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Sample records for bacterial nanowires produced

  1. Electrical conductivity measurements of bacterial nanowires from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthupandy, Muthusamy; Anand, Muthusamy; Maduraiveeran, Govindhan; Sait Hameedha Beevi, Akbar; Jeeva Priya, Radhakrishnan

    2015-12-01

    The extracellular appendages of bacteria (flagella) that transfer electrons to electrodes are called bacterial nanowires. This study focuses on the isolation and separation of nanowires that are attached via Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial culture. The size and roughness of separated nanowires were measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The obtained bacterial nanowires indicated a clear image of bacterial nanowires measuring 16 nm in diameter. The formation of bacterial nanowires was confirmed by microscopic studies (AFM and TEM) and the conductivity nature of bacterial nanowire was investigated by electrochemical techniques. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which are nondestructive voltammetry techniques, suggest that bacterial nanowires could be the source of electrons—which may be used in various applications, for example, microbial fuel cells, biosensors, organic solar cells, and bioelectronic devices. Routine analysis of electron transfer between bacterial nanowires and the electrode was performed, providing insight into the extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the electrode. CV revealed the catalytic electron transferability of bacterial nanowires and electrodes and showed excellent redox activities. CV and EIS studies showed that bacterial nanowires can charge the surface by producing and storing sufficient electrons, behave as a capacitor, and have features consistent with EET. Finally, electrochemical studies confirmed the development of bacterial nanowires with EET. This study suggests that bacterial nanowires can be used to fabricate biomolecular sensors and nanoelectronic devices.

  2. Bacterial Nanowires: Is the Subsurface Hardwired?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorby, Y. A.; Davis, C. A.; Atekwana, E.

    2006-05-01

    Bacteria, ranging from oxygenic photosynthetic cyanobacteria to heterotrophic sulfate reducing bacteria, produce electrically-conductive appendages referred to as bacterial nanowires. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, including Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens, produce electrically conductive nanowires in direct response to electron acceptor limitation and facilitate electron transfer to solid phase iron oxides. Nanowires produced by S. oneidensis strain MR-1, which served as our primary model organism, are functionalized by decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA that are distributed along the length of the nanowires. Mutants deficient in MtrC and OmcA produce nanowires that were poorly conductive. These mutants also differ from wild type cells in their ability to reduce solid phase iron oxides, to produce electrical current in a mediator less microbial fuel cell, and to form complex biofilms at air liquid interfaces. Recent results obtained using direct cell counts and low frequency electrical measurements demonstrate that microbial growth correlated with real and imaginary electrical conductivity response in uncoated silica sand columns. Direct observation of packing material with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) revealed a fine network of extracellular structures that were morphologically similar to nanowires observed in metal reducing bacteria. No such structures were observed in control columns. We hypothesize that microbial nanowires may in part be responsible for the electrical response observed in the biostimulated columns.

  3. New Applications of Electrochemically Produced Porous Semiconductors and Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leisner Malte

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growing demand for electro mobility together with advancing concepts for renewable energy as primary power sources requires sophisticated methods of energy storage. In this work, we present a Li ion battery based on Si nanowires, which can be produced reliable and cheaply and which shows superior properties, such as a largely increased capacity and cycle stability. Sophisticated methods based on electrochemical pore etching allow to produce optimized regular arrays of nanowires, which can be stabilized by intrinsic cross-links, which serve to avoid unwanted stiction effects and allow easy processing.

  4. Structure of the type IVa major pilin from the electrically conductive bacterial nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Patrick N; Mueller, Karl T

    2013-10-11

    Several species of δ proteobacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is proposed to be facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires are polymeric assemblies of proteins belonging to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution NMR structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is >85% α-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

  5. Structure of the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reardon, Patrick N.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2013-10-11

    Several species of bacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires belong to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is over 85% α-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

  6. A laser-assisted process to produce patterned growth of vertically aligned nanowire arrays for monolithic microwave integrated devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kerckhoven, Vivien; Piraux, Luc; Huynen, Isabelle

    2016-06-01

    An experimental process for the fabrication of microwave devices made of nanowire arrays embedded in a dielectric template is presented. A pulse laser process is used to produce a patterned surface mask on alumina templates, defining precisely the wire growing areas during electroplating. This technique makes it possible to finely position multiple nanowire arrays in the template, as well as produce large areas and complex structures, combining transmission line sections with various nanowire heights. The efficiency of this process is demonstrated through the realisation of a microstrip electromagnetic band-gap filter and a substrate-integrated waveguide.

  7. Controlled size, structure, and morphology of nanowires produced by single particle nano-fabrication technique (SPNT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross-linking reaction of the polymers was firstly promoted by charged particle irradiation to the thin films in the present study. Non-homogeneous cross-linking reaction in the polymers gives clear nanowires whose size, length, and number density are fairly controlled by selecting particles, molecular weights, etc. Electronic conductive nanowires were produced by the present technique, as well as achieving the formation of SiC ceramic nanowires by the combined processes of SPNT and subsequent sintering at ultra-high temperature. It is also demonstrated that the morphology of the final nanostructure is customized by appropriate selection of the ion fluence, combination of polymers, and the solvent employed for development. Octopus-like nanostructures consisting of a tangled hydrophilic polymer core and splayed hydrophobic polymer segments are successfully produced as an example of the process. The present technique provides universal feasibility for the formation of nanostructures based on 'any' polymer materials in which radiations induce crosslinking reactions. (author)

  8. Bacterial fermentation platform for producing artificial aromatic amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuo, Shunsuke; Zhou, Shengmin; Kaneko, Tatsuo; Takaya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic amines containing an aminobenzene or an aniline moiety comprise versatile natural and artificial compounds including bioactive molecules and resources for advanced materials. However, a bio-production platform has not been implemented. Here we constructed a bacterial platform for para-substituted aminobenzene relatives of aromatic amines via enzymes in an alternate shikimate pathway predicted in a Pseudomonad bacterium. Optimization of the metabolic pathway in Escherichia coli cells converted biomass glucose to 4-aminophenylalanine with high efficiency (4.4 g L−1 in fed-batch cultivation). We designed and produced artificial pathways that mimicked the fungal Ehrlich pathway in E. coli and converted 4-aminophenylalanine into 4-aminophenylethanol and 4-aminophenylacetate at 90% molar yields. Combining these conversion systems or fungal phenylalanine decarboxylases, the 4-aminophenylalanine-producing platform fermented glucose to 4-aminophenylethanol, 4-aminophenylacetate, and 4-phenylethylamine. This original bacterial platform for producing artificial aromatic amines highlights their potential as heteroatoms containing bio-based materials that can replace those derived from petroleum. PMID:27167511

  9. Semiconductor nanowire thermoelectric materials and devices, and processes for producing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max G.; Evans, Paul G.; Ritz, Clark S.

    2015-11-17

    The present invention provides nanowires and nanoribbons that are well suited for use in thermoelectric applications. The nanowires and nanoribbons are characterized by a periodic compositional longitudinal modulation. The nanowires are constructed using lithographic techniques from thin semiconductor membranes, or "nanomembranes."

  10. Frequency of Bacterial Frequency of Bacterial Contamination in Traditional Ice Cream Produced in Arak, Iran (2011)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Rezaei; Ghasemi khah , R. (PhD); M. Parviz; Zarei, D. (MSc

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Ice cream is a suitable environment for microbial growth due to its chemical structure, ingredients, and its increased supply and demand. In the absence of hygienic considerations, it can cause poisoning. This study aimed to determine bacterial contamination in traditional ice cream produced in Arak city in 2011. Material and Methods: The samples (n= 30) were randomly obtained from different parts of Arak in, 2011. The Samples were shipped in cold conditions and tota...

  11. Frequency of Bacterial Frequency of Bacterial Contamination in Traditional Ice Cream Produced in Arak, Iran (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaei, M. (MSc

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Ice cream is a suitable environment for microbial growth due to its chemical structure, ingredients, and its increased supply and demand. In the absence of hygienic considerations, it can cause poisoning. This study aimed to determine bacterial contamination in traditional ice cream produced in Arak city in 2011. Material and Methods: The samples (n= 30 were randomly obtained from different parts of Arak in, 2011. The Samples were shipped in cold conditions and total count of microorganisms test was performed according to Iranian national standards. Results: In 16.66%, the microbial contamination was below the limit of microbial load (5×104, and in 83.3% the contamination was more than allowed level. Conclusion: This study highlights the dire situation for bacterial contamination of traditional ice cream in Arak city. Keywords: Arak, Ice Cream, Microbial Contamination

  12. 利用市售不锈钢箔制备氮化硼纳米线%Boron Nitride Nanowires Produced on Commercial Stainless Steel foil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈拥军; 童张法; 骆丽杰

    2008-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition growth of one-dimensional nanomaterials usually demands substrates that have been coated with a layer of catalyst film. In this study, a green process to synthesize boron nitride (BN) nanowires directly on commercial stainless steel foils was proposed by heating boron and zinc oxide powders under a mixture gas flow of N2 and 15% H2 at 1100℃, and a large quantities of pure h-BN nanowires have been produced directly on commercial stainless steel foil. The stainless steel foils not only acted as the substrate but also the catalyst for the nanowire growth. The synthesized BN nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopes, X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The nanowires also possess strong PL emission bands at 515, 535, and 728nm.

  13. [Prolonged cultivation of an anaerobic bacterial community producing hydrogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belokopytov, B F; Ryzhmanova, Ia V; Laurinavichius, K S; Shcherbakova, V A

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies various methods of long-term maintenance of the process of hydrogen evolution during the growth of an aerobic bacterial community on a starch-containing environment. When cultured in separable trip fermentation mode for 72 days, from 0.10 to 0.23 H2/l of medium/day was formed. The regime of regular reseeding lasted more than 100 days, forming an average of 0.81 1 H2/l of medium/day. The advantages and disadvantages of different methods of microbial hydrogen production during a dark starch fermentation process are presented. From the obtained H2 forming microbial communities, we isolated an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium (strain BF). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S RNA gene sequence of the new strain showed that according to its genotype it belongs to the Clostridium butyricum species.

  14. Effect of the growth conditions on the spatial features of Re nanowires produced by directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, Srdjan; Hassel, Achim Walter; Schneider, André

    2006-04-01

    The effects of the solidification parameters, such as growth rate and temperature gradient, on the distance and diameter of Re nanowires have been examined. Both the spacing and diameter increase with decreasing growth rate and temperature gradient, respectively. The ratio of fiber spacing to diameter is 9.1. In addition, it was demonstrated that the temperature gradient influences interface undercooling in the same way as the growth rate and may be used as an additional parameter to control fiber spacing and diameter.

  15. Methods of producing protoporphyrin IX and bacterial mutants therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru; He, Zhili; Xie, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed in certain embodiments to a method of producing protoporphyrin IX by (1) cultivating a strain of Shewanella bacteria in a culture medium under conditions suitable for growth thereof, and (2) recovering the protoporphyrin IX from the culture medium. The strain of Shewanella bacteria comprises at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. In certain embodiments of the method, the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or of shew_1140. In other embodiments, the presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed to mutant strains of Shewanella bacteria having at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX during cultivation of the bacteria. In certain embodiments the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or shew_1140.

  16. Biodegradable films produced from the bacterial polysaccharide FucoPol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana R V; Torres, Cristiana A V; Freitas, Filomena; Reis, Maria A M; Alves, Vítor D; Coelhoso, Isabel M

    2014-11-01

    FucoPol, an exopolysaccharide produced by Enterobacter A47, grown in bioreactor with glycerol as carbon source, was used with citric acid to obtain biodegradable films by casting. The films were characterized in terms of optical, hygroscopic, mechanical and barrier properties. These films have shown to be transparent, but with a brown tone, imparting small colour changes when applied over coloured surfaces. They were hydrophilic, with high permeability to water vapour (1.01×10(-11)mol/msPa), but presented good barrier properties to oxygen and carbon dioxide (0.7×10(-16)molm/m(2)sPa and 42.7×10(-16)molm/m(2)sPa, respectively). Furthermore, films have shown mechanical properties under tensile tests characteristic of ductile films with high elongation at break, low tension at break and low elastic modulus. Although the obtained results are promising, films properties can be improved, namely by testing alternative plasticizers, crosslinking agents and blends with other biopolymers. Taking into account the observed ductile mechanical properties, good barrier properties to gases when low water content is used and their hydrophilic character, it is foreseen a good potential for FucoPol films to be incorporated as inner layer of a multilayer packaging material. PMID:24769364

  17. 3D plasmonic transducer based on gold nanoparticles produced by laser ablation on silica nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontad, F.; Caricato, A. P.; Manera, M. G.; Colombelli, A.; Resta, V.; Taurino, A.; Cesaria, M.; Leo, C.; Convertino, A.; Klini, A.; Perrone, A.; Rella, R.; Martino, M.

    2016-05-01

    Silica two-dimensional substrates and nanowires (NWs) forests have been successfully decorated with Au nanoparticles (NPs) through laser ablation by using a pulsed ArF excimer laser, for sensor applications. A uniform coverage of both substrate surfaces with NPs has been achieved controlling the number of laser pulses. The annealing of the as-deposited particles resulted in a uniform well-defined distribution of spherical NPs with an increased average diameter up to 25 nm. The deposited samples on silica NWs forest present a very good plasmonic resonance which resulted to be very sensitive to the changes of the environment (ethanol/water solutions with increasing concentration of ethanol) allowing the detection of changes on the second decimal digit of the refractive index, demonstrating its potentiality for further biosensing functionalities.

  18. Effects of bacterial communities on biofuel-producing microalgae: stimulation, inhibition and harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Hill, Russell T; Zheng, Tianling; Hu, Xiaoke; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great interest in microalgae as a potential source of biofuel to substitute for fossil fuels, little information is available on the effects of bacterial symbionts in mass algal cultivation systems. The bacterial communities associated with microalgae are a crucial factor in the process of microalgal biomass and lipid production and may stimulate or inhibit growth of biofuel-producing microalgae. In addition, we discuss here the potential use of bacteria to harvest biofuel-producing microalgae. We propose that aggregation of microalgae by bacteria to achieve >90% reductions in volume followed by centrifugation could be an economic approach for harvesting of biofuel-producing microalgae. Our aims in this review are to promote understanding of the effects of bacterial communities on microalgae and draw attention to the importance of this topic in the microalgal biofuel field.

  19. Neutrophils of Scophthalmus maximus produce extracellular traps that capture bacteria and inhibit bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Heng; Sun, Li

    2016-03-01

    Neutrophils constitute an essential part of the innate immune system. Recently, neutrophils have been found to produce a complex extracellular structure called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that capture bacteria, fungi, and parasites. In fish, a few studies on NETs production have been reported, however, the function of fish NETs is unknown. In this study, we examined the ability of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) neutrophils to produce NETs and investigated the effect of turbot NETs on bacterial infection. We found that upon lipopolysaccharides treatment, turbot head kidney neutrophils produced typical NETs structures that contained DNA and histones. Bacteria treatment also induced production of NETs, which in turn entrapped the bacterial cells and inhibited bacterial replication. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot, NETs-trapped bacteria exhibited significantly weakened ability of tissue dissemination and colonization. These results indicate for the first time that teleost NETs possess apparent antibacterial effect both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26586641

  20. Bacterial cellulose produced by a new acid-resistant strain of Gluconacetobacter genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Cristina; Zuluaga, Robin; Álvarez, Catalina; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Caro, Gloria; Rojas, Orlando J; Mondragon, Iñaki; Gañán, Piedad

    2012-08-01

    A bacterial strain isolated from the fermentation of Colombian homemade vinegar, Gluconacetobacter medellensis, was investigated as a new source of bacterial cellulose (BC). The BC produced from substrate media consisting of various carbon sources at different pH and incubation times was quantified. Hestrin-Schramm (HS) medium modified with glucose led to the highest BC yields followed by sucrose and fructose. Interestingly, the microorganisms are highly tolerant to low pH: an optimum yield of 4.5 g/L was achieved at pH 3.5, which is generally too low for other bacterial species to function. The cellulose microfibrils produced by the new strain were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. The morphological, structural and chemical characteristics of the cellulose produced are similar to those expected for BC.

  1. Bacterial Growth on Photochemically Transformed Leachates from Aquatic and Terrestrial Primary Producers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anesio, A.M.; Nielsen, Jon Theil; Granéli, W.

    2000-01-01

    We measured bacterial growth on phototransformed dissolved organic matter (DOM) leached from eight different primary producers. Leachates (10 mg C liter-1) were exposed to artificial UVA + UVB radiation, or kept in darkness, for 20 h. DOM solutions were subsequently inoculated with lake water...... leachate and type of bacterial growth criterion. Bacterial carbon utilization (biomass production plus respiration) over the entire incubation period (120 h) was enhanced by UV radiation of leachate from the terrestrial leaves, relative to carbon utilization in non-irradiated leachates. Conversely, carbon...... utilization was reduced by radiation of the leachates from aquatic macrophytes. In a separate experiment, the stable C and N isotope composition of bacteria grown on irradiated and non-irradiated DOM was estimated. Bacterial growth on UV-irradiated DOM was enriched in 13C relative to the bacteria in the non...

  2. Bacterial Canker (Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis) of tomato in commercial seed produced in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anwar, A.; Zouwen, van der P.S.; Ilyas, S.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In 2002, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Smith) Davis, the causal organism of bacterial canker of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), was isolated from two of six commercial asymptomatic tomato seed lots produced on Java in Indonesia. C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis has not been

  3. Biochemical diversity of the bacterial strains and their biopolymer producing capabilities in wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, T T; Yan, S; John, R P; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2012-10-01

    The biochemical characterization of 13 extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) producing bacterial strains were carried out by BIOLOG. The bacterial strains were cultured in sterilized sludge for EPS production. Flocculation and dewatering capabilities of produced EPS (broth, crude slime and capsular) were examined using kaolin suspension combined with calcium (150 mg of Ca(2+)/L of kaolin suspension). BIOLOG revealed that there were 9 Bacillus, 2 Serratia and 2 Yersinia species. Most of these bacterial strains had the capability to utilize wide spectrum of carbon and nitrogen sources. EPS concentration of more than 1g/L was produced by most of the bacterial strains. Concentration of EPS produced by different Bacillus strains was higher than that of Serratia and Yersinia. Broth EPS revealed flocculation activity more than 75% for Bacillus sp.7, Bacillus sp.4 and Bacillus sp.6, respectively. Flocculation activity higher than 75% was attained using very low concentrations of broth EPS (1.12-2.70 mg EPS/g SS).

  4. Phonon processes in vertically aligned silicon nanowire arrays produced by low-cost all-solution galvanic displacement method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debika; Trudeau, Charles; Gerlein, Luis Felipe; Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2016-03-01

    The nanoscale engineering of silicon can significantly change its bulk optoelectronic properties to make it more favorable for device integration. Phonon process engineering is one way to enhance inter-band transitions in silicon's indirect band structure alignment. This paper demonstrates phonon localization at the tip of silicon nanowires fabricated by galvanic displacement using wet electroless chemical etching of a bulk silicon wafer. High-resolution Raman micro-spectroscopy reveals that such arrayed structures of silicon nanowires display phonon localization behaviors, which could help their integration into the future generations of nano-engineered silicon nanowire-based devices such as photodetectors and solar cells.

  5. Isolation and Synthesis of a Bacterially Produced Inhibitor of Rosette Development in Choanoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, Alexandra M; Woznica, Arielle; Beemelmanns, Christine; King, Nicole; Clardy, Jon

    2016-04-01

    The choanoflagellate Salpingoeca rosetta is a microbial marine eukaryote that can switch between unicellular and multicellular states. As one of the closest living relatives of animals, this organism has become a model for understanding how multicellularity evolved in the animal lineage. Previously our laboratories isolated and synthesized a bacterially produced sulfonolipid that induces S. rosetta to form multicellular "rosettes." In this study, we report the identification of a bacterially produced inhibitor of rosettes (IOR-1) as well as the total synthesis of this molecule and all of its stereoisomers. Our results confirm the previously noted specificity and potency of rosette-modulating molecules, expand our understanding of the complex chemical ecology between choanoflagellates and rosette-inducing bacteria, and provide a synthetic probe template for conducting further mechanistic studies on the emergence of multicellularity. PMID:26998963

  6. Isolation of Biosurfactant–Producing Bacteria with Antimicrobial Activity against Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siripun Sarin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to study biosurfactant producing bacteria isolated from soil and to determine their property and efficiency as biosurfactants in order to inhibit bacterial pathogens. The result showed that there were 8 bacterial isolates out of 136 isolates of the total biosurfactant producing bacteria screened that exhibited the diameter of clear zone more than 1.5 cm. in the oil spreading test. The highest potential of emulsifying activity (%EA24 of 54.4 and the maximum additive concentration, (%MAC of 24.2 was obtained from the fermentation broth of the G7 isolate which the G7 isolate was later identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Psuedomonas aeruginosa were the tested bacterial pathogens that were most sensitive to the acid precipitated biosurfactant obtained from P. fluorescens G7 with the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 41.6 mg/ml and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of 41.6 mg/ml compared with the acid precipitated bisurfactants of the other isolates used in the antimicrobial activity test. The type of the separated crude biosurfactant produced by P. fluorescens G7 analyzed later by using the rhamose test, TLC and FT-IR techniques was rhamnolipid.

  7. Antibacterial synergy of curcumin with antibiotics against biofilm producing clinical bacterial isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kali, Arunava; Bhuvaneshwar, Devaraj; Charles, Pravin M. V.; Seetha, Kunigal Srinivasaiah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The role of natural bioactive substances in treating infections has been rediscovered as bacterial resistance become common to most of the antibiotics. Curcumin is a bioactive substance from turmeric. Owing to antimicrobial properties, its prospect as an antibacterial agent is currently under focus. Materials and Methods: We have evaluated the in vitro synergy of curcumin with antibiotics against sixty biofilm producing bacterial isolates. Congo red agar method was used to identify the biofilm producing isolates. Curcumin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by agar dilution method. Its antibiotic synergy was identified by the increase in disc diffusion zone size on Mueller-Hinton agar with 32 mg/L curcumin. Results: The mean MICs of curcumin against Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates were 126.9 mg/L and 117.4 mg/L, respectively. Maximum synergy was observed with ciprofloxacin among Gram-positive and amikacin, gentamicin, and cefepime among Gram-negative isolates. Conclusions: Curcumin per se as well as in combination with other antibiotics has a demonstrable antibacterial action against biofilm producing bacterial isolates. It may have a beneficial role in supplementing antibiotic therapy. PMID:27330262

  8. A new route to produce efficient surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates: Gold-decorated CdSe nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Gobind

    2013-04-13

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is a popular tool for the detection of extremely small quantities of target molecules. Au nanoparticles have been very successful in this respect due to local enhancement of the light intensity caused by their plasmon resonance. Furthermore, Au nanoparticles are biocompatible, and target substances can be easily attached to their surface. Here, we demonstrate that Au-decorated CdSe nanowires when employed as SERS substrates lead to an enhancement as large as 105 with respect to the flat Au surfaces. In the case of hybrid metal-CdSe nanowires, the Au nucleates preferably on lattice defects at the lateral facets of the nanowires, which leads to a homogeneous distribution of Au nanoparticles on the nanowire, and to an efficient quenching of the nanowire luminescence. Moreover, the size of the Au nanoparticles can be well controlled via the AuCl3 concentration in the fabrication process. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our SERS substrates with two target substances, namely, cresyl-violet and rhodamine-6G. Au-decorated nanowires can be easily fabricated in large quantities at low cost by wet-chemical synthesis. Furthermore, their deposition onto various substrates, as well as the functionalization of these wires with the target substances, is as straightforward as with the traditional markers. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  9. A Host-Produced Autoinducer-2 Mimic Activates Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Anisa S; Valastyan, Julie S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-04-13

    Host-microbial symbioses are vital to health; nonetheless, little is known about the role crosskingdom signaling plays in these relationships. In a process called quorum sensing, bacteria communicate with one another using extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. One autoinducer, AI-2, is proposed to promote interspecies bacterial communication, including in the mammalian gut. We show that mammalian epithelia produce an AI-2 mimic activity in response to bacteria or tight-junction disruption. This AI-2 mimic is detected by the bacterial AI-2 receptor, LuxP/LsrB, and can activate quorum-sensing-controlled gene expression, including in the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. AI-2 mimic activity is induced when epithelia are directly or indirectly exposed to bacteria, suggesting that a secreted bacterial component(s) stimulates its production. Mutagenesis revealed genes required for bacteria to both detect and stimulate production of the AI-2 mimic. These findings uncover a potential role for the mammalian AI-2 mimic in fostering crosskingdom signaling and host-bacterial symbioses.

  10. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain

    OpenAIRE

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Abbott, James; Micklem, Chris N.; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S.; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a remarkable material that is malleable, biocompatible, and over 10-times stronger than plant-based cellulose. It is currently used to create materials for tissue engineering, medicine, defense, electronics, acoustics, and fabrics. We describe here a bacterial strain that is readily amenable to genetic engineering and produces high quantities of bacterial cellulose in low-cost media. To reprogram this organism for biotechnology applications, we created a set of genetic ...

  11. Genome sequence and plasmid transformation of the model high-yield bacterial cellulose producer Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Florea; Benjamin Reeve; James Abbott; Freemont, Paul S.; Tom Ellis

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong, highly pure form of cellulose that is used in a range of applications in industry, consumer goods and medicine. Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582 is one of the highest reported bacterial cellulose producing strains and has been used as a model organism in numerous studies of bacterial cellulose production and studies aiming to increased cellulose productivity. Here we present a high-quality draft genome sequence for G. hansenii ATCC 53582 and find that in ...

  12. Effect of Organic Acids on Bacterial Cellulose Produced by Acetobacter xylinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the difference of bacterial cellulose production from rice saccharificate medium and chemical medium under static cultivation, effect of organic acids in the process of bacterial cellulose produced by A. xylinum was studied. The results showed that the kinds and contents of organic acids were different in both culture medium, in which accumulated oxalic acid and tartaric acid inhibited A. xylinum producing BC in chemical medium, while pyruvic acid, malic acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, citric acid and succinic acid, as ethanol, promoted A. xylinum to produce BC. Compared to the blank BC production 1.48 g/L, the optimum addition concentrations of pyruvic acid, malic acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and ethanol in chemical medium were 0.15%, 0.1%, 0.3%, 0.4%, 0.1%, 0.2% , 4% and the BC productions were 2.49 g/L, 2.83 g/L, 2.12 g/L, 2.54 g/L, 2.27 g/L, 1.88 g/L , 2.63 g/L, respectively. The co-existence of above organic acids and ethanol increased BC production even further.

  13. Partial Characteristics of Hydrogen Production by Fermentative Hydrogen-producing Bacterial Strain B49

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiangjing(王相晶); Ren Nanqi; Xiang Wensheng; Lin Ming; Guo Wanqian

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of hydrogen production by a novel fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49 (AF481148 in EMBL), batch experiments are conducted under different conditions. Hydrogen production has a correlation with cell growth and the consumption of glucose and soluble protein. The optimum pH for cell growth is 4.5±0.15. At acidic pH 4.0±0.15, the bacteria has the maximum accumulated hydrogen volume of 2382 ml/L culture and the maximum hydrogen evolution rate of 339.9 ml/L culture*h with 1% glucose. The optimum temperature for cell growth and hydrogen production is 35℃. In addition, fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49 can generate hydrogen from the decomposition of other organic substrates such as wheat, soybean, corn, and potato. Moreover, it can also produce hydrogen from molasses wastewater and brewage wastewater, and hydrogen yields are 137.9 ml H2/g COD and 49.9 ml H2/g COD, respectively.

  14. Effects of bacterial action on waste rock producing acid drainage in the Brazilian first uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is an evolution of the methodology showed in the paper 'Study of waste of waste rock piles producing acid drainage in the Brazilian first uranium mine', also submitted for INAC2009. Therefore, the present work also related to the determination of chemical species leaching from waste rock pile 4 (WRP4) of the Uranium Mine and Milling Facility located in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, as well as the generation of acid waters. With the previous experimental setup, it has been observed that not only water and available oxygen are significant to pyrite oxidation reaction, but bacterial activity as well. As a first approach, the present work addresses the same experiment, but now testing without the influence of bacterial action. Therefore, the new methodology and experimental setup is now capable of determining the acidity of water in contact with material from the WRP4 and the concentration of chemical species dissolved as function of time. Such would also show the extent of bacterial action interference on the pyrite oxidation reaction. Results are based on mass balances comparing concentrations of chemical species in the waste rock before the experiment and in the waste rock plus the remaining water after the experiment. In addition, the evolution of the pH and EMF (electromotive force) values along with chemical species quantified through the experiment are presented through graphics. That is followed by discussions on the significance of such results in terms of concentration of the involved chemical species. The present work has also shown the need of improving the injection of air into the system. A more sophisticated experimental setup should be assembled in the near future, which would allow the quantification of differences between experimental tests with and without bacterial action. (author)

  15. Isolation and characteristics analysis of a novel high bacterial cellulose producing strain Gluconacetobacter intermedius CIs26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Jia, Jingjing; Xing, Jianrong; Chen, Jianbing; Lu, Shengmin

    2013-02-15

    A strain producing bacterial cellulose (BC) screened from rotten mandarin fruit was identified as Gluconacetobacter intermedius CIs26 by the examination of general taxonomical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Furthermore, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum showed that pellicle produced by strain CIs26 was composed of glucan, and had the same functional group as a typical BC. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) analysis indicated that the BC was type I in structure with crystallinity index of 75%. BC yields of strain CIs26 in Hestrin-Schramn (HS), citrus waste modified HS (CMHS) and citrus waste solution (CWS) mediums were 2.1 g/L, 5.7 g/L, and 7.2 g/L, respectively. It was shown that citrus waste could stimulate BC production of strain CIs26 efficiently. Based on the ability of utilization of citrus waste, this strain appeared to have potential in BC manufacture on an industrial scale.

  16. Diverse Bacterial PKS Sequences Derived From Okadaic Acid-Producing Dinoflagellates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen S. Rein

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Okadaic acid (OA and the related dinophysistoxins are isolated from dinoflagellates of the genus Prorocentrum and Dinophysis. Bacteria of the Roseobacter group have been associated with okadaic acid producing dinoflagellates and have been previously implicated in OA production. Analysis of 16S rRNA libraries reveals that Roseobacter are the most abundant bacteria associated with OA producing dinoflagellates of the genus Prorocentrum and are not found in association with non-toxic dinoflagellates. While some polyketide synthase (PKS genes form a highly supported Prorocentrum clade, most appear to be bacterial, but unrelated to Roseobacter or Alpha-Proteobacterial PKSs or those derived from other Alveolates Karenia brevis or Crytosporidium parvum.

  17. Bacterially produced recombinant influenza vaccines based on virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Jegerlehner

    Full Text Available Although current influenza vaccines are effective in general, there is an urgent need for the development of new technologies to improve vaccine production timelines, capacities and immunogenicity. Herein, we describe the development of an influenza vaccine technology which enables recombinant production of highly efficient influenza vaccines in bacterial expression systems. The globular head domain of influenza hemagglutinin, comprising most of the protein's neutralizing epitopes, was expressed in E. coli and covalently conjugated to bacteriophage-derived virus-like particles produced independently in E.coli. Conjugate influenza vaccines produced this way were used to immunize mice and found to elicit immune sera with high antibody titers specific for the native influenza hemagglutinin protein and high hemagglutination-inhibition titers. Moreover vaccination with these vaccines induced full protection against lethal challenges with homologous and highly drifted influenza strains.

  18. High Frequency and Diversity of Antimicrobial Activities Produced by Nasal Staphylococcus Strains against Bacterial Competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek, Daniela; Zipperer, Alexander; Kulik, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The human nasal microbiota is highly variable and dynamic often enclosing major pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. The potential roles of bacteriocins or other mechanisms allowing certain bacterial clones to prevail in this nutrient-poor habitat have hardly been studied. Of 89 nasal Staphylococcus isolates, unexpectedly, the vast majority (84%) was found to produce antimicrobial substances in particular under habitat-specific stress conditions, such as iron limitation or exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Activity spectra were generally narrow but highly variable with activities against certain nasal members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, or several groups of bacteria. Staphylococcus species and many other Firmicutes were insusceptible to most of the compounds. A representative bacteriocin was identified as a nukacin-related peptide whose inactivation reduced the capacity of the producer Staphylococcus epidermidis IVK45 to limit growth of other nasal bacteria. Of note, the bacteriocin genes were found on mobile genetic elements exhibiting signs of extensive horizontal gene transfer and rearrangements. Thus, continuously evolving bacteriocins appear to govern bacterial competition in the human nose and specific bacteriocins may become important agents for eradication of notorious opportunistic pathogens from human microbiota.

  19. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    the light. The concentration and light trapping means that single junction nanowire solar cells have a higher theoretical maximum efficiency than equivalent planar solar cells. We have demonstrated the built-in light concentration of nanowires, by growing, contacting and characterizing a solar cell...... consisting of a single, vertical, gallium arsenide(GaAs) nanowire grown on silicon with a radial p-i-n-junction. The average concentration was ~8, and the peak concentration was ~12. By increasing the number of junctions in solar cells, they can extract more energy per absorbed photon. In ideal multi......Solar cells commercial success is based on an efficiency/cost calculation. Nanowire solar cells is one of the foremost candidates to implement third generation photo voltaics, which are both very efficient and cheap to produce. This thesis is about our progress towards commercial nanowire solar...

  20. Hierarchical, Ultrathin Single-Crystal Nanowires of CdS Conveniently Produced in Laser-Induced Thermal Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li-Li; Xin, Huolin L; Kulinich, Sergei A; Yang, Li-Jun; Du, Xi-Wen

    2015-07-28

    Hierarchical nanowires (HNWs) exhibit unique properties and have wide applications, while often suffering from imperfect structure. Herein, we report a facile strategy toward ultrathin CdS HNWs with monocrystal structure, where a continuous-wave (CW) Nd:YAG laser is employed to irradiate an oleic acid (OA) solution containing precursors and a light absorber. The high heating rate and large temperature gradient generated by the CW laser lead to the rapid formation of tiny zinc-blende CdS nanocrystals which then line up into nanowires with the help of OA molecules. Next, the nanowires experience a phase transformation from zinc-blende to wurtzite structure, and the transformation-induced stress creates terraces on their surface, which promotes the growth of side branches and eventually results in monocrystal HNWs with an ultrathin diameter of 24 nm. The one-step synthesis of HNWs is conducted in air and completes in just 40 s, thus being very simple and rapid. The prepared CdS HNWs display photocatalytic performance superior to their nanoparticle counterparts, thus showing promise for catalytic applications in the future. PMID:26154589

  1. Screening of bacterial strains for pectinolytic activity: characterization of the polygalacturonase produced by Bacillus sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Márcia M.C.N.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sixty eight bacterial strains, isolated from soil and samples of vegetable in decomposition, were screened for the use of citrus pectin as the sole carbon source. 102 were positive for pectinase depolymerization in assay plates as evidenced by clear hydrolization halos. Among them, 30% presented considerable pectinolytic activity. The cultivation of these strains by submerged and semi-solid fermentation for polygalacturonase production indicated that five strains of Bacillus sp produced high quantities of the enzyme. The physico-chemical characteristics, such as optimum pH of 6.0 - 7.0, optimum temperatures between 45oC and 55oC, stability at temperatures above 40oC and in neutral and alkaline pH, were determined.

  2. Characterization of Bacterial Mannanase for Hydrolyzing Palm Kernel Cake to Produce Manno-oligosaccharides Prebiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Utami

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Palm kernel cake (PKC is a promising source of prebiotics, since it contains high amount of β-mannan which can be further hydrolyzed to manno-oligasaccharides (MOS, a prebiotic. Therefore, this research was carried out to analyze the capability of a bacterial isolate (A2 isolates previously isolated from soils sample from around IPB campus to hydrolyze PKC. Based on 16S-DNA analysis, isolate A2 was identified as Brevibacillus borstelensis. Mannanase of A2 isolate had an optimum condition at 90 oC and pH 7. Mannanase activity of crude extracts using Locust Bean Gum (LBG and PKC as substrates were 0.37U/mL and 0.032U/mL, respectively. However, the most favorable production of oligosaccharides based on the degree of polymerization was obtained after 72-h of incubation with the ratio of substrate:enzyme, 1.2:1, on 1.5% PKC as substrate. The manno-oligosaccharides prebio-tic obtained was found to interfere the growth of both lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and pathogenic microflora (Escherichia coli. E. coli apparently could not use this prebiotic as the carbon sources, in contrast to L. casei. Substitution of carbon source in medium with prebiotics reduced the capability of L. casei to produce organic acids. It is concluded that local A2 isolate (B. borstelensis produces mannanase which can be used to produce prebiotics from PKC.

  3. Magnesium improves hydrogen production by a novel fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiang-jing; REN Nan-qi; XIANG Wen-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of magnesium on glucose metabolism, including growth and hydrogen-producing capacity of fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49. These abilities were enhanced with an increase in magnesium concentration. At the end of fermentation from 10 g/L ratio of ethanol amount (mg/L) to acetate amount (mg/L) was 1.1, and the accumulated hydrogen volume hydrogen volume was increased to 2 360. 5 mL H2/L culture, the ratio of ethanol amount (mg/L) to acetate amount (mg/L) was increased to 1.3 and polysaccharide was decreased to 2. 5 mg/L. Moreover, the magnesium solution addition to the medium at different fermentation times affected hydrogen-producing ability. However,the later the addition time was postponed, the less the effect was on hydrogen evolution. Further experiments confirmed the enhancement was dependent on magnesium ions and not on the other inorganic ions such as SO42- or Cl-, which constituted the magnesium salts.

  4. Diversity and abundance of the bacterial community of the red Macroalga Porphyra umbilicalis: did bacterial farmers produce macroalgae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth N Miranda

    Full Text Available Macroalgae harbor microbial communities whose bacterial biodiversity remains largely uncharacterized. The goals of this study were 1 to examine the composition of the bacterial community associated with Porphyra umbilicalis Kützing from Schoodic Point, ME, 2 determine whether there are seasonal trends in species diversity but a core group of bacteria that are always present, and 3 to determine how the microbial community associated with a laboratory strain (P.um.1 established in the presence of antibiotics has changed. P. umbilicalis blades (n = 5, fall 2010; n = 5, winter 2011; n = 2, clonal P.um.1 were analyzed by pyrosequencing over two variable regions of the 16 S rDNA (V5-V6 and V8; 147,880 total reads. The bacterial taxa present were classified at an 80% confidence threshold into eight phyla (Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, and the candidate division TM7. The Bacteroidetes comprised the majority of bacterial sequences on both field and lab blades, but the Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria were also abundant. Sphingobacteria (Bacteroidetes and Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes had inverse abundances on natural versus P.um.1 blades. Bacterial communities were richer and more diverse on blades sampled in fall compared to winter. Significant differences were observed between microbial communities among all three groups of blades examined. Only two OTUs were found on all 12 blades, and only one of these, belonging to the Saprospiraceae (Bacteroidetes, was abundant. Lewinella (as 66 OTUs was found on all field blades and was the most abundant genus. Bacteria from the Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes that are known to digest the galactan sulfates of red algal cell walls were well-represented. Some of these taxa likely provide essential morphogenetic and beneficial nutritive factors to P. umbilicalis and may have had

  5. Textile dye removal from wastewater effluents using bioflocculants produced by indigenous bacterial isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buthelezi, Simphiwe P; Olaniran, Ademola O; Pillay, Balakrishna

    2012-11-30

    Bioflocculant-producing bacteria were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant located in Durban, South Africa, and identified using standard biochemical tests as well as the analysis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. The bioflocculants produced by these organisms were ethanol precipitated, purified using 2% (w/v) cetylpyridinium chloride solution and evaluated for removal of wastewater dyes under different pH, temperature and nutritional conditions. Bioflocculants from these indigenous bacteria were very effective for decolourizing the different dyes tested in this study, with a removal rate of up to 97.04%. The decolourization efficiency was largely influenced by the type of dye, pH, temperature, and flocculant concentration. A pH of 7 was found to be optimum for the removal of both whale and mediblue dyes, while the optimum pH for fawn and mixed dye removal was found to be between 9 and 10. Optimum temperature for whale and mediblue dye removal was 35 °C, and that for fawn and mixed dye varied between 40–45 °C and 35–40 °C, respectively. These bacterial bioflocculants may provide an economical and cleaner alternative to replace or supplement present treatment processes for the removal of dyes from wastewater effluents, since they are biodegradable and easily sustainable.

  6. Textile Dye Removal from Wastewater Effluents Using Bioflocculants Produced by Indigenous Bacterial Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishna Pillay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Bioflocculant-producing bacteria were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant located in Durban, South Africa, and identified using standard biochemical tests as well as the analysis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. The bioflocculants produced by these organisms were ethanol precipitated, purified using 2% (w/v cetylpyridinium chloride solution and evaluated for removal of wastewater dyes under different pH, temperature and nutritional conditions. Bioflocculants from these indigenous bacteria were very effective for decolourizing the different dyes tested in this study, with a removal rate of up to 97.04%. The decolourization efficiency was largely influenced by the type of dye, pH, temperature, and flocculant concentration. A pH of 7 was found to be optimum for the removal of both whale and mediblue dyes, while the optimum pH for fawn and mixed dye removal was found to be between 9 and 10. Optimum temperature for whale and mediblue dye removal was 35 °C, and that for fawn and mixed dye varied between 40–45 °C and 35–40 °C, respectively. These bacterial bioflocculants may provide an economical and cleaner alternative to replace or supplement present treatment processes for the removal of dyes from wastewater effluents, since they are biodegradable and easily sustainable.

  7. Bacterial endophyte Sphingomonas sp. LK11 produces gibberellins and IAA and promotes tomato plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Hussain, Javid; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Al-Khiziri, Salima; Ullah, Ihsan; Ali, Liaqat; Jung, Hee-Young; Lee, In-Jung

    2014-08-01

    Plant growth promoting endophytic bacteria have been identified as potential growth regulators of crops. Endophytic bacterium, Sphingomonas sp. LK11, was isolated from the leaves of Tephrosia apollinea. The pure culture of Sphingomonas sp. LK11 was subjected to advance chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques to extract and isolate gibberellins (GAs). Deuterated standards of [17, 17-(2)H2]-GA4, [17, 17-(2)H2]-GA9 and [17, 17-(2)H2]-GA20 were used to quantify the bacterial GAs. The analysis of the culture broth of Sphingomonas sp. LK11 revealed the existence of physiologically active gibberellins (GA4: 2.97 ± 0.11 ng/ml) and inactive GA9 (0.98 ± 0.15 ng/ml) and GA20 (2.41 ± 0.23). The endophyte also produced indole acetic acid (11.23 ± 0.93 μM/ml). Tomato plants inoculated with endophytic Sphingomonas sp. LK11 showed significantly increased growth attributes (shoot length, chlorophyll contents, shoot, and root dry weights) compared to the control. This indicated that such phyto-hormones-producing strains could help in increasing crop growth. PMID:24994010

  8. Liver dendritic cells present bacterial antigens and produce cytokines upon Salmonella encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Cecilia; Wick, Mary Jo

    2004-02-15

    The capacity of murine liver dendritic cells (DC) to present bacterial Ags and produce cytokines after encounter with Salmonella was studied. Freshly isolated, nonparenchymal liver CD11c(+) cells had heterogeneous expression of MHC class II and CD11b and a low level of CD40 and CD86 expression. Characterization of liver DC subsets revealed that CD8alpha(-)CD4(-) double negative cells constituted the majority of liver CD11c(+) ( approximately 85%) with few cells expressing CD8alpha or CD4. Flow cytometry analysis of freshly isolated CD11c(+) cells enriched from the liver and cocultured with Salmonella expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed that CD11c(+) MHC class II(high) cells had a greater capacity to internalize Salmonella relative to CD11c(+) MHC class II(low) cells. Moreover, both CD8alpha(-) and CD8alpha(+) liver DC internalized bacteria with similar efficiency after both in vitro and in vivo infection. CD11c(+) cells enriched from the liver could also process Salmonella for peptide presentation on MHC class I and class II to primary, Ag-specific T cells after internalization requiring actin cytoskeletal rearrangements. Flow cytometry analysis of liver CD11c(+) cells infected with Salmonella expressing GFP showed that both CD8alpha(-) and CD8alpha(+) DC produced IL-12p40 and TNF-alpha. The majority of cytokine-positive cells did not contain bacteria (GFP(-)) whereas only a minor fraction of cytokine-positive cells were GFP(+). Furthermore, only approximately 30-50% of liver DC containing bacteria (GFP(+)) produced cytokines. Thus, liver DC can internalize and process Salmonella for peptide presentation to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and elicit proinflammatory cytokine production upon Salmonella encounter, suggesting that DC in the liver may contribute to immunity against hepatotropic bacteria.

  9. Bacterial diversity and composition in major fresh produce growing soils affected by physiochemical properties and geographic locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jincai; Ibekwe, A Mark; Yang, Ching-Hong; Crowley, David E

    2016-09-01

    Microbial diversity of agricultural soils has been well documented, but information on leafy green producing soils is limited. In this study, we investigated microbial diversity and community structures in 32 (16 organic, 16 conventionally managed soils) from California (CA) and Arizona (AZ) using pyrosequencing, and identified factors affecting bacterial composition. Results of detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity analysis showed that bacterial community structures of conventionally managed soils were similar to that of organically managed soils; while the bacterial community structures in soils from Salinas, California were different (Psoils from Yuma, Arizona and Imperial Valley, California. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and artificial neural network (ANN) analysis of bacterial community structures and soil variables showed that electrical conductivity (EC), clay content, water-holding capacity (WHC), pH, total nitrogen (TN), and organic carbon (OC) significantly (Psoil physical properties (clay, EC, and WHC), soil chemical variables (pH, TN, and OC) and sampling location explained 16.3%, 12.5%, and 50.9%, respectively, of total variations in bacterial community structure, leaving 13% of the total variation unexplained. Our current study showed that bacterial community composition and diversity in major fresh produce growing soils from California and Arizona is a function of soil physiochemical characteristics and geographic distances of sampling sites. PMID:27135583

  10. Separating the effects of mutation and selection in producing DNA skew in bacterial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Brian R

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many bacterial chromosomes display nucleotide asymmetry, or skew, between the leading and lagging strands of replication. Mutational differences between these strands result in an overall pattern of skew that is centered about the origin of replication. Such a pattern could also arise from selection coupled with a bias for genes coded on the leading strand. The relative contributions of selection and mutation in producing compositional skew are largely unknown. Results We describe a model to quantify the contribution of mutational differences between the leading and lagging strands in producing replication-induced skew. When the origin and terminus of replication are known, the model can be used to estimate the relative accumulation of G over C and of A over T on the leading strand due to replication effects in a chromosome with bidirectional replication arms. The model may also be implemented in a maximum likelihood framework to estimate the locations of origin and terminus. We find that our estimations for the origin and terminus agree very well with the location of genes that are thought to be associated with the replication origin. This indicates that our model provides an accurate, objective method of determining the replication arms and also provides support for the hypothesis that these genes represent an ancestral cluster of origin-associated genes. Conclusion The model has several advantages over other methods of analyzing genome skew. First, it quantifies the role of mutation in generating skew so that its effect on composition, for example codon bias, can be assessed. Second, it provides an objective method for locating origin and terminus, one that is based on chromosome-wide accumulation of leading vs lagging strand nucleotide differences. Finally, the model has the potential to be utilized in a maximum likelihood framework in order to analyze the effect of chromosome rearrangements on nucleotide composition.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Gluconacetobacter hansenii Strain NQ5 (ATCC 53582), an Efficient Producer of Bacterial Cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Mehta, Kalpa; Brown, R Malcolm

    2016-08-11

    This study reports the release of the complete nucleotide sequence of Gluconacetobacter hansenii strain NQ5 (ATCC 53582). This strain was isolated by R. Malcolm Brown, Jr. in a sugar mill in North Queensland, Australia, and is an efficient producer of bacterial cellulose. The elucidation of the genome will contribute to the study of the molecular mechanisms necessary for cellulose biosynthesis.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Gluconacetobacter hansenii Strain NQ5 (ATCC 53582), an Efficient Producer of Bacterial Cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Mehta, Kalpa; Brown, R Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the release of the complete nucleotide sequence of Gluconacetobacter hansenii strain NQ5 (ATCC 53582). This strain was isolated by R. Malcolm Brown, Jr. in a sugar mill in North Queensland, Australia, and is an efficient producer of bacterial cellulose. The elucidation of the genome will contribute to the study of the molecular mechanisms necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516505

  13. Electrically conductive bacterial cellulose composite membranes produced by the incorporation of graphite nanoplatelets in pristine bacterial cellulose membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs were utilized to improve the electrical conductivity of pristine bacterial cellulose (BC membranes. By physical and chemical methods, flake-shaped GNPs, weaving through the surface layer of web-like cellulose nanofibrils, were indeed fixed or trapped by the adjacent nanofibrils in the BC surface network, for comparison, rod-shaped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were homogeneously inserted into BC membrane through the pore structures and tunnels within the BC membrane. Strong physical and chemical interaction exists between the BC nanofibrils and the particles of GNP or MWCNT even after 15 h sonication. BC membrane with 8.7 wt% incorporated GNPs reached the maximum electrical conductivity of 4.5 S/cm, while 13.9 wt% MWCNT/BC composite membrane achieved the maximum electrical conductivity of 1.2 S/cm. Compared with one dimensional (1-D MWCNTs, as long as GNPs inserted into BC membranes, the 2-D reinforcement of GNPs was proven to be more effective in improving the electrical conductivity of BC membranes thus not only break the bottleneck of further improvement of the electrical conductivity of BC-based composite membranes but also broaden the applications of BC and GNPs.

  14. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Abbott, James; Micklem, Chris N; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2016-06-14

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong and ultrapure form of cellulose produced naturally by several species of the Acetobacteraceae Its high strength, purity, and biocompatibility make it of great interest to materials science; however, precise control of its biosynthesis has remained a challenge for biotechnology. Here we isolate a strain of Komagataeibacter rhaeticus (K. rhaeticus iGEM) that can produce cellulose at high yields, grow in low-nitrogen conditions, and is highly resistant to toxic chemicals. We achieved external control over its bacterial cellulose production through development of a modular genetic toolkit that enables rational reprogramming of the cell. To further its use as an organism for biotechnology, we sequenced its genome and demonstrate genetic circuits that enable functionalization and patterning of heterologous gene expression within the cellulose matrix. This work lays the foundations for using genetic engineering to produce cellulose-based materials, with numerous applications in basic science, materials engineering, and biotechnology.

  15. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Micklem, Chris N.; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S.; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong and ultrapure form of cellulose produced naturally by several species of the Acetobacteraceae. Its high strength, purity, and biocompatibility make it of great interest to materials science; however, precise control of its biosynthesis has remained a challenge for biotechnology. Here we isolate a strain of Komagataeibacter rhaeticus (K. rhaeticus iGEM) that can produce cellulose at high yields, grow in low-nitrogen conditions, and is highly resistant to toxic chemicals. We achieved external control over its bacterial cellulose production through development of a modular genetic toolkit that enables rational reprogramming of the cell. To further its use as an organism for biotechnology, we sequenced its genome and demonstrate genetic circuits that enable functionalization and patterning of heterologous gene expression within the cellulose matrix. This work lays the foundations for using genetic engineering to produce cellulose-based materials, with numerous applications in basic science, materials engineering, and biotechnology. PMID:27247386

  16. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Abbott, James; Micklem, Chris N; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2016-06-14

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong and ultrapure form of cellulose produced naturally by several species of the Acetobacteraceae Its high strength, purity, and biocompatibility make it of great interest to materials science; however, precise control of its biosynthesis has remained a challenge for biotechnology. Here we isolate a strain of Komagataeibacter rhaeticus (K. rhaeticus iGEM) that can produce cellulose at high yields, grow in low-nitrogen conditions, and is highly resistant to toxic chemicals. We achieved external control over its bacterial cellulose production through development of a modular genetic toolkit that enables rational reprogramming of the cell. To further its use as an organism for biotechnology, we sequenced its genome and demonstrate genetic circuits that enable functionalization and patterning of heterologous gene expression within the cellulose matrix. This work lays the foundations for using genetic engineering to produce cellulose-based materials, with numerous applications in basic science, materials engineering, and biotechnology. PMID:27247386

  17. Genome sequence and plasmid transformation of the model high-yield bacterial cellulose producer Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Reeve, Benjamin; Abbott, James; Freemont, Paul S.; Ellis, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong, highly pure form of cellulose that is used in a range of applications in industry, consumer goods and medicine. Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582 is one of the highest reported bacterial cellulose producing strains and has been used as a model organism in numerous studies of bacterial cellulose production and studies aiming to increased cellulose productivity. Here we present a high-quality draft genome sequence for G. hansenii ATCC 53582 and find that in addition to the previously described cellulose synthase operon, ATCC 53582 contains two additional cellulose synthase operons and several previously undescribed genes associated with cellulose production. In parallel, we also develop optimized protocols and identify plasmid backbones suitable for transformation of ATCC 53582, albeit with low efficiencies. Together, these results provide important information for further studies into cellulose synthesis and for future studies aiming to genetically engineer G. hansenii ATCC 53582 for increased cellulose productivity.

  18. Novel bacterial isolate from Permian groundwater, capable of aggregating potential biofuel-producing microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Laughinghouse, Haywood D; Anderson, Matthew A; Chen, Feng; Willliams, Ernest; Place, Allen R; Zmora, Odi; Zohar, Yonathan; Zheng, Tianling; Hill, Russell T

    2012-03-01

    Increasing petroleum costs and climate change have resulted in microalgae receiving attention as potential biofuel producers. Little information is available on the diversity and functions of bacterial communities associated with biofuel-producing algae. A potential biofuel-producing microalgal strain, Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1, was grown in Permian groundwater. Changes in the bacterial community structure at three temperatures were monitored by two culture-independent methods, and culturable bacteria were characterized. After 9 days of incubation, N. oceanica IMET1 began to aggregate and precipitate in cultures grown at 30°C, whereas cells remained uniformly distributed at 15°C and 25°C. The bacterial communities in cultures at 30°C changed markedly. Some bacteria isolated only at 30°C were tested for their potential for aggregating microalgae. A novel bacterium designated HW001 showed a remarkable ability to aggregate N. oceanica IMET1, causing microalgal cells to aggregate after 3 days of incubation, while the total lipid content of the microalgal cells was not affected. Direct interaction of HW001 and N. oceanica is necessary for aggregation. HW001 can also aggregate the microalgae N. oceanica CT-1, Tetraselmis suecica, and T. chuii as well as the cyanobacterium Synechococcus WH8007. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons indicated the great novelty of this strain, which exhibited only 89% sequence similarity with any previously cultured bacteria. Specific primers targeted to HW001 revealed that the strain originated from the Permian groundwater. This study of the bacterial communities associated with potential biofuel-producing microalgae addresses a little-investigated area of microalgal biofuel research and provides a novel approach to harvest biofuel-producing microalgae by using the novel bacterium strain HW001.

  19. Biodegradation of endosulfan isomers and its metabolite endosulfate by two biosurfactant producing bacterial strains of Bordetella petrii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odukkathil, Greeshma; Vasudevan, Namasivayam

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the investigation was to study the biodegradation of endosulfan isomers and its major metabolite endosulfate by two biosurfactant producing bacterial strains of Bordetella petrii. The significance of the study is to evaluate the capability of biosurfactant producing bacterial strains in enhancing the bioavailability of endosulfan. Sixty bacterial strains were isolated from the endosulfan degrading bacterial consortium and were screened for endosulfan degradation and biosurfactant production. Among those, two strains Bordetella petrii I GV 34 (Gene bank Accession No KJ02262) and Bordetella petrii II GV 36 (Gene bank Accession No KJ022625) were capable of degrading endosulfan with simultaneous biosurfactant production. Bordetella petrii I degraded 89% of α and 84% of β isomers of endosulfan whereas Bordetella petrii II degraded 82% of both the isomers. Both the strains were able to reduce the surface tension up to 19.6% and 21.4% with a minimum observed surface tension of 45 Dynes/cm and 44 Dynes/cm, respectively. The study revealed that the strains have the potential to enhance the degradation endosulfan residues in contaminated sites and water by biosurfactant production.

  20. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  1. Methods for synthesizing metal oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kumar, Vivekanand; Kim, Jeong H.; Clark, Ezra Lee

    2016-08-09

    A method of synthesizing a metal oxide nanowire includes the steps of: combining an amount of a transition metal or a transition metal oxide with an amount of an alkali metal compound to produce a mixture; activating a plasma discharge reactor to create a plasma discharge; exposing the mixture to the plasma discharge for a first predetermined time period such that transition metal oxide nanowires are formed; contacting the transition metal oxide nanowires with an acid solution such that an alkali metal ion is exchanged for a hydrogen ion on each of the transition metal oxide nanowires; and exposing the transition metal oxide nanowires to the plasma discharge for a second predetermined time period to thermally anneal the transition metal oxide nanowires. Transition metal oxide nanowires produced using the synthesis methods described herein are also provided.

  2. Characterization of Geographically Distinct Bacterial Communities Associated with Coral Mucus Produced by Acropora spp. and Porites spp.

    OpenAIRE

    McKew, B.A.; Dumbrell, A.J.; Daud, S. D.; Hepburn, L; Thorpe, E.; Mogensen, L.; Whitby, C.

    2012-01-01

    Acropora and Porites corals are important reef builders in the Indo-Pacific and Caribbean. Bacteria associated with mucus produced by Porites spp. and Acropora spp. from Caribbean (Punta Maroma, Mexico) and Indo-Pacific (Hoga and Sampela, Indonesia) reefs were determined. Analysis of pyrosequencing libraries showed that bacterial communities from Caribbean corals were significantly more diverse (H′, 3.18 to 4.25) than their Indonesian counterparts (H′, 2.54 to 3.25). Dominant taxa were Gammap...

  3. Exploration and conservation of bacterial genetic resources as bacteriocin producing inhibitory microorganisms to pathogen bacteria in livestock

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Exploration and conservation of microorganisms producing bacteriocin was done as the primary study towards the collection of potential bacteria and its application in improving livestock health condition and inhibit food borne pathogens. Diferent kinds of samples such as beef cattle rectal swab, rumen fluids, cow’s milk, chicken gut content, goat’s milk were collected at Bogor cattle slaughter houses, poultry slaughter houses, dairy cattle and goat farms. A total of 452 bacterial isolates con...

  4. The Population Structure of Antibiotic-Producing Bacterial Symbionts of Apterostigma dentigerum Ants: Impacts of Coevolution and Multipartite Symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Caldera, Eric J.; Currie, Cameron R

    2012-01-01

    Fungus-growing ants (Attini) are part of a complex symbiosis with Basidiomycetous fungi, which the ants cultivate for food, Ascomycetous fungal pathogens (Escovopsis), which parasitize cultivars, and Actinobacteria, which produce antibiotic compounds that suppress pathogen growth. Earlier studies that have characterized the association between attine ants and their bacterial symbionts have employed broad phylogenetic approaches, with conclusions ranging from a diffuse coevolved mutualism to n...

  5. Effects of Interactions of Auxin-Producing Bacteria and Bacterial-Feeding Nematodes on Regulation of Peanut Growths

    OpenAIRE

    Li Xu; Wensi Xu; Ying Jiang; Feng Hu; Huixin Li

    2015-01-01

    The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid)-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium) and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp.) on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1) after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and so...

  6. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxia Cui; Muyang Yang; Liping Wang; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated....

  7. Alkylpyrazines produced by bacterial spoilage of heat-treated and gamma-irradiated coconut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the sterilisation of coconut by autoclaving or gamma irradiation, followed by storage in water at 250 C for 8 weeks. Bacillus subtilis developed after storage in water. The volatile compounds formed as a result of bacterial activity were extracted and identified. (U.K.)

  8. Effects of Iron on Hydrogen-producing Capacity,Hydrogenase and NADH-fd Reductase Activities of a Fermentative Hydrogen-producing Bacterial Strain B49

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiangjing(王相晶); Ren Nanqi; Xiang Wensheng

    2004-01-01

    Iron plays an important role in hydrogen production, cell growth, hydrogenase and NADH-fd reductase activities of hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49 (AF481148 in EMBL). At the end of fermentation from 10 g/L glucose, for the culture containing 10 mg/L FeSO4*7H2O the cell growth in terms of optical density (OD) at 600nm was 1.13, the ratio of ethanol amount (mg/L) to acetate amount (mg/L) was 1.55, and the accumulated hydrogen volume was 1816.3 ml H2/L culture; whereas for the culture of 80 mg/L FeSO4*7H2O OD600nm was increased to 1.34, the accumulated hydrogen volume was increased to 2360.5 ml H2/L culture, and the ratio of ethanol amount (mg/L) to acetate amount (mg/L) decreased to 1.31. Moreover, the iron addition to the medium at different fermentation time could affect hydrogen-producing ability. However, the later the addition time of FeSO4*7H2O was postponed, the less the effect on hydrogen evolution was. In the course of fermentation, the specific activities of hydrogenase and NADH-fd reductase of hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49 decreased with the consumption of iron.

  9. No evidence for a culturable bacterial tetrodotoxin producer in Pleurobranchaea maculata (Gastropoda: Pleurobranchidae) and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes: Polycladida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvitti, Lauren R; Wood, Susanna A; McNabb, Paul; Cary, Stephen Craig

    2015-02-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin found in the tissues of many taxonomically diverse organisms. Its origin has been the topic of much debate, with suggestions including endogenous production, acquisition through diet, and symbiotic bacterial synthesis. Bacterial production of TTX has been reported in isolates from marine biota, but at lower than expected concentrations. In this study, 102 strains were isolated from Pleurobranchaea maculata (Opisthobranchia) and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes). Tetrodotoxin production was tested utilizing a recently developed sensitive method to detect the C9 base of TTX via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bacterial strains were characterized by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. To account for the possibility that TTX is produced by a consortium of bacteria, a series of experiments using marine broth spiked with various P. maculata tissues were undertaken. Sixteen unique strains from P. maculata and one from Stylochoplana sp. were isolated, representing eight different genera; Pseudomonadales, Actinomycetales, Oceanospirillales, Thiotrichales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Bacillales, and Vibrionales. Molecular fingerprinting of bacterial communities from broth experiments showed little change over the first four days. No C9 base or TTX was detected in isolates or broth experiments (past day 0), suggesting a culturable microbial source of TTX in P. maculata and Stylochoplana sp. is unlikely. PMID:25635464

  10. No Evidence for a Culturable Bacterial Tetrodotoxin Producer in Pleurobranchaea maculata (Gastropoda: Pleurobranchidae and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes: Polycladida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren R. Salvitti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a potent neurotoxin found in the tissues of many taxonomically diverse organisms. Its origin has been the topic of much debate, with suggestions including endogenous production, acquisition through diet, and symbiotic bacterial synthesis. Bacterial production of TTX has been reported in isolates from marine biota, but at lower than expected concentrations. In this study, 102 strains were isolated from Pleurobranchaea maculata (Opisthobranchia and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes. Tetrodotoxin production was tested utilizing a recently developed sensitive method to detect the C9 base of TTX via liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry. Bacterial strains were characterized by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. To account for the possibility that TTX is produced by a consortium of bacteria, a series of experiments using marine broth spiked with various P. maculata tissues were undertaken. Sixteen unique strains from P. maculata and one from Stylochoplana sp. were isolated, representing eight different genera; Pseudomonadales, Actinomycetales, Oceanospirillales, Thiotrichales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Bacillales, and Vibrionales. Molecular fingerprinting of bacterial communities from broth experiments showed little change over the first four days. No C9 base or TTX was detected in isolates or broth experiments (past day 0, suggesting a culturable microbial source of TTX in P. maculata and Stylochoplana sp. is unlikely.

  11. Biodegradation of Leonardite by an alkali-producing bacterial community and characterization of the degraded products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong-Guo; Jiang, Feng; Yang, Jin-Shui; Li, Bao-Zhen; Yuan, Hong-Li

    2012-03-01

    In this study, three bacterial communities were obtained from 12 Leonardite samples with the aim of identifying a clean, effective, and economic technique for the dissolution of Leonardite, a type of low-grade coal, in the production of humic acid (HA). The biodegradation ability and characteristics of the degraded products of the most effective bacterial community (MCSL-2), which degraded 50% of the Leonardite within 21 days, were further investigated. Analyses of elemental composition, (13)C NMR, and Fourier transform infrared revealed that the contents of C, O, and aliphatic carbon were similar in biodegraded humic acid (bHA) and chemically (alkali) extracted humic acid (cHA). However, the N and carboxyl carbon contents of bHA was higher than that of cHA. Furthermore, a positive correlation was identified between the degradation efficiency and the increasing pH of the culture medium, while increases of manganese peroxidase and esterase activities were also observed. These data demonstrated that both alkali production and enzyme reactions were involved in Leonardite solubilization by MCSL-2, although the former mechanism predominated. No fungus was observed by microscopy. Only four bacterial phylotypes were recognized, and Bacillus licheniformis-related bacteria were identified as the main group in MCSL-2 by analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes, thus demonstrating that Leonardite degradation ability has a limited distribution in bacteria. Hormone-like bioactivities of bHA were also detected. In this study, a bacterial community capable of Leonardite degradation was identified and the products characterized. These data implicate the use of such bacteria for the exploitation of Leonardite as a biofertilizer.

  12. Biodegradation of Leonardite by an alkali-producing bacterial community and characterization of the degraded products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong-Guo; Jiang, Feng; Yang, Jin-Shui; Li, Bao-Zhen; Yuan, Hong-Li

    2012-03-01

    In this study, three bacterial communities were obtained from 12 Leonardite samples with the aim of identifying a clean, effective, and economic technique for the dissolution of Leonardite, a type of low-grade coal, in the production of humic acid (HA). The biodegradation ability and characteristics of the degraded products of the most effective bacterial community (MCSL-2), which degraded 50% of the Leonardite within 21 days, were further investigated. Analyses of elemental composition, (13)C NMR, and Fourier transform infrared revealed that the contents of C, O, and aliphatic carbon were similar in biodegraded humic acid (bHA) and chemically (alkali) extracted humic acid (cHA). However, the N and carboxyl carbon contents of bHA was higher than that of cHA. Furthermore, a positive correlation was identified between the degradation efficiency and the increasing pH of the culture medium, while increases of manganese peroxidase and esterase activities were also observed. These data demonstrated that both alkali production and enzyme reactions were involved in Leonardite solubilization by MCSL-2, although the former mechanism predominated. No fungus was observed by microscopy. Only four bacterial phylotypes were recognized, and Bacillus licheniformis-related bacteria were identified as the main group in MCSL-2 by analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes, thus demonstrating that Leonardite degradation ability has a limited distribution in bacteria. Hormone-like bioactivities of bHA were also detected. In this study, a bacterial community capable of Leonardite degradation was identified and the products characterized. These data implicate the use of such bacteria for the exploitation of Leonardite as a biofertilizer. PMID:22075634

  13. Nanowire photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of integrated electronic circuitry ranks among the most disruptive and transformative technologies of the 20th century. Even though integrated circuits are ubiquitous in modern life, both fundamental and technical constraints will eventually test the limits of Moore's law. Nanowire photonic circuitry constructed from myriad one-dimensional building blocks offers numerous opportunities for the development of next-generation optical information processors and spectroscopy. However, several challenges remain before the potential of nanowire building blocks is fully realized. We cover recent advances in nanowire synthesis, characterization, lasing, integration, and the eventual application to relevant technical and scientific questions.

  14. Decreased Bacterial Attachment and Protein Adsorption to Coatings Produced by Low Enegy Plasma Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T.E.; Kingshott, Peter; Benter, M.;

    Introduction Silicone rubber is among the most biocompatible materials available, exhibiting low levels of extractables, absence of plasticizers and additives and fairly low activation of blood thrombogenesis components. However untreated silicone rubber does not efficiently resist protein...... by staining with crystal violet with the extent of biofilm formation determined from absorbance measurement of the extracted dye. Flow chamber assay: Measurements of bacterial colonization during prolonged growth in liquid flow were done using a flow chamber (modified version of FCS lc, Oligene, Germany......). Quantification was carried out by a similar method as described above, using crystal violet as a direct measure of the amount of adhering bacteria. Protein adsorption measurements: Gold plated QCMcrystals were spin coated with polystyrene (PS) to create a hydrophobic reference surface similar to silicone. PS...

  15. Preclinical test: bacterial reverse mutation test for {sup 18}F-fluorocholine produced in CDTN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Bruno M.; Bispo, Ana Carolina A.; Campos, Danielle C.; Silva, Juliana B., E-mail: bmm@cdtn.br, E-mail: acab@cdtn.br, E-mail: dcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvajb@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The choline labeled with fluorine-18 (18FCH) is being considered as a great importance radiopharmaceutical due to its effective detection of many type of malignant neoplasm. The research related to {sup 18}F-fluorocholine synthesis in CDTN was initiated in 2010. In order to obtain clinical research approval, as well as to register {sup 18}FCH for marketing, safety and efficacy preclinical testing are required. The present work evaluated the {sup 18}FCH genotoxic potential through the bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames test) using Salmonella typhimurium TA-98, TA-100, TA-1535 and TA-1537 strains and Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA strain. The reverse mutation test in bacteria for fluorcolina was conducted in two stages. Initially the method was applied to 'cold' fluorocholine molecule (19FCH). Subsequently, the decayed product of {sup 18}FCH synthesis was evaluated. The first step was performed in order to examine the FCH molecule mutagenicity. The second was carried out to determine the mutagenic potential of final product. All strains were tested in triplicate for each exposure concentration, in the presence and absence of metabolic activation (S-9 mix - 10%). There were no statistically significant increases in revertant colonies rate for any strains tested after their exposure to decayed {sup 18}FCH or {sup 19}FCH. The number of revertant colonies in positive controls was significantly higher than that observed in significant increases in revertant colonies rate for any strains tested after their exposure to decayed {sup 18}FCH or {sup 19}FCH. The number of revertant colonies in positive controls was significantly higher than that observed in negative controls. Based on results of this assay, {sup 18}FCH and {sup 19}FCH, at tested doses, were found to be non-mutagenic in bacterial reverse mutation test. (author)

  16. Preclinical test: bacterial reverse mutation test for 18F-fluorocholine produced in CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choline labeled with fluorine-18 (18FCH) is being considered as a great importance radiopharmaceutical due to its effective detection of many type of malignant neoplasm. The research related to 18F-fluorocholine synthesis in CDTN was initiated in 2010. In order to obtain clinical research approval, as well as to register 18FCH for marketing, safety and efficacy preclinical testing are required. The present work evaluated the 18FCH genotoxic potential through the bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames test) using Salmonella typhimurium TA-98, TA-100, TA-1535 and TA-1537 strains and Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA strain. The reverse mutation test in bacteria for fluorcolina was conducted in two stages. Initially the method was applied to 'cold' fluorocholine molecule (19FCH). Subsequently, the decayed product of 18FCH synthesis was evaluated. The first step was performed in order to examine the FCH molecule mutagenicity. The second was carried out to determine the mutagenic potential of final product. All strains were tested in triplicate for each exposure concentration, in the presence and absence of metabolic activation (S-9 mix - 10%). There were no statistically significant increases in revertant colonies rate for any strains tested after their exposure to decayed 18FCH or 19FCH. The number of revertant colonies in positive controls was significantly higher than that observed in significant increases in revertant colonies rate for any strains tested after their exposure to decayed 18FCH or 19FCH. The number of revertant colonies in positive controls was significantly higher than that observed in negative controls. Based on results of this assay, 18FCH and 19FCH, at tested doses, were found to be non-mutagenic in bacterial reverse mutation test. (author)

  17. Preparation of SiC Nanowires Self-sacrificially Templated by Carbonated Bacterial Cellulose%以碳化细菌纤维素为模板制备碳化硅纳米线

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温丽霞; 马拥军

    2012-01-01

    以碳化细菌纤维素为模板和碳源,通过气相渗硅法制备碳化硅纳米线。x射线衍射和扫描电镜(SEM)研究了碳化硅样品的结构与形貌,结果表明所得碳化硅都是纯立方相结构,并且粒度随温度的升高而增大。碳化硅纳米线表面光滑,长度达到微米级。%SiC nanowires were synthesized by the infiltration process of reactive vapor Si, using carbona- ted bacterial cellulose as carbon template and a reactant. XRD and SEM were used to study the phase and morphology of the silicon carbide. The results show that silicon carbide is pure cubic phase and the parti- cle sizes are increasing with the temperature increasing. The surface of SiC nanowires is smooth and the length reaches a micron level.

  18. Textile Dye Removal from Wastewater Effluents Using Bioflocculants Produced by Indigenous Bacterial Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishna Pillay; Ademola O Olaniran; Simphiwe P. Buthelezi

    2012-01-01

    Bioflocculant-producing bacteria were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant located in Durban, South Africa, and identified using standard biochemical tests as well as the analysis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. The bioflocculants produced by these organisms were ethanol precipitated, purified using 2% (w/v) cetylpyridinium chloride solution and evaluated for removal of wastewater dyes under different pH, temperature and nutritional conditions. Bioflocculants from ...

  19. Isolation and characterization of rhamnolipid-producing bacterial strains from a biodiesel facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Alejandro P; Price, Neil P J; Ray, Karen J; Kuo, Tsung-Min

    2009-06-01

    Novel strains of rhamnolipid-producing bacteria were isolated from soils at a biodiesel facility on the basis of their ability to grow on glycerol as a sole carbon source. Strains were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Enterobacter asburiae, Enterobacter hormaechei, Pantoea stewartii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strains of the former five species were found to produce rhamnolipids in quantities the same as, or similar to, coisolated strains of P. aeruginosa. Measurements of surface tension revealed that that emulsifying properties of these strains were similar to levels displayed by rhamnolipids produced by P. aeruginosa. Results of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS analyses revealed that the predominant compounds made by all strains were C10-C10 mono- and dirhamnolipids. Notably, E. hormaechei and one strain of A. calcoaceticus produced rhamnolipids in amounts similar to the pseudomonads. As all strains examined were from the same taxonomic class of Proteobacteria, further examination of this group may reveal many additional species not previously known to produce rhamnolipids in addition to novel strains of species currently known to produce rhamnolipids. PMID:19473254

  20. Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Al-Shamery, Katharina;

    Single crystalline nanowires from fluorescing organic molecules like para-phenylenes or thiophenes are supposed to become key elements in future integrated optoelectronic devices [1]. For a sophisticated design of devices based on nanowires the basic principles of the nanowire formation have...... to be well understood [2]. Nanowires from para-phenylenes, from ®-thiophenes, and from phenylene/thiophene co-oligomers, Fig. 1, are investigated exemplarily. Epitaxy and electrostatic interactions determine the microscopic growth mechanism, whereas kinetics ascertains the macroscopic habit. Results from...... atomic force microscopy and from polarized far-field optical microscopy for various prototypical molecules are reproduced by electrostatic and Monte Carlo calculations. Based on the crystal structure, predictions on the growth habit from other conjugated molecules become in reach....

  1. Contamination of knives and graters by bacterial foodborne pathogens during slicing and grating of produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Liao, Jean; Cannon, Jennifer L; Ortega, Ynes R

    2015-12-01

    Poor hygiene and improper food preparation practices in consumers' homes have previously been demonstrated as contributing to foodborne diseases. To address potential cross-contamination by kitchen utensils in the home, a series of studies was conducted to determine the extent to which the use of a knife or grater on fresh produce would lead to the utensil's contamination with Escherichia coli O157:H7 or Salmonella enterica. When shredding inoculated carrots (ca. 5.3 log CFU/carrot), all graters became contaminated and the number of E. coli O157:H7 present on the utensil was significantly greater than Salmonella (p Contamination of knives after slicing inoculated produce (4.9-5.4 log CFU/produce item) could only be detected by enrichment culture. After slicing tomatoes, honeydew melons, strawberries, cucumbers, and cantaloupes, the average prevalence of knife contamination by the two pathogens was 43%, 17%, 15%, 7%, and 3%, respectively. No significant increase in the incidence or level of contamination occurred on the utensils when residues were present (p > 0.05); however, subsequent contamination of 7 produce items processed with the contaminated utensils did occur. These results highlight the necessity of proper sanitization of these utensils when used in preparation of raw produce.

  2. Nanowire Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  3. Resistance to ketolide antibiotics by coordinated expression of rRNA methyltransferases in a bacterial producer of natural ketolides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almutairi, Mashal M; Park, Sung Ryeol; Rose, Simon;

    2015-01-01

    activation by ketolide antibiotics. The resistance genes and the induction mechanism remain fully functional when transferred to heterologous bacterial hosts. The anticipated wide use of ketolide antibiotics could promote horizontal transfer of these highly efficient resistance genes to pathogens. Taken......Ketolides are promising new antimicrobials effective against a broad range of Gram-positive pathogens, in part because of the low propensity of these drugs to trigger the expression of resistance genes. A natural ketolide pikromycin and a related compound methymycin are produced by Streptomyces...... venezuelae strain ATCC 15439. The producer avoids the inhibitory effects of its own antibiotics by expressing two paralogous rRNA methylase genes pikR1 and pikR2 with seemingly redundant functions. We show here that the PikR1 and PikR2 enzymes mono- and dimethylate, respectively, the N6 amino group in 23S r...

  4. Development of a Selective Medium for the Fungal Pathogen Fusarium graminearum Using Toxoflavin Produced by the Bacterial Pathogen Burkholderia glumae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boknam Jung

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The ascomycete fungus Fusarium graminearum is a major causal agent for Fusarium head blight in cereals and produces mycotoxins such as trichothecenes and zearalenone. Isolation of the fungal strains from air or cereals can be hampered by various other airborne fungal pathogens and saprophytic fungi. In this study, we developed a selective medium specific to F. graminearum using toxoflavin produced by the bacterial pathogen Burkholderia glumae. F. graminearum was resistant to toxoflavin, while other fungi were sensitive to this toxin. Supplementing toxoflavin into medium enhanced the isolation of F. graminearum from rice grains by suppressing the growth of saprophytic fungal species. In addition, a medium with or without toxoflavin exposed to wheat fields for 1 h had 84% or 25%, respectively, of colonies identified as F. graminearum. This selection medium provides an efficient tool for isolating F. graminearum, and can be adopted by research groups working on genetics and disease forecasting.

  5. Establishing a role for bacterial cellulose in environmental interactions: lessons learned from diverse biofilm-producing Proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Vincent Augimeri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cellulose (BC serves as a molecular glue to facilitate intra- and inter-domain interactions in nature. Biosynthesis of BC-containing biofilms occurs in a variety of Proteobacteria that inhabit diverse ecological niches. The enzymatic and regulatory systems responsible for the polymerization, exportation and regulation of BC are equally as diverse. Though the magnitude and environmental consequences of BC production are species-specific, the common role of BC containing biofilms is to establish close contact with a preferred host to facilitate efficient host-bacteria interactions. Universally, BC aids in attachment, adherence, and subsequent colonization of a substrate. Bi-directional interactions influence host physiology, bacterial physiology and regulation of BC biosynthesis, primarily through modulation of intracellular bis-(3’→5’-cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP levels. Depending on the circumstance, BC producers exhibit a pathogenic or symbiotic relationship with plant, animal or fungal hosts. Rhizobiaceae species colonize plant roots, Pseudomonadaceae inhabit the phyllosphere, Acetobacteriaceae associate with sugar-loving insects and inhabit the carposphere, Enterobacteriaceae use fresh produce as vehicles to infect animal hosts, and Vibrionaceae, particularly Aliivibrio fischeri, colonize the light organ of squid. This review will highlight the diversity of the biosynthesis and regulation of BC in nature by discussing various examples of Proteobacteria that use BC-containing biofilms to facilitate host-bacteria interactions. Through discussion of current data we will establish new directions for the elucidation of BC biosynthesis, regulation and ecophysiological roles.

  6. Resistance to ketolide antibiotics by coordinated expression of rRNA methyltransferases in a bacterial producer of natural ketolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Mashal M; Park, Sung Ryeol; Rose, Simon; Hansen, Douglas A; Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Douthwaite, Stephen; Sherman, David H; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-10-20

    Ketolides are promising new antimicrobials effective against a broad range of Gram-positive pathogens, in part because of the low propensity of these drugs to trigger the expression of resistance genes. A natural ketolide pikromycin and a related compound methymycin are produced by Streptomyces venezuelae strain ATCC 15439. The producer avoids the inhibitory effects of its own antibiotics by expressing two paralogous rRNA methylase genes pikR1 and pikR2 with seemingly redundant functions. We show here that the PikR1 and PikR2 enzymes mono- and dimethylate, respectively, the N6 amino group in 23S rRNA nucleotide A2058. PikR1 monomethylase is constitutively expressed; it confers low resistance at low fitness cost and is required for ketolide-induced activation of pikR2 to attain high-level resistance. The regulatory mechanism controlling pikR2 expression has been evolutionary optimized for preferential activation by ketolide antibiotics. The resistance genes and the induction mechanism remain fully functional when transferred to heterologous bacterial hosts. The anticipated wide use of ketolide antibiotics could promote horizontal transfer of these highly efficient resistance genes to pathogens. Taken together, these findings emphasized the need for surveillance of pikR1/pikR2-based bacterial resistance and the preemptive development of drugs that can remain effective against the ketolide-specific resistance mechanism.

  7. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A; Gilbert, Jack A; Nagler, Cathryn R

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow's milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. Our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut. PMID:26394008

  8. Secreted and immunogenic proteins produced by the honeybee bacterial pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antúnez, Karina; Anido, Matilde; Evans, Jay D; Zunino, Pablo

    2010-03-24

    American Foulbrood is a severe disease affecting larvae of honeybee Apis mellifera, causing significant decrease in the honeybee population, beekeeping industries and agricultural production. In spite of its importance, little is known about the virulence factors secreted by Paenibacillus larvae during larval infection. The aim of the present work was to perform a first approach to the identification and characterization of P. larvae secretome. P. larvae secreted proteins were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and identified by MALDI-TOF. Protein toxicity was evaluated using an experimental model based on feeding of A. mellifera larvae and immunogenicity was evaluated by Western blot, using an antiserum raised against cells and spores of P. larvae. Ten different proteins were identified among P. larvae secreted proteins, including proteins involved in transcription, metabolism, translation, cell envelope, transport, protein folding, degradation of polysaccharides and motility. Although most of these proteins are cytosolic, many of them have been previously detected in the extracellular medium of different Bacillus spp. cultures and have been related to virulence. The secreted proteins resulted highly toxic and immunogenic when larvae were exposed using an experimental model. This is the first description of proteins secreted by the honeybee pathogen P. larvae. This information may be relevant for the elucidation of bacterial pathogenesis mechanisms. PMID:19781868

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A; Gilbert, Jack A; Nagler, Cathryn R

    2016-03-01

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow's milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. Our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut. PMID:26394008

  10. [Construction and evaluation of an engineered bacterial strain for producing lipopeptide under anoxic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-long; Zhao, Feng; Shi, Rong-jiu; Ban, Yun-he; Zhou, Ji-dong; Han, Si-qin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Biosurfactant-facilitated oil recovery is one of the most important aspects of microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). However, the biosurfactant production by biosurfactant-producing microorganisms, most of which are aerobes, is severely suppressed due to the in-situ anoxic conditions within oil reservoirs. In this research, we successfully engineered a strain JD-3, which could grow rapidly and produce lipopeptide under anoxic conditions, by protoplast confusion using a Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain BQ-2 which produces biosurfactant aerobically, and a facultative anaerobic Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DQ-1 as parent strains. The alignment of 16S rDNA sequence (99% similarity) and comparisons of cell colony morphology showed that fusant JD-3 was closer to the parental strain B. amyloliquefaciens BQ-2. The surface tension of culture broth of fusant JD-3, after 36-hour cultivation under anaerobic conditions, decreased from initially 63.0 to 32.5 mN · m(-1). The results of thin layer chromatography and infrared spectrum analysis demonstrated that the biosurfactant produced by JD-3 was lipopeptide. The surface-active lipopeptide had a low critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 90 mg · L(-1) and presented a good ability to emulsify various hydrocarbons such as crude oil, liquid paraffin, and kerosene. Strain JD-3 could utilize peptone as nitrogen source and sucrose, glucose, glycerin or other common organics as carbon sources for anaerobic lipopeptide synthesis. The subculture of fusant JD-3 showed a stable lipopeptide-producing ability even after ten serial passages. All these results indicated that fusant JD-3 holds a great potential to microbially enhance oil recovery under anoxic conditions. PMID:26685621

  11. Genome sequencing and systems biology analysis of a lipase-producing bacterial strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, N; Li, D D; Zhang, Y Z; Yuan, Y Z; Geng, H; Xiong, L; Liu, D L

    2016-01-01

    Lipase-producing bacteria are naturally-occurring, industrially-relevant microorganisms that produce lipases, which can be used to synthesize biodiesel from waste oils. The efficiency of lipase expression varies between various microbial strains. Therefore, strains that can produce lipases with high efficiency must be screened, and the conditions of lipase metabolism and optimization of the production process in a given environment must be thoroughly studied. A high efficiency lipase-producing strain was isolated from the sediments of Jinsha River, identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis as Serratia marcescens, and designated as HS-L5. A schematic diagram of the genome sequence was constructed by high-throughput genome sequencing. A series of genes related to lipid degradation were identified by functional gene annotation through sequence homology analysis. A genome-scale metabolic model of HS-ML5 was constructed using systems biology techniques. The model consisted of 1722 genes and 1567 metabolic reactions. The topological graph of the genome-scale metabolic model was compared to that of conventional metabolic pathways using a visualization software and KEGG database. The basic components and boundaries of the tributyrin degradation subnetwork were determined, and its flux balance analyzed using Matlab and COBRA Toolbox to simulate the effects of different conditions on the catalytic efficiency of lipases produced by HS-ML5. We proved that the catalytic activity of microbial lipases was closely related to the carbon metabolic pathway. As production and catalytic efficiency of lipases varied greatly with the environment, the catalytic efficiency and environmental adaptability of microbial lipases can be improved by proper control of the production conditions. PMID:27050954

  12. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chengxiang

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M1 = silver or nickel) layer, 5 - 100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut ≈300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of theM1 layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M2 is electrodeposited (M2 = gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M1 layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 um sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowirenanowire junctions. The resistance, R, of single gold nanowires was measured in situ during electrooxidation in aqueous 0.10 M sulfuric acid. Electrooxidation caused the formation of a gold oxide that is approximately 0.8 monolayers (ML) in thickness at +1.1 V vs saturated mercurous sulfate reference electrode (MSE) based upon coulometry and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis. As the gold nanowires were electrooxidized, R increased by an amount that depended on the wire thickness, ranging from

  13. Isolation and characterization of an efficient bacterial cellulose producer strain in agitated culture: Gluconacetobacter hansenii P2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Yasar Andelib; Aksoy, Nuran Deveci

    2014-02-01

    In this study, typical niches of acetic acid bacteria were screened for isolation of cellulose producer strains. Hestrin Schramm broth was used as enrichment and production media. Only nine out of 329 isolates formed thick biofilms on liquid surface and were identified as potential cellulose producers. Physiological and biochemical tests proved that all cellulose producers belonged to Gluconacetobacter genus. Most productive and mutation-resistant strain was subjected to 16S rRNA sequence analysis and identified as Gluconacetobacter hansenii P2A due to 99.8 % sequence similarity. X-ray diffraction analysis proved that the biofilm conformed to Cellulose I crystal structure, rich in Iα mass fraction. Static cultivation of G. hansenii P2A in HS medium resulted with 1.89 ± 0.08 g/l of bacterial cellulose production corresponding to 12.0 ± 0.3 % yield in terms of substrate consumption. Shaking and agitation at 120 rpm aided in enhancement of the amount and yield of produced cellulose. Productivity and yield reached up to 3.25 ± 0.11 g/l and 17.20 ± 0.14 % in agitated culture while a slight decrease from 78.7 % to 77.3 % was observed in the crystallinity index.

  14. Strong Ionization in carbon Nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Kaymak, Vural; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N; Rocca, Jorge J

    2015-01-01

    Surfaces covered with nanostructures, such as nanowire arrays, have shown to facilitate a significantly higher absorption of laser energy as compared to flat surfaces. Due to the efficient coupling of the laser energy, highly energetic electrons are produced, which in turn can emit intense ultrafast X-ray pulses. In the present work we use full three dimensional PIC simulations to analyze the behavior of arrays of carbon nanowires $400 nm$ in diameter, irradiated by a $\\lambda_0 = 400 nm$ laser pulse of $60 fs$ duration at FWHM and a vector potential of $a_0 = 18$. We analyze the ionization dynamics of the nanowires. We investigate the difference of the ionization strength and structure between linearly and circularly polarized laser beam. The nanowires are found to be fully ionized after about 30 laser cycles. Circularly polarized light reveals a slightly stronger ionization effect.

  15. Optimization of biohydrogen yield produced by bacterial consortia using residual glycerin from biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Mariana de Oliveira; Ferreira-Leitão, Viridiana Santana

    2016-11-01

    The aims of this study were to simplify the fermentation medium and to optimize the conditions of dark fermentation of residual glycerin to produce biohydrogen. It was possible to remove all micronutrients of fermentation medium and improve biohydrogen production by applying residual glycerin as feedstock. After statistical analysis of the following parameters pH, glycerin concentration and volatile suspended solids, the values of 5.5; 0.5g.L(-1) and 8.7g.L(-1), respectively, were defined as optimum condition for this process. It generated 2.44molH2/molglycerin, an expressive result when compared to previous results reported in literature and considering that theoretical yield of H2 from glycerol in dark fermentation process is 3molH2/molglycerol. This study allowed the improvement of yield and productivity by 68% and 67%, respectively. PMID:27501033

  16. Study on Screening and Cultivation Conditions of Xylanase-Producing Alkalophilic Bacterial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Xiao-fang; Zheng Lian-shuang; Xie Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    An xylanase producting alkalophilic Bacillus NT-9 was obtaind by the screening method of transparent zone on the selective medium, and the effects of carbon source and nitrogen source on xylanase production were studied. The medium composed of xylose 1.5%, (NH4)2SO4 0.25%, K2HPO4 0.1%, MgSO4·7H2O 0.02%, with the initial pH of 10, was suggested to be optimal for the enzyme production in this study. When cultivatied at 37 ℃ for 72 h, the enzyme activity elaborated by the strain may reach as high as 10.5 U/mL. The xylanase produced by Bacillus NT-9 was a constituent enzyme.

  17. Optimization of biohydrogen yield produced by bacterial consortia using residual glycerin from biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Mariana de Oliveira; Ferreira-Leitão, Viridiana Santana

    2016-11-01

    The aims of this study were to simplify the fermentation medium and to optimize the conditions of dark fermentation of residual glycerin to produce biohydrogen. It was possible to remove all micronutrients of fermentation medium and improve biohydrogen production by applying residual glycerin as feedstock. After statistical analysis of the following parameters pH, glycerin concentration and volatile suspended solids, the values of 5.5; 0.5g.L(-1) and 8.7g.L(-1), respectively, were defined as optimum condition for this process. It generated 2.44molH2/molglycerin, an expressive result when compared to previous results reported in literature and considering that theoretical yield of H2 from glycerol in dark fermentation process is 3molH2/molglycerol. This study allowed the improvement of yield and productivity by 68% and 67%, respectively.

  18. Characterization of novel extracellular protease produced by marine bacterial isolate from the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Fulzele

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Out of the vast pool of enzymes, proteolytic enzymes from microorganisms are the most widely used in different industries such as detergent, food, peptide production etc. Several marine microorganisms are known to produce proteases with commercially desirable characteristics. We have isolated nine different cultures from marine samples of the Indian Ocean. All of them were i motile ii rod shaped iii non spore forming iv catalase and amylase positive v able to grow in presence of 10 % NaCl. They produced acid from glucose, fructose and maltose and grew optimally at 30 0C temperature and pH 7.0-8.0. None of them could grow above 45 0C and below 15 0C. Only one of them (MBRI 7 exhibited extracellular protease activity on skim milk agar plates. Based on 16S rDNA sequencing, it belonged to the genus Marinobacter (98% sequence similarity, 1201 bp. The cell free extract was used to study effects of temperature and pH on protease activity. The optimum temperature and pH for activity were found to be 40 0C and 7.0 respectively. The crude enzyme was stable at temperature range of 30-80 0C and pH 5.0-9.0. It retained 60 % activity at 80 0C after 4 h and more than 70 % activity at 70 0C after 1 h. D value was found to be 342 minutes and 78 minutes for 40 0C and 80 0C respectively. Interestingly the enzyme remained 50 % active at pH 9.0 after 1 h. Comparison with other proteases from different microbial sources indicated that the neutral protease from the halotolerant marine isolate MBRI 7 is a novel enzyme with high thermostability.

  19. Effect of PGR producing bacterial strains isolated from vermisources on germination and growth of Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandharaj Marimuthu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen bacterial strains were isolated from vermisources andscreened for Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA production among themonly nine strains produce IAA and they were identified asStreptococcus spp., Micrococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Bacillus spp., Enterobacter spp., Escherichia spp., Alcaligenes spp., Erwinia spp., and Pseudomonas spp. Among all other strains Bacillus sp. showed the higher IAA production hence selected for further molecular analysis and confirmed as Bacillus cereus. The B. cereus was grown in nutrient broth supplemented with different concentrations (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5mg/ml of tryptophan for seven days at pH 7 and at 37ºC. Crude IAA was used for in vitro phytostimulatory studies using Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. The plant growth parameters were analyzed at different day intervals (5, 10 and 15 days. Supplementation of 5 ml crude IAA (2mg/ml of tryptophan dynamically enhances the plant growth parameters after 15 days.

  20. Anti-bacterial effect of essential oil from Xanthium strumarium against shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Rad, J; Soufi, L; Ayatollahi, S A M; Iriti, M; Sharifi-Rad, M; Varoni, E M; Shahri, F; Esposito, S; Kuhestani, K; Sharifi-Rad, M

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O157:H7 is one of the most important human pathogenic microorganisms, which can cause life-threatening infections. Xanthium strumarium L. is a plant with anti-bacterial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. This study aims to demonstrate in vitro efficacy of the essential oil (EO) extracted from Xanthium strumarium L. against E. coli O157:H7. Using the agar test diffusion, the effect of Xanthium strumarium L. EO (5, 10, 15, 30, 60, and 120 mg/mL) was verified at each of the four different growth phases of E. coli O157:H7. Cell counts of viable cells and colony forming unit (CFU) were determined at regular time points using Breed's method and colony counting method, respectively. No viable cell was detectable after the 1 hour-exposure to X. strumarium EO at 30, 60, and 120 mg/mL concentrations. No bacterial colony was formed after 1 h until the end of the incubation period at 24 h. At lower concentrations, the number of bacteria cells decreased and colonies could be observed only after incubation. At the exponential phase, the EO at 15 mg/mL was only bacteriostatic, while from 30 mg/mL started to be bactericidal. X. strumarium EO antibacterial activity against Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 is dependent on EO concentration and physiological state of the microorganisms tested. The best inhibitory activity was achieved during the late exponential and the stationary phases. PMID:27650979

  1. Gluconacetobacter hansenii subsp. nov., a high-yield bacterial cellulose producing strain induced by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Han-Jing; Du, Shuang-Kui; Lin, De-Hui; Zhang, Jun-Na; Xiang, Jin-Le; Li, Zhi-Xi

    2011-12-01

    Strain M(438), deposited as CGMCC3917 and isolated from inoculums of bacterial cellulose (BC) producing strain screened in homemade vinegar and then induced by high hydrostatic pressure treatment (HHP), has strong ability to produce BC more than three times as that of its initial strain. It is the highest yield BC-producing strain ever reported. In this paper, M(438) was identidied as Gluconacetobacter hansenii subsp. nov. on the basis of the results obtained by examining it phylogenetically, phenotypically, and physiologically-biochemically. Furthermore, the genetic diversity of strain M(438) and its initial strain was examined by amplified fragment length polymorphism. The results indicated that strain M(438) was a deletion mutant induced by HHP, and the only deleted sequence showed 99% identity with 24,917-24,723 bp in the genome sequence of Ga. hansenii ATCC23769, and the complement gene sequence was at 24,699-25,019 bp with local tag GXY_15142, which codes small multidrug resistance (SMR) protein. It can be inferred that SMR might be related to inhibiting BC production to a certain extent.

  2. Pestalone, a new antibiotic produced by a marine fungus in response to bacterial challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto, M; Jensen, P R; Kauffman, C; Fenical, W; Lobkovsky, E; Clardy, J

    2001-11-01

    The isolation and structure determination of a new chlorinated benzophenone antibiotic, pestalone (1), is described. The new compound was produced by a cultured marine fungus only when a unicellular marine bacterium, strain CNJ-328, was co-cultured in the fungal fermentation. The fungus, isolated from the surface of the brown alga Rosenvingea sp. collected in the Bahamas Islands, was identified as an undescribed member of the genus Pestalotia. The structure of 1, initially assigned with only modest confidence by combined spectral and chemical data, was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Pestalone (1) exhibits moderate in vitro cytotoxicity in the National Cancer Institute's 60 human tumor cell line screen (mean GI(50) = 6.0 microM). More importantly, pestalone shows potent antibiotic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 37 ng/mL) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (MIC = 78 ng/mL), indicating that pestalone should be evaluated in advanced models of infectious disease. PMID:11720529

  3. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition: a method for patterning electrically continuous metal nanowires on dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chenxiang; Kung, Sheng-Chin; Taggart, David K; Yang, Fan; Thompson, Michael A; Güell, Aleix G; Yang, Yongan; Penner, Reginald M

    2008-09-23

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M(1)=silver or nickel) layer, 5-100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A (+) photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut approximately 300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of the M(1) layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M(2) is electrodeposited (M(2)=gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M(1) layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 microm sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowire-nanowire junctions.

  4. Exploration and conservation of bacterial genetic resources as bacteriocin producing inhibitory microorganisms to pathogen bacteria in livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chotiah S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Exploration and conservation of microorganisms producing bacteriocin was done as the primary study towards the collection of potential bacteria and its application in improving livestock health condition and inhibit food borne pathogens. Diferent kinds of samples such as beef cattle rectal swab, rumen fluids, cow’s milk, chicken gut content, goat’s milk were collected at Bogor cattle slaughter houses, poultry slaughter houses, dairy cattle and goat farms. A total of 452 bacterial isolates consisted of 73 Gram negative bacteria and 379 Gram positive bacteria were isolated from samples collected and screened for bacteriocin activity. Determination of bacteriocin activity with bioassay using agar spot tests were carried out on liquid and semisolid medium assessing 8 kins of indicators of pathogenic bacteria and food borne pathogens. A total of 51 bacteriocin producing strains were collected and some of the strains had high inhibitory zone such as Lactobacillus casei SS14C (26 mm, Enterobacter cloacae SRUT (24mm, Enterococcus faecalis SK39 (21mm and Bifidobacterium dentium SS14T (20mm respectively, to Salmonella typhimurium BCC B0046/ATCC 13311, E. coli O157 hemolytic BCC B2717, Listeria monocytogenes BCC B2767/ATCC 7764 and Escherichia coli VTEC O157 BCC B2687. Evaluation after conservation ex situ to all bacterocin producing strain at 5oC for 1 year in freeze drying ampoules in vacuum and dry condition revealed the decreasing viability starting from log 0.8 CFU/ml for Lactococcus and Leuconostoc to log 2.2. CFU/ml for Streptococcus. Result of the study showed that the bacteriocin producing strains obtained were offered a potential resource for preventing disease of livestock and food borne diseases.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of WO3 nano-wires and thermo-chromism study of VO2 belts produced by ultrasonic spray and laser pyrolysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel optical and electrical properties of newly synthesized nano-wires of monoclinic WO3 and nano-belts of rutile VO2 have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy and thermo-chromism studies respectively. Phonon confinement is observed in the WO3 nano-wires and the previously modified Richter equation is fitted to the experimental Raman spectroscopy data to obtain the optical phonon dispersion relations for the 713 cm-1 branch and the 808 cm-1 branch of WO3 phonon spectra for the first time. Electrical measurements on the VO2 nano-belts at varying temperature reveal an enhanced hysteresis width of about 83 C surpassing previously reported values on the thermo-chromism studies on VO2. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Effects of bacterially produced precipitates on the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria during the bio-treatment process of copper-containing wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A large volume of bacterially produced precipitates are generated during the bio-treatment of heavy metal wastewater.The composition of the bacterially produced precipitates and its effects on sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in copper-containing waste stream were evaluated in this study.The elemental composition of the microbial precipitate was studied using electrodispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX),and it was found that the ratio of S:Cu was 1.12.Combining with the results of copper distribution in the SRB metabolism culture,which was analyzed by the sequential extraction procedure,copper in the precipitates was determined as covellite (CuS).The bacterially produced precipitates caused a decrease of the sulfate reduction rate,and the more precipitates were generated,the lower the sulfate reduction rate was.The particle sizes of bacterially generated covellite were ranging from 0.03 to 2 m by particles size distribution (PSD) analysis,which was smaller than that of the SRB cells.Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed that the microbial covellite was deposited on the surface of the cell.The effects of the microbial precipitate on SRB metabolism were found to be weakened by increasing the precipitation time and adding microbial polymeric substances in later experiments.These results provided direct evidence that the SRB activity was inhibited by the bacterially produced covellite,which enveloped the bacterium and thus affected the metabolism of SRB on mass transfer.

  7. Effects of interactions of auxin-producing bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes on regulation of peanut growths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Xu, Wensi; Jiang, Ying; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2015-01-01

    The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid)-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium) and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp.) on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1) after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and soil auxin concentration. The addition of nematodes caused greater increases in these indices than those of bacteria, while the addition of the combination of bacteria and nematodes caused further increases. After 42-day growth, the increases in soil respiration differed between the additions of two kinds of nematodes because of differences in their life strategies. The effects of the bacteria and nematodes on the nutrient and hormone concentrations were responsible for the increases in plant growth. These results indicate the potential for promoting plant growth via the addition of nematodes and bacteria to soil.

  8. Characterization of geographically distinct bacterial communities associated with coral mucus produced by Acropora spp. and Porites spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKew, B A; Dumbrell, A J; Daud, S D; Hepburn, L; Thorpe, E; Mogensen, L; Whitby, C

    2012-08-01

    Acropora and Porites corals are important reef builders in the Indo-Pacific and Caribbean. Bacteria associated with mucus produced by Porites spp. and Acropora spp. from Caribbean (Punta Maroma, Mexico) and Indo-Pacific (Hoga and Sampela, Indonesia) reefs were determined. Analysis of pyrosequencing libraries showed that bacterial communities from Caribbean corals were significantly more diverse (H', 3.18 to 4.25) than their Indonesian counterparts (H', 2.54 to 3.25). Dominant taxa were Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria, which varied in relative abundance between coral genera and region. Distinct coral host-specific communities were also found; for example, Clostridiales were dominant on Acropora spp. (at Hoga and the Mexican Caribbean) compared to Porites spp. and seawater. Within the Gammproteobacteria, Halomonas spp. dominated sequence libraries from Porites spp. (49%) and Acropora spp. (5.6%) from the Mexican Caribbean, compared to the corresponding Indonesian coral libraries (coral mucus. In addition, the predominance of Clostridiales associated with Acropora spp. provided additional evidence for coral host-specific microorganisms. PMID:22636010

  9. Hemolysin, Protease, and EPS Producing Pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila Strain An4 Shows Antibacterial Activity against Marine Bacterial Fish Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Pandey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila strain An4 was isolated from marine catfish and characterized with reference to its proteolytic and hemolytic activity along with SDS-PAGE profile (sodium dodecyl sulphate-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of ECPs (extracellular proteins showing hemolysin (approximately 50 kDa. Agar well diffusion assay using crude cell extract of the bacterial isolate clearly demonstrated antibacterial activity against indicator pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus arlettae strain An1, Acinetobacter sp. strain An2, Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain An3, and Alteromonas aurentia SE3 showing inhibitory zone >10 mm well comparable to common antibiotics. Further GC-MS analysis of crude cell extract revealed several metabolites, namely, phenolics, pyrrolo-pyrazines, pyrrolo-pyridine, and butylated hydroxytoluene (well-known antimicrobials. Characterization of EPS using FTIR indicated presence of several protein-related amine and amide groups along with peaks corresponding to carboxylic and phenyl rings which may be attributed to its virulent and antibacterial properties, respectively. Besides hemolysin, EPS, and protease, Aeromonas hydrophila strain An4 also produced several antibacterial metabolites.

  10. Effects of interactions of auxin-producing bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes on regulation of peanut growths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Xu, Wensi; Jiang, Ying; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2015-01-01

    The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid)-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium) and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp.) on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1) after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and soil auxin concentration. The addition of nematodes caused greater increases in these indices than those of bacteria, while the addition of the combination of bacteria and nematodes caused further increases. After 42-day growth, the increases in soil respiration differed between the additions of two kinds of nematodes because of differences in their life strategies. The effects of the bacteria and nematodes on the nutrient and hormone concentrations were responsible for the increases in plant growth. These results indicate the potential for promoting plant growth via the addition of nematodes and bacteria to soil. PMID:25867954

  11. Effects of interactions of auxin-producing bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes on regulation of peanut growths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp. on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1 after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and soil auxin concentration. The addition of nematodes caused greater increases in these indices than those of bacteria, while the addition of the combination of bacteria and nematodes caused further increases. After 42-day growth, the increases in soil respiration differed between the additions of two kinds of nematodes because of differences in their life strategies. The effects of the bacteria and nematodes on the nutrient and hormone concentrations were responsible for the increases in plant growth. These results indicate the potential for promoting plant growth via the addition of nematodes and bacteria to soil.

  12. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Cui

    Full Text Available While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production.

  13. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production. PMID:26716833

  14. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for a bacterial thiaminase I gene and the thiaminase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, C.A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Zajicek, J.L.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    The thiaminase I enzyme produced by the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus isolated from the viscera of Lake Michigan alewives Alosa pseudoharengus is currently the only defined source of the thiaminase activity linked to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in early mortality syndrome (EMS) in the larvae of Great Lakes salmonines. Diets of alewife or isolated strains of P. thiaminolyticus mixed in a semipurified diet and fed to lake trout Salvelinus namaycush have been shown to produce EMS in fry. We utilized quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) to aid in studies of the sources of P. thiaminolyticus and thiaminase I. Quantitative PCR assays were established to detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus, the 16S rRNA gene from most species of bacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene specifically from P. thiaminolyticus and a few closely related taxa. The Q-PCR assays are linear over at least six orders of magnitude and can detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus from as few as 1,000 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample or the Paenibacillus 16S rRNA gene from as few as 100 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample. The initial results from alewife viscera samples with high thiaminase activity yielded unexpectedly low densities of P. thiaminolyticus cells; Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus was detectable in 2 of 6 alewife viscera tested at densities on the order of 100 cells/g out of 100,000,000 total bacterial cells/g. The low numbers of P. thiaminolyticus detected suggest that alewives contain additional non-P. thiaminolyticus sources of thiaminase activity.

  15. Mechanism of Excretion of a Bacterial Proteinase: Demonstration of Two Proteolytic Enzymes Produced by a Sarcina Strain (Coccus P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SARNER, NITZA Z; BISSELL, MINA J; GIROLAMO, MARIO Di; GORINI, LUIGI

    1970-06-29

    A Sarcina strain (Coccus P) produces two proteolytic enzymes. One is found only extracellularly, is far more prevalent, and is actively excreted during exponential growth. It is the enzyme responsible for the known strong proteolytic activity of the cultures of this strain. A second protease is, however, produced which remains associated with the intact cells but is released by the protoplasts. The two enzymes appear unrelated in their derivation. Calcium ions play an essential role in preventing autodigestion of the excreted enzyme. Bacterial proteins are found outside the cell boundary as a consequence either of passive processes such as leakage or lysis or of active excretion. Under conditions in which leakage and lysis do not occur, as during exponential growth, the cell boundary is a barrier causing a complete separation of the bulk of the intracellular proteins from the one or very few extracellular proteins, with no trace of either type being detectable on the wrong side of the boundary. Since in bacteria there is no evidence of protein being produced other than internally, the separation into intraand extracellular proteins should occur after peptide chain formation. The question arises as to whether the structure of the cell boundary or that of the excreted proteins themselves determines this separation. Coccus P, a Sarcina closely related to Micrococcus lysodeikticus (3), produces an extracellular proteinase during the exponential phase of growth so that the process appears to be active excretion. The organism grows exponentially in a defined synthetic medium (12) to relatively high cell density (10{sup 9} cells/ml); therefore the mechanism of excretion can be studied over an extended period of time without the difficulties of changing growth rates. Coagulation of reconstituted skim milk provides a simple and sensitive assay for enzyme activity (I 1). The extracellular proteinase has also been purified and partially characterized (6-8). It has been shown

  16. Nanowire photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Peter J. Pauzauskie; Peidong Yang

    2006-01-01

    The development of integrated electronic circuitry ranks among the most disruptive and transformative technologies of the 20th century. Even though integrated circuits are ubiquitous in modern life, both fundamental and technical constraints will eventually test the limits of Moore's law. Nanowire photonic circuitry constructed from myriad one-dimensional building blocks offers numerous opportunities for the development of next-generation optical information processors and spectroscopy. Howev...

  17. Isolation and Identification of a New Tetrodotoxin-Producing Bacterial Species, Raoultella terrigena, from Hong Kong Marine Puffer Fish Takifugu niphobles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Wang-Fat Lee

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Puffer fish, Takifugu niphobles, collected from the Hong Kong coastal waters were screened for tetrodotoxin-producing bacteria. A Gram-negative, non-acid-fast, non-sporing and rod shaped bacterial strain (designated as gutB01 was isolated from the intestine of the puffer fish and was shown to produce tetrodotoxin (TTX. Based on the Microbial Identification (MIDI and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS phylogenetic analysis, the strain was identified as Raoultella terrigena. The TTX production ability of the strain was confirmed by mouse bioassay, ELISA and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF. Our results reiterate that the TTX found in puffer fish was likely produced by the associated bacteria and TTX are widely produced amongst a diversity of bacterial species.

  18. Isolation and identification of a new tetrodotoxin-producing bacterial species, Raoultella terrigena, from Hong Kong marine puffer fish Takifugu niphobles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Vincent Chung-Him; Yu, Peter Hoi-Fu; Ho, Kin-Chung; Lee, Fred Wang-Fat

    2011-01-01

    Puffer fish, Takifugu niphobles, collected from the Hong Kong coastal waters were screened for tetrodotoxin-producing bacteria. A Gram-negative, non-acid-fast, non-sporing and rod shaped bacterial strain (designated as gutB01) was isolated from the intestine of the puffer fish and was shown to produce tetrodotoxin (TTX). Based on the Microbial Identification (MIDI) and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) phylogenetic analysis, the strain was identified as Raoultella terrigena. The TTX production ability of the strain was confirmed by mouse bioassay, ELISA and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). Our results reiterate that the TTX found in puffer fish was likely produced by the associated bacteria and TTX are widely produced amongst a diversity of bacterial species.

  19. Electrodeposited germanium nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahenderkar, Naveen K; Liu, Ying-Chau; Koza, Jakub A; Switzer, Jay A

    2014-09-23

    Germanium (Ge) is a group IV semiconductor with superior electronic properties compared with silicon, such as larger carrier mobilities and smaller effective masses. It is also a candidate anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Here, a simple, one-step method is introduced to electrodeposit dense arrays of Ge nanowires onto indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates from aqueous solution. The electrochemical reduction of ITO produces In nanoparticles that act as a reduction site for aqueous Ge(IV) species, and as a solvent for the crystallization of Ge nanowires. Nanowires deposited at 95 °C have an average diameter of 100 nm, whereas those deposited at room temperature have an average diameter of 35 nm. Both optical absorption and Raman spectroscopy suggest that the electrodeposited Ge is degenerate. The material has an indirect bandgap of 0.90-0.92 eV, compared with a value of 0.67 eV for bulk, intrinsic Ge. The blue shift is attributed to the Moss-Burstein effect, because the material is a p-type degenerate semiconductor. On the basis of the magnitude of the blue shift, the hole concentration is estimated to be 8 × 10(19) cm(-3). This corresponds to an In impurity concentration of about 0.2 atom %. The resistivity of the wires is estimated to be 4 × 10(-5) Ω·cm. The high conductivity of the wires should make them ideal for lithium-ion battery applications. PMID:25157832

  20. Facile synthesis of vanadium oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kysar, Jesse; Sekhar, Praveen Kumar

    2016-10-01

    A simple growth process is reported for the synthesis of vanadium (II) oxide nanowires with an average width of 65 nm and up to 5 μm in length for growth at 1000 °C for 3 h. The vanadium (II) oxide nanowires were grown on a gold-coated silicon substrate at ambient pressure using a single heat zone furnace with Ar as the carrier gas. Gold was utilized as a catalyst for the growth of the nanowires. The growth temperature and heating time were varied to observe the nanowire morphology. An increase in nanowire width was observed with an increase in the heating temperature. A ninefold increase in the number density of the nanowires was observed when the heating time was changed from 30 min to 3 h. This is the first time a simple growth process for producing VO nanowires at ambient pressure has been demonstrated. Such a scheme enables wider use of VO nanowires in critical applications such as energy storage, gas sensors, and optical devices.

  1. Laser direct synthesis of silicon nanowire field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a single-step, laser-based technique to fabricate silicon nanowire field effect transistors. Boron-doped silicon nanowires are synthesized using a laser-direct-write chemical vapor deposition process, which can produce nanowires as small as 60 nm, far below the diffraction limit of the laser wavelength of 395 nm. In addition, the method has the advantages of in situ doping, catalyst-free growth, and precise control of nanowire position, orientation, and length. Silicon nanowires are directly fabricated on an insulating surface and ready for subsequent device fabrication without the need for transfer and alignment, thus greatly simplifying device fabrication processes. Schottky barrier nanowire field effect transistors with a back-gate configuration are fabricated from the laser-direct-written Si nanowires and electrically characterized. (paper)

  2. Characterization of geographically distinct bacterial communities associated with coral mucus produced by Acropora spp. and Porites spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKew, B A; Dumbrell, A J; Daud, S D; Hepburn, L; Thorpe, E; Mogensen, L; Whitby, C

    2012-08-01

    Acropora and Porites corals are important reef builders in the Indo-Pacific and Caribbean. Bacteria associated with mucus produced by Porites spp. and Acropora spp. from Caribbean (Punta Maroma, Mexico) and Indo-Pacific (Hoga and Sampela, Indonesia) reefs were determined. Analysis of pyrosequencing libraries showed that bacterial communities from Caribbean corals were significantly more diverse (H', 3.18 to 4.25) than their Indonesian counterparts (H', 2.54 to 3.25). Dominant taxa were Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria, which varied in relative abundance between coral genera and region. Distinct coral host-specific communities were also found; for example, Clostridiales were dominant on Acropora spp. (at Hoga and the Mexican Caribbean) compared to Porites spp. and seawater. Within the Gammproteobacteria, Halomonas spp. dominated sequence libraries from Porites spp. (49%) and Acropora spp. (5.6%) from the Mexican Caribbean, compared to the corresponding Indonesian coral libraries (<2%). Interestingly, with the exception of Porites spp. from the Mexican Caribbean, there was also a ubiquity of Psychrobacter spp., which dominated Acropora and Porites libraries from Indonesia and Acropora libraries from the Caribbean. In conclusion, there was a dominance of Halomonas spp. (associated with Acropora and Porites [Mexican Caribbean]), Firmicutes (associated with Acropora [Mexican Caribbean] and with Acropora and Porites [Hoga]), and Cyanobacteria (associated with Acropora and Porites [Hoga] and Porites [Sampela]). This is also the first report describing geographically distinct Psychrobacter spp. associated with coral mucus. In addition, the predominance of Clostridiales associated with Acropora spp. provided additional evidence for coral host-specific microorganisms.

  3. The population structure of antibiotic-producing bacterial symbionts of Apterostigma dentigerum ants: impacts of coevolution and multipartite symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldera, Eric J; Currie, Cameron R

    2012-11-01

    Fungus-growing ants (Attini) are part of a complex symbiosis with Basidiomycetous fungi, which the ants cultivate for food, Ascomycetous fungal pathogens (Escovopsis), which parasitize cultivars, and Actinobacteria, which produce antibiotic compounds that suppress pathogen growth. Earlier studies that have characterized the association between attine ants and their bacterial symbionts have employed broad phylogenetic approaches, with conclusions ranging from a diffuse coevolved mutualism to no specificity being reported. However, the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution proposes that coevolved interactions likely occur at a level above local populations but within species. Moreover, the scale of population subdivision is likely to impact coevolutionary dynamics. Here, we describe the population structure of bacteria associated with the attine Apterostigma dentigerum across Central America using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of six housekeeping genes. The majority (90%) of bacteria that were isolated grouped into a single clade within the genus Pseudonocardia. In contrast to studies that have suggested that Pseudonocardia dispersal is high and therefore unconstrained by ant associations, we found highly structured ([Formula: see text]) and dispersal-limited (i.e., significant isolation by distance; [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) populations over even a relatively small scale (e.g., within the Panama Canal Zone). Estimates of recombination versus mutation were uncharacteristically low compared with estimates for free-living Actinobacteria (e.g., [Formula: see text] in La Selva, Costa Rica), which suggests that recombination is constrained by association with ant hosts. Furthermore, Pseudonocardia population structure was correlated with that of Escovopsis species ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]), supporting the bacteria's role in disease suppression. Overall, the population dynamics of symbiotic Pseudonocardia are more consistent with a

  4. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  5. Chemical Sensing with Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Reginald M.

    2012-07-01

    Transformational advances in the performance of nanowire-based chemical sensors and biosensors have been achieved over the past two to three years. These advances have arisen from a better understanding of the mechanisms of transduction operating in these devices, innovations in nanowire fabrication, and improved methods for incorporating receptors into or onto nanowires. Nanowire-based biosensors have detected DNA in undiluted physiological saline. For silicon nanowire nucleic acid sensors, higher sensitivities have been obtained by eliminating the passivating oxide layer on the nanowire surface and by substituting uncharged protein nucleic acids for DNA as the capture strands. Biosensors for peptide and protein cancer markers, based on both semiconductor nanowires and nanowires of conductive polymers, have detected these targets at physiologically relevant concentrations in both blood plasma and whole blood. Nanowire chemical sensors have also detected several gases at the parts-per-million level. This review discusses these and other recent advances, concentrating on work published in the past three years.

  6. Nanowire Optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhihuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanowires have been used in a variety of passive and active optoelectronic devices including waveguides, photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs, lasers, sensors, and optical antennas. We review the optical properties of these nanowires in terms of absorption, guiding, and radiation of light, which may be termed light management. Analysis of the interaction of light with long cylindrical/hexagonal structures with subwavelength diameters identifies radial resonant modes, such as Leaky Mode Resonances, or Whispering Gallery modes. The two-dimensional treatment should incorporate axial variations in “volumetric modes,”which have so far been presented in terms of Fabry–Perot (FP, and helical resonance modes. We report on finite-difference timedomain (FDTD simulations with the aim of identifying the dependence of these modes on geometry (length, width, tapering, shape (cylindrical, hexagonal, core–shell versus core-only, and dielectric cores with semiconductor shells. This demonstrates how nanowires (NWs form excellent optical cavities without the need for top and bottommirrors. However, optically equivalent structures such as hexagonal and cylindrical wires can have very different optoelectronic properties meaning that light management alone does not sufficiently describe the observed enhancement in upward (absorption and downward transitions (emission of light inNWs; rather, the electronic transition rates should be considered. We discuss this “rate management” scheme showing its strong dimensional dependence, making a case for photonic integrated circuits (PICs that can take advantage of the confluence of the desirable optical and electronic properties of these nanostructures.

  7. Selected lactic acid-producing bacterial isolates with the capacity to reduce Salmonella translocation and virulence gene expression in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojian Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probiotics have been used to control Salmonella colonization/infection in chickens. Yet the mechanisms of probiotic effects are not fully understood. This study has characterized our previously-selected lactic acid-producing bacterial (LAB isolates for controlling Salmonella infection in chickens, particularly the mechanism underlying the control. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In vitro studies were conducted to characterize 14 LAB isolates for their tolerance to low pH (2.0 and high bile salt (0.3-1.5% and susceptibility to antibiotics. Three chicken infection trials were subsequently carried out to evaluate four of the isolates for reducing the burden of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the broiler cecum. Chicks were gavaged with LAB cultures (10(6-7 CFU/chick or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at 1 day of age followed by Salmonella challenge (10(4 CFU/chick next day. Samples of cecal digesta, spleen, and liver were examined for Salmonella counts on days 1, 3, or 4 post-challenge. Salmonella in the cecum from Trial 3 was also assessed for the expression of ten virulence genes located in its pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1. These genes play a role in Salmonella intestinal invasion. Tested LAB isolates (individuals or mixed cultures were unable to lower Salmonella burden in the chicken cecum, but able to attenuate Salmonella infection in the spleen and liver. The LAB treatments also reduced almost all SPI-1 virulence gene expression (9 out of 10 in the chicken cecum, particularly at the low dose. In vitro treatment with the extracellular culture fluid from a LAB culture also down-regulated most SPI-1 virulence gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The possible correlation between attenuation of Salmonella infection in the chicken spleen and liver and reduction of Salmonella SPI-1 virulence gene expression in the chicken cecum by LAB isolates is a new observation. Suppression of Salmonella virulence gene expression in

  8. Electrical properties of single CdTe nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Matei; Camelia Florica; Andreea Costas; María Eugenia Toimil-Molares; Ionut Enculescu

    2015-01-01

    Ion track, nanoporous membranes were employed as templates for the preparation of CdTe nanowires. For this purpose, electrochemical deposition from a bath containing Cd and Te ions was employed. This process leads to high aspect ratio CdTe nanowires, which were harvested and placed on a substrate with lithographically patterned, interdigitated electrodes. Focused ion beam-induced metallization was used to produce individual nanowires with electrical contacts and electrical measurements were p...

  9. Identification and characterization of an anaerobic ethanol-producing cellulolytic bacterial consortium from Great Basin hot springs with agricultural residues and energy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chao; Deng, Yunjin; Wang, Xingna; Li, Qiuzhe; Huang, Yifan; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    In order to obtain the cellulolytic bacterial consortia, sediments from Great Basin hot springs (Nevada, USA) were sampled and enriched with cellulosic biomass as the sole carbon source. The bacterial composition of the resulting anaerobic ethanol-producing celluloytic bacterial consortium, named SV79, was analyzed. With methods of the full-length 16S rRNA librarybased analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 21 bacteria belonging to eight genera were detected from this consortium. Clones with closest relation to the genera Acetivibrio, Clostridium, Cellulosilyticum, Ruminococcus, and Sporomusa were predominant. The cellulase activities and ethanol productions of consortium SV79 using different agricultural residues (sugarcane bagasse and spent mushroom substrate) and energy crops (Spartina anglica, Miscanthus floridulus, and Pennisetum sinese Roxb) were studied. During cultivation, consortium SV79 produced the maximum filter paper activity (FPase, 9.41 U/ml), carboxymethylcellulase activity (CMCase, 6.35 U/ml), and xylanase activity (4.28 U/ml) with sugarcane bagasse, spent mushroom substrate, and S. anglica, respectively. The ethanol production using M. floridulus as substrate was up to 2.63 mM ethanol/g using gas chromatography analysis. It has high potential to be a new candidate for producing ethanol with cellulosic biomass under anoxic conditions in natural environments.

  10. Vertical nanowire architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfl-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.;

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires and statistics: A statistical process for reading ultradense arrays of nanostructured materials is presented (see image). The experimental realization is achieved through selective nanowire growth using porous alumina templates. The statistical patterning approach is found to provide ri...

  11. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.;

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  12. Screening the thermophilic and hyperthermophilic bacterial population of three Iranian hot-springs to detect the thermostable α- amylase producing strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sajjadian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Screening is a routine procedure for isolation of microorganisms which are able to produce special metabolites. Purified thermostable α-amylase from bacterial sources is widely used in different industries. In this study we analyzed samples collected from three different hot springs in Iran to detect any strains capable of producing thermostable α-amylase."nMaterials and Methods: Hot water samples from Larijan (67°C, pH 6.5, Mahallat (46°C, pH 7, and Meshkinshahr (82°C, pH 6, were cultivated in screening starch agar plates and incubated at 65°C for 24 hours. Thereafter, the plates were stained with Gram's iodine solution."nResults and Discussion: The bacterial colonies from the Meshkinshahr hot-spring produced the largest haloforming zone. Based on the phenotypic tests, the strain was identified as Bacillus sp. The culture condition was optimized for biosynthesis of α-amylase. The enzyme was produced at maximum level when it was incubated at 70 °C in the presence of soluble starch (1% at pH 6. The addition of calcium (10 mM and peptone (1% to the mineral medium, shortened the lag period and improved the growth and α-amylase synthesis. The addition of glucose (1% to the culture greatly diminished the syntheses of α -amylase. Importantly, the enzyme extract retained 100% activity when incubated for 45 minutes at 100°C."nConclusion: The Meshkinshahr hot-spring is rich in the Bacillus spp thermostable α-amylase producing strain of the thermophilic bacterial population. Iranian hot-springs like Meshkinshahr, have large microbial storages and can be used as sources of different biological products like enzymes. The enzyme which was produced with Bacillus sp. could hydrolyse polymers like starch and was used at laboratory scale successfully.

  13. Inquisition of Microcystis aeruginosa and Synechocystis nanowires: characterization and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sure, Sandeep; Torriero, Angel A J; Gaur, Aditya; Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Ackland, M Leigh; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-11-01

    Identification of extracellular conductive pilus-like structures (PLS) i.e. microbial nanowires has spurred great interest among scientists due to their potential applications in the fields of biogeochemistry, bioelectronics, bioremediation etc. Using conductive atomic force microscopy, we identified microbial nanowires in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 which is an aerobic, photosynthetic microorganism. We also confirmed the earlier finding that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 produces microbial nanowires. In contrast to the use of highly instrumented continuous flow reactors for Synechocystis reported earlier, we identified simple and optimum culture conditions which allow increased production of nanowires in both test cyanobacteria. Production of these nanowires in Synechocystis and Microcystis were found to be sensitive to the availability of carbon source and light intensity. These structures seem to be proteinaceous in nature and their diameter was found to be 4.5-7 and 8.5-11 nm in Synechocystis and M. aeruginosa, respectively. Characterization of Synechocystis nanowires by transmission electron microscopy and biochemical techniques confirmed that they are type IV pili (TFP) while nanowires in M. aeruginosa were found to be similar to an unnamed protein (GenBank : CAO90693.1). Modelling studies of the Synechocystis TFP subunit i.e. PilA1 indicated that strategically placed aromatic amino acids may be involved in electron transfer through these nanowires. This study identifies PLS from Microcystis which can act as nanowires and supports the earlier hypothesis that microbial nanowires are widespread in nature and play diverse roles. PMID:26319534

  14. Metabolism of DMSP, DMS and DMSO by the cultivable bacterial community associated with the DMSP-producing dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hatton, A.D.; Shenoy, D.M.; Hart, M.C.; Mogg, A.; Green, D.H.

    (Table 3). However, in each case the full amount of the DMS lost could be accounted for via the formation of DMSO (Table 3). DMS oxidation rates were calculated for each species, both in the presence and absence of glucose. Results showed oxidation... experiments confirmed that of the thirteen cultivatable bacterial strains tested only two, DG1236 and DG1229, could metabolise DMSP. Both strains appeared to be capable of metabolising DMSP via both DMSP assimilatory pathways (e.g., demethylation) and DMSP...

  15. Electrical properties of single CdTe nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Matei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ion track, nanoporous membranes were employed as templates for the preparation of CdTe nanowires. For this purpose, electrochemical deposition from a bath containing Cd and Te ions was employed. This process leads to high aspect ratio CdTe nanowires, which were harvested and placed on a substrate with lithographically patterned, interdigitated electrodes. Focused ion beam-induced metallization was used to produce individual nanowires with electrical contacts and electrical measurements were performed on these individual nanowires. The influence of a bottom gate was investigated and it was found that surface passivation leads to improved transport properties.

  16. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Allen M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-08-16

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  17. Stability of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Schiek, M.; Wallmann, I.;

    2011-01-01

    The morphological stability of organic nanowires over time and under thermal load is of major importance for their use in any device. In this study the growth and stability of organic nanowires from a naphthyl end-capped thiophene grown by organic molecular beam deposition is investigated via...... atomic force microscopy (AFM). Aging experiments under ambient conditions already show substantial morphological changes. Nanoscopic organic clusters, which initially coexist with the nanowires, vanish within hours. Thermal annealing of nanowire samples leads to even more pronounced morphology changes......, such as a strong decrease in nanowire number density, a strong increase in nanowire height, and the formation of new types of crystallites. This happens even before sublimation of organic material starts. These experiments also shine new light on the formation process of the nanowires....

  18. Endocytosis-inducer adhesins produced by enteropathogenic serogroups of Escherichia coli participate on bacterial attachment to infant enterocytes

    OpenAIRE

    João Ramos Costa Andrade; Carla Cavalheiro da Silva

    1987-01-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) infection of Hep-2 cells preoceeds through bacterial attachment to cell surface and internalization of adhered bacteria. EPEC attachment is a prerequisite for cell infection and is mediated by adhesins that recognize carbohydrate-containing receptors on cell membrane. Such endocytosis-inducer adhesins (EIA) also promote EPEC binding to infant enterocytes, suggesting that EIA may have an important role on EPEC gastroenteritis.A infecção de células Hep-2 por E. c...

  19. Nitrogen and energy balance in growing mink (Mustela vison) fed different levels of bacterial protein meal produced with natural gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Ahlstrøm, Øystein;

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of increasing the dietary content of bacterial protein meal (BPM) on energy and protein metabolism in growing mink kits. Sixteen male mink kits of the standard brown genotype were randomly fed one of four diets: A control (Diet III) and 60.......7% on Diet I to 26.6% on Diet IV, and oxidation of fat increased from 53.8% on Diet I to 63.5% Diet IV. In conclusion, protein and energy metabolism remained unaffected when up to 40% of DN was derived from BPM....

  20. Planar Gallium arsenide nanowire arrays for nanoelectronics: Controlled growth, doping, characterization, and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, Ryan Stewart

    The Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism is a bottom-up approach to produce onedimensional semiconductor structures, or nanowires. VLS nanowires are formed via a chemical or physical deposition process, where a metallic nanoparticle (seed) facilitates the growth. Nanowire growth diameter is strongly correlated to seed size, therefore top-down patterning can control site location and diameter of nanowire growth. Nanowires are sought after for their potential use as a manageable way produce small dimensioned semiconductor features without the need of expensive lithographic techniques. VLS nanowires commonly grow out-of-plane with respect to their growth substrate, resulting in difficulty with integrating VLS nanowires into existing device processing which is intended for planar geometries. Nanowires are typically removed from the substrate, which requires painstaking and uneconomical methods to pattern and align the nanowires. Planar nanowires are a potential solution to this issue; they grow in-plane on the substrate surface, epitaxially attached along its entire axis. Planar nanowires, as is, can be integrated into any preexisting planar semiconductor process, combining the advantages of nanowires with increased manufacturability. In this dissertation, planar GaAs nanowires are grown using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with Au nanoparticles as the liquid metal seed. Growth occurs across multiple substrates to elucidate the mechanism behind planar nanowire growth direction. Knowledge gained by observing planar nanowire growth is used to precisely control nanowire growth direction. Subsequently the doping of planar nanowires is explored and unique phenomena related to the p-type doping of planar nanowires are investigated and discussed. The advantages of using planar nanowires are demonstrated through the controlled growth and doping of planar nanowires, and ultimately fabrication of electronic devices using conventional planar process techniques

  1. A simple synthesis method to produce metal oxide loaded carbon paper using bacterial cellulose gel and characterization of its electrochemical behavior in an aqueous electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Naoya; Jinguji, Ken; Matsumura, Taiyu; Matsubara, Toshihiro; Sakane, Hideto; Akatsu, Takashi; Tanaike, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    A simple synthetic chemical process to produce metal oxide loaded carbon papers was developed using bacterial cellulose gel, which consisted of nanometer-sized fibrous cellulose and water. Metal ions were successfully impregnated into the gel via aqueous solution media before drying and carbonization methods resulting in metal oxide contents that were easy to control through variations in the concentration of aqueous solutions. The papers loaded by molybdenum oxides were characterized as pseudocapacitor electrodes preliminary, and the large redox capacitance of the oxides was followed by a conductive fibrous carbon substrate, suggesting that a binder and carbon black additive-free electrode consisting of metal oxides and carbon paper was formed.

  2. Additional compound semiconductor nanowires for photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, F.

    2016-02-01

    GaAs related compound semiconductor heterostructures are one of the most developed materials for photonics. Those have realized various photonic devices with high efficiency, e. g., lasers, electro-optical modulators, and solar cells. To extend the functions of the materials system, diluted nitride and bismide has been paid attention over the past decade. They can largely decrease the band gap of the alloys, providing the greater tunability of band gap and strain status, eventually suppressing the non-radiative Auger recombinations. On the other hand, selective oxidation for AlGaAs is a vital technique for vertical surface emitting lasers. That enables precisely controlled oxides in the system, enabling the optical and electrical confinement, heat transfer, and mechanical robustness. We introduce the above functions into GaAs nanowires. GaAs/GaAsN core-shell nanowires showed clear redshift of the emitting wavelength toward infrared regime. Further, the introduction of N elongated the carrier lifetime at room temperature indicating the passivation of non-radiative surface recombinations. GaAs/GaAsBi nanowire shows the redshift with metamorphic surface morphology. Selective and whole oxidations of GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires produce semiconductor/oxide composite GaAs/AlGaOx and oxide GaOx/AlGaOx core-shell nanowires, respectively. Possibly sourced from nano-particle species, the oxide shell shows white luminescence. Those property should extend the functions of the nanowires for their application to photonics.

  3. Antimicrobial and immune modulatory effects of lactic acid and short chain fatty acids produced by vaginal microbiota associated with eubiosis and bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldunate, Muriel; Srbinovski, Daniela; Hearps, Anna C; Latham, Catherine F; Ramsland, Paul A; Gugasyan, Raffi; Cone, Richard A; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced by vaginal microbiota have reported antimicrobial and immune modulatory activities indicating their potential as biomarkers of disease and/or disease susceptibility. In asymptomatic women of reproductive-age the vaginal microbiota is comprised of lactic acid-producing bacteria that are primarily responsible for the production of lactic acid present at ~110 mM and acidifying the vaginal milieu to pH ~3.5. In contrast, bacterial vaginosis (BV), a dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota, is characterized by decreased lactic acid-producing microbiota and increased diverse anaerobic bacteria accompanied by an elevated pH>4.5. BV is also characterized by a dramatic loss of lactic acid and greater concentrations of mixed SCFAs including acetate, propionate, butyrate, and succinate. Notably women with lactic acid-producing microbiota have more favorable reproductive and sexual health outcomes compared to women with BV. Regarding the latter, BV is associated with increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. In vitro studies demonstrate that lactic acid produced by vaginal microbiota has microbicidal and virucidal activities that may protect against STIs and endogenous opportunistic bacteria as well as immune modulatory properties that require further characterization with regard to their effects on the vaginal mucosa. In contrast, BV-associated SCFAs have far less antimicrobial activity with the potential to contribute to a pro-inflammatory vaginal environment. Here we review the composition of lactic acid and SCFAs in respective states of eubiosis (non-BV) or dysbiosis (BV), their effects on susceptibility to bacterial/viral STIs and whether they have inherent microbicidal/virucidal and immune modulatory properties. We also explore their potential as biomarkers for the presence and/or increased susceptibility to STIs.

  4. Antimicrobial and immune modulatory effects of lactic acid and short chain fatty acids produced by vaginal microbiota associated with eubiosis and bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel eAldunate

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs produced by vaginal microbiota have reported antimicrobial and immune modulatory activities indicating their potential as biomarkers of disease and/or disease susceptibility. In asymptomatic women of reproductive-age the vaginal microbiota is comprised of lactic acid-producing bacteria that are primarily responsible for the production of lactic acid present at ~110 mM and acidifying the vaginal milieu to pH ~3.5. In contrast, bacterial vaginosis (BV, a dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota, is characterized by decreased lactic acid-producing microbiota and increased diverse anaerobic bacteria accompanied by an elevated pH>4.5. BV is also characterized by a dramatic loss of lactic acid and greater concentrations of mixed SCFAs including acetate, propionate, butyrate and succinate. Notably women with lactic acid-producing microbiota have more favorable reproductive and sexual health outcomes compared to women with BV. Regarding the latter, BV is associated with increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs including HIV. In vitro studies demonstrate that lactic acid produced by vaginal microbiota has microbicidal and virucidal activities that may protect against STIs and endogenous opportunistic bacteria as well as immune modulatory properties that require further characterization with regard to their effects on the vaginal mucosa. In contrast, BV-associated SCFAs have far less antimicrobial activity with the potential to contribute to a pro-inflammatory vaginal environment. Here we review the composition of lactic acid and SCFAs in respective states of eubiosis (non-BV or dysbiosis (BV, their effects on susceptibility to bacterial/viral STIs and whether they have inherent microbicidal/virucidal and immune modulatory properties. We also explore their potential as biomarkers for the presence and/or increased susceptibility to STIs.

  5. Characterization of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) producing bacteria isolated from vacuum-packaged refrigerated turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and possible influence of exogenous AHLs on bacterial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caili; Zhu, Suqin; Jatt, Abdul-Nabi; Zeng, Mingyong

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication mechanism through which microbial cells communicate and regulate their wide variety of biological activities. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are considered to be the most important QS signaling molecules produced by several Gram-negative bacteria. The present study aimed to screen the AHLs-producing bacteria from spoiled vacuum-packaged refrigerated turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) by biosensor assays, and the profiles of AHLs produced by these bacteria were determined using reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography (RP-TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Effects of exogenous AHLs and QS inhibitor (QSI) on the phenotypes (i.e., extracellular proteolytic activity and biofilm formation) of the AHLs-producing bacteria were also evaluated. Our results demonstrated that eight out of twenty-two isolates were found to produce AHLs. Three of the AHLs-producing isolates were identified as Serratia sp., and the other five were found to belong to the family of Aeromonas. Two isolates (i.e., S. liquefaciens A2 and A. sobria B1) with higher AHLs-producing activities were selected for further studies. Mainly, RP-TLC and GC-MS analysis revealed three AHLs, i.e., 3-oxo-C6-HSL, C8-HSL and C10-HSL were produced by S. liquefaciens A2, while five AHLs, i.e., C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL, and C12-HSL, were produced by A. sobria B1. Moreover, production of AHLs in both bacterial strains were found to be density-dependent, and the AHLs activity reached a maximum level in their middle logarithmic phase and decreased in the stationary phase. The addition of exogenous AHLs and QSI decreased the specific protease activity both of the Serratia A2 and Aeromonas B1. Exogenous AHLs inhibited the biofilm formation of Serratia A2 while it enhanced the biofilm formation in Aeromonas B1. QSI inhibited the specific protease activity and biofilm formation in both bacterial strains. PMID:27118073

  6. Characterization of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) producing bacteria isolated from vacuum-packaged refrigerated turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and possible influence of exogenous AHLs on bacterial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caili; Zhu, Suqin; Jatt, Abdul-Nabi; Zeng, Mingyong

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication mechanism through which microbial cells communicate and regulate their wide variety of biological activities. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are considered to be the most important QS signaling molecules produced by several Gram-negative bacteria. The present study aimed to screen the AHLs-producing bacteria from spoiled vacuum-packaged refrigerated turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) by biosensor assays, and the profiles of AHLs produced by these bacteria were determined using reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography (RP-TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Effects of exogenous AHLs and QS inhibitor (QSI) on the phenotypes (i.e., extracellular proteolytic activity and biofilm formation) of the AHLs-producing bacteria were also evaluated. Our results demonstrated that eight out of twenty-two isolates were found to produce AHLs. Three of the AHLs-producing isolates were identified as Serratia sp., and the other five were found to belong to the family of Aeromonas. Two isolates (i.e., S. liquefaciens A2 and A. sobria B1) with higher AHLs-producing activities were selected for further studies. Mainly, RP-TLC and GC-MS analysis revealed three AHLs, i.e., 3-oxo-C6-HSL, C8-HSL and C10-HSL were produced by S. liquefaciens A2, while five AHLs, i.e., C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL, and C12-HSL, were produced by A. sobria B1. Moreover, production of AHLs in both bacterial strains were found to be density-dependent, and the AHLs activity reached a maximum level in their middle logarithmic phase and decreased in the stationary phase. The addition of exogenous AHLs and QSI decreased the specific protease activity both of the Serratia A2 and Aeromonas B1. Exogenous AHLs inhibited the biofilm formation of Serratia A2 while it enhanced the biofilm formation in Aeromonas B1. QSI inhibited the specific protease activity and biofilm formation in both bacterial strains.

  7. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N R Rao; A Govindaraj

    2001-10-01

    Synthesis and characterization of nanotubes and nanowires constitute an important part of nanoscience since these materials are essential bui lding units for several devices. We have prepared aligned carbon nanotube bundles and Y-junction nanotubes by the pyrolysis of appropriate organic precursors. The aligned bundles are useful for field emission display while the Y-junction nanotubes are likely to be useful as nanochips since they exhibit diode properties at the junction. By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal oxides and GaN have be en obt a ined. Both the oxide and GaN nanowires are single crystalline. Gold nanowires exhibit plasmon bands varying markedly with the aspect ratio. GaN nanowires show excellent photoluminescence characteristics. It has been possible to synthesise nanotubes and nanowires of metal chalcogenides by employing different strategies.

  8. Construction and evaluation of an exopolysaccharide-producing engineered bacterial strain by protoplast fusion for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shanshan; Luo, Yijing; Cao, Siyuan; Li, Wenhong; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Jiang, Lingxi; Dong, Hanping; Yu, Li; Wu, Wei-Min

    2013-09-01

    Enterobacter cloacae strain JD, which produces water-insoluble biopolymers at optimal temperature of 30°C, and a thermophilic Geobacillus strain were used to construct an engineered strain for exopolysaccharide production at high temperatures by protoplast fusion. The obtained fusant strain ZR3 produced exopolysaccharides at up to 45°C with optimal growth temperature at 35°C. The fusant produced exopolysaccharides of approximately 7.5 g/L or more at pH between 7.0 and 9.0. The feasibility of the enhancement of crude oil recovery with the fusant was tested in a sand-packed column at 40°C. The results demonstrated that bioaugmentation of the fusant was promising approach for MEOR. Mass growth of the fusant was confirmed in fermentor tests. PMID:23856587

  9. Endocytosis-inducer adhesins produced by enteropathogenic serogroups of Escherichia coli participate on bacterial attachment to infant enterocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ramos Costa Andrade

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC infection of Hep-2 cells preoceeds through bacterial attachment to cell surface and internalization of adhered bacteria. EPEC attachment is a prerequisite for cell infection and is mediated by adhesins that recognize carbohydrate-containing receptors on cell membrane. Such endocytosis-inducer adhesins (EIA also promote EPEC binding to infant enterocytes, suggesting that EIA may have an important role on EPEC gastroenteritis.A infecção de células Hep-2 por E. coli enteropatogênicas (ECEP implica na aderência bacteriana e posterior interiorização dos microrganismos aderidos por um mecanismo de endocitose. A aderência das ECEP é pré-requisito para a infecção e é mediada por adesinas que reconhecem receptores inibidos por certas oses na membrana celular. Tais "adesinas indutoras da endocitose" (AIE também promovem a ligação bacteriana a enterócitos obtidos do intestino delgado de lactente, sugerindo que as AIE possam desempenhar algum papel nas diarréias causadas por ECEP.

  10. Optical fibre nanowire devices

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Fei

    2008-01-01

    The Optical Fibre Nanowire (OFN) is a potential building block in future micro- and nano-photonic device since it offers a number of unique optical and mechanical properties. In this thesis, the background and fundamental features of nanowires are introduced; the theory, design and demonstration of novel nanowire devices are discussed. At first, a short adiabatic taper tip is manufactured, and it is used as optical tweezers for trapping 1?m microspheres. Then, the most important devic...

  11. Growth of Gold-assisted Gallium Arsenide Nanowires on Silicon Substrates via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon M. delos Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gallium arsenide nanowires were grown on silicon (100 substrates by what is called the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth mechanism using a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE system. Good quality nanowires with surface density of approximately 108 nanowires per square centimeter were produced by utilizing gold nanoparticles, with density of 1011 nanoparticles per square centimeter, as catalysts for nanowire growth. X-ray diffraction measurements, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the nanowires are epitaxially grown on the silicon substrates, are oriented along the [111] direction and have cubic zincblende structure.

  12. Imaging Single ZnO Vertical Nanowire Laser Cavities using UV-Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargas, D.J.; Toimil-Molares, M.E.; Yang, P.

    2008-11-17

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of individual ZnO vertical nanowire laser cavities. Dilute nanowire arrays with interwire spacing>10 ?m were produced by a modified chemical vapor transport (CVT) method yielding an ideal platform for single nanowire imaging and spectroscopy. Lasing characteristics of a single vertical nanowire are presented, as well as high-resolution photoluminescence imaging by UV-laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the photoluminescence emission performed in both planar and vertical dimensions demonstrates height-selective imaging useful for vertical nanowires and heteronanostructures emerging in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  13. Enzymes produced by halotolerant spore-forming gram-positive bacterial strains isolated from a resting habitat (Restinga de Jurubatiba) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: focus on proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D Santos, Anderson Fragoso; Pacheco, Clarissa Almeida; Valle, Roberta D Santos; Seldin, Lucy; D Santos, André Luis Souza

    2014-12-01

    The screening for hydrolases-producing, halotolerant, and spore-forming gram-positive bacteria from the root, rhizosphere, and non-rhizosphere soil of Blutaparon portulacoides, a plant found in the Restinga de Jurubatiba located at the northern region of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, resulted in the isolation of 22 strains. These strains were identified as Halobacillus blutaparonensis (n = 2), Oceanobacillus picturae (n = 5), and Oceanobacillus iheyensis (n = 15), and all showed the ability to produce different extracellular enzymes. A total of 20 isolates (90.9 %) showed activity for protease, 5 (22.7 %) for phytase, 3 (13.6 %) for cellulase, and 2 (9.1 %) for amylase. Some bacterial strains were capable of producing three (13.6 %) or two (9.1 %) distinct hydrolytic enzymes. However, no bacterial strain with ability to produce esterase and DNase was observed. The isolate designated M9, belonging to the species H. blutaparonensis, was the best producer of protease and also yielded amylase and phytase. This strain was chosen for further studies regarding its protease activity. The M9 strain produced similar amounts of protease when grown either without or with different NaCl concentrations (from 0.5 to 10 %). A simple inspection of the cell-free culture supernatant by gelatin-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed the presence of three major alkaline proteases of 40, 50, and 70 kDa, which were fully inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) (two classical serine protease inhibitors). The secreted proteases were detected in a wide range of temperature (from 4 to 45 °C) and their hydrolytic activities were stimulated by NaCl (up to 10 %). The serine proteases produced by the M9 strain cleaved gelatin, casein, albumin, and hemoglobin, however, in different extensions. Collectively, these results suggest the potential use of the M9 strain in biotechnological

  14. Development of palladium nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chuanding

    Inherent limitations of traditional lithography have prompted the search for means of achieving self-assembly of nano-scale structures and networks for the next generation of electronic and photonic devices. The nanowire, the basic building block of a nanocircuit, has recently become the focus of intense research. Reports on nanowire synthesis and assembly have appeared in the scientific literature, which include Vapor-Liquid-Solid mechanism, template-based electrochemical fabrication, solvothermal or wet chemistry, and assembly by fluid alignment or microchannel networks. An ideal approach for practical application of nanowires would circumvent technical and economic constraints of templating. Here we report on the self-assembly of highly-ordered metallic nanowires directly from a palladium acetate solution under an applied alternating current (AC) electric field of relatively high intensity and frequency. DNA-templated nanowires are first presented here. DNA molecules were stretched and positioned by electric field, followed by metallization by palladium acetate solution. Palladium nanowire arrays have been found to grow directly between microelectrodes without any template, under an alternating electric field of relatively high intensity and frequency. The wires grew spontaneously along the direction of the electric field and have high uniformity and conductivity. Single 75 nm-diameter palladium nanowires have also been self-assembled from aqueous solution at predefined locations between 15 mum-gap electrodes built on a SiO2 substrate. Nanowire assembly was initiated by application an electric field, and it occurred only along the direction of field lines where the field is strongest. Related metals did not support single nanowire assembly under comparable conditions. Current-limiting circuits for controlled nanowire synthesis, electric field simulation, and growth mechanism were studied. The simple and straightforward approach to nanowire assembly outlined here

  15. Development of methods for orderly growth of nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, R. R.; Kotlyar, K. P.; Khrebtov, A. I.; Samsonenko, Yu B.; Soshnikov, I. P.; Dyakonov, V.; Zadiranov, U. M.; Tankelevskaya, E. M.; Kudryashov, D. A.; Shevchuk, D. S.; Cirlin, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Method of manufacturing substrates for self-catalyst/free-catalyst ordered growth of the nanowires has been developed. Experiments show the possibility of autocatalytic growth of ordered GaAs NWs on the substrates produced during the research.

  16. SiC nanowires synthesized from graphene and silicon vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichenpei, Luo; Gong-yi, Li; Zengyong, Chu; Tianjiao, Hu; Xiaodong, Li; Xuefei, Zhang

    2016-04-01

    The preparation of silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires is basically important for its potential applications in nanodevices, nanocomposites, etc. In the present work, a simple route was reported to synthesize SiC nanowires by heating commercial graphene with silicon vapors and no catalyst. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy scattering, X-ray diffraction, and Raman dispersive spectrum demonstrates the products are composed of β-SiC crystal. The SiC nanowires have the average diameter of about 50 nm and length of tens of micrometers. The vapor-solid mechanism was employed to interpret the SiC nanowires growth. Gaseous SiO which was produced by the reaction of Si powders with its surface oxidation reacted with the solid graphene to form SiC crystal nuclei. And SiC crystal nuclei would act as active sites for further growing into nanowires.

  17. Internalization of ferromagnetic nanowires by different living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coey John

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability of living cells, either adherent or suspended, to internalize nickel nanowires is demonstrated for MC3T3-E1, UMR106-tumour and Marrow-Stromal cells. Nanowires were produced by electrodeposition, 20 μm long and 200 nm in diameter. Cell separation and manipulation was achieved for the three cell types. Applied magnetic field successfully oriented the internalized nanowires but no clear anisotropy is induced on the adherent cells. Nanowires tend to bind to cytoplasm metalloproteins and trigger lysosome reorganization around the nucleus. This work demonstrates the applications of nanowires in adherent and suspended cells for cell separation and manipulation, and further explore into their role in nanobiotechnology.

  18. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  19. Metallic nanowire networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A.

    2012-11-06

    A metallic nanowire network synthesized using chemical reduction of a metal ion source by a reducing agent in the presence of a soft template comprising a tubular inverse micellar network. The network of interconnected polycrystalline nanowires has a very high surface-area/volume ratio, which makes it highly suitable for use in catalytic applications.

  20. Recent Advances in Directed Assembly of Nanowires or Nanotub es

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Liu; Zhizheng Wu; Woon Ming Lau; Jun Yang

    2012-01-01

    Nanowires and nanotubes of diverse material compositions, properties and/or functions have been produced or fabricated through various bottom-up or top-down approaches. These nanowires or nanotubes have also been utilized as potential building blocks for functional nanodevices. The key for the integration of those nanowire or nanotube based devices is to assemble these one dimensional nanomaterials to specific locations using techniques that are highly controllable and scalable. Ideally such techniques should enable assembly of highly uniform nanowire/nanotube arrays with precise control of density, location, dimension or even ma-terial types of nanowires/nanotubes. Numerous assembly techniques are being developed that can quickly align and assemble large quantities of one type or multiple types of nanowires through parallel processes, in-cluding flow-assisted alignment, Langmuir-Blodgett assembly, bubble-blown technique, electric/magnetic- field directed assembly, contact/roll printing, knocking-down, etc.. With these assembling techniques, applications of nanowire/nanotube based devices such as flexible electronics and sensors have been demonstrated. This paper delivers an overall review of directed nanowire/nanotube assembling approaches and analyzes advantages and limitations of each method. The future research directions have also been discussed.

  1. Growh performance, nitrogen balance and urinary purine derivatives in growing-furring mink (Mustela vison) fed bacterial protein produced from natural gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlstrøm, Ø.; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl;

    2006-01-01

    A bacterial protein meal (BPM), containing 70% crude protein and produced on natural gas, was evaluated versus fish meal as protein source for mink in the growing-furring period (June 29-November 26). BPM, rich in nucleic acids, accounted for 0 (control), 20 and 40% of dietary crude protein......, except for males on the 8% BPM diet. Balance experiments carried out with 18 and 28 weeks old males, revealed similar digestibility of main nutrients except for fat that were reduced with BPM inclusion. N-retentions were similar for the dietary groups. Daily excretion of urine was lower with the 8% BPM...... diet than with the other diets. Excretion of urinary purine derivativ es (allantoin, xanthine), decreased or was not consistently affected (hypoxanthine, uric acid) by the dietary level of BPM, indicating that nucleic acids from BPM were utilized in vivo. The skin characteristics and fur quality were...

  2. Nanowire Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Erik C.; Brongersma, Mark L.; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Michael D.

    2011-08-01

    The nanowire geometry provides potential advantages over planar wafer-based or thin-film solar cells in every step of the photoconversion process. These advantages include reduced reflection, extreme light trapping, improved band gap tuning, facile strain relaxation, and increased defect tolerance. These benefits are not expected to increase the maximum efficiency above standard limits; instead, they reduce the quantity and quality of material necessary to approach those limits, allowing for substantial cost reductions. Additionally, nanowires provide opportunities to fabricate complex single-crystalline semiconductor devices directly on low-cost substrates and electrodes such as aluminum foil, stainless steel, and conductive glass, addressing another major cost in current photovoltaic technology. This review describes nanowire solar cell synthesis and fabrication, important characterization techniques unique to nanowire systems, and advantages of the nanowire geometry.

  3. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  4. Plasmonic engineering of metal-oxide nanowire heterojunctions in integrated nanowire rectification units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Luchan; Zou, Guisheng; Liu, Lei; Duley, Walt W.; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2016-05-01

    We show that irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses can produce robust nanowire heterojunctions in coupled non-wetting metal-oxide Ag-TiO2 structures. Simulations indicate that joining arises from the effect of strong plasmonic localization in the region of the junction. Strong electric field effects occur in both Ag and TiO2 resulting in the modification of both surfaces and an increase in wettability of TiO2, facilitating the interconnection of Ag and TiO2 nanowires. Irradiation leads to the creation of a thin layer of highly defected TiO2 in the contact region between the Ag and TiO2 nanowires. The presence of this layer allows the formation of a heterojunction and offers the possibility of engineering the electronic characteristics of interfacial structures. Rectifying junctions with single and bipolar properties have been generated in Ag-TiO2 nanowire circuits incorporating asymmetrical and symmetrical interfacial structures, respectively. This fabrication technique should be applicable for the interconnection of other heterogeneous metal-oxide nanowire components and demonstrates that femtosecond laser irradiation enables interfacial engineering for electronic applications of integrated nanowire structures.

  5. GaAs nanowires. Epitaxy, crystal structure-related properties and magnetic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubmann, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    The intention of this work is twofold: On the one hand, we explore the controlability of GaAs nanowire growth concerning orientation, shape and crystal structure. These are necessary steps, since the growth of GaAs nanowires proceeds not necessarily uniformly, and in GaAs nanowires the in bulk unstable wurtzite phase, and the usual observed zinc-blende crystal phase may coexist in one and the same nanowire. On the other hand, we include ferromagnetic materials into GaAs nanowires. To do that, we produce either ''core/shell'' structures, where the GaAs nanowire is coated with a ferromagnetic ''shell'' material, or grow ferromagnetic nanoscale segments in GaAs nanowires.

  6. Characterisation of the bacterial microbiota of the vagina of dairy cows and isolation of pediocin-producing Pediococcus acidilactici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine infections in dairy cows lower profitability of dairy operations. Infections of the reproductive tract are related to the overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria during the first three weeks after parturition. However, alterations in the vaginal microbiota composition in the first weeks after parturition remain poorly documented. Results In this study, bacteria isolated from the vagina of healthy pregnant, and infected postpartum cows were characterised by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis and partial 16S ribosomal RNA (rDNA gene sequencing. Populations of bacilli and lactic acid bacteria of the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, and Pediococcus were present in both healthy and infected cows. Infected cows had a significant increase in the vaginal enteric bacteria population which consisted mainly of Escherichia coli. Three E. coli isolates harboured the gene coding for Shiga-like-toxin (SLT I or II. Several isolates of the Pediococcus acidilactici were found to produce the bacteriocin pediocin AcH/PA-1. Quantitative PCR analyses of vaginal mucus samples collected from ten metritic cows before and after parturition confirmed the presence of the Lactobacillus group (Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp., Leuconostoc spp., and Weissella spp.; Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, and bacilli. The presence of the pediocin AcH/PA-1 structural gene and SLT genes were also confirmed with qPCR. Conclusions In conclusion, overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria, particularly E. coli, after parturition likely contributes to the development of metritis. Our microbiota analysis extends the information related to the composition of commensal bacteria in the bovine female reproductive tract and may facilitate the development of novel intervention strategies for prevention of uterine infections in dairy cows.

  7. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  8. Effects of volatile organic compounds produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on the growth and virulence traits of tomato bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Waseem; Wang, Jichen; Wu, Yuncheng; Ling, Ning; Wei, Zhong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-09-01

    The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by microbes is an important characteristic for their selection as biocontrol agents against plant pathogens. In this study, we identified the VOCs produced by the biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens T-5 and evaluated their impact on the growth and virulence traits of tomato bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. The results showed that the VOCs of strain T-5 significantly inhibited the growth of R. solanacearum in agar medium and in soil. In addition, VOCs significantly inhibited the motility traits, root colonization, biofilm formation, and production of antioxidant enzymes and exopolysaccharides by R. solanacearum. However, no effect of VOCs on the production of hydrolytic enzymes by R. solanacearum was observed. The strain T-5 produced VOCs, including benzenes, ketones, aldehydes, alkanes, acids, and one furan and naphthalene compound; among those, 13 VOCs showed 1-10 % antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum in their produced amounts by T-5; however, the consortium of all VOCs produced on agar medium, in sterilized soil, and in natural soil showed 75, 62, and 85 % growth inhibition of R. solanacearum, respectively. The real-time PCR analysis further confirmed the results when the expression of different virulence- and metabolism-related genes in R. solanacearum cells was decreased after exposure to the VOCs of strain T-5. The results of this study clearly revealed the significance of VOCs in the control of plant pathogens. This information would help to better comprehend the microbial interactions mediated by VOCs in nature and to develop safer strategies to control plant disease. PMID:27183998

  9. Biotransformation of arsenite and bacterial aox activity in drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses: Arsenic contamination in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    The potential arsenite bioteansformation activity of arsenic was investigated by examining bacterial arsenic arsenite-oxidizing gene such as aoxS, aoxR, aoxA, aoxB, aoxC, and aoxD in high arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from the surface water of floating houses. There is a biogeochemical cycle of activity involving arsenite oxidase aox system and the ars (arsenic resistance system) gene operon and aoxR leader gene activity in Alcaligenes faecalis SRR-11 and aoxS leader gene activity in Achromobacter xylosoxidans TSL-66. Batch experiments showed that SRR-11 and TSL-66 completely oxidized 1 mM of As (III) to As (V) within 35-40 h. The leaders of aoxS and aoxR are important for gene activity, and their effects in arsenic bioremediation and mobility in natural water has a significant ecological role because it allows arsenite oxidase in bacteria to control the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses.

  10. A bacterial symbiont is converted from an inedible producer of beneficial molecules into food by a single mutation in the gacA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallforth, Pierre; Brock, Debra A; Cantley, Alexandra M; Tian, Xiangjun; Queller, David C; Strassmann, Joan E; Clardy, Jon

    2013-09-01

    Stable multipartite mutualistic associations require that all partners benefit. We show that a single mutational step is sufficient to turn a symbiotic bacterium from an inedible but host-beneficial secondary metabolite producer into a host food source. The bacteria's host is a "farmer" clone of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum that carries and disperses bacteria during its spore stage. Associated with the farmer are two strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, only one of which serves as a food source. The other strain produces diffusible small molecules: pyrrolnitrin, a known antifungal agent, and a chromene that potently enhances the farmer's spore production and depresses a nonfarmer's spore production. Genome sequence and phylogenetic analyses identify a derived point mutation in the food strain that generates a premature stop codon in a global activator (gacA), encoding the response regulator of a two-component regulatory system. Generation of a knockout mutant of this regulatory gene in the nonfood bacterial strain altered its secondary metabolite profile to match that of the food strain, and also, independently, converted it into a food source. These results suggest that a single mutation in an inedible ancestral strain that served a protective role converted it to a "domesticated" food source. PMID:23898207

  11. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  12. Magnetoresistance of nanosized magnetic configurations in single nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrowe, J.-E.; Gilbert, S.; Doudin, B.; Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    1998-03-01

    The problem of studying spin configurations at nanoscopic level is that magnetic measurements at this scale cannot be performed using usual magnetometers. We have shown that anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) measured with micro-contacts allows spin configurations of a single nanowire to be studied in details. The nanowires are diameter 50 nm and length 6000 nm and are produced by a combination of electrodeposition in track-etched membrane templates and sputtering technics. Magnetoresistance of well-defined spin configurations in single nanowires, like Curling magnetization reversal modes or domain wall, are measured.

  13. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  14. A force sensor using nanowire arrays to understand biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Prasana K.; Cavalli, Alessandro; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Murillo, Duber M.; Souza, Alessandra A.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the cellular signaling and function at the nano-bio interface can pave the way towards developing next-generation smart diagnostic tools. From this perspective, limited reports detail so far the cellular and subcellular forces exerted by bacterial cells during the interaction with abiotic materials. Nanowire arrays with high aspect ratio have been used to detect such small forces. In this regard, live force measurements were performed ex-vivo during the interaction of Xylella fastidiosa bacterial cells with InP nanowire arrays. The influence of nanowire array topography and surface chemistry on the response and motion of bacterial cells was studied in detail. The nanowire arrays were also functionalized with different cell adhesive promoters, such as amines and XadA1, an afimbrial protein of X.fastidiosa. By employing the well-defined InP nanowire arrays platform, and single cell confocal imaging system, we were able to trace the bacterial growth pattern, and show that their initial attachment locations are strongly influenced by the surface chemistry and nanoscale surface topography. In addition, we measure the cellular forces down to few nanonewton range using these nanowire arrays. In case of nanowire functionalized with XadA1, the force exerted by vertically and horizontally attached single bacteria on the nanowire is in average 14% and 26% higher than for the pristine array, respectively. These results provide an excellent basis for live-cell force measurements as well as unravel the range of forces involved during the early stages of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

  15. Sub-diffraction Laser Synthesis of Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, James I.; Zhou, Nan; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate synthesis of silicon nanowires of tens of nanometers via laser induced chemical vapor deposition. These nanowires with diameters as small as 60 nm are produced by the interference between incident laser radiation and surface scattered radiation within a diffraction limited spot, which causes spatially confined, periodic heating needed for high resolution chemical vapor deposition. By controlling the intensity and polarization direction of the incident radiation, multiple parallel nanowires can be simultaneously synthesized. The nanowires are produced on a dielectric substrate with controlled diameter, length, orientation, and the possibility of in-situ doping, and therefore are ready for device fabrication. Our method offers rapid one-step fabrication of nano-materials and devices unobtainable with previous CVD methods.

  16. Mesoscopic Models of Plants Composed of Metallic Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Strukova, Galina K.; Strukov, Gennady V.; Postnova, Evgeniya Yu.; Rusanov, Alexander Yu.; Veshchunov, Ivan S.

    2013-01-01

    Various metallic structures of complex shape resembling living plant organisms (biomimetics) are produced as a result of selfassembly of nanowires growing on porous membranes in the course of pulse current electrodeposition. These structures occur if the electroplating is continued after the nanowires appear on the membrane surface. By varying the membrane ge- ometry, pulse current electroplating parameters, and alternating electrodeposition from two baths composed of a variety of electrolyte...

  17. Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-12-19

    Magnetic nanowires can be used as an alternative method overcoming the limitations of current cancer treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Nanowires are developed so that they selectively attach to cancer cells via antibodies, potentially destroying them when a magnetic field induces their vibration. This will transmit a mechanical force to the targeted cells, which is expected to induce apoptosis on the cancer cells.

  18. Multishelled Gold Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Bilalbegovic, G.

    1999-01-01

    The current miniaturization of electronic devices raises many questions about the properties of various materials at nanometre-scales. Recent molecular dynamics computer simulations have shown that small finite nanowires of gold exist as multishelled structures of lasting stability. These classical simulations are based on a well-tested embedded atom potential. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of metallic nanowires should help in developing methods for their fabrication, such as electron...

  19. Noble metal nanowires: from plasmon waveguides to passive and active devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Surbhi; Hafner, Jason H; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan; Nordlander, Peter

    2012-11-20

    Using chemical synthesis, researchers can produce noble metal nanowires with highly regular, crystalline properties unachievable by alternative, top-down nanofabrication methods. Sitting at the intersection of nanochemistry and nanooptics, noble metal nanowires have generated intense and growing research interest. These nanostructures combine subwavelength transverse dimensions (50-100 nm) and longitudinal dimensions that can reach tens of micrometers or more, which makes them an ideal platform to launch surface plasmon waves by direct illumination of one end of the structure. Because of this property, researchers are using noble metal nanowires as a tool for fundamental studies of subwavelength plasmon-based optics and the properties of surface plasmon guided wave propagation in highly confined geometries below the classical optical diffraction limit. In this Account, we review some of the recent developments in plasmonic nanowire fabrication, nanowire plasmon imaging, and nanowire optical components and devices. The addition of an adjacent nanowire, substrate, or other symmetry-breaking defect can enable the direct coupling of light to and from free space to the guided waves on a nanowire structure. Such structures lead to more complex nanowire-based geometries with multiple optical inputs and outputs. Additional nanowire imaging methods are also possible: plasmon propagation on nanowires produces intense near-field diffraction, which can induce fluorescence in nearby quantum dots or photobleach adjacent molecules. When the nanowire is deposited on a dielectric substrate, the plasmon propagation along chemically synthesized nanowires exceeds 10 μm, which makes these structures useful in nonlocal applications such as remote surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensing. Nanowires can be used as passive optical devices, which include, for example, polarization manipulators, linear polarization rotators, or even broadband linear-to-circular polarization

  20. Nanowire structures and electrical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadin, Alexey; Remeika, Mikas

    2010-07-06

    The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive segments and conductance constricting segments of a nanowire, such as metallic, superconducting or semiconducting nanowire. The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive nanowire segments and conductance constricting nanowire segments having accurately selected phases including crystalline and amorphous states, compositions, morphologies and physical dimensions, including selected cross sectional dimensions, shapes and lengths along the length of a nanowire. Further, the present invention provides methods of processing nanowires capable of patterning a nanowire to form a plurality of conductance constricting segments having selected positions along the length of a nanowire, including conductance constricting segments having reduced cross sectional dimensions and conductance constricting segments comprising one or more insulating materials such as metal oxides.

  1. Novel nanotubes and encapsulated nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrones, M.; Hsu, W. K.; Schilder, A.; Terrones, H.; Grobert, N.; Hare, J. P.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Schwoerer, M.; Prassides, K.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    Carbon nanotubes, with or without encapsulated material, generated by arc discharge and electrolytic techniques have been studied. Microcrystals of refractory carbides (i.e. NbC, TaC, MoC), contained in nanotubes and polyhedral particles, produced by arcing electrodes of graphite/metal mixtures, were analysed by high hesolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray powder diffraction. Encapsulation of MoC was found to give rise to an unusual stable form, namely face-centered-cubic MoC. SQUID measurements indicate that the encapsulated carbides exhibit superconducting transitions at about 10-12 K, thus they differ from carbon nanotubes/nanoparticles which do not superconduct. Four-probe and microwave (contactless) conductivity measurements indicate that most of the analysed samples behave as semiconductors. However, metallic transport was observed in specimens containing single conglomerated carbon nanotube bundles and boron-doped carbon nanotubes. Novel metallic βSn nanowires were produced by electrolysis of graphite electrodes immersed in molten LiCl/SnCl2 mixtures. Prolonged electron irradiation of these nanowires leads to axial growth and to dynamic transformations. These observations suggest ways in which materials may be modified by microencapsulation and irradiation.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Amorphous Silicon Oxide Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale amorphous silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with a diameter about 100 nm and a length of dozens of micrometers on silicon wafers were synthesized by thermal evaporation of silicon monoxide (SiO).Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations show that the silicon nanowires are smooth.Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) shows that the silicon nanowires are amorphous and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) indicates that the nanowires have the composition of Si and O elements in an atomic ratio of 1:2, their composition approximates that of SiO2.SiO is considered to be used as a Si sources to produce SiNWs.We conclude that the growth mechanism is closely related to the defect structure and silicon monoxide followed by growth through an oxide-assisted vapor-solid reaction.

  3. Raman spectra of silicon carbide small particles and nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two manufacturing protocols of silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires are discussed. The Raman spectra of produced SiC nanowires are compared with spectra of SiC powders of various grain sizes. The temperature and pressure dependence of the Raman spectra for powders is similar to that of bulk crystals, but is different for nanowires. Frequency shifts, band broadenings and the presence of shoulders are discussed in terms of crystal size, character of defects and their population. The concentration of defects in synthesized nanowires depends on the sintering method. Raman intensity enhancement of the LO phonon was observed when the wavelength of the excitation laser was changed from 780 to 514 nm

  4. Oligo and Poly-thiophene/Zno Hybrid Nanowire Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briseno, Alejandro L.; Holcombe, Thomas W.; Boukai, Akram I.; Garnett, Erik C.; Shelton, Steve W.; Frechet, Jean J. M.; Yang, Peidong

    2009-11-03

    We demonstrate the basic operation of an organic/inorganic hybrid single nanowire solar cell. End-functionalized oligo- and polythiophenes were grafted onto ZnO nanowires to produce p-n heterojunction nanowires. The hybrid nanostructures were characterized via absorption and electron microscopy to determine the optoelectronic properties and to probe the morphology at the organic/inorganic interface. Individual nanowire solar cell devices exhibited well-resolved characteristics with efficiencies as high as 0.036percent, Jsc = 0.32 mA/cm2, Voc = 0.4 V, and a FF = 0.28 under AM 1.5 illumination with 100 mW/cm2 light intensity. These individual test structures will enable detailed analysis to be carried out in areas that have been difficult to study in bulk heterojunction devices.

  5. Hysteresis loops and susceptibility of a transverse Ising nanowire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the magnetization, susceptibility, and hysteresis loops of a magnetic nanowire are described by the transverse Ising model using the effective field theory within a probability distribution technique. The effects of the exchange interaction between core/shell and the external fields on the magnetization and the susceptibility of the system are examined. Some characteristic phenomena are found in the thermal variations, depending on the ratios of the physical parameters in the shell and the core. - Highlights: ► We use the effective-field theory with a probability distribution technique to investigate. ► The magnetic properties of a magnetic nanowire in the presence of both the longitudinal and the transverse field. ► Triple hysteresis loop patterns for magnetic nanowire are observed which may have potential in producing a multi-state memory. ► Our theoretical predictions may be a reference for future experimental studies on the magnetic nanowire.

  6. The Novel Semiconductor Nanowire Heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Q.Hu; Y.Bando; J.H.Zhan; D.Golberg

    2007-01-01

    1 Results If one-dimensional heterostructures with a well-defined compositional profile along the wire radial or axial direction can be realized within semiconductor nanowires, new nano-electronic devices,such as nano-waveguide and nano-capcipator, might be obtained. Here,we report the novel semiconducting nanowire heterostructures:(1) Si/ZnS side-to-side biaxial nanowires and ZnS/Si/ZnS sandwich-like triaxial nanowires[1],(2) Ga-Mg3N2 and Ga-ZnS metal-semiconductor nanowire heterojunctions[2-3]and (3) ...

  7. Nanowire mesh solar fuels generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Peidong; Chan, Candace; Sun, Jianwei; Liu, Bin

    2016-05-24

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator. In one aspect, a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator includes (1) a photoanode configured to perform water oxidation and (2) a photocathode configured to perform water reduction. The photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode. The photoanode may include a high surface area network of photoanode nanowires. The photocathode may include a high surface area network of photocathode nanowires. In some embodiments, the nanowire mesh solar fuels generator may include an ion conductive polymer infiltrating the photoanode and the photocathode in the region where the photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode.

  8. Piezoresistive boron doped diamond nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Wang, Xinpeng

    2016-09-13

    A UNCD nanowire comprises a first end electrically coupled to a first contact pad which is disposed on a substrate. A second end is electrically coupled to a second contact pad also disposed on the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is doped with a dopant and disposed over the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is movable between a first configuration in which no force is exerted on the UNCD nanowire and a second configuration in which the UNCD nanowire bends about the first end and the second end in response to a force. The UNCD nanowire has a first resistance in the first configuration and a second resistance in the second configuration which is different from the first resistance. The UNCD nanowire is structured to have a gauge factor of at least about 70, for example, in the range of about 70 to about 1,800.

  9. Single-nanowire photoelectrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yude; Liu, Chong; Brittman, Sarah; Tang, Jinyao; Fu, Anthony; Kornienko, Nikolay; Kong, Qiao; Yang, Peidong

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectrochemistry is one of several promising approaches for the realization of efficient solar-to-fuel conversion. Recent work has shown that photoelectrodes made of semiconductor nano-/microwire arrays can have better photoelectrochemical performance than their planar counterparts because of their unique properties, such as high surface area. Although considerable research effort has focused on studying wire arrays, the inhomogeneity in the geometry, doping, defects and catalyst loading present in such arrays can obscure the link between these properties and the photoelectrochemical performance of the wires, and correlating performance with the specific properties of individual wires is difficult because of ensemble averaging. Here, we show that a single-nanowire-based photoelectrode platform can be used to reliably probe the current–voltage (I–V) characteristics of individual nanowires. We find that the photovoltage output of ensemble array samples can be limited by poorly performing individual wires, which highlights the importance of improving nanowire homogeneity within an array. Furthermore, the platform allows the flux of photogenerated electrons to be quantified as a function of the lengths and diameters of individual nanowires, and we find that the flux over the entire nanowire surface (7–30 electrons nm–2 s–1) is significantly reduced as compared with that of a planar analogue (∼1,200 electrons nm–2 s–1). Such characterization of the photogenerated carrier flux at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface is essential for designing nanowire photoelectrodes that match the activity of their loaded electrocatalysts.

  10. Electrodeposition of Cobalt Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sungbok; Hong, Kimin [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    We developed an electroplating process of cobalt nanowires of which line-widths were between 70 and 200 nm. The plating electrolyte was made of CoSO{sub 4} and an organic additive, dimethyldithiocarbamic acid ester sodium salt (DAESA). DAESA in plating electrolytes had an accelerating effect and reduced the surface roughness of plated cobalt thin films. We obtained void-free cobalt nanowires when the plating current density was 6.25 mA/cm{sup 2} and DAESA concentration was 1 mL/L.

  11. EDITORIAL: Nanowires for energy Nanowires for energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPierre, Ray; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2012-05-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology focuses on studies illustrating the application of nanowires for energy including solar cells, efficient lighting and water splitting. Over the next three decades, nanotechnology will make significant contributions towards meeting the increased energy needs of the planet, now known as the TeraWatt challenge. Nanowires in particular are poised to contribute significantly in this development as presented in the review by Hiralal et al [1]. Nanowires exhibit light trapping properties that can act as a broadband anti-reflection coating to enhance the efficiency of solar cells. In this issue, Li et al [2] and Wang et al [3] present the optical properties of silicon nanowire and nanocone arrays. In addition to enhanced optical properties, core-shell nanowires also have the potential for efficient charge carrier collection across the nanowire diameter as presented in the contribution by Yu et al [4] for radial junction a-Si solar cells. Hybrid approaches that combine organic and inorganic materials also have potential for high efficiency photovoltaics. A Si-based hybrid solar cell is presented by Zhang et al [5] with a photoconversion efficiency of over 7%. The quintessential example of hybrid solar cells is the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) where an organic absorber (dye) coats an inorganic material (typically a ZnO nanostructure). Herman et al [6] present a method of enhancing the efficiency of a DSSC by increasing the hetero-interfacial area with a unique hierarchical weeping willow ZnO structure. The increased surface area allows for higher dye loading, light harvesting, and reduced charge recombination through direct conduction along the ZnO branches. Another unique ZnO growth method is presented by Calestani et al [7] using a solution-free and catalyst-free approach by pulsed electron deposition (PED). Nanowires can also make more efficient use of electrical power. Light emitting diodes, for example, will eventually become the

  12. Magnetron sputtering synthesis of large area well-ordered boron nanowire arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO; Limin; ZHANG; Ze; WANG; Wenkui

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensionally nanostructured materials, such as nanowires and nanotubes, are the smallest dimensional structures for efficient transport of electrons and excitons, and are therefore critical building blocks for nanoscale electronic and mechanical devices. In this paper, boron nanowires with uniform diameters from 20 to 80nm were synthesized by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering of pure boron powder and B2O3 powder mixtures in argon atmosphere. The boron nanowires produced stand vertically on the substrate surface to form well-ordered arrays over large areas with selforganized arrangements without involvement of any template and patterned catalyst. The high-density boron nanowires are parallel to each other and well distributed, forming highly ordered and uniform arrays. A more interesting and unique feature of the boron nanowires is that most of their tips are flat rather than hemispherical in morphologies.Detailed studies on its structure and composition indicate that boron nanowires are amorphous. Boron nanowire appears as a new member in the family of one-dimensional nanostructures. Considering the unique properties of boron-rich solids and other nanostructures, it is reasonable to expect that the boron nanowires will display some exceptional and interesting properties. A vapor-cluster-solid (VCS) mechanism was proposed to explain the growth of boron nanowires based on our experimental observations.

  13. Indium Arsenide Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal

    This thesis is about growth of Au-assisted and self-assisted InAs nanowires (NWs). The wires are synthesized using a solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system and characterized with several techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ...

  14. Aging of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Osadnik, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    Organic semiconductors formed by epitaxial growth from small molecules such as the para-phenylenes or squaraines promise a vast application potential as the active ingredient in electric and optoelectronic devices. Their self-organization into organic nanowires or "nanofibers" adds a peculiar...

  15. Fabrication of ultrahigh-density nanowires by electrochemical nanolithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hongquan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An approach has been developed to produce silver nanoparticles (AgNPs rapidly on semiconductor wafers using electrochemical deposition. The closely packed AgNPs have a density of up to 1.4 × 1011 cm-2 with good size uniformity. AgNPs retain their shape and position on the substrate when used as nanomasks for producing ultrahigh-density vertical nanowire arrays with controllable size, making it a one-step nanolithography technique. We demonstrate this method on Si/SiGe multilayer superlattices using electrochemical nanopatterning and plasma etching to obtain high-density Si/SiGe multilayer superlattice nanowires.

  16. Electric Conductivity of Phosphorus Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Xiang; LI Hui; ZHANG Xue-Qing; LIEW Kim-Meow

    2009-01-01

    We present the structures and electrical transport properties of nanowires made from different strands of phosphorus chains encapsulated in carbon nanotubes. Optimized by density function theory, our results indicate that the conductance spectra reveal an oscillation dependence on the size of wires. It can be seen from the density of states and current-voltage curves that the structure of nanowires affects their properties greatly. Among them,the DNA-like double-helical phosphorus nanowire exhibits the distinct characteristic of an approximately linear I - V relationship and has a higher conductance than others. The transport properties of phosphorus nanowires are highly correlated with their microstructures.

  17. Astrocytes Produce IL-19 in Response to Bacterial Challenge and are Sensitive to the Immunosuppressive Effects of this IL-10 Family Member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Ian D.; Chauhan, Vinita S.; Donneyz, Miguel A.; Marriott, Ian

    2014-01-01

    There is growing appreciation that resident glial cells can initiate and/or regulate inflammation following trauma or infection in the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously demonstrated the ability of microglia and astrocytes to respond to bacterial pathogens or their products by rapid production of inflammatory mediators, followed by the production of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)210. IL-19, another member of the IL-10 family of cytokines, has been studied in the context of a number of inflammatory conditions in the periphery and is known to modulate immune cell activity. In the present study, we demonstrate the constitutive and/or inducible expression of IL-19 and its cognate receptor subunits, IL-19Rα and IL-19Rβ (also known as IL-20R1 and IL-20R2, and IL-20RA and IL-20RB), in mouse brain tissue, and by primary murine and human astrocytes. We also provide evidence for the presence of a novel truncated IL-19Rα transcript variant in mouse brain tissue, but not glial cells, that shows reduced expression following bacterial infection. Importantly, IL-19R functionality in GLIA is indicated by the ability of IL-19 to regulate signaling component expression in these cells. Furthermore, while IL-19 itself had no effect on glial cytokine production, IL-19 treatment of bacterially infected or Toll-like receptor ligand stimulated astrocytes significantly attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine production. The bacterially induced production of IL-19 by these resident CNS cells, the constitutive expression of its cognate receptor subunits, and the immunomodulatory effects of this cytokine, suggest a novel mechanism by which astrocytes can regulate CNS inflammation. PMID:24677051

  18. Ice microsphere templating to produce highly porous nanocomposite PLA matrix scaffolds with pores selectively lined by bacterial cellulose nano-whiskers

    OpenAIRE

    Blaker, J. J.; Lee, K-Y; Mantalaris, A.; Bismarck, A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The production of 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering with provision of a controlled nano-topography remains a significant challenge. Here we have combined an ice microsphere templating technique with thermally induced phase separation, and by taking advantage of interactions between hydrophilic and hydrophobic phases, lined the pore walls with bacterial cellulose nano-whiskers. The cryogenic technique we have developed not only allows the decoration of the pore walls of 3...

  19. Nanowire liquid pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian Yu; Lo, Yu-Chieh; Niu, Jun Jie; Kushima, Akihiro; Qian, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Li; Mao, Scott X.; Li, Ju

    2013-04-01

    The ability to form tiny droplets of liquids and control their movements is important in printing or patterning, chemical reactions and biological assays. So far, such nanofluidic capabilities have principally used components such as channels, nozzles or tubes, where a solid encloses the transported liquid. Here, we show that liquids can flow along the outer surface of solid nanowires at a scale of attolitres per second and the process can be directly imaged with in situ transmission electron microscopy. Microscopy videos show that an ionic liquid can be pumped along tin dioxide, silicon or zinc oxide nanowires as a thin precursor film or as beads riding on the precursor film. Theoretical analysis suggests there is a critical film thickness of ~10 nm below which the liquid flows as a flat film and above which it flows as discrete beads. This critical thickness is the result of intermolecular forces between solid and liquid, which compete with liquid surface energy and Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  20. Silicon nanowire transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  1. Bismuth nanowire growth under low deposition rate and its ohmic contact free of interface damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available High quality bismuth (Bi nanowire and its ohmic contact free of interface damage are quite desired for its research and application. In this paper, we propose one new way to prepare high-quality single crystal Bi nanowires at a low deposition rate, by magnetron sputtering method without the assistance of template or catalyst. The slow deposition growth mechanism of Bi nanowire is successfully explained by an anisotropic corner crossing effect, which is very different from existing explanations. A novel approach free of interface damage to ohmic contact of Bi nanowire is proposed and its good electrical conductivity is confirmed by I-V characteristic measurement. Our method provides a quick and convenient way to produce high-quality Bi nanowires and construct ohmic contact for desirable devices.

  2. Suppression of superconductivity in thin Nb nanowires fabricated in the vortex cores of superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Eugene B., E-mail: Gordon.eb@gmail.com [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Semenov Avenue 1, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Bezryadin, Alexey V. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61874 (United States); Karabulin, Alexander V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Semenov Avenue 1, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe Highway 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Matyushenko, Vladimir I. [The Branch of Talrose Institute for Energy Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Semenov Avenue 1/10, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Khodos, Igor I. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High Purity Materials RAS, Institutskaya Street 6, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Laser ablation in superfluid helium allows producing thin nanowires of any metal. • Nb nanowires, about 4 nm in diameter, form in the cores of superfluid vortices. • Our oxide-free Nb nanowires exhibit a quantum superconductor-to-insulator transition. • The insulating behavior in Nb wires is explained in terms of quantum phase slips. • Such nanowires can be used in superconducting phase-slip qubits and transistors. - Abstract: Nanowires of niobium, platinum and indium–lead In{sub 88}Pb{sub 12} alloy with diameters of 4.2, 3.6 and 8 nm, respectively, were grown in quantized vortices of superfluid helium, and the dependences of their resistance on temperature have been studied. Through a detailed comparison of these dependences we present evidence that superconducting niobium wires allow a high rate of quantum phase slip. This phase slippage leads to a phase transition to an insulating state at T → 0.

  3. Nanowires and nanoribbons formed by methylphosphonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archanjo, B S; Carvalho, L A S; Rassa, M; Miquita, D R; de Oliveira, F A C; Cançado, L G; Agero, U; Plentz, F; Cury, L A; Gonzalez, J C; Moreira, R L; Paniago, R; Magalhães-Paniago, R; Neves, B R A

    2007-09-01

    The production and physical properties of nanowires and nanoribbons formed by methylphosphonic acid (MPA)--CH3PO(OH)2--were investigated. These structures are formed on an aluminum coated substrate when immersed in an ethanolic solution of MPA for several days. A careful investigation of the growth conditions resulted in a narrow window of solution concentrations and temperatures for the successful development of nanowires and nanoribbons. Several different techniques were employed to characterize these nanostructures: (1) Photoluminescence experiments showed a strong emission at 2.3 eV (green), which is visible to the naked eye; (2) X-ray diffraction experiments indicated a significant cristalinity, in agreement with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) morphology images, which show organized nano-scale wires and ribbons, (furthermore, AFM-Phase and TEM images also suggest that nanoribbons are formed by well-aligned nanowires); (3) Conductive-AFM experiments revealed an intermediary conductivity for these structures (10(-1)/Ohm x m), which is similar to some intrinsic semiconductors and; (4) finally, Infrared, Raman, and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopies produced information about the contents, structure, and composition of both wires and ribbons. PMID:18019131

  4. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growt

  5. Improving information storage by means of segmented magnetic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisternas, E., E-mail: eduardo.cisternas@gmail.com; Vogel, E.E.

    2015-08-15

    A set of magnetic nanowires trapped in the membrane used to produce them can be employed to inscribe information in the form of sectors of wires with the same ferromagnetic orientation (Cisternas and Vogel, 2013 [1]). However, such a system relays on the shape anisotropy of each nanowire as the stabilizing mechanism avoiding magnetization reversal. Such stabilization mechanism weakens as the size of the nanowires decrease. In the present paper we introduce a way of using segmented nanowires to produce a self-stabilization mechanism based on the fact that interactions among segments of different layers can contribute with negative energies. Then, for some particular geometries it is possible to make this interaction the most important one producing a more stable system with respect to spontaneous magnetization reversal. Such inscribed ferromagnetic sector will then last longer than other ferromagnetic sectors formed by exclusively repelling elements. We make use of available algebraic expressions to calculate the energy contribution of noncoaxial segments. For the coaxial segments a similar expression is developed here and it is applied to real systems. The total interaction energy for all segments in the system is calculated for different geometrical possibilities. Application to two particular symbols (letters T and O) is fully discussed bringing out general aspects that could be applied to other symbols. Projections of this work are finally mentioned. - Highlights: • Information storage on magnetic nanowires trapped in the fabrication membrane. • Calculations of the energy trying to revert the magnetization of the stored patterns. • Self-stabilization mechanism based on interactions of multisegmented nanowire. • Choice of geometrical parameters leads to negative energies allowing stability.

  6. Si nanowire arrays as anodes in Li ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foell, H.; Hartz, H.; Ossei-Wusu, E.; Carstensen, J.; Riemenschneider, O. [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Si nanowires can incorporate large amounts of Li without fracturing and are thus prime candidates for anodes in Li ion batteries. Anodes made from Si nanowires offer a specific capacity per gram more then 10 times larger than the present graphite standard. It is shown how optimized Si nanowire arrays embedded in Cu can be produced in a relatively simple way employing macropore etching in Si followed by chemical etching and Cu galvanic deposition. First tests of these arrays in half-cells and batteries demonstrated a substantially increased capacity, small irreversible losses and cycle stability. In particular more than 60 charge/discharge cycles could be realized without loss of capacity. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Ordered Mesostructured CdS Nanowire Arrays with Rectifying Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Na

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Highly ordered mesoporous CdS nanowire arrays were synthesized by using mesoporous silica as hard template and cadmium xanthate (CdR2 as a single precursor. Upon etching silica, mesoporous CdS nanowire arrays were produced with a yield as high as 93 wt%. The nanowire arrays were characterized by XRD, N2adsorption, TEM, and SEM. The results show that the CdS products replicated from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 hard template possess highly ordered hexagonal mesostructure and fiber-like morphology, analogous to the mother template. The current–voltage characteristics of CdS nanoarrays are strongly nonlinear and asymmetrical, showing rectifying diode-like behavior.

  8. Novel nanotubes and encapsulated nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes, with or without encapsulated material, generated by arcdischarge and electrolytic techniques have been studied. Microcrystals of refractory carbides (i.e. NbC, TaC, MoC), contained in nanotubes and polyhedral particles, produced by arcing electrodes of graphite/metal mixtures, were analysed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray powder diffraction. Encapsulation of MoC was found to give rise to an unusual stable form, namely face-centered-cubic MoC. SQUID measurements indicate that the encapsulated carbides exhibit superconducting transitions at about 10-12 K, thus they differ from carbon nanotubes/nanoparticles which do not superconduct. Four-probe and microwave (contactless) conductivity measurements indicate that most of the analysed samples behave as semiconductors. However, metallic transport was observed in specimens containing single conglomerated carbon nanotube bundles and boron-doped carbon nanotubes. Novel metallic βSn nanowires were produced by electrolysis of graphite electrodes immersed in molten LiCl/SnCl2 mixtures. Prolonged electron irradiation of these nanowiresleads to axial growth and to dynamic transformations. These observations suggest ways in which materials may be modified by microencapsulation and irradiation. (orig.)

  9. X-ray diffraction from single GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermanns, Andreas

    2012-11-12

    In recent years, developments in X-ray focussing optics have allowed to produce highly intense, coherent X-ray beams with spot sizes in the range of 100 nm and below. Together with the development of new experimental stations, X-ray diffraction techniques can now be applied to study single nanometer-sized objects. In the present work, X-ray diffraction is applied to study different aspects of the epitaxial growth of GaAs nanowires. Besides conventional diffraction methods, which employ X-ray beams with dimensions of several tens of {mu}m, special emphasis lies on the use of nanodiffraction methods which allow to study single nanowires in their as-grown state without further preparation. In particular, coherent X-ray diffraction is applied to measure simultaneously the 3-dimensional shape and lattice parameters of GaAs nanowires grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. It is observed that due to a high density of zinc-blende rotational twins within the nanowires, their lattice parameter deviates systematically from the bulk zinc-blende phase. In a second step, the initial stage in the growth of GaAs nanowires on Si (1 1 1) surfaces is studied. This nanowires, obtained by Ga-assisted growth in molecular beam epitaxy, grow predominantly in the cubic zinc-blende structure, but contain inclusions of the hexagonal wurtzite phase close to their bottom interface. Using nanodiffraction methods, the position of the different structural units along the growth axis is determined. Because the GaAs lattice is 4% larger than silicon, these nanowires release their lattice mismatch by the inclusion of dislocations at the interface. Whereas NWs with diameters below 50 nm are free of strain, a rough interface structure in nanowires with diameters above 100 nm prevents a complete plastic relaxation, leading to a residual strain at the interface that decays elastically along the growth direction. Finally, measurements on GaAs-core/InAs-shell nanowire heterostructures are presented

  10. Lattice dislocation in Si nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Taha, H.T. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2009-12-15

    Modified formulas were used to calculate lattice thermal expansion, specific heat and Bulk modulus for Si nanowires with diameters of 115, 56, 37 and 22 nm. From these values and Gruneisen parameter taken from reference, mean lattice volumes were found to be as 20.03 A{sup 3} for the bulk and 23.63, 29.91, 34.69 and 40.46 A{sup 3} for Si nanowire diameters mentioned above, respectively. Their mean bonding length was calculated to be as 0.235 nm for the bulk and 0.248, 0.269, 0.282 and 0.297 nm for the nanowires diameter mentioned above, respectively. By dividing the nanowires diameter on the mean bonding length, number of layers per each nanowire size was found to be as 230, 104, 65 and 37 for the diameters mentioned above, respectively. Lattice dislocations in 22 nm diameter wire were found to be from 0.00324 nm for the 1st central lattice to 0.2579 nm for the last surface lattice. Such dislocation was smaller for larger wire diameters. Dislocation concentration found to change in Si nanowires according to the proportionalities of surface thickness to nanowire radius ratios.

  11. Optimization of culture conditions of producing bacterial cellulose utilizing starch wastewater%淀粉废水发酵产细菌纤维素发酵条件的优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐伟; 张妍; 傅徐阳

    2012-01-01

    The culture conditions of Gluconacetobacter xylinus producing bacterial cellulose utilizing corn starch wastewater(adding glucose 20g/L,corn steep liquor 40g/L,ethanol 150mL/L) were investigated through singlefactor and orthogonal tests. The suitable culture conditions were as follows.liquid level was 80mL in 250mL triangle bottle,pH4.0,inoculation volume was 9% (VN),culture temperature was 28℃ ,the the yield of bacterial cellulose reached the peak(4.41g/L) at this time. The bacterial cellulose was verified by FTIR,SEM was used to observe the surface pattern of bacterial cellulose membrane.%以玉米淀粉废水添加葡萄糖20g/L,玉米浆40班,乙醇150mL/L为发酵基质,采用单因素和正交实验设计对葡糖醋杆菌(Gluconacetobacter xylinus)发酵产细菌纤维素条件进行优化。结果表明,最佳发酵条件为:装液量80mL/250mL,pH4.0,接种量9%(V/V),温度28℃;在此条件下得到细菌纤维素产量为4.41g/L。采用傅立叶转换红外光谱FTIR验证产物为细菌纤维素,并由SEM扫描电镜观察纤维素膜表面形貌。

  12. Magnetic Bloch oscillations in nanowire superlattice rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, D S

    2004-05-14

    The recent growth of semiconductor nanowire superlattices encourages hope that Bloch-like oscillations in such structures formed into rings may soon be observed in the presence of a time-dependent magnetic flux threading the ring. These magnetic Bloch oscillations are a consequence of Faraday's law; the time-dependent flux produces an electromotive force around the ring, thus leading to the Bloch-like oscillations. In the spectroscopic domain, generalized Wannier-Stark states are found that are manifestations of the emf-induced localization of the states.

  13. Superconductivity in nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Bezryadin, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The importance and actuality of nanotechnology is unabated and will be for years to come. A main challenge is to understand the various properties of certain nanostructures, and how to generate structures with specific properties for use in actual applications in Electrical Engineering and Medicine.One of the most important structures are nanowires, in particular superconducting ones. They are highly promising for future electronics, transporting current without resistance and at scales of a few nanometers. To fabricate wires to certain defined standards however, is a major challenge, and so i

  14. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ); Scientific Opinion on the public health risks of bacterial strains producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases and/or AmpC β-lactamases in food and food-producing animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    /or AmpC-producing bacteria related to food-producing animals. Prioritisation is complex, but it is considered that a highly effective control option would be to stop all uses of cephalosporins/systemically active 3rd/4th generation cephalosporins, or to restrict their use (use only allowed under specific......The potential contribution of food-producing animals or foods to public health risks by ESBL and/or AmpC-producing bacteria is related to specific plasmid-mediated ESBL and/or AmpC genes encoded by a number of organisms. The predominant ESBL families encountered are CTX-M, TEM, and SHV...... commonly identified with these genes are Escherichia coli and non-typhoidal Salmonella. ESBL/AmpC transmission is mainly driven by integrons, insertion sequences, transposons and plasmids, some of which are homologous in isolates from both food-production animals and humans. Cefotaxime is used as the drug...

  15. Simple, Inexpensive, and Rapid Approach to Fabricate Cross-Shaped Memristors Using an Inorganic-Nanowire-Digital-Alignment Technique and a One-Step Reduction Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wentao; Lee, Yeongjun; Min, Sung-Yong; Park, Cheolmin; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, scalable, and designable approach to produce a cross-shaped memristor array is demonstrated using an inorganic-nanowire digital-alignment technique and a one-step reduction process. Two-dimensional arrays of perpendicularly aligned, individually conductive Cu-nanowires with a nanometer-scale Cux O layer sandwiched at each cross point are produced. PMID:26585580

  16. Fabrication of 30 nm pitch imprint moulds by frequency doubling for nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the fabrication of 30 nm pitch nanowire array imprint moulds by spatial frequency doubling a 60 nm pitch array generated by electron beam lithography. We have successfully fabricated nanowire arrays at a 30 nm pitch, which is targeted for the year 2020 by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, with an average line-width of 17 nm and a 3σ line width roughness (LWR) of 4.0 nm. In contrast to previously reported procedures, our spatial frequency doubling technique produces electrically isolated nanowires that are appropriate for crossbar circuits

  17. Universal, geometry-driven hydrophobic behaviour of bare metal nanowire clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A parallel array of isolated metal nanowires is expected to be hydrophilic. We show, however, that a clustering of such nanowires brought about by vacuum drying produces a 'dual-scale roughness' and confers a strongly hydrophobic property to the surface. The mean size of the nanowire clusters as well as the contact angle are both found to be related to the wire length, and the critical wire length above which the surface becomes hydrophobic is ∼10 μm. Surface roughness is generally known to enhance water-repellent properties, but this is the first report of roughness-induced hydrophobicity on a bare (uncoated) metallic surface

  18. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  19. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell–nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed. (topical review)

  20. Compressive mechanical behavior of Au nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Yuhua, E-mail: yhwen@xmu.edu.c [Department of Physics, and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 (Canada); Wang Quan, E-mail: q_wang@umanitoba.c [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 (Canada); Liew, Kim Meow [Department of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Zhu Zizhong [Department of Physics, and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2010-06-28

    The structural evolution, deformation mechanism, and failure behavior of Au [001] nanowires with various sizes and slenderness ratios under uniaxial compression have been investigated using molecular dynamics. The results show that the elastic modulus, yield stress, and strain all are dependent on the diameters and slenderness ratios of the nanowires. Buckling behavior is observed in a long nanowire, followed by slips in the {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes. Differences are identified in the failure behavior of a short nanowire and a medium nanowire, although the plastic deformation of both types of nanowire originates from the slips in the {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes.

  1. Compressive mechanical behavior of Au nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural evolution, deformation mechanism, and failure behavior of Au [001] nanowires with various sizes and slenderness ratios under uniaxial compression have been investigated using molecular dynamics. The results show that the elastic modulus, yield stress, and strain all are dependent on the diameters and slenderness ratios of the nanowires. Buckling behavior is observed in a long nanowire, followed by slips in the {111} planes. Differences are identified in the failure behavior of a short nanowire and a medium nanowire, although the plastic deformation of both types of nanowire originates from the slips in the {111} planes.

  2. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alexander S.; Peteu, Serban F.; Ly, James V.; Requicha, Aristides A. G.; Thompson, Mark E.; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-04-01

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 µm, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  3. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Alexander S; Peteu, Serban F; Ly, James V; Requicha, Aristides A G; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou Chongwu [Laboratory for Molecular Robotics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)], E-mail: requicha@usc.edu

    2008-04-23

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 {mu}m, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  4. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alexander S; Peteu, Serban F; Ly, James V; Requicha, Aristides A G; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-04-23

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 µm, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  5. Bacterial Type I Glutamine Synthetase of the Rifamycin SV Producing Actinomycete, Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32, is the Only Enzyme Responsible for Glutamine Synthesis under Physiological Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Tao PENG; Jin WANG; Ting WU; Jian-Qiang HUANG; Jui-Shen CHIAO; Guo-Ping ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    The structural gene for glutamine synthetase, glnA, from Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32 was cloned via screening a genomic library using the analog gene from Streptomyces coelicolor. The clone was functionally verified by complementing for glutamine requirement of an Escherichia coli glnA null mutant under the control of a lac promoter. Sequence analysis showed an open reading frame encoding a protein of466 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence bears significant homologies to other bacterial type I glutamine synthetases, specifically, 71% and 72% identical to the enzymes of S. coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively. Disruption of this glnA gene in A. mediterranei U32 led to glutamine auxotrophy with no detectable glutamine synthetase activity in vivo. In contrast, the cloned glnA+ gene can complement for both phenotypes in trans. It thus suggested that in A. mediterranei U32, the glnA gene encoding glutamine synthetase is uniquely responsible for in vivo glutamine synthesis under our laboratory defined physiological conditions.

  6. Electric Conductivity of Phosphorus Nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the structures and electrical transport properties of nanowires made from different strands of phosphorus chains encapsulated in carbon nanotubes. Optimized by density function theory, our results indicate that the conductance spectra reveal an oscillation dependence on the size of wires. It can be seen from the density of states and current-voltage curves that the structure of nanowires affects their properties greatly. Among them, the DNA-like double-helical phosphorus nanowire exhibits the distinct characteristic of an approximately linear I – V relationship and has a higher conductance than others. The transport properties of phosphorus nanowires are highly correlated with their microstructures. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of a Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769 Isolate, AY201, Producer of Bacterial Cellulose and Important Model Organism for the Study of Cellulose Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Mehta, Kalpa; Brown, R Malcolm

    2016-08-11

    The cellulose producer and model organism used for the study of cellulose biosynthesis, Gluconacetobacter hansenii AY201, is a variant of G. hansenii ATCC 23769. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of G. hansenii AY201, information which may be utilized to further the research into understanding the genes necessary for cellulose biosynthesis.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769 Isolate, AY201, Producer of Bacterial Cellulose and Important Model Organism for the Study of Cellulose Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kalpa

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose producer and model organism used for the study of cellulose biosynthesis, Gluconacetobacter hansenii AY201, is a variant of G. hansenii ATCC 23769. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of G. hansenii AY201, information which may be utilized to further the research into understanding the genes necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516506

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of a Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769 Isolate, AY201, Producer of Bacterial Cellulose and Important Model Organism for the Study of Cellulose Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Mehta, Kalpa; Brown, R Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose producer and model organism used for the study of cellulose biosynthesis, Gluconacetobacter hansenii AY201, is a variant of G. hansenii ATCC 23769. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of G. hansenii AY201, information which may be utilized to further the research into understanding the genes necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516506

  10. Synthesis of FAEEs from glycerol in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae using endogenously produced ethanol by heterologous expression of an unspecific bacterial acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyung Ok; Jung, Ju; Kim, Seung Wook; Park, Chul Hwan; Han, Sung Ok

    2012-01-01

    The high price of petroleum-based diesel fuel has led to the development of alternative fuels, such as ethanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically engineered to utilize glycerol as a substrate for ethanol production. For the synthesis of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) by engineered S. cerevisiae that utilize glycerol as substrate, heterologous expression of an unspecific acyltransferase from Acinetobacter baylyi with glycerol utilizing genes was established. As a result, the engineered YPH499 (pGcyaDak, pGupWs-DgaTCas) strain produced 0.24 g/L FAEEs using endogenous ethanol produced from glycerol. And this study also demonstrated the possibility of increasing FAEE production by enhancing ethanol production by minimizing the synthesis of glycerol. The overall FAEE production in strain YPH499 fps1Δ gpd2Δ (pGcyaDak, pGupWs-DgaTCas) was 2.1-fold more than in YPH499 (pGcyaDak, pGupWs-DgaTCas), with approximately 0.52 g/L FAEEs produced, while nearly 17 g/L of glycerol was consumed. These results clearly indicated that FAEEs were synthesized in engineered S. cerevisiae by esterifying exogenous fatty acids with endogenously produced ethanol from glycerol. This microbial system acts as a platform in applying metabolic engineering that allows the production of FAEEs from cheap and abundant substrates specifically glycerol through the use of endogenous bioethanol.

  11. Oxygen clamps in gold nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Novaes, Frederico D.; da Silva, Antonio J. R.; da Silva, E. Z.; Fazzio, A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate how the insertion of an oxygen atom in an atomically thin gold nanowire can affect its rupture. We find, using ab initio total energy density functional theory calculations, that O atoms when inserted in gold nanowires form not only stable but also very strong bonds, in such a way that they can extract atoms from a stable tip, serving in this way as a clamp that could be used to pull a string of gold atoms.

  12. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth. The huge versatility of this material system (e.g. in size and materials) results in a wide range of potential applications in (opto-)electronics. During the last few years many important proofs...

  13. 细菌纤维素膜对木醋杆菌发酵生产广式米醋的影响%Effect of Bacterial Cellulose Pellicle on Gluconacetobacter xylinus Fermentation Producing Guangdong Rice Vinegar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅亮; 陈思谦; 易九龙; 吴炳鸿

    2012-01-01

    Isolated from a Guangdong rice vinegar factory, the RF4 Gluconacetobacter xylinus is used to produce rice vinegar by surface fermentation. The effect of intact bacterial cellulose peUicle on total acidity in fermentation, the comparison of ADH enzyme activity in the pellicle and liquor, and the influence of inoculation methods on acidity, viscosity and turbidity are researched. The results show that the morphology of bacterial cellulose pellicle is very im- portant to total acidity produced, and the ADH enzyme activity in the bacterial cellulose pellicle is 2.26 x 10-2U/g, 8 times of that in the liquor. The highest acidity achieved when bacterial cellulose pellicle was inoculated with Glu- conacetobacter xylinus, 12 days accompanying and was taken out during the fermentation, resulting in a high yielding of 4.86g/100mL after by low viscosity and turbidity.%以分离自广式米醋生产车间的木醋杆菌RF4(Gluconacetobacter xylinus)为菌种进行表面发酵。研究了发酵过程中细菌纤维素膜对总酸度的影响,纤维素膜内与发酵液中乙醇脱氢酶活性差异,讨论了3种不同接种培养方式对总酸度、黏度及浑浊度的影响。结果表明,纤维素膜完整性对发酵总酸度有重要影响,纤维素膜内乙醇脱氢酶活性是发酵液中的8倍,达2.26×10-2U/g。含木醋杆菌纤维素膜接种并中途取出的接种培养方式总酸度最高,发酵12天后可达4.86 g/100 mL,且黏度及浑浊度都较低。

  14. Analysis of Bacterial Community and Screening and Identification of Enzyme-Producing Bacteria in Intestine of Antheraea pernyi%柞蚕肠道菌群分析及产酶菌的筛选与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹昌瑞; 魏国清; 刘朝良; 朱保建; 王在贵; 杨文静

    2011-01-01

    [目的]研究柞蚕肠道菌群结构及产酶菌,探寻具有新的生理功能的微生物,用于研制微生态制剂,以提高柞蚕生产的叶丝转化率及抗病能力.[方法]采用培养法分离柞树叶饲喂的5龄柞蚕幼虫肠道细菌,通过生理生化特性结合16S rDNA系统发育分析,对其肠道细菌群落类型进行鉴定,采用筛选培养基筛选产纤维素酶、蛋白酶、脂肪酶的菌株.[结果]获得的柞蚕肠道菌有芽孢杆菌、葡萄球菌、肠杆菌,其中以芽孢杆菌为主要菌群.芽孢杆菌是肠道菌中产纤维素酶、蛋白酶的主要菌群;葡萄球菌产蛋白酶能力较弱;肠杆菌不产酶.[结论]柞蚕肠道菌与家蚕肠道菌群结构相似,筛选出的产酶菌活性较高,可以制备微生态制剂用于蚕业生产.%[Objective] The objective of this study is to isolate and identify bacterial community and enzyme-producing bacteria in intestine of Antheraea pernyi larvae and to develop microecological agents for increasing leaf-silk conversation rate and disease resistance. [ Method ] Bacteria were isolated from intestine of fifth instars Antheraea pernyi larvae reared on oak leaves by isolated culture. Intestinal bacterial community was identified according to physiological and biochemical characteristics and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences. Cellulase, protease, lipase-producing strains were screened on selective medium. [Result] The intestinal bacteria isolated from Antheraea pernyi larvae belong to Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Enterobacter. Among them, Bacillus is the main bacteria and the main enzyme-producing bacteria which could produce cellulase and protease, Staphylococcus could produce protease weakly, Enterobacter couldn't produce enzyme. [Conclusion] Intestinal bacteria community of Antheraea pernyi was similar to that of Bombyx mori, which could be developed as microecological agents in sericulture for the enzyme-producing strains exhibiting high activity.

  15. Improvement of electron transport in a ZnSe nanowire by in situ strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain is introduced in a single ZnSe nanowire by compressive stress in situ applied along the axial direction, which controllably bends the nanowire under transmission electron microscope inspection. Meanwhile, the I-V measurement of a single ZnSe nanowire before and after the strain is carried out in order to investigate the influence of strain on the electrical properties of the individual ZnSe nanowire. A remarkable jump of about 100% in current and a reduction of about 30% in threshold voltage are detected when the stress is applied along the longitudinal direction of the nanowire. The advantage of stress-induced strains is to produce both compression and tension simultaneously in a single nanowire, which enhance the electron and hole mobilities and significantly improve the electron transport as a consequence. Narrowing the band gap due to the tensile strain, confirmed by theoretical calculation, is responsible for the reduction of threshold voltage. The stress-induced strains in the ZnSe nanowire are favourable for optimization of the carrier transport.

  16. Do transgenesis and marker-assisted backcross breeding produce substantially equivalent plants? - A comparative study of transgenic and backcross rice carrying bacterial blight resistant gene Xa21

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Lifen; Cao, Yinghao; Xia, Zhihui; Jiang, Guanghuai; Liu, Guozhen; Zhang, Weixiong; Zhai, Wenxue

    2013-01-01

    Background The potential impact of genetically modified (GM) plants on human health has attracted much attention worldwide, and the issue remains controversial. This is in sharp contrast to the broad acceptance of plants produced by breeding through Marker Assisted Backcrossing (MAB). Results Focusing on transcriptome variation and perturbation to signaling pathways, we assessed the molecular and biological aspects of substantial equivalence, a general principle for food safety endorsed by th...

  17. A bacterial symbiont is converted from an inedible producer of beneficial molecules into food by a single mutation in the gacA gene

    OpenAIRE

    Stallforth, Pierre; Brock, Debra A.; Cantley, Alexandra M.; Tian, Xiangjun; Queller, David C; Strassmann, Joan E.; Clardy, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Stable multipartite mutualistic associations require that all partners benefit. We show that a single mutational step is sufficient to turn a symbiotic bacterium from an inedible but host-beneficial secondary metabolite producer into a host food source. The bacteria’s host is a “farmer” clone of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum that carries and disperses bacteria during its spore stage. Associated with the farmer are two strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, only one of which serves a...

  18. Controlling nanowire emission profile using conical taper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    The influence of a conical taper on nanowire light emission is studied. For nanowires with divergent output beams, the introduction of tapers improves the emission profile and increase the collection efficiency of the detection optics....

  19. Gallium-Catalyzed Silicon Oxide Nanowire Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wei Pan; Sheng Dai; Douglas H.Lowndes

    2005-01-01

    Silicon oxide nanowires tend to assemble into various complex morphologies through a metalcatalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth process. This article summarizes our recent efforts in the controlled growth of silicon oxide nanowire assemblies by using molten gallium as the catalyst and silicon wafer,SiO powder, or silane (SiH4) as the silicon sources. Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with morphologies of carrotlike, cometlike, gourdlike, spindlelike, badmintonlike, sandwichlike, etc. were obtained. Although the morphologies of the nanowire assemblies are temperature- and silicon source-dependent, they share similar structural and compositional features: all the assemblies contain a microscale spherical liquid Ga ball and a highly aligned, closely packed amorphous silicon oxide nanowire bunch. The Ga-catalyzed silicon oxide nanowire growth reveals several interesting new nanowire growth phenomena that expand our knowledge of the conventional VLS nanowire growth mechanism.

  20. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes, E.

    2013-12-06

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  1. Semiconducting silicon nanowires for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Coffer, JL

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications have benefited greatly from the increasing interest and research into semiconducting silicon nanowires. Semiconducting Silicon Nanowires for Biomedical Applications reviews the fabrication, properties, and applications of this emerging material. The book begins by reviewing the basics, as well as the growth, characterization, biocompatibility, and surface modification, of semiconducting silicon nanowires. It goes on to focus on silicon nanowires for tissue engineering and delivery applications, including cellular binding and internalization, orthopedic tissue scaffol

  2. Surfactant-Templated Mesoporous Metal Oxide Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Hongmei Luo; Qianglu Lin; Stacy Baber; Mahesh Naalla

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate two approaches to prepare mesoporous metal oxide nanowires by surfactant assembly and nanoconfinement via sol-gel or electrochemical deposition. For example, mesoporous Ta2O5 and zeolite nanowires are prepared by block copolymer Pluronic 123-templated sol-gel method, and mesoporous ZnO nanowires are prepared by electrodeposition in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant, in porous membranes. The morphologies of porous nanowires are studied by sca...

  3. Electrochemical synthesis of highly crystalline copper nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Amandeep [Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002, Punjab (India); Gupta, Tanish; Kumar, Akshay [Department of Nanotechnology, SGGSW University, Fatehgarh Sahib 140406, Punjab (India); Kumar, Sanjeev [Department of Applied Sciences, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Singh, Karamjeet [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala 147002, Punjab (India); Thakur, Anup, E-mail: dranupthakur@gmail.com [Advanced Materials Research Lab, Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002, Punjab (India)

    2015-05-15

    Copper nanowires were fabricated within the pores of anodic alumina template (AAT) by template synthesis method at pH = 2.9. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the structure, morphology and composition of fabricated nanowires. These characterizations revealed that the deposited copper nanowires were highly crystalline in nature, dense and uniform. The crystalline copper nanowires are promising in application of future nanoelectronic devices and circuits.

  4. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  5. Atmospheric pressure plasma produced inside a closed package by a dielectric barrier discharge in Ar/CO2 for bacterial inactivation of biological samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiper, Alina Silvia; Chen, Weifeng; Mejlholm, Ole;

    2011-01-01

    The generation and evaluation of a dielectric barrier discharge produced inside a closed package made of a commercially available packaging film and filled with gas mixtures of Ar/CO2 at atmospheric pressure is reported. The discharge parameters were analysed by electrical measurements and optical...... emission spectroscopy in two modes of operation: trapped gas atmosphere and flowing gas atmosphere. Gas temperature was estimated using the OH(A–X) emission spectrum and the rotational temperature reached a saturation level after a few minutes of plasma running. The rotational temperature was almost three...

  6. Inorganic nanowires applications, properties, and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Meyyappan, M

    2009-01-01

    IntroductionHistorical Perspective Growth TechniquesLiquid-Phase TechniquesVapor-Phase TechniquesBulk Production MethodsFuture Developments Thermodynamic and Kinetic Aspects of Nanowire GrowthThermodynamic Considerations for Vapor-Liquid-Solid GrowthKinetic Considerations of Nanowire Growth Under VLS Growth Modeling of Nanowire GrowthEnergetics of Stable Surface Face

  7. Characterization of Cichopeptins, New Phytotoxic Cyclic Lipodepsipeptides Produced by Pseudomonas cichorii SF1-54 and Their Role in Bacterial Midrib Rot Disease of Lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Jui; Pauwelyn, Ellen; Ongena, Marc; Debois, Delphine; Leclère, Valerie; Jacques, Philippe; Bleyaert, Peter; Höfte, Monica

    2015-09-01

    The lettuce midrib rot pathogen Pseudomonas cichorii SF1-54 produces seven bioactive compounds with biosurfactant properties. Two compounds exhibited necrosis-inducing activity on chicory leaves. The structure of the two phytotoxic compounds, named cichopeptin A and B, was tentatively characterized. They are related cyclic lipopeptides composed of an unsaturated C12-fatty acid chain linked to the N-terminus of a 22-amino acid peptide moiety. Cichopeptin B differs from cichopeptin A only in the last C-terminal amino acid residue, which is probably Val instead of Leu/Ile. Based on peptide sequence similarity, cichopeptins are new cyclic lipopeptides related to corpeptin, produced by the tomato pathogen Pseudomonas corrugata. Production of cichopeptin is stimulated by glycine betaine but not by choline, an upstream precursor of glycine betaine. Furthermore, a gene cluster encoding cichopeptin synthethases, cipABCDEF, is responsible for cichopeptin biosynthesis. A cipA-deletion mutant exhibited significantly less virulence and rotten midribs than the parental strain upon spray inoculation on lettuce. However, the parental and mutant strains multiplied in lettuce leaves at a similar rate. These results demonstrate that cichopeptins contribute to virulence of P. cichorii SF1-54 on lettuce. PMID:25961750

  8. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chin-Guo; Chang, Ho; Wang, Jian-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn) into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA.

  9. The influence of H2O2 concentration to the structure of silicon nanowire growth by metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hafsa; Jani, Abdul Mutalib Md.; Rusop, Mohamad; Abdullah, Saifollah

    2016-07-01

    A simple and low cost method to produce well aligned silicon nanowires at large areas using Ag-assisted chemical etching at room temperature were presented. The structure of silicon nanowires growth by metal-assisted chemical etching was observed. Prior to the etching, the silicon nanowires were prepared by electroless metal deposited (EMD) in solution containing hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide in Teflon vessel. The silver particle was deposited on substrate by immersion in hydrofluoric acid and silver nitrate solution for sixty second. The silicon nanowires were growth in different hydrogen peroxide concentration which are 0.3M, 0.4M, 0.5M and 0.6M and 0.7M.The influence of hydrogen peroxide concentration to the formation of silicon nanowires was studied. The morphological properties of silicon nanowires were investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS).

  10. ZrTiO4 nanowire growth using membrane-assisted Pechini route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. de Lucena

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The high surface-to-volume ratio of nanowires makes them natural competitors as new device components. In this regard, a current major challenge is to produce quasi-one-dimensional nanostructures composed of well established oxide-based materials. This article reports the synthesis of ZrTiO4 nanowires on a silicon (100 wafer in a single-step deposition/thermal treatment. The template-directed membrane synthesis strategy was associated with the Pechini route and spin-coating deposition technique. ZrTiO4 nanowires were obtained at 700 ˚C with diameters in the range of 80-100 nm. FEG- SEM images were obtained to investigate ZrTiO4 nanowire formation on the silicon surface and energy dispersive x-ray detection (EDS and x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses were performed to confirm the oxide composition and structure.

  11. In-plane trapping and manipulation of ZnO nanowires by a hybrid plasmonic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lichao; Dou, Xiujie; Min, Changjun; Zhang, Yuquan; Du, Luping; Xie, Zhenwei; Shen, Junfeng; Zeng, Yujia; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2016-05-01

    In general, when a semiconductor nanowire is trapped by conventional laser beam tweezers, it tends to be aligned with the trapping beam axis rather than confined in the horizontal plane, and this limits the application of these nanowires in many in-plane nanoscale optoelectronic devices. In this work, we achieve the in-plane trapping and manipulation of a single ZnO nanowire by a hybrid plasmonic tweezer system on a flat metal surface. The gap between the nanowire and the metallic substrate leads to an enhanced gradient force caused by deep subwavelength optical energy confinement. As a result, the nanowire can be securely trapped in-plane at the center of the excited surface plasmon polariton field, and can also be dynamically moved and rotated by varying the position and polarization direction of the incident laser beam, which cannot be performed using conventional optical tweezers. The theoretical results show that the focused plasmonic field induces a strong in-plane trapping force and a high rotational torque on the nanowire, while the focused optical field produces a vertical trapping force to produce the upright alignment of the nanowire; this is in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, some typical ZnO nanowire structures are built based on this technique, which thus further confirms the potential of this method for precise manipulation of components during the production of nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices.In general, when a semiconductor nanowire is trapped by conventional laser beam tweezers, it tends to be aligned with the trapping beam axis rather than confined in the horizontal plane, and this limits the application of these nanowires in many in-plane nanoscale optoelectronic devices. In this work, we achieve the in-plane trapping and manipulation of a single ZnO nanowire by a hybrid plasmonic tweezer system on a flat metal surface. The gap between the nanowire and the metallic substrate leads to an enhanced gradient force

  12. Arrays of TiO2 Nanowires as Photoelectrochemical Sensors for Hydrazine Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ongaro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrodes based on arrays of TiO2 nanowires were prepared by template sol-gel synthesis with the goal of developing a hydrazine photoelectrochemical sensor. Experimental conditions were chosen so that the gelation reaction occurred inside the nanopores of track-etched polycarbonate membranes, with consequent filling with TiO2 nanowires. Different procedures for the removal of the template were examined, in order to obtain arrays of self-standing TiO2 nanowires. The nanowire arrays were bound to fluorine doped tin oxide substrates to produce handy photoelectrodes. The photocurrent recorded with the photoelectrodes in the presence of hydrazine showed significant dependence on the pollutant concentration. The development of a photoelectrochemical sensor for hydrazine detection in water samples, based on this principle, is presented.

  13. Length distributions of Au-catalyzed and In-catalyzed InAs nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Sibirev, N. V.; Berdnikov, Y.; Gomes, U. P.; Ercolani, D.; Zannier, V.; Sorba, L.

    2016-09-01

    We present experimental data on the length distributions of InAs nanowires grown by chemical beam epitaxy with Au catalyst nanoparticles obtained by thermal dewetting of Au film, Au colloidal nanoparticles and In droplets. Poissonian length distributions are observed in the first case. Au colloidal nanoparticles produce broader and asymmetric length distributions of InAs nanowires. However, the distributions can be strongly narrowed by removing the high temperature annealing step. The length distributions for the In-catalyzed growth are instead very broad. We develop a generic model that is capable of describing the observed behaviors by accounting for both the incubation time for nanowire growth and secondary nucleation of In droplets. These results allow us to formulate some general recipes for obtaining more uniform length distributions of III-V nanowires.

  14. Fabrication of CdS nanowires with increasing anionic precursor by SILAR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dariani, R. S.; Salehi, F.

    2016-05-01

    CdS nanowires were fabricated on glass substrate at room temperature by SILAR method with cadmium nitrate cationic and sodium sulfide anionic precursors. The deposition were done at different S:Cd concentration ratios of 1:1, 3:1, 5:1, and 7:1. Nanowires growth procedure was studied in the mentioned concentrations. The number of immersion cycles was kept constant at 15 cycles. EDX analysis showed that in all stoichiometric ratios, S/Cd composition ratio remains at about unity. Our results indicated that S:Cd concentration ratio of 7:1 had the longest nanowires with hexagonal structure. The main objective of this paper was to produce CdS nanowires with increasing concentration of sulfur.

  15. Silicon nanowires made via macropore etching for superior Li ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossei-Wusu, Emmanuel; Cojocaru, Ala; Hartz, Hauke; Carstensen, Juergen; Foell, Helmut [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Kaiserstrasse 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    The future of electro mobility depends critically on substantially improved Li ion batteries. Si as anode material has a more than tenfold higher capacity as compared to the standard graphite anode, but needs to be nanostructured to avoid fracture. It is shown that macropore etching combined with suitable follow-up processes allows to produce nanowire arrays with optimized geometries. First tests of these anodes showed very promising results with respect to prime battery parameters like capacity and capacity losses during cycling. In particular, a first test battery showed superior performance for more than 60 cycles in comparison to an otherwise identical battery with a graphite anode. Critical processes like galvanic Cu deposition at the nanowire bottom can be avoided by using an optimized pore etching process that produces complex pore diameter profiles as a function of depth, allowing easy separation of the nanowire layer from the Si substrate and processing the nanowire surface area. In total, the production of Si nanowire anodes using this improved process should allow mass production at competitive costs. Si nanowire array for use as a high-capacity anode in a Li ion battery. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Plasmonic Properties of Vertically Aligned Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanowires (NWs/Ag sheath composites were produced to investigate plasmonic coupling between vertically aligned NWs for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS applications. In this investigation, two types of vertical NW arrays were studied; those of ZnO NWs grown on nanosphere lithography patterned sapphire substrate via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS mechanism and Si NW arrays produced by wet chemical etching. Both types of vertical NW arrays were coated with a thin layer of silver by electroless silver plating for SERS enhancement studies. The experimental results show extremely strong SERS signals due to plasmonic coupling between the NWs, which was verified by COMSOL electric field simulations. We also compared the SERS enhancement intensity of aligned and random ZnO NWs, indicating that the aligned NWs show much stronger and repeatable SERS signal than those grown in nonaligned geometries.

  17. A small scale study on the effects of oral administration of the β-glucan produced by Aureobasidium pullulans on milk quality and cytokine expressions of Holstein cows, and on bacterial flora in the intestines of Japanese black calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchiyama Hirofumi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The β–(1 → 3,(1 → 6-D-glucan extracellularly produced by Aureobasidium pullulans exhibits immunomodulatory activity, and is used for health supplements. To examine the effects of oral administration of the β–(1 → 3,(1 → 6-D-glucan to domestic animals, a small scale study was conducted using Holstein cows and newborn Japanese Black calves. Findings Holstein cows of which somatic cell count was less than 3 x 105/ml were orally administered with or without the β-(1 → 3,(1 → 6-D-glucan-enriched A. pullulans cultured fluid (AP-CF for 3 months, and the properties of milk and serum cytokine expression were monitored. Somatic cell counts were not significantly changed by oral administration of AP-CF, whereas the concentration of solid non fat in the milk tended to increase in the AP-CF administered cows. The results of cytokine expression analysis in the serum using ELISA indicate that the expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6 in all cows which were orally administered with AP-CF became slightly lower than that of control cows after the two-month treatment. On the other hand, IL-8 expression tended to indicate a moderately higher level in all treated cows after the three-month administration of AP-CF in comparison with that of the control cows. Peripartum Japanese Black beef cows and their newborn calves were orally administered with AP-CF, and bacterial flora in the intestines of the calves were analyzed by T-RFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. The results suggest that bacterial flora are tendentiously changed by oral administration of AP-CF. Conclusions Our data indicated the possibility that oral administration of the β–(1 → 3,(1 → 6-D- glucan produced by A. pullulans affects cytokine expressions in the serum of Holstein cows, and influences bacterial flora in the intestines of Japanese Black calves. The findings may be

  18. Transfer, composition and technological characterization of the lactic acid bacterial populations of the wooden vats used to produce traditional stretched cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatassa, Maria Luisa; Gaglio, Raimondo; Macaluso, Giusi; Francesca, Nicola; Randazzo, Walter; Cardamone, Cinzia; Di Grigoli, Antonino; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Settanni, Luca

    2015-12-01

    The biofilms of 12 wooden vats used for the production of the traditional stretched cheeses Caciocavallo Palermitano and PDO Vastedda della valle del Belìce were investigated. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes were never detected. Total coliforms were at low numbers with Escherichia coli found only in three vats. Coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) were below the enumeration limit, whereas lactic acid bacteria (LAB) dominated the surfaces of all vats. In general, the dominance was showed by coccus LAB. Enterococci were estimated at high numbers, but usually between 1 and 2 Log cycles lower than other LAB. LAB populations were investigated at species and strain level and for their technological properties relevant in cheese production. Eighty-five strains were analysed by a polyphasic genetic approach and allotted into 16 species within the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus and Streptococcus. Enterococcus faecium was found in all wooden vats and the species most frequently isolated were Enterococcus faecalis, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Pediococcus acidilactici and Streptococcus thermophilus. The study of the quantitative data on acidification rate, autolysis kinetics, diacetyl production, antibacterial compound generation and proteolysis by cluster and principal component analysis led to the identification of some strains with promising dairy characteristics. Interestingly, a consistent percentage of LAB was bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) producer. Thus, the microbial biofilms of the wooden vats analysed in this study might contribute actively to the stability of the final cheeses.

  19. Biodiversity of aerobic endospore-forming bacterial species occurring in Yanyanku and Ikpiru, fermented seeds of Hibiscus sabdariffa used to produce food condiments in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbobatinkpo, Pélagie B; Thorsen, Line; Nielsen, Dennis S; Azokpota, Paulin; Akissoe, Noèl; Hounhouigan, Joseph D; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2013-05-15

    Yanyanku and Ikpiru made by the fermentation of Malcavene bean (Hibiscus sabdariffa) are used as functional additives for Parkia biglobosa seed fermentations in Benin. A total of 355 aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (AEFB) isolated from Yanyanku and Ikpiru produced in northern and southern Benin were identified using phenotypic and genotypic methods, including GTG5-PCR, M13-PCR, 16S rRNA, gyrA and gyrB gene sequencing. Generally, the same 5-6 species of the genus Bacillus predominated: Bacillus subtilis (17-41% of isolates), Bacillus cereus (8-39%), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (9-22%), Bacillus licheniformis (3-26%), Bacillus safensis (8-19%) and Bacillus altitudinis (0-19%). Bacillus aryabhattai, Bacillus flexus, and Bacillus circulans (0-2%), and species of the genera Lysinibacillus (0-14%), Paenibacillus (0-13%), Brevibacillus (0-4%), and Aneurinibacillus (0-3%) occurred sporadically. The diarrheal toxin encoding genes cytK-1, cytK-2, hblA, hblC, and hblD were present in 0%, 91% 15%, 34% and 35% of B. cereus isolates, respectively. 9% of them harbored the emetic toxin genetic determinant, cesB. This study is the first to identify the AEFB of Yanyanku and Ikpiru to species level and perform a safety evaluation based on toxin gene detections. We further suggest, that the gyrA gene can be used for differentiating the closely related species Bacillus pumilus and B. safensis.

  20. Micromagnetic simulations of cylindrical magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2015-05-27

    This chapter reviews micromagnetic simulations of cylindrical magnetic nanowires and their ordered arrays. It starts with a description of the theoretical background of micromagnetism. The chapter discusses main magnetization reversal modes, domain wall types, and state diagrams in cylindrical nanowires of different types and sizes. The results of the hysteresis process in individual nanowires and nanowire arrays also are presented. Modeling results are compared with experimental ones. The chapter also discusses future trends in nanowire applications in relation to simulations, such as current-driven dynamics, spintronics, and spincaloritronics. The main micromagnetic programs are presented and discussed, together with the corresponding links.

  1. Mapping the local structure of nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    The crystallographic and compositional structure of heterostructured semiconductor nanowires has been studied by means of transmission electron microscopy. The native geometry of the studied InP-GaAs nanowires (80-100 nm in diameter) is in general too thick for reliable high-resolution TEM imaging....... Nano Beam Electron Diffraction (NBED) is shown to be a powerful technique to reveal strain near the interface of compositional change in heterostructured semiconductor nanowires. Furthermore, the relative orientation of the nanowires is studied by means of NBED revealing the nanowires to be very...

  2. Gold nanowires and the effect of impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaes Frederico

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMetal nanowires and in particular gold nanowires have received a great deal of attention in the past few years. Experiments on gold nanowires have prompted theory and simulation to help answer questions posed by these studies. Here we present results of computer simulations for the formation, evolution and breaking of very thin Au nanowires. We also discuss the influence of contaminants, such as atoms and small molecules, and their effect on the structural and mechanical properties of these nanowires.

  3. Nonlinear optics with ZnO nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Tobias; Kudyk, Iryna; Wischmeier, Lars; Gutowski, Juergen [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    Second-harmonic generation and two-photon induced photoluminescence from arrays of ZnO nanowires and single nanowires under excitation with femtosecond pulses is experimentally studied. The ratio of relevant components of the nonlinear {chi}{sup (2)} tensor is obtained. The excitation of the nanowire array with femtosecond laser pulses induces significant heating of the free-standing nanowires. The heat distribution is analyzed in phenomenological finite-element studies. Two-photon excitation of a broad internal photoluminescence in single ZnO nanowires is used to perform a single-nanowire transmission experiment. From the transmitted intensity, the band-gap shift in the excited nanowire is obtained. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Electrically Injected UV-Visible Nanowire Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, George T.; Li, Changyi; Li, Qiming; Liu, Sheng; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting -Shan; Chow, Weng W.; Leung, Benjamin; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lu, Tzu-Ming

    2015-09-01

    There is strong interest in minimizing the volume of lasers to enable ultracompact, low-power, coherent light sources. Nanowires represent an ideal candidate for such nanolasers as stand-alone optical cavities and gain media, and optically pumped nanowire lasing has been demonstrated in several semiconductor systems. Electrically injected nanowire lasers are needed to realize actual working devices but have been elusive due to limitations of current methods to address the requirement for nanowire device heterostructures with high material quality, controlled doping and geometry, low optical loss, and efficient carrier injection. In this project we proposed to demonstrate electrically injected single nanowire lasers emitting in the important UV to visible wavelengths. Our approach to simultaneously address these challenges is based on high quality III-nitride nanowire device heterostructures with precisely controlled geometries and strong gain and mode confinement to minimize lasing thresholds, enabled by a unique top-down nanowire fabrication technique.

  5. Semiconductor nanowires and templates for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Xiang

    2009-07-15

    This thesis starts by developing a platform for the organized growth of nanowires directly on a planar substrate. For this, a method to fabricate horizontal porous alumina membranes is studied. The second part of the thesis focuses on the study of nanowires. It starts by the understanding of the growth mechanisms of germanium nanowires and follows by the structural and electrical properties at the single nanowire level. Horizontally aligned porous anodic alumina (PAA) was used as a template for the nanowire synthesis. Three PAA arrangements were studied: - high density membranes - micron-sized fingers - multi-contacts Membranes formed by a high density of nanopores were obtained by anodizing aluminum thin films. Metallic and semiconducting nanowires were synthesized into the PAA structures via DC deposition, pulsed electro-depostion and CVD growth. The presence of gold, copper, indium, nickel, tellurium, and silicon nanowires inside PAA templates was verified by SEM and EDX analysis. Further, room-temperature transport measurements showed that the pores are completely filled till the bottom of the pores. In this dissertation, single crystalline and core-shell germanium nanowires are synthesized using indium and bismuth as catalyst in a chemical vapor deposition procedure with germane (GeH{sub 4}) as growth precursor. A systematic growth study has been performed to obtain high aspect-ratio germanium nanowires. The influence of the growth conditions on the final morphology and the crystalline structure has been determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the case of indium catalyzed germanium nanowires, two different structures were identified: single crystalline and crystalline core-amorphous shell. The preferential growth axis of both kinds of nanowires is along the [110] direction. The occurrence of the two morphologies was found to only depend on the nanowire dimension. In the case of bismuth

  6. Synthesis process of nanowired Al/CuO thermite

    OpenAIRE

    Petrantoni, Marine; Rossi, Carole; Conédéra, Véronique; Bourrier, D.; Alphonse, Pierre; Tenailleau, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Al/CuO nanothermites were fabricated by thermal oxidation of copper layer at 4501C for 5 hand by aluminum thermal evaporation: thermal evaporation allows producing thin layer less than 2 mminsize. The copper has been deposited by electroplating or thermal evaporation depending on the required thickness. The obtained diameter of Al/CuO nanowiresis 150–250nm. Al/CuO nanowires composite were characterized by scanning electronmicroscopy (SEM), X-raydiffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorim...

  7. IL-17A is produced by Th17, gammadelta T cells and other CD4- lymphocytes during infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and has a mild effect in bacterial clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Silke M; Köhler, Gabriele; Holscher, Christoph; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Alber, Gottfried

    2008-09-01

    T(h)17 cells represent a new pro-inflammatory T(h) cell lineage distinct from T(h)1 and T(h)2 cells. T(h)17 cells have been shown to be involved in extracellular bacterial infection but their role in intracellular infection remains unclear. We found antigen-specific IL-17A production during a systemic infection of mice with the facultative intracellular bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) and examined the function and cellular source of IL-17A during the adaptive immune response to S. Enteritidis. Infected IL-17A-/- mice survived completely after inoculation with the highest infection dose found to be sub-lethal for wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. However, at 20 and 80 days post-infection (d.p.i.), we repeatedly found mildly elevated bacterial burden in spleen and liver of IL-17A-/- mice as compared with WT mice. Overall, IL-17A-/- mice showed reduced clearance of S. Enteritidis. S. Enteritidis-specific IL-17A production was induced in splenocytes and lymph node cells of infected WT mice at both time points, 20 and 80 d.p.i. Classical CD4+ T(h)17 cells developed upon infection with Salmonella. CD4- gammadelta TCR+ and CD4- gammadelta TCR- cells were found to be additional IL-17A-producing cell populations. In infected IL-17A-/- mice, a normal T(h)1 cytokine profile was observed consistent with the overall subtle phenotype. Nevertheless, in the absence of IL-17A, recruitment of neutrophils and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactivity was significantly compromised. Our data indicate that IL-17A responses are induced by Salmonella and mildly contribute to protective immunity during S. Enteritidis infection. Thus, IL-17A complements the IL-12/IFN-gamma axis which is essential for protective immunity against salmonellosis in mice and men.

  8. Photoconductive properties of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andzane, J., E-mail: jana.andzane@lu.lv; Kunakova, G.; Erts, D. [Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia); Varghese, J.; Holmes, J. D. [Materials Chemistry and Analysis Group, Department of Chemistry and the Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2015-02-14

    The photoconductive properties of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanowires synthesized inside anodized alumina (AAO) membrane have been characterized as a function of illuminating photon energy between the wavelengths of 500 to 900 nm and at constant illumination intensity of 1–4 μW·cm{sup −2}. Photoconductivity spectra, photocurrent values, photocurrent onset/decay times of individual Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanowires liberated from the AAO membrane were determined and compared with those of arrays of as-produced Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanowires templated inside pores of AAO membrane. The alumina membrane was found to significantly influence the photoconductive properties of the AAO-hosted Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanowires, when compared to liberated from the AAO membrane individual Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanowires, possibly due to charge carrier trapping at the interface between the nanowire surface and the pore walls.

  9. Formation of nanowires via single particle-triggered linear polymerization of solid-state aromatic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horio, Akifumi; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Lakshmi, G B V S; Kumar Avasthi, Devesh; Sugimoto, Masaki; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Seki, Shu

    2016-08-11

    Nanowires occupy a prestigious place in nanoelectronics, nanomechanics, and biomimetics. Although there are notable methods to grow nanowires via self-assembly, there is a key drawback in the need to find out the specific conditions appropriate for each system. In this sense, universal techniques to fabricate such nanowires from various organic materials have been sought for the continued progress of the related research field. Here we report one of the promising and facile methodologies to quantitatively produce nanowires with controlled geometrical parameters. In this method, referred to as "Single Particle-Triggered Linear Polymerization (STLiP)", organic thin films on a supporting substrate were irradiated with high-energy charged particles, accelerated by particle accelerators. Each particle penetrates from the top of the films to the substrate while gradually releasing kinetic energy along its trajectory (ion track), generating reactive intermediates such as radical species that eventually induce propagation reactions. The resulting polymerized products were integrated into nanowires with uniform diameter and length that can be isolated via development with appropriate organic solvents. Considering the widely applicable nature of STLiP to organic materials, the present technique opens a new door for access to a number of functional nanowires and their assembly. PMID:27355341

  10. Tailoring light-matter coupling in semiconductor and hybrid-plasmonic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, Brian; Aspetti, Carlos O.; Cho, Chang-Hee; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2014-08-01

    Understanding interactions between light and matter is central to many fields, providing invaluable insights into the nature of matter. In its own right, a greater understanding of light-matter coupling has allowed for the creation of tailored applications, resulting in a variety of devices such as lasers, switches, sensors, modulators, and detectors. Reduction of optical mode volume is crucial to enhancing light-matter coupling strength, and among solid-state systems, self-assembled semiconductor and hybrid-plasmonic nanowires are amenable to creation of highly-confined optical modes. Following development of unique spectroscopic techniques designed for the nanowire morphology, carefully engineered semiconductor nanowire cavities have recently been tailored to enhance light-matter coupling strength in a manner previously seen in optical microcavities. Much smaller mode volumes in tailored hybrid-plasmonic nanowires have recently allowed for similar breakthroughs, resulting in sub-picosecond excited-state lifetimes and exceptionally high radiative rate enhancement. Here, we review literature on light-matter interactions in semiconductor and hybrid-plasmonic monolithic nanowire optical cavities to highlight recent progress made in tailoring light-matter coupling strengths. Beginning with a discussion of relevant concepts from optical physics, we will discuss how our knowledge of light-matter coupling has evolved with our ability to produce ever-shrinking optical mode volumes, shifting focus from bulk materials to optical microcavities, before moving on to recent results obtained from semiconducting nanowires.

  11. Tailoring light–matter coupling in semiconductor and hybrid-plasmonic nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding interactions between light and matter is central to many fields, providing invaluable insights into the nature of matter. In its own right, a greater understanding of light–matter coupling has allowed for the creation of tailored applications, resulting in a variety of devices such as lasers, switches, sensors, modulators, and detectors. Reduction of optical mode volume is crucial to enhancing light–matter coupling strength, and among solid-state systems, self-assembled semiconductor and hybrid-plasmonic nanowires are amenable to creation of highly-confined optical modes. Following development of unique spectroscopic techniques designed for the nanowire morphology, carefully engineered semiconductor nanowire cavities have recently been tailored to enhance light–matter coupling strength in a manner previously seen in optical microcavities. Much smaller mode volumes in tailored hybrid-plasmonic nanowires have recently allowed for similar breakthroughs, resulting in sub-picosecond excited-state lifetimes and exceptionally high radiative rate enhancement. Here, we review literature on light–matter interactions in semiconductor and hybrid-plasmonic monolithic nanowire optical cavities to highlight recent progress made in tailoring light–matter coupling strengths. Beginning with a discussion of relevant concepts from optical physics, we will discuss how our knowledge of light–matter coupling has evolved with our ability to produce ever-shrinking optical mode volumes, shifting focus from bulk materials to optical microcavities, before moving on to recent results obtained from semiconducting nanowires. (review article)

  12. Effect of diborane on the microstructure of boron-doped silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ling; Lew, Kok-Keong; Redwing, Joan M.; Dickey, Elizabeth C.

    2005-04-01

    Boron-doped silicon (Si) nanowires, with nominal diameters of 80 nm, were grown via the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism using gold (Au) as a catalyst and silane (SiH 4) and diborane (B 2H 6) as precursors. The microstructure of the nanowires was studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. At lower B 2H 6 partial pressure and thus lower doping levels (⩽1×10 18 cm -3), most of the boron-doped Si nanowires exhibited high crystallinity. At higher B 2H 6 partial pressure (˜2×10 19 cm -3 doping level), the majority of the wires exhibited a core-shell structure with an amorphous Si shell (20-30 nm thick) surrounding a crystalline Si core. Au nanoparticles on the outer surface of the nanowires were also observed in structures grown with high B/Si gas ratios. The structural changes are believed to result from an increase in the rate of Si thin-film deposition on the outer surface of the nanowire at high B 2H 6 partial pressure, which produces the amorphous coating and also causes an instability at the liquid/solid interface resulting in a loss of Au during nanowire growth.

  13. High frequency III–V nanowire MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Erik

    2016-09-01

    III–V nanowire transistors are promising candidates for very high frequency electronics applications. The improved electrostatics originating from the gate-all-around geometry allow for more aggressive scaling as compared with planar field-effect transistors, and this can lead to device operation at very high frequencies. The very high mobility possible with In-rich devices can allow very high device performance at low operating voltages. GaN nanowires can take advantage of the large band gap for high voltage operation. In this paper, we review the basic physics and device performance of nanowire field- effect transistors relevant for high frequency performance. First, the geometry of lateral and vertical nanowire field-effect transistors is introduced, with special emphasis on the parasitic capacitances important for nanowire geometries. The basic important high frequency transistor metrics are introduced. Secondly, the scaling properties of gate-all-around nanowire transistors are introduced, based on geometric length scales, demonstrating the scaling possibilities of nanowire transistors. Thirdly, to model nanowire transistor performance, a two-band non-parabolic ballistic transistor model is used to efficiently calculate the current and transconductance as a function of band gap and nanowire size. The intrinsic RF metrics are also estimated. Finally, experimental state-of-the-art nanowire field-effect transistors are reviewed and benchmarked, lateral and vertical transistor geometries are explored, and different fabrication routes are highlighted. Lateral devices have demonstrated operation up to 350 GHz, and vertical devices up to 155 GHz.

  14. High frequency III-V nanowire MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Erik

    2016-09-01

    III-V nanowire transistors are promising candidates for very high frequency electronics applications. The improved electrostatics originating from the gate-all-around geometry allow for more aggressive scaling as compared with planar field-effect transistors, and this can lead to device operation at very high frequencies. The very high mobility possible with In-rich devices can allow very high device performance at low operating voltages. GaN nanowires can take advantage of the large band gap for high voltage operation. In this paper, we review the basic physics and device performance of nanowire field- effect transistors relevant for high frequency performance. First, the geometry of lateral and vertical nanowire field-effect transistors is introduced, with special emphasis on the parasitic capacitances important for nanowire geometries. The basic important high frequency transistor metrics are introduced. Secondly, the scaling properties of gate-all-around nanowire transistors are introduced, based on geometric length scales, demonstrating the scaling possibilities of nanowire transistors. Thirdly, to model nanowire transistor performance, a two-band non-parabolic ballistic transistor model is used to efficiently calculate the current and transconductance as a function of band gap and nanowire size. The intrinsic RF metrics are also estimated. Finally, experimental state-of-the-art nanowire field-effect transistors are reviewed and benchmarked, lateral and vertical transistor geometries are explored, and different fabrication routes are highlighted. Lateral devices have demonstrated operation up to 350 GHz, and vertical devices up to 155 GHz.

  15. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  16. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  17. Surface physics of semiconducting nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Michele; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    Semiconducting nanowires (NWs) are firm candidates for novel nanoelectronic devices and a fruitful playground for fundamental physics. Ultra-thin nanowires, with diameters below 10 nm, present exotic quantum effects due to the confinement of the wave functions, e.g. widening of the electronic band-gap, deepening of the dopant states. However, although several reports of sub-10 nm wires exist to date, the most common NWs have diameters that range from 20 to 200 nm, where these quantum effects are absent or play a very minor role. Yet, the research activity on this field is very intense and these materials still promise to provide an important paradigm shift for the design of emerging electronic devices and different kinds of applications. A legitimate question is then: what makes a nanowire different from bulk systems? The answer is certainly the large surface-to-volume ratio. In this article we discuss the most salient features of surface physics and chemistry in group-IV semiconducting nanowires, focusing mostly on Si NWs. First we review the state-of-the-art of NW growth to achieve a smooth and controlled surface morphology. Next we discuss the importance of a proper surface passivation and its role on the NW electronic properties. Finally, stressing the importance of a large surface-to-volume ratio and emphasizing the fact that in a NW the surface is where most of the action takes place, we discuss molecular sensing and molecular doping.

  18. Photonic nanowires for quantum optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munsch, M.; Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.;

    Photonic nanowires (PWs) are simple dielectric structures for which a very efficient and broadband spontaneous emission (SE) control has been predicted [1]. Recently, a single photon source featuring a record high efficiency was demonstrated using this geometry [2]. Using time-resolved micro-phot...

  19. Optical properties of semiconducting nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, L.K. van

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires of high purity and crystallinity hold promise as building blocks for opto-electronical devices at the nanoscale.. They are commonly grown via a Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism in which metal (nano) droplets collect the semiconductor precursors to form a solution which, whe

  20. Nanowire-based gas sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Yuan, C.A.; Zhang, G.

    2013-01-01

    Gas sensors fabricated with nanowires as the detecting elements are powerful due to their many improved characteristics such as high surface-to-volume ratios, ultrasensitivity, higher selectivity, low power consumption, and fast response. This paper gives an overview on the recent process of the dev

  1. Bacterial Alkaloids Prevent Amoebal Predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapper, Martin; Götze, Sebastian; Barnett, Robert; Willing, Karsten; Stallforth, Pierre

    2016-07-25

    Bacterial defense mechanisms have evolved to protect bacteria against predation by nematodes, predatory bacteria, or amoebae. We identified novel bacterial alkaloids (pyreudiones A-D) that protect the producer, Pseudomonas fluorescens HKI0770, against amoebal predation. Isolation, structure elucidation, total synthesis, and a proposed biosynthetic pathway for these structures are presented. The generation of P. fluorescens gene-deletion mutants unable to produce pyreudiones rendered the bacterium edible to a variety of soil-dwelling amoebae. PMID:27294402

  2. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  3. Polysilicon Nanowires for chemical sensing applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques, Emmanuel; Ni, Liang; Salaun, Anne-Claire; Rogel, Régis; Pichon, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon nanowires are synthesized using a classical fabrication method commonly used in microelectronic industry: the sidewall spacer formation technique. Assets of this technological process rest on low cost lithographic tools use, classical silicon planar technology compatibility and the possibility to get by direct patterning numerous parallel nanowires with precise location on the substrate. Grounded and suspended polycrystalline silicon nanowires with a curvature radius a...

  4. Indium Antimonide Nanowires: Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Penchev, Miroslav Valentinov

    2012-01-01

    Indium Antimonide (InSb) nanowires with a diameter ranging from 30 nm to 200 nm, were synthesized by electrochemical disposition in anodized alumina and polycarbonate porous membranes. In addition, epitaxial single crystalline InSb nanowires with diameters ranging from 5 nm to 100 nm, were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Au nanoparticles as catalyst. Structural and material characterization of InSb nanowires was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy di...

  5. Constricted nanowire with stabilized magnetic domain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiaa, R.; Al Bahri, M.

    2016-08-01

    Domain wall (DW)-based magnetic memory offers the possibility for increasing the storage capacity. However, stability of DW remains the major drawback of this scheme. In this letter, we propose a stepped nanowire for pinning DW in a desirable position. From micromagnetic simulation, the proposed design applied to in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows that by adjusting the nanowire step size and its width it is possible to stabilize DW for a desirable current density range. In contrast, only a movement of DW could be seen for conventional nanowire. An extension to a multi-stepped nanowire could be used for multi-bit per cell magnetic memory.

  6. Electrochemical Preparation of WO_3 Nanowire Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Ordered WO3 nanowires arrays have been fabricated by electrochemical deposition with anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates and annealing the W nanowire arrays in air at 400 ℃. The morphology and the chemical composition of WO3 nanowires arrays were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM),Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the diameters of the WO3 nanowires are about 90 nm, which is in go...

  7. Surfactant-Templated Mesoporous Metal Oxide Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Luo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate two approaches to prepare mesoporous metal oxide nanowires by surfactant assembly and nanoconfinement via sol-gel or electrochemical deposition. For example, mesoporous Ta2O5 and zeolite nanowires are prepared by block copolymer Pluronic 123-templated sol-gel method, and mesoporous ZnO nanowires are prepared by electrodeposition in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS surfactant, in porous membranes. The morphologies of porous nanowires are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analyses.

  8. Preparation and characterization of haematite nanowire arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, D S; Liu, Q F; Zhang, L Y

    2003-01-01

    Arrays of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanowires embedded in anodic alumina membranes were obtained after heat-treating beta-FeOOH nanowire arrays fabricated by electrochemical deposition. Haematite polycrystalline nanowires with maximum length of about 7 mu m and average diameter of about 120 nm were characterized by means of x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The Morin temperature below 80 K and Neel temperature of about 350 K for the alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanowire arrays, far lower than those of bulk material, were measured by Moessbauer spectroscopy and using a Magnetic Property Measurement System.

  9. Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanowires: synthesis by cyclic electrodeposition/stripping, thinning by electrooxidation, and electrical power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, E J; Brown, M A; Li, Q; Hemminger, J C; Penner, R M

    2006-12-01

    Nanowires composed of the thermoelectric material Bi2Te3 were synthesized on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrodes using the electrochemical step edge decoration (ESED) method. Nanowire synthesis was initiated by applying a voltage pulse of -0.75 V versus SCE for 5 ms to an HOPG electrode in an aqueous solution containing both Bi3+ and TeO22-, thereby producing nuclei at the step edges. Bi2Te3 was electrodeposited onto these nuclei using a cyclic electrodeposition-stripping scheme that involved the electrodeposition of bismuth-rich Bi2Te3 on a negative-going voltammetric scan (to -0.05 V) and the subsequent anodic stripping of excess bismuth from these nanowires during a positive-going scan (to +0.35 V). When this cycle was repeated 10-50 times, Bi2Te3 nanowires in the 100-300-nm-diameter range were obtained. These nanowires were narrowly dispersed in diameter (RSDdia = 10-20%), were more than 100 microm in length, and were organized into parallel arrays containing hundreds of wires. Smaller nanowires, with diameters down to 30 nm, were obtained by electrooxidizing 150-nm-diameter Bi2Te3 nanowires at +0.37 V under conditions of kinetic control. This oxidation process unexpectedly improved the uniformity of Bi2Te3 nanowires, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that these nanowires retain a Bi2Te3 core but also have a thin surface layer composed of Bi and Te oxides. The ability of Bi2Te3 nanowires to generate electrical power was assessed by transferring ensembles of these nanowires onto cyanoacrylate-coated glass surfaces and evaporating 4-point nickel contacts. A dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, ranging from 0 to 0.85 was measured for fresh samples that were less than 1 day old. XPS reveals that Bi2Te3 nanowires are oxidized within a week to Bi2O3 and TeO2. These oxides may interfere with the application by evaporation of electrical contacts to these nanowires.

  10. Laser induced augmentation of silver nanospheres to nanowires in ethanol fostered by Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, Suneetha, E-mail: sunikutty@gmail.com; Linslal, C.L.; Vallabhan, C.P.G.; Nampoori, V.P.N.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Kailasnath, M.

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Silver nanospheres are synthesised in ethanol containing Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone which acts as a polymeric capping agent to nanoparticles thus improving its stability. • Laser irradiation onto the colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles produced well defined nanowires through ripening mechanism promoted by Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone. • Nanowires so formed are having an average length of 8.7 μm and width of 160 nm. - Abstract: Stable uniform silver nanospheres having an average diameter of 45 nm are synthesised in ethanol containing Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone using Laser Ablation in Liquid technique. Further irradiation of the nanocolloidal solution by focussed laser beam produced stable well defined silver nanowires through ripening mechanism fostered by the presence of Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone. Confirmation of the mechanism is obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopic images of the nanocolloidal solution irradiated for different time durations.

  11. 2株纤维素降解细菌处理白酒丢糟的应用特性%Application Characteristics of Two Cellulose-degradation Bacterial Strains in Waste Distiller's Grains from Liquor Producing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游玲; 周黎军; 罗刚; 陈思慧; 王涛

    2014-01-01

    Application features of two bacterial strains (No. G7B-58 and S522B-41) of Bacillus in the fermentation of waste distiller's grains from liquor producing were studied. It's found that the two strains can adapt to the environment of waste distiller's grains, when inoculated in the waste distiller's grains separately, the cellulose of waste distiller's grains reduced by 16.9%and 16.6%, and the protein of waste distiller's grains increased by 35.0%and 39.2%, respectively. In the case of two strains inoculated in the waste distiller's grains together, the cellulose of waste distiller's grains decompose by 21.1%, the protein increased by 41.1%and the acidity reduced by 86%, with significantly reducing of acid, starch and residual sugar at the same time. For the scale of 10 kg waste distiller's grains, inoculated with 2%of the bacterial suspension, and piled up six days was appropriate. The results showed that the strains in the spent grains harmless or Grains fodder production had a good prospect of application. The results showed that the two bacteria strains had a good prospect of application in pollution control of waste distiller's grains and feed industry.%对2株Bacillus属细菌在白酒丢糟中的生长及降解纤维素的情况进行了研究。发现2株菌均可在丢糟中生长良好;分别可使丢糟纤维素降低16.9%及16.6%,蛋白质增加35.0%及39.2%。2株菌等比例混合接种于丢糟(2%接种量,处理10 kg丢糟),堆积6 d后可使丢糟纤维素降解21.1%,蛋白增加41.1%,酸度降低86%;同时丢糟中淀粉、残糖、酸度等指标也有明显降低。结果显示该2株细菌在丢糟饲料生产或丢糟无害化处理方面有很好的应用前景。

  12. 芽孢杆菌动态发酵产细菌纤维素工艺的优化%Optimization of Agitation Fermentation Process of Bacterial Cellulose Pro-duced by Bacillus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱宏阳; 冯珊; 杨宏芳; 李泳宁; 林伟铃

    2015-01-01

    The agitation fermentation process of bacterial cellulose (BC) produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ZF-7 was optimized in this study.The effect of agitation conditions such as rotation speed,medium volume,tempera-ture,inoculum volume and culture time on the production of BC pellets and the yield of 0.5cm~0.8cm BC pellets was investigated.The result showed that the optimal fermentation conditions were as followed:medium volume 70 mL per 250mL flask, inoculum 5%, rotation speed 150r · min-1 , temperature 32℃ and fermentation time 5d.Under these conditions,the yield of 0.5cm~0.8cm BC pellets reached 89.5%,and dry weight was 6.56g· L-1.%以解淀粉芽孢杆菌ZF-7(Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ZF-7)为菌源,对其动态发酵生产细菌纤维素(Bacterial cellulose,BC)的发酵工艺条件进行优化. 利用单因素试验,以粒径为0.5cm~0.8cm的BC颗粒产量及其占总纤维素比率为考察指标,考察摇床转速、装液量、温度、接种量及培养时间对其BC颗粒形成的影响,探索最佳动态发酵工艺. 结果表明:最优培养条件为装液量70mL/250mL三角瓶,接种量5%,150r· min -1 , 32℃振荡培养5d,在此条件下,可获得89.5%的φ0.5cm~0.8cm颗粒状BC,干重为6.56g· L -1.

  13. Resistance of Single Ag Nanowire Junctions and Their Role in the Conductivity of Nanowire Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellew, Allen T; Manning, Hugh G; Gomes da Rocha, Claudia; Ferreira, Mauro S; Boland, John J

    2015-11-24

    Networks of silver nanowires appear set to replace expensive indium tin oxide as the transparent conducting electrode material in next generation devices. The success of this approach depends on optimizing the material conductivity, which until now has largely focused on minimizing the junction resistance between wires. However, there have been no detailed reports on what the junction resistance is, nor is there a known benchmark for the minimum attainable sheet resistance of an optimized network. In this paper, we present junction resistance measurements of individual silver nanowire junctions, producing for the first time a distribution of junction resistance values and conclusively demonstrating that the junction contribution to the overall resistance can be reduced beyond that of the wires through standard processing techniques. We find that this distribution shows the presence of a small percentage (6%) of high-resistance junctions, and we show how these may impact the performance of network-based materials. Finally, through combining experiment with a rigorous model, we demonstrate the important role played by the network skeleton and the specific connectivity of the network in determining network performance. PMID:26448205

  14. Indium Tin Oxide@Carbon Core–Shell Nanowire and Jagged Indium Tin Oxide Nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper reports two new indium tin oxide (ITO-based nanostructures, namely ITO@carbon core–shell nanowire and jagged ITO nanowire. The ITO@carbon core–shell nanowires (~50 nm in diameter, 1–5 μm in length, were prepared by a chemical vapor deposition process from commercial ITO nanoparticles. A carbon overlayer (~5–10 in thickness was observed around ITO nanowire core, which was in situ formed by the catalytic decomposition of acetylene gas. This carbon overlayer could be easily removed after calcination in air at an elevated temperature of 700°C, thus forming jagged ITO nanowires (~40–45 nm in diameter. The growth mechanisms of ITO@carbon core–shell nanowire and jagged ITO nanowire were also suggested.

  15. In Situ Study of Noncatalytic Metal Oxide Nanowire Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskas, Simas; Jiang, Hua; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal;

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the nanowire synthesis methods utilize catalyst particles to guide the nanowire geometry. In contrast, catalyst-free methods are attractive for facile fabrication of pure nanowires without the need for catalyst preparation. Nonetheless, how nanowire growth is guided without a cata...

  16. Growth mechanism and quantum confinement effect of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯孙齐; 俞大鹏; 张洪洲; 白志刚; 丁彧; 杭青岭; 邹英华; 王晶晶

    1999-01-01

    The methods for synthesizing one-dimensional Si nanowires with controlled diameter are introduced. The mechanism for the growth of Si nanowires and the growth model for different morphologies of Si nanowires are described, and the quantum confinement effect of the Si nanowires is presented.

  17. Controlled growth of single nanowires within a supported alumina template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlad, A [Unite de Dispositifs Integres et Circuits Electroniques, Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Place de Levant, 3, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Matefi-Tempfli, M [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux, UCL, Place Croix du Sud, 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Faniel, S [Unite de Dispositifs Integres et Circuits Electroniques, Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Place de Levant, 3, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Bayot, V [Unite de Dispositifs Integres et Circuits Electroniques, Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Place de Levant, 3, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Melinte, S [Unite de Dispositifs Integres et Circuits Electroniques, Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Place de Levant, 3, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Piraux, L [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux, UCL, Place Croix du Sud, 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Matefi-Tempfli, S [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux, UCL, Place Croix du Sud, 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2006-10-14

    A simple technique for fabricating single nanowires with well-defined position is presented. The process implies the use of a silicon nitride mask for selective electrochemical growth of the nanowires in a porous alumina template. We show that this method allows the realization of complex nanowire patterns as well as arrays of single nanowires with a precise position and spacing.

  18. Controlled growth of single nanowires within a supported alumina template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Faniel, S.; Bayot, V.; Melinte, S.; Piraux, L.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, S.

    2006-10-01

    A simple technique for fabricating single nanowires with well-defined position is presented. The process implies the use of a silicon nitride mask for selective electrochemical growth of the nanowires in a porous alumina template. We show that this method allows the realization of complex nanowire patterns as well as arrays of single nanowires with a precise position and spacing.

  19. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...... with microelectronic processes make it an ideal candidate for further integration into large-scale fabrication of various nanowire-based devices. © 2009 Springer-Verlag....

  20. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  1. Nanowire-based Quantum Photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Bulgarini, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis work, I studied individual quantum dots embedded in one-dimensional nanostructures called nanowires. Amongst the effects given by the nanometric dimensions, quantum dots enable the generation of single light particles: photons. Single photon emitters and detectors are central building blocks of future communication technologies. As the miniaturization in electronics is driving towards the quantum limit, we envision future telecommunication as based on single photons. Single pho...

  2. Nanowire sensors and arrays for chemical/biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Minhee; Lee, Choonsup; Vasquez, Richard P.; Ramanathan, K.; Bangar, M. A.; Chen, W.; Mulchandan, A.; Myung, N. V.

    2005-01-01

    We report electrochemical growth of single nanowire based sensors using e-beam patterned electrolyte channels, potentially enabling the controlled fabrication of individually addressable high density arrays. The electrodeposition technique results in nanowires with controlled dimensions, positions, alignments, and chemical compositions. Using this technique, we have fabricated single palladium nanowires with diameters ranging between 75 nm and 300 nm and conducting polymer nanowires (polypyrrole and polyaniline) with diameters between 100 nm and 200 nm. Using these single nanowires, we have successfully demonstrated gas sensing with Pd nanowires and pH sensing with polypirrole nanowires.

  3. Oxide-assisted Synthesis and Properties of Semiconductor Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee S. T.

    2001-01-01

    @@ We introduce a new synthetic approach, called oxide-assisted growth method, which can produce bulk-quantity synthesis of high-purity (no metal contamination) onedimensional semiconductor nanomaterials. In contrast to the conventional metalcatalyst VLS approach, the oxide-assisted growth method uses oxides instead of metal catalysis in a laser ablation, thermal evaporation or CVD process. Using this new approach, we have synthesized various high-purity, one-dimensional semiconductor nanomaterials, including nanowires of Si, Ge, C, SiC, Si3N4, GaN, GaAs, GaP and CdS. Notably, silicon nanomaterials of controlled diameter, desired orientation or pattern, and morphologies (wire, chain, ribbons, cable) are attainable. We have characterized the morphology, microstructure, and optical and field-emission properties of silicon nanowires. The atomic structure and electronic properties of Si nanowires have been measured by STM and STS, which are correlated to the transport measurements. The effect of quantum confinement has been manifested. The results are important for developing nanoelectronic devices and offer exciting opportunities for research and applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  4. Oxide-assisted Synthesis and Properties of Semiconductor Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee; S.; T.

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a new synthetic approach, called oxide-assisted growth method, which can produce bulk-quantity synthesis of high-purity (no metal contamination) onedimensional semiconductor nanomaterials. In contrast to the conventional metalcatalyst VLS approach, the oxide-assisted growth method uses oxides instead of metal catalysis in a laser ablation, thermal evaporation or CVD process. Using this new approach, we have synthesized various high-purity, one-dimensional semiconductor nanomaterials, including nanowires of Si, Ge, C, SiC, Si3N4, GaN, GaAs, GaP and CdS. Notably, silicon nanomaterials of controlled diameter, desired orientation or pattern, and morphologies (wire, chain, ribbons, cable) are attainable. We have characterized the morphology, microstructure, and optical and field-emission properties of silicon nanowires. The atomic structure and electronic properties of Si nanowires have been measured by STM and STS, which are correlated to the transport measurements. The effect of quantum confinement has been manifested. The results are important for developing nanoelectronic devices and offer exciting opportunities for research and applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.  ……

  5. Investigation of functionalized silicon nanowires by self-assembled monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemed, Nofar Mintz; Convertino, Annalisa; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2016-03-01

    The functionalization using self assembled monolayer (SAM) of silicon nanowires (SiNW) fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is reported here. The SAM is being utilized as the first building block in the functionalization process. The morphology of the SiNW comprises a polycrystalline core wrapped by an hydrogenated amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) shell. Since most of the available methods for SAM verification and characterization are suitable only for flat substrates; therefore, in addition to the SiNW α-Si:H on flat samples were produced in the same system as the SiNWs. First we confirmed the SAM's presence on the flat α-Si:H samples using the following methods: contact angle measurement to determine the change in surface energy; atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine uniformity and molecular coverage. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) were performed to measure SAM layer thickness and density. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was applied to study the chemical states of the surface. Next, SiNW/SAM were tested by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and the results were compared to α-Si:H/SAM. The SAM electrical coverage on SiNW and α-Si:H was found to be ∼37% and ∼65 ± 3%, respectively. A model, based on transmission line theory for the nanowires is presented to explain the disparity in results between the nanowires and flat surface of the same materials.

  6. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector. PMID:27417510

  7. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector.

  8. Transparent conducting silver nanowire networks

    CERN Document Server

    van de Groep, Jorik; Polman, Albert; 10.1021/nl301045a

    2013-01-01

    We present a transparent conducting electrode composed of a periodic two-dimensional network of silver nanowires. Networks of Ag nanowires are made with wire diameters of 45-110 nm and pitch of 500, 700 and 1000 nm. Anomalous optical transmission is observed, with an averaged transmission up to 91% for the best transmitting network and sheet resistances as low as 6.5 {\\Omega}/sq for the best conducting network. Our most dilute networks show lower sheet resistance and higher optical transmittance than an 80 nm thick layer of ITO sputtered on glass. By comparing measurements and simulations we identify four distinct physical phenomena that govern the transmission of light through the networks: all related to the excitation of localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons on the wires. The insights given in this paper provide the key guidelines for designing high-transmittance and low-resistance nanowire electrodes for optoelectronic devices, including thin-film solar cells. For these latter, we disc...

  9. 短蛸胃肠道产蛋白酶菌株的筛选及其酶学性质研究%Screening and Enzymatic Property of Protease Producing Bacterial Strains from Octopus Octopus ocellatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉荣; 曲田丽; 金玉兰

    2014-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains were isolated from octopus Octopus ocellatus by casein medium ,in which 4 strains S-1 ,S-2 ,S-3 and S-8 showed high protease activity .The major physical and chemical characteristics of the proteinases were studied in this article .The protease activity of the fermentation liquid was found to be 1289 U/mL in S-1 ,937 U/mL in S-2 ,1222 U/mL in S-3 ,and 885 U/mL in S-8 . The maximal proteases activity was observed at temperature of 30 ℃ for the strains S-1 ,and S-3 ,and at 50 ℃ for the strains S-2 ,and S-8 ,with the optimum pH of 8 .5 in stain S-1 ,7 .0 in strain S-2 ,8 .0 in S-3 ,and 7 .0 in S-8 .The SDS-PAGE ,substrate casein and active staining confirmed that the main proteases produced by strain S-1 had molecular weights of 149 .6 ,127 .4 and 40 .3 ku ,and the protease molecular mass in strain S-3 showed molecular weights of about 123 .3 ,112 .2 ,71 .6 and 37 .8 ku .The findings suggest that the protease from protease-producing bacterial strains in the octopus was feasible to be isolated due to suitable fermentation condition ,high activity and stability and can be applied to industrial production .%为获得能产生高效蛋白酶的新菌株,应用于洗涤、食品、饲料加工及医药等领域,由短蛸的胃肠道中分离筛选出10种胃肠道菌株,其中4种菌S-1、S-2、S-3和S-8的蛋白酶活性较高,对其产生的蛋白酶进行生化特性的研究。结果显示,这4种菌株发酵产粗酶液的酶活性分别为1289、937、1222、885 U/m L ;S-1和S-3蛋白酶的最佳反应温度为30℃,S-2和S-8为50℃;蛋白酶最佳反应p H值分别为8.5、7.0、8.0和7.0。通过SDS-PAGE测定,并以酪蛋白为底物进行活性染色,发现粗酶溶液活性高的S-1菌株产生的主要蛋白酶分子量分别为149.6、127.4、40.3 ku;S-3菌株产生的主要蛋白酶分子量分别为123.3、112.2、71.6 ku和37.8 ku。研究表明,从短蛸胃肠道中可分离出产

  10. Nanowire sensor, sensor array, and method for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Minhee (Inventor); Myung, Nosang (Inventor); Vasquez, Richard (Inventor); Homer, Margie (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Pin (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar (Inventor); Choi, Daniel (Inventor); Goddard, William (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a nanowire sensor and method for forming the same. More specifically, the nanowire sensor comprises at least one nanowire formed on a substrate, with a sensor receptor disposed on a surface of the nanowire, thereby forming a receptor-coated nanowire. The nanowire sensor can be arranged as a sensor sub-unit comprising a plurality of homogeneously receptor-coated nanowires. A plurality of sensor subunits can be formed to collectively comprise a nanowire sensor array. Each sensor subunit in the nanowire sensor array can be formed to sense a different stimulus, allowing a user to sense a plurality of stimuli. Additionally, each sensor subunit can be formed to sense the same stimuli through different aspects of the stimulus. The sensor array is fabricated through a variety of techniques, such as by creating nanopores on a substrate and electrodepositing nanowires within the nanopores.

  11. Fabrication of a Zinc Aluminum Oxide Nanowire Array Photoelectrode for a Solar Cell Using a High Vacuum Die Casting Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Guo Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc aluminum alloy nanowire was fabricated by the vacuum die casting. Zinc aluminum alloy was melted, injected into nanomold under a hydraulic pressure, and solidified as nanowire shape. Nanomold was prepared by etching aluminum sheet with a purity of 99.7 wt.% in oxalic acid solution. A nanochannel within nanomold had a pore diameter of 80 nm and a thickness of 40 μm. Microstructure and characteristic analysis of the alumina nanomold and zinc-aluminum nanowire were performed by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction analysis, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Zinc aluminum oxide nanowire array was produced using the thermal oxidation method and designed for the photoelectrode application.

  12. High-Performance Single Nanowire Tunnel Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallentin, Jesper; Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate single nanowire tunnel diodes with room temperature peak current densities of up to 329 A/cm(2). Despite the large surface to volume ratio of the type-II InP-GaAs axial heterostructure nanowires, we measure peak to valley current ratios (PVCR) of up to 8.2 at room temperature and 27...

  13. Measurement of light diffusion in ZnO nanowire forests

    CERN Document Server

    Versteegh, Marijn A M; Dijkhuis, Jaap I

    2016-01-01

    Optimum design of efficient nanowire solar cells requires better understanding of light diffusion in a nanowire array. Here we demonstrate that our recently developed ultrafast all-optical shutter can be used to directly measure the dwell time of light in a nanowire array. Our measurements on disordered ZnO nanowire arrays, "nanowire forests," indicate that the photon mean free path and the dwell time of light can be well predicted from SEM images.

  14. Deflections of Nanowires with Consideration of Surface Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI He; YANG Zhou; ZHANG Yi-Min; WEN Bang-Chun

    2010-01-01

    @@ The elementary beam model is modified to include the surface effects and used to analyze the deflections of nanowires under different boundary conditions.The results show that compared to deflections of nanowires without consideration of surface effects,the surface effects can enlarge or reduce deflections of nanowires,and nanowire buckling occurs under certaJn conditions.This study might be helpful for design of nanowire-based nanoelectromechanical systems.

  15. Electroless Fabrication of Cobalt Alloys Nanowires within Alumina Template

    OpenAIRE

    Nazila Dadvand; Kipouros, Georges J.

    2007-01-01

    A new method of nanowire fabrication based on electroless deposition process is described. The method is novel compared to the current electroless procedure used in making nanowires as it involves growing nanowires from the bottom up. The length of the nanowires was controlled at will simply by adjusting the deposition time. The nanowires were fabricated within the nanopores of an alumina template. It was accomplished by coating one side of the template by a thin layer of palladium in order t...

  16. Synthesis of metal nanowires using nanocracks and DNA-templates and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sathyanarayanan

    A major challenge in the field of nanotechnology is the synthesis and testing of nanostructures, such as nanowires, in a cost effective manner. Currently, there are two general approaches for fabricating nanowires, namely top-down and bottom-up. While the top-down approach that uses nano-lithography is controlled but expensive, the bottom-up approach that uses self-assembly is inexpensive but uncontrolled. This research, describes the mechanism behind an innovative and inexpensive method that combines both the top-down and bottom-up approaches to produce metal nanowires. The method uses cracks in PECVD silicon dioxide thin films on silicon substrate as molds to produce electroless deposited nickel nanowires. The cracks are initiated from voids formed due to nonconformal deposition of oxide on RIE etched trenches in silicon substrate. A model was developed to characterize void formation and the stress response of these oxide films during a thermal ramp, and identify the operating conditions such as film deposit thickness, trench dimensions and annealing temperature for controlled crack pattern formation. The nickel nanowires (50-250 nm wide) are polycrystalline with grain size ranging between 10 to 50 nm. Electrical characterization revealed that the resistivity of these wires decreased 10 times on sintering. However, this resistivity was still twice that of their bulk counterpart. This higher resistivity can be explained by the enhanced scattering of conductive electrons by grain boundaries and phosphorous impurities. An alternate nanowire fabrication technique that simplifies their testing by enabling their direct integration with MEMS test-beds has also been presented. In this approach, commercially available lambda DNA's (16.1 microns long and 2 nm wide) are used as templates to form nanowires of various metals through sputter deposition or evaporation. The test-bed is compatible with commercially available TEM stages for conducting in situ nanostructural

  17. Probing Field Emission from Boron Carbide Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Ji-Fa; GAO Hong-Jun; BAO Li-Hong; WANG Xing-Jun; HUI Chao; LIU Fei; LI Chen; SHEN Cheng-Min; WANG Zong-Li; GU Chang-Zhi

    2008-01-01

    High density boron carbide nanowires are grown by an improved carbon thermal reduction technique. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy lose spectroscopy of the sample show that the synthesized nanowires are B4 C with good crystallization. The field emission measurement for an individual boron nanowire is performed by using a Pt tip installed in the focused ion beam system. A field emission current with enhancement factor of 106 is observed and the evolution process during emission is also carefully studied. Furthermore, a two-step field emission with stable emission current density is found from the high-density nanowire film. Our results together suggest that boron carbide nanowires are promising candidates for electron emission nanodevices.

  18. Synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Teresa J. (Arizona State University); Hsu, Julia W. P.

    2007-11-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid growth process for synthesis of group-IV semiconducting nanowires using silane, germane, disilane and digermane precursor gases has been investigated. The nanowire growth process combines in situ gold seed formation by vapor deposition on atomically clean silicon (111) surfaces, in situ growth from the gaseous precursor(s), and real-time monitoring of nanowire growth as a function of temperature and pressure by a novel optical reflectometry technique. A significant dependence on precursor pressure and growth temperature for the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires is observed, depending on the stability of the specific precursor used. Also, the presence of a nucleation time for the onset of nanowire growth has been found using our new in situ optical reflectometry technique.

  19. Polarization response of nanowires à la carte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadei, Alberto; Llado, Esther Alarcon; Amaduzzi, Francesca; Russo-Averchi, Eleonora; Rüffer, Daniel; Heiss, Martin; Dal Negro, Luca; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to their special interaction with light, semiconductor nanowires have opened new avenues in photonics, quantum optics and solar energy harvesting. One of the major challenges for their full technological deployment has been their strong polarization dependence in light absorption and emission. In the past, metal nanostructures have been shown to have the ability to modify and enhance the light response of nanoscale objects. Here we demonstrate that a hybrid structure formed by GaAs nanowires with a highly dense array of bow-tie antennas is able to modify the polarization response of a nanowire. As a result, the increase in light absorption for transverse polarized light changes the nanowire polarization response, including the polarization response inversion. This work will open a new path towards the widespread implementation of nanowires applications such as in photodetection, solar energy harvesting and light emission. PMID:25564366

  20. Nanowires for thermal energy conversion and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renkun

    This dissertation presents the application of nanowires in two aspects of thermal energy conversion and management: (i) silicon (Si) nanowires as efficient and scalable thermoelectric materials due to the reduced thermal conductivity (k), and (ii) Si and copper (Cu) nanowire arrays for enhanced phase change heat transfer including boiling and evaporation and their applications in thermal management of microelectronics. In the first half of the thesis (chapter 2 and 3), we describe thermal and thermoelectric measurements of individual Si nanowires for studying phonon transport properties and their potential application in thermoelectrics. A theoretical model based on coherent phonon scattering was developed to explain the experiemental data, which suggests that phonon-boundary scattering is highly frequency dependent. For low frequency (long wavelength) phonons, the transport is nearly ballistic, whereas high frequency or short wavelength phonons scatter diffusively at nanowire boundary. The competition between the two phonon transmission regimes results in the unusual linear behavior of the thermal conductance of thin VLS Si nanowires at low temperature. Next, the thermal conductivity of EE Si nanowires, which have much rougher surface compared to VLS nanowires, was measured and found to be five-eight times lower than that of VLS counterparts with similar diameters. The substantial reduction in k is presumably due to the higher surface roughness, since both types of nanowires have single crystalline cores. In particular, for ˜ 50 nm EE Si nanowires etched from 0.1 O-cm B-doped p-Si (˜2 x 1017 cm-3 dopant concentration), the k is around 1.6 Wm-1K-1 and the kL is ˜1.2 Wm-1 K-1 at room temperature, approaching that of amorphous Si. The single nanowire measurements show the great promise of using Si nanowire arrays as high-performance, scalable thermoelectric materials. As the second focus of the thesis (chapter 4 and 5), nanowire arrays were used for enhanced phase

  1. Surface effects on large deflection of nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨帆

    2015-01-01

    Surface effects play an important role in the mechanical behavior of nanosized structural elements owing to the increased ratio of surface area to volume. The surface effects on the large deflection of nanowires were considered. Both geometric nonlinearity in finite deformation and surface effects at nanoscale were taken into account to analyze the bending of nanowires subjected to a concentrated force. For simply supported beams and clamped-clamped beams, the influence of surface effects and geometric nonlinearity were discussed in detail. It is found that both surface effects and geometric nonlinearity tend to decrease the deflection of bending nanowires and thus increase the effective elastic modulus of nanowires. Surface effects yield the size dependent behavior of nanowires.

  2. Superconductive silicon nanowires using gallium beam lithography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Michael David; Jarecki, Robert Leo,

    2014-01-01

    This work was an early career LDRD investigating the idea of using a focused ion beam (FIB) to implant Ga into silicon to create embedded nanowires and/or fully suspended nanowires. The embedded Ga nanowires demonstrated electrical resistivity of 5 m-cm, conductivity down to 4 K, and acts as an Ohmic silicon contact. The suspended nanowires achieved dimensions down to 20 nm x 30 nm x 10 m with large sensitivity to pressure. These structures then performed well as Pirani gauges. Sputtered niobium was also developed in this research for use as a superconductive coating on the nanowire. Oxidation characteristics of Nb were detailed and a technique to place the Nb under tensile stress resulted in the Nb resisting bulk atmospheric oxidation for up to years.

  3. Nanowire-based All Oxide Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang*, Benjamin D. Yuhas and Peidong; Yang, Peidong

    2008-12-07

    We present an all-oxide solar cell fabricated from vertically oriented zinc oxide nanowires and cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solar cell consists of vertically oriented n-type zinc oxide nanowires, surrounded by a film constructed from p-type cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solution-based synthesis of inexpensive and environmentally benign oxide materials in a solar cell would allow for the facile production of large-scale photovoltaic devices. We found that the solar cell performance is enhanced with the addition of an intermediate oxide insulating layer between the nanowires and the nanoparticles. This observation of the important dependence of the shunt resistance on the photovoltaic performance is widely applicable to any nanowire solar cell constructed with the nanowire array in direct contact with one electrode.

  4. Bandgap engineering of GaN nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Bang-Ming; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Yam, Chi-Yung; Xu, Li-Chun; Lau, Woon-Ming; Yan, Hui

    2016-05-01

    Bandgap engineering has been a powerful technique for manipulating the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors. In this work, a systematic investigation of the electronic properties of [0001] GaN nanowires was carried out using the density functional based tight-binding method (DFTB). We studied the effects of geometric structure and uniaxial strain on the electronic properties of GaN nanowires with diameters ranging from 0.8 to 10 nm. Our results show that the band gap of GaN nanowires depends linearly on both the surface to volume ratio (S/V) and tensile strain. The band gap of GaN nanowires increases linearly with S/V, while it decreases linearly with increasing tensile strain. These linear relationships provide an effect way in designing GaN nanowires for their applications in novel nano-devices.

  5. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  6. 产细菌纤维素菌株中间葡糖醋杆菌的分离与发酵条件优化%Isolation and Culture Optimization of Bacterial Cellulose Producing Strain Gluconacetobacter intermedius

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏俊霞; 陆震鸣; 王宗敏; 史劲松; 陆茂林; 许正宏

    2015-01-01

    Five bacterial cellulose (BC) producing strains were isolated from solid -state fermentation cultures of traditional Chinese vinegar,and identified as Gluconacetobacter intermedius based on their physiological and biochemical characteristics as well as 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Strain 1-17 could produce more BC then the others. Furthermore,surface features and chemical structure of BC were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy,respectively. Effects of temperature,time,carbon sources and initial pH on BC production were tested. The optimal temperature for strain 1-17 was 35 ℃, and the fermentation time was 7 d. Glucose and glycerol were the optimal carbon sources,and the optimal initial pH was 6.0. Both lactate and calcium could promote the synthesis of BC. The yield of BC was improved from (3.90±0.08) g/L to (7.90±0.19) g/L under the optimal conditions.%从中国传统固态发酵食醋醋醅中分离出5株产细菌纤维素(BC)的菌株,经生理生化特征及16S rDNA序列分析,它们均属于中间葡糖醋杆菌(Gluconacetobacter intermedius),其中编号为1-17的菌株初始产量较高。应用扫描电镜技术(SEM)和傅里叶红外光谱技术(FT-IR)分析了BC结构特征。采用单因素研究了温度、培养时间、碳源、初始pH对BC合成的影响。确定菌株1-17最适温度为35℃,发酵时间为7 d,甘油和葡萄糖为最适碳源,最适初始pH为6.0,乳酸根离子和钙离子能够促进BC的合成。通过培养条件优化使得细菌纤维素产量从初始的(3.90±0.08) g/L增加到(7.90±0.19) g/L。

  7. Electrospun ZnO Nanowires as Gas Sensors for Ethanol Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Po-Jung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ZnO nanowires were produced using an electrospinning method and used in gas sensors for the detection of ethanol at 220 °C. This electrospinning technique allows the direct placement of ZnO nanowires during their synthesis to bridge the sensor electrodes. An excellent sensitivity of nearly 90% was obtained at a low ethanol concentration of 10 ppm, and the rest obtained at higher ethanol concentrations, up to 600 ppm, all equal to or greater than 90%.

  8. Rapid Hydrothermal Synthesis of Zinc Oxide Nanowires by Annealing Methods on Seed Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Bo Shim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-aligned zinc oxide (ZnO nanowire arrays were successfully synthesized on a glass substrate using the rapid microwave heating process. The ZnO seed layers were produced by spinning the precursor solutions onto the substrate. Among coatings, the ZnO seed layers were annealed at 100°C for 5 minutes to ensure particle adhesion to the glass surface in air, nitrogen, and vacuum atmospheres. The annealing treatment of the ZnO seed layer was most important for achieving the high quality of ZnO nanowire arrays as ZnO seed nanoparticles of larger than 30 nm in diameter evolve into ZnO nanowire arrays. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a single-crystalline lattice of the ZnO nanowires. Because of their low power (140 W, low operating temperatures (90°C, easy fabrication (variable microwave sintering system, and low cost (90% cost reduction compared with gas condensation methods, high quality ZnO nanowires created with the rapid microwave heating process show great promise for use in flexible solar cells and flexible display devices.

  9. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...... biogeochemical processes are carried exclusively by bacteria. * Bacteria play an important role in all types of habitats including some that cannot support eukaryotic life....

  10. Nanowire growth process modeling and reliability models for nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi Aghdam, Faranak

    Nowadays, nanotechnology is becoming an inescapable part of everyday life. The big barrier in front of its rapid growth is our incapability of producing nanoscale materials in a reliable and cost-effective way. In fact, the current yield of nano-devices is very low (around 10 %), which makes fabrications of nano-devices very expensive and uncertain. To overcome this challenge, the first and most important step is to investigate how to control nano-structure synthesis variations. The main directions of reliability research in nanotechnology can be classified either from a material perspective or from a device perspective. The first direction focuses on restructuring materials and/or optimizing process conditions at the nano-level (nanomaterials). The other direction is linked to nano-devices and includes the creation of nano-electronic and electro-mechanical systems at nano-level architectures by taking into account the reliability of future products. In this dissertation, we have investigated two topics on both nano-materials and nano-devices. In the first research work, we have studied the optimization of one of the most important nanowire growth processes using statistical methods. Research on nanowire growth with patterned arrays of catalyst has shown that the wire-to-wire spacing is an important factor affecting the quality of resulting nanowires. To improve the process yield and the length uniformity of fabricated nanowires, it is important to reduce the resource competition between nanowires during the growth process. We have proposed a physical-statistical nanowire-interaction model considering the shadowing effect and shared substrate diffusion area to determine the optimal pitch that would ensure the minimum competition between nanowires. A sigmoid function is used in the model, and the least squares estimation method is used to estimate the model parameters. The estimated model is then used to determine the optimal spatial arrangement of catalyst arrays

  11. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  12. Silver nanowires as catalytic cathodes for stabilizing lithium-oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Won-Jin; Jung, Hun-Gi; Lee, Seon-Hwa; Park, Jin-Bum; Aurbach, Doron; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanowires have been investigated as a catalytic cathode material for lithium-oxygen batteries. Their high aspect ratio contributes to the formation of a corn-shaped layer structure of the poorly crystalline lithium peroxide (Li2O2) nanoparticles produced by oxygen reduction in poly-ether based electrolyte solutions. The nanowire morphology seems to provide the necessary large contact area and facile electron supply for a very effective oxygen reduction reaction. The unique morphology and structure of the Li2O2 deposits and the catalytic nature of the silver nano-wires promote decomposition of Li2O2 at low potentials (below 3.4 V) upon the oxygen evolution. This situation avoids decomposition of the solution species and oxidation of the electrodes during the anodic (charge) reactions, leading to high electrical efficiently of lithium-oxygen batteries.

  13. Development of low temperature technology for the growth of wide band gap semiconductor nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jishiashvili

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In2Ge2O7, Ge3N4, In2O3 and germanium nanowires were synthesized by the developed hydrazine (N2H4-based technology. Annealing of germanium or Ge+In sources in the vapor of N2H4+3 mol.% H2O caused the formation of volatile GeO and In2O molecules in the hot zone. These molecules were transferred to the Si substrate, which was placed in the could zone of a reactor. After interacting with hydrazine decomposition products (NH3, NH2, NH, H2, H and water, Ge3N4 nanowires and nanobelts were produced on the Ge source in the temperature range of 500–520 ºC. The growth temperature of Ge3N4 nanowires in hydrazine vapor was by 350 ºC lower than the temperature reported in the literature. Using In+Ge source the tapered In2O3 nanowires were formed on the Si substrate at 400 ºC. At 420–440 ºC the mixture of In2O3 and Ge nanowires were synthesized, while at 450 ºC In2Ge2O7 nanowires were produced, with InN nanocrystals growing on their stems. The possible chemical reactions for the synthesis of these nanostructures were evaluated. The growth temperatures of both, In2Ge2O7 and InN nanostructures were by 50–150 ºC lower than that, reported in the literature. The results of this work clearly demonstrate the ability of hydrazine vapor to reduce the growth temperature of nitride and oxide nanomaterials.

  14. Production and characterization of nanocomposite thin films based on Ni matrix reinforced with SnO{sub 2} single-crystalline nanowires for electrical contact applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, F.L., E-mail: f.miguel@mx.uni-saarland.de [Saarland University, Functional Materials, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Müller, R. [University of Cologne, Inorganic and Materials Chemistry, 50939 Cologne (Germany); Weinmann, M.; Hempelmann, R. [Saarland University, Physical Chemistry, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Mathur, S. [University of Cologne, Inorganic and Materials Chemistry, 50939 Cologne (Germany); Mücklich, F. [Saarland University, Functional Materials, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Metal-matrix nanocomposites obtained, reinforced by nanowires attached to substrate. • Nanocrystalline matrix in spite of direct-current electrodeposition being used. • Strong influence of SnO{sub 2} nanowires on surface and microstructural properties. • Previous coating of nanowires (with Ag) improved the matrix deposition. - Abstract: Nanocomposite thin films based on electrodeposited Ni matrix reinforced with SnO{sub 2} single-crystalline nanowires grown onto Si substrates by chemical vapor deposition were produced. The composites were characterized by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy (for imaging, selected area diffraction and transmission Kikuchi diffraction), atomic force microscopy (for 3D surface profiling and roughness evaluation) and 4-point probe electrical resistivity measurements. The Ni matrices obtained were nanocrystalline in nature (41 nm crystallite mean size) even though low direct current electrodeposition was used. The topography and roughness of the samples were strongly affected by the presence of the nanowires as so was the electrical resistivity, which could be improved by Ag-coating the nanowires. A comparison with pure Ni produced in the same way is presented for determining the effects of the SnO{sub 2} nanowires.

  15. Review on photonic properties of nanowires for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkapati, S; Jagadish, C

    2016-07-25

    III-V semiconductor nanowires behave as optical antennae because of their shape anisotropy and high refractive index. The antennae like behavior modifies the absorption and emission properties of nanowires compared to planar materials. Nanowires absorb light more efficiently compared to an equivalent volume planar material, leading to higher short circuit current densities. The modified emission from the nanowires has the potential to increase the open circuit voltage from nanowire solar cells compared to planar solar cells. In order to achieve high efficiency nanowire solar cells it is essential to control the surface state density and doping in nanowires. We review the physics of nanowire solar cells and progress made in addressing the surface recombination and doping of nanowires, with emphasis on GaAs and InP materials. PMID:27464182

  16. Review on photonic properties of nanowires for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkapati, S; Jagadish, C

    2016-07-25

    III-V semiconductor nanowires behave as optical antennae because of their shape anisotropy and high refractive index. The antennae like behavior modifies the absorption and emission properties of nanowires compared to planar materials. Nanowires absorb light more efficiently compared to an equivalent volume planar material, leading to higher short circuit current densities. The modified emission from the nanowires has the potential to increase the open circuit voltage from nanowire solar cells compared to planar solar cells. In order to achieve high efficiency nanowire solar cells it is essential to control the surface state density and doping in nanowires. We review the physics of nanowire solar cells and progress made in addressing the surface recombination and doping of nanowires, with emphasis on GaAs and InP materials.

  17. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Michael G.; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  18. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tanner, Michael G; Hadfield, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    We explore optimised control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) through bright illumination. We consider the behaviour of the SNSPD in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching) in long-running quantum key distribution experiments. We propose and demonstrate an effective bright-light attack on this realistic configuration, by applying transient blinding illumination lasting for a fraction of a microsecond and producing several deterministic fake clicks during this time. We show that this attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and is hence not introducing significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  19. Smooth-surface silver nanowire electrode with high conductivity and transparency on functional layer coated flexible film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Hee; Lim, Sooman; Kim, Haekyoung, E-mail: hkkim@ynu.ac.kr

    2015-08-31

    Transparent conductive electrode (TCE) with silver nanowires has been widely studied as an alternative of indium tin oxide for flexible electronic or optical devices such as organic light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. However, it has an issue of surface roughness due to nanowire's intrinsic properties. Here, to achieve a smooth electrode with high conductivity and transmittance on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates, a functional layer of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) is utilized with a mechanical transfer process. The silver nanowire electrode on PVP-coated PET with low surface roughness of 9 nm exhibits the low sheet resistance of 18 Ω □{sup −1} and high transmittance of 87.6%. It is produced by transferring the silver nanowire electrode spin-coated on the glass to PVP-coated PET using a pressure of 10 MPa for 10 min. Silver nanowire electrode on PVP-coated PET demonstrates the stable sheet resistance of 18 Ω □{sup −1} after the mechanical taping test due to strong adhesion between PVP functional layer and silver nanowires. Smooth TCE with silver nanowires could be proposed as a transparent electrode for flexible electronic or optical devices, which consist of thin electrical active layers on TCE. - Highlights: • Silver nanowire (Ag NWs) transparent electrodes were fabricated on flexible film. • Flexible film was coated with poly N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). • PVP layer plays roles as an adhesive layer and matrix in electrode. • Ag NWs electrode exhibited with low surface roughness of 9 nm. • Ag NWs electrode has a low resistance (18 Ω ☐{sup −1}) and high transmittance (87.6%)

  20. Mechanical properties of Silicon Carbide Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Abdullah; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Aston, David Eric

    2004-05-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires could be potentially useful for high strength materials which lead to the interest in understanding their mechanical properties. In this report we use the digital pulse force microscopy to analyze the mechanical properties of SiC nanowires .Stiffness and adhesion images of SiC nanowires on silicon grating were obtained and calibrated force-distance curves were plotted along the wire which spans on a 1.5 micron trench. Moreover, spring constant and Young's modules have been calculated from the linear part of the force-distance curves.

  1. Nanowire-decorated microscale metallic electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Antohe, V.A.;

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of metallic nanowire patterns within anodic alumina oxide (AAO) membranes on top of continuous conducting substrates are discussed. The fabrication protocol is based on the realization of nanowire patterns using supported nanoporous alumina templates (SNAT) prepared on top...... of lithographically defined metallic microelectrodes. The anodization of the aluminum permits electroplating only on top of the metallic electrodes, leading to the nanowire patterns having the same shape as the underlying metallic tracks. The variation in the fabricated structures between the patterned and non...

  2. Semiconductor Nanowires: What's Next?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Peidong; Yan, Ruoxue; Fardy, Melissa

    2010-04-28

    In this perspective, we take a critical look at the research progress within the nanowire community for the past decade. We discuss issues on the discovery of fundamentally new phenomena versus performance benchmarking for many of the nanowire applications. We also notice that both the bottom-up and top-down approaches have played important roles in advancing our fundamental understanding of this new class of nanostructures. Finally we attempt to look into the future and offer our personal opinions on what the future trends will be in nanowire research.

  3. Encoding Active Device Elements at Nanowire Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    No, You-Shin; Gao, Ruixuan; Mankin, Max N; Day, Robert W; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2016-07-13

    Semiconductor nanowires and other one-dimensional materials are attractive for highly sensitive and spatially confined electrical and optical signal detection in biological and physical systems, although it has been difficult to localize active electronic or optoelectronic device function at one end of such one-dimensional structures. Here we report a new nanowire structure in which the material and dopant are modulated specifically at only one end of nanowires to encode an active two-terminal device element. We present a general bottom-up synthetic scheme for these tip-modulated nanowires and illustrate this with the synthesis of nanoscale p-n junctions. Electron microscopy imaging verifies the designed p-Si nanowire core with SiO2 insulating inner shell and n-Si outer shell with clean p-Si/n-Si tip junction. Electrical transport measurements with independent contacts to the p-Si core and n-Si shell exhibited a current rectification behavior through the tip and no detectable current through the SiO2 shell. Electrical measurements also exhibited an n-type response in conductance versus water-gate voltage with pulsed gate experiments yielding a temporal resolution of at least 0.1 ms and ∼90% device sensitivity localized to within 0.5 μm from the nanowire p-n tip. In addition, photocurrent experiments showed an open-circuit voltage of 0.75 V at illumination power of ∼28.1 μW, exhibited linear dependence of photocurrent with respect to incident illumination power with an estimated responsivity up to ∼0.22 A/W, and revealed localized photocurrent generation at the nanowire tip. The tip-modulated concept was further extended to a top-down/bottom-up hybrid approach that enabled large-scale production of vertical tip-modulated nanowires with a final synthetic yield of >75% with >4300 nanowires. Vertical tip-modulated nanowires were fabricated into >50 individually addressable nanowire device arrays showing diode-like current-voltage characteristics. These tip

  4. Functionalization of magnetic nanowires by charged biopolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnin, D.; Callegari, V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan;

    2008-01-01

    We report on a facile method for the preparation of biocompatible and bioactive magnetic nanowires. The method consists of the direct deposition of polysaccharides by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly onto a brush of metallic nanowires; obtained by electrodeposition of the metal within the nanopores...... released by a gentle ultrasonic treatment. Transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-dispersive loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of an homogeneous coating onto the nickel nanowires when one, two, or three CMP/CHI bilayers are deposited. This easy...

  5. Growth and characterization of semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipose, Usha

    This thesis describes a catalytic growth approach to synthesize semiconductor nanowires with good control over their physical dimensions, chemical composition, and optical/electronic properties. Using the Vapour-Liquid-Solid growth mechanism, gold nanoclusters serve as the catalytic sites directing the growth of crystalline Zinc Selenide (ZnSe), Zinc Oxide (ZnO) and Zinc Sulphide (ZnS) nanowires with length of several microns and diameters varying from 15 nm to 100 nm. The morphology and properties of the nanowires were found to be strongly dependent on growth conditions. Optical characterization by photoluminescence spectroscopy show that the spectra is dominated by near band edge emission for low defect density nanowires in contrast to the high level of defect related emission from high defect density nanowires. The growth parameters were optimized leading to the synthesis of nanowires with minimum defect concentration. Electrical transport studies on an array of ZnSe nanowires confirm that there exists a non-uniform carrier distribution along the nanowires leading to 'super-linear' current-voltage behaviour with carrier mobilities comparable to that of bulk material. Photoconductivity measurements on ZnSe nanoribbons show that they are of good quality, enabling realization of a nanoscale photodetector with a peak efficiency of 43%. Spectral response of photoconductivity had a threshold character with edge corresponding to the ZnSe bandgap, which makes it an ideal candidate for blue and ultraviolet light detection. The effect of doping of these nanowires with transition elements such as manganese (Mn) has been studied. In this effort, the first successful attempt at synthesizing room temperature ferromagnetic nanowires has been realized. Above room temperature ferromagnetism has been observed for the first time in dilute Mn-doped crystalline ZnO nanowires. From the observed saturation magnetization, the magnetic moment per Mn atom is estimated to be in the range

  6. Electrodeposited L10 CoPt nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallet, J.; Yu-Zhang, K.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan;

    2005-01-01

    Arrays of face-centred cubic (fee) CoPt (0.45 nanowires were electrodeposited into thin film nanoporous alumina supported on a Si substrate. The heat treatment under specific conditions was then carried out in order to transform the fee phase into the face-centred tetragonal or L1 ordered...... phase. The influence of both the phase transition and the temperature on the magnetic properties of Co Pt nanowires has been studied. Coercive fields higher than 1 T (10kOe) have been obtained at room temperature with ordered nanowires, 80 nm in diameter. © 2005 IOP Publishing Ltd....

  7. Salt flux synthesis of single and bimetallic carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Brian M.; Waetzig, Gregory R.; Clouser, Dale A.; Schmuecker, Samantha M.; Harris, Daniel P.; Stacy, John M.; Duffee, Kyle D.; Wan, Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Metal carbide compounds have a broad range of interesting properties and are some of the hardest and highest melting point compounds known. However, their high melting points force very high reaction temperatures and thus limit the formation of high surface area nanomaterials. To avoid the extreme synthesis temperatures commonly associated with these materials, a new salt flux technique has been employed to reduce reaction temperatures and form these materials in the nanometer regime. Additionally, the use of multiwall carbon nanotubes as a reactant further reduces the diffusion distance and provides a template for the final carbide materials. The metal carbide compounds produced through this low temperature salt flux technique maintain the nanowire morphology of the carbon nanotubes but increase in size to ˜15-20 nm diameter due to the incorporation of metal in the carbon lattice. These nano-carbides not only have nanowire like shape but also have much higher surface areas than traditionally prepared metal carbides. Finally, bimetallic carbides with composition control can be produced with this method by simply using two metal precursors in the reaction. This method provides the ability to produce nano sized metal carbide materials with size, morphology, and composition control and will allow for these compounds to be synthesized and studied in a whole new size and temperature regime.

  8. Biofunctionalization of zinc oxide nanowires for DNA sensory applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolph Bettina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the biofunctionalization of zinc oxide nanowires for the attachment of DNA target molecules on the nanowire surface. With the organosilane glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane acting as a bifunctional linker, amino-modified capture molecule oligonucleotides have been immobilized on the nanowire surface. The dye-marked DNA molecules were detected via fluorescence microscopy, and our results reveal a successful attachment of DNA capture molecules onto the nanowire surface. The electrical field effect induced by the negatively charged attached DNA molecules should be able to control the electrical properties of the nanowires and gives way to a ZnO nanowire-based biosensing device.

  9. Growth of Silicon Nanowires by Heating Si Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢英杰; 奚中和; 俞大鹏; 杭青岭; 严涵斐; 冯孙齐; 薛增泉

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous silicon nanowires were prepared by heating an Si substrate at high temperatures using an Ni (or Au) catalyst. The nanowires have a diameter of 10 - 40nm and a length of up to several tens of micrometres.Unlike the well-known vapour-liquid-solid mechanism, a solid-liquid-solid mechanism appeared to control the nanowire growth. The heating process had a strong influence on the growth of silicon nanowires. It was found that ambient gas was necessary to grow nanowires. This method can be used to prepare other kinds of nanowires.

  10. Coupling of Semiconductor Nanowires with Neurons and Their Interfacial Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhim Hyewhon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the compatibility of various nanowires with hippocampal neurons and the structural study of the neuron–nanowire interface. Si, Ge, SiGe, and GaN nanowires are compatible with hippocampal neurons due to their native oxide, but ZnO nanowires are toxic to neuron due to a release of Zn ion. The interfaces of fixed Si nanowire and hippocampal neuron, cross-sectional samples, were prepared by focused ion beam and observed by transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the processes of neuron were adhered well on the nanowire without cleft.

  11. Direct laser fabrication of nanowires on semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghizadeh, Anahita; Yang, Haeyeon

    2016-03-01

    Periodic nanowires are observed from (001) orientation of Si and GaAs when the surfaces are irradiated interferentially by high power laser pulses. These nanowires are self-assembled and can be strain-free while their period is consistent with interference period. The nanowire morphologies are studied by atomic force microscopy. The observed period between nanowires depends on the wavelengths used and interference angle. The nanowire width increases with laser intensity. The narrowest nanowires observed have the width smaller than 20 nm, which is more than 10 times smaller than the interference period.

  12. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Desheng

    2010-01-13

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi2Se3 material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi2Se5 nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi 2Se5 nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [1120] direction with a rectangular cross-section and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with ∼ 1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitais to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Superconducting nanowire single-photon imager

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Qing-Yuan; Calandri, Niccolò; Dane, Andrew E; McCaughan, Adam N; Bellei, Francesco; Wang, Hao-Zhu; Santavicca, Daniel F; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-01-01

    Detecting spatial and temporal information of individual photons is a crucial technology in today's quantum information science. Among the existing single-photon detectors, superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) have been demonstrated with a sub-50 ps timing jitter, near unity detection efficiency1, wide response spectrum from visible to infrared and ~10 ns reset time. However, to gain spatial sensitivity, multiple SNSPDs have to be integrated into an array, whose spatial and temporal resolutions are limited by the multiplexing circuit. Here, we add spatial sensitivity to a single nanowire while preserving the temporal resolution from an SNSPD, thereby turning an SNSPD into a superconducting nanowire single-photon imager (SNSPI). To achieve an SNSPI, we modify a nanowire's electrical behavior from a lumped inductor to a transmission line, where the signal velocity is slowed down to 0.02c (where c is the speed of light). Consequently, we are able to simultaneously read out the landing locati...

  14. Locomotion of chemically powered autonomous nanowire motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Longqiu; Li, Tianlong; Zhang, Guangyu; Sun, Qian

    2015-08-01

    Physical insights on the hydrodynamics and locomotion of self-propelled nanowire motor under nonequilibrium steady state are investigated using finite element method in accordance with hybrid molecular dynamics/multiparticle collision dynamics and rigid body dynamics. Nanowire motor is discretized into finite segments, and forces of solvent molecule acting on the motor are assumed to be the sum of forces acting on all segments of the motor. We show that the locomotion of nanowire motor is mainly determined by the imbalance forces acting on the catalytic and noncatalytic segments. The average velocity along the axis increases significantly as a function of time prior to reaching equilibrium. The length of nanowire motor shows negligible effect on the velocity of the motor. Preliminary experimental results are provided to validate the current model.

  15. Preparation of Ni/Cu composite nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ni/Cu composite nanowires were synthesized in an aqueous solution for the first time. The synthetic process consisted of two steps. Firstly, pure nickel nanowires were prepared through chemical reduction in solution under a magnetic field. Secondly, copper was reduced on the surface of the nickel nanowires, during which Ni/Cu composite nanowires with an average length of 80 µm and diameter of about 200 nm were synthesized. The products were characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. The method has notable advantages: It is template-free, inexpensive, easy-to-operate, and it only needs a short reaction time, which makes it suitable for large-scale preparation.

  16. Electrodeposition and Characterization of Bismuth Telluride Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, C.; Stein, N.; Gravier, L.; Granville, S.; Boulanger, C.

    2010-09-01

    In this work, we report thermoelectric measurements on electroplated bismuth telluride nanowires. Porous polycarbonate membranes, obtained by ion-track irradiation lithography, were chosen as electroplating templates. Bismuth telluride nanowires were achieved in acidic media under potentiostatic conditions at -100 mV versus saturated silver chloride electrode. The filling ratio of the pores was increased to 80% by adding dimethyl sulfoxide to the electrolyte. Whatever the experimental conditions, the nanowires were polycrystalline in the rhombohedral phase of Bi2Te3. Finally, the power output of arrays of bismuth telluride nanowires was analyzed as a function of load resistance. The results were strongly dependent on the internal resistance, which can be significantly reduced by the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide during electroplating.

  17. Oleylamine Assisted Synthesis of Ultralong Copper Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Michael

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the hydrothermal synthesis of smooth and ultralong copper nanowires (Cu NW prepared using oleylamine (OM, oleic acid (OA, and Cl- ion as coordinating and etching agents respectively. Cu nanowires with mean diameters around 82.3 nm and lengths exceeding 300 μm were synthesized using 2 % vol. OM and 1.8 mM OA at 120ºC after 12 h. The Cu NWs exhibit five-fold twinning and growth along the [110] direction. The morphological evolution of the products were also observed and discussed. Without Cl-, octahedral crystals instead of nanowires were formed. The addition of oleic acid as coordinating agent resulted to fewer particles and smoother nanowires which exhibit excellent mechanical stability. This method provides a simple, low-cost and high yield synthesis of Cu NWs for applications such as gas sensors and transparent conducting electrodes.

  18. Optical properties of nanowire metamaterials with gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isidio de Lima, Joaquim Junior; Adam, Jost; Rego, Davi;

    2016-01-01

    The transmittance, reflectance and absorption of a nanowire metamaterial with optical gain are numerically simulated and investigated. It is assumed that the metamaterial is represented by aligned silver nanowires embedded into a semiconductor matrix, made of either silicon or gallium phosphide....... The gain in the matrix is modeled by adding a negative imaginary part to the dielectric function of the semiconductor. It is found that the optical coefficients of the metamaterial depend on the gain magnitude in a non-trivial way: they can both increase and decrease with gain depending on the lattice...... constant of the metamaterial. This peculiar behavior is explained by the field redistribution between the lossy metal nanowires and the amplifying matrix material. These findings are significant for a proper design of nanowire metamaterials with low optical losses for diverse applications....

  19. Optical properties of nanowire metamaterials with gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Joaquim; Adam, Jost; Rego, Davi; Esquerre, Vitaly; Bordo, Vladimir

    2016-11-01

    The transmittance, reflectance and absorption of a nanowire metamaterial with optical gain are numerically simulated and investigated. It is assumed that the metamaterial is represented by aligned silver nanowires embedded into a semiconductor matrix, made of either silicon or gallium phosphide. The gain in the matrix is modeled by adding a negative imaginary part to the dielectric function of the semiconductor. It is found that the optical coefficients of the metamaterial depend on the gain magnitude in a non-trivial way: they can both increase and decrease with gain depending on the lattice constant of the metamaterial. This peculiar behavior is explained by the field redistribution between the lossy metal nanowires and the amplifying matrix material. These findings are significant for a proper design of nanowire metamaterials with low optical losses for diverse applications.

  20. Characterizing the elasticity of hollow metal nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji Changjiang; Park, Harold S [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    We have performed atomistic simulations on solid and hollow copper nanowires to quantify the elastic properties of hollow nanowires (nanoboxes). We analyse variations in the modulus, yield stress and strain for <100> and <110> nanoboxes by varying the amount of bulk material that is removed to create the nanoboxes. We find that, while <100> nanoboxes show no improvement in elastic properties as compared to solid <100>nanowires, <110> nanoboxes can show enhanced elastic properties as compared to solid <110> nanowires. The simulations reveal that the elastic properties of the nanoboxes are strongly dependent on the relative strength of the bulk material that has been removed, as well as the total surface area of the nanoboxes, and indicate the potential of ultralight, high-strength nanomaterials such as nanoboxes.

  1. Nanowire-based All Oxide Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Peidong

    2009-01-01

    We present an all-oxide solar cell fabricated from vertically oriented zinc oxide nanowires and cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solar cell consists of vertically oriented n-type zinc oxide nanowires, surrounded by a film constructed from p-type cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solution-based synthesis of inexpensive and environmentally benign oxide materials in a solar cell would allow for the facile production of large-scale photovoltaic devices. We found that the solar cell performance is ...

  2. Optical Properties of Rotationally Twinned Nanowire Superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Jiming; Bell, David C.; Capasso, Federico;

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a technique so that both transmission electron microscopy and microphotoluminescence can be performed on the same semiconductor nanowire over a large range of optical power, thus allowing us to directly correlate structural and optical properties of rotationally twinned zinc...... a heterostructure in a chemically homogeneous nanowire material and alter in a major way its optical properties opens new possibilities for band-structure engineering....

  3. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  4. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  5. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline Bi2Te3 nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 μm. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi2Te3 and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 μm thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  6. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-05-26

    Polycrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}m. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 {mu}m thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  7. Synthesis of Nanowires by Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana C. Pingali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanowires of carbon as well as nickel-carbon (Ni-C were synthesized by spray-pyrolysis. The carbon nanowires were synthesized using methanol as a precursor while the Ni-C nanowires were obtained by using nickel chloride methanol solution as feed. It was found that low argon carrier gas flow rates (<100 cm3/min and suitable reaction temperatures (∼700∘C were found to be critical for the formation of wired structures. The formation of nanowires was quite sensitive to reaction temperature. Nanowires could not form at temperatures higher than 900∘C in the presence of hexane. Ruthenium chloride and nickel chloride dissolved in hexane and methanol resulted in carbon coated binary metallic nanoparticles. Morphological differences of carbon nanowires, Ni-C wires and carbon coated binary nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS. The formation mechanism for the wired structures is proposed to explain the structural results obtained.

  8. Fabrication of Si3N4 nanowire membranes: free standing disordered nanopapers and aligned nanowire assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitao; Fang, Minghao; Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Juntong; Liu, Yan-gai; Wu, Xiaowen

    2016-08-01

    Herein, ultralong silicon nitride nanowires were synthesized via a chemical vapor deposition method by using the low-cost quartz and silicon powder as raw materials. Simple processes were used for the fabrication of disordered and ordered nanowire membranes of pure silicon nitride nanowires. The nanowires in the disordered nanopapers are intertwined with each other to form a paper-like structure which exhibit excellent flame retardancy and mechanical properties. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravity analysis were employed to characterize the refractory performance of the disordered nanopapers. Highly ordered nanowire membranes were also assembled through a three-phase assembly approach which make the Si3N4 nanowires have potential use in textured ceramics and semiconductor field. Moreover, the surface nanowires can also be modified to be hydrophobic; this characteristic make the as-prepared nanowires have the potential to be assembled by the more effective Langmuir-Blodgett method and also make the disordered nanopapers possess a super-hydrophobic surface.

  9. Hydrogen Generation from Photocatalytic Silver|Zinc Oxide Nanowires: Towards Multifunctional Multisegmented Nanowire Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maijenburg, A. Wouter; Rodijk, Eddy J.B.; Maas, Michiel G.; Enculescu, Monica; Blank, Dave H.A.; Elshof, ten Johan E.

    2011-01-01

    Photoactive nanowires: A novel photo-electrochemical nanowire diode that catalyzes the conversion of methanol and water to hydrogen under UV light is demonstrated. The wire consists of a metal and a metal oxide segment that are connected via a Schottky barrier. Other functions, such as remote- contr

  10. 68株北极产蛋白酶菌株的筛选、鉴定以及部分酶学性质%Isolation, identification and characterization of 68protease-producing bacterial strains from the Arctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明霞; 李和阳; 陈维维; 刁伟程; 刘承忠; 袁敏; 李晓虹

    2013-01-01

    [目的]从北极海水样品中分离产蛋白酶细菌,并对其进行初步的分类鉴定,为低温蛋白酶的低温适应性及其应用研究奠定基础.[方法]通过酪蛋白筛选培养基低温培养的方法从北极水样中分离出68株产蛋白酶细菌,采用16S rRNA基因PCR-RFLP(限制性酶切多态性)方法及传统的表型特性分析对所分离纯化的菌株进行分类,每种细菌类型各取1株代表菌株进行16S rRNA基因序列测定、GenBank数据库blast分析以及通过DNAMAN软件进行系统进化树分析.对代表菌株的蛋白酶酶学性质进行初步研究.[结果]68个菌株可归为3种类型(54.41%、42.65%和2.94%),分别以菌株6、11和52为代表菌株.16S rRNA基因序列分析结果表明,菌株11与比目鱼黄杆菌(Chryseobacterium scophthalmum)具有98.24%的同源性;菌株52与嗜根寡养单胞菌(Stenotrophomonas rhizophila)具有98.55%的同源性;菌株6与Stenotrophomonas rhizophila具有96.50%的同源性,可能为该属的新物种.对3种类型代表菌株进行表型性状研究显示,菌株6、1 1和52为革兰氏阴性、直杆状、不产胞外脂肪酶和淀粉酶,具有强的蛋白酶活性.菌株6的蛋白酶最适酶活温度为55℃,最适宜pH为6.7;菌株1 1的蛋白酶最适酶活温度为40℃,属于低温酶,最适酶活pH约为8.5;菌株52的蛋白酶最适酶活温度为65℃,最适酶活pH为7.4.[结论]本文首次报道了Stenotrophomonas和C hryseobacterium的菌株在北极海水样品中的分布,充实了极地产蛋白酶菌的种属分布多样性,为后续低温蛋白酶的研究和应用奠定了基础.%[Objective] We screened and identified protease-producing bacterial strains from the Arctic,the results would help find cold-adapted protease.[Methods] In total 68 protease-producing strains were screened from the Arctic using the casein-agar plate under low temperature.All strains were classified using the 16S rRNA gene-restriction fragment

  11. Why self-catalyzed nanowires are most suitable for large-scale hierarchical integrated designs of nanowire nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor Mohammad, S.

    2011-10-01

    Nanowires are grown by a variety of mechanisms, including vapor-liquid-solid, vapor-quasiliquid-solid or vapor-quasisolid-solid, oxide-assisted growth, and self-catalytic growth (SCG) mechanisms. A critical analysis of the suitability of self-catalyzed nanowires, as compared to other nanowires, for next-generation technology development has been carried out. Basic causes of superiority of self-catalyzed (SCG) nanowires over other nanowires have been described. Polytypism in nanowires has been studied, and a model for polytypism has been proposed. The model predicts polytypism in good agreement with available experiments. This model, together with various evidences, demonstrates lower defects, dislocations, and stacking faults in SCG nanowires, as compared to those in other nanowires. Calculations of carrier mobility due to dislocation scattering, ionized impurity scattering, and acoustic phonon scattering explain the impact of defects, dislocations, and stacking faults on carrier transports in SCG and other nanowires. Analyses of growth mechanisms for nanowire growth directions indicate SCG nanowires to exhibit the most controlled growth directions. In-depth investigation uncovers the fundamental physics underlying the control of growth direction by the SCG mechanism. Self-organization of nanowires in large hierarchical arrays is crucial for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI). Unique features and advantages of self-organized SCG nanowires, unlike other nanowires, for this ULSI have been discussed. Investigations of nanowire dimension indicate self-catalyzed nanowires to have better control of dimension, higher stability, and higher probability, even for thinner structures. Theoretical calculations show that self-catalyzed nanowires, unlike catalyst-mediated nanowires, can have higher growth rate and lower growth temperature. Nanowire and nanotube characteristics have been found also to dictate the performance of nanoelectromechanical systems. Defects, such as

  12. Thermal stability of silicon nanowires:atomistic simulation study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wen-Liang; Zhang Kai-Wang; Zhong Jian-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Using the Stillinger-Weber (SW) potential model, we investigate the thermal stability of pristine silicon nanowires based on classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We explore the structural evolutions and the Lindemann indices of silicon nanowires at different temperatures in order to unveil atomic-level melting behaviour of silicon nanowires.The simulation results show that silicon nanowires with surface reconstructions have higher thermal stability than those without surface reconstructions, and that silicon nanowires with perpendicular dimmer rows on the two (100) surfaces have somewhat higher thermal stability than nanowires with parallel dimmer rows on the two (100) surfaces. Furthermore, the melting temperature of silicon nanowires increases as their diameter increases and reaches a saturation value close to the melting temperature of bulk silicon. The value of the Lindemann index for melting silicon nanowires is 0.037.

  13. Resistance Fluctuations in GaAs Nanowire Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Marasović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical study on resistance fluctuations in a series of nanowire-based grids. Each grid is made of GaAs nanowires arranged in parallel with metallic contacts crossing all nanowires perpendicularly. Electrical properties of GaAs nanowires known from previous experimental research are used as input parameters in the simulation procedure. Due to the nonhomogeneous doping, the resistivity changes along nanowire. Allowing two possible nanowire orientations (“upwards” or “downwards”, the resulting grid is partially disordered in vertical direction which causes resistance fluctuations. The system is modeled using a two-dimensional random resistor network. Transfer-matrix computation algorithm is used to calculate the total network resistance. It is found that probability density function (PDF of resistance fluctuations for a series of nanowire grids changes from Gaussian behavior towards the Bramwell-Holdsworth-Pinton distribution when both nanowire orientations are equally represented in the grid.

  14. Nanoscale manipulation of Ge nanowires by ion hammering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picraux, Samuel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romano, Lucia [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Rudawski, Nicholas G [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Holzworth, Monta R [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Jones, Kevin S [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Choi, S G [NREL

    2009-01-01

    Nanowires generated considerable interest as nanoscale interconnects and as active components of both electronic and electromechanical devices. However, in many cases, manipulation and modification of nanowires are required to realize their full potential. It is essential, for instance, to control the orientation and positioning of nanowires in some specific applications. This work demonstrates a simple method to reversibly control the shape and the orientation of Ge nanowires by using ion beams. Initially, crystalline nanowires were partially amorphized by 30 keY Ga+-implantation. After amorphization, viscous flow and plastic deformation occurred due to the ion hammering effect, causing the nanowires to bend toward the beam direction. The bending was reversed multiple times by ion-implanting the opposite side of the nanowires, resulting in straightening of the nanowires and subsequent bending in the opposite direction. This ion hammering effect demonstrates the detailed manipulation of nanoscale structures is possible through the use of ion irradiation.

  15. Dependence of magnetization process in a Ni-Fe nanowire on the width of the nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Y; Matsumura, Y; Nakatani, R; Yamamoto, M [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: endo@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-03-15

    We investigated the dependence of the magnetization process in 30-nm-thick Ni-Fe nanowires on the width of the nanowire using the magnetic field sweeping (MFS) - magnetic force microscopy (MFM), which measures phase changes (stray field changes) using a MFM tip as a detector. The phase changes are dependent on the width of the nanowire; hysteresis loops of the phase and plateau areas of the phase are observed at local points for the widths between 100 - 600 nm, while local points, each, display the hysteresis loops of the phase and the valleys of the phase for the width of 800 nm. These results demonstrate that the dominant factor in the magnetization process of 30-nm-thick Ni-Fe nanowires changes from 'domain wall motion and domain wall pinning' to 'domain wall motion with increasing the width of the nanowires'.

  16. 饵料对蚯蚓粪细菌群落结构多样性的影响%Characterization of Bacterial Community Diversity in Various Vermicomposts Produced from Feedstocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈浩; 赵海涛; 姚振飞; 孙红军; 胡健

    2012-01-01

    以牛粪、猪粪和污泥等有机废弃物作为蚯蚓饵料,利用细菌16S rDNA V3区特异扩增及变性梯度凝胶电泳(PCR-DGGE)技术,比较了不同饵料及饵料改变对蚯蚓粪细菌群落结构多样性的影响.结果表明:(1)与所取食的饵料相比,蚯蚓粪细菌群落结构多样性均有不同程度的下降,蚯蚓粪与对应饵料之间细菌群落结构相似性范围为15.3%~37.7%;(2)来自不同饵料的蚯蚓粪细菌群落结构相似性范围为17.2%~39.1%,其中以牛粪和猪粪为饵料时,蚯蚓粪细菌群落结构相似性最高,与对应的饵料细菌群落结构相似性相比,提高了近1倍;(3)当饵料由猪粪改为牛粪后,随着时间延长,蚯蚓粪细菌群落结构多样性逐渐下降并趋于稳定,并且蚯蚓粪与饵料牛粪的细菌群落结构相似性由0d的33.2%逐渐下降到21d的14.8%并趋于稳定.由此可知,饵料的种类及转换可以影响蚯蚓粪细菌群落结构多样性.%The earthworms were fed with different feedstocks, such as cattle manure, pig manure and sludge. Then the bacterial community diversity between feedstock and vermicompost were determined by DGGE analysis of PCR-amplified bacterial 16S rDNA V3 region. The results showed that: (1 )The diversities of bacterial community in various vermicomposts were all decreased as compared with different feedstocks. The similarity coefficients of the bacterial community between vermicompost and feedstock were different among all the tested samples, which were from 15.3% to 37.7%;(2)Feeding with different kind of feedstocks resulted in the different similarity coefficient of bacteria] community among all the types of vermicomposts, but some vermicompost samples showed similar bacterial community diversity. The highest similarity value was found between two vermicomposts derived from cattle manure and pig manure, respectively, both of which were about one fold higher than their corresponding feedstocks;( 3 )The

  17. Synthesis and characterization of Co2FeAl nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Gyawali, Parshu; Forbes, Andrew; Pegg, Ian L.; Philip, John

    2012-06-01

    We report the growth and characterization of Co2FeAl nanowires. Nanowires are grown using electrospinning method and the diameters range from 50 to 500 nm. These nanowires exhibit cubic crystal structure with a lattice constant of a =5.639 Å. The nanowires exhibit ferromagnetic behavior with a very high Curie temperature. The temperature dependent magnetization behavior displays an anomaly in the temperature range 600-850 K, which disappears at higher external magnetic fields.

  18. Controlled growth of single nanowires within a supported alumina template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Faniel, S.;

    2006-01-01

    A simple technique for fabricating single nanowires with well-defined position is presented. The process implies the use of a silicon nitride mask for selective electrochemical growth of the nanowires in a porous alumina template. We show that this method allows the realization of complex nanowire...... patterns as well as arrays of single nanowires with a precise position and spacing. © IOP Publishing Ltd....

  19. Blue Luminescence of CdS Nanowires Synthesized by Sulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Tao; MENG Guo-Wen; WANG Tai-Hong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Polycrystalline CdS nanowires have been synthesized by sulfurizing metal Cd nanowires deposited electrochemically within the nanochannels of porous anodic alumina (PAA) templates. Photoluminescence (PL) investigation shows that the CdS nanowires have an intensive and broad PL emission band peaked around 435nm. The investigation results suggest that localized defects and excess S atoms existing in the CdS nanowires are responsible for this blue luminescence.

  20. Electrochemical Fabrication of Metallic Nanowires and Metal Oxide Nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Ohgai, Takeshi; Mizumoto, Masayuki; Nomura, Shigeki; Kagawa, Akio

    2007-01-01

    A nuclear track etched polycarbonate membrane filter with numerous cylindrical nanopores was applied as a nanoporous template for growing metallic nanowires. Nickel, cobalt, and iron nanowires were electrodeposited into the cylindrical nanopores. Cathodic polarization curves were measured to determine an optimum condition for growing nanowires. The shape of nanowires was observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the crystal structure was analyzed using transmission electron micros...

  1. Long-range magnetostatic interactions in arrays of nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Raposo, V; González, J M; Vázquez, M

    2000-01-01

    Experimental measurements and micromagnetic simulations of the hysteresis loops of arrays of cobalt nanowires are compared here. Arrays of cobalt nanowires (200 nm in diameter) were electrodeposited into the pores of alumina membranes (thickness 60 mu m). Their hysteresis loops along the axial direction of nanowires were measured using vibrating sample magnetometry. Micromagnetic simulations were performed considering dipolar interaction between nanowires leading to similar hysteresis loops as those obtained experimentally.

  2. A member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides is produced in the upper airway of the chinchilla and its mRNA expression is altered by common viral and bacterial co-pathogens of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivary, Glen; Ray, William C; Bevins, Charles L; Munson, Robert S; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2007-03-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a component of the innate immune system, play a major role in defense of mucosal surfaces against a wide spectrum of microorganisms such as viral and bacterial co-pathogens of the polymicrobial disease otitis media (OM). To further understand the role of AMPs in OM, we cloned a cDNA encoding a cathelicidin homolog (cCRAMP) from upper respiratory tract (URT) mucosae of the chinchilla, the predominant host used to model experimental OM. Recombinant cCRAMP exhibited alpha-helical secondary structure and killed the three main bacterial pathogens of OM. In situ hybridization showed cCRAMP mRNA production in epithelium of the chinchilla Eustachian tube and RT-PCR was used to amplify cCRAMP mRNA from several other tissues of the chinchilla URT. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of chinchilla middle ear epithelial cells (CMEEs) incubated with either viral (influenza A virus, adenovirus, or RSV) or bacterial (nontypeable H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, or S. pneumoniae) pathogens associated with OM demonstrated distinct microbe-specific patterns of altered expression. Collectively, these data showed that viruses and bacteria modulate AMP messages in the URT, which likely contributes to the disease course of OM.

  3. Fabrication of nanowires by varying energy microbeam lithography using heavy ions at the TIARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, T. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)], E-mail: kamiya.tomihiro@jaea.go.jp; Takano, K.; Ishii, Y.; Satoh, T.; Oikawa, M.; Ohkubo, T.; Haga, J. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nishikawa, H.; Furuta, Y.; Uchiya, N. [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, 3-7-5 Toyosu, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8548 (Japan); Seki, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sugimoto, M. [Quatum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    In TIARA facility of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) Takasaki, we have produced three-dimensional micro/nano-structures with high aspect ratio using cross linking process based on negative resist such as SU-8 by a technique of mask less ion beam lithography. By bombarding high energy heavy ions such as 450 MeV Xe{sup 23+} to SU-8, on the other hand, it appeared that a nanowire could be produced just with a single ion hitting. Then we tried to produce nanowires, of which both ends were fixed in the three-dimensional structure. This paper shows a preliminary experiment for this purpose using a combination of 15 MeV Ni{sup 4+} ion microbeam patterning and the 450 MeV {sup 129}Xe{sup 23+} hitting on SU-8.

  4. Controlled Living Nanowire Growth: Precise Control over the Morphology and Optical Properties of AgAuAg Bimetallic Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Martin; Scarabelli, Leonardo; March, Katia; Altantzis, Thomas; Tebbe, Moritz; Kociak, Mathieu; Bals, Sara; García de Abajo, F Javier; Fery, Andreas; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2015-08-12

    Inspired by the concept of living polymerization reaction, we are able to produce silver-gold-silver nanowires with a precise control over their total length and plasmonic properties by establishing a constant silver deposition rate on the tips of penta-twinned gold nanorods used as seed cores. Consequently, the length of the wires increases linearly in time. Starting with ∼210 nm × 32 nm gold cores, we produce nanowire lengths up to several microns in a highly controlled manner, with a small self-limited increase in thickness of ∼4 nm, corresponding to aspect ratios above 100, whereas the low polydispersity of the product allows us to detect up to nine distinguishable plasmonic resonances in a single colloidal solution. We analyze the spatial distribution and the nature of the plasmons by electron energy loss spectroscopy and obtain excellent agreement between measurements and electromagnetic simulations, clearly demonstrating that the presence of the gold core plays a marginal role, except for relatively short wires or high-energy modes. PMID:26134470

  5. Potential of semiconductor nanowires for single photon sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmand, J.-C.; Liu, L.; Patriarche, G.; Tchernycheva, M.; Akopian, N.; Perinetti, U.; Zwiller, V.

    2009-01-01

    The catalyst-assisted growth of semiconductor nanowires heterostructures offers a very flexible way to design and fabricate single photon emitters. The nanowires can be positioned by organizing the catalyst prior to growth. Single quantum dots can be formed in the core of single nanowires which can

  6. Understanding quantum confinement in nanowires: basics, applications and possible laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive investigation of quantum confinement in nanowires has been carried out. Though applied to silicon nanowires (SiNWs), it is general and applicable to all nanowires. Fundamentals and applications of quantum confinement in nanowires and possible laws obeyed by these nanowires, have been investigated. These laws may serve as backbones of nanowire science and technology. The relationship between energy band gap and nanowire diameter has been studied. This relationship appears to be universal. A thorough review indicates that the first principles results for quantum confinement vary widely. The possible cause of this variation has been examined. Surface passivation and surface reconstruction of nanowires have been elucidated. It has been found that quantum confinement owes its origin to surface strain resulting from surface passivation and surface reconstruction and hence thin nanowires may actually be crystalline-core/amorphous-shell (c-Si/a-Si) nanowires. Experimental data available in the literature corroborate with the suggestion. The study also reveals an intrinsic relationship between quantum confinement and the surface amorphicity of nanowires. It demonstrates that surface amorphicity may be an important tool to investigate the electronic, optoelectronic and sensorial properties of quantum-confined nanowires. (topical review)

  7. Failure mechanisms and electromechanical coupling in semiconducting nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng B.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One dimensional nanostructures, like nanowires and nanotubes, are increasingly being researched for the development of next generation devices like logic gates, transistors, and solar cells. In particular, semiconducting nanowires with a nonsymmetric wurtzitic crystal structure, such as zinc oxide (ZnO and gallium nitride (GaN, have drawn immense research interests due to their electromechanical coupling. The designing of the future nanowire-based devices requires component-level characterization of individual nanowires. In this paper, we present a unique experimental set-up to characterize the mechanical and electromechanical behaviour of individual nanowires. Using this set-up and complementary atomistic simulations, mechanical properties of ZnO nanowires and electromechanical properties of GaN nanowires were investigated. In ZnO nanowires, elastic modulus was found to depend on nanowire diameter decreasing from 190 GPa to 140 GPa as the wire diameter increased from 5 nm to 80 nm. Inconsistent failure mechanisms were observed in ZnO nanowires. Experiments revealed a brittle fracture, whereas simulations using a pairwise potential predicted a phase transformation prior to failure. This inconsistency is addressed in detail from an experimental as well as computational perspective. Lastly, in addition to mechanical properties, preliminary results on the electromechanical properties of gallium nitride nanowires are also reported. Initial investigations reveal that the piezoresistive and piezoelectric behaviour of nanowires is different from bulk gallium nitride.

  8. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, D.S.

    2010-06-02

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [11-20] direction with a rectangular crosssection and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with {approx}1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitals to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states.

  9. Quantification of nanowire uptake by live cells

    KAUST Repository

    Margineanu, Michael B.

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructures fabricated by different methods have become increasingly important for various applications at the cellular level. In order to understand how these nanostructures “behave” and for studying their internalization kinetics, several attempts have been made at tagging and investigating their interaction with living cells. In this study, magnetic iron nanowires with an iron oxide layer are coated with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), and subsequently labeled with a fluorogenic pH-dependent dye pHrodo™ Red, covalently bound to the aminosilane surface. Time-lapse live imaging of human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells interacting with the labeled iron nanowires is performed for 24 hours. As the pHrodo™ Red conjugated nanowires are non-fluorescent outside the cells but fluoresce brightly inside, internalized nanowires are distinguished from non-internalized ones and their behavior inside the cells can be tracked for the respective time length. A machine learning-based computational framework dedicated to automatic analysis of live cell imaging data, Cell Cognition, is adapted and used to classify cells with internalized and non-internalized nanowires and subsequently determine the uptake percentage by cells at different time points. An uptake of 85 % by HCT 116 cells is observed after 24 hours incubation at NW-to-cell ratios of 200. While the approach of using pHrodo™ Red for internalization studies is not novel in the literature, this study reports for the first time the utilization of a machine-learning based time-resolved automatic analysis pipeline for quantification of nanowire uptake by cells. This pipeline has also been used for comparison studies with nickel nanowires coated with APTES and labeled with pHrodo™ Red, and another cell line derived from the cervix carcinoma, HeLa. It has thus the potential to be used for studying the interaction of different types of nanostructures with potentially any live cell types.

  10. Direct observation of Sn crystal growth during the lithiation and delithiation processes of SnO(2) nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li Qiang; Liu, Xiao Hua; Perng, Ya-Chuan; Cho, Jea; Chang, Jane P; Mao, Scott X; Ye, Zhi Zhen; Huang, Jian Yu

    2012-11-01

    Tin (Sn) crystal growth on Sn-based anodes in lithium ion batteries is hazardous for reasons such as possible short-circuit failure by Sn whiskers and Sn-catalyzed electrolyte decomposition, but the growth mechanism of Sn crystals during battery cycling is not clear. Here we report different growth mechanisms of Sn crystal during the lithiation and delithiation processes of SnO(2) nanowires revealed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Large spherical Sn nanoparticles with sizes of 20-200nm grew instantaneously upon lithiation of a single-crystalline SnO(2) nanowire at large current density (j>20A/cm(2)), which suppressed formation of the Li(x)Sn alloy but promoted agglomeration of Sn atoms. Control experiments of Joule-heating (j≈2400A/cm(2)) the pristine SnO(2) nanowires resulted in melting of the SnO(2) nanowires but not Sn particle growth, indicating that the abnormal Sn particle growth was induced by both chemical reduction (i.e., breaking the SnO(2) lattice to produce Sn atoms) and agglomeration of the Sn atoms assisted by Joule heating. Intriguingly, Sn crystals grew out of the nanowire surface via a different "squeeze-out" mechanism during delithiation of the lithiated SnO(2) nanowires coated with an ultra-thin solid electrolyte LiAlSiO(x) layer. It is attributed to the negative stress gradient generated by the fast Li extraction in the surface region through the Li(+)-conducting LiAlSiO(x) layer. Our previous studies showed that Sn precipitation does not occur in the carbon-coated SnO(2) nanowires, highlighting the effect of nanoengineering on tailoring the electrochemical reaction kinetics to suppress the hazardous Sn whiskers or nanoparticles formation in a lithium ion battery. PMID:22770619

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of ZnO Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Michael Hsuan-Yi; Mao Samuel; Henning Feick; Yan Haoquan; Wu Yiying; Hennes Kind; Richard Russo; Eicke Weber; Yang Peidong

    2004-01-01

    Zinc oxide is a wide bandgap (3.37 eV) semiconductor with a hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure. ZnO prepared in nanowire form may be used as a nanosized ultraviolet light-emitting source. In this study, ZnO nanowires were prepared by vapor-phase transport of Zn vapor onto gold-coated silicon substrates in a tube furnace heated to 900 C. Gold serves as a catalyst to capture Zn vapor during nanowire growth.Size control of ZnO nanowires has been achieved by varying the gold film thickness, using fine gold clusters, or tuning other growth conditions. Nanowire diameters ranging from 20 - 200 nm and lengths between 2 - 40 μm can be made. Structural characterization of the nanowires was mainly performed using powder X-ray diffractometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Orientational control of ZnO nanowires can be achieved by growing the nanowires on sapphire substrates. Nearly perfect lattice match between the (002) c-axis growth of ZnO nanowires and the (110) a-plane surface of sapphire substrate allows vertical growth of ZnO nanowires. Fabrication of patterned ZnO nanowire array was then made by patterning the gold layer on the sapphire substrates.Optical characterization of the ZnO nanowires using a He-Cd laser (325 nm) shows that the nanowires possess a strong emission band around 375 - 380 nm. Room temperature power-dependent photoluminescence study using a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm, 3-ns pulse width) shows that the nanowires exhibit lasing emission property. This is the first nanowire system displaying such phenomenon.

  12. Cooperative nucleation modes in polycrystalline CoxPd1-x nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viqueira, M. S.; Pozo-López, G.; Urreta, S. E.; Condó, A. M.; Cornejo, D. R.; Fabietti, L. M.

    2015-05-01

    Polycrystalline CoxPd1-x (x = 1, 0.60, 0.45, 0.23, and 0.11) cylindrical nanowires (ø = 18-35 nm, about 1 μm length) are produced by AC electrodeposition into hexagonally ordered alumina pores. Single-phase nanowires of an fcc Co-Pd solid solution, with randomly oriented equiaxed grains (7-12 nm) are obtained; in all the cases, the grain size is smaller than the wire diameter. The coercive field and the reduced remanence of Co-rich nanowire arrays are hardly sensitive to temperature within the range varying from 4 K to 300 K. On the other hand, in Pd-rich nanowires both magnitudes are smaller and they largely increase when cooling below 100 K. This behavior also depends on the mean grain size. These facts are systematized considering two main aspects: the non-trivial temperature and composition dependence of the crystalline anisotropy and the saturation magnetostriction in Co-Pd alloys; and a random anisotropy effect, which defines a nucleation localization length that may involve more than a single grain, and thus promotes more cooperative nucleation modes.

  13. Fabrication and optical properties of multishell InAs quantum dots on GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia, E-mail: xzhang@bupt.edu.cn; Li, Junshuai; Cui, Jiangong; Ren, Xiaomin [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China)

    2015-02-07

    Hybrid nanostructures combining nanowires with quantum dots promote the development of nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices with integrated functionalities. In this work, we present a complex nanostructure with multishell quantum dots grown on nanowires. 1–4 shells of Stranski-Krastanov InAs quantum dots are grown on the sidewalls of GaAs nanowires by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Different dot shells are separated by 8 nm GaAs spacer shells. With increasing the number of shells, the quantum dots become sparser and tend to align in one array, which is caused by the shrinkage of facets on which dots prefer to grow as well as the strain fields produced by the lower set of dots which influences the migration of In adatoms. The size of quantum dots increases with the increase of shell number due to enhanced strain fields coupling. The spectra of multishell dots exhibit multiwavelength emission, and each peak corresponds to a dot shell. This hybrid structure may serve as a promising element in nanowire intermediate band solar cells, infrared nanolasers, and photodetectors.

  14. Silicon nanowire properties from theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheel, H.M.

    2007-09-10

    Silicon has played an outstanding role at the end of the 20th century and is still one of the most important components for micro computing. In recent years the ability to miniaturize semiconductor structures and devices to nanometer length scales has opened an all new field of physics, i.e. nanoscience. Simply by miniaturizing the size of semiconducting structures the physics describing electronic or vibronic properties has to be altered fundamentally leading to new phenomena and interesting effects. For silicon the two major mile-stones where the fabrication of porous silicon and later the fabrication of free-standing silicon nanowires. The intense research concerning the fabrication of silicon nanowires has led to single crystalline nanowires with diameters of only a few nanometers. The hope that drove these intense research efforts where to find efficient photonic properties in these quantized systems. In the first part of this work detailed theoretical investigations are presented for the commonly observed ([111] and [11 anti 2]) representatives of free-standing and for the most frequently discussed ([001]) silicon nanowires not (so far) observed as free standing wires. Using density functional theory in the local density approximation the electronic properties as well as the structural changes due to the reduced dimensionality of silicon nanowires are calculated and discussed. The comparison to recent experimental, scanning tunneling experiments reveal a fundamental discrepancy between the calculated band structures and experimental findings. With our results we are able to explain these differences. Raman investigations on silicon nanowires where in a state of controversial discussion about the origin of observed red shifted spectra. Various contributions like quantum confinement, photo excitation and thermal effects where discussed. The second part of this thesis contributes to this discussion, with detailed laser power dependent Raman spectroscopic

  15. Diameter Modification of Si Nanowires via Catalyst Size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢英杰; 奚中和; 薛增泉; 俞大鹏

    2003-01-01

    Si nanowires with different diameters are grown on catalyst coated Si substrates via a solid-liquid-solid mechanism. It is found that the thickness and type of catalyst film can modify the average diameter of Si nanowires obviously. The nanowires prepared on substrates deposited with Ni film of 40, 10, and 4nm thick have a mean diameter around 41, 36, and 24nm, respectively. Si nanowires with the smallest average diameter (~ 16 nm) are grown with a gold catalyst. Studies of diameter distributions show that the minimum diameter of nanowires does not shift with the average diameters spontaneously and has the same size of 10nm.

  16. Electronic and Elastic Properties of Helical Nickel Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bao-Lin; ZHAO Ji-Jun; SHI Da-Ning; JIA Jian-Min; WANG Guang-Hou

    2005-01-01

    @@ The structural and elastic properties of ultrathin nickel nanovires are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation with a Sutton-Chen potential. Helical multi-shell structures are obtained as the most stable structures for Ni nanowires with diameters of about 1 nm. The electronic states of these nanowires are computed and compared with that of Ni solid. The mechanical responses of the helical nanowires under tensile forces are simulated. We observe elastic deformation of nanowires characterized by periodic oscillations of the nanowire length under constant force. Within an elastic limit, both the atomic structures and the electronic structures remain stable under external tensile loading.

  17. Waveguiding properties and applications of silica nanowires in various environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Cheng-hua; WU Ping-hui; ZHAO Pan

    2009-01-01

    Waveguiding properties of silica nanowires in various environments are studied by solving the eigenvalue equations of a circular cross-section waveguide numerically in cylindrical coordinates. The single-mode condition, propagation constants, poynting vector and power distribution inside and outside silica nanowire are calculated. The results show that silica nanowires in water, compared with silica nanowires in air, have higher fraction of the evanescent fields. Due to the sensiti-vity to surrounding environment, silica nanowires are very suitable for sensing elements, which can be used to implement a single-mode fiber optic evanescent wave sensing element of highly sensitive and accurate measurement.

  18. Raman study of thermochromic phase transition in tungsten trioxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dong Yu; Chen, Jian; Chen, Huan Jun; Gong, Li; Deng, Shao Zhi; Xu, Ning Sheng; Liu, Yu Long

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanowires were synthesized by thermal evaporation of tungsten powder in two steps: tungsten suboxide (WO3-x) nanowires were synthesized, and then oxidized in O2 ambient and transformed into WO3 nanowires. Raman spectroscopy was applied to study the thermochromic phase transition of one-dimensional WO3 nanowires. From the temperature dependence of the characteristic mode at 33cm-1 in WO3, the phase transition temperature was determined. It was found that the phase transition of WO3 nanowires was reversible and the phase transition temperatures were even lower than that of WO3 nanopowder.

  19. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irshad, M. I., E-mail: imrancssp@gmail.com; Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia); Ahmad, F., E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Abdullah, M. Z., E-mail: zaki-abdullah@petronas.com.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl{sub 2}Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidified by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications.

  20. Identification and characterization of icosahedral metallic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaez, Samuel; Serena, Pedro A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Guerrero, Carlo [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad Experimental de Ciencias, La Universidad del Zulia, Maracaibo (Venezuela); Paredes, Ricardo [Centro de Fisica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Apto. 20632, Caracas 1020A (Venezuela); Garcia-Mochales, Pedro [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, c/Tomas y Valiente 7, Cantoblanco, 28049-Madrid (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    We present and discuss an algorithm to identify ans characterize the long icosahedral structures (staggered pentagonal nanowires with 1-5-1-5 atomic structure) that appear in Molecular Dynamics simulations of metallic nanowires of different species subjected to stretching. The use of the algorithm allows the identification of pentagonal rings forming the icosahedral structure as well as the determination of its number n{sub p}, and the maximum length of the pentagonal nanowire L{sub p}{sup m}. The algorithm is tested with some ideal structures to show its ability to discriminate between pentagonal rings and other ring structures. We applied the algorithm to Ni nanowires with temperatures ranging between 4 K and 865 K, stretched along the[100] direction. We studied statistically the formation of pentagonal nanowires obtaining the distributions of length L{sub p}{sup m} and number of rings n{sub p} as function of the temperature. The L{sub p}{sup m} distribution presents a peaked shape, with peaks locate at fixes distances whose separation corresponds to the distance between two consecutive pentagonal rings. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Nanowire Electrodes for Advanced Lithium Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eHuang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs in the past two decades, rechargeable LIBs have become widespread power sources for portable devices used in daily life. However, current demands require higher energy density and power density of batteries. The electrochemical energy storage performance of LIBs could be improved by applying nanomaterial electrodes, but their fast capacity fading is still one of the key limitations and the mechanism needs to be clearly understood. Single nanowire electrode devices are considered as a versatile platform for in situ probing the direct relationship between electrical transport, structure change, and other properties of the single nanowire electrode along with the charge/discharge process. The results indicate the conductivity decrease of the nanowire electrode and the structural disorder/destruction during electrochemical reactions which limit the cycling performance of LIBs. Based on the in situ observations, some feasible structure architecture strategies, including prelithiation, coaxial structure, nanowire arrays and hierarchical structure architecture, are proposed and utilized to restrain the conductivity decrease and structural disorder/destruction. Further, the applications of nanowire electrodes in some beyond Li-ion batteries, such as Li-S and Li-air battery, are also described.

  2. 红茶菌产细菌纤维素菌种分离与初步鉴定%Isolation and Identification of Microbes from Kombucha Producing Bacterial Cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张妍; 徐伟; 傅徐阳

    2012-01-01

    Traditional kombucha will form a layer of white membrane in green tea-sucrose medium surface. Microbes attached to the membrane were taken. The A and Y strains were isolated by crossing on the acetic acid bacterial and yeast plate medium. The two strains were isolated and identified Gluconobacter asai and Schizosaccharomyces pombeLinder by observing the colonies & cell morphology and physiological & biochemical tests separately. The mixture of the two strains was inoculated in green tea-sucrose medium and the products were identified as bacterial cellulose.%传统红茶菌在绿茶-蔗糖培养基表面会形成一层白色菌膜,取附着于菌膜上的菌体,在醋酸菌和酵母菌平板培养基上划线分离得到纯菌种A和Y,经菌落、菌体形态观察和生理生化试验鉴定,确定A为葡糖杆菌Gluconobacter asai和Y为路德类酵母Saccharomycodes ludwigli,进一步将两种菌株混合接入绿茶-蔗糖培养液中,对产物判定结果为纤维素。

  3. High-density gold nanowire arrays by lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujdic, Justin E; Sargisian, Alan P; Shao, Jingru; Ye, Tao; Menke, Erik J

    2011-07-01

    Here we describe a new method for preparing multiple arrays of parallel gold nanowires with dimensions and separation down to 50 nm. This method uses photolithography to prepare an electrode consisting of a patterned nickel film on glass, onto which a gold and nickel nanowire array is sequentially electrodeposited. After the electrodeposition, the nickel is stripped away, leaving behind a gold nanowire array, with dimensions governed by the gold electrodeposition parameters, spacing determined by the nickel electrodeposition parameters, and overall placement and shape dictated by the photolithography.

  4. Mesoscopic Models of Plants Composed of Metallic Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Galina K.Strukova; Gennady V.Strukov; Evgeniya Yu.Postnova; Alexander Yu.Rusanov; Ivan S.Veshchunov

    2013-01-01

    Various metallic structures of complex shape resembling living plant organisms (biomimetics) are produced as a result of self-assembly of nanowires growing on porous membranes in the course of pulse current electrodeposition.These structures occur if the electroplating is continued after the nanowires appear on the membrane surface.By varying the membrane geometry,pulse current electroplating parameters,and alternating electrodeposition from two baths composed of a variety of electrolytes,diverse models were fabricated,including a hollow container with a wall thickness of 10 nm-20 nm.This biomimetic method suggests an analogy between the shape-forming processes of plants and their metallic models.Nanostructured mesostructures of various metals (Ag,Pd,Ni),alloys (PdNi,PbIn) and hybrid structures.(PdNi/Pb,PdNi/PbIn) were obtained.They can be of interest for fundamental research (self-assembly,morphogenesis) as well as for applications in nanotechnology (catalysis,nanoplasmonics,medicine,superhydrophobic surfaces).

  5. Platinum-Coated Nickel Nanowires as Oxygen-Reducing Electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alia, Shaun M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Larsen, Brian A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Pylypenko, Svitlana [ORNL; Cullen, David A [ORNL; Diercks, David R [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Neyerlin, Kenneth C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Kocha, Shyam S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Pivovar, Bryan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2014-01-01

    Platinum (Pt)-coated nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) are synthesized by the partial spontaneous galvanic displacement of NiNWs, with a diameter of 150 250 nm and a length of 100 200 m. PtNiNWs are electrochemically characterized for oxygen reduction (ORR) in rotating disk electrode half-cells with an acidic electrolyte and compared to carbon-supported Pt (Pt/HSC) and a polycrystalline Pt electrode. Like other extended surface catalysts, the nanowire morphology yields significant gains in ORR specific activity compared to Pt/HSC. Unlike other extended surface approaches, the resultant materials have yielded exceptionally high surface areas, greater than 90 m2 gPt 1. These studies have found that reducing the level of Pt displacement increases Pt surface area and ORR mass activity. PtNiNWs produce a peak mass activity of 917 mA mgPt 1, 3.0 times greater than Pt/HSC and 2.1 times greater than the U.S. Department of Energy target for proton-exchange membrane fuel cell activity.

  6. Fluorescent carbon nanowires made by pyrolysis of DNA nanofibers and plasmon-assisted emission enhancement of their fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Hidenobu; Tokonami, Shiho; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2014-10-14

    We report on a facile method for preparing fluorescent carbon nanowires (CNWs) with pyrolysis of highly aligned DNA nanofibers as carbon sources. Silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-doped CNWs were also produced using pyrolysis of DNA nanofibers with well-attached AgNPs, indicating emission enhancement assisted by localized plasmon resonances.

  7. A detailed study of magnetization reversal in individual Ni nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Vilanova Vidal, Enrique

    2015-01-19

    Magnetic nanowires have emerged as essential components for a broad range of applications. In many cases, a key property of these components is the switching field, which is studied as a function of the angle between the field and the nanowire. We found remarkable differences of up to 100% between the switching fields of different nanowires from the same fabrication batch. Our experimental results and micromagnetic simulations indicate that the nanowires exhibit a single domain behavior and that the switching mechanism includes vortex domain wall motion across the nanowire. The differences between the switching fields are attributed to different cross-sections of the nanowires, as found by electron microscopy. While a circular cross-section yields the smallest switching field values, any deviation from this shape results in an increase of the switching field. The shape of the nanowires\\' cross-sections is thus a critical parameter that has not been previously taken into account.

  8. Silicon carbide nanowires synthesized with phenolic resin and silicon powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Shi, Limin; Li, Ziqiang; Tang, Chunhe

    2009-02-01

    Large-scale silicon carbide nanowires with the lengths up to several millimeters were synthesized by a coat-mix, moulding, carbonization, and high-temperature sintering process, using silicon powder and phenolic resin as the starting materials. Ordinary SiC nanowires, bamboo-like SiC nanowires, and spindle SiC nanochains are found in the fabricated samples. The ordinary SiC nanowire is a single-crystal SiC phase with a fringe spacing of 0.252 nm along the [1 1 1] growth direction. Both of the bamboo-like SiC nanowires and spindle SiC nanochains exhibit uniform periodic structures. The bamboo-like SiC nanowires consist of amorphous stem and single-crystal knots, while the spindle SiC nanochains consist of uniform spindles which grow uniformly on the entire nanowires.

  9. Tunable magnetic nanowires for biomedical and harsh environment applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2016-04-13

    We have synthesized nanowires with an iron core and an iron oxide (magnetite) shell by a facile low-cost fabrication process. The magnetic properties of the nanowires can be tuned by changing shell thicknesses to yield remarkable new properties and multi-functionality. A multi-domain state at remanence can be obtained, which is an attractive feature for biomedical applications, where a low remanence is desirable. The nanowires can also be encoded with different remanence values. Notably, the oxidation process of single-crystal iron nanowires halts at a shell thickness of 10 nm. The oxide shell of these nanowires acts as a passivation layer, retaining the magnetic properties of the iron core even during high-temperature operations. This property renders these core-shell nanowires attractive materials for application to harsh environments. A cell viability study reveals a high degree of biocompatibility of the core-shell nanowires.

  10. Optical properties of indium phosphide nanowire ensembles at various temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohn, Andrew J; Onishi, Takehiro; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P [Baskin School of Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR), Advanced Studies Laboratories, University of California Santa Cruz-NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Ensembles that contain two types (zincblende and wurtzite) of indium phosphide nanowires grown on non-single crystalline surfaces were studied by micro-photoluminescence and micro-Raman spectroscopy at various low temperatures. The obtained spectra are discussed with the emphasis on the effects of differing lattice types, geometries, and crystallographic orientations present within an ensemble of nanowires grown on non-single crystalline surfaces. In the photoluminescence spectra, a typical Varshni dependence of band gap energy on temperature was observed for emissions from zincblende nanowires and in the high temperature regime energy transfer from excitonic transitions and band-edge transitions was identified. In contrast, the photoluminescence emissions associated with wurtzite nanowires were rather insensitive to temperature. Raman spectra were collected simultaneously from zincblende and wurtzite nanowires coexisting in an ensemble. Raman peaks of the wurtzite nanowires are interpreted as those related to the zincblende nanowires by a folding of the phonon dispersion.

  11. Tunable magnetic nanowires for biomedical and harsh environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yurii P.; Alfadhel, Ahmed; Alnassar, Mohammed; Perez, Jose E.; Vazquez, Manuel; Chuvilin, Andrey; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We have synthesized nanowires with an iron core and an iron oxide (magnetite) shell by a facile low-cost fabrication process. The magnetic properties of the nanowires can be tuned by changing shell thicknesses to yield remarkable new properties and multi-functionality. A multi-domain state at remanence can be obtained, which is an attractive feature for biomedical applications, where a low remanence is desirable. The nanowires can also be encoded with different remanence values. Notably, the oxidation process of single-crystal iron nanowires halts at a shell thickness of 10 nm. The oxide shell of these nanowires acts as a passivation layer, retaining the magnetic properties of the iron core even during high-temperature operations. This property renders these core-shell nanowires attractive materials for application to harsh environments. A cell viability study reveals a high degree of biocompatibility of the core-shell nanowires.

  12. Raman Spectroscopy of InAs Based Nanowires & Electronic Characterization of Heterostructure InAs/GaInAs Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanta, Rawa

    spectroscopy measurements on InAs based nanowires include several topics. Firstly, we use polarized Raman spectroscopy for determining the crystal orientation of the nanowires based on conventional Raman selection rules. We studied the effect of the high power laser irradiation on the nanowire, and its......The work presented in this thesis represents two main topics. The first one, which covers a bigger volume of the thesis, is mainly about Raman spectroscopy on individual InAs based nanowires. The second part presents electronic characterization of heterostructure InAs/GaInAs nanowires. Raman...

  13. Magneto-mechanical modeling study of CO-based amorphous micro- and nanowires for acoustic sensing medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atitoaie, Alexandru; Stancu, Alexandru; Ovari, Tibor-Adrian; Lupu, Nicoleta; Chiriac, Horia

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic nanowires are potential candidates for substituting, within enhanced cochlear implants, the role played by hair cilia from the inner ear, which are responsible for the transduction of acoustic vibrations into electric signals. The sound waves pressure that is bending the magnetic wires induces stresses that are leading to changes in magnetic properties, such as magnetization and permeability. These changes can be detected by a GMR sensor placed below the nanowire array or, in the case of different designs, by a pick-up coil wrapped around the fixed-end of the wires. For the latter case, we are studying the stress distributions caused by bending deformations using the COMSOL finite element software package. We are also proposing a theoretical method for the evaluation of magnetic permeability variation vs. induced stress dependence. The study is performed on CoFeSiB amorphous micro- and nanowires subjected to mechanical perturbations similar to the ones produced by sound pressure waves.

  14. Field-emission properties of patterned ZnO nanowires on 2.5D MEMS substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung-Beum; Kim, Byeong-Guk; Kim, Jeong-Yeon; Jung, Tae-Hwan; Lim, Dong-Gun; Park, Jae-Hwan [Chungju National University, Department of Electronic Engineering, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae-Gwan [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Nano-Materials Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    We fabricated a nanowire-based field-emission display (FED) device on a 2.5D substrate using a photolithography, lift-off, thermal-evaporation, and plasma-etching process. We first fabricated a 3 x 3 array of microholes (diameter = 400 {mu}m and depth = 50 {mu}m) on a Si substrate and fabricated ZnO nanowires inside the microholes by using a thermal CVD process. The field-emission pattern image of the 3 x 3 array of microholes was clearly apparent. The threshold emission field was ca. 5.6 V/{mu}m and we obtained considerable brightness when the applied voltage was 1900 V (i.e. 6.3 V/{mu}m). Because the fabrication processes used in this study are standard semiconductor fabrication routes, the study suggests the feasibility of mass producing a nanowire-based FED device. (orig.)

  15. Vertically Integrated Multiple Nanowire Field Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Ho; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Park, Jun-Young; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Hur, Jae; Lee, Dongil; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-12-01

    A vertically integrated multiple channel-based field-effect transistor (FET) with the highest number of nanowires reported ever is demonstrated on a bulk silicon substrate without use of wet etching. The driving current is increased by 5-fold due to the inherent vertically stacked five-level nanowires, thus showing good feasibility of three-dimensional integration-based high performance transistor. The developed fabrication process, which is simple and reproducible, is used to create multiple stiction-free and uniformly sized nanowires with the aid of the one-route all-dry etching process (ORADEP). Furthermore, the proposed FET is revamped to create nonvolatile memory with the adoption of a charge trapping layer for enhanced practicality. Thus, this research suggests an ultimate design for the end-of-the-roadmap devices to overcome the limits of scaling. PMID:26544156

  16. Surface superconductivity in thin cylindrical Bi nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jian; Ning, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E; Chan, Moses H W

    2015-03-11

    The physical origin and the nature of superconductivity in nanostructured Bi remains puzzling. Here, we report transport measurements of individual cylindrical single-crystal Bi nanowires, 20 and 32 nm in diameter. In contrast to nonsuperconducting Bi nanoribbons with two flat surfaces, cylindrical Bi nanowires show superconductivity below 1.3 K. However, their superconducting critical magnetic fields decrease with their diameter, which is the opposite of the expected behavior for thin superconducting wires. Quasiperiodic oscillations of magnetoresistance were observed in perpendicular fields but were not seen in the parallel orientation. These results can be understood by a model of surface superconductivity with an enhanced surface-to-bulk volume in small diameter wires, where the superconductivity originates from the strained surface states of the nanowires due to the surface curvature-induced stress. PMID:25658139

  17. Rare earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Martina

    2008-11-10

    The growth, structure and electronic properties of rare earth silicide nanowires are investigated on planar and vicinal Si(001) und Si(111) surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). On all surfaces investigated within this work hexagonal disilicides are grown epitaxially with a lattice mismatch of -2.55% up to +0.83% along the hexagonal a-axis. Along the hexagonal c-axis the lattice mismatch is essentially larger with 6.5%. On the Si(001)2 x 1 surface two types of nanowires are grown epitaxially. The socalled broad wires show a one-dimensional metallic valence band structure with states crossing the Fermi level. Along the nanowires two strongly dispersing states at the anti J point and a strongly dispersing state at the anti {gamma} point can be observed. Along the thin nanowires dispersing states could not be observed. Merely in the direction perpendicular to the wires an intensity variation could be observed, which corresponds to the observed spacial structure of the thin nanowires. The electronic properties of the broad erbium silicide nanowires are very similar to the broad dysprosium silicide nanowires. The electronic properties of the DySi{sub 2}-monolayer and the Dy{sub 3}Si{sub 5}-multilayer on the Si(111) surface are investigated in comparison to the known ErSi{sub 2}/Si(111) and Er{sub 3}Si{sub 5}/Si(111) system. The positions and the energetic locations of the observed band in the surface Brillouin zone will be confirmed for dysprosium. The shape of the electron pockets in the (vector)k {sub parallel} space is elliptical at the anti M points, while the hole pocket at the anti {gamma} point is showing a hexagonal symmetry. On the Si(557) surface the structural and electronic properties depend strongly on the different preparation conditions likewise, in particular on the rare earth coverage. At submonolayer coverage the thin nanowires grow in wide areas

  18. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.;

    2010-01-01

    A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and DNA. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and disinfectant chemicals as well as resisting phagocytosis...... and other components of the body's defence system. The persistence of, for example, staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation. Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains....... Characteristically, gradients of nutrients and oxygen exist from the top to the bottom of biofilms and these gradients are associated with decreased bacterial metabolic activity and increased doubling times of the bacterial cells; it is these more or less dormant cells that are responsible for some of the tolerance...

  19. Extended Two Dimensional Nanotube and Nanowire Surfaces as Fuel Cell Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Alia, Shaun Michael

    2011-01-01

    Extended network nanomaterials of platinum (Pt), silver (Ag), palladium (Pd), and gold (Au) are synthesized and characterized as proton exchange membrane (PEMFC), hydroxide exchange membrane (HEMFC), and direct alcohol (DAFC) fuel cell catalysts.Porous Pt nanotubes (PPtNTs), 5 nm thick, are synthesized by the galvanic displacement of Ag nanowires (AgNWs) for PEMFCs and DAFCs. PPtNTs produce oxygen reduction (ORR) and durability characteristics significantly higher than supported Pt nanopartic...

  20. Smooth Nanowire/Polymer Composite Transparent Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Gaynor, Whitney

    2011-04-29

    Smooth composite transparent electrodes are fabricated via lamination of silver nanowires into the polymer poly-(4,3-ethylene dioxythiophene): poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The surface roughness is dramatically reduced compared to bare nanowires. High-efficiency P3HT:PCBM organic photovoltaic cells can be fabricated using these composites, reproducing the performance of cells on indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass and improving the performance of cells on ITO on plastic. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Glassy Carbon Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Lentz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of carbon-based micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems has revived the interest in glassy carbon, whose properties are relatively unknown at lower dimensions. In this paper, electrical conductivity of individual glassy carbon nanowires was measured as a function of microstructure (controlled by heat treatment temperature and ambient temperature. The semiconducting nanowires with average diameter of 150 nm were synthesized from polyfurfuryl alcohol precursors and characterized using transmission electron and Raman microscopy. DC electrical measurements made at 90 K to 450 K show very strong dependence of temperature, following mixed modes of activation energy and hopping-based conduction.

  2. An optically guided microdevice comprising a nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a microdevice (100) for emitting electromagnetic radiation onto an associated object. Simultaneous non-contact spatial control over the microdevice in terms of translational movement in three dimensions, and rotational movement around at least two axes, preferably...... three axes, is possible. The microdevice further comprises a nanowire (150) being arranged for emitting electromagnetic radiation onto said associated object. This is advantageous for obtaining better spatial control of the microdevice comprising the nanowire, and this enables that light could more...

  3. Burnout current density of bismuth nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, T. W.; Picht, O.; Müller, S.; Neumann, R.; Völklein, F.; Karim, S.; Duan, J. L.

    2008-05-01

    Single bismuth nanowires with diameters ranging from 100nmto1μm were electrochemically deposited in ion track-etched single-pore polycarbonate membranes. The maximum current density the wires are able to carry was investigated by ramping up the current until failure occurred. It increases by three to four orders of magnitude for nanowires embedded in the template compared to bulk bismuth and rises with diminishing diameter. Simulations show that the wires are heated up electrically to the melting temperature. Since the surface-to-volume ratio rises with diminishing diameter, thinner wires dissipate the heat more efficiently to the surrounding polymer matrix and, thus, can tolerate larger current densities.

  4. Nanowires and nanostructures fabrication using template methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Vlad, A.;

    2009-01-01

    One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis...... of nanowires and nanostructures using nanoporous host materials such as supported anodic aluminum considering it as a key template for nanowires based devices. New ways are opened for applications by combining such template synthesis methods with nanolithographic techniques....

  5. Synchrotron characterization of functional tin dioxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domashevskaya, E. P., E-mail: ftt@phys.vsu.ru; Chuvenkova, O. A.; Turishchev, S. Yu. [Voronezh State University, Voronezh (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-31

    Wire-like crystals of tin dioxide were synthesized by a gas-transport technique. The wires, of mainly nanometric diameters, were characterized by spectroscopy and microscopy techniques with the use of highly brilliant and intense synchrotron radiation. We studied the influence of the surface chemical state and the oxygen vacancies on the atomic and electronic structure of the nanowires. The surface of the nanowires is covered by a few nanometers of tin suboxides. The lack of oxygen over the surface layers leads to specific sub-zone formation in a gap, as shown by synchrotron studies.

  6. Diamond Nanowires: A Novel Platform for Electrochemistry and Matrix-Free Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Szunerits

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, carbon-based nanostructures have generated a huge interest from both fundamental and technological viewpoints owing to their physicochemical characteristics, markedly different from their corresponding bulk states. Among these nanostructured materials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, and more recently graphene and its derivatives, hold a central position. The large amount of work devoted to these materials is driven not only by their unique mechanical and electrical properties, but also by the advances made in synthetic methods to produce these materials in large quantities with reasonably controllable morphologies. While much less studied than CNTs and graphene, diamond nanowires, the diamond analogue of CNTs, hold promise for several important applications. Diamond nanowires display several advantages such as chemical inertness, high mechanical strength, high thermal and electrical conductivity, together with proven biocompatibility and existence of various strategies to functionalize their surface. The unique physicochemical properties of diamond nanowires have generated wide interest for their use as fillers in nanocomposites, as light detectors and emitters, as substrates for nanoelectronic devices, as tips for scanning probe microscopy as well as for sensing applications. In the past few years, studies on boron-doped diamond nanowires (BDD NWs focused on increasing their electrochemical active surface area to achieve higher sensitivity and selectivity compared to planar diamond interfaces. The first part of the present review article will cover the promising applications of BDD NWS for label-free sensing. Then, the potential use of diamond nanowires as inorganic substrates for matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, a powerful label-free approach for quantification and identification of small compounds, will be discussed.

  7. Silver nanowire decorated heatable textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganay, Doga; Coskun, Sahin; Genlik, Sevim Polat; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-10-28

    The modification of insulating fabrics with electrically conductive nanomaterials has opened up a novel application field. With the help of Joule heating mechanism, conductive fabrics can be used as mobile heaters. In this work, heatable textiles are fabricated using silver nanowires (Ag NWs). Cotton fabrics are decorated with polyol synthesized Ag NWs via a simple dip-and-dry method. The time-dependent thermal response of the fabrics under different applied voltages is investigated. It is found that the fabrics can be heated to 50 °C under an applied power density of as low as 0.05 W cm(-2). Uniform deposition of Ag NWs resulted in the homogeneous generation of heat. In addition, the stability of the fabrics with time and under different bending and washing conditions is examined. Moreover, a simple control circuit is fabricated and integrated in order to demonstrate the high potential of the fabrics for mobile applications. This work provides a roadmap for researchers who would like to work on heatable textiles with metallic NWs. PMID:27651222

  8. FtsZ Cytoskeletal Filaments as a Template for Metallic Nanowire Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, Nili; Fichman, Galit; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies can serve as templates for the fabrication of inorganic nanowires due to their morphological reproducibility and innate proclivity to form well-ordered structures. Amongst the variety of naturally occurring nano-scale assemblies, cytoskeletal fibers from diverse biological sources represent a unique family of scaffolds for biomimetics as they efficiently self-assemble in vitro in a controllable manner to form stable filaments. Here, we harness the bacterial FtsZ filament system as a scaffold for protein-based metal nanowires, and further demonstrate the control of wire alignment with the use of an external magnetic field. Due to the ease at which the bacterial FtsZ is overexpressed and purified, as well as the extensive studies of its ultrastructural properties and physiological significance, FtsZ filaments are an ideal substrate for large-scale production and chemical manipulation. Using a biologically compatible electroless metal deposition technique initiated by adsorption of platinum as a surface catalyst, we demonstrate the coating of assembled FtsZ filaments with iron, nickel, gold, and copper to fabricate continuous nanowires with diameters ranging from 10-50 nm. Organic-inorganic hybrid wires were analyzed using high-resolution field-emission-gun transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and confirmed by energy-dispersive elemental analysis. We also achieved alignment of ferrofluid-coated FtsZ filaments using an external magnetic field. Overall, we provide evidence for the robustness of the FtsZ filament system as a molecular scaffold, and offer an efficient, biocompatible procedure for facile bottom-up assembly of metallic wires on biological templates. We believe that bottom-up fabrication methods as reported herein significantly contribute to the expanding toolkit available for the incorporation of biological materials in nano-scale devices for electronic and electromechanical applications. PMID:26328401

  9. Carbon nanostructures produced through ion irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Several nanostructures we produced by ion irradiation have been reviewed in this paper. By using ions to irradiate two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene targets respectively, it was found that small fullerenes C20 and C26 were grown, adding two members to the fullerene family. Meanwhile, crystalline diamonds also have been produced by Ar+ ions irradiation of graphite. In the experiment of double ions Ni+ and Ar+ irradiation, nanoscale argon bubbles formed. On the other side, when multi-wall carbon nanotubes were irradiated by C+, many MWCNTs evolved to amorphous carbon nanowires and amorphous carbon nanotubes. And there are possible welding in the crossed nanotubes.

  10. Sputtered gold-coated ITO nanowires by alternating depositions from Indium and ITO targets for application in surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setti, Grazielle O. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Renato Archer Information Technology Center, Rodovia Dom Pedro I (SP-65), Km 143,6 – Amarais, 13069-901 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Mamián-López, Mónica B.; Pessoa, Priscila R.; Poppi, Ronei J. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Joanni, Ednan, E-mail: ednan.joanni@cti.gov.br [Renato Archer Information Technology Center, Rodovia Dom Pedro I (SP-65), Km 143,6 – Amarais, 13069-901 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Jesus, Dosil P. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • ITO nanowires were grown by the sputtering method using a new synthesis procedure. • By changing the deposition parameters the morphology and dimensions of the nanostructures were modified. • Seed layer thickness was an important factor for obtaining branched nanowires. • SERS substrates having good performance and a high application potential were produced. • The first Raman results for our substrates are already comparable to commercial substrates. - Abstract: Indium Tin oxide (ITO) nanowires were deposited by RF sputtering over oxidized silicon using ITO and Indium targets. The nanowires grew on the substrate with a catalyst layer of Indium by the vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) mechanism. Modifications in the deposition conditions affected the morphology and dimensions of the nanowires. The samples, after being covered with gold, were evaluated as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates for detection of dye solutions and very good intensifications of the Raman signal were obtained. The SERS performance of the samples was also compared to that of a commercial SERS substrate and the results achieved were similar. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time ITO nanowires were grown by the sputtering technique using oxide and metal targets.

  11. Welding of silver nanowire networks via flash white light and UV-C irradiation for highly conductive and reliable transparent electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-08-01

    In this work, silver nanowire inks with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) binders were coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and welded via flash white light and ultraviolet C (UV-C) irradiation to produce highly conductive transparent electrodes. The coated silver nanowire films were firmly welded and embedded into PET substrate successfully at room temperature and under ambient conditions using an in-house flash white light welding system and UV-C irradiation. The effects of light irradiation conditions (light energy, irradiation time, pulse duration, and pulse number) on the silver nanowire networks were studied and optimized. Bending fatigue tests were also conducted to characterize the reliability of the welded transparent conductive silver nanowire films. The surfaces of the welded silver nanowire films were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the transmittance of the structures was measured using a spectrophotometer. From the results, a highly conductive and transparent silver nanowire film with excellent reliability could be achieved at room temperature under ambient conditions via the combined flash white light and UV-C irradiation welding process.

  12. Welding of silver nanowire networks via flash white light and UV-C irradiation for highly conductive and reliable transparent electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-01-01

    In this work, silver nanowire inks with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) binders were coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and welded via flash white light and ultraviolet C (UV-C) irradiation to produce highly conductive transparent electrodes. The coated silver nanowire films were firmly welded and embedded into PET substrate successfully at room temperature and under ambient conditions using an in-house flash white light welding system and UV-C irradiation. The effects of light irradiation conditions (light energy, irradiation time, pulse duration, and pulse number) on the silver nanowire networks were studied and optimized. Bending fatigue tests were also conducted to characterize the reliability of the welded transparent conductive silver nanowire films. The surfaces of the welded silver nanowire films were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the transmittance of the structures was measured using a spectrophotometer. From the results, a highly conductive and transparent silver nanowire film with excellent reliability could be achieved at room temperature under ambient conditions via the combined flash white light and UV-C irradiation welding process. PMID:27553755

  13. Group IV semiconductor nanowire arrays: epitaxy in different contexts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epitaxy can be used to direct nanowire deposition and to influence the crystallographic orientation of nanowires during their nucleation and growth via the vapor–liquid–solid mechanism. We have investigated rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial Ge nanowires and have used it to separately study nanowire nucleation and growth. This work has provided important insights into deep-subeutectic Ge nanowire growth using Au catalyst particles. Germanium nanowires have also been studied as the cores in epitaxial Ge core/Si shell nanowires. We have studied the conditions under which strain-driven surface roughening and dislocations formation occur in these coaxial nanowire heterostructures. Our results indicate that suppression of Si shell surface roughening can lead to fully strained, coherent core/shell nanowires. Recently, we have used vertical arrays of Ge (1 1 1) nanowires grown at low temperatures on Si substrates to seed liquid-phase epitaxy of large-area amorphous Ge islands above the substrate surface. This work demonstrates a potential approach for dense vertical integration of Ge-based devices on Si substrates, for on-chip optoelectronics or 3D integrated circuit applications

  14. The cluster-assembled nanowires based on M12N12 (M = Al and Ga) clusters as potential gas sensors for CO, NO, and NO2 detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yongliang; Jiang, Huai; Li, Xiaohong; Lv, Shijie; Cao, Jingxiao

    2016-08-01

    The advances in cluster-assembled materials where clusters serve as building blocks have opened new opportunities to develop ever more sensitive gas sensors. Here, using density functional theory calculations, the structural and electronic properties of cluster-assembled nanowires based on M12N12 (M = Al and Ga) clusters and their application as gas sensors have been investigated. Our results show that the nanowires can be produced via the coalescence of stable M12N12 fullerene-like clusters. The M12N12-based nanowires have semiconducting electrical properties with direct energy gaps, and are particularly stable at room temperature for long enough to allow for their characterization and applications. Furthermore, we found that the CO, NO, and NO2 molecules are chemisorbed on the M12N12-based nanowires with reasonable adsorption energies and apparent charge transfer. The electronic properties of the M12N12-based nanowires present dramatic changes after the adsorption of the CO, NO, and NO2 molecules, especially their electric conductivity. However, the adsorption of NO2 on the Al12N12-based nanowire is too strong, indicating an impractical recovery time as NO2 sensors. In addition to this, due to reasonable adsorption energies, apparent charge transfer, change in the electric conductivity, and the short recovery time, the Al12N12-based nanowire should be a good CO and NO sensor with quick response as well as short recovery time, while the Ga12N12-based nanowire should be a promising gas sensor for CO, NO, and NO2 detection. PMID:27424739

  15. Superconducting nanowire photon number resolving detector at telecom wavelength

    CERN Document Server

    Divochiy, Aleksander; Bitauld, David; Gaggero, Alessandro; Leoni, Roberto; Mattioli, Francesco; Korneev, Alexander; Seleznev, Vitaliy; Kaurova, Nataliya; Minaeva, Olga; Goltsman, Gregory; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G; Benkhaoul, Moushab; Levy, Francis; Fiore, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The optical-to-electrical conversion, which is the basis of optical detectors, can be linear or nonlinear. When high sensitivities are needed single-photon detectors (SPDs) are used, which operate in a strongly nonlinear mode, their response being independent of the photon number. Nevertheless, photon-number resolving (PNR) detectors are needed, particularly in quantum optics, where n-photon states are routinely produced. In quantum communication, the PNR functionality is key to many protocols for establishing, swapping and measuring entanglement, and can be used to detect photon-number-splitting attacks. A linear detector with single-photon sensitivity can also be used for measuring a temporal waveform at extremely low light levels, e.g. in long-distance optical communications, fluorescence spectroscopy, optical time-domain reflectometry. We demonstrate here a PNR detector based on parallel superconducting nanowires and capable of counting up to 4 photons at telecommunication wavelengths, with ultralow dark ...

  16. Aligned nanowires and nanodots by directed block copolymer assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Shuaigang; Yang Xiaomin; Lee, Kim Y; Ver der Veerdonk, Rene J M; Kuo, David [Seagate Technology, 47010 Kato Road, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Russell, Thomas P, E-mail: shuaigang.xiao@seagate.com [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts, 120 Governors Drive, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    The directed self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) is a promising route to generate highly ordered arrays of sub-10 nm features. Ultradense arrays of a monolayer of spherical microdomains or cylindrical microdomains oriented parallel to the surface have been produced where the lateral ordering is guided by surface patterning and the lattice defined by the patterning can be commensurate or incommensurate with the natural period of the BCP. Commensurability between the two can be used to elegantly manipulate the lateral ordering and orientation of the BCP microdomains so as to form well-aligned arrays of 1D nanowires or 2D addressable nanodots. No modification of the substrate surface, aside from the patterning, was used, making the influence of lattice mismatch and pattern amplification on the size, shape and pitch of the BCP microdomains more transparent. A skew angle between incommensurate lattices, defining a stretching or compression of the BCP chains to compensate for the lattice mismatch, is presented.

  17. GaN Nanowire Arrays for High-Output Nanogenerators

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Chi-Te

    2010-04-07

    Three-fold symmetrically distributed GaN nanowire (NW) arrays have been epitaxially grown on GaN/sapphire substrates. The GaN NW possesses a triangular cross section enclosed by (0001), (2112), and (2112) planes, and the angle between the GaN NW and the substrate surface is ∼62°. The GaN NW arrays produce negative output voltage pulses when scanned by a conductive atomic force microscope in contact mode. The average of piezoelectric output voltage was about -20 mV, while 5-10% of the NWs had piezoelectric output voltages exceeding -(0.15-0.35) V. The GaN NW arrays are highly stable and highly tolerate to moisture in the atmosphere. The GaN NW arrays demonstrate an outstanding potential to be utilized for piezoelectric energy generation with a performance probably better than that of ZnO NWs. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Acetobacter xylinum NUST4.2摇瓶发酵细菌纤维素的动力学研究%Studies on Fermentation Kinetics of Acetobacter xylinumNUST4.2 Producing Bacterial Cellulose in Shake Flask

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷智超; 马波; 朱春林; 孙东平

    2011-01-01

    研究了细菌纤维素生产菌株Acetobacter xylinum NUST4.2的发酵动力学特性,建立了基于Logistic方程的菌体生长动力学、产物生成动力学、底物消耗动力学,得到了描述摇瓶发酵过程的动力学模型及模型参数,模型与实验数据拟合良好,反映了该菌株分批发酵过程的动力学特征。%The fermentation kinetics of bacterial cellulose-producting strain Acetobacter xylinum NUST4.2 was studied.A kinetic model was established based on the Logistic equation for cell growth,product formation and substrate consumption during fermentation in shake flask.The model fitted well and gave a reasonable description of the batch fermentation process.

  19. Ab initio vibrations in nonequilibrium nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Engelund, Mads; Markussen, T;

    2010-01-01

    We review recent results on electronic and thermal transport in two different quasi one-dimensional systems: Silicon nanowires (SiNW) and atomic gold chains. For SiNW's we compute the ballistic electronic and thermal transport properties on equal footing, allowing us to make quantitative...

  20. Broadband Nonlinear Signal Processing in Silicon Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Pu, Minhao; Hvam, Jørn Märcher;

    The fast non-linearity of silicon allows Tbit/s optical signal processing. By choosing suitable dimensions of silicon nanowires their dispersion can be tailored to ensure a high nonlinearity at power levels low enough to avoid significant two-photon abso We have fabricated low insertion...

  1. In Situ TEM Creation of Nanowire Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal

    Integration of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as active components in devices requires that desired mechanical, thermal and electrical interfaces can be established between the nanoscale geometry of the SiNW and the microscale architecture of the device. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM),...

  2. Abnormal Raman spectral phenomenon of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Raman spectra of two one-dimensional silicon nanowire samples with different excitation wavelengths were measured and an abnormal phenomenon was discovered that the Raman spectral features change with the wavelengths of excitation. Closer analysis of the crystalline structure of samples and the changes in Raman spectral features showed that the abnormal behavior is the result of resonance Raman scattering selection effect.

  3. Silicon nanowire field-effect chemical sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Songyue

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the work that has been done on the project “Design and optimization of silicon nanowire for chemical sensing”, including Si-NW fabrication, electrical/electrochemical modeling, the application as ISFET, and the build-up of Si- NW/LOC system for automatic sample delivery. A nove

  4. Optical Control of Electrons in Au Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Eric; Basnet, Gobind; Huang, Wayne; Flanders, Bret; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanowires, with diameters less than 100 nm, are novel sources for electron field emission. Their geometry confines the propagation of conduction electrons, giving rise to effects not seen in the bulk, such as ballistic currents and surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Dynamics within the wire are probed with laser-induced field emission from the nanowire tip. A balanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to split and delay pulses up to 170 ps from a Ti:Saph oscillator (800 nm, 50 fs) in a pump-probe scheme. The output beamsplitter of the interferometer is mounted on a translation stage to control the separation of the pump and probe beams with sub-micron precision. The beams are focused to 3 μm spots on the tip and shaft of a nanowire, mounted under vacuum at 2 × 10-7 mTorr, by an off-axis parabolic mirror. Field-emitted electrons are counted by a channel electron multiplier. We discuss experimental results of our pump-probe experiments taken at different pump positions. Optical control of electron dynamics within these nanowires may lead to a truly on-demand source of single and multiple electron pulses. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF awards 1306565 and 1430519.

  5. Efficient water reduction with gallium phosphide nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Standing, A.; Assali, S.; Gao, L.; Verheijen, M.A.; Van Dam, D.; Cui, Y.; Notten, P.H.L.; Haverkort, J.E.M.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from solar energy and water offers a clean and sustainable fuel option for the future. Planar III/V material systems have shown the highest efficiencies, but are expensive. By moving to the nanowire regime the demand on material quantity is reduced, and new m

  6. Fully solution-processed transparent electrodes based on silver nanowire composites for perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Areum; Lee, Hongseuk; Kwon, Hyeok-Chan; Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Nam-Gyu; Jeong, Sunho; Moon, Jooho

    2016-03-01

    We report all-solution-processed transparent conductive electrodes based on Ag nanowire (AgNW)-embedded metal oxide composite films for application in organometal halide perovskite solar cells. To address the thermal instability of Ag nanowires, we used combustive sol-gel derived thin films to construct ZnO/ITO/AgNW/ITO composite structures. The resulting composite configuration effectively prevented the AgNWs from undergoing undesirable side-reactions with halogen ions present in the perovskite precursor solutions that significantly deteriorate the optoelectrical properties of Ag nanowires in transparent conductive films. AgNW-based composite electrodes had a transmittance of ~80% at 550 nm and sheet resistance of 18 Ω sq-1. Perovskite solar cells fabricated using a fully solution-processed transparent conductive electrode, Au/spiro-OMeTAD/CH3NH3PbI3 + m-Al2O3/ZnO/ITO/AgNW/ITO, exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 8.44% (comparable to that of the FTO/glass-based counterpart at 10.81%) and were stable for 30 days in ambient air. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using AgNWs as a transparent bottom electrode in perovskite solar cells produced by a fully printable process.We report all-solution-processed transparent conductive electrodes based on Ag nanowire (AgNW)-embedded metal oxide composite films for application in organometal halide perovskite solar cells. To address the thermal instability of Ag nanowires, we used combustive sol-gel derived thin films to construct ZnO/ITO/AgNW/ITO composite structures. The resulting composite configuration effectively prevented the AgNWs from undergoing undesirable side-reactions with halogen ions present in the perovskite precursor solutions that significantly deteriorate the optoelectrical properties of Ag nanowires in transparent conductive films. AgNW-based composite electrodes had a transmittance of ~80% at 550 nm and sheet resistance of 18 Ω sq-1. Perovskite solar cells fabricated using a fully solution

  7. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...

  8. Twin plane re-entrant mechanism for catalytic nanowire growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamalski, Andrew D; Voorhees, Peter W; Ducati, Caterina; Sharma, Renu; Hofmann, Stephan

    2014-03-12

    A twin-plane based nanowire growth mechanism is established using Au catalyzed Ge nanowire growth as a model system. Video-rate lattice-resolved environmental transmission electron microscopy shows a convex, V-shaped liquid catalyst-nanowire growth interface for a ⟨112⟩ growth direction that is composed of two Ge {111} planes that meet at a twin boundary. Unlike bulk crystals, the nanowire geometry allows steady-state growth with a single twin boundary at the nanowire center. We suggest that the nucleation barrier at the twin-plane re-entrant groove is effectively reduced by the line energy, and hence the twin acts as a preferential nucleation site that dictates the lateral step flow cycle which constitutes nanowire growth.

  9. Characterization of Co2FeAl nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Pegg, I. L.; Philip, J.

    2011-03-01

    Heusler alloy, Co 2 FeAl (CFA) is a potentially useful material in the field of spintronics due to its high spin polarization. The CFA nanowires are grown for the first time by the electrospinning method. The diameters of the wires formed are ranging from 80 -- 100 nm. The structural characterization of the nanowires is done using X-Ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The nanowires exhibit cubic structure with a lattice constant, a = 2.44 Å. Parallel arrays of nanowires are grown for magnetic characterization using electric field applied at the collector plate. The nanowires exhibit ferromagnetic behavior with a Curie temperature higher than 400 K. Nanoscale devices are fabricated with single CFA nanowire to understand the magnetotransport properties. This work has been supported by funding from NSF under CAREER Grant No. ECCS-0845501 and NSF-MRI, DMR-0922997.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of single-crystalline alumina nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing; XU Xiang-yu; ZHANG Hong-zhou; CHEN Yao-feng; XU Jun; YU Da-peng

    2005-01-01

    Alumina nanowires were synthesized on large-area silicon substrate via simple thermal evaporation method of heating a mixture of aluminum and alumina powders without using any catalyst or template. The phase structure and the surface morphology of the as-grown sample were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry(XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The chemical composition and the microstructure of the as-grown alumina nanowires were characterized using transmission electron microscope(TEM). The nanowires are usually straight and the single crystalline has average diameter of 40 nm and length of 3 - 5 μm. The growth direction is along the [002] direction. Well aligned alumina nanowire arrays were observed on the surface of many large particles. The catalyst-free growth of the alumina nanowires was explained under the framework of a vapor-solid(VS)growth mechanism. This as-synthesized alumina nanowires could find potential applications in the fabrication of nanodevices.

  11. Theory of second-harmonic generation in silica nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of second-harmonic generation based on surface dipole and bulk multipole nonlinearities in silica nanowires is investigated numerically. Both circular and microstructured nanowires are considered. Phase matching is provided by propagating the pump field in the fundamental mode......, while generating the second harmonic in one of the modes of the LP11 multiplet. This is shown to work in both circular and microstructured nanowires, although only one of the LP11 modes can be phase-matched in the microstructure. The prospect of obtaining large conversion efficiencies in silica......-based nanowires is critically discussed, based on simulations of second-harmonic generation in nanowires with a fluctuating phase-matching wavelength. It is concluded that efficient wavelength conversion will either require strong improvements in the nanowire uniformity, or an increase of the second...

  12. Electrochemical synthesis of CORE-shell magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ovejero, Jesús G.

    2015-04-16

    (Fe, Ni, CoFe) @ Au core-shell magnetic nanowires have been synthesized by optimized two-step potentiostatic electrodeposition inside self-assembled nanopores of anodic aluminium templates. The optimal electrochemical parameters (e.g., potential) have been firstly determined for the growth of continuous Au nanotubes at the inner wall of pores. Then, a magnetic core was synthesized inside the Au shells under suitable electrochemical conditions for a wide spectrum of single elements and alloy compositions (e.g., Fe, Ni and CoFe alloys). Novel opportunities offered by such nanowires are discussed particularly the magnetic behavior of (Fe, Ni, CoFe) @ Au core-shell nanowires was tested and compared with that of bare TM nanowires. These core-shell nanowires can be released from the template so, opening novel opportunities for biofunctionalization of individual nanowires.

  13. Electroless Fabrication of Cobalt Alloys Nanowires within Alumina Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila Dadvand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of nanowire fabrication based on electroless deposition process is described. The method is novel compared to the current electroless procedure used in making nanowires as it involves growing nanowires from the bottom up. The length of the nanowires was controlled at will simply by adjusting the deposition time. The nanowires were fabricated within the nanopores of an alumina template. It was accomplished by coating one side of the template by a thin layer of palladium in order to activate the electroless deposition within the nanopores from bottom up. However, prior to electroless deposition process, the template was pretreated with a suitable wetting agent in order to facilitate the penetration of the plating solution through the pores. As well, the electroless deposition process combined with oblique metal evaporation process within a prestructured silicon wafer was used in order to fabricate long nanowires along one side of the grooves within the wafer.

  14. Capping of rare earth silicide nanowires on Si(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capping of Tb and Dy silicide nanowires grown on Si(001) was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Several nanometers thick amorphous Si films deposited at room temperature allow an even capping, while the nanowires maintain their original structural properties. Subsequent recrystallization by thermal annealing leads to more compact nanowire structures and to troughs in the Si layer above the nanowires, which may even reach down to the nanowires in the case of thin Si films, as well as to V-shaped stacking faults forming along (111) lattice planes. This behavior is related to strain due to the lattice mismatch between the Si overlayer and the nanowires

  15. Controlled coupling of quantum dots to nanowire plasmons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The diameter of dielectric waveguides is limited by the wavelength of the guided light. In contrast, gold and silver nanowires can sustain propagating plasmon modes even for significantly smaller dimensions. Furthermore the strong eld localization of the nanowire plasmon modes leads to a strong interaction with nearby quantum emitters such as quantum dots. We use electron beam lithography, rst, to fabricate silver nanowires and, second, to position a few dots close to one nanowire end in a template-assisted process. Scanning a focused laser spot over the nanowire ends, we demonstrate both, the excitation of nanowire modes by quantum dots and the addressing of the same dots by plasmons. We use the fluorescence signals to quantify the quantum dots/plasmon coupling and show that part of the plasmon-induced dot fluorescence couples back to plasmonic modes. (author)

  16. Tunnel junction enhanced nanowire ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polarization engineered interband tunnel junctions (TJs) are integrated in nanowire ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs). A ∼6 V reduction in turn-on voltage is achieved by the integration of tunnel junction at the base of polarization doped nanowire UV LEDs. Moreover, efficient hole injection into the nanowire LEDs leads to suppressed efficiency droop in TJ integrated nanowire LEDs. The combination of both reduced bias voltage and increased hole injection increases the wall plug efficiency in these devices. More than 100 μW of UV emission at ∼310 nm is measured with external quantum efficiency in the range of 4–6 m%. The realization of tunnel junction within the nanowire LEDs opens a pathway towards the monolithic integration of cascaded multi-junction nanowire LEDs on silicon

  17. Capping of rare earth silicide nanowires on Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelfeller, Stephan; Franz, Martin; Kubicki, Milan; Dähne, Mario [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Reiß, Paul; Niermann, Tore; Lehmann, Michael [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Schubert, Markus Andreas [IHP–Leibniz-Institut für innovative Mikroelektronik, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2016-01-04

    The capping of Tb and Dy silicide nanowires grown on Si(001) was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Several nanometers thick amorphous Si films deposited at room temperature allow an even capping, while the nanowires maintain their original structural properties. Subsequent recrystallization by thermal annealing leads to more compact nanowire structures and to troughs in the Si layer above the nanowires, which may even reach down to the nanowires in the case of thin Si films, as well as to V-shaped stacking faults forming along (111) lattice planes. This behavior is related to strain due to the lattice mismatch between the Si overlayer and the nanowires.

  18. On the thermomechanical deformation of silver shape memory nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Harold S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, VU Station B 351831, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37235-1831 (United States)]. E-mail: harold.park@vanderbilt.edu; Ji, Changjiang [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, VU Station B 351831, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37235-1831 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    We present an analysis of the uniaxial thermomechanical deformation of single-crystal silver shape memory nanowires using atomistic simulations. We first demonstrate that silver nanowires can show both shape memory and pseudoelastic behavior, then perform uniaxial tensile loading of the shape memory nanowires at various deformation temperatures, strain rates and heat transfer conditions. The simulations show that the resulting mechanical response of the shape memory nanowires depends strongly upon the temperature during deformation, and can be fundamentally different from that observed in bulk polycrystalline shape memory alloys. The energy and temperature signatures of uniaxially loaded silver shape memory nanowires are correlated to the observed nanowire deformation, and are further discussed in comparison to bulk polycrystalline shape memory alloy behavior.

  19. Synthetic Strategies and Applications of GaN Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoquan Suo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GaN is an important III-V semiconductor material with a direct band gap of 3.4 eV at 300 K. The wide direct band gap makes GaN an attractive material for various applications. GaN nanowires have demonstrated significant potential as fundamental building blocks for nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices and also offer substantial promise for integrated nanosystems. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review on the general synthetic strategies, characterizations, and applications of GaN nanowires. We first summarize several growth techniques of GaN nanowires. Subsequently, we discuss mechanisms involved to generate GaN nanowires from different synthetic schemes and conditions. Then we review some characterization methods of GaN nanowires. Finally, several kinds of main applications of GaN nanowires are discussed.

  20. Synthesis and electrical characterization of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Rui; Zhu Jing; Yu Rong

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires of diameters ranging from 7 to 200 nm are prepared on a tungsten rod substrate by using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method with vapour-solid (VS) mechanism. Tin powders are used to control oxygen concentration in the furnace, thereby assisting the growth of the tungsten oxide nanowires. The grown tungsten oxide nanowires are determined to be of crystalline W18O49. Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves are measured by an in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) to investigate the electrical properties of the nanowires. All of the Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves observed are symmetric, which reveals that the tungsten oxide nanowires are semiconducting. Quantitative analyses of the experimental I V curves by using a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) model give some intrinsic parameters of the tungsten oxide nanowires, such as the carrier concentration, the carrier mobility and the conductivity.

  1. Solution derived p-ZnO/n-Si nanowire heterojunctions for photodetection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradel, Ken C.; Jevasuwan, Wipakorn; Suwardy, Joko; Bando, Yoshio; Fukata, Naoki; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-08-01

    While there is considerable interest in zinc oxide nanomaterials for optoelectronics research, one weakness of the material is the difficulty in producing p-type zinc oxide. This can be attributed to a number of factors such as acceptor instability, donor compensation during growth, and the formation of deep acceptors. Recently, it was discovered that antimony is a stable p-type dopant in hydrothermally grown ZnO nanowires, and this method has been modified to produce ultra-long nanowires and homojunction thin films. In order to broaden the applicability of this new material, it is important to investigate how it interacts with other semiconducting nanomaterials. In this work we demonstrate a solution grown p-ZnO/n-Si nanowire heterojunction. After investigating its basic materials properties, we show its applicability as an photodetector with responsivity as high as 1.02 A/W at 442 nm, an order of magnitude higher than similar nanostructures based on n-type ZnO and p-type Si.

  2. Enhanced thermoelectric properties in bulk nanowire heterostructure-based nanocomposites through minority carrier blocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoran; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Day, Tristan; Mohammed, Amr M S; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Shakouri, Ali; Wu, Yue

    2015-02-11

    To design superior thermoelectric materials the minority carrier blocking effect in which the unwanted bipolar transport is prevented by the interfacial energy barriers in the heterogeneous nanostructures has been theoretically proposed recently. The theory predicts an enhanced power factor and a reduced bipolar thermal conductivity for materials with a relatively low doping level, which could lead to an improvement in the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT). Here we show the first experimental demonstration of the minority carrier blocking in lead telluride-silver telluride (PbTe-Ag2Te) nanowire heterostructure-based nanocomposites. The nanocomposites are made by sintering PbTe-Ag2Te nanowire heterostructures produced in a highly scalable solution-phase synthesis. Compared with Ag2Te nanowire-based nanocomposite produced in similar method, the PbTe-Ag2Te nanocomposite containing ∼5 atomic % PbTe exhibits enhanced Seebeck coefficient, reduced thermal conductivity, and ∼40% improved ZT, which can be well explained by the theoretical modeling based on the Boltzmann transport equations when energy barriers for both electrons and holes at the heterostructure interfaces are considered in the calculations. For this p-type PbTe-Ag2Te nanocomposite, the barriers for electrons, that is, minority carriers, are primarily responsible for the ZT enhancement. By extending this approach to other nanostructured systems, it represents a key step toward low-cost solution-processable nanomaterials without heavy doping level for high-performance thermoelectric energy harvesting.

  3. Tailoring the surface properties and carrier dynamics in SnO2 nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Ayan; Stroscio, Michael A; Meyyappan, M; Gosztola, David J; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Dutta, Mitra

    2011-07-15

    We report a study of the role of mid-gap defect levels due to surface states in SnO(2) nanowires on carrier trapping. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy provides carrier relaxation time constants that reveal the nature and positions of various defect levels due to the surface states which in turn provide details on how the carriers relax after their injection. The effect of oxygen annealing on carrier concentration is also studied through XPS valence band photoemission spectroscopy, a sensitive non-contact surface characterization technique. These measurements show that charge transfer associated with chemisorption of oxygen in different forms produces an upward band bending and leads to an increase in the depletion layer width by approximately 70 nm, thereby decreasing surface conductivity and forming the basis for the molecular sensing capability of the nanowires.

  4. Tailoring the surface properties and carrier dynamics in SnO{sub 2} nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Ayan; Stroscio, Michael A; Dutta, Mitra [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Meyyappan, M [Center for Nanotechnology, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Gosztola, David J; Wiederrecht, Gary P, E-mail: dutta@ece.uic.edu [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    We report a study of the role of mid-gap defect levels due to surface states in SnO{sub 2} nanowires on carrier trapping. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy provides carrier relaxation time constants that reveal the nature and positions of various defect levels due to the surface states which in turn provide details on how the carriers relax after their injection. The effect of oxygen annealing on carrier concentration is also studied through XPS valence band photoemission spectroscopy, a sensitive non-contact surface characterization technique. These measurements show that charge transfer associated with chemisorption of oxygen in different forms produces an upward band bending and leads to an increase in the depletion layer width by approximately 70 nm, thereby decreasing surface conductivity and forming the basis for the molecular sensing capability of the nanowires.

  5. Wafer-Level Patterned and Aligned Polymer Nanowire/Micro- and Nanotube Arrays on any Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Morber, Jenny Ruth

    2009-05-25

    A study was conducted to fabricate wafer-level patterned and aligned polymer nanowire (PNW), micro- and nanotube arrays (PNT), which were created by exposing the polymer material to plasma etching. The approach for producing wafer-level aligned PNWs involved a one-step inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching process. The polymer nanowire array was fabricated in an ICP reactive ion milling chamber with a pressure of 10mTorr. Argon (Ar), O 2, and CF4 gases were released into the chamber as etchants at flow rates of 15 sccm, 10 sccm, and 40 sccm. Inert gasses, such as Ar-form positive ions were incorporated to serve as a physical component to assist in the material degradation process. One power source (400 W) was used to generate dense plasma from the input gases, while another power source applied a voltage of approximately 600V to accelerate the plasma toward the substrate.

  6. Single Crystal Fe Nanowire Arrays Encapsulated by SiO2 Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing LIN; Lianzeng YAO; Guowei JIANG; Chuangui JIN; Weifeng LIU; Weili CAI; Zhen YAO

    2004-01-01

    Aligned silicon dioxide nanotubes with diameter of 60~70 nm were synthesized inside the nanoholes of an anodic Al membrane (AAM) template by pressure impregnating the AAM pores with the SiO2 sol. The SiO2 nanotubes with different wall thickness were produced by repeating the process. Using the second-order template of porous AAM with silicon dioxide nanotubes, it was fabricated the nanostructure of Fe nanowires encapsulated by SiO2 nanotubes by electrochemical deposition. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations show that the nanotubes and nanocables are compact, continuous and uniform. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern shows the Fe nanowire is a single crystal. The magnetic properties of these samples were checked by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The coercivities of the samples are greatly improved compared to the corresponding bulk materials.

  7. A Robust Highly Aligned DNA Nanowire Array-Enabled Lithography for Graphene Nanoribbon Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Wan Sik; Lin, Zhiqun; Kwon, Se Hun; Hong, Suck Won

    2015-12-01

    Because of its excellent charge carrier mobility at the Dirac point, graphene possesses exceptional properties for high-performance devices. Of particular interest is the potential use of graphene nanoribbons or graphene nanomesh for field-effect transistors. Herein, highly aligned DNA nanowire arrays were crafted by flow-assisted self-assembly of a drop of DNA aqueous solution on a flat polymer substrate. Subsequently, they were exploited as "ink" and transfer-printed on chemical vapor deposited (CVD)-grown graphene substrate. The oriented DNA nanowires served as the lithographic resist for selective removal of graphene, forming highly aligned graphene nanoribbons. Intriguingly, these graphene nanoribbons can be readily produced over a large area (i.e., millimeter scale) with a high degree of feature-size controllability and a low level of defects, rendering the fabrication of flexible two terminal devices and field-effect transistors.

  8. Structural, electronic, and transport properties of silicon nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Rurali, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review the theory of silicon nanowires. We focus on nanowires with diameters below 10 nm, where quantum effects become important and the properties diverge significantly from those of bulk silicon. These wires can be efficiently treated within electronic structure simulation methods and will be among the most important functional blocks of future nanoelectronic devices. Firstly, we review the structural properties of silicon nanowires, emphasizing the close connection between...

  9. Synthesis, chemical modification, and surface assembly of carbon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amma, A.; St. Angelo, S.K.; Mallouk, T.E. [Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Razavi, B.; Mayer, T.S. [Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Carbon nanotubules and nanowires were synthesized by pyrolysis of polymer precursors in the pores of alumina membranes. The nanowires were released by dissolving the membranes, and were then made hydrophobic or hydrophilic by chemical surface derivatization. These nanowires could be placed into lithographically defined wells on surfaces by means of electrostatic interactions with monolayers at the bottoms of the wells. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K. PMID:26698787

  11. Tungsten oxide nanowire synthesis from amorphous-like tungsten films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelaboyina, Raghunandan

    2016-03-18

    A synthesis technique which can lead to direct integration of tungsten oxide nanowires onto silicon chips is essential for preparing various devices. The conversion of amorphous tungsten films deposited on silicon chips by pulsed layer deposition to nanowires by annealing is an apt method in that direction. This perspective discusses the ingenious features of the technique reported by Dellasega et al on the various aspects of tungsten oxide nanowire synthesis. PMID:26871521

  12. Impacts of Atomistic Coating on Thermal Conductivity of Germanium Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2012-01-01

    By using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrated that thermal conductivity of Germanium nanowires can be reduced more than 25% at room temperature by atomistic coating. There is a critical coating thickness beyond which thermal conductivity of the coated nanowire is larger than that of the host nanowire. The diameter dependent critical coating thickness and minimum thermal conductivity are explored. Moreover, we found that interface roughness can induce further reducti...

  13. CdTe Nanowires studied by Transient Absorption Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuno M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient absorption measurements were performed on single CdTe nanowires. The traces show fast decays that were assigned to charge carrier trapping at surface states. The observed power dependence suggests the existence of a trap-filling mechanism. Acoustic phonon modes were also observed, which were assigned to breathing modes of the nanowires. Both the fundamental breathing mode and the first overtone were observed, and the dephasing times provide information about how the nanowires interact with their environment.

  14. Optical Trapping and Control of a Nanowire by a Nanoaperture

    CERN Document Server

    Aporvari, Mehdi Shafiei; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a single sub-wavelength nanoaperture in a metallic thin film can be used to achieve dynamic optical trapping and control of a single dielectric nanowire. A nanoaperture can trap a nanowire, control its orientation when illuminated by a linearly-polarized incident field, and also rotate the nanowire when illuminated by a circularly-polarized incident field. Compared to other designs, this approach has the advantages of a low-power driving field entailing low heating and photodamage.

  15. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K.

  16. Bacterial Community Analysis, New Exoelectrogen Isolation and Enhanced Performance of Microbial Electrochemical Systems Using Nano-Decorated Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shoutao

    Microbial electrochemical systems (MESs) have attracted much research attention in recent years due to their promising applications in renewable energy generation, bioremediation, and wastewater treatment. In a MES, microorganisms interact with electrodes via electrons, catalyzing oxidation and reduction reactions at the anode and the cathode. The bacterial community of a high power mixed consortium MESs (maximum power density is 6.5W/m2) was analyzed by using denature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S DNA clone library methods. The bacterial DGGE profiles were relatively complex (more than 10 bands) but only three brightly dominant bands in DGGE results. These results indicated there are three dominant bacterial species in mixed consortium MFCs. The 16S DNA clone library method results revealed that the predominant bacterial species in mixed culture is Geobacter sp (66%), Arcobacter sp and Citrobacter sp. These three bacterial species reached to 88% of total bacterial species. This result is consistent with the DGGE result which showed that three bright bands represented three dominant bacterial species. Exoelectrogenic bacterial strain SX-1 was isolated from a mediator-less microbial fuel cell by conventional plating techniques with ferric citrate as electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed that it was related to the members of Citrobacter genus with Citrobacter sp. sdy-48 being the most closely related species. The bacterial strain SX-1 produced electricity from citrate, acetate, glucose, sucrose, glycerol, and lactose in MFCs with the highest current density of 205 mA/m2 generated from citrate. Cyclic voltammetry analysis indicated that membrane associated proteins may play an important role in facilitating electron transfer from the bacteria to the electrode. This is the first study that demonstrates that Citrobacter species can transfer electrons to extracellular electron acceptors

  17. Electric current induced modification of germanium nanowire NEM switch contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meija, R.; Kosmaca, J.; Jasulaneca, L.; Petersons, K.; Biswas, S.; Holmes, J. D.; Erts, D.

    2015-05-01

    We present an investigation of contact properties of a germanium (Ge) nanowire based nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switch in its ON state. The contact stiffness in the ON state was evaluated by detecting the nanowire’s resonance frequency. It was found that the resonance frequency increases when electric current flows through the nanowire/counter electrode contact area. The reason for modification in the contact area is referred to as electric-current-induced processes in the native oxide layer covering the nanowires. The presented resonance shift method is a simple way to indicate strengthening of the nanowire/counter electrode contact area without disassembling the contact.

  18. Coulomb Blockade in an Ultrathin Ti Nanowire at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAIQiyu; YANGTao; CAIBingchu; YINYou; JIANGJianfei

    2003-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope operated in ambient air was employed to fabricate a~ 30nm-wide and ~ 700nm-long Ti nanowire connecting the source and drain electrodes on a 3nm-thick Ti film. The ultraflne but nonuniform Ti nanowire was well defined between two ox-idized lines. The gate electrode was capacitively coupled to the nanowire by a ~150nm-wide oxidized line. The electrical properties measured at room temperature of the Ti nanowire showed Coulomb blockade in highly nonlinear Ids-Vds characteristics and Coulomb oscillation in Ids - Vgs characteristics.

  19. III–V nanowire arrays: growth and light interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconductor nanowire arrays are reproducible and rational platforms for the realization of high performing designs of light emitting diodes and photovoltaic devices. In this paper we present an overview of the growth challenges of III–V nanowire arrays obtained by molecular beam epitaxy and the design of III–V nanowire arrays on silicon for solar cells. While InAs tends to grow in a relatively straightforward manner on patterned (111)Si substrates, GaAs nanowires remain more challenging; success depends on the cleaning steps, annealing procedure, pattern design and mask thickness. Nanowire arrays might also be used for next generation solar cells. We discuss the photonic effects derived from the vertical configuration of nanowires standing on a substrate and how these are beneficial for photovoltaics. Finally, due to the special interaction of light with standing nanowires we also show that the Raman scattering properties of standing nanowires are modified. This result is important for fundamental studies on the structural and functional properties of nanowires. (paper)

  20. Electrochemical Deposition and Properties of ZnTe Nanowire Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG You-Wen; LI Liang; YE Min; WU Yu-Cheng; XIE Ting; LI Guang-Hai

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed electrodeposited technique is applied to fabricate ZnTe nanowire arrays with different diameters into the anodic alumina membrane in citric acid solution. The x-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate that the high ordered, uniform and single-crystalline nanowires have been fabricated. The optical absorption spectra of the nanowire array show that the optical absorption band edge of the ZnTe nanowire array exhibit a blue shift compared with that of bulk ZnTe, and the nonlinear current-voltage characteristic is observed.

  1. Smooth germanium nanowires prepared by a hydrothermal deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.Z., E-mail: lzpei1977@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Zhao, H.S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Tan, W. [Henkel Huawei Electronics Co. Ltd., Lian' yungang, Jiangsu 222006 (China); Yu, H.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Chen, Y.W. [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Fan, C.G. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Zhang, Qian-Feng, E-mail: zhangqf@ahut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Smooth germanium nanowires were prepared using Ge and GeO{sub 2} as the starting materials and Cu sheet as the substrate by a simple hydrothermal deposition process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterizations show that the germanium nanowires are smooth and straight with uniform diameter of about 150 nm in average and tens of micrometers in length. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum of the germanium nanowires display that the germanium nanowires are mainly composed of cubic diamond phase. PL spectrum shows a strong blue light emission at 441 nm. The growth mechanism is also discussed.

  2. Nanowires:inter-connection between newton mechanics and quantum mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nanowires have been proved to be excellent candidates for future nanodevices for their advantages of being the smallest charge carrier,enabling abundant choice of materials,and related size,surface and quantum effects.Nanowires thus play important role to understand the physical phenomena between macro-scale Newton world and the micro-scale quantum mechanical world. Our group is among the few pioneers in early 1998's in developing methods for synthesis of silicon nanowires,and extending the nanowire synt...

  3. Helical Growth of Ultrathin Gold-Copper Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Cruz, Rubén; Bazán-Díaz, Lourdes; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Bahena-Uribe, Daniel; Reyes-Gasga, José; Romeu, David; Guisbiers, Grégory; Herrera-Becerra, Raúl; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis and detailed structural characterization of novel helical gold-copper nanowires. The nanowires possess the Boerdijk-Coxeter-Bernal structure, based on the pile up of octahedral, icosahedral, and/or decahedral seeds. They are self-assembled into a coiled manner as individual wires or into a parallel-ordering way as groups of wires. The helical nanowires are ultrathin with a diameter of less than 10 nm and variable length of several micrometers, presenting a high density of twin boundaries and stacking faults. To the best of our knowledge, such gold-copper nanowires have never been reported previously. PMID:26849249

  4. Ultrafine Metal-Organic Right Square Prism Shaped Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, Ken-Ichi; Otsubo, Kazuya; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-05-23

    We report the structural design and control of electronic states of a new series of ultrafine metal-organic right square prism-shaped nanowires. These nanowires have a very small inner diameter of about 2.0 Å, which is larger than hydrogen and similar to xenon atomic diameters. The electronic states of nanowires can be widely controlled by substitution of structural components. Moreover, the platinum homometallic nanowire shows a 100 times higher proton conductivity than a palladium/platinum heterometallic one depending on the electronic states. PMID:27080935

  5. Synthesis and Growth Mechanism of Ni Nanotubes and Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yiqian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Highly ordered Ni nanotube and nanowire arrays were fabricated via electrodeposition. The Ni microstructures and the process of the formation were investigated using conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Herein, we demonstrated the systematic fabrication of Ni nanotube and nanowire arrays and proposed an original growth mechanism. With the different deposition time, nanotubes or nanowires can be obtained. Tubular nanostructures can be obtained at short time, while nanowires take longer time to form. This formation mechanism is applicable to design and synthesize other metal nanostructures and even compound nanostuctures via template-based electrodeposition.

  6. Deformation mechanisms of Cu nanowires with planar defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Xia, E-mail: tianxia@lsec.cc.ac.cn; Yang, Haixia; Wan, Rui [College of Mechanics and Materials, HoHai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Cui, Junzhi [LSEC, ICMSEC, Academy of Mathematics and System Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yu, Xingang [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-01-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the mechanical behavior of Cu nanowires (NWs) with planar defects such as grain boundaries (GBs), twin boundaries (TBs), stacking faults (SFs), etc. To investigate how the planar defects affect the deformation and fracture mechanisms of naowires, three types of nanowires are considered in this paper: (1) polycrystalline Cu nanowire; (2) single-crystalline Cu nanowire with twin boundaries; and (3) single-crystalline Cu nanowire with stacking faults. Because of the large fraction of atoms at grain boundaries, the energy of grain boundaries is higher than that of the grains. Thus, grain boundaries are proved to be the preferred sites for dislocations to nucleate. Moreover, necking and fracture prefer to occur at the grain boundary interface owing to the weakness of grain boundaries. For Cu nanowires in the presence of twin boundaries, it is found that twin boundaries can strength nanowires due to the restriction of the movement of dislocations. The pile up of dislocations on twin boundaries makes them rough, inducing high energy in twin boundaries. Hence, twin boundaries can emit dislocations, and necking initiates at twin boundaries. In the case of Cu nanowires with stacking faults, all pre-existing stacking faults in the nanowires are observed to disappear during deformation, giving rise to a fracture process resembling the samples without stacking fault.

  7. Controlled growth of large-scale silver nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Cong-Wen; Yang Hai-Tao; Shen Cheng-Min; Li Zi-An; Zhang Huai-Ruo; Liu Fei; Yang Tian-Zhong; Chen Shu-Tang; Gao Hong-Jun

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale silver nanowires with controlled aspect ratio were synthesized via reducing silver nitrate with 1, 2-propanediol in the presence of poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were employed to characterize these silver nanowires. The diameter of the silver nanowires can be readily controlled in the range of 100 to 400 nm by varying the experimental conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results show that there exists no chemical bond between the silver and the nitrogen atoms. The interaction between PVP and silver nanowires is mainly through the oxygen atom in the carbonyl group.

  8. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  9. Bacterial Probiotic Modulation of Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Drakes, Maureen; Blanchard, Thomas; Czinn, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal dendritic cells are continually exposed to ingested microorganisms and high concentrations of endogenous bacterial flora. These cells can be activated by infectious agents and other stimuli to induce T-cell responses and to produce chemokines which recruit other cells to the local environment. Bacterial probiotics are of increasing use against intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. They act as nonpathogenic stimuli within the gut to regain immunologic quiescence. ...

  10. Plant Natural Products Targeting Bacterial Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laura Nunes; Zimmer, Karine Rigon; Macedo, Alexandre José; Trentin, Danielle Silva

    2016-08-24

    Decreased antimicrobial efficiency has become a global public health issue. The paucity of new antibacterial drugs is evident, and the arsenal against infectious diseases needs to be improved urgently. The selection of plants as a source of prototype compounds is appropriate, since plant species naturally produce a wide range of secondary metabolites that act as a chemical line of defense against microorganisms in the environment. Although traditional approaches to combat microbial infections remain effective, targeting microbial virulence rather than survival seems to be an exciting strategy, since the modulation of virulence factors might lead to a milder evolutionary pressure for the development of resistance. Additionally, anti-infective chemotherapies may be successfully achieved by combining antivirulence and conventional antimicrobials, extending the lifespan of these drugs. This review presents an updated discussion of natural compounds isolated from plants with chemically characterized structures and activity against the major bacterial virulence factors: quorum sensing, bacterial biofilms, bacterial motility, bacterial toxins, bacterial pigments, bacterial enzymes, and bacterial surfactants. Moreover, a critical analysis of the most promising virulence factors is presented, highlighting their potential as targets to attenuate bacterial virulence. The ongoing progress in the field of antivirulence therapy may therefore help to translate this promising concept into real intervention strategies in clinical areas. PMID:27437994

  11. Fracture strain of SiC nanowires and direct evidence of electron-beam induced amorphisation in the strained nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiliang; Wu, Yueqin; Lin, Liangwu; He, Yuehui; Huang, Han

    2015-04-01

    SiC nanowires with diameters ranging from 29 to 270 nm exhibit an average strain of 5.5% with a maximum of up to 7.0%. The brittle fracture of the nano-wires being measured was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. This study demonstrates that amorphisation occurs in the stained SiC nanowires during normal TEM examination, which could be induced by electron irradiation. PMID:25367627

  12. Polaronic transport and current blockades in epitaxial silicide nanowires and nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Violeta; Zhang, X-G; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Menard, Laurent D; Kent, P R C; Woodson, Michael E; Ramsey, J Michael; Li, An-Ping; Weitering, Hanno H

    2013-08-14

    Crystalline micrometer-long YSi2 nanowires with cross sections as small as 1 × 0.5 nm(2) can be grown on the Si(001) surface. Their extreme aspect ratios make electron conduction within these nanowires almost ideally one-dimensional, while their compatibility with the silicon platform suggests application as metallic interconnect in Si-based nanoelectronic devices. Here we combine bottom-up epitaxial wire synthesis in ultrahigh vacuum with top-down miniaturization of the electrical measurement probes to elucidate the electronic conduction mechanism of both individual wires and arrays of nanowires. Temperature-dependent transport through individual nanowires is indicative of thermally assisted tunneling of small polarons between atomic-scale defect centers. In-depth analysis of complex wire networks emphasize significant electronic crosstalk between the nanowires due to the long-range Coulomb fields associated with polaronic charge fluctuations. This work establishes a semiquantitative correlation between the density and distributions of atomic-scale defects and resulting current-voltage characteristics of nanoscale network devices. PMID:23902411

  13. Investigation of Defect Free SiGe Nanowire Biosensor Modified by Dual Plasma Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Chang, Tai-Yuan; Lai, Chiung-Hui; Chang, Kow-Ming; Chen, Chu-Feng; Lai, Yi-Lung; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei; Lai, Hui-Lung; Hsu, Terng-Ren

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been extensively investigated and discussed in various fields due to their unique physical properties. In this paper, we successfully produce SiGe NWs biosensor by VLSI technology. We propose the dual plasma technology with CF4 plasma pre-treatment and N2 plasma post-treatment for repairs of defects as well as optimization of SiGe NWs biosensor. The results indicate that sensitivity (S) of the biosensor with dual plasma technology has significantly improved at least 32.8%, suitable for producing industrial SiGe NWs biosensor in the future.

  14. Investigation of Defect Free SiGe Nanowire Biosensor Modified by Dual Plasma Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Chang, Tai-Yuan; Lai, Chiung-Hui; Chang, Kow-Ming; Chen, Chu-Feng; Lai, Yi-Lung; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei; Lai, Hui-Lung; Hsu, Terng-Ren

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been extensively investigated and discussed in various fields due to their unique physical properties. In this paper, we successfully produce SiGe NWs biosensor by VLSI technology. We propose the dual plasma technology with CF4 plasma pre-treatment and N2 plasma post-treatment for repairs of defects as well as optimization of SiGe NWs biosensor. The results indicate that sensitivity (S) of the biosensor with dual plasma technology has significantly improved at least 32.8%, suitable for producing industrial SiGe NWs biosensor in the future. PMID:27433604

  15. GaN Nanowire Devices: Fabrication and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Reum

    The development of microelectronics in the last 25 years has been characterized by an exponential increase of the bit density in integrated circuits (ICs) with time. Scaling solid-state devices improves cost, performance, and power; as such, it is of particular interest for companies, who gain a market advantage with the latest technology. As a result, the microelectronics industry has driven transistor feature size scaling from 10 μm to ~30 nm during the past 40 years. This trend has persisted for 40 years due to optimization, new processing techniques, device structures, and materials. But when noting processor speeds from the 1970's to 2009 and then again in 2010, the implication would be that the trend has ceased. To address the challenge of shrinking the integrated circuit (IC), current research is centered on identifying new materials and devices that can supplement and/or potentially supplant it. Bottom-up methods tailor nanoscale building blocks---atoms, molecules, quantum dots, and nanowires (NWs)---to be used to overcome these limitations. The Group IIIA nitrides (InN, AlN, and GaN) possess appealing properties such as a direct band gap spanning the whole solar spectrum, high saturation velocity, and high breakdown electric field. As a result nanostructures and nanodevices made from GaN and related nitrides are suitable candidates for efficient nanoscale UV/ visible light emitters, detectors, and gas sensors. To produce devices with such small structures new fabrication methods must be implemented. Devices composed of GaN nanowires were fabricated using photolithography and electron beam lithography. The IV characteristics of these devices were noted under different illuminations and the current tripled from 4.8*10-7 A to 1.59*10 -6 A under UV light which persisted for at least 5hrs.

  16. Evaluating plasmonic transport in current-carrying silver nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingxia; Stolz, Arnaud; Zhang, Douguo; Arocas, Juan; Markey, Laurent; Colas des Francs, Gérard; Dujardin, Erik; Bouhelier, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging technology capable of simultaneously transporting a plasmonic signal and an electronic signal on the same information support. In this context, metal nanowires are especially desirable for realizing dense routing networks. A prerequisite to operate such shared nanowire-based platform relies on our ability to electrically contact individual metal nanowires and efficiently excite surface plasmon polaritons in this information support. In this article, we describe a protocol to bring electrical terminals to chemically-synthesized silver nanowires randomly distributed on a glass substrate. The positions of the nanowire ends with respect to predefined landmarks are precisely located using standard optical transmission microscopy before encapsulation in an electron-sensitive resist. Trenches representing the electrode layout are subsequently designed by electron-beam lithography. Metal electrodes are then fabricated by thermally evaporating a Cr/Au layer followed by a chemical lift-off. The contacted silver nanowires are finally transferred to a leakage radiation microscope for surface plasmon excitation and characterization. Surface plasmons are launched in the nanowires by focusing a near infrared laser beam on a diffraction-limited spot overlapping one nanowire extremity. For sufficiently large nanowires, the surface plasmon mode leaks into the glass substrate. This leakage radiation is readily detected, imaged, and analyzed in the different conjugate planes in leakage radiation microscopy. The electrical terminals do not affect the plasmon propagation. However, a current-induced morphological deterioration of the nanowire drastically degrades the flow of surface plasmons. The combination of surface plasmon leakage radiation microscopy with a simultaneous analysis of the nanowire electrical transport characteristics reveals the intrinsic limitations of such plasmonic circuitry. PMID:24378340

  17. Materialization of single multicomposite nanowire: entrapment of ZnO nanoparticles in polyaniline nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present materialization of single multicomposite nanowire (SMNW-entrapped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs via an electrochemical growth method, which is a newly developed fabrication method to grow a single nanowire between a pair of pre-patterned electrodes. Entrapment of ZnO NPs was controlled via different conditions of SMNW fabrication such as an applied potential and mixture ratio of NPs and aniline solution. The controlled concentration of ZnO NP results in changes in the physical properties of the SMNWs, as shown in transmission electron microscopy images. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity and elasticity of SMNWs show improvement over those of pure polyaniline nanowire. The new nano-multicomposite material showed synergistic effects on mechanical and electrical properties, with logarithmical change and saturation increasing ZnO NP concentration.

  18. A review of the electrical properties of semiconductor nanowires: insights gained from terahertz conductivity spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Hannah J.; Boland, Jessica L.; Davies, Christopher L.; Baig, Sarwat A.; Johnston, Michael B.

    2016-10-01

    Accurately measuring and controlling the electrical properties of semiconductor nanowires is of paramount importance in the development of novel nanowire-based devices. In light of this, terahertz (THz) conductivity spectroscopy has emerged as an ideal non-contact technique for probing nanowire electrical conductivity and is showing tremendous value in the targeted development of nanowire devices. THz spectroscopic measurements of nanowires enable charge carrier lifetimes, mobilities, dopant concentrations and surface recombination velocities to be measured with high accuracy and high throughput in a contact-free fashion. This review spans seminal and recent studies of the electronic properties of nanowires using THz spectroscopy. A didactic description of THz time-domain spectroscopy, optical pump-THz probe spectroscopy, and their application to nanowires is included. We review a variety of technologically important nanowire materials, including GaAs, InAs, InP, GaN and InN nanowires, Si and Ge nanowires, ZnO nanowires, nanowire heterostructures, doped nanowires and modulation-doped nanowires. Finally, we discuss how THz measurements are guiding the development of nanowire-based devices, with the example of single-nanowire photoconductive THz receivers.

  19. Density-controlled growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowires using chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Well-aligned ZnO nanowires were grown on Si substrate by chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the density of nanowires was related to the heating process and growth temperature.High-density ZnO nanowires were obtained under optimal conditions.The growth mechanism of the ZnO nanowires was presented as well.

  20. Thermodynamics Properties of Mesoscopic Quantum Nanowire Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Attia A.AwadAlla; Adel H.Phillips

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics properties of mesoscopic quantum nanowire devices, such as the effect of electron-phonon relaxation time, Peltier coefficient, carrier concentration, frequency of this field, and channel width. The influence of time-varying fields on the transport through such device has been taken into consideration. This device is modelled as nanowires connecting to two reservoirs. The two-dimensional electron gas in a GaAs-AlGaAs heterojunction has a Fermi wave length which is a hundred times larger than that in a metal. The results show the oscillatory behaviour of dependence of the thermo power on frequency of the induced field. These results agree with the existing experiments and may be important for electronic nanodevices.