanin, obtained from the mutant strain ofBacillus Thuringiensis, has been shown to promote recovery after central nervous system injury. It is hypothesized, in this study, that bacterial melanin can promote structural and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Rats subjected to sciatic nerve transection were intramuscularly administered bacterial melanin. The sciatic nerve transected rats that did not receive intramuscular administration of bacterial melanin served as controls. Behavior tests showed that compared to control rats, the time taken for instrumental conditioned relfex recovery was signiifcantly shorter and the ability to keep the balance on the rotating bar was signiifcantly better in bacterial melanin-treated rats. Histomor-phological tests showed that bacterial melanin promoted axon regeneration after sciatic nerve injury. These ifndings suggest that bacterial melanin exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve, contributes to limb motor function recovery, and therefore can be used for rehabil-itation treatment of peripheral nerve injury.

  3. Propionibacterium acidipropionici CRL1198 influences the production of acids and the growth of bacterial genera stimulated by inulin in a murine model of cecal slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Pisarello, M J; Gultemirian, M L; Nieto-Peñalver, C; Perez Chaia, A

    2010-08-01

    Different attempts have been made to improve the health status of humans and animals by increasing the intestinal production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) derived from non-digestible carbohydrates fermentation. In this paper we investigate the in vitro production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) after addition of inulin, propionibacteria or a combination of both in an experimental model of mice cecal slurries. The development of bacterial genera which are usually stimulated by inulin addition was also investigated. According to our experimental data, acetic acid and butyric acids concentrations increased after incubation in slurries that had no supplements. By contrast, butyric acid concentrations remained in the basal value when supplements were used. Fermentation of only inulin did not increase the concentration of total SCFA. Propionibacterium acidipropionici CRL1198 improved the production of propionic acid in cecal slurries when it was added alone, but the effect was more noticeable in the combination with inulin. A modulation of the global fermentative activity of the cecal microbiota was evidenced by the increase on the ratio propionic acid/SCFA in supplementations with propionibacteria. Statistical analysis of data demonstrated that samples from homogenates with propionibacteria alone or combined with inulin belong to the same cluster. The presence of propionibacteria limited the growth of Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium hystoliticum groups in slurries with and without inulin. The growth of Bifidobacterium was not modified and the stimulating effect of inulin on lactobacilli disappeared in the presence of propionibacteria. In conclusion, dairy propionibacteria are potential candidates to develop new functional foods helpful to ensure the intestinal production of SCFA during inulin supplementation and to control the overgrowth of bacteria belonging to Bacteroides and Clostridium genera.

  4. Phase 1 Dose-ranging Safety Trial of Lactobacillus crispatus CTV-05 (LACTIN-V) for the Prevention of Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerling, Anke; Harrison, William; Schroeder, Adrienne; Park, Jeanna; Korn, Abner; Shiboski, Stephen; Cohen, Craig R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis is a very common vaginal infection. The lack of endogenous lactobacilli and overgrowth of pathogens facilitate numerous gynecological complications. Methods A phase I dose-ranging safety trial tested the safety, tolerability and acceptability of Lactobacillus crispatus CTV-05 (LACTIN-V) administered by vaginal applicator. Twelve healthy volunteers were enrolled in three blocks of four (5 × 108, 1 × 109 and 2 × 109 cfu/dose). Each block was randomized in a 3:1 ratio of active product to placebo. Participants used study product for 5 consecutive days, returned for follow up on Days 7 and 14, and had phone interviews on Days 2 and 35. Results All 12 participants took 5 doses and completed study follow-up. Overall, 45 adverse events (AEs) occurred, of which 31 (69%) were genitourinary (GU) AEs. GU AEs appeared evenly distributed between the three treatment blocks and between LACTIN-V and placebo arms. The most common GU AEs were vaginal discharge in 5 subjects (42%), abdominal pain in 4 subjects (33%), metrorrhagia in 4 subjects (33%), vulvovaginitis in 4 subjects (33%), vaginal candidiasis in 3 subjects (25%), and vaginal odor in 3 subjects (25%). Forty one (91%) AEs were mild (grade 1) in severity. All four moderate AEs (grade 2) were unrelated to product use. No grade 3 or 4 AEs or serious adverse events (SAE) occurred. Laboratory parameters and colposcopy findings were within normal limits or clinically insignificant. The product was well tolerated and accepted. Conclusion All three dose levels of LACTIN-V appeared to be safe and acceptable in healthy volunteers. PMID:19543144

  5. Tracking bacterial growth in liquid media and a new bacterial life model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘实

    1999-01-01

    By increasing viscosity of liquid media above 8.4 centipoise (cp) i.e. 0.084 g·cm-1·S-1 individual growth and family formation of Escherichia coli was continuously observed in real-time for up to 6 h. The observations showed primarily unidirectional growth and reproduction of E. coli and suggested more than one reproduction in the observed portion of E. coli life span. A new bacterial life model is proposed: each bacterium has a stable cell polarity that ultimately transforms into two bacteria of different generations; the life cycle of a bacterium can contain more than one reproduction cycle; and the age of a bacterium should be defined by its experienced chronological time. This new bacterial life model differs from the dominant concepts of bacterial life but complies with all basic life principles based on direct observation of macroorganisms.

  6. Antimicrobial effect against different bacterial strains and bacterial adaptation to essential oils used as feed additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Antonio Diego Brandão; Amaral, Amanda Figueiredo; Schaefer, Gustavo; Luciano, Fernando Bittencourt; de Andrade, Carla; Costa, Leandro Batista; Rostagno, Marcos Horácio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oils derived from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree), Cinnamomum cassia (cassia), and Thymus vulgaris (white thyme) against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The study also investigated the ability of these different bacterial strains to develop adaptation after repetitive exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of these essential oils. The MBC of the essential oils studied was determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. All essential oils showed antimicrobial effect against all bacterial strains. In general, the development of adaptation varied according to the bacterial strain and the essential oil (tea tree > white thyme > oregano). Therefore, it is important to use essential oils at efficient bactericidal doses in animal feed, food, and sanitizers, since bacteria can rapidly develop adaptation when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of these oils. PMID:26424908

  7. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the

  8. Water Microbiology. Bacterial Pathogens and Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João P. S. Cabral

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Water is essential to life, but many people do not have access to clean and safe drinking water and many die of waterborne bacterial infections. In this review a general characterization of the most important bacterial diseases transmitted through water—cholera, typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery—is presented, focusing on the biology and ecology of the causal agents and on the diseases’ characteristics and their life cycles in the environment. The importance of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and emerging pathogens in drinking water-transmitted diseases is also briefly discussed. Microbiological water analysis is mainly based on the concept of fecal indicator bacteria. The main bacteria present in human and animal feces (focusing on their behavior in their hosts and in the environment and the most important fecal indicator bacteria are presented and discussed (focusing on the advantages and limitations of their use as markers. Important sources of bacterial fecal pollution of environmental waters are also briefly indicated. In the last topic it is discussed which indicators of fecal pollution should be used in current drinking water microbiological analysis. It was concluded that safe drinking water for all is one of the major challenges of the 21st century and that microbiological control of drinking water should be the norm everywhere. Routine basic microbiological analysis of drinking water should be carried out by assaying the presence of Escherichia coli by culture methods. Whenever financial resources are available, fecal coliform determinations should be complemented with the quantification of enterococci. More studies are needed in order to check if ammonia is reliable for a preliminary screening for emergency fecal pollution outbreaks. Financial resources should be devoted to a better understanding of the ecology and behavior of human and animal fecal bacteria in environmental waters.

  9. Water microbiology. Bacterial pathogens and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, João P S

    2010-10-01

    Water is essential to life, but many people do not have access to clean and safe drinking water and many die of waterborne bacterial infections. In this review a general characterization of the most important bacterial diseases transmitted through water-cholera, typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery-is presented, focusing on the biology and ecology of the causal agents and on the diseases' characteristics and their life cycles in the environment. The importance of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and emerging pathogens in drinking water-transmitted diseases is also briefly discussed. Microbiological water analysis is mainly based on the concept of fecal indicator bacteria. The main bacteria present in human and animal feces (focusing on their behavior in their hosts and in the environment) and the most important fecal indicator bacteria are presented and discussed (focusing on the advantages and limitations of their use as markers). Important sources of bacterial fecal pollution of environmental waters are also briefly indicated. In the last topic it is discussed which indicators of fecal pollution should be used in current drinking water microbiological analysis. It was concluded that safe drinking water for all is one of the major challenges of the 21st century and that microbiological control of drinking water should be the norm everywhere. Routine basic microbiological analysis of drinking water should be carried out by assaying the presence of Escherichia coli by culture methods. Whenever financial resources are available, fecal coliform determinations should be complemented with the quantification of enterococci. More studies are needed in order to check if ammonia is reliable for a preliminary screening for emergency fecal pollution outbreaks. Financial resources should be devoted to a better understanding of the ecology and behavior of human and animal fecal bacteria in environmental waters.

  10. Sensitive, Rapid Detection of Bacterial Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Roger G.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chen, Fei; Pickett, Molly; Matsuyama, Asahi

    2009-01-01

    A method of sensitive detection of bacterial spores within delays of no more than a few hours has been developed to provide an alternative to a prior three-day NASA standard culture-based assay. A capability for relatively rapid detection of bacterial spores would be beneficial for many endeavors, a few examples being agriculture, medicine, public health, defense against biowarfare, water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and the food-packaging and medical-equipment industries. The method involves the use of a commercial rapid microbial detection system (RMDS) that utilizes a combination of membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and analysis of luminescence images detected by a charge-coupled-device camera. This RMDS has been demonstrated to be highly sensitive in enumerating microbes (it can detect as little as one colony-forming unit per sample) and has been found to yield data in excellent correlation with those of culture-based methods. What makes the present method necessary is that the specific RMDS and the original protocols for its use are not designed for discriminating between bacterial spores and other microbes. In this method, a heat-shock procedure is added prior to an incubation procedure that is specified in the original RMDS protocols. In this heat-shock procedure (which was also described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article on enumerating sporeforming bacteria), a sample is exposed to a temperature of 80 C for 15 minutes. Spores can survive the heat shock, but nonspore- forming bacteria and spore-forming bacteria that are not in spore form cannot survive. Therefore, any colonies that grow during incubation after the heat shock are deemed to have originated as spores.

  11. Novel receptors for bacterial protein toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    While bacterial effectors are often directly introduced into eukaryotic target cells by various types of injection machines, toxins enter the cytosol of host cells from endosomal compartments or after retrograde transport via Golgi from the ER. A first crucial step of toxin-host interaction is receptor binding. Using optimized protocols and new methods novel toxin receptors have been identified, including metalloprotease ADAM 10 for Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin, laminin receptor Lu/BCAM for Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor CNF1, lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) for Clostridium difficile transferase CDT and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 1 for Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin.

  12. The Carboxysome and Other Bacterial Microcompartments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Greenleaf, William B.; Kinney, James N.

    2010-06-23

    - Carboxysomes are part of the carbon concentrating mechanism in cyanobacteria and chemoautotrophs. - Carboxysomes are a subclass of bacterial microcompartments (BMCs); BMCs can encapsulate a range of metabolic processes. - Like some viral particles, the carboxysome can be modeled as an icosahedron-in its case, having 4,000-5,000 hexameric shell subunits and 12 surface pentamers to generate curvature. - The threefold axis of symmetry of the CsoS1D protein in carboxysomes forms a pore that can open and close, allowing for selective diffusion. - Genetic modules encoding BMC shell proteins and the enzymes that they encapsulate are horizontally transferable, suggesting they enable bacteria to adapt to diverse environments.

  13. Bacterial Motion in Quasi Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. L.; Libchaber, Albert

    2000-03-01

    We study the effect of bacterial motion on micron-scale beads in a freely suspended soap film. Given the size of bacteria and beads, the geometry of the experiment is quasi-two-dimensional. Large positional fluctuations are observed for beads as large as 10 um in diameter, and the mean-square displacements, measured using video imaging, indicate superdiffusion on short times and normal diffusion on long times. Though the phenomenon is similar to Brownian motion of small particles, its physical origin is different and can be attributed to collective dynamics of bacteria.

  14. Russian vaccines against especially dangerous bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feodorova, Valentina A; Sayapina, Lidiya V; Corbel, Michael J; Motin, Vladimir L

    2014-01-01

    In response to the epidemiological situation, live attenuated or killed vaccines against anthrax, brucellosis, cholera, glanders, plague and tularemia were developed and used for immunization of at-risk populations in the Former Soviet Union. Certain of these vaccines have been updated and currently they are used on a selective basis, mainly for high risk occupations, in the Russian Federation. Except for anthrax and cholera these vaccines currently are the only licensed products available for protection against the most dangerous bacterial pathogens. Development of improved formulations and new products is ongoing. PMID:26038506

  15. Field determination of bacterial disappearance in seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoës, Poul

    1970-01-01

    The article presents two approaches to field determination of disappearance of viable, fecal bacteria after discharge with sewage into a marine environment. The first approach is based on simultaneous sampling for bacterial counting and monitoring of dilution using a conservative tracer, which is...... released continuously with the sewage. The second approach uses an abrupt release of tracer for determination of both dilution and residence time in the sewage field. In both cases, the disappearance rate is best determined by comparison of fluxes of two bacteria and of tracer through cross-sections of the...

  16. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Money

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV is an extremely common health problem for women. In addition to the troublesome symptoms often associated with a disruption in the balance of vaginal flora, BV is associated with adverse gynecological and pregnancy outcomes. Although not technically a sexually transmitted infection, BV is a sexually associated condition. Diagnostic tests include real-time clinical/microbiological diagnosis, and the current gold standard, the standardized evaluation of morphotypes on Gram stain analysis. The inappropriate use of vaginal culture can be misleading. Future developments into molecular-based diagnostics will be important to further understand this complex endogenous flora disruption.

  17. The role of metabolism in bacterial persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Amato

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial persisters are phenotypic variants with extraordinary tolerances toward antibiotics. Persister survival has been attributed to inhibition of essential cell functions during antibiotic stress, followed by reversal of the process and resumption of growth upon removal of the antibiotic. Metabolism plays a critical role in this process, since it participates in the entry, maintenance, and exit from the persister phenotype. Here, we review the experimental evidence that demonstrates the importance of metabolism to persistence, highlight the successes and potential for targeting metabolism in the search for anti-persister therapies, and discuss the current methods and challenges to understand persister physiology.

  18. The enzymes of bacterial census and censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Walter; Tipton, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    N-Acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are a major class of quorum-sensing signals used by Gram-negative bacteria to regulate gene expression in a population-dependent manner, thereby enabling group behavior. Enzymes capable of generating and catabolizing AHL signals are of significant interest for the study of microbial ecology and quorum-sensing pathways, for understanding the systems that bacteria have evolved to interact with small-molecule signals, and for their possible use in therapeutic and industrial applications. The recent structural and functional studies reviewed here provide a detailed insight into the chemistry and enzymology of bacterial communication. PMID:22099187

  19. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in bacterial meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attout, H; Guez, S; Seriès, C

    2007-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most common cause of cerebral salt wasting syndrome. There are few reports of this condition in infectious meningitis. We describe a patient with hyponatremia and bacterial meningitis. Hyponatremia rapidly improved after administration of sodium chloride. The purpose of this report is to alert clinicians to the fact that hyponatremic patients with central nervous system disease do not necessarily have a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), but may have cerebral salt wasting syndrome. By contrast with SIADH, the treatment requires saline administration.

  20. Experimental assessment of bacterial storage yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karahan-Gül, Ö.; Artan, N.; Orhon, D.;

    2002-01-01

    An experimental procedure was developed for the respirometric determination of bacterial storage yield as defined in the Activated Sludge Model No. 3. The proposed approach is based on the oxygen utilization rate (OUR) profile obtained from a batch test and correlates the area under the OUR curve...... to the amount of oxygen associated with substrate storage. Model simulation was used to evaluate the procedure for different initial experimental conditions. The procedure was tested on acetate. The same storage yield value of 0.76 gCOD/gCOD was calculated for two experiments, starting with different...

  1. The enzymes of bacterial census and censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Walter; Tipton, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    N-Acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are a major class of quorum-sensing signals used by Gram-negative bacteria to regulate gene expression in a population-dependent manner, thereby enabling group behavior. Enzymes capable of generating and catabolizing AHL signals are of significant interest for the study of microbial ecology and quorum-sensing pathways, for understanding the systems that bacteria have evolved to interact with small-molecule signals, and for their possible use in therapeutic and industrial applications. The recent structural and functional studies reviewed here provide a detailed insight into the chemistry and enzymology of bacterial communication.

  2. The early prognosis at the bacterial meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. V. Lobzin; V. V. Pilipenko; M. V. Rezvansev

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of the studying of clinical and laboratory sings of 150 cases of bacterial meningitis (BM) with the use of various statistical methods, including multivariate logistical regression analysis, the early prognostic criteria of the maximum risk and the relation of chances of the maximum risk of an acyclic (severe, complicated, including lethal) variant of a diseases were estimated. These criteria are: age of the patient ≥ 55 years, late hospitalisation (≥3 days of disease), the expre...

  3. A field study of ovine bacterial meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P R; Sargison, N D; Penny, C D; Pirie, R S

    1994-08-13

    Bacterial meningoencephalitis most commonly affected lambs two to four weeks old (median three weeks, range three days to six months) with clinical signs of episcleral congestion, lack of suck reflex, weakness, altered gait and depression extending to stupor, but hyperaesthesia to auditory and tactile stimuli. Opisthotonos was observed during the agonal stages of the disease. Analysis of lumbosacral cerebrospinal fluid revealed a highly significant increase in protein concentration (P sheep, control measures should ensure an adequate transfer of passive antibody, repeated treatments of the navel, and hygienic conditions in the lambing and rearing environments. PMID:7985344

  4. Cryo-electron tomography of bacterial viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C. [Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Wright, Elizabeth R., E-mail: erwrigh@emory.edu [Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)

    2013-01-05

    Bacteriophage particles contain both simple and complex macromolecular assemblages and machines that enable them to regulate the infection process under diverse environmental conditions with a broad range of bacterial hosts. Recent developments in cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) make it possible to observe the interactions of bacteriophages with their host cells under native-state conditions at unprecedented resolution and in three-dimensions. This review describes the application of cryo-ET to studies of bacteriophage attachment, genome ejection, assembly and egress. Current topics of investigation and future directions in the field are also discussed.

  5. Increasing complexity of the bacterial cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Löwe, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria contain cytoskeletal elements involved in major cellular processes including DNA segregation and cell morphogenesis and division. Distant bacterial homologues of tubulin (FtsZ) and actin (MreB and ParM) not only resemble their eukaryotic counterparts structurally but also show similar...... functional characteristics, assembling into filamentous structures in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Recent advances in fluorescence microscopic imaging have revealed that FtsZ and MreB form highly dynamic helical structures that encircle the cells along the inside of the cell membrane. With the discovery...

  6. Bacterial communities of two ubiquitous Great Barrier Reef corals reveals both site- and species-specificity of common bacterial associates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Charlotte E Kvennefors

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral-associated bacteria are increasingly considered to be important in coral health, and altered bacterial community structures have been linked to both coral disease and bleaching. Despite this, assessments of bacterial communities on corals rarely apply sufficient replication to adequately describe the natural variability. Replicated data such as these are crucial in determining potential roles of bacteria on coral. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE of the V3 region of the 16S ribosomal DNA was used in a highly replicated approach to analyse bacterial communities on both healthy and diseased corals. Although site-specific variations in the bacterial communities of healthy corals were present, host species-specific bacterial associates within a distinct cluster of gamma-proteobacteria could be identified, which are potentially linked to coral health. Corals affected by "White Syndrome" (WS underwent pronounced changes in their bacterial communities in comparison to healthy colonies. However, the community structure and bacterial ribotypes identified in diseased corals did not support the previously suggested theory of a bacterial pathogen as the causative agent of the syndrome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to employ large numbers of replicated samples to assess the bacterial communities of healthy and diseased corals, and the first culture-independent assessment of bacterial communities on WS affected Acroporid corals on the GBR. Results indicate that a minimum of 6 replicate samples are required in order to draw inferences on species, spatial or health-related changes in community composition, as a set of clearly distinct bacterial community profiles exist in healthy corals. Coral bacterial communities may be both site and species specific. Furthermore, a cluster of gamma-proteobacterial ribotypes may represent a group of specific common coral and marine

  7. Algal-bacterial interactions in metal contaminated floodplain sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, M.E.Y. [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Animal Ecology, IES, Vrije Universiteit, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Greve, G.D. [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Animal Ecology, IES, Vrije Universiteit, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Garcia-Meza, J.V. [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, IBED, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM Amsterdam (Netherlands); Massieux, B. [Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Centre for Limnology, Rijkstraatweg 6, 3631 AC Nieuwersluis (Netherlands); Sprenger, W. [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, IBED, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kraak, M.H.S. [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, IBED, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: castella@science.uva.nl; Breure, A.M. [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Rutgers, M. [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Admiraal, W. [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, IBED, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate algal-bacterial interactions in a gradient of metal contaminated natural sediments. By means of multivariate techniques, we related the genetic structure (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DGGE) and the physiological structure (community-level physiological profiling, CLPP) of the bacterial communities to the species composition of the algal communities and to the abiotic environmental variables, including metal contamination. The results revealed that genetic and physiological structure of the bacterial communities correlated with the species composition of the algal community, but hardly to the level of metal pollution. This must be interpreted as an indication for a strong and species-specific linkage of algal and bacterial species in floodplain sediments. Metals were, however, not proven to affect either the algal or the bacterial communities of the Dutch river floodplains. - Algal and bacterial communities in floodplain sediments are interlinked, but are not affected by metal pollution.

  8. Motility Disorders of the Stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pseudo-Obstruction Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth The Large Intestine (Colon) Constipation Diarrhea Hirschsprung's Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) The Anorectum and Pelvic Floor Fecal Incontinence ...

  9. About GI Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pseudo-Obstruction Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth The Large Intestine (Colon) Constipation Diarrhea Hirschsprung's Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) The Anorectum and Pelvic Floor Fecal Incontinence ...

  10. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Eudes Gv; Aburjaile, Flavia F; Ramos, Rommel Tj; Carneiro, Adriana R; Le Loir, Yves; Baumbach, Jan; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Azevedo, Vasco

    2014-05-26

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have made high-throughput sequencing available to medium- and small-size laboratories, culminating in a tidal wave of genomic information. The quantity of sequenced bacterial genomes has not only brought excitement to the field of genomics but also heightened expectations that NGS would boost antibacterial discovery and vaccine development. Although many possible drug and vaccine targets have been discovered, the success rate of genome-based analysis has remained below expectations. Furthermore, NGS has had consequences for genome quality, resulting in an exponential increase in draft (partial data) genome deposits in public databases. If no further interests are expressed for a particular bacterial genome, it is more likely that the sequencing of its genome will be limited to a draft stage, and the painstaking tasks of completing the sequencing of its genome and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the "scientific value" of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses the factors that could be leading to the increase in the number of draft deposits and the consequent loss of relevant biological information. PMID:24921006

  11. The bacterial contamination of surgical scrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Chad A; Murray, Clinton K; Mende, Katrin; Guymon, Charles H; Gerlinger, Tad L

    2012-05-01

    To our knowledge, no study has examined the bacterial profile of residents' scrubs. The goal of this investigation was to determine the bacterial profile of worn and unworn resident scrubs. Thirty pairs of scrubs were swabbed in 10 predetermined locations both prior to and after being worn continuously by the on-call resident. All swabs were screened for aerobic gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Bacteria underwent antimicrobial resistance testing and genetic relatedness by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Forty-one percent (123) of unworn scrub samples yielded bacteria, compared with 89% (268) of post-call scrub samples. On unworn scrubs, the most common organisms were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS; 94), gram positive rods (GPR; 34) and Streptococcus viridians (8). On post-call scrubs, the most common bacteria were CNS (271), micrococcus (51), Staphylococcus aureus (33), and GPR (28). All S. aureus were methicillin susceptible. There were different species, pulse-field types and antibiotic resistance profiles found amongst the CNS identified. No scrubs were found to harbor multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. This study found that unworn scrubs harbored normal skin flora and scrubs worn for at least 24 hours have a higher burden of bacteria than unworn scrubs but not an increased incidence of contamination with MDR organisms. PMID:22715444

  12. Clostridium difficile is an autotrophic bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köpke

    Full Text Available During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile.

  13. Bacterial signaling and motility: Sure bets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2008-01-01

    The IX International Conference on Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction (BLAST IX) was held from 14 to 19 January 2007 in Laughlin, NV, a town in the Mojave Desert on the Nevada-Arizona border near old Route 66 and along the banks of the Colorado River. This area is a home to rattlesnakes, sagebrush, abandoned gold mines, and compulsive gamblers. What better venue could scientists possibly dream of for a professional meeting? So there they were, about 190 scientists gathered in the Aquarius Casino Resort, the largest hotel and casino in Laughlin, discussing the latest advances in the field. Aside from a brief excursion to an abandoned gold mine and a dinner cruise on the Colorado River, the scientists focused on nothing but their data and hypotheses, in spirited arguments and rebuttals, and outlined their visions and future plans in a friendly and open environment. The BLAST IX program was dense, with nearly 50 talks and over 90 posters. For that reason, this meeting report will not attempt to be comprehensive; instead it will first provide general background information on the central topics of the meeting and then highlight only a few talks that were of special interest to us and hopefully to the wider scientific community. We will also attempt to articulate some of the future directions or perspectives to the best of our abilities. The best known and understood bacterial motility mechanism is swimming powered by flagella. The rotation of bacterial flagella drives this form of bacterial movement in an aqueous environment. A bacterial flagellum consists of a helical filament attached to the cell body through a complex structure known as the hook-basal body, which drives flagellar rotation. The essential components of the basal body are the MotA-MotB motor-stator proteins bound to the cytoplasmic membrane. These stator proteins interact with proteins that comprise the supramembrane and cytoplasmic rings, which are components of the motor imbedded in the

  14. Midgut bacterial dynamics in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenius, Olle; Lindh, Jenny M; Eriksson-Gonzales, Karolina; Bussière, Luc; Laugen, Ane T; Bergquist, Helen; Titanji, Kehmia; Faye, Ingrid

    2012-06-01

    In vector mosquitoes, the presence of midgut bacteria may affect the ability to transmit pathogens. We have used a laboratory colony of Aedes aegypti as a model for bacterial interspecies competition and show that after a blood meal, the number of species (culturable on Luria-Bertani agar) that coexist in the midgut is low and that about 40% of the females do not harbor any cultivable bacteria. We isolated species belonging to the genera Bacillus, Elizabethkingia, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Serratia, and Sphingomonas, and we also determined their growth rates, antibiotic resistance, and ex vivo inhibition of each other. To investigate the possible existence of coadaptation between midgut bacteria and their host, we fed Ae. aegypti cohorts with gut bacteria from human, a frog, and two mosquito species and followed the bacterial population growth over time. The dynamics of the different species suggests coadaptation between host and bacteria, and interestingly, we found that Pantoea stewartii isolated from Ae. aegypti survive better in Ae. aegypti as compared to P. stewartii isolated from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. PMID:22283178

  15. A NEW APPROACH TO BACTERIAL VACCINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GREENBERG, L

    1963-08-31

    Immunizing antigens against only 10 bacterial diseases-cholera, diphtheria, paratyphoid, pertussis, plague, scarlet fever, staphylococcal disease, tetanus, tuberculosis and typhoid-have been licensed for sale in Canada and the United States. Convincing evidence of efficacy is available for only four of these-diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and pertussis and typhoid vaccines.The principles which determine the efficacy of different immunizing antigens are not always the same. Toxoids, for example, stimulate the formation of antitoxin-producing mechanisms which can neutralize toxins produced by invading organisms, thereby rendering them harmless. Conversely, vaccines stimulate the formation of antibacterial mechanisms which stop the growth of organisms before they can produce disease.Use of enzyme-lysed vaccines for prevention of staphylococcal disease represents a new approach in vaccine research. Animal tests have shown lysed vaccines to be 10 to 100 times less toxic, and about eight times more effective, than whole bacterial vaccines. Studies with lysed vaccines for other diseases are now in progress.

  16. The dynamics in the bacterial chemosensory arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Ady

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial chemoreceptors form two-dimensional sensory arrays on the cell membrane. These sensory arrays, which contain thousands of molecules, detect chemical changes in the environment of the bacterial cell and accordingly control its swimming behaviour, allowing these bacteria to track chemical gradients. It was recently demonstrated that stimulus, by ligand binding, alters the physical organization of these arrays, with dynamics that follow an apparent logarithmic time dependence. Such non-exponential dynamics is often observed in glass-like systems in which the internal dynamics slow down exponentially as the system approaches its equilibrium state. In a few of these `glassy' systems it was also demonstrated that after altering the equilibrium state of the system for a certain time tw the ensuing relaxation scales with tw. Here, we examined the relaxation of the receptor arrays in the bacterium E. coli after a perturbation by ligand binding for varying periods of times. We find that changing the time tw, during which the stimulus was present, affects mostly the deviation of the receptor arrays from equilibrium, but the dynamics of the relaxation seem to be independent of tw. A possible interpretation is discussed.

  17. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  18. PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ECONOMICAL BACTERIAL CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssni El-Saied

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the economical production of bacterial cellulose (BC by Gluconacetobacter subsp. Xylinus (ATCC 10245 in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks cultivated under static conditions. The fermentation media used contained food industrial by-product liquors, such as black strap molasses solution and corn steep liquor (CSL, which represents some of the most economical carbon and nitrogen sources. However, because of the presence of undesirable components in molasses (such as coloring substances, heavy metals, and other compounds that may act as inhibitors, and in order to eliminate them, crude molasses has been treated with an acid, as an attempt to increase BC productivity. The amount of BC produced using these carbon and nitrogen sources was determined and compared to that produced using previously reported fermentation media. The characterizations of the bacterial cellulose (BC pellicles obtained using either conventional or by-product media were studied by thermal and spectral techniques and compared to those of plant-derived cellulose such as cotton linter, viscose pulp, and microcrystalline cellulose.

  19. Mucin dynamics in intestinal bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara K Lindén

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial gastroenteritis causes morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Murine Citrobacter rodentium infection is a model for gastroenteritis caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli. Mucin glycoproteins are the main component of the first barrier that bacteria encounter in the intestinal tract. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Immunohistochemistry, we investigated intestinal expression of mucins (Alcian blue/PAS, Muc1, Muc2, Muc4, Muc5AC, Muc13 and Muc3/17 in healthy and C. rodentium infected mice. The majority of the C. rodentium infected mice developed systemic infection and colitis in the mid and distal colon by day 12. C. rodentium bound to the major secreted mucin, Muc2, in vitro, and high numbers of bacteria were found in secreted MUC2 in infected animals in vivo, indicating that mucins may limit bacterial access to the epithelial surface. In the small intestine, caecum and proximal colon, the mucin expression was similar in infected and non-infected animals. In the distal colonic epithelium, all secreted and cell surface mucins decreased with the exception of the Muc1 cell surface mucin which increased after infection (p<0.05. Similarly, during human infection Salmonella St Paul, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium difficile induced MUC1 in the colon. CONCLUSION: Major changes in both the cell-surface and secreted mucins occur in response to intestinal infection.

  20. Resonant activation: a strategy against bacterial persistence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bacterial colony may develop a small number of cells genetically identical to, but phenotypically different from, other normally growing bacteria. These so-called persister cells keep themselves in a dormant state and thus are insensitive to antibiotic treatment, resulting in serious problems of drug resistance. In this paper, we proposed a novel strategy to 'kill' persister cells by triggering them to switch, in a fast and synchronized way, into normally growing cells that are susceptible to antibiotics. The strategy is based on resonant activation (RA), a well-studied phenomenon in physics where the internal noise of a system can constructively facilitate fast and synchronized barrier crossings. Through stochastic Gilliespie simulation with a generic toggle switch model, we demonstrated that RA exists in the phenotypic switching of a single bacterium. Further, by coupling single cell level and population level simulations, we showed that with RA, one can greatly reduce the time and total amount of antibiotics needed to sterilize a bacterial population. We suggest that resonant activation is a general phenomenon in phenotypic transition, and can find other applications such as cancer therapy