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Sample records for bacterial microbiota profiling

  1. Bacterial microbiota profile in gills of modified atmosphere-packaged oysters stored at 4 °C.

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    Chen, Huibin; Wang, Meiying; Lin, Xiangzhi; Shi, Caihua; Liu, Zhiyu

    2017-02-01

    As filter-feeding bivalves, oysters can accumulate microorganisms into their gills, causing spoilage and potential safety issues. This study aims to investigate the changes in the gill microbiota of oysters packed under air and modified atmospheres (MAs, 50% CO 2 : 50% N 2 , 70% CO 2 : 30% O 2 , and 50% CO 2 : 50% O 2 ) during storage at 4 °C. The diversity of bacterial microbiota in oyster gills was profiled through polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis on the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to describe the variation during the entire storage period. The DGGE profile revealed high bacterial diversity in the air- and MA-packaged oyster gills, and the spoilage bacterial microbiota varied in the MA-packaged oyster gills. Results indicated that CO 2 :O 2 (70%:30%) was suitable for oyster MA packaging and that high bacterial loads in oyster gills need to be considered during storage. In addition, Lactobacillus and Lactococcus species were found to grow dominantly in fresh oyster gills under MA packaging, which supports the potential application of MA packaging for oyster storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial microbiota profiling in gastritis without Helicobacter pylori infection or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use.

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    Xiao-Xing Li

    Full Text Available Recent 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA molecular profiling of the stomach mucosa revealed a surprising complexity of microbiota. Helicobacter pylori infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use are two main contributors to gastritis and peptic ulcer. However, little is known about the association between other members of the stomach microbiota and gastric diseases. In this study, cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA was used to profile the stomach microbiota from normal and gastritis patients. One hundred and thirty three phylotypes from eight bacterial phyla were identified. The stomach microbiota was found to be closely adhered to the mucosa. Eleven Streptococcus phylotypes were successfully cultivated from the biopsies. One to two genera represented a majority of clones within any of the identified phyla. We further developed two real-time quantitative PCR assays to quantify the relative abundance of the Firmicutes phylum and the Streptococcus genus. Significantly higher abundance of the Firmicutes phylum and the Streptococcus genus within the Firmicutes phylum was observed in patients with antral gastritis, compared with normal controls. This study suggests that the genus taxon level can largely represent much higher taxa such as the phylum. The clinical relevance and the mechanism underlying the altered microbiota composition in gastritis require further functional studies.

  3. Gut bacterial microbiota and obesity.

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    Million, M; Lagier, J-C; Yahav, D; Paul, M

    2013-04-01

    Although probiotics and antibiotics have been used for decades as growth promoters in animals, attention has only recently been drawn to the association between the gut microbiota composition, its manipulation, and obesity. Studies in mice have associated the phylum Firmicutes with obesity and the phylum Bacteroidetes with weight loss. Proposed mechanisms linking the microbiota to fat content and weight include differential effects of bacteria on the efficiency of energy extraction from the diet, and changes in host metabolism of absorbed calories. The independent effect of the microbiota on fat accumulation has been demonstrated in mice, where transplantation of microbiota from obese mice or mice fed western diets to lean or germ-free mice produced fat accumulation among recipients. The microbiota can be manipulated by prebiotics, probiotics, and antibiotics. Probiotics affect the microbiota directly by modulating its bacterial content, and indirectly through bacteriocins produced by the probiotic bacteria. Interestingly, certain probiotics are associated with weight gain both in animals and in humans. The effects are dependent on the probiotic strain, the host, and specific host characteristics, such as age and baseline nutritional status. Attention has recently been drawn to the association between antibiotic use and weight gain in children and adults. We herein review the studies describing the associations between the microbiota composition, its manipulation, and obesity. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  4. Bacterial Microbiota of Rice Roots: 16S-Based Taxonomic Profiling of Endophytic and Rhizospheric Diversity, Endophytes Isolation and Simplified Endophytic Community.

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    Moronta-Barrios, Felix; Gionechetti, Fabrizia; Pallavicini, Alberto; Marys, Edgloris; Venturi, Vittorio

    2018-02-11

    Rice is currently the most important food crop in the world and we are only just beginning to study the bacterial associated microbiome. It is of importance to perform screenings of the core rice microbiota and also to develop new plant-microbe models and simplified communities for increasing our understanding about the formation and function of its microbiome. In order to begin to address this aspect, we have performed a 16S rDNA taxonomic bacterial profiling of the rhizosphere and endorhizosphere of two high-yield rice cultivars-Pionero 2010 FL and DANAC SD20A-extensively grown in Venezuela in 2014. Fifteen putative bacterial endophytes were then isolated from surface-sterilized roots and further studied in vitro and in planta . We have then performed inoculation of rice seedlings with a simplified community composed by 10 of the isolates and we have tracked them in the course of 30 days in greenhouse cultivation. The results obtained suggest that a set was able to significantly colonize together the rice endorhizospheres, indicating possible cooperation and the ability to form a stable multispecies community. This approach can be useful in the development of microbial solutions for a more sustainable rice production.

  5. Gut microbiota composition modifies fecal metabolic profiles in mice.

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    Zhao, Ying; Wu, Junfang; Li, Jia V; Zhou, Ning-Yi; Tang, Huiru; Wang, Yulan

    2013-06-07

    The gut microbiome is known to be extensively involved in human health and disease. In order to reveal the metabolic relationship between host and microbiome, we monitored recovery of the gut microbiota composition and fecal profiles of mice after gentamicin and/or ceftriaxone treatments. This was performed by employing (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint of gut microbiota. The common features of fecal metabolites postantibiotic treatment include decreased levels of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), amino acids and primary bile acids and increased oligosaccharides, d-pinitol, choline and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic acid). This suggests suppressed bacterial fermentation, protein degradation and enhanced gut microbial modification of bile acids. Barnesiella, Prevotella, and Alistipes levels were shown to decrease as a result of the antibiotic treatment, whereas levels of Bacteroides, Enterococcus and Erysipelotrichaceae incertae sedis, and Mycoplasma increased after gentamicin and ceftriaxone treatment. In addition, there was a strong correlation between fecal profiles and levels of Bacteroides, Barnesiella, Alistipes and Prevotella. The integration of metabonomics and gut microbiota profiling provides important information on the changes of gut microbiota and their impact on fecal profiles during the recovery after antibiotic treatment. The correlation between gut microbiota and fecal metabolites provides important information on the function of bacteria, which in turn could be important in optimizing therapeutic strategies, and developing potential microbiota-based disease preventions and therapeutic interventions.

  6. Early respiratory microbiota composition determines bacterial succession patterns and respiratory health in children.

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    Biesbroek, Giske; Tsivtsivadze, Evgeni; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Montijn, Roy; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Keijser, Bart J F; Bogaert, Debby

    2014-12-01

    Many bacterial pathogens causing respiratory infections in children are common residents of the respiratory tract. Insight into bacterial colonization patterns and microbiota stability at a young age might elucidate healthy or susceptible conditions for development of respiratory disease. To study bacterial succession of the respiratory microbiota in the first 2 years of life and its relation to respiratory health characteristics. Upper respiratory microbiota profiles of 60 healthy children at the ages of 1.5, 6, 12, and 24 months were characterized by 16S-based pyrosequencing. We determined consecutive microbiota profiles by machine-learning algorithms and validated the findings cross-sectionally in an additional cohort of 140 children per age group. Overall, we identified eight distinct microbiota profiles in the upper respiratory tract of healthy infants. Profiles could already be identified at 1.5 months of age and were associated with microbiota stability and change over the first 2 years of life. More stable patterns were marked by early presence and high abundance of Moraxella and Corynebacterium/Dolosigranulum and were positively associated with breastfeeding in the first period of life and with lower rates of parental-reported respiratory infections in the consecutive periods. Less stable profiles were marked by high abundance of Haemophilus or Streptococcus. These findings provide novel insights into microbial succession in the respiratory tract in infancy and link early-life profiles to microbiota stability and respiratory health characteristics. New prospective studies should elucidate potential implications of our findings for early diagnosis and prevention of respiratory infections. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00189020).

  7. Aspects regarding the profile of intestinal microbiota on wild populations of sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus, linnaeus, 1758

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    Lucian OPREA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to examinate the profile of intestinal microbiota of sterlet from the Danube River. Genomic DNA was extracted from each gut fish and polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to amplify the conserved 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE of PCR amplified 16S rDNA to characterise the variability of bacterial populations, the results showed different microbial profiles for 50% of fish. These results demonstrate the potential of PCRDGGE-based analysis for identification of gut microbiota and could contribute to a better understanding of fish ecology.

  8. Fecal menaquinone profiles of overweight adults are associated with gut microbiota composition during a gut microbiota-targeted dietary intervention.

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    Karl, J Philip; Fu, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaoxin; Zhao, Yufeng; Shen, Jian; Zhang, Chenhong; Wolfe, Benjamin E; Saltzman, Edward; Zhao, Liping; Booth, Sarah L

    2015-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports novel roles for vitamin K in cardiometabolic health, some of which may be unique to the bacterially synthesized vitamin K forms known as menaquinones. However, factors influencing menaquinone biosynthesis by the gut microbiota and associations with cardiometabolic health have not been examined. The objective of this study was to identify associations between fecal menaquinone profiles, gut microbiota composition, and biomarkers of cardiometabolic health. The menaquinone profile and gut microbiota structure were periodically measured in fecal samples collected from 77 overweight Chinese adults who consumed a prescribed diet previously shown to alter gut microbiota composition and to improve cardiometabolic biomarkers. Covariance among menaquinones within individual fecal samples partitioned individuals into 2 distinct groups, herein introduced as menaquinotypes of the human gut. Menaquinotypes were characterized by differences in menaquinone (MK) 5 and MK9-MK13 and differences in the relative abundance of several operational taxonomic units (OTUs) delineated at the species level, predominantly within the genera Prevotella spp. and Bacteroides spp. Fecal MK4, MK6, and MK8 decreased during the intervention (P 100 OTUs were associated with altered fecal content of ≥1 individual menaquinone. The strongest and most consistent relations were between Prevotella spp. and MK5 and MK11-MK13, between Bacteroides spp. and MK9 and MK10, and between Escherichia/Shigella spp. and MK8. Neither individual menaquinones nor menaquinotypes were longitudinally associated with markers of glycemia, insulin resistance, or inflammation. These findings suggest that variability in fecal menaquinone content is predominantly determined by relatively few genera within the gut microbiota and that diet-mediated alterations in gut microbiota composition may provide a feasible approach for altering gut menaquinone content. This trial was registered at the Chinese

  9. Convergent bacterial microbiotas in the fungal agricultural systems of insects.

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    Aylward, Frank O; Suen, Garret; Biedermann, Peter H W; Adams, Aaron S; Scott, Jarrod J; Malfatti, Stephanie A; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Tringe, Susannah G; Poulsen, Michael; Raffa, Kenneth F; Klepzig, Kier D; Currie, Cameron R

    2014-11-18

    The ability to cultivate food is an innovation that has produced some of the most successful ecological strategies on the planet. Although most well recognized in humans, where agriculture represents a defining feature of civilization, species of ants, beetles, and termites have also independently evolved symbioses with fungi that they cultivate for food. Despite occurring across divergent insect and fungal lineages, the fungivorous niches of these insects are remarkably similar, indicating convergent evolution toward this successful ecological strategy. Here, we characterize the microbiota of ants, beetles, and termites engaged in nutritional symbioses with fungi to define the bacterial groups associated with these prominent herbivores and forest pests. Using culture-independent techniques and the in silico reconstruction of 37 composite genomes of dominant community members, we demonstrate that different insect-fungal symbioses that collectively shape ecosystems worldwide have highly similar bacterial microbiotas comprised primarily of the genera Enterobacter, Rahnella, and Pseudomonas. Although these symbioses span three orders of insects and two phyla of fungi, we show that they are associated with bacteria sharing high whole-genome nucleotide identity. Due to the fine-scale correspondence of the bacterial microbiotas of insects engaged in fungal symbioses, our findings indicate that this represents an example of convergence of entire host-microbe complexes. The cultivation of fungi for food is a behavior that has evolved independently in ants, beetles, and termites and has enabled many species of these insects to become ecologically important and widely distributed herbivores and forest pests. Although the primary fungal cultivars of these insects have been studied for decades, comparatively little is known of their bacterial microbiota. In this study, we show that diverse fungus-growing insects are associated with a common bacterial community composed of the

  10. Intra- and Interspecific Comparisons of Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure Support Coevolution of Gut Microbiota and Termite Host†

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    Hongoh, Yuichi; Deevong, Pinsurang; Inoue, Tetsushi; Moriya, Shigeharu; Trakulnaleamsai, Savitr; Ohkuma, Moriya; Vongkaluang, Charunee; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the bacterial gut microbiota from 32 colonies of wood-feeding termites, comprising four Microcerotermes species (Termitidae) and four Reticulitermes species (Rhinotermitidae), using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and clonal analysis of 16S rRNA. The obtained molecular community profiles were compared statistically between individuals, colonies, locations, and species of termites. Both analyses revealed that the bacterial community structure was rema...

  11. Comparison of Cultivable Acetic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in Organic and Conventional Apple Cider Vinegar

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    Aleksandra Štornik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic apple cider vinegar is produced from apples that go through very restricted treatment in orchard. During the first stage of the process, the sugars from apples are fermented by yeasts to cider. The produced ethanol is used as a substrate by acetic acid bacteria in a second separated bioprocess. In both, the organic and conventional apple cider vinegars the ethanol oxidation to acetic acid is initiated by native microbiota that survived alcohol fermentation. We compared the cultivable acetic acid bacterial microbiota in the production of organic and conventional apple cider vinegars from a smoothly running oxidation cycle of a submerged industrial process. In this way we isolated and characterized 96 bacteria from organic and 72 bacteria from conventional apple cider vinegar. Using the restriction analysis of the PCR-amplifi ed 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS regions, we identified four different HaeIII and five different HpaII restriction profiles for bacterial isolates from organic apple cider vinegar. Each type of restriction profile was further analyzed by sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS regions, resulting in identification of the following species: Acetobacter pasteurianus (71.90 %, Acetobacter ghanensis (12.50 %, Komagataeibacter oboediens (9.35 % and Komagataeibacter saccharivorans (6.25 %. Using the same analytical approach in conventional apple cider vinegar, we identified only two different HaeIII and two different HpaII restriction profiles of the 16S‒23S rRNA gene ITS regions, which belong to the species Acetobacter pasteurianus (66.70 % and Komagataeibacter oboediens (33.30 %. Yeasts that are able to resist 30 g/L of acetic acid were isolated from the acetic acid production phase and further identified by sequence analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA‒ITS2 region as Candida ethanolica, Pichia membranifaciens and Saccharomycodes ludwigii. This study has shown for the first time that the bacterial microbiota for the

  12. Airway Microbiota Determines Innate Cell Inflammatory or Tissue Remodeling Profiles in Lung Transplantation.

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    Bernasconi, Eric; Pattaroni, Céline; Koutsokera, Angela; Pison, Christophe; Kessler, Romain; Benden, Christian; Soccal, Paola M; Magnan, Antoine; Aubert, John-David; Marsland, Benjamin J; Nicod, Laurent P

    2016-11-15

    In lung transplant recipients, long-term graft survival relies on the control of inflammation and tissue remodeling to maintain graft functionality and avoid chronic lung allograft dysfunction. Although advances in clinical practice have improved transplant success, the mechanisms by which the balance between inflammation and remodeling is maintained are largely unknown. To assess whether host-microbe interactions in the transplanted lung determine the immunologic tone of the airways, and consequently could impact graft survival. Microbiota DNA and host total RNA were isolated from 203 bronchoalveolar lavages obtained from 112 patients post-lung transplantation. Microbiota composition was determined using 16S ribosomal RNA analysis, and expression of a set of genes involved in prototypic macrophage functions was quantified using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We show that the characteristics of the pulmonary microbiota aligned with distinct innate cell gene expression profiles. Although a nonpolarized activation was associated with bacterial communities consisting of a balance between proinflammatory (e.g., Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas) and low stimulatory (e.g., Prevotella and Streptococcus) bacteria, "inflammatory" and "remodeling" profiles were linked to bacterial dysbiosis. Mechanistic assays provided direct evidence that bacterial dysbiosis could lead to inflammatory or remodeling profiles in macrophages, whereas a balanced microbial community maintained homeostasis. The crosstalk between bacterial communities and innate immune cells potentially determines the function of the transplanted lung offering novel pathways for intervention strategies.

  13. Capturing the diversity of the human gut microbiota through culture-enriched molecular profiling.

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    Lau, Jennifer T; Whelan, Fiona J; Herath, Isiri; Lee, Christine H; Collins, Stephen M; Bercik, Premysl; Surette, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    The human gut microbiota has been implicated in most aspects of health and disease; however, most of the bacteria in this community are considered unculturable, so studies have relied on molecular-based methods. These methods generally do not permit the isolation of organisms, which is required to fully explore the functional roles of bacteria for definitive association with host phenotypes. Using a combination of culture and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, referred to as culture-enriched molecular profiling, we show that the majority of the bacteria identified by 16S sequencing of the human gut microbiota can be cultured. Five fresh, anaerobic fecal samples were cultured using 33 media and incubation of plates anaerobically and aerobically resulted in 66 culture conditions for culture-enriched molecular profiling. The cultivable portion of the fecal microbiota was determined by comparing the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recovered by 16S sequencing of the culture plates to OTUs from culture-independent sequencing of the fecal sample. Targeted isolation of Lachnospiraceae strains using conditions defined by culture-enriched molecular profiling was carried out on two fresh stool samples. We show that culture-enriched molecular profiling, utilizing 66 culture conditions combined with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, allowed for the culturing of an average of 95 % of the OTUs present at greater than 0.1 % abundance in fecal samples. Uncultured OTUs were low abundance in stool. Importantly, comparing culture-enrichment to culture-independent sequencing revealed that the majority of OTUs were detected only by culture, highlighting the advantage of culture for studying the diversity of the gut microbiota. Applying culture-enriched molecular profiling to target Lachnospiraceae strains resulted in the recovery of 79 isolates, 12 of which are on the Human Microbiome Project's "Most Wanted" list. We show that, through culture-enriched molecular profiling, the majority of the

  14. Intracolony variation of bacterial gut microbiota among castes and ages in the fungus-growing termite Macrotermes gilvus.

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    Hongoh, Y; Ekpornprasit, L; Inoue, T; Moriya, S; Trakulnaleamsai, S; Ohkuma, M; Noparatnaraporn, N; Kudo, T

    2006-02-01

    The fungus-growing termites Macrotermes cultivate the obligate ectosymbiontic fungi, Termitomyces. While their relationship has been extesively studied, little is known about the gut bacterial symbionts, which also presumably play a crucial role for the nutrition of the termite host. In this study, we investigated the bacterial gut microbiota in two colonies of Macrotermes gilvus, and compared the diversity and community structure of bacteria among nine termite morphotypes, differing in caste and/or age, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clonal analysis of 16S rRNA. The obtained molecular community profiles clustered by termite morphotype rather than by colony, and the clustering pattern was clearly more related to a difference in age than to caste. Thus, we suggest that the bacterial gut microbiota change in relation to the food of the termite, which comprises fallen leaves and the fungus nodules of Termitomyces in young workers, and leaves degraded by the fungi, in old workers. Despite these intracolony variations in bacterial gut microbiota, their T-RFLP profiles formed a distinct cluster against those of the fungus garden, adjacent soil and guts of sympatric wood-feeding termites, implying a consistency and uniqueness of gut microbiota in M. gilvus. Since many bacterial phylotypes from M. gilvus formed monophyletic clusters with those from distantly related termite species, we suggest that gut bacteria have co-evolved with the termite host and form a microbiota specific to a termite taxonomic and/or feeding group, and furthermore, to caste and age within a termite species.

  15. Stool consistency is strongly associated with gut microbiota richness and composition, enterotypes and bacterial growth rates.

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    Vandeputte, Doris; Falony, Gwen; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Tito, Raul Y; Joossens, Marie; Raes, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of potentially confounding factors affecting colon microbiota composition is essential to the identification of robust microbiome based disease markers. Here, we investigate the link between gut microbiota variation and stool consistency using Bristol Stool Scale classification, which reflects faecal water content and activity, and is considered a proxy for intestinal colon transit time. Through 16S rDNA Illumina profiling of faecal samples of 53 healthy women, we evaluated associations between microbiome richness, Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio, enterotypes, and genus abundance with self-reported, Bristol Stool Scale-based stool consistency. Each sample's microbiota growth potential was calculated to test whether transit time acts as a selective force on gut bacterial growth rates. Stool consistency strongly correlates with all known major microbiome markers. It is negatively correlated with species richness, positively associated to the Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio, and linked to Akkermansia and Methanobrevibacter abundance. Enterotypes are distinctly distributed over the BSS-scores. Based on the correlations between microbiota growth potential and stool consistency scores within both enterotypes, we hypothesise that accelerated transit contributes to colon ecosystem differentiation. While shorter transit times can be linked to increased abundance of fast growing species in Ruminococcaceae-Bacteroides samples, hinting to a washout avoidance strategy of faster replication, this trend is absent in Prevotella-enterotyped individuals. Within this enterotype adherence to host tissue therefore appears to be a more likely bacterial strategy to cope with washout. The strength of the associations between stool consistency and species richness, enterotypes and community composition emphasises the crucial importance of stool consistency assessment in gut metagenome-wide association studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  16. Compositional stability of a salivary bacterial population against supragingival microbiota shift following periodontal therapy.

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    Wataru Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Supragingival plaque is permanently in contact with saliva. However, the extent to which the microbiota contributes to the salivary bacterial population remains unclear. We compared the compositional shift in the salivary bacterial population with that in supragingival plaque following periodontal therapy. Samples were collected from 19 patients with periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy (mean sample collection interval, 25.8 ± 2.6 months, and their bacterial composition was investigated using barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic community analysis using the UniFrac distance metric revealed that the overall bacterial community composition of saliva is distinct from that of supragingival plaque, both pre- and post-therapy. Temporal variation following therapy in the salivary bacterial population was significantly smaller than in the plaque microbiota, and the post-therapy saliva sample was significantly more similar to that pre-therapy from the same individual than to those from other subjects. Following periodontal therapy, microbial richness and biodiversity were significantly decreased in the plaque microbiota, but not in the salivary bacterial population. The operational taxonomic units whose relative abundances changed significantly after therapy were not common to the two microbiotae. These results reveal the compositional stability of salivary bacterial populations against shifts in the supragingival microbiota, suggesting that the effect of the supragingival plaque microbiota on salivary bacterial population composition is limited.

  17. Gastric microbial community profiling reveals a dysbiotic cancer-associated microbiota

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    Pereira-Marques, Joana; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Costa, Jose L; Carneiro, Fatima; Machado, Jose C

    2018-01-01

    Objective Gastric carcinoma development is triggered by Helicobacter pylori. Chronic H. pylori infection leads to reduced acid secretion, which may allow the growth of a different gastric bacterial community. This change in the microbiome may increase aggression to the gastric mucosa and contribute to malignancy. Our aim was to evaluate the composition of the gastric microbiota in chronic gastritis and in gastric carcinoma. Design The gastric microbiota was retrospectively investigated in 54 patients with gastric carcinoma and 81 patients with chronic gastritis by 16S rRNA gene profiling, using next-generation sequencing. Differences in microbial composition of the two patient groups were assessed using linear discriminant analysis effect size. Associations between the most relevant taxa and clinical diagnosis were validated by real-time quantitative PCR. Predictive functional profiling of microbial communities was obtained with PICRUSt. Results The gastric carcinoma microbiota was characterised by reduced microbial diversity, by decreased abundance of Helicobacter and by the enrichment of other bacterial genera, mostly represented by intestinal commensals. The combination of these taxa into a microbial dysbiosis index revealed that dysbiosis has excellent capacity to discriminate between gastritis and gastric carcinoma. Analysis of the functional features of the microbiota was compatible with the presence of a nitrosating microbial community in carcinoma. The major observations were confirmed in validation cohorts from different geographic origins. Conclusions Detailed analysis of the gastric microbiota revealed for the first time that patients with gastric carcinoma exhibit a dysbiotic microbial community with genotoxic potential, which is distinct from that of patients with chronic gastritis. PMID:29102920

  18. Molecular analysis of the diversity of vaginal microbiota associated with bacterial vaginosis

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    Ling Zongxin

    2010-09-01

    Conclusions The data presented here have clearly profiled the overall structure of vaginal communities and clearly demonstrated that BV is associated with a dramatic increase in the taxonomic richness and diversity of vaginal microbiota. The study also provides the most comprehensive picture of the vaginal community structure and the bacterial ecosystem, and significantly contributes to the current understanding of the etiology of BV.

  19. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota.

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    Ellegaard, Kirsten M; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities.

  20. Alteration of the fecal microbiota and serum metabolite profiles in dogs with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease

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    Minamoto, Yasushi; Otoni, Cristiane C; Steelman, Samantha M; Büyükleblebici, Olga; Steiner, Jörg M; Jergens, Albert E; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common cause of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disease in dogs. The combination of an underlying host genetic susceptibility, an intestinal dysbiosis, and dietary/environmental factors are suspected as main contributing factors in the pathogenesis of canine IBD. However, actual mechanisms of the host-microbe interactions remain elusive. The aim of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota and serum metabolite profiles between healthy dogs (n = 10) and dogs with IBD before and after 3 weeks of medical therapy (n = 12). Fecal microbiota and metabolite profiles were characterized by 454-pyrosequencing of 16 S rRNA genes and by an untargeted metabolomics approach, respectively. Significantly lower bacterial diversity and distinct microbial communities were observed in dogs with IBD compared to the healthy control dogs. While Gammaproteobacteria were overrepresented, Erysipelotrichia, Clostridia, and Bacteroidia were underrepresented in dogs with IBD. The functional gene content was predicted from the 16 S rRNA gene data using PICRUSt, and revealed overrepresented bacterial secretion system and transcription factors, and underrepresented amino acid metabolism in dogs with IBD. The serum metabolites 3-hydroxybutyrate, hexuronic acid, ribose, and gluconic acid lactone were significantly more abundant in dogs with IBD. Although a clinical improvement was observed after medical therapy in all dogs with IBD, this was not accompanied by significant changes in the fecal microbiota or in serum metabolite profiles. These results suggest the presence of oxidative stress and a functional alteration of the GI microbiota in dogs with IBD, which persisted even in the face of a clinical response to medical therapy. PMID:25531678

  1. Anal microbiota profiles in HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM.

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    Yu, Guoqin; Fadrosh, Doug; Ma, Bing; Ravel, Jacques; Goedert, James J

    2014-03-13

    Because differences in anal microbial populations (microbiota) could affect acquisition of HIV or other conditions, especially among MSM, we profiled the microbiota of the anal canal, assessed its stability, and investigated associations with diversity and composition. Microbiota profiles in anal swabs collected from 76 MSM (52 in 1989, swab-1; 66 1-5 years later, swab-2) were compared by HIV status (25 HIV-positive), T-cell subsets, and questionnaire data. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified, sequenced (Illumina MiSeq), and clustered into species-level operational taxonomic units (QIIME and Greengenes). Regression models and Wilcoxon tests were used for associations with alpha diversity (unique operational taxonomic units, Shannon's index). Composition was compared by Adonis (QIIME). Most anal bacteria were Firmicutes (mean 60.6%, range 21.1-91.1%) or Bacteroidetes (29.4%, 4.1-70.8%). Alpha diversity did not change between the two swabs (N = 42 pairs). In swab-2, HIV-positives had lower alpha diversity (P ≤ 0.04) and altered composition, with fewer Firmicutes and more Fusobacteria taxa (P ≤ 0.03), not completely attributable to very low CD4(+) cell count (median 232 cells/μl), prior AIDS clinical diagnosis (N = 17), or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use (N = 6). Similar but weaker differences were observed in swab-1 (HIV-positive median 580 CD4(+) cells/μl; no trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Associations with T-cell subsets, smoking, and sexual practices were null or inconsistent. The anal microbiota of MSM was relatively stable over 1-5 years. However, with uncontrolled, advanced HIV infection, the microbiota had altered composition and reduced diversity partially attributable to antibiotics. Investigations of microbial community associations with other immune perturbations and clinical abnormalities are needed.

  2. Species-specific diversity of novel bacterial lineages and differential abundance of predicted pathways for toxic compound degradation in scorpion gut microbiota.

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    Bolaños, Luis M; Rosenblueth, Mónica; Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago; Figuier-Huttin, Gilles; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2016-05-01

    Scorpions are considered 'living fossils' that have conserved ancestral anatomical features and have adapted to numerous habitats. However, their gut microbiota diversity has not been studied. Here, we characterized the gut microbiota of two scorpion species, Vaejovis smithi and Centruroides limpidus. Our results indicate that scorpion gut microbiota is species-specific and that food deprivation reduces bacterial diversity. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis revealed novel bacterial lineages showing a low level of sequence identity to any known bacteria. Furthermore, these novel bacterial lineages were each restricted to a different scorpion species. Additionally, our results of the predicted metagenomic profiles revealed a core set of pathways that were highly abundant in both species, and mostly related to amino acid, carbohydrate, vitamin and cofactor metabolism. Notably, the food-deprived V. smithi shotgun metagenome matched almost completely the metabolic features of the prediction. Finally, comparisons among predicted metagenomic profiles showed that toxic compound degradation pathways were more abundant in recently captured C. limpidus scorpions. This study gives a first insight into the scorpion gut microbiota and provides a reference for future studies on the gut microbiota from other arachnid species. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Distinct patterns in human milk microbiota and fatty acid profiles across specific geographic locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast feeding results in long term health benefits in the prevention of communicable and non-communicable diseases at both individual and population levels. Geographical location directly impacts the composition of breast milk including microbiota and lipids. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of geographical location, i.e., Europe (Spain and Finland, Africa (South Africa and Asia (China, on breast milk microbiota and lipid composition in samples obtained from healthy mothers after the first month of lactation. Altogether, 80 women (20 from each country participated in the study, with equal number of women who delivered by vaginal or caesarean section from each country. Lipid composition particularly that of polyunsaturated fatty acids differed between the countries, with the highest amount of n-6 PUFA (25.6% observed in the milk of Chinese women. Milk microbiota composition also differed significantly between the countries (p=0.002. Among vaginally delivered women, Spanish women had highest amount of Bacteroidetes whereas Chinese women had highest amount of Actinobacteria. Women who had had a caesarean section had higher amount of Proteobacteria as observed in the milk of the Spanish and South African women. Interestingly, the Spanish and South African women had significantly higher bacterial genes mapped to lipid, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism (p<0.05. Association of the lipid profile with the microbiota revealed that monounsaturated fatty acids were negatively associated with Proteobacteria (r= -0.43, p<0.05, while Lactobacillus genus was associated with monounsaturated fatty acids (r= -0.23, p=0.04. These findings reveal that the milk microbiota and lipid composition exhibit differences based on geographical locations in addition to the differences observed due to the mode of delivery.

  4. Distinct Patterns in Human Milk Microbiota and Fatty Acid Profiles Across Specific Geographic Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Himanshu; du Toit, Elloise; Kulkarni, Amruta; Aakko, Juhani; Linderborg, Kaisa M; Zhang, Yumei; Nicol, Mark P; Isolauri, Erika; Yang, Baoru; Collado, Maria C; Salminen, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Breast feeding results in long term health benefits in the prevention of communicable and non-communicable diseases at both individual and population levels. Geographical location directly impacts the composition of breast milk including microbiota and lipids. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of geographical location, i.e., Europe (Spain and Finland), Africa (South Africa), and Asia (China), on breast milk microbiota and lipid composition in samples obtained from healthy mothers after the 1 month of lactation. Altogether, 80 women (20 from each country) participated in the study, with equal number of women who delivered by vaginal or cesarean section from each country. Lipid composition particularly that of polyunsaturated fatty acids differed between the countries, with the highest amount of n-6 PUFA (25.6%) observed in the milk of Chinese women. Milk microbiota composition also differed significantly between the countries ( p = 0.002). Among vaginally delivered women, Spanish women had highest amount of Bacteroidetes (mean relative abundance of 3.75) whereas Chinese women had highest amount of Actinobacteria (mean relative abundance 5.7). Women who had had a cesarean section had higher amount of Proteobacteria as observed in the milk of the Spanish and South African women. Interestingly, the Spanish and South African women had significantly higher bacterial genes mapped to lipid, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism ( p < 0.05). Association of the lipid profile with the microbiota revealed that monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) were negatively associated with Proteobacteria ( r = -0.43, p < 0.05), while Lactobacillus genus was associated with MUFA ( r = -0.23, p = 0.04). These findings reveal that the milk microbiota and lipid composition exhibit differences based on geographical locations in addition to the differences observed due to the mode of delivery.

  5. Smokeless tobacco products harbor diverse bacterial microbiota that differ across products and brands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Eoghan M; Kulkarni, Prachi; Claye, Emma; Stanfill, Stephen; Tyx, Robert; Maddox, Cynthia; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Sapkota, Amy R

    2017-07-01

    Smokeless tobacco products contain numerous chemical compounds, including known human carcinogens. Other smokeless tobacco constituents, including bacteria, may also contribute to adverse health effects among smokeless tobacco users. However, there is a lack of data regarding the microbial constituents of smokeless tobacco. Our goal was to characterize the bacterial microbiota of different smokeless tobacco products and evaluate differences across product types and brands. DNA was extracted from 15 brands of smokeless tobacco products (including dry snuff, moist snuff, snus, and Swedish snus) and 6 handmade products (e.g., toombak) using an enzymatic and mechanical lysis approach. Bacterial community profiling was performed using PCR amplification of the V1-V2 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene, followed by 454 pyrosequencing of the resulting amplicons and sequence analysis using the QIIME package. Total viable counts were also determined to estimate the number of viable bacteria present in each product. Average total viable counts ranged from 0 to 9.35 × 10 7  CFU g -1 . Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high bacterial diversity across the majority of products tested: dry snuff products where characterized by the highest diversity indices compared to other products. The most dominant bacterial phyla across all products were Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Significant differences in both bacterial community composition and in silico predicted gene content were observed between smokeless tobacco product types and between brands of specific smokeless tobacco products. These data are useful in order to comprehensively address potential health risks associated with the use of smokeless tobacco products.

  6. Comprehensive pyrosequencing analysis of the bacterial microbiota of the skin of patients with seborrheic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiomi; Cho, Otomi; Saito, Chie; Saito, Mami; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Sugita, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a chronic inflammatory dermatologic condition in which erythema and itching develop on areas of the body with sebaceous glands, such as the scalp, face and chest. The inflammation is evoked directly by oleic acid, which is hydrolyzed from sebum by lipases secreted by skin microorganisms. Although the skin fungal genus, Malassezia, is thought to be the causative agent of SD, analysis of the bacterial microbiota of skin samples of patients with SD is necessary to clarify any association with Malassezia because the skin microbiota comprises diverse bacterial and fungal genera. In the present study, bacterial microbiotas were analyzed at non-lesional and lesional sites of 24 patients with SD by pyrosequencing and qPCR. Principal coordinate analysis revealed clear separation between the microbiota of non-lesional and lesional sites. Acinetobacter, Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Propionibacterium were abundant at both sites. Propionibacterium was abundant at non-lesional sites, whereas Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus predominated at lesional sites; however, the extent of Propionibacterium colonization did not differ significantly between lesional and non-lesional sites according to qPCR. Given that these abundant bacteria hydrolyze sebum, they may also contribute to SD development. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of the bacterial microbiotas of the skin of SD patients. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Intrinsic factors of Peltigera lichens influence the structure of the associated soil bacterial microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Diego; Clavero-León, Claudia; Carú, Margarita; Orlando, Julieta

    2016-11-01

    Definition of lichens has evolved from bi(tri)partite associations to multi-species symbioses, where bacteria would play essential roles. Besides, although soil bacterial communities are known to be affected by edaphic factors, when lichens grow upon them these could become less preponderant. We hypothesized that the structure of both the lichen microbiota and the microbiota in the soil underneath lichens is shaped by lichen intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In this work, intrinsic factors corresponded to mycobiont and cyanobiont identities of Peltigera lichens, metabolite diversity and phenoloxidase activity and extrinsic factors involved the site of the forest where lichens grow. Likewise, the genetic and metabolic structure of the lichen and soil bacterial communities were analyzed by fingerprinting. Among the results, metabolite diversity was inversely related to the genetic structure of bacterial communities of lichens and soils, highlighting the far-reaching effect of these substances; while phenoloxidase activity was inversely related to the metabolic structure only of the lichen bacterial microbiota, presuming a more limited effect of the products of these enzymes. Soil bacterial microbiota was different depending on the site and, strikingly, according to the cyanobiont present in the lichen over them, which could indicate an influence of the photobiont metabolism on the availability of soil nutrients. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Sexual variation of bacterial microbiota of Dendroctonus valens guts and frass in relation to verbenone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Letian; Lu, Min; Xu, Dandan; Chen, Li; Sun, Jianghua

    2016-12-01

    Gut microbiota are widely involved in insect biology, and many factors can influence the microbiota in guts and frass. Dendroctonus valens is a very destructive forest pest in China, and the mass-attacking behavior is regulated by several semiochemicals, including verbenone, a multifunctional pheromone. The beetle harbors a variety of bacteria in its guts and frass and some of them are capable of verbenone production. D. valens is characterized by monogamy and female-initiated attacking behavior. Whether the bacterial communities fluctuate according to sex, and whether the variation influences the verbenone production, remains to be determined. In this study, the bacterial microbiota in D. valens guts and frass were analyzed, and verbenone production by their crude bacterial suspensions was compared in vitro. Bacterial diversity in female frass is more abundant compared to male frass, and the percentages and total amounts of main genera like Lactococcus and Pseudomonas in female frass are significantly higher than those in male frass. The verbenone produced by the female frass suspension is significantly higher than male frass. This study presents a comprehensive comparison of bacterial communities in guts and frass between both sexes of D. valens, highlighting the potential significance of female frass microbiota in verbenone production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial microbiota of Kazakhstan cheese revealed by single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing and its comparison with Belgian, Kalmykian and Italian artisanal cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Yi; Xu, Haiyan; Xi, Xiaoxia; Hou, Qiangchuan; Feng, Shuzhen; Wuri, Laga; Bian, Yanfei; Yu, Zhongjie; Kwok, Lai-Yu; Sun, Zhihong; Sun, Tiansong

    2017-01-09

    In Kazakhstan, traditional artisanal cheeses have a long history and are widely consumed. The unique characteristics of local artisanal cheeses are almost completely preserved. However, their microbial communities have rarely been reported. The current study firstly generated the Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) sequencing bacterial diversity profiles of 6 traditional artisanal cheese samples of Kazakhstan origin, followed by comparatively analyzed the microbiota composition between the current dataset and those from cheeses originated from Belgium, Russian Republic of Kalmykia (Kalmykia) and Italy. Across the Kazakhstan cheese samples, a total of 238 bacterial species belonging to 14 phyla and 140 genera were identified. Lactococcus lactis (28.93%), Lactobacillus helveticus (26.43%), Streptococcus thermophilus (12.18%) and Lactobacillus delbrueckii (12.15%) were the dominant bacterial species for these samples. To further evaluate the cheese bacterial diversity of Kazakhstan cheeses in comparison with those from other geographic origins, 16S rRNA datasets of 36 artisanal cheeses from Belgium, Russian Republic of Kalmykia (Kalmykia) and Italy were retrieved from public databases. The cheese bacterial microbiota communities were largely different across sample origins. By principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), the structure of the Kazakhstan artisanal cheese samples was found to be different from those of the other geographic origins. Furthermore, the redundancy analysis (RDA) identified 16 bacterial OTUs as the key variables responsible for such microbiota structural difference. Our results together suggest that the diversity of bacterial communities in different groups is stratified by geographic region. This study does not only provide novel information on the bacterial microbiota of traditional artisanal cheese of Kazakhstan at species level, but also interesting insights into the bacterial diversity of artisanal

  10. Bacterial microbiota compositions of naturally fermented milk are shaped by both geographic origin and sample type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Z; Hou, Q; Kwok, L; Yu, Z; Zheng, Y; Sun, Z; Menghe, B; Zhang, H

    2016-10-01

    Naturally fermented dairy products contain a rich microbial biodiversity. This study aimed to provide an overview on the bacterial microbiota biodiversity of 85 samples, previously collected across a wide region of China, Mongolia, and Russia. Data from these 85 samples, including 55 yogurts, 18 naturally fermented yak milks, 6 koumisses, and 6 cheeses, were retrieved and collectively analyzed. The most prevalent phyla shared across samples were Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, which together accounted for 99% of bacterial sequences. The predominant genera were Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Streptococcus, Acetobacter, Acinetobacter, Leuconostoc, and Macrococcus, which together corresponded to 96.63% of bacterial sequences. Further multivariate statistical analyses revealed significant differences in the microbiota structure across sample geographic origin and type. First, on the principal coordinate score plot, samples representing the 3 main sample collection regions (Russia, Xinjiang, and Tibet) were mostly located respectively in the upper left, lower right, and lower left quadrants, although slight overlapping occurred. In contrast, samples from the minor sampling areas (Inner Mongolia, Mongolia, Gansu, and Sichuan) were predominantly distributed in the lower left quadrant. These results suggest a possible association between sample geographical origin and microbiota composition. Second, bacterial microbiota structure was stratified by sample type. In particular, the microbiota of cheese was largely distinct from the other sample types due to its high abundances of Lactococcus and Streptococcus. The fermented yak milk microbiota was most like that of the yogurts. Koumiss samples had the lowest microbial diversity and richness. In conclusion, both geographic origin and sample type shape the microbial diversity of naturally fermented milk. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. The urinary microbiota of men and women and its changes in women during bacterial vaginosis and antibiotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschick, Cornelia; Deng, Zhi-Luo; Vital, Marius; Masur, Clarissa; Abels, Christoph; Pieper, Dietmar H; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2017-08-14

    The urinary microbiota is similarly complex as the vaginal and penile microbiota, yet its role as a reservoir for pathogens and for recurrent polymicrobial biofilm diseases like bacterial vaginosis (BV) is not clear. Here, we analysed the urinary microbiota of healthy men and women and compared it with that of women during BV and after antibiotic treatment using next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V1-V2 regions. Eight different community types, so called urotypes (UT), were identified in healthy humans, all of which were shared between men and women, except UT 7, dominated in relative abundance by Lactobacillus crispatus, which was found in healthy women only. Orally applied metronidazole significantly reduced Shannon diversity and the mean relative abundance of Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, and Sneathia amnii, while L. iners increased to levels twofold higher than those found in healthy women. Although individual urine microbial profiles strongly responded to the antibiotic, the healthy community could not be restored. The correlation between urinary and vaginal fluid microbiota was generally weak and depending on UT and BV status. It was highest in UT 1 in acute BV (59% of samples), but after metronidazole treatment, only 3 out of 35 women showed a significant correlation between their urinary and vaginal microbiota composition. Urethra and bladder thus harbor microbial communities distinct from the vagina. The high abundance of BV related species in the urine of both men and women suggests that urine may act as a reservoir of pathogens and contribute to recurrence. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02687789.

  12. Species Level Description of the Human Ileal Bacterial Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villmones, Heidi Cecilie; Haug, Erik Skaaheim; Ulvestad, Elling; Grude, Nils; Stenstad, Tore; Halland, Adrian; Kommedal, Øyvind

    2018-03-16

    The small bowel is responsible for most of the body's nutritional uptake and for the development of intestinal and systemic tolerance towards microbes. Nevertheless, the human small bowel microbiota has remained poorly characterized, mainly owing to sampling difficulties. Sample collection directly from the distal ileum was performed during radical cystectomy with urinary diversion. Material from the ileal mucosa were analysed using massive parallel sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Samples from 27 Caucasian patients were included. In total 280 unique Operational Taxonomic Units were identified, whereof 229 could be assigned to a species or a species group. The most frequently detected bacteria belonged to the genera Streptococcus, Granulicatella, Actinomyces, Solobacterium, Rothia, Gemella and TM7(G-1). Among these, the most abundant species were typically streptococci within the mitis and sanguinis groups, Streptococcus salivarius, Rothia mucilaginosa and Actinomyces from the A. meyeri/odontolyticus group. The amounts of Proteobacteria and strict anaerobes were low. The microbiota of the distal part of the human ileum is oral-like and strikingly different from the colonic microbiota. Although our patient population is elderly and hospitalized with a high prevalence of chronic conditions, our results provide new and valuable insights into a lesser explored part of the human intestinal ecosystem.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Microbiota on Brazilian Currency Note Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tairacan Augusto Pereira da Fonseca

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Currency notes have been implicated as a vehicle for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial population residing on banknotes is still unknown in Brazil. In this study, we aimed to investigate the overall bacterial population from 150 different Brazilian Rial (R$ notes in circulation using a culture-independent Illumina massively parallel sequencing approach of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were randomly collected from three different street markets or “feiras” in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Proteobacteria phyla, followed by Firmicutes and Streptophyta, with a total of 1193 bacterial families and 3310 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human, animal, and environmental origins. Also, our analysis revealed the presence of some potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, and Klebsiella. The results demonstrate that there is a tremendous diversity of bacterial contamination on currency notes, including organisms known to be opportunistic pathogens. One of the factors that may contribute to the richness of bacterial diversity in currency notes is personal hygiene. Thus, our results underscore the need to increase public awareness of the importance of personal hygiene of money handlers who also handle food.

  14. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Microbiota on Brazilian Currency Note Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira da Fonseca, Tairacan Augusto; Pessôa, Rodrigo; Sanabani, Sabri Saeed

    2015-10-22

    Currency notes have been implicated as a vehicle for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial population residing on banknotes is still unknown in Brazil. In this study, we aimed to investigate the overall bacterial population from 150 different Brazilian Rial (R$) notes in circulation using a culture-independent Illumina massively parallel sequencing approach of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were randomly collected from three different street markets or "feiras" in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Proteobacteria phyla, followed by Firmicutes and Streptophyta, with a total of 1193 bacterial families and 3310 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human, animal, and environmental origins. Also, our analysis revealed the presence of some potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, and Klebsiella. The results demonstrate that there is a tremendous diversity of bacterial contamination on currency notes, including organisms known to be opportunistic pathogens. One of the factors that may contribute to the richness of bacterial diversity in currency notes is personal hygiene. Thus, our results underscore the need to increase public awareness of the importance of personal hygiene of money handlers who also handle food.

  15. Exometabolomic Profiling of Bacterial Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Anders Hans

    as the application into other food matrices. The scope of the thesis was to develop and apply a chromatography mass spectrometry based metabolomic footprint workflow for the investigation of the mechanisms behind the antifungal properties of a co‐culture, consisting of Lactobacillus paracasei (LAB A...... chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Data from the untargeted LC/MS analysis was processed using feature selection and subsequent multivariate data analysis. The antifungal properties of the co‐culture were composed of several components when fermented in the model system. The major contribution came from......Selected bacterial cultures are used on an industrial scale for biopreservation of fresh fermented dairy products. The selected cultures provide efficient inhibition of yeasts and molds and serve as an alternative to the use of purified or synthetic antimicrobials. Despite the fact that numerous...

  16. Characterizing a model human gut microbiota composed of members of its two dominant bacterial phyla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahowald, Michael [Washington University, St. Louis; Rey, Frederico E. [Washington University, St. Louis; Seedorf, Henning [Washington University, St. Louis; Turnbaugh, Peter J. [Washington University, St. Louis; Fulton, Robert S. [Washington University, St. Louis; Wollam, Aye [Washington University, St. Louis; Shah, Neha [Washington University, St. Louis; Wang, Chunyan [Washington University, St. Louis; Magrini, Vincent [Washington University, St. Louis; Wilson, Richard K. [Washington University, St. Louis; Cantarel, Brandi L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Unite Mixte de Recherche; Coutinho, Pedro M [Universite d' Aix-Marseille I & II; Henrissat, Bernard [Universite d' Aix-Marseille I & II; Crock, Lara W. [Washington University, St. Louis; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Erickson, Alison L [ORNL; Gordon, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis

    2009-01-01

    The adult human distal gut microbial community is typically dominated by 2 bacterial phyla (divisions), the Firmicutes and the Bacteroidetes. Little is known about the factors that govern the interactions between their members. Here, we examine the niches of representatives of both phyla in vivo. Finished genome sequences were generated from Eubacterium rectale and E. eligens, which belong to Clostridium Cluster XIVa, one of the most common gut Firmicute clades. Comparison of these and 25 other gut Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes indicated that the Firmicutes possess smaller genomes and a disproportionately smaller number of glycan-degrading enzymes. Germ-free mice were then colonized with E. rectale and/or a prominent human gut Bacteroidetes, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, followed by whole-genome transcriptional profiling, high-resolution proteomic analysis, and biochemical assays of microbial microbial and microbial host interactions. B. thetaiotaomicron adapts to E. rectale by up-regulating expression of a variety of polysaccharide utilization loci encoding numerous glycoside hydrolases, and by signaling the host to produce mucosal glycans that it, but not E. rectale, can access. E. rectale adapts to B. thetaiotaomicron by decreasing production of its glycan-degrading enzymes, increasing expression of selected amino acid and sugar transporters, and facilitating glycolysis by reducing levels of NADH, in part via generation of butyrate from acetate, which in turn is used by the gut epithelium. This simplified model of the human gut microbiota illustrates niche specialization and functional redundancy within members of its major bacterial phyla, and the importance of host glycans as a nutrient foundation that ensures ecosystem stability.

  17. Cultivable bacterial microbiota of northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus: a new reservoir of antimicrobial resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen Su

    Full Text Available The northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus is an ecologically and economically important avian species. At the present time, little is known about the microbial communities associated with these birds. As the first step to create a quail microbiology knowledge base, the current study conducted an inventory of cultivable quail tracheal, crop, cecal, and cloacal microbiota and associated antimicrobial resistance using a combined bacteriology and DNA sequencing approach. A total of 414 morphologically unique bacterial colonies were selected from nonselective aerobic and anaerobic cultures, as well as selective and enrichment cultures. Analysis of the first 500-bp 16S rRNA gene sequences in conjunction with biochemical identifications revealed 190 non-redundant species-level taxonomic units, representing 160 known bacterial species and 30 novel species. The bacterial species were classified into 4 phyla, 14 orders, 37 families, and 59 or more genera. Firmicutes was the most commonly encountered phylum (57% followed by Actinobacteria (24%, Proteobacteria (17% and Bacteroidetes (0.02%. Extensive diversity in the species composition of quail microbiota was observed among individual birds and anatomical locations. Quail microbiota harbored several opportunistic pathogens, such as E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa, as well as human commensal organisms, including Neisseria species. Phenotypic characterization of selected bacterial species demonstrated a high prevalence of resistance to the following classes of antimicrobials: phenicol, macrolide, lincosamide, quinolone, and sulphate. Data from the current investigation warrant further investigation on the source, transmission, pathology, and control of antimicrobial resistance in wild quail populations.

  18. Correlation of the lung microbiota with metabolic profiles in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbs, Sushma K; Uppal, Karan; Li, Shuzhao; Jones, Dean P; Huang, Laurence; Tipton, Laura; Fitch, Adam; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Kingsley, Lawrence; Guidot, David M; Ghedin, Elodie; Morris, Alison

    2016-01-20

    While 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequencing has been used to characterize the lung's bacterial microbiota in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, taxonomic studies provide limited information on bacterial function and impact on the host. Metabolic profiles can provide functional information on host-microbe interactions in the lungs. We investigated the relationship between the respiratory microbiota and metabolic profiles in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected outpatients. Targeted sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to analyze the bacterial community structure and liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to detect features in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Global integration of all metabolic features with microbial species was done using sparse partial least squares regression. Thirty-nine HIV-infected subjects and 20 HIV-uninfected controls without acute respiratory symptoms were enrolled. Twelve mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) features from C18 analysis were significantly different between HIV-infected individuals and controls (false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.2); another 79 features were identified by network analysis. Further metabolite analysis demonstrated that four features were significantly overrepresented in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of HIV-infected individuals compared to HIV-uninfected, including cystine, two complex carbohydrates, and 3,5-dibromo-L-tyrosine. There were 231 m/z features significantly associated with peripheral blood CD4 cell counts identified using sparse partial least squares regression (sPLS) at a variable importance on projection (VIP) threshold of 2. Twenty-five percent of these 91 m/z features were associated with various microbial species. Bacteria from families Caulobacteraceae, Staphylococcaceae, Nocardioidaceae, and genus Streptococcus were associated with the greatest number of features. Glycerophospholipid and lineolate pathways correlated

  19. The Rhizosphere Bacterial Microbiota of Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir in an Integrated Pest Management Vineyard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Novello

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms associated with Vitis vinifera (grapevine can affect its growth, health and grape quality. The aim of this study was to unravel the biodiversity of the bacterial rhizosphere microbiota of grapevine in an integrated pest management vineyard located in Piedmont, Italy. Comparison between the microbial community structure in the bulk and rhizosphere soil (variable: space were performed. Moreover, the possible shifts of the bulk and rhizosphere soil microbiota according to two phenological stages such as flowering and early fruit development (variable: time were characterized. The grapevine microbiota was identified using metagenomics and next-generation sequencing. Biodiversity was higher in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil, independent of the phenological stage. Actinobacteria were the dominant class with frequencies ≥ 50% in all the soil samples, followed by Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, and Bacteroidetes. While Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria are well-known as being dominant in soil, this is the first time the presence of Gemmatimonadetes has been observed in vineyard soils. Gaiella was the dominant genus of Actinobacteria in all the samples. Finally, the microbiota associated with grapevine differed from the bulk soil microbiota and these variations were independent of the phenological stage of the plant.

  20. The Rhizosphere Bacterial Microbiota ofVitis viniferacv. Pinot Noir in an Integrated Pest Management Vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novello, Giorgia; Gamalero, Elisa; Bona, Elisa; Boatti, Lara; Mignone, Flavio; Massa, Nadia; Cesaro, Patrizia; Lingua, Guido; Berta, Graziella

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms associated with Vitis vinifera (grapevine) can affect its growth, health and grape quality. The aim of this study was to unravel the biodiversity of the bacterial rhizosphere microbiota of grapevine in an integrated pest management vineyard located in Piedmont, Italy. Comparison between the microbial community structure in the bulk and rhizosphere soil (variable: space) were performed. Moreover, the possible shifts of the bulk and rhizosphere soil microbiota according to two phenological stages such as flowering and early fruit development (variable: time) were characterized. The grapevine microbiota was identified using metagenomics and next-generation sequencing. Biodiversity was higher in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil, independent of the phenological stage. Actinobacteria were the dominant class with frequencies ≥ 50% in all the soil samples, followed by Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, and Bacteroidetes. While Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria are well-known as being dominant in soil, this is the first time the presence of Gemmatimonadetes has been observed in vineyard soils. Gaiella was the dominant genus of Actinobacteria in all the samples. Finally, the microbiota associated with grapevine differed from the bulk soil microbiota and these variations were independent of the phenological stage of the plant.

  1. Nasal Airway Microbiota Profile and Severe Bronchiolitis in Infants: A Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Linnemann, Rachel W; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Ajami, Nadim J; Espinola, Janice A; Petrosino, Joseph F; Piedra, Pedro A; Stevenson, Michelle D; Sullivan, Ashley F; Thompson, Amy D; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about the relationship of airway microbiota with bronchiolitis in infants. We aimed to identify nasal airway microbiota profiles and to determine their association with the likelihood of bronchiolitis in infants. A case-control study was conducted. As a part of a multicenter prospective study, we collected nasal airway samples from 40 infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis. We concurrently enrolled 110 age-matched healthy controls. By applying 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and an unbiased clustering approach to these 150 nasal samples, we identified microbiota profiles and determined the association of microbiota profiles with likelihood of bronchiolitis. Overall, the median age was 3 months and 56% were male. Unbiased clustering of airway microbiota identified 4 distinct profiles: Moraxella-dominant profile (37%), Corynebacterium/Dolosigranulum-dominant profile (27%), Staphylococcus-dominant profile (15%) and mixed profile (20%). Proportion of bronchiolitis was lowest in infants with Moraxella-dominant profile (14%) and highest in those with Staphylococcus-dominant profile (57%), corresponding to an odds ratio of 7.80 (95% confidence interval, 2.64-24.9; P profile and greater likelihood of bronchiolitis persisted (odds ratio for comparison with Moraxella-dominant profile, 5.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-22.9; P = 0.03). By contrast, Corynebacterium/Dolosigranulum-dominant profile group had low proportion of infants with bronchiolitis (17%); the likelihood of bronchiolitis in this group did not significantly differ from those with Moraxella-dominant profile in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. In this case-control study, we identified 4 distinct nasal airway microbiota profiles in infants. Moraxella-dominant and Corynebacterium/Dolosigranulum-dominant profiles were associated with low likelihood of bronchiolitis, while Staphylococcus-dominant profile was associated with high likelihood of bronchiolitis.

  2. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-05-05

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Culturable Bacterial Microbiota of the Stomach of Helicobacter pylori Positive and Negative Gastric Disease Patients

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    Yalda Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human stomach is the only known natural habitat of Helicobacter pylori (Hp, a major bacterial pathogen that causes different gastroduodenal diseases. Despite this, the impact of Hp on the diversity and the composition of the gastric microbiota has been poorly studied. In this study, we have analyzed the culturable gastric microbiota of 215 Malaysian patients, including 131 Hp positive and 84 Hp negative individuals that were affected by different gastric diseases. Non-Hp bacteria isolated from biopsy samples were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry based biotyping and 16SrRNA sequencing. The presence of Hp did not significantly modify the diversity of the gastric microbiota. However, correlation was observed between the isolation of Streptococci and peptic ulcer disease. In addition, as a first report, Burkholderia pseudomallei was also isolated from the gastric samples of the local population. This study suggested that there may be geographical variations in the diversity of the human gastric microbiome. Geographically linked diversity in the gastric microbiome and possible interactions between Hp and other bacterial species from stomach microbiota in pathogenesis are proposed for further investigations.

  4. Distinct gut microbiota profiles in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer, Lukas; Kverka, Miloslav; Kostovcik, Martin; Macinga, Peter; Dvorak, Jiri; Stehlikova, Zuzana; Brezina, Jan; Wohl, Pavel; Spicak, Julius; Drastich, Pavel

    2017-07-07

    To characterize the gut bacterial microbiota of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Stool samples were collected and relevant clinical data obtained from 106 study participants, 43 PSC patients with ( n = 32) or without ( n = 11) concomitant inflammatory bowel disease, 32 UC patients, and 31 healthy controls. The V3 and V4 regions of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene were sequenced on Illumina MiSeq platform to cover low taxonomic levels. Data were further processed in QIIME employing MaAsLin and LEfSe tools for analysis of the output data. Microbial profiles in both PSC and UC were characterized by low bacterial diversity and significant change in global microbial composition. Rothia , Enterococcus , Streptococcus , Veillonella , and three other genera were markedly overrepresented in PSC regardless of concomitant inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rothia , Veillonella and Streptococcus were tracked to the species level to identify Rothia mucilaginosa , Streptococcus infantus , S. alactolyticus , and S. equi along with Veillonella parvula and V. dispar . PSC was further characterized by decreased abundance of Adlercreutzia equolifaciens and Prevotella copri . Decrease in genus Phascolarctobacterium was linked to presence of colonic inflammation regardless of IBD phenotype. Akkermansia muciniphila , Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum and Clostridium colinum were decreased in UC along with genus Roseburia . Low levels of serum albumin were significantly correlated with enrichment of order Actinomycetales. PSC is associated with specific gut microbes independently of concomitant IBD and several bacterial taxa clearly distinguish IBD phenotypes (PSC-IBD and UC).

  5. Cultivation-independent methods reveal differences among bacterial gut microbiota in triatomine vectors of Chagas disease.

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    Fabio Faria da Mota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease is a trypanosomiasis whose agent is the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to humans by hematophagous bugs known as triatomines. Even though insecticide treatments allow effective control of these bugs in most Latin American countries where Chagas disease is endemic, the disease still affects a large proportion of the population of South America. The features of the disease in humans have been extensively studied, and the genome of the parasite has been sequenced, but no effective drug is yet available to treat Chagas disease. The digestive tract of the insect vectors in which T. cruzi develops has been much less well investigated than blood from its human hosts and constitutes a dynamic environment with very different conditions. Thus, we investigated the composition of the predominant bacterial species of the microbiota in insect vectors from Rhodnius, Triatoma, Panstrongylus and Dipetalogaster genera. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Microbiota of triatomine guts were investigated using cultivation-independent methods, i.e., phylogenetic analysis of 16s rDNA using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and cloned-based sequencing. The Chao index showed that the diversity of bacterial species in triatomine guts is low, comprising fewer than 20 predominant species, and that these species vary between insect species. The analyses showed that Serratia predominates in Rhodnius, Arsenophonus predominates in Triatoma and Panstrongylus, while Candidatus Rohrkolberia predominates in Dipetalogaster. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The microbiota of triatomine guts represents one of the factors that may interfere with T. cruzi transmission and virulence in humans. The knowledge of its composition according to insect species is important for designing measures of biological control for T. cruzi. We found that the predominant species of the bacterial microbiota in triatomines form a group of low

  6. Integrated community profiling indicates long-term temporal stability of the predominant faecal microbiota in captive cheetahs.

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    Anne A M J Becker

    Full Text Available Understanding the symbiotic relationship between gut microbes and their animal host requires characterization of the core microbiota across populations and in time. Especially in captive populations of endangered wildlife species such as the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus, this knowledge is a key element to enhance feeding strategies and reduce gastrointestinal disorders. In order to investigate the temporal stability of the intestinal microbiota in cheetahs under human care, we conducted a longitudinal study over a 3-year period with bimonthly faecal sampling of 5 cheetahs housed in two European zoos. For this purpose, an integrated 16S rRNA DGGE-clone library approach was used in combination with a series of real-time PCR assays. Our findings disclosed a stable faecal microbiota, beyond intestinal community variations that were detected between zoo sample sets or between animals. The core of this microbiota was dominated by members of Clostridium clusters I, XI and XIVa, with mean concentrations ranging from 7.5-9.2 log10 CFU/g faeces and with significant positive correlations between these clusters (P<0.05, and by Lactobacillaceae. Moving window analysis of DGGE profiles revealed 23.3-25.6% change between consecutive samples for four of the cheetahs. The fifth animal in the study suffered from intermediate episodes of vomiting and diarrhea during the monitoring period and exhibited remarkably more change (39.4%. This observation may reflect the temporary impact of perturbations such as the animal's compromised health, antibiotic administration or a combination thereof, which temporarily altered the relative proportions of Clostridium clusters I and XIVa. In conclusion, this first long-term monitoring study of the faecal microbiota in feline strict carnivores not only reveals a remarkable compositional stability of this ecosystem, but also shows a qualitative and quantitative similarity in a defined set of faecal bacterial lineages across the five

  7. Colonic lesions, cytokine profiles, and gut microbiota in plasminogen-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Bill; Krych, Lukasz; Lund, Leif R.

    2015-01-01

    closure. Colonic lesions in plg(tm1Jld) mice, which were characterized by necrotizing ulcerations and cystically dilated glands, were restricted to the intermediate and distal parts of the colon. The cytokine profile was indicative of chronic tissue damage, but the genetic modification did not change...... the composition of the gut microbiota, and none of the clinical or biochemical parameters correlated with the gut microbiota composition....

  8. Rye affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition and bone mineralization in Turkey poults.

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    Guillermo Tellez

    Full Text Available Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group. At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d. After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (p<0.05 intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed

  9. Alteration of fecal microbiota profiles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 allele and disease status.

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    Monica Di Paola

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial pro-arthritogenic profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA, the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS, evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA, in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA. Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly

  10. Characterization of gut microbiota profiles in coronary artery disease patients using data mining analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism: gut microbiota could be a diagnostic marker of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, Takuo; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Toshio; Sasaki, Naoto; Hirota, Yushi; Hayashi, Tomohiro; So, Anna; Kasahara, Kazuyuki; Yodoi, Keiko; Matsumoto, Takuya; Mizoguchi, Taiji; Ogawa, Wataru; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    The association between atherosclerosis and gut microbiota has been attracting increased attention. We previously demonstrated a possible link between gut microbiota and coronary artery disease. Our aim of this study was to clarify the gut microbiota profiles in coronary artery disease patients using data mining analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). This study included 39 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and 30 age- and sex- matched no-CAD controls (Ctrls) with coronary risk factors. Bacterial DNA was extracted from their fecal samples and analyzed by T-RFLP and data mining analysis using the classification and regression algorithm. Five additional CAD patients were newly recruited to confirm the reliability of this analysis. Data mining analysis could divide the composition of gut microbiota into 2 characteristic nodes. The CAD group was classified into 4 CAD pattern nodes (35/39 = 90 %), while the Ctrl group was classified into 3 Ctrl pattern nodes (28/30 = 93 %). Five additional CAD samples were applied to the same dividing model, which could validate the accuracy to predict the risk of CAD by data mining analysis. We could demonstrate that operational taxonomic unit 853 (OTU853), OTU657, and OTU990 were determined important both by the data mining method and by the usual statistical comparison. We classified the gut microbiota profiles in coronary artery disease patients using data mining analysis of T-RFLP data and demonstrated the possibility that gut microbiota is a diagnostic marker of suffering from CAD.

  11. Intra- and interspecific comparisons of bacterial diversity and community structure support coevolution of gut microbiota and termite host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Yuichi; Deevong, Pinsurang; Inoue, Tetsushi; Moriya, Shigeharu; Trakulnaleamsai, Savitr; Ohkuma, Moriya; Vongkaluang, Charunee; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2005-11-01

    We investigated the bacterial gut microbiota from 32 colonies of wood-feeding termites, comprising four Microcerotermes species (Termitidae) and four Reticulitermes species (Rhinotermitidae), using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and clonal analysis of 16S rRNA. The obtained molecular community profiles were compared statistically between individuals, colonies, locations, and species of termites. Both analyses revealed that the bacterial community structure was remarkably similar within each termite genus, with small but significant differences between sampling sites and/or termite species. In contrast, considerable differences were found between the two termite genera. Only one bacterial phylotype (defined with 97% sequence identity) was shared between the two termite genera, while 18% and 50% of the phylotypes were shared between two congeneric species in the genera Microcerotermes and Reticulitermes, respectively. Nevertheless, a phylogenetic analysis of 228 phylotypes from Microcerotermes spp. and 367 phylotypes from Reticulitermes spp. with other termite gut clones available in public databases demonstrated the monophyly of many phylotypes from distantly related termites. The monophyletic "termite clusters" comprised of phylotypes from more than one termite species were distributed among 15 bacterial phyla, including the novel candidate phyla TG2 and TG3. These termite clusters accounted for 95% of the 960 clones analyzed in this study. Moreover, the clusters in 12 phyla comprised phylotypes from more than one termite (sub)family, accounting for 75% of the analyzed clones. Our results suggest that the majority of gut bacteria are not allochthonous but are specific symbionts that have coevolved with termites and that their community structure is basically consistent within a genus of termites.

  12. French invasive Asian tiger mosquito populations harbor reduced bacterial microbiota and genetic diversity compared to Vietnamese autochthonous relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eMinard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is one of the most significant pathogen vectors of the 21st century. Originating from Asia, it has invaded a wide range of eco-climatic regions worldwide. The insect-associated microbiota is now recognized to play a significant role in host biology. While genetic diversity bottlenecks are known to result from biological invasions, the resulting shifts in host-associated microbiota diversity has not been thoroughly investigated. To address this subject, we compared four autochthonous Ae. albopictus populations in Vietnam, the native area of Ae. albopictus, and three populations recently introduced to Metropolitan France, with the aim of documenting whether these populations display differences in host genotype and bacterial microbiota. Population-level genetic diversity (microsatellite markers and COI haplotype and bacterial diversity (16S rDNA metabarcoding were compared between field-caught mosquitoes. Bacterial microbiota from the whole insect bodies were largely dominated by Wolbachia pipientis. Targeted analysis of the gut microbiota revealed a greater bacterial diversity in which a fraction was common between French and Vietnamese populations. The genus Dysgonomonas was the most prevalent and abundant across all studied populations. Overall genetic diversities of both hosts and bacterial microbiota were significantly reduced in recently established populations of France compared to the autochthonous populations of Vietnam. These results open up many important avenues of investigation in order to link the process of geographical invasion to shifts in commensal and symbiotic microbiome communities, as such shifts may have dramatic impacts on the biology and/or vector competence of invading hematophagous insects.

  13. Characterisation of the spoilage bacterial microbiota in oyster gills during storage at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huibin; Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Meiying; Chen, Shaojun; Chen, Tuanwei

    2013-12-01

    The spoilage bacterial community in oyster gill was investigated during storage at 4, 10 and 20 °C. Aerobic plate counts and pH values were determined. Total bacterial DNA was extracted from oyster gill and bulk cells of plate count media. The major bacterial species during fresh or different temperatures storage were determined by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The initial aerobic plate count in oyster gill reached 6.70 log CFU g(-1). PCR-DGGE fingerprinting analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region revealed that most of the strains in fresh oyster gill belonged to the genera Lactococcus and Enterobacter. The major spoilage bacteria at a storage temperature of 20 °C were Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, an uncultured bacterium, Cytophaga fermentans, Lactococcus lactis, Pseudoalteromonas sp., Enterococcus mundtii, Clostridium difficile and an uncultured Fusobacteria; those at 10 °C were Lactococcus spp., Lactobacillus curvatus, Weissella confusa and C. difficile; those at 4 °C were Lactococcus, Weissella, Enterobacter and Aeromonas. The other minor species were L. curvatus, Pseudomonas sp. and E. mundtii. Lactococcus spp. was the most common main spoilage bacteria in oyster gill during chilled storage. PCR-DGGE revealed the complexity of the bacterial microbiota and the major bacteria species in oyster gill for fresh and storage. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Amplicon sequencing for the quantification of spoilage microbiota in complex foods including bacterial spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Paulo; Caspers, Martien; Sanders, Jan-Willem; Kemperman, Robèr; Wijman, Janneke; Lommerse, Gijs; Roeselers, Guus; Montijn, Roy; Abee, Tjakko; Kort, Remco

    2015-01-01

    Spoilage of food products is frequently caused by bacterial spores and lactic acid bacteria. Identification of these organisms by classic cultivation methods is limited by their ability to form colonies on nutrient agar plates. In this study, we adapted and optimized 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing for quantification of bacterial spores in a canned food matrix and for monitoring the outgrowth of spoilage microbiota in a ready-to-eat food matrix. The detection limit of bar-coded 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was determined for the number of bacterial spores in a canned food matrix. Analysis of samples from a canned food matrix spiked with a mixture of equinumerous spores from the thermophiles, Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, and the mesophiles, Bacillus sporothermodurans, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus subtilis, led to the detection of these spores with an average limit of 2 × 10(2) spores ml(-1). The data were normalized by setting the number of sequences resulting from DNA of an inactivated bacterial species, present in the matrix at the same concentration in all samples, to a fixed value for quantitative sample-to-sample comparisons. The 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing method was also employed to monitor population dynamics in a ready-to-eat rice meal, incubated over a period of 12 days at 7 °C. The most predominant outgrowth was observed by the genera Leuconostoc, Bacillus, and Paenibacillus. Analysis of meals pre-treated with weak acids showed inhibition of outgrowth of these three genera. The specificity of the amplicon synthesis was improved by the design of oligonucleotides that minimize the amplification of 16S rRNA genes from chloroplasts originating from plant-based material present in the food. This study shows that the composition of complex spoilage populations, including bacterial spores, can be monitored in complex food matrices by bar-coded amplicon sequencing in a quantitative manner. In order to allow sample

  15. Leaf microbiota in an agroecosystem: spatiotemporal variation in bacterial community composition on field-grown lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Gurdeep; Sbodio, Adrian; Tech, Jan J; Suslow, Trevor V; Coaker, Gitta L; Leveau, Johan H J

    2012-01-01

    The presence, size and importance of bacterial communities on plant leaf surfaces are widely appreciated. However, information is scarce regarding their composition and how it changes along geographical and seasonal scales. We collected 106 samples of field-grown Romaine lettuce from commercial production regions in California and Arizona during the 2009–2010 crop cycle. Total bacterial populations averaged between 105 and 106 per gram of tissue, whereas counts of culturable bacteria were on average one (summer season) or two (winter season) orders of magnitude lower. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from 88 samples revealed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were the most abundantly represented phyla. At the genus level, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Massilia, Arthrobacter and Pantoea were the most consistently found across samples, suggesting that they form the bacterial ‘core' phyllosphere microbiota on lettuce. The foliar presence of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians, which is the causal agent of bacterial leaf spot of lettuce, correlated positively with the relative representation of bacteria from the genus Alkanindiges, but negatively with Bacillus, Erwinia and Pantoea. Summer samples showed an overrepresentation of Enterobacteriaceae sequences and culturable coliforms compared with winter samples. The distance between fields or the timing of a dust storm, but not Romaine cultivar, explained differences in bacterial community composition between several of the fields sampled. As one of the largest surveys of leaf surface microbiology, this study offers new insights into the extent and underlying causes of variability in bacterial community composition on plant leaves as a function of time, space and environment. PMID:22534606

  16. Leaf microbiota in an agroecosystem: spatiotemporal variation in bacterial community composition on field-grown lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Gurdeep; Sbodio, Adrian; Tech, Jan J; Suslow, Trevor V; Coaker, Gitta L; Leveau, Johan H J

    2012-10-01

    The presence, size and importance of bacterial communities on plant leaf surfaces are widely appreciated. However, information is scarce regarding their composition and how it changes along geographical and seasonal scales. We collected 106 samples of field-grown Romaine lettuce from commercial production regions in California and Arizona during the 2009-2010 crop cycle. Total bacterial populations averaged between 10(5) and 10(6) per gram of tissue, whereas counts of culturable bacteria were on average one (summer season) or two (winter season) orders of magnitude lower. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from 88 samples revealed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were the most abundantly represented phyla. At the genus level, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Massilia, Arthrobacter and Pantoea were the most consistently found across samples, suggesting that they form the bacterial 'core' phyllosphere microbiota on lettuce. The foliar presence of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians, which is the causal agent of bacterial leaf spot of lettuce, correlated positively with the relative representation of bacteria from the genus Alkanindiges, but negatively with Bacillus, Erwinia and Pantoea. Summer samples showed an overrepresentation of Enterobacteriaceae sequences and culturable coliforms compared with winter samples. The distance between fields or the timing of a dust storm, but not Romaine cultivar, explained differences in bacterial community composition between several of the fields sampled. As one of the largest surveys of leaf surface microbiology, this study offers new insights into the extent and underlying causes of variability in bacterial community composition on plant leaves as a function of time, space and environment.

  17. Bacterial Diversity in Meconium of Preterm Neonates and Evolution of Their Fecal Microbiota during the First Month of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moles, L.; Gómez, M.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Bustos, G.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Fernandez, L.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Jimenez, E.

    2013-01-01

    The establishment and succession of bacterial communities in infants may have a profound impact in their health, but information about the composition of meconium microbiota and its evolution in hospitalized preterm infants is scarce. In this context, the objective of this work was to characterize

  18. The longitudinal effect of a multi-strain probiotic on the intestinal bacterial microbiota of neonatal foals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Guardabassi, Luca; Staempfli, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    or class level between treatment groups at any age (all p>0.08) but some significant changes in relative abundance of families. Probiotic administration did not result in an increased relative abundance of lactobacilli or bifidobacteria at any age (Lactobacillus: p = 0.95, p = 0.1 and p = 0...... applied (all p>0.65). CONCLUSIONS: There were limited effects of probiotic treatment on the bacterial microbiota of foals. The studied probiotic based on lactobacilli and bifidobacteria has a limited potential for therapeutic modification of the gastrointestinal microbiota. This article is protected...

  19. Diagnostics and Resistance Profiling of Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornischer, Klaus; Häußler, Susanne

    Worldwide infectious disease is one of the leading causes of death. Despite improvements in technology and healthcare services, morbidity and mortality due to infections have remained unchanged over the past few decades. The high and increasing rate of antibiotic resistance is further aggravating the situation. Growing resistance hampers the use of conventional antibiotics, and substantial higher mortality rates are reported in patients given ineffective empiric therapy mainly due to resistance to the agents used. These infections cause suffering, incapacity, and death and impose an enormous financial burden on both healthcare systems and on society in general. The accelerating development of multidrug resistance is one of the greatest diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to modern medicine. The lack of new antibiotic options underscores the need for optimization of current diagnostics, therapies, and prevention of the spread of multidrug-resistant organisms. The so-called -omics technologies (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) have yielded large-scale datasets that advanced the search for biomarkers of infectious diseases in the last decade. One can imagine that in the future the implementation of biomarker-driven molecular test systems will transform diagnostics of infectious diseases and will significantly accelerate the identification of the bacterial pathogens at the infected host site. Furthermore, molecular tests based on the identification of markers of antibiotic resistance will dramatically change resistance profiling. The replacement of culturing methods by molecular test systems for early diagnosis will provide the basis not only for a prompt and targeted therapy, but also for a much more effective stewardship of antibiotic agents and a reduction of the spread of multidrug resistance as well as the appearance of new antibiotic resistances.

  20. Gut Microbiota Profiling: Metabolomics Based Approach to Unravel Compounds Affecting Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernocchi, Pamela; Del Chierico, Federica; Putignani, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is composed of a huge number of different bacteria, that produce a large amount of compounds playing a key role in microbe selection and in the construction of a metabolic signaling network. The microbial activities are affected by environmental stimuli leading to the generation of a wide number of compounds, that influence the host metabolome and human health. Indeed, metabolite profiles related to the gut microbiota can offer deep insights on the impact of lifestyle and dietary factors on chronic and acute diseases. Metagenomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics are some of the meta-omics approaches to study the modulation of the gut microbiota. Metabolomic research applied to biofluids allows to: define the metabolic profile; identify and quantify classes and compounds of interest; characterize small molecules produced by intestinal microbes; and define the biochemical pathways of metabolites. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are the principal technologies applied to metabolomics in terms of coverage, sensitivity and quantification. Moreover, the use of biostatistics and mathematical approaches coupled with metabolomics play a key role in the extraction of biologically meaningful information from wide datasets. Metabolomic studies in gut microbiota-related research have increased, focusing on the generation of novel biomarkers, which could lead to the development of mechanistic hypotheses potentially applicable to the development of nutritional and personalized therapies.

  1. Microbiota bacteriana da conjuntiva de doadores de córnea Bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva of donor corneas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Emília Xavier dos Santos Araújo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Quantificar e qualificar a microbiota aeróbia da conjuntiva de doadores de córnea segundo a interferência do intervalo de tempo entre o óbito e a colheita do espécime conjuntival, a causa do óbito e a idade do doador e avaliar a atividade biocida de determinados antibióticos aos microrganismos isolados. MÉTODOS: Entre janeiro e março de 1994 foram colhidos espécimes da conjuntiva de 242 olhos de doadores de córnea. O material transportado em meio de Stuart foi semeado em ágares sangue, chocolate, sangue azida, MacConkey e caldo tioglicolato. Foi registrada a idade do doador, hora e causa do óbito. A atividade biocida dos antibióticos foi avaliada pela metodologia de Kirby e Bauer. A análise estatística utilizou os testes do qui-quadrado, exato de Fisher e Mann-Whitney. RESULTADOS: A freqüência de cultura positiva da conjuntiva de doadores de córnea foi de 91,7%. A mediana da idade dos doadores foi de 62 anos e do intervalo de tempo entre o óbito e a colheita do espécime foi de 4,2 horas. A causa mais freqüente de óbito foi doença cardiovascular (26,4%. Não houve diferença significante entre a cultura positiva e as variáveis estudadas. A vancomicina inibiu 100% das cepas de bactérias Gram-positivas e a sensibilidade dos bacilos Gram-negativos à gentamicina variou de 36,7% a 92,3%. CONCLUSÕES: O estudo revelou freqüência elevada de cultura positiva da conjuntiva de doadores de córneas. Staphylococcus coagulase negativo foi a espécie com maior número de isolamentos positivos. Não foi encontrada associação entre os fatores de risco avaliados e cultura positiva. Os antibióticos tiveram atividade biocida variável sobre os Gram-negativos e 100% dos Gram-positivos foram sensíveis à vancomicina.PURPOSE: To identify and qualify bacterial organisms in conjunctival tissue of donor corneas. To correlate the frequency of positive cultures with donor age, cause of death, and time from death to collection of

  2. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Bacterial Expression Profiles Following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial proteins were then extracted from the cell pellets and culture supernatants, using bacterial protein extraction reagent (Thermo Scientific) and ammonium sulfate precipitation. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and protein sequence analysis. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis was performed using 12 % resolving gel [1.5 ...

  4. Microbiota bacteriana aeróbia da conjuntiva de doadores de córnea Aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva of cornea donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Fontana Lorenzini

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar a microbiota bacteriana aeróbia da conjuntiva de doadores de córnea e seu padrão de suscetibilidade a antibióticos; verificar o número de córneas utilizadas para transplante e a média de tempo de preservação em solução preservante com gentamicina e estreptomicina; traçar o perfil dos doadores e receptores de córnea. MÉTODOS: Espécimes clínicos foram colhidos de saco inferior da conjuntiva de ambos os olhos, de 40 doadores de córnea. As amostras foram inoculadas em ágar sangue azida, ágar chocolate e ágar MacConkey e o antibiograma foi realizado pelo método de Kirby-Bauer. RESULTADOS: A freqüência de cultura positiva da conjuntiva de doadores de córnea foi de 72,5%, sendo que Gram-positivos totalizaram 81,6% e apenas 18,4% das amostras foram identificadas como Gram-negativos. Vancomicina inibiu 100% dos Gram-positivos, ao passo que a sensibilidade dos Gram-negativos à gentamicina foi de 53,8% e à estreptomicina foi de 30%. O sexo masculino predominou entre os doadores e receptores, a média de tempo entre o óbito e a enucleação foi de 2h e a de preservação em solução preservante com gentamicina e estreptomicina foi de 7 dias. Neoplasia e mais de uma causa associada foram as causas de óbito mais freqüentes. O ceratocone foi a principal indicação para transplante (51,7%. CONCLUSÕES: Staphylococcus coagulase negativo foi o microrganismo com o maior número de isolamentos, apresentando sensibilidade variada aos antimicrobianos. A quantidade de córneas utilizadas para transplante foi bastante inferior em relação ao total de captações. O perfil dos doadores e receptores de córnea mostrou-se heterogêneo para grande parte das variáveis analisadas.PURPOSE: To determine aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva of cornea donors and its patterns of susceptibility to antibiotics; verify the number of corneas used for transplant and the average time of preservation in solutions with

  5. Antibiotic resistance profiling and microbiota of the upper respiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rearing of dogs and other pets has become increasingly popular in modern society. Bacterial flora resides within the nasal and oral cavities of dogs and when chanced, can be pathogenic. Certain similarities between humans and dogs portends dangerous behavioral habits that could lead to zoonotic disease ...

  6. The effects of micronutrient deficiencies on bacterial species from the human gut microbiota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibberd, Matthew C. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research; Wu, Meng [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology; Rodionov, Dmitry A. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation). A.A. Kharkevich Inst. for Information Transmission Problems; Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Li, Xiaoqing [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Cheng, Jiye [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Researc; Griffin, Nicholas W. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Researc; Barratt, Michael J. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Researc; Giannone, Richard J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Hettich, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Osterman, Andrei L. [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Gordon, Jeffrey I. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Researc

    2017-05-17

    Micronutrient deficiencies afflict two billion people. And while the impact of these imbalances on host biology has been studied extensively, much less is known about their effects on the developing or adult gut microbiota. Thus, we established a community of 44 cultured, sequenced human gut-derived bacterial species in gnotobiotic mice and fed the animals a defined, micronutrient-sufficient diet, followed by a derivative diet devoid of vitamin A, folate, iron or zinc, followed by return to the sufficient diet. Acute vitamin A deficiency had the largest effect on community structure and meta-transcriptome, with Bacteroides vulgatus, a prominent responder, increasing its abundance in the absence of vitamin A, and manifesting transcriptional changes involving various metabolic pathways. Applying retinol selection to a library of 30,300 B. vulgatus transposon mutants revealed that disruption of acrR abrogated retinol sensitivity. Genetic complementation studies, microbial RNA-Seq, and transcription factor binding assays disclosed that AcrR functions as a repressor of an adjacent AcrAB-TolC efflux system plus other members of its regulon. Retinol efflux measurements in wild-type, acrR-mutant, and complemented acrR mutant strains, plus treatment with a pharmacologic inhibitor of the efflux system, revealed that AcrAB-TolC is a determinant of retinol and bile acid sensitivity. We associated acute vitamin A deficiency with altered bile acid metabolism in vivo, raising the possibility that retinol, bile acid metabolites, and AcrAB-TolC interact to influence the fitness of B. vulgatus and perhaps other microbiota members. This type of preclinical model can help develop mechanistic insights about and more effective treatment strategies for micronutrient deficiencies.

  7. Comprehensive postmortem analyses of intestinal microbiota changes and bacterial translocation in human flora associated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus M Heimesaat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postmortem microbiological examinations are performed in forensic and medical pathology for defining uncertain causes of deaths and for screening of deceased tissue donors. Interpretation of bacteriological data, however, is hampered by false-positive results due to agonal spread of microorganisms, postmortem bacterial translocation, and environmental contamination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a kinetic survey of naturally occurring postmortem gut flora changes in the small and large intestines of conventional and gnotobiotic mice associated with a human microbiota (hfa applying cultural and molecular methods. Sacrificed mice were kept under ambient conditions for up to 72 hours postmortem. Intestinal microbiota changes were most pronounced in the ileal lumen where enterobacteria and enterococci increased by 3-5 orders of magnitude in conventional and hfa mice. Interestingly, comparable intestinal overgrowth was shown in acute and chronic intestinal inflammation in mice and men. In hfa mice, ileal overgrowth with enterococci and enterobacteria started 3 and 24 hours postmortem, respectively. Strikingly, intestinal bacteria translocated to extra-intestinal compartments such as mesenteric lymphnodes, spleen, liver, kidney, and cardiac blood as early as 5 min after death. Furthermore, intestinal tissue destruction was characterized by increased numbers of apoptotic cells and neutrophils within 3 hours postmortem, whereas counts of proliferative cells as well as T- and B-lymphocytes and regulatory T-cells decreased between 3 and 12 hours postmortem. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that kinetics of ileal overgrowth with enterobacteria and enterococci in hfa mice can be used as an indicator for compromized intestinal functionality and for more precisely defining the time point of death under defined ambient conditions. The rapid translocation of intestinal bacteria starting within a few minutes after death will help

  8. ANTAGONISM AGAINST VIBRIO CHOLERAE BY BACTERIAL DIFFUSIBLE COMPOUND IN THE FECAL MICROBIOTA OF RODENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Simone Helena da

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In an ex vivo agar plate assay, we monitored the appearance of an inhibitory halo against Vibrio cholerae from the feces of Wistar and Fischer rats aged 10 to 42 days. The frequency of Wistar rats showing halo increased from 0% (10 days to a maximum of 80.0% (29 days and then decreased to 53.3% (42 days. A similar pattern was obtained with Fischer rats but with a lower intensity (maximum frequency of 50.0% by day 36. In a separate experiment, when Wistar rats were fed a low-protein diet for 7 days, the inhibitory halo decreased drastically. Three apparently different colony morphologies were isolated from the dominant fecal microbiota: a facultative anaerobe (FAN and two strict anaerobes (SAN. The ex vivo inhibitory test showed a halo around the feces of germfree mice monoassociated with the FAN bacterium or one of the SAN bacterium but not of the germfree ones. After oral challenge of all groups with V. cholerae, a permissive and a drastic barrier effects were observed in mice with FAN and SAN associated bacteria, respectively. The FAN and one SAN bacteria used in the in vivo challenges were identified as Escherichia coli and Streptococcus intermedius, respectively. The potent antagonism developed by the rat intestinal microbiota against V. cholerae seems to be due, in part, to diffusible compounds and this phenomenon depends apparently on age, strain and nutrition of the animals. These preliminary results also suggest that this effect was due to more than one bacterial component at any given moment.

  9. Antibiotic resistance profiles and relatedness of enteric bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic resistance profiles and relatedness of enteric bacterial pathogens isolated from HIV/AIDS patients with and without diarrhoea and their household drinking water in rural communities in Limpopo Province South Africa.

  10. High diversity and variability in the bacterial microbiota of the coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), with emphasis on Wolbachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Yobana A; Ospina, Oscar E; Verle Rodrigues, José C; Bayman, Paul

    2018-03-30

    Variation in microbiota of the coffee berry borer (CBB) Hypothenemus hampei was studied. Diversity, structure and function of bacterial communities were compared between eggs vs. adults, CBBs from shade coffee vs. sun coffee, CBBs from the field vs. raised in the lab, and CBBs with and without the antibiotic tetracycline. We sequenced the region V4 of the gene 16 S rRNA. Pseudomonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, particularly Pseudomonas and Pantoea, dominated microbiota of the CBB. Comparative functional inferences with PICRUSt suggested that samples from the field were enriched for genes involved in carbohydrate and protein digestion and absorption, while lab-reared samples were higher in genes for melanization and caffeine metabolism. Microbiota of the CBB was diverse and dominated by the genus Pseudomonas, several species of which have been previously associated with caffeine degradation in this insect. Wolbachia was the only endosymbiont detected with known ability to manipulate host reproduction. This study demonstrates that stage of development and origin of samples affected the structure and function of the CBB's bacterial communities. This is the first attempt to predict functional significance of the CBB microbiota in nutrition, reproduction and defense. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Impacts of feeding preweaned calves milk containing drug residues on the functional profile of the fecal microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Richard Van Vleck; Carroll, Laura M.; Lima, Svetlana; Foditsch, Carla; Siler, Julie D.; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho; Warnick, Lorin D.

    2018-01-01

    Feeding drug residue-containing milk to calves is common worldwide and no information is currently available on the impact on the functional profile of the fecal microbiota. Our objective was to characterize the functional profile of the fecal microbiota of preweaned dairy calves fed raw milk with residual concentrations of antimicrobials commonly found in waste milk from birth to weaning. Calves were assigned to a controlled feeding trial being fed milk with no drug residues or milk with ant...

  12. Physico-chemical and microbiological profile of bacterial and fungal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    This study examined the physico-chemical and microbiological profile of bacterial and fungal isolates of Ikpoba River between February 2013 and March 2013. The mean bacterial count for upstream water sample obtained in February was 2 × 102 ±1 cfu/ml while 1.09 × 104 ±3.6 was the count for treated industrial effluent ...

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Bacterial Expression Profiles Following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were performed to determine the phytochemicals in the active fraction. Results: Five differentially expressed bacterial proteins (four from Escherichia coli and one from Staphylococcus aureus), were identified via ...

  14. Metagenomic profiles and antibiotic resistance genes in gut microbiota of mice exposed to arsenic and iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuechao; Liu, Su; Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Xu-xiang; Li, Mei; Wu, Bing

    2014-10-01

    Iron (Fe) has been widely applied to treat arsenic (As)-contaminated water, and Fe could influence bioavailability and toxicity of As. However, little is known about the impact of As and/or Fe on gut microbiota, which plays important roles in host health. In this study, high-throughput sequencing and quantitative real time PCR were applied to analyze the impact of As and Fe on mouse gut microbiota. Co-exposure of As and Fe mitigated effects on microbial community to a certain extent. Correlation analysis showed the shifts in gut microbiota caused by As and/or Fe exposure might be important reason of changes in metabolic profiles of mouse. For antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), co-exposure of As and Fe increased types and abundance of ARGs. But for high abundance ARGs, such as tetQ, tetO and tetM, co-exposure of As and Fe mitigated effects on their abundances compared to exposure to As and Fe alone. No obvious relationship between ARGs and mobile genetic elements were found. The changes in ARGs caused by metal exposure might be due to the alteration of gut microbial diversity. Our results show that changes of gut microbial community caused by As and/or Fe can influence host metabolisms and abundances of ARGs in gut, indicating that changes of gut microbiota should be considered during the risk assessment of As and/or Fe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Altered Bacterial Profiles in Saliva from Adults with Caries Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, D; Fiehn, N-E; Nielsen, C H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to learn whether presence of caries in an adult population was associated with a salivary bacterial profile different from that of individuals without untreated caries. Stimulated saliva samples from 621 participants of the Danish Health Examination Survey were analyzed ...... of commensal microbial communities are involved in the shift from oral health to tooth decay. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel....... using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray technology. Samples from 174 individuals with dental caries and 447 from a control cohort were compared using frequency and levels of identified bacterial taxa/clusters as endpoints. Differences at taxon/cluster level were analyzed using Mann......-Whitney's test with Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple comparisons. Principal component analysis was used to visualize bacterial community profiles. A reduced bacterial diversity was observed in samples from subjects with dental caries. Five bacterial taxa (Veillonella parvula, Veillonella atypica...

  16. Bacterial identification of the vaginal microbiota in Ecuadorian pregnant teenagers: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Ana María; Osorio, Verónica Gabriela; Endara, Pablo Francisco; Salazar, Eduardo Ramiro; Vasco, Gabriela Piedad; Vivero, Sandra Guadalupe; Machado, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a microbial imbalance (i.e., dysbiosis) that can produce serious medical effects in women at childbearing age. Little is known, however, about the incidence of BV or vaginal microbiota dysbiosis in pregnant teenagers in low and middle-income countries such as Ecuador. The scope of this exploratory analysis was to study the relationship between epidemiologic and microbial risk factors. Among the microbiology risk factors this study investigated five Lactobacillus species, two of them know in preview studies as microbiology risk factors for BV development ( Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus iners ), and the last three known for being associated with a healthy vaginal tract ( Lactobacillus crispatus , Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus jensenii ). In addition, fastidious anaerobes known to be microbial risk factors for BV development in pregnant teenagers were searched as well, more exactly, Gardnerella vaginalis , Atopobium vaginae and Mobiluncus mulieris . Ninety-five healthy adolescent pregnant women, visiting a secondary level hospital in Quito, Ecuador, were enrolled into the study in 2015. The enrolled patients were between 10 to 13 weeks of pregnancy. Four epidemiological risk factors were collected in a survey: age, civil status, sexual partners and condom use. Also, vaginal pH was measured as a health risk factor. DNA was extracted from endocervical and exocervical epithelia from all the patients' samples. PCR analysis was performed in order to characterize the presence of the eight bacterial species known as risk factors for BV development, targeting three anaerobes and five Lactobacillus species. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to identify associated factors for the presence of anaerobic species using logistic regression. The 95 vaginal microflora samples of these teenagers were analyzed. Two of the bacterial species known to cause BV: A. vaginae (100%) and G. vaginalis (93.7%) were found in

  17. Effects of Acarbose Addition on Ruminal Bacterial Microbiota, Lipopolysaccharide Levels and Fermentation Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-yang Yin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of acarbose addition on changes in ruminal fermentation characteristics and the composition of the ruminal bacterial community in vitro using batch cultures. Rumen fluid was collected from the rumens of three cannulated Holstein cattle fed forage ad libitum that was supplemented with 6 kg of concentrate. The batch cultures consisted of 8 mL of strained rumen fluid in 40 mL of an anaerobic buffer containing 0.49 g of corn grain, 0.21 g of soybean meal, 0.15 g of alfalfa and 0.15g of Leymus chinensis. Acarbose was added to incubation bottles to achieve final concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/mL. After incubation for 24 h, the addition of acarbose linearly decreased (p<0.05 the total gas production and the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total volatile fatty acids, lactate and lipopolysaccharide (LPS. It also linearly increased (p<0.05 the ratio of acetate to propionate, the concentrations of isovalerate, valerate and ammonia-nitrogen and the pH value compared with the control. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene showed that the addition of acarbose decreased (p<0.05 the proportion of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and increased (p<0.05 the percentage of Bacteroidetes, Fibrobacteres, and Synergistetes compared with the control. A principal coordinates analysis plot based on unweighted UniFrac values and molecular variance analysis revealed that the structure of the ruminal bacterial communities in the control was different to that of the ruminal microbiota in the acarbose group. In conclusion, acarbose addition can affect the composition of the ruminal microbial community and may be potentially useful for preventing the occurrence of ruminal acidosis and the accumulation of LPS in the rumen.

  18. The type VI secretion system impacts bacterial invasion and population dynamics in a model intestinal microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Savannah L.; Shields, Drew S.; Hammer, Brian K.; Xavier, Joao B.; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    Animal gastrointestinal tracts are home to a diverse community of microbes. The mechanisms by which microbial species interact and compete in this dense, physically dynamic space are poorly understood, limiting our understanding of how natural communities are assembled and how different communities could be engineered. Here, we focus on a physical mechanism for competition: the type VI secretion system (T6SS). The T6SS is a syringe-like organelle used by certain bacteria to translocate effector proteins across the cell membranes of target bacterial cells, killing them. Here, we use T6SS+ and T6SS- strains of V. cholerae, the pathogen that causes cholera in humans, and light sheet fluorescence microscopy for in vivo imaging to show that the T6SS provides an advantage to strains colonizing the larval zebrafish gut. Furthermore, we show that T6SS+ bacteria can invade and alter an existing population of a different species in the zebrafish gut, reducing its abundance and changing the form of its population dynamics. This work both demonstrates a mechanism for altering the gut microbiota with an invasive species and explores the processes controlling the stability and dynamics of the gut ecosystem. Research Corporation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and the Simons Foundation.

  19. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of Uropathogenic Bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to find out the prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in Yobe State with particular emphasis on community-acquired (CA) and hospital acquired (HA) UTIs and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of causative bacterial strains. A retrospective study of 1,577 urine samples processed at the Federal ...

  20. Gut Microbiota and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daniel Y; Tang, W H Wilson

    2017-08-25

    Studies in microbiota-mediated health risks have gained traction in recent years since the compilation of the Human Microbiome Project. No longer do we believe that our gut microbiota is an inert set of microorganisms that reside in the body without consequence. In this review, we discuss the recent findings which further our understanding of the connection between the gut microbiota and the atherosclerosis. We evaluate studies which illustrate the current understanding of the relationship between infection, immunity, altered metabolism, and bacterial products such as immune activators or dietary metabolites and their contributions to the development of atherosclerosis. In particular, we critically examine rec ent clinical and mechanistic findings for the novel microbiota-dependent dietary metabolite, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which has been implicated in atherosclerosis. These discoveries are now becoming integrated with advances in microbiota profiling which enhance our ability to interrogate the functional role of the gut microbiome and develop strategies for targeted therapeutics. The gut microbiota is a multi-faceted system that is unraveling novel contributors to the development and progression of atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss historic and novel contributors while highlighting the TMAO story mainly as an example of the various paths taken beyond deciphering microbial composition to elucidate downstream mechanisms that promote (or protect from) atherogenesis in the hopes of translating these findings from bench to bedside.

  1. Gut Microbiota, Microinflammation, Metabolic Profile, and Zonulin Concentration in Obese and Normal Weight Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Żak-Gołąb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between gut microbiota and circulating zonulin level, a marker of intestinal permeability, has not been studied yet. The aim of the study is the assessment of plasma zonulin, haptoglobin and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6 levels in relation to composition of gut microbiota in obese and normal weight subjects. Circulating inflammation markers, such as TNF-α, sTNFR1, sTNFR2, IL-6, zonulin, and haptoglobin levels were measured and semiquantitative analysis of gut microbiota composition was carried out in 50 obese and 30 normal weight subjects without concomitant diseases. Higher circulating zonulin, TNF-α, sTNFR1, sTNFR2, and IL-6 levels were found in the obese subjects. Plasma zonulin level correlated positively with age (r=0.43, P<0.001, body mass (r=0.30, P<0.01, BMI (r=0.33, P<0.01, fat mass and fat percentage (r=0.31, P<0.01 and r=0.23, P<0.05, resp.. Positive correlations between bacterial colony count and sTNFR1 (r=0.33, P<0.01 and plasma zonulin (r=0.26, P<0.05 but not haptoglobin levels were found. Additionally, plasma zonulin level was proportional to daily energy intake (r=0.27, P<0.05 and serum glucose concentration (r=0.18, P<0.05 and inversely proportional to diet protein percentage (r=-0.23, P<0.05. Gut microbiota-related systemic microinflammation in the obese is reflected by circulating zonulin level, a potential marker of interstitial permeability.

  2. Quantitative prediction of shrimp disease incidence via the profiles of gut eukaryotic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jinbo; Yu, Weina; Dai, Wenfang; Zhang, Jinjie; Qiu, Qiongfen; Ou, Changrong

    2018-04-01

    One common notion is emerging that gut eukaryotes are commensal or beneficial, rather than detrimental. To date, however, surprisingly few studies have been taken to discern the factors that govern the assembly of gut eukaryotes, despite growing interest in the dysbiosis of gut microbiota-disease relationship. Herein, we firstly explored how the gut eukaryotic microbiotas were assembled over shrimp postlarval to adult stages and a disease progression. The gut eukaryotic communities changed markedly as healthy shrimp aged, and converged toward an adult-microbiota configuration. However, the adult-like stability was distorted by disease exacerbation. A null model untangled that the deterministic processes that governed the gut eukaryotic assembly tended to be more important over healthy shrimp development, whereas this trend was inverted as the disease progressed. After ruling out the baseline of gut eukaryotes over shrimp ages, we identified disease-discriminatory taxa (species level afforded the highest accuracy of prediction) that characteristic of shrimp health status. The profiles of these taxa contributed an overall 92.4% accuracy in predicting shrimp health status. Notably, this model can accurately diagnose the onset of shrimp disease. Interspecies interaction analysis depicted how the disease-discriminatory taxa interacted with one another in sustaining shrimp health. Taken together, our findings offer novel insights into the underlying ecological processes that govern the assembly of gut eukaryotes over shrimp postlarval to adult stages and a disease progression. Intriguingly, the established model can quantitatively and accurately predict the incidences of shrimp disease.

  3. Use of a metagenetic approach to monitor the bacterial microbiota of "Tomme d'Orchies" cheese during the ripening process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceugniez, Alexandre; Taminiau, Bernard; Coucheney, Françoise; Jacques, Philippe; Delcenserie, Véronique; Daube, Georges; Drider, Djamel

    2017-04-17

    The study of microbial ecosystems in artisanal foodstuffs is important to complete in order to unveil its diversity. The number of studies performed on dairy products has increased during the last decade, particularly those performed on milk and cheese derivative products. In this work, we investigated the bacterial content of "Tomme d'Orchies" cheese, an artisanal pressed and uncooked French cheese. To this end, a metagenetic analysis, using Illumina technology, was utilized on samples taken from the surface and core of the cheese at 0, 1, 3, 14 and 21days of ripening process. In addition to the classical microbiota found in cheese, various strains likely from environmental origin were identified. A large difference between the surface and the core content was observed within samples withdrawn during the ripening process. The main species encountered in the core of the cheese were Lactococcus spp. and Streptococcus spp., with an inversion of this ratio during the ripening process. Less than 2.5% of the whole population was composed of strains issued from environmental origin, as Lactobacillales, Corynebacterium and Brevibacterium. In the core, about 85% of the microbiota was attributed to the starters used for the cheese making. In turn, the microbiota of the surface contained less than 30% of these starters and interestingly displayed more diversity. The predominant genus was Corynebacterium sp., likely originating from the environment. The less abundant microbiota of the surface was composed of Bifidobacteria, Brevibacterium and Micrococcales. To summarize, the "Tomme d'Orchies" cheese displayed a high diversity of bacterial species, especially on the surface, and this diversity is assumed to arise from the production environment and subsequent ripening process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Metagenomic profile of gut microbiota in children during cholera and recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monira Shirajum

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diverse bacterial communities colonizing the gut (gastrointestinal tract of infants as commensal flora, which play an important role in nutrient absorption and determining the state of health, are known to alter due to diarrhea. Method Bacterial community dynamics in children suffering from cholera and during recovery period were examined in the present study by employing metagenomic tool, followed by DNA sequencing and analysis. For this, bacterial community DNA was extracted from fecal samples of nine clinically confirmed cholera children (age 2–3 years at day 0 (acute cholera, day 2 (antibiotic therapy, day 7 and, and day 28, and the variable region of 16S rRNA genes were amplified by universal primer PCR. Results 454 parallel sequencing of the amplified DNA followed by similarity search of the sequenced data against an rRNA database allowed us to identify V. cholerae, the cause of cholera, in all nine children at day 0, and as predominant species in six children, accounting for 35% of the total gut microbiota on an average in all the nine children. The relative abundance (mean ± sem % of bacteria belonging to phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, was 55 ± 7, 18 ± 4, 13 ± 4, and 8 ± 4, respectively, at day 0, while these values were 12 ± 4, 43 ± 4, 33 ± 3, and 12 ± 2, respectively, at day 28. As antibiotic therapy began, V. cholerae count declined significantly (pEscherichia coli, Enterococcus, and Veillonella increased at day 2 (antibiotic therapy while Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, and Ruminococcus decreased. Conclusion Cholera results expulsion of major commensal bacteria of phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria, and increase of harmful Proteobacteria to colonize the gut during acute and convalescence states. The observed microbiota disruption might explain the prevalent malnutrition in children of Bangladesh where diarrheal diseases are endemic.

  5. Aerobic bacterial microbiota in stomoxys calcitrans: preliminary studies in Brazil Microbiota bacteriana aeróbica em Stomoxys calcitrans: estudos preliminares no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno G. de Castro

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans, has a great importance in medical and veterinary health due to its feeding and reproductive habits, which can disseminate some pathogenic agents among hosts even at long distances. This study aimed to describe, for the first time in Brazil, the bacterial microbiota in segments of the stable fly. Bacterial species were isolated from three different segments (cuticle, mouth parts and abdominal alimentary tract of the stable fly. Twenty dairy farms were visited in four municipalities: Barra Mansa, Quatis, Resende and Rio Claro in the State of Rio de Janeiro in order to collect 20 flies in each site. Dissection of the flies and procedures of isolation and identification of bacterial species were performed. A total of 161 colonies of 33 distinct species were isolated, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and S. intermedius. Stomoxys calcitrans may harbor bacterial agents on their cuticle, mouth parts and abdominal alimentary tract and these bacteria may be pathogenic to their hosts.A mosca dos estábulos, Stomoxys calcitrans, possui grande importância médica e veterinária devido a seus hábitos alimentares e reprodutivos, visto que pode disseminar agentes patogênicos para hospedeiros, mesmo a longas distâncias. Esse estudo teve por objetivo, pela primeira vez no Brasil, descrever a microbiota bacteriana de segmentos da mosca dos estábulos. As espécies bacterianas foram isoladas de três diferentes segmentos (superfície externa, aparelho bucal e trato digestivo abdominal de S. calcitrans. Foram visitadas 20 fazendas leiteiras em quatro municípios: Barra Mansa, Quatis, Resende e Rio Claro no Estado do Rio de Janeiro para coletar 20 moscas em cada uma delas. A dissecção das moscas e os procedimentos de isolamento e identificação bacteriana foram realizados. Um total de 161 colônias de 33 espécies distintas foi isolado, dentre elas Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus e S. intermedius

  6. Sepsis in preterm infants causes alterations in mucosal gene expression and microbiota profiles compared to non-septic twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernada, María; Bäuerl, Christine; Serna, Eva; Collado, Maria Carmen; Martínez, Gaspar Pérez; Vento, Máximo

    2016-05-16

    Sepsis is a life-threatening condition in preterm infants. Neonatal microbiota plays a pivotal role in the immune system maturation. Changes in gut microbiota have been associated to inflammatory disorders; however, a link with sepsis in the neonatal period has not yet been established. We aimed to analyze gut microbiota and mucosal gene expression using non-invasively obtained samples to provide with an integrative perspective of host-microbe interactions in neonatal sepsis. For this purpose, a prospective observational case-control study was conducted in septic preterm dizygotic twins and their non-septic twin controls. Fecal samples were used for both microbiota analysis and host genome-wide expression using exfoliated intestinal cells. Gene expression of exfoliated intestinal cells in septic preterm showed an induction of inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways in the gut and pro-oxidant profile that caused dysbiosis in the gut microbiota with predominance of Enterobacteria and reduction of Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium spp.in fecal samples, leading to a global reduction of beneficial anaerobic bacteria. Sepsis in preterm infants induced low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress in the gut mucosa, and also changes in the gut microbiota. This study highlights the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in neonatal sepsis on gut microbial profiles.

  7. Utilization of rye as energy source affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition and bone mineralization in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo eTellez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the utilization of rye as energy source on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut integrity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with a traditional cereal (corn in broiler chickens. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, broiler chickens were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 20 chickens/group. At 10d of age, in both experiments, 12 chickens/group were randomly selected, and given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d. After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood samples were collected to determine the passage of FITC-d. The liver was collected from each bird to evaluate bacterial translocation (BT. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with rye showed increased (p < 0.05 intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that chickens fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to chickens fed with corn. Chickens fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in chickens fed with rye when compared with corn fed chickens. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in chickens that alter the intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition as well as bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected DFM candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed chickens are currently being evaluated.

  8. 16S rRNA gene-based profiling of the human infant gut microbiota is strongly influenced by sample processing and PCR primer choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alan W; Martin, Jennifer C; Scott, Paul; Parkhill, Julian; Flint, Harry J; Scott, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    Characterisation of the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota is increasingly carried out with a view to establish the role of different bacterial species in causation or prevention of disease. It is thus essential that the methods used to determine the microbial composition are robust. Here, several widely used molecular techniques were compared to establish the optimal methods to assess the bacterial composition in faecal samples from babies, before weaning. The bacterial community profile detected in the faeces of infants is highly dependent on the methodology used. Bifidobacteria were the most abundant bacteria detected at 6 weeks in faeces from two initially breast-fed babies using fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH), in agreement with data from previous culture-based studies. Using the 16S rRNA gene sequencing approach, however, we found that the detection of bifidobacteria in particular crucially depended on the optimisation of the DNA extraction method, and the choice of primers used to amplify the V1-V3 regions of 16S rRNA genes prior to subsequent sequence analysis. Bifidobacteria were only well represented among amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences when mechanical disruption (bead-beating) procedures for DNA extraction were employed together with optimised "universal" PCR primers. These primers incorporate degenerate bases at positions where mismatches to bifidobacteria and other bacterial taxa occur. The use of a DNA extraction kit with no bead-beating step resulted in a complete absence of bifidobacteria in the sequence data, even when using the optimised primers. This work emphasises the importance of sample processing methodology to downstream sequencing results and illustrates the value of employing multiple approaches for determining microbiota composition.

  9. Microbial profile, antibiotic sensitivity and heat resistance of bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: This study was aimed at determining the prevalence, antibiotic resistance and heat resistance profile of bacterial isolates obtained from ready to eat roasted beef (suya) sold in Abuja, Nigeria. Methods and Results: Fifty samples of suya were purchased from different vendors within the Federal Capital Territory and ...

  10. Antibiotic resistance profiles and relatedness of enteric bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-16

    Apr 16, 2007 ... Antibiotic resistance profiles and the correlation of enteric bacterial pathogens from HIV positive indivi- duals with and ... from the various study cohorts showed multiple antibiotic resistance to penicillin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin .... chose to work closely with support groups, NGOs and HIV care-.

  11. Risk Factors and Bacterial Profile of Suspected Neonatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonatal septicaemia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries and a major health concern. The aim of this study is to evaluate the bacterial profile, antibiotics susceptibility pattern and associated risk factors of suspected septicaemia in neonates in this locality. Five hundred and forty seven ...

  12. Evaluation of bacterial profile and biodegradation potential of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abattoir wastewater treatments were monitored using physicochemical parameters, bacterial profile and biodegradation potential for 28 days at 7 days intervals. The stages of abattoir wastewater treatment were evaluated through determination of physicochemical parameters such as pH, conductivity, total dissolved solid, ...

  13. Profiling of Oral Microbiota in Early Childhood Caries Using Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alterations of oral microbiota are the main cause of the progression of caries. The goal of this study was to characterize the oral microbiota in childhood caries based on single-molecule real-time sequencing.Methods: A total of 21 preschoolers, aged 3–5 years old with severe early childhood caries, and 20 age-matched, caries-free children as controls were recruited. Saliva samples were collected, followed by DNA extraction, Pacbio sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses of the oral microbial communities.Results: Eight hundred and seventy six species derived from 13 known bacterial phyla and 110 genera were detected from 41 children using Pacbio sequencing. At the species level, 38 species, including Veillonella spp., Streptococcus spp., Prevotella spp., and Lactobacillus spp., showed higher abundance in the caries group compared to the caries-free group (p < 0.05. The core microbiota at the genus and species levels was more stable in the caries-free micro-ecological niche. At follow-up, oral examinations 6 months after sample collection, development of new dental caries was observed in 5 children (the transitional group among the 21 caries free children. Compared with the caries-free children, in the transitional and caries groups, 6 species, which were more abundant in the caries-free group, exhibited a relatively low abundance in both the caries group and the transitional group (p < 0.05. We conclude that Abiotrophia spp., Neisseria spp., and Veillonella spp., might be associated with healthy oral microbial ecosystem. Prevotella spp., Lactobacillus spp., Dialister spp., and Filifactor spp. may be related to the pathogenesis and progression of dental caries.

  14. The A0 blood group genotype modifies the jejunal glycomic binding pattern profile of piglets early associated with a simple or complex microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priori, D.; Colombo, M.; Koopmans, S.J.; Jansman, A.J.M.; Meulen, van der J.; Trevisi, P.; Bosi, P.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium glycocalyx sugar motif is an important determinant of the bacterial-host interaction and may be affected in pigs by gut microbiota and by blood group genotype. The aim was to study the effect of intestinal association with different microbiota and A0 blood group

  15. Profiling of Oral Microbiota in Early Childhood Caries Using Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Xi; Jiang, Wen; Wang, Sa; Xu, Lei; Tu, Yan; Zheng, Pei; Wang, Ying; Lin, Xiaolong; Chen, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Background: Alterations of oral microbiota are the main cause of the progression of caries. The goal of this study was to characterize the oral microbiota in childhood caries based on single-molecule real-time sequencing. Methods: A total of 21 preschoolers, aged 3-5 years old with severe early childhood caries, and 20 age-matched, caries-free children as controls were recruited. Saliva samples were collected, followed by DNA extraction, Pacbio sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses of the oral microbial communities. Results: Eight hundred and seventy six species derived from 13 known bacterial phyla and 110 genera were detected from 41 children using Pacbio sequencing. At the species level, 38 species, including Veillonella spp., Streptococcus spp., Prevotella spp., and Lactobacillus spp., showed higher abundance in the caries group compared to the caries-free group ( p free micro-ecological niche. At follow-up, oral examinations 6 months after sample collection, development of new dental caries was observed in 5 children (the transitional group) among the 21 caries free children. Compared with the caries-free children, in the transitional and caries groups, 6 species, which were more abundant in the caries-free group, exhibited a relatively low abundance in both the caries group and the transitional group ( p < 0.05). We conclude that Abiotrophia spp., Neisseria spp., and Veillonella spp., might be associated with healthy oral microbial ecosystem. Prevotella spp., Lactobacillus spp., Dialister spp., and Filifactor spp. may be related to the pathogenesis and progression of dental caries.

  16. Gut bacterial profile in patients newly diagnosed with treatment-naïve Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricanek P

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Petr Ricanek,1,2 Sheba M Lothe,1 Stephan A Frye,1 Andreas Rydning,2 Morten H Vatn,3,4 Tone Tønjum1,51Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience and Department of Microbiology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog and Faculty Division Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Lørenskog, 3EpiGen Institute, Faculty Division Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Lørenskog, 4Department of Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, 5Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience and Department of Microbiology, University of Oslo, Oslo, NorwayObjectives: The aim of this study was to define the composition of the gut bacterial flora in Norwegian patients with early stage Crohn's disease (CD. Methods: By using a nonselective metagenomics approach, the general bacterial composition in mucosal biopsies from the ileum and the colon of five subjects, four patients with different phenotypes of CD, and one noninflammatory bowel disease control, was characterized. After partial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequencing, BLAST homology searches for species identification and phylogenetic analysis were performed.Results: An overall biodiversity of 106 different bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs was detected in the cloned libraries. Nearly all OTUs belonged to the phylae Bacteroidetes (42% in CD, 71% in the control or Firmicutes (42% in CD, 28% in the control, except for some OTUs that belonged to the phylum Proteobacteria (15% in CD, 0% in the control and a few OTUs that could not be assigned to a phylum (2% in CD, 1% in the control.Conclusion: Based on the high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in Norway, this pilot study represents a relevant determination of the gut microbiota in Norwegian patients compared to previous findings in other countries. The bacterial profile of Norwegian CD patients was found to be similar

  17. Site and strain-specific variation in gut microbiota profiles and metabolism in experimental mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa K Friswell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract microbiota (GTM of mammals is a complex microbial consortium, the composition and activities of which influences mucosal development, immunity, nutrition and drug metabolism. It remains unclear whether the composition of the dominant GTM is conserved within animals of the same strain and whether stable GTMs are selected for by host-specific factors or dictated by environmental variables.The GTM composition of six highly inbred, genetically distinct strains of mouse (C3H, C57, GFEC, CD1, CBA nu/nu and SCID was profiled using eubacterial -specific PCR-DGGE and quantitative PCR of feces. Animals exhibited strain-specific fecal eubacterial profiles that were highly stable (c. >95% concordance over 26 months for C57. Analyses of mice that had been relocated before and after maturity indicated marked, reproducible changes in fecal consortia and that occurred only in young animals. Implantation of a female BDF1 mouse with genetically distinct (C57 and Agoutie embryos produced highly similar GTM profiles (c. 95% concordance between mother and offspring, regardless of offspring strain, which was also reflected in urinary metabolite profiles. Marked institution-specific GTM profiles were apparent in C3H mice raised in two different research institutions.Strain-specific data were suggestive of genetic determination of the composition and activities of intestinal symbiotic consortia. However, relocation studies and uterine implantation demonstrated the dominance of environmental influences on the GTM. This was manifested in large variations between isogenic adult mice reared in different research institutions.

  18. Decreased bacterial diversity characterizes the altered gut microbiota in patients with psoriatic arthritis, resembling dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Jose U; Ubeda, Carles; Artacho, Alejandro; Attur, Mukundan; Isaac, Sandrine; Reddy, Soumya M; Marmon, Shoshana; Neimann, Andrea; Brusca, Samuel; Patel, Tejas; Manasson, Julia; Pamer, Eric G; Littman, Dan R; Abramson, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the diversity and taxonomic relative abundance of the gut microbiota in patients with never-treated, recent-onset psoriatic arthritis (PsA). High-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing was utilized to compare the community composition of gut microbiota in patients with PsA (n = 16), patients with psoriasis of the skin (n = 15), and healthy, matched control subjects (n = 17). Samples were further assessed for the presence and levels of fecal and serum secretory IgA (sIgA), proinflammatory proteins, and fatty acids. The gut microbiota observed in patients with PsA and patients with skin psoriasis was less diverse when compared to that in healthy controls. This could be attributed to the reduced presence of several taxa. Samples from both patient groups showed a relative decrease in abundance of Coprococcus species, while samples from PsA patients were also characterized by a significant reduction in Akkermansia, Ruminococcus, and Pseudobutyrivibrio. Supernatants of fecal samples from PsA patients revealed an increase in sIgA levels and decrease in RANKL levels. Analysis of fatty acids revealed low fecal quantities of hexanoate and heptanoate in both patients with PsA and patients with psoriasis. Patients with PsA and patients with skin psoriasis had a lower relative abundance of multiple intestinal bacteria. Although some genera were concomitantly decreased in both conditions, PsA samples had a lower abundance of reportedly beneficial taxa. This gut microbiota profile in PsA was similar to that previously described in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and was associated with changes in specific inflammatory proteins unique to this group, and distinct from that in patients with skin psoriasis and healthy controls. Thus, the role of the gut microbiome in the continuum of psoriasis-PsA pathogenesis and the associated immune response merits further study. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Bacterial community profiles in low microbial abundance sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Emily C; Kamke, Janine; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Taylor, Michael W; Hentschel, Ute; Ravasi, Timothy; Schmitt, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    It has long been recognized that sponges differ in the abundance of associated microorganisms, and they are therefore termed either 'low microbial abundance' (LMA) or 'high microbial abundance' (HMA) sponges. Many previous studies concentrated on the dense microbial communities in HMA sponges, whereas little is known about microorganisms in LMA sponges. Here, two LMA sponges from the Red Sea, two from the Caribbean and one from the South Pacific were investigated. With up to only five bacterial phyla per sponge, all LMA sponges showed lower phylum-level diversity than typical HMA sponges. Interestingly, each LMA sponge was dominated by a large clade within either Cyanobacteria or different classes of Proteobacteria. The overall similarity of bacterial communities among LMA sponges determined by operational taxonomic unit and UniFrac analysis was low. Also the number of sponge-specific clusters, which indicate bacteria specifically associated with sponges and which are numerous in HMA sponges, was low. A biogeographical or host-dependent distribution pattern was not observed. In conclusion, bacterial community profiles of LMA sponges are clearly different from profiles of HMA sponges and, remarkably, each LMA sponge seems to harbour its own unique bacterial community. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacterial community profiles in low microbial abundance sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Giles, Emily

    2012-09-04

    It has long been recognized that sponges differ in the abundance of associated microorganisms, and they are therefore termed either \\'low microbial abundance\\' (LMA) or \\'high microbial abundance\\' (HMA) sponges. Many previous studies concentrated on the dense microbial communities in HMA sponges, whereas little is known about microorganisms in LMA sponges. Here, two LMA sponges from the Red Sea, two from the Caribbean and one from the South Pacific were investigated. With up to only five bacterial phyla per sponge, all LMA sponges showed lower phylum-level diversity than typical HMA sponges. Interestingly, each LMA sponge was dominated by a large clade within either Cyanobacteria or different classes of Proteobacteria. The overall similarity of bacterial communities among LMA sponges determined by operational taxonomic unit and UniFrac analysis was low. Also the number of sponge-specific clusters, which indicate bacteria specifically associated with sponges and which are numerous in HMA sponges, was low. A biogeographical or host-dependent distribution pattern was not observed. In conclusion, bacterial community profiles of LMA sponges are clearly different from profiles of HMA sponges and, remarkably, each LMA sponge seems to harbour its own unique bacterial community. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  1. Bacterial flora of Dona Paula, India using numerical profiles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    period of six months. Maximum density was noted at 1 cm depth. Overall 155 isolates were identified into 13 genera. The predominant genus was Coryneforms (22.6%). The isolates were grouped into 43 by 3 digits sorts when profiled numerically... suited for studying bacterial variability in tropical estuarine beach. Shore monitoring programmes to study the impact of industrial discharge into the sea or estuaries are carried out routinely on a temporal basis. The studies of microbial community...

  2. Bacterial profile of dentine caries and the impact of pH on bacterial population diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kianoush

    Full Text Available Dental caries is caused by the release of organic acids from fermentative bacteria, which results in the dissolution of hydroxyapatite matrices of enamel and dentine. While low environmental pH is proposed to cause a shift in the consortium of oral bacteria, favouring the development of caries, the impact of this variable has been overlooked in microbial population studies. This study aimed to detail the zonal composition of the microbiota associated with carious dentine lesions with reference to pH. We used 454 sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V3-V4 region to compare microbial communities in layers ranging in pH from 4.5-7.8 from 25 teeth with advanced dentine caries. Pyrosequencing of the amplicons yielded 449,762 sequences. Nine phyla, 97 genera and 409 species were identified from the quality-filtered, de-noised and chimera-free sequences. Among the microbiota associated with dentinal caries, the most abundant taxa included Lactobacillus sp., Prevotella sp., Atopobium sp., Olsenella sp. and Actinomyces sp. We found a disparity between microbial communities localised at acidic versus neutral pH strata. Acidic conditions were associated with low diversity microbial populations, with Lactobacillus species including L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. crispatus, being prominent. In comparison, the distinctive species of a more diverse flora associated with neutral pH regions of carious lesions included Alloprevotella tanerrae, Leptothrix sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Streptococcus anginosus. While certain bacteria were affected by the pH gradient, we also found that ∼ 60% of the taxa associated with caries were present across the investigated pH range, representing a substantial core. We demonstrated that some bacterial species implicated in caries progression show selective clustering with respect to pH gradient, providing a basis for specific therapeutic strategies.

  3. Influence of vitamin D on key bacterial taxa in infant microbiota in the KOALA Birth Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris E Talsness

    Full Text Available Vitamin D has immunomodulatory properties giving it the potential to affect microbial colonization of the intestinal tract. We investigated whether maternal vitamin D supplemention, maternal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration, or direct supplementation of the infant influences key bacterial taxa within microbiota of one month old infants. Infant and maternal vitamin D supplement use was ascertained via questionnaires. Maternal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D was determined at approximately the 36th week of pregnancy. In 913 one month old infants in the prospective KOALA Birth Cohort Study, fecal Bifidobacterium spp., Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile, Bacteroides fragilis group, Lactobacillus spp. and total bacteria were quantified with real-time polymerase chain reaction assays targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences. The association between vitamin D exposure and prevalence or abundance of a specific bacterial group or species was analyzed using logistic or linear regression, respectively. There was a statistically significant negative linear trend between counts of Bifidobacterium spp. and levels of maternal vitamin D supplementation and maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D quintiles, respectively. In addition, a positive linear trend between quintile groups and B. fragilis group counts was observed. Lower counts of C. difficile were associated with vitamin D supplementation of breast fed infants whose mothers were more likely to adhere to an alternative lifestyle in terms of, e.g., dietary habits. These data suggest that vitamin D influences the abundance of several key bacterial taxa within the infant microbiota. Given that intestinal microbiotic homeostasis may be an important factor in the prevention of immune mediated diseases and that vitamin D status is a modifiable factor, further investigation of the impact of postnatal vitamin D supplementation should be conducted in older infants.

  4. Effect of apple pectin on gut microbiota - qPCR in applied microbiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Wilcks, Andrea; Poulsen, Morten

    community in rats, as well as on a number of cecal parameters, which could be influenced by a changed microbiota. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of cecal microbiota profiles obtained by PCR-DGGE targeting bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed an effect of whole apples in a long-term feeding study (14 weeks...

  5. Strongyle Infection and Gut Microbiota: Profiling of Resistant and Susceptible Horses Over a Grazing Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Clark

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal strongyles are a major threat to horses' health and welfare. Given that strongyles inhabit the same niche as the gut microbiota, they may interact with each other. These beneficial or detrimental interactions are unknown in horses and could partly explain contrasted susceptibility to infection between individuals. To address these questions, an experimental pasture trial with 20 worm-free female Welsh ponies (10 susceptible (S and 10 resistant (R to parasite infection was implemented for 5 months. Fecal egg counts (FEC, hematological and biochemical data, body weight and gut microbiological composition were studied in each individual after 0, 24, 43, 92 and 132 grazing days. R and S ponies displayed divergent immunological profiles and slight differences in microbiological composition under worm-free conditions. After exposure to natural infection, the predicted R ponies exhibited lower FEC after 92 and 132 grazing days, and maintained higher levels of circulating monocytes and eosinophils, while lymphocytosis persisted in S ponies. Although the overall gut microbiota diversity and structure remained similar during the parasite infection between the two groups, S ponies exhibited a reduction of bacteria such as Ruminococcus, Clostridium XIVa and members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which may have promoted a disruption of mucosal homeostasis at day 92. In line with this hypothesis, an increase in pathobionts such as Pseudomonas and Campylobacter together with changes in several predicted immunological pathways, including pathogen sensing, lipid metabolism, and activation of signal transduction that are critical for the regulation of immune system and energy homeostasis were observed in S relative to R ponies. Moreover, S ponies displayed an increase in protozoan concentrations at day 92, suggesting that strongyles and protozoa may contribute to each other's success in the equine intestines. It could also be that S individuals

  6. Early Innate Immunity to Bacterial Infection in the Lung Is Regulated Systemically by the Commensal Microbiota via Nod-Like Receptor Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The commensal microbiota is a major regulator of the immune system. The majority of commensal bacteria inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are known to regulate local mucosal defenses against intestinal pathogens. There is growing appreciation that the commensal microbiota also regulates immune responses at extraintestinal sites. Currently, however, it is unclear how this influences host defenses against bacterial infection outside the intestine. Microbiota depletion caused significant defects in the early innate response to lung infection by the major human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. After microbiota depletion, early clearance of K. pneumoniae was impaired, and this could be rescued by administration of bacterial Nod-like receptor (NLR) ligands (the NOD1 ligand MurNAcTriDAP and NOD2 ligand muramyl dipeptide [MDP]) but not bacterial Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Importantly, NLR ligands from the gastrointestinal, but not upper respiratory, tract rescued host defenses in the lung. Defects in early innate immunity were found to be due to reduced reactive oxygen species-mediated killing of bacteria by alveolar macrophages. These data show that bacterial signals from the intestine have a profound influence on establishing the levels of antibacterial defenses in distal tissues. PMID:25135683

  7. Safety assessment of genetically modified rice expressing human serum albumin from urine metabonomics and fecal bacterial profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaozhe; Chen, Siyuan; Sheng, Yao; Guo, Mingzhang; Liu, Yifei; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2015-02-01

    The genetically modified (GM) rice expressing human serum albumin (HSA) is used for non-food purposes; however, its food safety assessment should be conducted due to the probability of accidental mixture with conventional food. In this research, Sprague Dawley rats were fed diets containing 50% (wt/wt) GM rice expressing HSA or non-GM rice for 90 days. Urine metabolites were detected by (1)H NMR to examine the changes of the metabolites in the dynamic process of metabolism. Fecal bacterial profiles were detected by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to reflect intestinal health. Additionally, short chain fatty acids and fecal enzymes were investigated. The results showed that compared with rats fed the non-GM rice, some significant differences were observed in rats fed with the GM rice; however, these changes were not significantly different from the control diet group. Additionally, the gut microbiota was associated with blood indexes and urine metabolites. In conclusion, the GM rice diet is as safe as the traditional daily diet. Furthermore, urine metabonomics and fecal bacterial profiles provide a non-invasive food safety assessment rat model for genetically modified crops that are used for non-food/feed purposes. Fecal bacterial profiles have the potential for predicting the change of blood indexes in future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The yin and yang of bacterial resilience in the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Molly K; Pesesky, Mitchell W; Dantas, Gautam

    2014-11-25

    The human gut is home to trillions of microbes that form a symbiotic relationship with the human host. During health, the intestinal microbiota provides many benefits to the host and is generally resistant to colonization by new species; however, disruption of this complex community can lead to pathogen invasion, inflammation, and disease. Restoration and maintenance of a healthy gut microbiota composition requires effective therapies to reduce and prevent colonization of harmful bacteria (pathogens) while simultaneously promoting growth of beneficial bacteria (probiotics). Here we review the mechanisms by which the host modulates the gut community composition during health and disease, and we discuss prospects for antibiotic and probiotic therapy for restoration of a healthy intestinal community following disruption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Altered gut microbiota in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Francesco; Cavalieri, Duccio; Albanese, Davide; De Felice, Claudio; Donati, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef; Jousson, Olivier; Leoncini, Silvia; Pindo, Massimo; Renzi, Daniela; Rizzetto, Lisa; Stefanini, Irene; Calabrò, Antonio; De Filippo, Carlotta

    2016-07-30

    The human gut microbiota directly affects human health, and its alteration can lead to gastrointestinal abnormalities and inflammation. Rett syndrome (RTT), a progressive neurological disorder mainly caused by mutations in MeCP2 gene, is commonly associated with gastrointestinal dysfunctions and constipation, suggesting a link between RTT's gastrointestinal abnormalities and the gut microbiota. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial and fungal gut microbiota in a cohort of RTT subjects integrating clinical, metabolomics and metagenomics data to understand if changes in the gut microbiota of RTT subjects could be associated with gastrointestinal abnormalities and inflammatory status. Our findings revealed the occurrence of an intestinal sub-inflammatory status in RTT subjects as measured by the elevated values of faecal calprotectin and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. We showed that, overall, RTT subjects harbour bacterial and fungal microbiota altered in terms of relative abundances from those of healthy controls, with a reduced microbial richness and dominated by microbial taxa belonging to Bifidobacterium, several Clostridia (among which Anaerostipes, Clostridium XIVa, Clostridium XIVb) as well as Erysipelotrichaceae, Actinomyces, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, Eggerthella, Escherichia/Shigella and the fungal genus Candida. We further observed that alterations of the gut microbiota do not depend on the constipation status of RTT subjects and that this dysbiotic microbiota produced altered short chain fatty acids profiles. We demonstrated for the first time that RTT is associated with a dysbiosis of both the bacterial and fungal component of the gut microbiota, suggesting that impairments of MeCP2 functioning favour the establishment of a microbial community adapted to the costive gastrointestinal niche of RTT subjects. The altered production of short chain fatty acids associated with this microbiota might reinforce the constipation status of RTT

  10. Oral bacterial microbiota and traumatic injuries of free-ranging Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines, Chelidae in southeastern Brazil

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    Bruno O. Ferronato

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available During 2006 and 2007, we collected free-ranging Phrynops geoffroanus, from two anthropogenically altered rivers in southeastern Brazil. Oral microbiological samples were taken for isolation of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria; a physical examination was performed;and we evaluated possible effects on the turtles’ health. Twenty-nine species of bacteria were isolated in Piracicaba River turtles (n=10, and twenty-four species in Piracicamirim stream turtles (n=8, most of them gram-negative. In both sites, potential pathogens for reptiles were: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter agglomerans, Citrobacter freundii, and Bacillus sp. Although boatpropeller lesions were common on the carapace of the turtles, we have not found turtles with signs of clinical diseases. The oral bacterial microbiota of P. geoffroanus inhabiting the Piracicaba River basin are composed of a diverse microbe spectrum, and long-term studies of the effects of pollution and traumatic injuries on this population and its microbial flora are warranted.

  11. Deep sequencing analyses of low density microbial communities: working at the boundary of accurate microbiota detection.

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    Giske Biesbroek

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Accurate analyses of microbiota composition of low-density communities (10(3-10(4 bacteria/sample can be challenging. Background DNA from chemicals and consumables, extraction biases as well as differences in PCR efficiency can significantly interfere with microbiota assessment. This study was aiming to establish protocols for accurate microbiota analysis at low microbial density. METHODS: To examine possible effects of bacterial density on microbiota analyses we compared microbiota profiles of serial diluted saliva and low (nares, nasopharynx and high-density (oropharynx upper airway communities in four healthy individuals. DNA was extracted with four different extraction methods (Epicentre Masterpure, Qiagen DNeasy, Mobio Powersoil and a phenol bead-beating protocol combined with Agowa-Mag-mini. Bacterial DNA recovery was analysed by 16S qPCR and microbiota profiles through GS-FLX-Titanium-Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons spanning the V5-V7 regions. RESULTS: Lower template concentrations significantly impacted microbiota profiling results. With higher dilutions, low abundant species were overrepresented. In samples of <10(5 bacteria per ml, e.g. DNA <1 pg/µl, microbiota profiling deviated from the original sample and other dilutions showing a significant increase in the taxa Proteobacteria and decrease in Bacteroidetes. In similar low density samples, DNA extraction method determined if DNA levels were below or above 1 pg/µl and, together with lysis preferences per method, had profound impact on microbiota analyses in both relative abundance as well as representation of species. CONCLUSION: This study aimed to interpret microbiota analyses of low-density communities. Bacterial density seemed to interfere with microbiota analyses at < than 10(6 bacteria per ml or DNA <1 pg/µl. We therefore recommend this threshold for working with low density materials. This study underlines that bias reduction is crucial for adequate

  12. Fecal Microbiota in Healthy Subjects Following Omnivore, Vegetarian and Vegan Diets: Culturable Populations and rRNA DGGE Profiling.

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    Ilario Ferrocino

    Full Text Available In this study, the fecal microbiota of 153 healthy volunteers, recruited from four different locations in Italy, has been studied by coupling viable counts, on different microbiological media, with ribosomal RNA Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (rRNA-DGGE. The volunteers followed three different diets, namely omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan. The results obtained from culture-dependent and -independent methods have underlined a high level of similarity of the viable fecal microbiota for the three investigated diets. The rRNA DGGE profiles were very complex and comprised a total number of bands that varied from 67 to 64 for the V3 and V9 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Only a few bands were specific in/of all three diets, and the presence of common taxa associated with the dietary habits was found. As far as the viable counts are concerned, the high similarity of the fecal microbiota was once again confirmed, with only a few of the investigated groups showing significant differences. Interestingly, the samples grouped differently, according to the recruitment site, thus highlighting a higher impact of the food consumed by the volunteers in the specific geographical locations than that of the type of diet. Lastly, it should be mentioned that the fecal microbiota DGGE profiles obtained from the DNA were clearly separated from those produced using RNA, thus underlining a difference between the total and viable populations in the fecal samples.

  13. Fecal Microbiota in Healthy Subjects Following Omnivore, Vegetarian and Vegan Diets: Culturable Populations and rRNA DGGE Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrocino, Ilario; Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria; Turroni, Silvia; Vannini, Lucia; Bancalari, Elena; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Neviani, Erasmo; Cocolin, Luca

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the fecal microbiota of 153 healthy volunteers, recruited from four different locations in Italy, has been studied by coupling viable counts, on different microbiological media, with ribosomal RNA Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (rRNA-DGGE). The volunteers followed three different diets, namely omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan. The results obtained from culture-dependent and -independent methods have underlined a high level of similarity of the viable fecal microbiota for the three investigated diets. The rRNA DGGE profiles were very complex and comprised a total number of bands that varied from 67 to 64 for the V3 and V9 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Only a few bands were specific in/of all three diets, and the presence of common taxa associated with the dietary habits was found. As far as the viable counts are concerned, the high similarity of the fecal microbiota was once again confirmed, with only a few of the investigated groups showing significant differences. Interestingly, the samples grouped differently, according to the recruitment site, thus highlighting a higher impact of the food consumed by the volunteers in the specific geographical locations than that of the type of diet. Lastly, it should be mentioned that the fecal microbiota DGGE profiles obtained from the DNA were clearly separated from those produced using RNA, thus underlining a difference between the total and viable populations in the fecal samples. PMID:26035837

  14. Fecal Microbiota in Healthy Subjects Following Omnivore, Vegetarian and Vegan Diets: Culturable Populations and rRNA DGGE Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrocino, Ilario; Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria; Turroni, Silvia; Vannini, Lucia; Bancalari, Elena; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Neviani, Erasmo; Cocolin, Luca

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the fecal microbiota of 153 healthy volunteers, recruited from four different locations in Italy, has been studied by coupling viable counts, on different microbiological media, with ribosomal RNA Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (rRNA-DGGE). The volunteers followed three different diets, namely omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan. The results obtained from culture-dependent and -independent methods have underlined a high level of similarity of the viable fecal microbiota for the three investigated diets. The rRNA DGGE profiles were very complex and comprised a total number of bands that varied from 67 to 64 for the V3 and V9 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Only a few bands were specific in/of all three diets, and the presence of common taxa associated with the dietary habits was found. As far as the viable counts are concerned, the high similarity of the fecal microbiota was once again confirmed, with only a few of the investigated groups showing significant differences. Interestingly, the samples grouped differently, according to the recruitment site, thus highlighting a higher impact of the food consumed by the volunteers in the specific geographical locations than that of the type of diet. Lastly, it should be mentioned that the fecal microbiota DGGE profiles obtained from the DNA were clearly separated from those produced using RNA, thus underlining a difference between the total and viable populations in the fecal samples.

  15. Combined oral and topical antimicrobial therapy for male partners of women with bacterial vaginosis: Acceptability, tolerability and impact on the genital microbiota of couples - A pilot study.

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    Erica L Plummer

    Full Text Available Recurrence following recommended treatment for bacterial vaginosis is unacceptably high. While the pathogenesis of recurrence is not well understood, recent evidence indicates re-infection from sexual partners is likely to play a role. The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability and tolerability of topical and oral antimicrobial therapy in male partners of women with bacterial vaginosis (BV, and to investigate the impact of dual-partner treatment on the vaginal and penile microbiota.Women with symptomatic BV (Nugent Score of 4-10 and ≥3 Amsel criteria and their regular male sexual partner were recruited from Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Melbourne, Australia. Women received oral metronidazole 400mg twice daily (or intra-vaginal 2% clindamycin cream, if contraindicated for 7-days. Male partners received oral metronidazole 400mg twice daily and 2% clindamycin cream topically to the penile skin twice daily for 7-days. Couples provided self-collected genital specimens and completed questionnaires at enrolment and then weekly for 4-weeks. Genital microbiota composition was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Changes in genital microbiota composition were assessed by Bray-Curtis index. Bacterial diversity was measured by the Shannon Diversity Index.Twenty-two couples were recruited. Sixteen couples (76% completed all study procedures. Adherence was high; most participants took >90% of prescribed medication. Medication, and particularly topical clindamycin in males, was well tolerated. Dual-partner treatment had an immediate and sustained effect on the composition of vaginal microbiota (median Bray-Curtis score day 0 versus day 8 = 0.03 [IQR 0-0.15], day 0 vs day 28 = 0.03 [0.02-0.11]. We observed a reduction in bacterial diversity of the vaginal microbiota and a decrease in the prevalence and abundance of BV-associated bacteria following treatment. Treatment had an immediate effect on the composition of the cutaneous penile

  16. Combined oral and topical antimicrobial therapy for male partners of women with bacterial vaginosis: Acceptability, tolerability and impact on the genital microbiota of couples - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Erica L; Vodstrcil, Lenka A; Danielewski, Jennifer A; Murray, Gerald L; Fairley, Christopher K; Garland, Suzanne M; Hocking, Jane S; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Bradshaw, Catriona S

    2018-01-01

    Recurrence following recommended treatment for bacterial vaginosis is unacceptably high. While the pathogenesis of recurrence is not well understood, recent evidence indicates re-infection from sexual partners is likely to play a role. The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability and tolerability of topical and oral antimicrobial therapy in male partners of women with bacterial vaginosis (BV), and to investigate the impact of dual-partner treatment on the vaginal and penile microbiota. Women with symptomatic BV (Nugent Score of 4-10 and ≥3 Amsel criteria) and their regular male sexual partner were recruited from Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Melbourne, Australia. Women received oral metronidazole 400mg twice daily (or intra-vaginal 2% clindamycin cream, if contraindicated) for 7-days. Male partners received oral metronidazole 400mg twice daily and 2% clindamycin cream topically to the penile skin twice daily for 7-days. Couples provided self-collected genital specimens and completed questionnaires at enrolment and then weekly for 4-weeks. Genital microbiota composition was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Changes in genital microbiota composition were assessed by Bray-Curtis index. Bacterial diversity was measured by the Shannon Diversity Index. Twenty-two couples were recruited. Sixteen couples (76%) completed all study procedures. Adherence was high; most participants took >90% of prescribed medication. Medication, and particularly topical clindamycin in males, was well tolerated. Dual-partner treatment had an immediate and sustained effect on the composition of vaginal microbiota (median Bray-Curtis score day 0 versus day 8 = 0.03 [IQR 0-0.15], day 0 vs day 28 = 0.03 [0.02-0.11]). We observed a reduction in bacterial diversity of the vaginal microbiota and a decrease in the prevalence and abundance of BV-associated bacteria following treatment. Treatment had an immediate effect on the composition of the cutaneous penile microbiota (median

  17. The Dynamic Microbiota Profile During Pepper (Piper nigrum L.) Peeling by Solid-State Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qisong; Zhang, Jiachao; Xu, Chuanbiao; Li, Congfa; Liu, Sixin

    2017-06-01

    White pepper (Piper nigrum L.), a well-known spice, is the main pepper processing product in Hainan province, China. The solid-state method of fermentation can peel pepper in a highly efficient manner and yield high-quality white pepper. In the present study, we used next-generation sequencing to reveal the dynamic changes in the microbiota during pepper peeling by solid-state fermentation. The results suggested that the inoculated Aspergillus niger was dominant throughout the fermentation stage, with its strains constituting more than 95% of the fungi present; thus, the fungal community structure was relatively stable. The bacterial community structure fluctuated across different fermentation periods; among the bacteria present, Pseudomonas, Tatumella, Pantoea, Acinetobacter, Lactococcus, and Enterobacter accounted for more than 95% of all bacteria. Based on the correlations among the microbial community, we found that Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter were significantly positively related with A. niger, which showed strong synergy with them. In view of the microbial functional gene analysis, we found that these three bacteria and fungi were closely related to the production of pectin esterase (COG4677) and acetyl xylan esterase (COG3458), the key enzymes for pepper peeling. The present research clarifies the solid-state fermentation method of pepper peeling and lays a theoretical foundation to promote the development of the pepper peeling process and the production of high-quality white pepper.

  18. Does adaptive radiation of a host lineage promote ecological diversity of its bacterial communities? A test using gut microbiota of Anolis lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Tiantian; Kahrl, Ariel F; Wu, Martin; Cox, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive radiations provide unique opportunities to test whether and how recent ecological and evolutionary diversification of host species structures the composition of entire bacterial communities. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing of faecal samples to test for differences in the gut microbiota of six species of Puerto Rican Anolis lizards characterized by the evolution of distinct 'ecomorphs' related to differences in habitat use. We found substantial variation in the composition of the microbiota within each species and ecomorph (trunk-crown, trunk-ground, grass-bush), but no differences in bacterial alpha diversity among species or ecomorphs. Beta diversity analyses revealed subtle but significant differences in bacterial composition related to host phylogeny and species, but these differences were not consistently associated with Anolis ecomorph. Comparison of a trunk-ground species from this clade (A. cristatellus) with a distantly related member of the same ecomorph class (A. sagrei) where the two species have been introduced and are now sympatric in Florida revealed pronounced differences in the alpha diversity and beta diversity of their microbiota despite their ecological similarity. Comparisons of these populations with allopatric conspecifics also revealed geographic differences in bacterial alpha diversity and beta diversity within each species. Finally, we observed high intraindividual variation over time and strong effects of a simplified laboratory diet on the microbiota of A. sagrei. Collectively, our results indicate that bacterial communities are only weakly shaped by the diversification of their lizard hosts due to the strikingly high levels of bacterial diversity and variation observed within Anolis species. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Microbiota in anorexia nervosa: The triangle between bacterial species, metabolites and psychological tests.

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    Francesca Borgo

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is a psychiatric disease with devastating physical consequences, with a pathophysiological mechanism still to be elucidated. Metagenomic studies on anorexia nervosa have revealed profound gut microbiome perturbations as a possible environmental factor involved in the disease. In this study we performed a comprehensive analysis integrating data on gut microbiota with clinical, anthropometric and psychological traits to gain new insight in the pathophysiology of AN. Fifteen AN women were compared with fifteen age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. AN diet was characterized by a significant lower energy intake, but macronutrient analysis highlighted a restriction only in fats and carbohydrates consumption. Next generation sequencing showed that AN intestinal microbiota was significantly affected at every taxonomic level, showing a significant increase of Enterobacteriaceae, and of the archeon Methanobrevibacter smithii compared with healthy controls. On the contrary, the genera Roseburia, Ruminococcus and Clostridium, were depleted, in line with the observed reduction in AN of total short chain fatty acids, butyrate, and propionate. Butyrate concentrations inversely correlated with anxiety levels, whereas propionate directly correlated with insulin levels and with the relative abundance of Roseburia inulinivorans, a known propionate producer. BMI represented the best predictive value for gut dysbiosis and metabolic alterations, showing a negative correlation with Bacteroides uniformis (microbiota, with alanine aminotransferase (liver function, and with psychopathological scores (obsession-compulsion, anxiety, and depression, and a positive correlation with white blood cells count. In conclusion, our findings corroborate the hypothesis that the gut dysbiosis could take part in the AN neurobiology, in particular in sustaining the persistence of alterations that eventually result in relapses after renourishment and

  20. Microbiota in anorexia nervosa: The triangle between bacterial species, metabolites and psychological tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgo, Francesca; Riva, Alessandra; Benetti, Alberto; Casiraghi, Maria Cristina; Bertelli, Sara; Garbossa, Stefania; Anselmetti, Simona; Scarone, Silvio; Pontiroli, Antonio E; Morace, Giulia; Borghi, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disease with devastating physical consequences, with a pathophysiological mechanism still to be elucidated. Metagenomic studies on anorexia nervosa have revealed profound gut microbiome perturbations as a possible environmental factor involved in the disease. In this study we performed a comprehensive analysis integrating data on gut microbiota with clinical, anthropometric and psychological traits to gain new insight in the pathophysiology of AN. Fifteen AN women were compared with fifteen age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. AN diet was characterized by a significant lower energy intake, but macronutrient analysis highlighted a restriction only in fats and carbohydrates consumption. Next generation sequencing showed that AN intestinal microbiota was significantly affected at every taxonomic level, showing a significant increase of Enterobacteriaceae, and of the archeon Methanobrevibacter smithii compared with healthy controls. On the contrary, the genera Roseburia, Ruminococcus and Clostridium, were depleted, in line with the observed reduction in AN of total short chain fatty acids, butyrate, and propionate. Butyrate concentrations inversely correlated with anxiety levels, whereas propionate directly correlated with insulin levels and with the relative abundance of Roseburia inulinivorans, a known propionate producer. BMI represented the best predictive value for gut dysbiosis and metabolic alterations, showing a negative correlation with Bacteroides uniformis (microbiota), with alanine aminotransferase (liver function), and with psychopathological scores (obsession-compulsion, anxiety, and depression), and a positive correlation with white blood cells count. In conclusion, our findings corroborate the hypothesis that the gut dysbiosis could take part in the AN neurobiology, in particular in sustaining the persistence of alterations that eventually result in relapses after renourishment and psychological

  1. Integrated Community Profiling Indicates Long-Term Temporal Stability of the Predominant Faecal Microbiota in Captive Cheetahs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anne A. M. J.; Janssens, Geert P. J.; Snauwaert, Cindy; Hesta, Myriam; Huys, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the symbiotic relationship between gut microbes and their animal host requires characterization of the core microbiota across populations and in time. Especially in captive populations of endangered wildlife species such as the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), this knowledge is a key element to enhance feeding strategies and reduce gastrointestinal disorders. In order to investigate the temporal stability of the intestinal microbiota in cheetahs under human care, we conducted a longitudinal study over a 3-year period with bimonthly faecal sampling of 5 cheetahs housed in two European zoos. For this purpose, an integrated 16S rRNA DGGE-clone library approach was used in combination with a series of real-time PCR assays. Our findings disclosed a stable faecal microbiota, beyond intestinal community variations that were detected between zoo sample sets or between animals. The core of this microbiota was dominated by members of Clostridium clusters I, XI and XIVa, with mean concentrations ranging from 7.5-9.2 log10 CFU/g faeces and with significant positive correlations between these clusters (Pcheetahs. The fifth animal in the study suffered from intermediate episodes of vomiting and diarrhea during the monitoring period and exhibited remarkably more change (39.4%). This observation may reflect the temporary impact of perturbations such as the animal’s compromised health, antibiotic administration or a combination thereof, which temporarily altered the relative proportions of Clostridium clusters I and XIVa. In conclusion, this first long-term monitoring study of the faecal microbiota in feline strict carnivores not only reveals a remarkable compositional stability of this ecosystem, but also shows a qualitative and quantitative similarity in a defined set of faecal bacterial lineages across the five animals under study that may typify the core phylogenetic microbiome of cheetahs. PMID:25905625

  2. 16S rRNA gene-based profiling of the human infant gut microbiota is strongly influenced by sample processing and PCR primer choice

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Alan W.; Martin, Jennifer C.; Scott, Paul; Parkhill, Julian; Flint, Harry J.; Scott, Karen P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterisation of the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota is increasingly carried out with a view to establish the role of different bacterial species in causation or prevention of disease. It is thus essential that the methods used to determine the microbial composition are robust. Here, several widely used molecular techniques were compared to establish the optimal methods to assess the bacterial composition in faecal samples from babies, before weaning. Results The bac...

  3. Comparative gut microbiota and resistome profiling of intensive care patients receiving selective digestive tract decontamination and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Elena; Bello González, Teresita D J; Fuentes, Susana; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Lahti, Leo; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R; Majoor, Eline A M; Braat, Johanna C; van Mourik, Maaike S M; Oostdijk, Evelien A N; Willems, Rob J L; Bonten, Marc J M; van Passel, Mark W J; Smidt, Hauke; van Schaik, Willem

    2017-08-14

    The gut microbiota is a reservoir of opportunistic pathogens that can cause life-threatening infections in critically ill patients during their stay in an intensive care unit (ICU). To suppress gut colonization with opportunistic pathogens, a prophylactic antibiotic regimen, termed "selective decontamination of the digestive tract" (SDD), is used in some countries where it improves clinical outcome in ICU patients. Yet, the impact of ICU hospitalization and SDD on the gut microbiota remains largely unknown. Here, we characterize the composition of the gut microbiota and its antimicrobial resistance genes ("the resistome") of ICU patients during SDD and of healthy subjects. From ten patients that were acutely admitted to the ICU, 30 fecal samples were collected during ICU stay. Additionally, feces were collected from five of these patients after transfer to a medium-care ward and cessation of SDD. Feces from ten healthy subjects were collected twice, with a 1-year interval. Gut microbiota and resistome composition were determined using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic profiling and nanolitre-scale quantitative PCRs. The microbiota of the ICU patients differed from the microbiota of healthy subjects and was characterized by lower microbial diversity, decreased levels of Escherichia coli and of anaerobic Gram-positive, butyrate-producing bacteria of the Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa, and an increased abundance of Bacteroidetes and enterococci. Four resistance genes (aac(6')-Ii, ermC, qacA, tetQ), providing resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, disinfectants, and tetracyclines, respectively, were significantly more abundant among ICU patients than in healthy subjects, while a chloramphenicol resistance gene (catA) and a tetracycline resistance gene (tetW) were more abundant in healthy subjects. The gut microbiota of SDD-treated ICU patients deviated strongly from the gut microbiota of healthy subjects. The negative effects on the resistome were limited to selection

  4. Antimicrobial and immune modulatory effects of lactic acid and short chain fatty acids produced by vaginal microbiota associated with eubiosis and bacterial vaginosis

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    Muriel eAldunate

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs produced by vaginal microbiota have reported antimicrobial and immune modulatory activities indicating their potential as biomarkers of disease and/or disease susceptibility. In asymptomatic women of reproductive-age the vaginal microbiota is comprised of lactic acid-producing bacteria that are primarily responsible for the production of lactic acid present at ~110 mM and acidifying the vaginal milieu to pH ~3.5. In contrast, bacterial vaginosis (BV, a dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota, is characterized by decreased lactic acid-producing microbiota and increased diverse anaerobic bacteria accompanied by an elevated pH>4.5. BV is also characterized by a dramatic loss of lactic acid and greater concentrations of mixed SCFAs including acetate, propionate, butyrate and succinate. Notably women with lactic acid-producing microbiota have more favorable reproductive and sexual health outcomes compared to women with BV. Regarding the latter, BV is associated with increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs including HIV. In vitro studies demonstrate that lactic acid produced by vaginal microbiota has microbicidal and virucidal activities that may protect against STIs and endogenous opportunistic bacteria as well as immune modulatory properties that require further characterization with regard to their effects on the vaginal mucosa. In contrast, BV-associated SCFAs have far less antimicrobial activity with the potential to contribute to a pro-inflammatory vaginal environment. Here we review the composition of lactic acid and SCFAs in respective states of eubiosis (non-BV or dysbiosis (BV, their effects on susceptibility to bacterial/viral STIs and whether they have inherent microbicidal/virucidal and immune modulatory properties. We also explore their potential as biomarkers for the presence and/or increased susceptibility to STIs.

  5. Antimicrobial and immune modulatory effects of lactic acid and short chain fatty acids produced by vaginal microbiota associated with eubiosis and bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldunate, Muriel; Srbinovski, Daniela; Hearps, Anna C; Latham, Catherine F; Ramsland, Paul A; Gugasyan, Raffi; Cone, Richard A; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced by vaginal microbiota have reported antimicrobial and immune modulatory activities indicating their potential as biomarkers of disease and/or disease susceptibility. In asymptomatic women of reproductive-age the vaginal microbiota is comprised of lactic acid-producing bacteria that are primarily responsible for the production of lactic acid present at ~110 mM and acidifying the vaginal milieu to pH ~3.5. In contrast, bacterial vaginosis (BV), a dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota, is characterized by decreased lactic acid-producing microbiota and increased diverse anaerobic bacteria accompanied by an elevated pH>4.5. BV is also characterized by a dramatic loss of lactic acid and greater concentrations of mixed SCFAs including acetate, propionate, butyrate, and succinate. Notably women with lactic acid-producing microbiota have more favorable reproductive and sexual health outcomes compared to women with BV. Regarding the latter, BV is associated with increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. In vitro studies demonstrate that lactic acid produced by vaginal microbiota has microbicidal and virucidal activities that may protect against STIs and endogenous opportunistic bacteria as well as immune modulatory properties that require further characterization with regard to their effects on the vaginal mucosa. In contrast, BV-associated SCFAs have far less antimicrobial activity with the potential to contribute to a pro-inflammatory vaginal environment. Here we review the composition of lactic acid and SCFAs in respective states of eubiosis (non-BV) or dysbiosis (BV), their effects on susceptibility to bacterial/viral STIs and whether they have inherent microbicidal/virucidal and immune modulatory properties. We also explore their potential as biomarkers for the presence and/or increased susceptibility to STIs.

  6. Bacterial diversity and spoilage-related microbiota associated with freshly prepared chicken products under aerobic conditions at 4°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rongrong; Yu, Xiaoqiao; Wang, Renhuan; Luo, Xin; Mao, Yanwei; Zhu, Lixian; Zhang, Yimin

    2012-06-01

    This study analyzed the bacterial diversity and spoilage-related microbiota associated with freshly prepared chicken products stored aerobically at 4°C, using "bone and chicken string," a product popular in the People's Republic of China, as the study subject. Samples collected from three different factories were tray packaged with cling film and stored at 4°C. Bacterial diversity and dominant bacteria were analyzed using PCR amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Combined with selective cultivation of the dominant bacteria and correlation analysis, the dominant spoilage microbiota was determined. The results showed that bacterial diversity varied with different manufacturers. Such bacteria as Acinetobacter sp., Carnobacterium sp., Rahnella sp., Pseudomonas sp., Brochothrix sp., and Weissella sp. were detected in freshly prepared chicken products during storage. And Carnobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Brochothrix sp. bacteria were the common dominant spoilage bacteria groups in most freshly prepared chicken products from different factories. Carnobacterium was, for the first time, shown to be an important contributor to the spoilage-related microflora of freshly prepared chicken products stored aerobically under refrigeration. Our work shows the bacterial diversity and dominant spoilage microbiota of freshly prepared chicken products stored aerobically under refrigeration.

  7. Advanced glycation end products dietary restriction effects on bacterial gut microbiota in peritoneal dialysis patients; a randomized open label controlled trial.

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    Rabi Yacoub

    Full Text Available The modern Western diet is rich in advanced glycation end products (AGEs. We have previously shown an association between dietary AGEs and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in a population of end stage renal disease (ESRD patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD. In the current pilot study we explored the effects of dietary AGEs on the gut bacterial microbiota composition in similar patients. AGEs play an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular (CVD disease. Plasma concentrations of different bacterial products have been shown to predict the risk of incident major adverse CVD events independently of traditional CVD risk factors, and experimental animal models indicates a possible role AGEs might have on the gut microbiota population. In this pilot randomized open label controlled trial, twenty PD patients habitually consuming a high AGE diet were recruited and randomized into either continuing the same diet (HAGE, n = 10 or a one-month dietary AGE restriction (LAGE, n = 10. Blood and stool samples were collected at baseline and after intervention. Variable regions V3-V4 of 16s rDNA were sequenced and taxa was identified on the phyla, genus, and species levels. Dietary AGE restriction resulted in a significant decrease in serum Nε-(carboxymethyl lysine (CML and methylglyoxal-derivatives (MG. At baseline, our total cohort exhibited a lower relative abundance of Bacteroides and Alistipes genus and a higher abundance of Prevotella genus when compared to the published data of healthy population. Dietary AGE restriction altered the bacterial gut microbiota with a significant reduction in Prevotella copri and Bifidobacterium animalis relative abundance and increased Alistipes indistinctus, Clostridium citroniae, Clostridium hathewayi, and Ruminococcus gauvreauii relative abundance. We show in this pilot study significant microbiota differences in peritoneal dialysis patients' population, as well as the effects

  8. Advanced glycation end products dietary restriction effects on bacterial gut microbiota in peritoneal dialysis patients; a randomized open label controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Rabi; Nugent, Melinda; Cai, Weijin; Nadkarni, Girish N; Chaves, Lee D; Abyad, Sham; Honan, Amanda M; Thomas, Shruthi A; Zheng, Wei; Valiyaparambil, Sujith A; Bryniarski, Mark A; Sun, Yijun; Buck, Michael; Genco, Robert J; Quigg, Richard J; He, John C; Uribarri, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    The modern Western diet is rich in advanced glycation end products (AGEs). We have previously shown an association between dietary AGEs and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in a population of end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). In the current pilot study we explored the effects of dietary AGEs on the gut bacterial microbiota composition in similar patients. AGEs play an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular (CVD) disease. Plasma concentrations of different bacterial products have been shown to predict the risk of incident major adverse CVD events independently of traditional CVD risk factors, and experimental animal models indicates a possible role AGEs might have on the gut microbiota population. In this pilot randomized open label controlled trial, twenty PD patients habitually consuming a high AGE diet were recruited and randomized into either continuing the same diet (HAGE, n = 10) or a one-month dietary AGE restriction (LAGE, n = 10). Blood and stool samples were collected at baseline and after intervention. Variable regions V3-V4 of 16s rDNA were sequenced and taxa was identified on the phyla, genus, and species levels. Dietary AGE restriction resulted in a significant decrease in serum Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML) and methylglyoxal-derivatives (MG). At baseline, our total cohort exhibited a lower relative abundance of Bacteroides and Alistipes genus and a higher abundance of Prevotella genus when compared to the published data of healthy population. Dietary AGE restriction altered the bacterial gut microbiota with a significant reduction in Prevotella copri and Bifidobacterium animalis relative abundance and increased Alistipes indistinctus, Clostridium citroniae, Clostridium hathewayi, and Ruminococcus gauvreauii relative abundance. We show in this pilot study significant microbiota differences in peritoneal dialysis patients' population, as well as the effects of dietary

  9. Influence of Pasture Rearing on the Cecal Bacterial Microbiota in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čermák L.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Differences in quantity of cecal microbiota in broiler chickens from conventional and pasture rearing were investigated by cultivation. Rearing on pasture brings stress reduction and increases comfort and bird welfare, which leads to products with better taste and flavour compared to conventionally produced broiler chickens. A difference in cecal settlement of general anaerobes, coliforms, lactic acid bacteria, and campylobacters and salmonellas in the two different rearing systems was addressed. Whereas numbers of total anaerobes and lactic acid bacteria were not affected, those of coliforms were significantly reduced in pasture rearing. Campylobacters were found only in pasture-reared chickens (in 28% of animals. Salmonellas were not detected in any of the systems.

  10. New perspectives on dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis: lessons we learned from bacterial and fungal skin microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Luciana Campos

    2017-06-01

    The human body is inhabited by complex microbial communities, which positively impact different aspects of our health, and might also be related to the development of diseases. Progress in technologies, particularly sequencing methods and bioinformatics tools, has been crucial for the advances in this field. Microbial communities from skin can modulate immune response and protect the host against pathogens, and there are also data supporting their association with several skin conditions; including dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis. For decades, they have been thought to be related to Malassezia yeasts; however, the microbial role has not been elucidated, and their etiology remains poorly understood. This review discusses the recent findings in dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis and their relation to the skin microbiota. Data provided new perceptions to aid in the understanding of these skin disorders, broadening our view of their etiology and the possible roles of microbial communities in symptom development.

  11. Restoring vaginal microbiota: biological control of bacterial vaginosis. A prospective case-control study using Lactobacillus rhamnosus BMX 54 as adjuvant treatment against bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recine, Nadia; Palma, Ettore; Domenici, Lavinia; Giorgini, Margherita; Imperiale, Ludovica; Sassu, Carolina; Musella, Angela; Marchetti, Claudia; Muzii, Ludovico; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent lower genital tract infection in reproductive-age women worldwide. BV is an ecological disorder of the vaginal microbiota characterized microbiologically by replacement of the lactobacilli, predominant vaginal microbiota. It is characterized by a high rate of relapse in sexual active women, and these patients show three or more relapses each year. A healthy vagina is characterized by hydrogen peroxide and acid-producing lactobacilli, which are crucial to maintain the physiological vaginal ecosystem and their depletion speeds up bacterial overgrowth with pH elevation, salidase and amine production, leading to the observed signs and symptoms of BV. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-term vaginal lactobacilli's implementation in restoring and maintaining vaginal microflora and pH and to collect data about prophylactic approach based on probiotics supplementation with lactobacilli. This is a prospective case-control study, performed between January 2013 and September 2014 at Department of Gynecological Obstetrics and Urologic Sciences of "Sapienza" University of Rome. 250 non-pregnant sexually active women with diagnoses of BV were collected. Patients selected were divided in Group A (125 patients assigned to standard treatment for BV-metronidazole 500 mg orally twice a day for 7 days) and Group B (125 women undergoing the same standard antibiotic regimen followed by vaginal tablets containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus BMX 54). Patients were evaluated after 2, 6, and 9 months (T0, T2, T6, and T9) in term of recurrences rates of BV, vaginal symptoms, re-establishment of healthy vaginal flora, vaginal pH, and treatment tolerability. Vaginal flora was significantly replaced in Group B patients after 2 months comparing with Group A (p = 0.014). These data were confirmed at 6 and 9 months follow-up: patients that underwent prophylactic therapy with NORMOGIN(®) experienced significantly low rate of

  12. Whole Rye Consumption Improves Blood and Liver n-3 Fatty Acid Profile and Gut Microbiota Composition in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounnas, Fayçal; Privé, Florence; Salen, Patricia; Gaci, Nadia; Tottey, William; Calani, Luca; Bresciani, Letizia; López-Gutiérrez, Noelia; Hazane-Puch, Florence; Laporte, François; Brugère, Jean-François; Del Rio, Daniele; Demeilliers, Christine; de Lorgeril, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Whole rye (WR) consumption seems to be associated with beneficial health effects. Although rye fiber and polyphenols are thought to be bioactive, the mechanisms behind the health effects of WR have yet to be fully identified. This study in rats was designed to investigate whether WR can influence the metabolism of n-3 and n-6 long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) and gut microbiota composition. For 12 weeks, rats were fed a diet containing either 50% WR or 50% refined rye (RR). The WR diet provided more fiber (+21%) and polyphenols (+29%) than the RR diet. Fat intake was the same in both diets and particularly involved similar amounts of essential (18-carbon) n-3 and n-6 LCFAs. The WR diet significantly increased the 24-hour urinary excretion of polyphenol metabolites-including enterolactone-compared with the RR diet. The WR rats had significantly more n-3 LCFA-in particular, eicosapentanoic (EPA) and docosahexanoic (DHA) acids-in their plasma and liver. Compared with the RR diet, the WR diet brought significant changes in gut microbiota composition, with increased diversity in the feces (Shannon and Simpson indices), decreased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and decreased proportions of uncultured Clostridiales cluster IA and Clostridium cluster IV in the feces. In contrast, no difference was found between groups with regards to cecum microbiota. The WR rats had lower concentrations of total short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in cecum and feces (pconsumption results in major biological modifications-increased plasma and liver n-3 EPA and DHA levels and improved gut microbiota profile, notably with increased diversity-known to provide health benefits. Unexpectedly, WR decreased SCFA levels in both cecum and feces. More studies are needed to understand the interactions between whole rye (fiber and polyphenols) and gut microbiota and also the mechanisms of action responsible for stimulating n-3 fatty acid metabolism.

  13. Effects of the Exclusive Enteral Nutrition on the Microbiota Profile of Patients with Crohn’s Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Simona; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Franceschini, Elisa; Annibali, Roberta; Albano, Veronica; De Angelis, Maria; Lionetti, Maria Elena; Catassi, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the efficacy of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) in Crohn’s disease (CD) remain poorly understood, despite the high rate of treatment response. Evidence accumulated in the last 20 years suggests that a positive shift of the disrupted microbiota is one of the treatment effects. The purpose of this study was to critically review and summarize data reporting the microbiological effects of EEN in patients with CD. Fourteen studies were considered in the review, overall involving 216 CD patients on EEN. The studies were heterogeneous in methods of microbiota analysis and exclusion criteria. The most frequently reported effect of EEN was a reduction in microbiota diversity, reversible when patients returned to a normal diet. The effect of EEN on specific bacteria was very variable in the different studies, partially due to methodological limitations of the mentioned studies. The EEN seem to induce some metabolomic changes, which are different in long-term responder patients compared to patients that relapse earlier. Bacterial changes can be relevant to explaining the efficacy of EEN; however, microbiological data obtained from rigorously performed studies and derived from last generation techniques are largely inconsistent. PMID:28777338

  14. Amplicon sequencing for the quantification of spoilage microbiota in complex foods including bacterial spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de P.; Caspers, M.; Sanders, J.W.; Kemperman, R.; Wijman, J.; Lommerse, G.; Roeselers, G.; Montijn, R.; Abee, T.; Kort, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background
    Spoilage of food products is frequently caused by bacterial spores and lactic acid bacteria. Identification of these organisms by classic cultivation methods is limited by their ability to form colonies on nutrient agar plates. In this study, we adapted and optimized 16S rRNA amplicon

  15. Role of the gut microbiota in host appetite control: bacterial growth to animal feeding behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2017-01-01

    The life of all animals is dominated by alternating feelings of hunger and satiety - the main involuntary motivations for feeding-related behaviour. Gut bacteria depend fully on their host for providing the nutrients necessary for their growth. The intrinsic ability of bacteria to regulate their growth and to maintain their population within the gut suggests that gut bacteria can interfere with molecular pathways controlling energy balance in the host. The current model of appetite control is based mainly on gut-brain signalling and the animal's own needs to maintain energy homeostasis; an alternative model might also involve bacteria-host communications. Several bacterial components and metabolites have been shown to stimulate intestinal satiety pathways; at the same time, their production depends on bacterial growth cycles. This short-term bacterial growth-linked modulation of intestinal satiety can be coupled with long-term regulation of appetite, controlled by the neuropeptidergic circuitry in the hypothalamus. Indeed, several bacterial products are detected in the systemic circulation, which might act directly on hypothalamic neurons. This Review analyses the data relevant to possible involvement of the gut bacteria in the regulation of host appetite and proposes an integrative homeostatic model of appetite control that includes energy needs of both the host and its gut bacteria.

  16. Bacterial profiles of saliva in relation to diet, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The bacterial profile of saliva is composed of bacteria from different oral surfaces. The objective of this study was to determine whether different diet intake, lifestyle, or socioeconomic status is associated with characteristic bacterial saliva profiles. DESIGN...... presence and levels (mean HOMIM-value) of bacterial probes as endpoints, the influence of diet intake, lifestyle, and socioeconomic status on the bacterial saliva profile was analyzed by Mann-Whitney tests with Benjamini-Hochberg's correction for multiple comparisons and principal component analysis.......01). Stratification of the group based on extreme ends of the parameters age, gender, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI), and diet intake had no statistical influence on the composition of the bacterial profile of saliva. Conversely, differences in socioeconomic status were reflected by the bacterial profiles...

  17. The Mouse Intestinal Bacterial Collection (miBC) provides host-specific insight into cultured diversity and functional potential of the gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Pukall, Rüdiger; Abt, Birte

    2016-01-01

    BC), a public repository of bacterial strains and associated genomes from the mouse gut, and studied host-specificity of colonization and sequence-based relevance of the resource. The collection includes several strains representing novel species, genera and even one family. Genomic analyses showed that certain...... of intestinal microbiomes and their interactions with diet and host. It is thus important to study in detail the diversity and functions of gut microbiota members, including those colonizing the mouse intestine. To address these issues, we aimed at establishing the Mouse Intestinal Bacterial Collection (mi...... and molecular studies. The resource is available at www.dsmz.de/miBC....

  18. Colonic lesions, cytokine profiles, and gut microbiota in plasminogen-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Bill; Krych, Lukasz; Lund, Leif R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen-deficient (FVB/NPan-plg(tm1Jld), plg(tm1Jld)) mice, which are widely used as a wound-healing model, are prone to spontaneous rectal prolapses. The aims of this study were 1) to evaluate the fecal microbiome of plg(tm1Jld) mice for features that might contribute to the development of r...... the composition of the gut microbiota, and none of the clinical or biochemical parameters correlated with the gut microbiota composition....

  19. Inulin-type fructan improves diabetic phenotype and gut microbiota profiles in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Qian Zhang; Hongyue Yu; Xinhua Xiao; Ling Hu; Fengjiao Xin; Xiaobing Yu

    2018-01-01

    Background & Aims Accumulating research has addressed the linkage between the changes to gut microbiota structure and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Inulin is one type of soluble dietary fiber that can alleviate T2D. As a prebiotic, inulin cannot be digested by humans, but rather is digested by probiotics. However, whether inulin treatment can benefit the entire gut bacteria community remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the differences in gut microbiota composition among diabetic, inulin-tre...

  20. [Intestinal microbiota and cardiometabolic risk: mechanisms and diet modulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Ana Carolina Franco de; Silva, Isis Tande da; Almeida-Pititto, Bianca de; Ferreira, Sandra Roberta G

    2014-06-01

    The gut microbiota obtained after birth is composed of a large range of bacteria that play different roles in the human host, such as nutrient uptake, protection against pathogens and immune modulation. The intestinal bacterial content is not completely known, but it is influenced by internal, and mainly by external factors, which modulate its composition and function. Studies indicate that the gut microbiota differs in lean and obese individuals, and in individuals with different food habits. There is evidence that the relationship between diet, inflammation, insulin resistance, and cardiometabolic risk are, in part, mediated by the composition of intestinal bacteria. Knowledge about the gut microbiota may result in different strategies to manipulate bacterial populations and promote health. This review discusses the relevance of understanding the role of dietary factors or patterns in the composition of the microbiota, as well as pathophysiological mechanisms of chronic metabolic diseases, and the potential of prebiotics and probiotics on the cardiometabolic risk profile.

  1. Differential sharing and distinct co-occurrence networks among spatially close bacterial microbiota of bark, mosses and lichens‬‬.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbrenner, Ines Aline; Cernava, Tomislav; Erlacher, Armin; Berg, Gabriele; Grube, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge of bacterial community host-specificity has increased greatly in recent years. However, the intermicrobiome relationships of unrelated but spatially close organisms remain little understood. Trunks of trees covered by epiphytes represent complex habitats with a mosaic of ecological niches. In this context, we investigated the structure, diversity and interactions of microbiota associated with lichens, mosses and the bare tree bark. Comparative analysis revealed significant differences in the habitat-associated community structures. Corresponding co-occurrence analysis indicated that the lichen microbial network is less complex and less densely interconnected than the moss- and bark-associated networks. Several potential generalists and specialists were identified for the selected habitats. Generalists belonged mainly to Proteobacteria, with Sphingomonas as the most abundant genus. The generalists comprise microorganisms with generally beneficial features, such as nitrogen fixation or other supporting functions, according to a metagenomic analysis. We argue that beneficial strains shared among hosts contribute to ecological stability of the host biocoenoses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Characterization of the bacterial gut microbiota of piglets suffering from new neonatal porcine diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stockmarr, Anders

    2015-01-01

    such as vaccination or treatment with antibiotics, have a limited effect on NNPD. Previous studies have investigated the clinical manifestations, histopathology, and to some extent, microbiological findings; however, these studies were either inconclusive or suggested that Enterococci, possibly in interaction...... genus Enterococcus and species E. coli to be involved in the pathogenesis of NNPD. Moreover, the results indicate that NNPD is associated with a disturbed bacterial composition and larger variation between the diarrhoeic piglets....

  3. Exploring the Bacterial Microbiota of Colombian Fermented Maize Dough "Masa Agria" (Maiz Añejo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Lopez, Clemencia; Serio, Annalisa; Delgado-Ospina, Johannes; Rossi, Chiara; Grande-Tovar, Carlos D; Paparella, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Masa Agria is a naturally fermented maize dough produced in Colombia, very common in the traditional gastronomy. In this study we used culture-dependent and RNA-based pyrosequencing to investigate the bacterial community structure of Masa Agria samples produced in the south west of Colombia. The mean value of cell density was 7.6 log CFU/g of presumptive lactic acid bacteria, 5.4 log cfu/g for presumptive acetic bacteria and 5.6 og CFU/g for yeasts. The abundance of these microorganisms is also responsible for the low pH (3.1-3.7) registered. Although the 16S rRNA pyrosequencing revealed that the analyzed samples were different in bacteria richness and diversity, the genera Lactobacillus, Weissella, and Acetobacter were predominant. In particular, the most common species were Lactobacillus plantarum and Acetobacter fabarum, followed by L. fermentum, L. vaccinostercus, and Pediococcus argentinicus. Several microorganisms of environmental origin, such as Dechloromonas and most of all Sphingobium spp., revealed in each sample, were detected, and also bacteria related to maize, such as Phytoplasma. In conclusion, our results elucidated for the first time the structures of the bacterial communities of Masa Agria samples obtained from different producers, identifying the specific dominant species and revealing a complete picture of the bacterial consortium in this specific niche. The selective pressure of tropical environments may favor microbial biodiversity characterized by a useful technological potential.

  4. Differentiation of salivary bacterial profiles of subjects with periodontitis and dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belstrøm

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries have been demonstrated to differ from that of oral health. The aim of this comparative analysis of existing data generated by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM from 293 stimulated saliva samples was to compare bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries.

  5. Differentiation of salivary bacterial profiles of subjects with periodontitis and dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Nielsen, Claus H.; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Paster, Bruce J.; Twetman, Svante; Holmstrup, Palle

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries have been demonstrated to differ from that of oral health. The aim of this comparative analysis of existing data generated by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) from 293 stimulated saliva samples was to compare bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries. PMID:25854857

  6. Differentiation of salivary bacterial profiles of subjects with periodontitis and dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Nielsen, Claus H

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries have been demonstrated to differ from that of oral health. The aim of this comparative analysis of existing data generated by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) from 293 stimulated saliva samples...... was to compare bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries....

  7. Changes in composition of caecal microbiota associated with increased colon inflammation in interleukin-10 gene-deficient mice inoculated with Enterococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Shalome A; Young, Wayne; Barnett, Matthew P G; Cookson, Adrian L; McNabb, Warren C; Roy, Nicole C

    2015-03-11

    Human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal disease where the resident microbiota contributes to disease development, yet the specific mechanisms remain unclear. Interleukin-10 gene-deficient (Il10-/-) mice develop inflammation similar to IBD, due in part to an inappropriate response to commensal bacteria. We have previously reported changes in intestinal morphology and colonic gene expression in Il10-/- mice in response to oral bacterial inoculation. In this study, we aimed to identify specific changes in the caecal microbiota associated with colonic inflammation in these mice. The microbiota was evaluated using pyrotag sequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative real-time PCR. Microbiota profiles were influenced by genotype of the mice and by bacterial inoculation, and a strong correlation was observed between the microbiota and colonic inflammation scores. Although un-inoculated Il10-/- and C57 mice had similar microbiota communities, bacterial inoculation resulted in different changes to the microbiota in Il10-/- and C57 mice. Inoculated Il10-/- mice had significantly less total bacteria than un-inoculated Il10-/- mice, with a strong negative correlation between total bacterial numbers, relative abundance of Escherichia/Shigella, microbiota diversity, and colonic inflammation score. Our results show a putative causative role for the microbiota in the development of IBD, with potentially key roles for Akkermansia, or for Bacteroides, Helicobacter, Parabacteroides, and Alistipes, depending on the composition of the bacterial inoculum. These data support the use of bacterially-inoculated Il10-/- mice as an appropriate model to investigate human IBD.

  8. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation.

  9. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation

  10. The role of the bacterial microbiota on reproductive and pregnancy health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Deborah B; Rockwell, L Christie; Prioleau, Morgan D; Goetzl, Laura

    2016-12-01

    Recent assessments have examined the composition of bacterial communities influencing reproductive, pregnancy and infant health. The Microbiome Project has made great strides in sequencing the microbiome and identifying the vast communities of microorganisms that inhabit our bodies and much work continues to examine the individual contribution of bacteria on health and disease to inform future therapies. This review explores the current literature outlining the contribution of important bacteria on reproductive health among sexually active men and women, outlines gaps in current research to determine causal and interventional relationships, and suggests future research initiatives. Novel treatments options to reduce adverse outcomes must recognize the heterogeneity of the bacteria within the microbiome and adequately assess long-term benefits in reducing disease burden and re-establishing a healthy Lactobacillus-dominant state. Recognizing other reservoirs outside of the lower genital track and within sexual partners as well as genetic and individual moderators may be most important for long-term cure and reduction of disease. It will be important to develop useful screening tools and comprehensively examine novel therapeutic options to promote the long-term reduction of high-risk bacteria and the re-establishment of healthy bacterial levels to considerably improve outcomes among pregnant women and sexually active men and women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Phylogenetic profile of gut microbiota in healthy adults after moderate intake of red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Elvira; Muñoz-González, Irene; Jiménez, Esther; Bartolomé, Begoña; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria; Peláez, Carmen; Del Carmen Martínez-Cuesta, María; Requena, Teresa

    2017-03-01

    There is growing interest in understanding how human colonic microbiota can be modified by dietary habits. We examined the influence of moderate red wine intake on the colonic microbiota of 15 healthy volunteers, related to the high concentration of polyphenols present in this beverage. The volunteers were classified into high, moderate, and low polyphenol metabolizers (metabotypes) due to their ability to metabolize polyphenols and the results were compared with that of five control (no wine intake) subjects. We analyzed the composition, diversity, and dynamics of their fecal microbiota before and after 1 month of wine consumption. The 16S rDNA sequencing allowed detection of 2324 phylotypes, of which only 30 were found over the 0.5% of mean relative frequency, representing 84.6% of the total taxonomical assignments. The samples clustered more strongly by individuals than by wine intake or metabotypes, however an increase in diversity, after the wine intake, was observed. The results of this study suggest an increase in the global fecal microbial diversity associated to the consumption of red wine, confirm the high variability of the microbiota from different individuals, and show the stability of their singular microbiota composition to small and short-term dietary changes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Bacterial profiles of saliva in relation to diet, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belstrøm

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The bacterial profile of saliva is composed of bacteria from different oral surfaces. The objective of this study was to determine whether different diet intake, lifestyle, or socioeconomic status is associated with characteristic bacterial saliva profiles. Design: Stimulated saliva samples from 292 participants with low levels of dental caries and periodontitis, enrolled in the Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES, were analyzed for the presence of approximately 300 bacterial species by means of the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM. Using presence and levels (mean HOMIM-value of bacterial probes as endpoints, the influence of diet intake, lifestyle, and socioeconomic status on the bacterial saliva profile was analyzed by Mann–Whitney tests with Benjamini–Hochberg's correction for multiple comparisons and principal component analysis. Results: Targets for 131 different probes were identified in 292 samples, with Streptococcus and Veillonella being the most predominant genera identified. Two bacterial taxa (Streptococcus sobrinus and Eubacterium [11][G-3] brachy were more associated with smokers than non-smokers (adjusted p-value<0.01. Stratification of the group based on extreme ends of the parameters age, gender, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI, and diet intake had no statistical influence on the composition of the bacterial profile of saliva. Conversely, differences in socioeconomic status were reflected by the bacterial profiles of saliva. Conclusions: The bacterial profile of saliva seems independent of diet intake, but influenced by smoking and maybe socioeconomic status.

  13. Microbiota bacteriana da conjuntiva no pré-operatório de injeção intravítrea de antiangiogênico por degeneração macular relacionada à idade comparada com a de cirurgia de catarata Preoperative conjunctival bacterial microbiota of antiangiogenic intravitreous injection for age-related macular degeneration compared to cataract surgery preoperative microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Diniz

    2010-06-01

    pacientes no pré-operatório de cirurgia de catarata.Purpose: To evaluate the conjunctival bacterial microbiota and antibiogram profile in the preoperative of antiangiogenic intravitreous injection for age-related macular degeneration, and compare to the preoperative microbiota of patients submitted to cataract surgery. Methods: Cross-sectional, observational, case series study. Two groups were organized: group I (macular degeneration with 26 eyes from 26 patients (12 men/14 women with mean age of 69.2 ± 11.5 years; group II (cataract with 27 eyes from 27 patients (9 men/18 women with mean age of 67.6 ± 7.9 years. The groups were similar regarding age (p=0.538 and gender (p=0.787. The lower conjunctival sac was swabbed and the obtained material was immediately put in a tube filled with liquid culture media BHI ("brain heart infusion". Samples were processed according to standard laboratory techniques and antibiogram was determined for each bacterial colony. Results: Twenty-six bacterial colonies growth in group I, with 2 eyes showing no growth and 30 colonies growth in group II. Gram positive bacteria were more prevalent in both groups: 23/26 colonies (88.4% in group I and 29/30 colonies (96.7% in group II, with a Staphylococcus aureus predominance in both groups, with 16 samples (61.5% and 17 (56.7%, respectively. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus was the second most common identified bacteria, with 19.2% in group I and 20.0% in group II. No differences between the groups reached statistical significance. No statistically significant difference was noted on the antibiotic sensibility between both groups. Conclusions: There was no difference in the distribution of bacteria and antibiogram profile of the conjunctival microbiota in the preoperative of intravitreous injection of antiangiogenic for macular degeneration compared to the preoperative of cataract surgery.

  14. Characterization of the bacterial gut microbiota in new neonatal porcine diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise

    During the last decade farmers and veterinarians have reported the emergence of a new neonatal porcine diarrhoea (NNPD) affecting piglets up to 7 days old. Routine laboratory testing for common pathogens are inconclusive and vaccination and treatment with antibiotics or alternative zootechnical....... The Gut Microbiotassay was optimized for the high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR-based 48.48 Access Array™ Integrated Fluidic Circuit (Fluidigm). The efficiency and sensitivity of the primer sets were tested against 15 different pure-cultured bacterial strains. Finally the Gut Microbiotassay...... is of economic importance to the farmer. Despite the limited effect of antibiotics, farmers often treat affected piglets with antibiotics to prevent secondary infections to NNPD resulting in increased consumption of antibiotics. Thus, there are several encouraging reasons for identifying the aetiology behind...

  15. Gut microbiota, microinflammation, metabolic profile, and zonulin concentration in obese and normal weight subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak-Gołąb, Agnieszka; Kocełak, Piotr; Aptekorz, Małgorzata; Zientara, Maria; Juszczyk, Lukasz; Martirosian, Gayane; Chudek, Jerzy; Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The association between gut microbiota and circulating zonulin level, a marker of intestinal permeability, has not been studied yet. The aim of the study is the assessment of plasma zonulin, haptoglobin and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF- α and IL-6) levels in relation to composition of gut microbiota in obese and normal weight subjects. Circulating inflammation markers, such as TNF- α , sTNFR1, sTNFR2, IL-6, zonulin, and haptoglobin levels were measured and semiquantitative analysis of gut microbiota composition was carried out in 50 obese and 30 normal weight subjects without concomitant diseases. Higher circulating zonulin, TNF- α , sTNFR1, sTNFR2, and IL-6 levels were found in the obese subjects. Plasma zonulin level correlated positively with age (r = 0.43, P zonulin (r = 0.26, P zonulin level was proportional to daily energy intake (r = 0.27, P zonulin level, a potential marker of interstitial permeability.

  16. Structure and dynamics of the gut bacterial microbiota of the bark beetle, Dendroctonus rhizophagus (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) across their life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones-Roblero, Carlos Iván; Hernández-García, Juan Alfredo; Gonzalez-Escobedo, Roman; Soto-Robles, L Viridiana; Rivera-Orduña, Flor N; Zúñiga, Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    Bark beetles play an important role as agents of natural renovation and regeneration in coniferous forests. Several studies have documented the metabolic capacity of bacteria associated with the gut, body surface, and oral secretions of these insects; however, little is known about how the bacterial community structure changes during the life cycle of the beetles. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of the bacterial community of the gut of the bark beetle D. rhizophagus during the insect's life cycle using 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 4 bacterial phyla, 7 classes, 15 families and 23 genera were identified. The α-diversity was low, as demonstrated in previous studies. The dominant bacterial taxa belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae families. This low α-diversity can be attributed to the presence of defensive chemical compounds in conifers or due to different morpho-physiological factors in the gut of these insects acting as strong selective factors. Members of the genera Rahnella, Serratia, Pseudomonas and Propionibacterium were found at all life stages, and the first three genera, particularly Rahnella, were predominant suggesting the presence of a core microbiome in the gut. Significant differences in β-diversity were observed, mainly due to bacterial taxa present at low frequencies and only in certain life stages. The predictive functional profiling indicated metabolic pathways related to metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates, and membrane transport as the most significant in the community. These differences in the community structure might be due to several selective factors, such as gut compartmentalization, physicochemical conditions, and microbial interactions.

  17. Structure and dynamics of the gut bacterial microbiota of the bark beetle, Dendroctonus rhizophagus (Curculionidae: Scolytinae across their life stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Iván Briones-Roblero

    Full Text Available Bark beetles play an important role as agents of natural renovation and regeneration in coniferous forests. Several studies have documented the metabolic capacity of bacteria associated with the gut, body surface, and oral secretions of these insects; however, little is known about how the bacterial community structure changes during the life cycle of the beetles. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of the bacterial community of the gut of the bark beetle D. rhizophagus during the insect's life cycle using 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 4 bacterial phyla, 7 classes, 15 families and 23 genera were identified. The α-diversity was low, as demonstrated in previous studies. The dominant bacterial taxa belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae families. This low α-diversity can be attributed to the presence of defensive chemical compounds in conifers or due to different morpho-physiological factors in the gut of these insects acting as strong selective factors. Members of the genera Rahnella, Serratia, Pseudomonas and Propionibacterium were found at all life stages, and the first three genera, particularly Rahnella, were predominant suggesting the presence of a core microbiome in the gut. Significant differences in β-diversity were observed, mainly due to bacterial taxa present at low frequencies and only in certain life stages. The predictive functional profiling indicated metabolic pathways related to metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates, and membrane transport as the most significant in the community. These differences in the community structure might be due to several selective factors, such as gut compartmentalization, physicochemical conditions, and microbial interactions.

  18. Profiling of Oral Microbiota in Early Childhood Caries Using Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan Wang; Jie Zhang; Xi Chen; Wen Jiang; Sa Wang; Lei Xu; Yan Tu; Pei Zheng; Ying Wang; Xiaolong Lin; Hui Chen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Alterations of oral microbiota are the main cause of the progression of caries. The goal of this study was to characterize the oral microbiota in childhood caries based on single-molecule real-time sequencing.Methods: A total of 21 preschoolers, aged 3–5 years old with severe early childhood caries, and 20 age-matched, caries-free children as controls were recruited. Saliva samples were collected, followed by DNA extraction, Pacbio sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses of the oral...

  19. Clinical, Laboratory and Bacterial Profile of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis in Chronic Liver Disease Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, S.; Ahmed, W.; Arif, A.; Khan, F.; Alam, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical and laboratory features, bacterial profile and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP) in Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) patients presenting at a tertiary care hospital of Karachi. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: PMRC Centre for Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from April 2010 to March 2012. Methodology: CLD patients with ascites were recruited from PMRC Centre for Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi. Basic demographics, symptoms and clinical signs of patients were recorded. Patients with the history of antibiotic use within last 3 days or any intra-abdominal source of infection were excluded. Diagnostic paracentesis was done for ascitic fluid detailed report (D/R) and culture. Blood sample was collected for total leukocyte count, serum proteins and billirubin levels. Results: Out of a total 152 CLD patients, 38 (25%) were diagnosed with SBP. Eight (24.2%) patients presented with classical SBP, 20 (52.6%) had culture negative neutrocytic ascites and 10 (26%) had bacterascites. Fever, abdominal tenderness and constipation were common in SBP patients. Ascitic fluid culture was positive in 19 (50%) patients. E. coli (65%) was the predominant pathogen followed by Enterococcus species (15%). Resistance was high against cephalosporins (78%) and fluoroquinolones (69.6%) and least against amikacin (13%) and meropenem (12%). Conclusion: Ascitic fluid D/R and culture together can lead to the accurate diagnosis of SBP and can guide for the right antibiotic choice as resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotic is common in such patients. (author)

  20. Sensitive quantitative analysis of the meconium bacterial microbiota in healthy term infants born vaginally or by cesarean section.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Nagpal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For decades, babies were thought to be born germ-free, but recent evidences suggest that they are already exposed to various bacteria in-utero. However, the data on population levels of such pioneer gut bacteria, particularly in context to birth mode, is sparse. We herein aimed to quantify such bacteria from the meconium of 151 healthy term Japanese infants born vaginally or by C-section. Neonatal first meconium was obtained within 24-48 hours of delivery; RNA was extracted and subjected to reverse-transcription-quantitative PCR using specific primers for Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Bacteroides fragilis group, Atopobium cluster, Prevotella, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Clostridium perfringens, and C. difficile. We detected several bacterial groups in both vaginally- and cesarean-born infants. B. fragilis group, Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus, Streptococcus and Staphylococcus were detected in more than 50% of infants, with counts ranging from 105-108 cells/g sample. About 30-35% samples harbored Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus (104-105 cells/g; whereas C. coccoides group, C. leptum subgroup and C. perfringens were detected in 10-20% infants (103-105 cells/g. Compared to vaginally-born babies, cesarean-born babies were significantly less often colonized with Lactobacillus genus (6% vs. 37%; P=0.01 and L. gasseri subgroup (6% vs. 31%; P=0.04. Overall, seven Lactobacillus subgroups/ species i.e. L. gasseri subgroup, L. ruminis subgroup, L. casei subgroup, L. reuteri subgroup, L. sakei subgroup, L. plantarum subgroup and L. brevis were detected in the samples from vaginally-born group, whereas only two members i.e. L. gasseri subgroup and L. brevis were detected in the cesarean group. These data corroborate that several bacterial clades may already be present before birth in term infants’ gut. Further, Remarkably lower detection rate

  1. Inulin-type fructan improves diabetic phenotype and gut microbiota profiles in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims Accumulating research has addressed the linkage between the changes to gut microbiota structure and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Inulin is one type of soluble dietary fiber that can alleviate T2D. As a prebiotic, inulin cannot be digested by humans, but rather is digested by probiotics. However, whether inulin treatment can benefit the entire gut bacteria community remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the differences in gut microbiota composition among diabetic, inulin-treated diabetic, normal control, and inulin-treated normal control rats. Methods A diabetic rat model was generated by a high-fat diet and streptozotocin injections (HF/STZ. Inulin was orally administered to normal and diabetic rats. To determine the composition of the gut microbiota, fecal DNA extraction and 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing were performed. Results We found that inulin treatment reduced fasting blood glucose levels and alleviated glucose intolerance and blood lipid panels in diabetic rats. Additionally, inulin treatment increased the serum glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 level, reduced serum IL-6 level, Il6 expression in epididymal adipose tissue, and Pepck, G6pc expression in liver of diabetic rats. Pyrophosphate sequencing of the 16s V3–V4 region demonstrated an elevated proportion of Firmicutes and a reduced abundance of Bacteroidetes at the phylogenetic level in diabetic rats compared to normal control rats. The characteristics of the gut microbiota in control and inulin-treated rats were similar. Inulin treatment can normalize the composition of the gut microbiota in diabetic rats. At the family and genus levels, probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA-producing bacteria Lachnospiraceae, Phascolarctobacterium, and Bacteroides were found to be significantly more abundant in the inulin-treated diabetic group than in the non-treated diabetic group. In addition, inulin-treated rats had a lower abundance of

  2. Inulin-type fructan improves diabetic phenotype and gut microbiota profiles in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Hongyue; Xiao, Xinhua; Hu, Ling; Xin, Fengjiao; Yu, Xiaobing

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating research has addressed the linkage between the changes to gut microbiota structure and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Inulin is one type of soluble dietary fiber that can alleviate T2D. As a prebiotic, inulin cannot be digested by humans, but rather is digested by probiotics. However, whether inulin treatment can benefit the entire gut bacteria community remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the differences in gut microbiota composition among diabetic, inulin-treated diabetic, normal control, and inulin-treated normal control rats. A diabetic rat model was generated by a high-fat diet and streptozotocin injections (HF/STZ). Inulin was orally administered to normal and diabetic rats. To determine the composition of the gut microbiota, fecal DNA extraction and 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing were performed. We found that inulin treatment reduced fasting blood glucose levels and alleviated glucose intolerance and blood lipid panels in diabetic rats. Additionally, inulin treatment increased the serum glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) level, reduced serum IL-6 level, Il6 expression in epididymal adipose tissue, and Pepck , G6pc expression in liver of diabetic rats. Pyrophosphate sequencing of the 16s V3-V4 region demonstrated an elevated proportion of Firmicutes and a reduced abundance of Bacteroidetes at the phylogenetic level in diabetic rats compared to normal control rats. The characteristics of the gut microbiota in control and inulin-treated rats were similar. Inulin treatment can normalize the composition of the gut microbiota in diabetic rats. At the family and genus levels, probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA)-producing bacteria Lachnospiraceae , Phascolarctobacterium , and Bacteroides were found to be significantly more abundant in the inulin-treated diabetic group than in the non-treated diabetic group. In addition, inulin-treated rats had a lower abundance of Desulfovibrio , which produce lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The

  3. Whole Rye Consumption Improves Blood and Liver n-3 Fatty Acid Profile and Gut Microbiota Composition in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayçal Ounnas

    Full Text Available Whole rye (WR consumption seems to be associated with beneficial health effects. Although rye fiber and polyphenols are thought to be bioactive, the mechanisms behind the health effects of WR have yet to be fully identified. This study in rats was designed to investigate whether WR can influence the metabolism of n-3 and n-6 long-chain fatty acids (LCFA and gut microbiota composition.For 12 weeks, rats were fed a diet containing either 50% WR or 50% refined rye (RR. The WR diet provided more fiber (+21% and polyphenols (+29% than the RR diet. Fat intake was the same in both diets and particularly involved similar amounts of essential (18-carbon n-3 and n-6 LCFAs.The WR diet significantly increased the 24-hour urinary excretion of polyphenol metabolites-including enterolactone-compared with the RR diet. The WR rats had significantly more n-3 LCFA-in particular, eicosapentanoic (EPA and docosahexanoic (DHA acids-in their plasma and liver. Compared with the RR diet, the WR diet brought significant changes in gut microbiota composition, with increased diversity in the feces (Shannon and Simpson indices, decreased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and decreased proportions of uncultured Clostridiales cluster IA and Clostridium cluster IV in the feces. In contrast, no difference was found between groups with regards to cecum microbiota. The WR rats had lower concentrations of total short-chain fatty acids (SCFA in cecum and feces (p<0.05. Finally, acetate was lower (p<0.001 in the cecum of WR rats while butyrate was lower (p<0.05 in the feces of WR rats.This study shows for the first time that WR consumption results in major biological modifications-increased plasma and liver n-3 EPA and DHA levels and improved gut microbiota profile, notably with increased diversity-known to provide health benefits. Unexpectedly, WR decreased SCFA levels in both cecum and feces. More studies are needed to understand the interactions between whole rye (fiber and

  4. Gut Microbiota Interacts With Brain Microstructure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Real, José-Manuel; Serino, Matteo; Blasco, Gerard; Puig, Josep; Daunis-i-Estadella, Josep; Ricart, Wifredo; Burcelin, Remy; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Portero-Otin, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    Evidence from animals suggests that gut microbiota affects brain structure and function but evidence in humans is scarce. This study sought to evaluate potential interactions among gut microbiota composition, brain microstructure, and cognitive tests in obese and nonobese subjects. This was a cross-sectional study at a tertiary hospital including 20 consecutive obese and 19 nonobese subjects similar in age and sex. Gut microbiota (16S bacterial gene pyrosequencing), brain microstructure (diffusion tensor imaging of brain white and gray matter and R2* sequences in magnetic resonance imaging) and cognitive tests. Hierarchical clustering revealed a specific gut microbiota-brain map profile for obese individuals who could be discriminated from nonobese subjects (accuracy of 0.81). Strikingly, Shannon index was linked to R2* and fractional anisotropy of the hypothalamus, caudate nucleus, and hippocampus, suggesting sparing of these brain structures with increased bacterial biodiversity. Microbiota profile also clustered with cognitive function. The relative abundance of Actinobacteria phylum was linked not only to magnetic resonance imaging diffusion tensor imaging variables in the thalamus, hypothalamus, and amygdala but also to cognitive test scores related to speed, attention, and cognitive flexibility. In sum, obesity status affects microbiota-brain microstructure and function crosstalk.

  5. Microbiota in Breast Milk of Chinese Lactating Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwinska, Olga; Moine, Déborah; Delley, Michèle; Combremont, Séverine; Rezzonico, Enea; Descombes, Patrick; Vinyes-Pares, Gerard; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Peiyu; Thakkar, Sagar K

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota of breast milk from Chinese lactating mothers at different stages of lactation was examined in the framework of a Maternal Infant Nutrition Growth (MING) study investigating the dietary habits and breast milk composition in Chinese urban mothers. We used microbiota profiling based on the sequencing of fragments of 16S rRNA gene and specific qPCR for bifidobacteria, lactobacilli and total bacteria to study microbiota of the entire breast milk collected using standard protocol without aseptic cleansing (n = 60), and the microbiota of the milk collected aseptically (n = 30). We have also investigated the impact of the delivery mode and the stage of lactation on the microbiota composition. The microbiota of breast milk was dominated by streptococci and staphylococci for both collection protocols and, in the case of standard collection protocol, Acinetobacter sp. While the predominance of streptococci and staphylococci was consistently reported previously for other populations, the abundance of Acinetobacter sp. was reported only once before in a study where milk collection was done without aseptic cleansing of the breast and rejection of foremilk. Higher bacterial counts were found in the milk collected using standard protocol. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were present in few samples with low abundance. We observed no effect of the stage of lactation or the delivery mode on microbiota composition. Methodological and geographical differences likely explain the variability in microbiota composition reported to date.

  6. Vaginal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendling, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the normal and abnormal vaginal microbiome has changed over the last years. Culturing techniques are not suitable any more for determination of a normal or abnormal vaginal microbiota. Non culture-based modern technologies revealed a complex and dynamic system mainly dominated by lactobacilli.The normal and the abnormal vaginal microbiota are complex ecosystems of more than 200 bacterial species influenced by genes, ethnic background and environmental and behavioral factors. Several species of lactobacilli per individuum dominate the healthy vagina. They support a defense system together with antibacterial substances, cytokines, defensins and others against dysbiosis, infections and care for an normal pregnancy without preterm birth.The numbers of Lactobacillus (L.) iners increase in the case of dysbiosis.Bacterial vaginosis (BV) - associated bacteria (BVAB), Atopobium vaginae and Clostridiales and one or two of four Gardnerella vaginalis - strains develop in different mixtures and numbers polymicrobial biofilms on the vaginal epithelium, which are not dissolved by antibiotic therapies according to guidelines and, thus, provoke recurrences.Aerobic vaginitis seems to be an immunological disorder of the vagina with influence on the microbiota, which is here dominated by aerobic bacteria (Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli). Their role in AV is unknown.Vaginal or oral application of lactobacilli is obviously able to improve therapeutic results of BV and dysbiosis.

  7. Differences in bacterial saliva profile between periodontitis patients and a control cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Nielsen, Claus H

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Periodontitis is a multifactorial disease in which subgingival bacteria play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. The objective of this study was to determine if periodontitis is associated with a characteristic salivary bacterial profile. This was accomplished by comparing...... the bacterial profile of saliva from subjects with chronic periodontitis with that of saliva from a control cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stimulated saliva samples from 139 chronic periodontitis patients and 447 samples from a control cohort were analysed using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray...... component analysis was used to visualize bacterial community profiles obtained by the HOMIM. RESULTS: Eight bacterial taxa, including putative periodontal pathogens as Parvimonas micra and Filifactor alocis, and four bacterial clusters were identified statistically more frequently and at higher levels...

  8. Effect of Co-Composting Cattle Manure with Construction and Demolition Waste on the Archaeal, Bacterial, and Fungal Microbiota, and on Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B; Hao, Xiying; Topp, Edward; Yang, Hee Eun; Alexander, Trevor W

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural operations generate large quantities of manure which must be eliminated in a manner that is consistent with public health guidelines. Meanwhile, construction and demolition waste makes up about 25% of total solid municipal waste. Co-composting of manure with construction and demolition waste offers a potential means to make manure safe for soil amendment and also divert construction and demolition waste from municipal landfills. Therefore, the archaeal, bacterial, and fungal microbiota of two different types of composted cattle manure and one co-composted with construction and demolition waste, were assessed over a 99-day composting period. The microbiota of the three compost mixtures did not differ, but significant changes over time and by sampling depth were observed. Bacillus and Halocella, however, were more relatively abundant in composted manure from cattle fed dried distillers' grains and solubles. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were enriched at day 0 and Firmicutes at day 99. The fungal genus Kernia was the most relatively abundant overall and was enriched at day 0. The concentration of 12 antimicrobial resistance determinants in the compost mixtures was also determined, and 10 of these determinants decreased significantly from days 0 to 99. The addition of construction and demolition waste did not affect the persistence of antimicrobial resistance genes or community structure of the compost microbiota and therefore co-composting construction and demolition waste with cattle manure offers a safe, viable way to divert this waste from landfills.

  9. Effect of Co-Composting Cattle Manure with Construction and Demolition Waste on the Archaeal, Bacterial, and Fungal Microbiota, and on Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B.; Hao, Xiying; Topp, Edward; Yang, Hee Eun; Alexander, Trevor W.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural operations generate large quantities of manure which must be eliminated in a manner that is consistent with public health guidelines. Meanwhile, construction and demolition waste makes up about 25% of total solid municipal waste. Co-composting of manure with construction and demolition waste offers a potential means to make manure safe for soil amendment and also divert construction and demolition waste from municipal landfills. Therefore, the archaeal, bacterial, and fungal microbiota of two different types of composted cattle manure and one co-composted with construction and demolition waste, were assessed over a 99-day composting period. The microbiota of the three compost mixtures did not differ, but significant changes over time and by sampling depth were observed. Bacillus and Halocella, however, were more relatively abundant in composted manure from cattle fed dried distillers’ grains and solubles. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were enriched at day 0 and Firmicutes at day 99. The fungal genus Kernia was the most relatively abundant overall and was enriched at day 0. The concentration of 12 antimicrobial resistance determinants in the compost mixtures was also determined, and 10 of these determinants decreased significantly from days 0 to 99. The addition of construction and demolition waste did not affect the persistence of antimicrobial resistance genes or community structure of the compost microbiota and therefore co-composting construction and demolition waste with cattle manure offers a safe, viable way to divert this waste from landfills. PMID:27300323

  10. The evaluation of cultivable microbiota profile in patients with secondary endodontic infection before and after photo-activated disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Ghorbanzadeh, Roghayeh; Parker, Steven; Chiniforush, Nasim; Bahador, Abbas

    2017-06-01

    Secondary/persistent endodontic infection can be the outcome of failure of endodontic treatment. Photo-activated disinfection (PAD) can be a useful adjunct to mechanical and antimicrobial agents in eliminating endopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we evaluated the effect of PAD on diversity and count of microbiota related to secondary/persistent endodontic infections. Root canal samples were taken using sterile paper points from the root canals of 14 patients with secondary/persistent endodontic infections after removing the root-canal filling materials. PAD was performed on teeth with toluidine blue O (TBO) in combination with diode laser. Then re-sampling was conducted from the canal root using sterile paper points and transferred to transport medium. The samples were plated and pure cultures of the target microorganisms were then isolated and identified by analytical profile index (API ® 20A) assays and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Before TBO-PAD, a total of 31 cultivable isolates could be retrieved; 25.8% of the isolated species were obligate anaerobic or microphilics including Veillonella parvula, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Propionibacterium acnes, and Lactobacillus acidophilus, and 74.2% of the isolated species were facultative anaerobic such as Enterococcus faecalis, Actinomyces naeslundii, L. rhamnosus, L. casei, Streptococcus sanguinis, S. mitis, and Candida albicans. According to this in vivo study, the diversity and count of microbiota in root canal-treated teeth were decreased after TBO-PAD, so that E. faecalis, V. parvula, and C. albicans were the microorganisms that recovered after PAD. TBO-PAD is an effective approach that exhibited anti-microbial potential activity against microbiota involved in secondary/persistent endodontic infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibiotic resistance profile of bacterial isolates from food sold on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibiotic resistance profile of bacterial isolates from cooked food samples sold in different eateries on the campus of the University of Ado-Ekiti was investigated. A total of seventy-eight bacterial isolates belonging to six genera were encountered in the following proportion: Escherichia coli (29.5%), Klebsiella spp.

  12. Prebiotic inulin-type fructans induce specific changes in the human gut microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Vandeputte, Doris; Falony, Gwen; Vieira-Silva, Sara Manuel; Wang, Jun; Sailer, Manuela; Theis, Stephan; Verbeke, Kristin; Raes, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Objective Contrary to the long-standing prerequisite of inducing selective (ie, bifidogenic) effects, recent findings suggest that prebiotic interventions lead to ecosystem-wide microbiota shifts. Yet, a comprehensive characterisation of this process is still lacking. Here, we apply 16S rDNA microbiota profiling and matching (gas chromatography mass spectrometry) metabolomics to assess the consequences of inulin fermentation both on the composition of the colon bacterial ecosystem and faecal ...

  13. Natural polyreactive IgA antibodies coat the intestinal microbiota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunker, Jeffrey J.; Erickson, Steven A.; Flynn, Theodore M.; Henry, Carole; Koval, Jason C.; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Bendelac, Albert

    2017-09-28

    Large quantities of immunoglobulin A (IgA) are constitutively secreted by intestinal plasma cells to coat and contain the commensal microbiota, yet the specificity of these antibodies remains elusive. Here we profiled the reactivities of single murine IgA plasma cells by cloning and characterizing large numbers of monoclonal antibodies. IgAs were not specific to individual bacterial taxa but rather polyreactive, with broad reactivity to a diverse, but defined, subset of microbiota. These antibodies arose at low frequencies among naïve B cells and were selected into the IgA repertoire upon recirculation in Peyer’s patches. This selection process occurred independent of microbiota or dietary antigens. Furthermore, although some IgAs acquired somatic mutations, these did not substantially influence their reactivity. These findings reveal an endogenous mechanism driving homeostatic production of polyreactive IgAs with innate specificity to microbiota.

  14. Inhibition of bacterial growth in sweet cheese whey by carbon dioxide as determined by culture-independent community profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Raquel; Xue, Tian; Weeks, Mike; Turner, Mark S; Bansal, Nidhi

    2016-01-18

    Whey is a valuable co-product from cheese making that serves as a raw material for a wide range of products. Its rich nutritional content lends itself to rapid spoilage, thus it typically needs to be pasteurised and refrigerated promptly. Despite the extensive literature on milk spoilage bacteria, little is known about the spoilage bacteria of whey. The utility of carbon dioxide (CO2) to extend the shelf-life of raw milk and cottage cheese has been well established, but its application in whey preservation has not yet been explored. This study aims to characterise the microbial populations of fresh and spoiled sweet whey by culture-independent community profiling using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and to determine whether carbonation is effective in inhibiting bacterial growth in sweet whey. The microbiota of raw Cheddar and Mozzarella whey was dominated by cheese starter bacteria. After pasteurisation, two out of the three samples studied became dominated by diverse environmental bacteria from various phyla, with Proteobacteria being the most dominant. Diverse microbial profiles were maintained until spoilage occurred, when the entire population was dominated by just one or two genera. Whey spoilage bacteria were found to be similar to those of milk. Pasteurised Cheddar and Mozzarella whey was spoiled by Bacillus sp. or Pseudomonas sp., and raw Mozzarella whey was spoiled by Pseudomonas sp., Serratia sp., and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. CO2 was effective in inhibiting bacterial growth of pasteurised Cheddar and Mozzarella whey stored at 15°C and raw Mozzarella whey stored at 4°C. The spoilage bacteria of the carbonated samples were similar to those of the non-carbonated controls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of liquid versus spray-dried Laminaria digitata extract on selected bacterial groups in the piglet gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphya, Padraigin; Dal Bello, Fabio; O'Doherty, John; Arendt, Elke K; Sweeney, Torres; Coffey, Aidan

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the effects of supplementing animal feed with a liquid and spray-dried fucoidan and laminarin extract, derived from the seaweed Laminaria digitata on the porcine gastrointestinal microbiota, specifically the communities of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and enterobacteria were evaluated. Twenty four piglets were fed one of three diets over a 21-day period to determine the effect that each had on the bacterial communities. The dietary treatments were as follows; (1) control diet, (2) control diet plus spray-dried formulation of laminarin fucoidan (L/F-SD) extract, (3) control diet plus a liquid formulation of (L/F-WS) extract. Control diet consisted of wheat, soya bean meal, soya oil and a vitamin and mineral mixture. The L/F-SD and L/F-WS supplemented diets had equal proportion of 500 ppm laminarin and fucoidan. At the end of the 21 day feeding period all animals were sacrificed and samples were collected from the ileum, caecum and colon. Counts were determined for Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and enterobacteria. Plate count analysis revealed that the L/F-SD diet caused a statistically significant 1.5 log and 2 log increases in the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium counts of ileum samples respectively. A greater difference was observed with the L/F-WS diet in that Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium increased by 2 log and 3 log respectively. Alterations in the Lactobacillus species composition of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) were analysed using specific PCR - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The DGGE profiles indicated that Lactobacillus species richness decreased along the gastrointestinal tract i.e. the number of dominant species detected in the colon was less than those detected in the ileum and caecum irrespective of the diet consumed. Consumption of both the L/F-SD and L/F-WS diets resulted in a richer Lactobacillus species composition in the ileum, with the L/F-SD diet being associated the emergence of Lactobacillus

  16. Gut microbiota as an epigenetic regulator: pilot study based on whole-genome methylation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Himanshu; Lund, Riikka; Laiho, Asta; Lundelin, Krista; Ley, Ruth E; Isolauri, Erika; Salminen, Seppo

    2014-12-16

    The core human gut microbiota contributes to the developmental origin of diseases by modifying metabolic pathways. To evaluate the predominant microbiota as an epigenetic modifier, we classified 8 pregnant women into two groups based on their dominant microbiota, i.e., Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Deep sequencing of DNA methylomes revealed a clear association between bacterial predominance and epigenetic profiles. The genes with differentially methylated promoters in the group in which Firmicutes was dominant were linked to risk of disease, predominantly to cardiovascular disease and specifically to lipid metabolism, obesity, and the inflammatory response. This is one of the first studies that highlights the association of the predominant bacterial phyla in the gut with methylation patterns. Further longitudinal and in-depth studies targeting individual microbial species or metabolites are recommended to give us a deeper insight into the molecular mechanism of such epigenetic modifications. Epigenetics encompasses genomic modifications that are due to environmental factors and do not affect the nucleotide sequence. The gut microbiota has an important role in human metabolism and could be a significant environmental factor affecting our epigenome. To investigate the association of gut microbiota with epigenetic changes, we assessed pregnant women and selected the participants based on their predominant gut microbiota for a study on their postpartum methylation profile. Intriguingly, we found that blood DNA methylation patterns were associated with gut microbiota profiles. The gut microbiota profiles, with either Firmicutes or Bacteroidetes as a dominant group, correlated with differential methylation status of gene promoters functionally associated with cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, differential methylation of gene promoters linked to lipid metabolism and obesity was observed. For the first time, we report here a position of the predominant

  17. Aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with normal and altered glycated hemoglobin levels in two regions in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Pimentel Moreno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with regard to the management of diabetes, assessed using glycated hemoglobin levels. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using conjunctival smears of diabetic patients from both sexes and with different ages, residing in two different Brazilian cities (Sorocaba and Rio Branco. A control group of non-diabetic patients was also included. The diabetic patients were considered to have controlled diabetes when their glycated hemoglobin level was ≤7% and blood glucose level was ≤126 mg/dL. Patients with non-controlled diabetes were those with glycated hemoglobin levels >7% and blood glucose levels >126 mg/dL. The samples obtained were inoculated in Brain-Heart Infusion broth and in culture media for aerobic bacteria (blood and chocolate agars; bacterial growth was evaluated in a microbiology laboratory. Results: A total of 120 eyes of 120 patients were included in the present study. The percentage of cultures in which bacterial growth was observed was greater in diabetic patients, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.103. There was a greater trend toward bacterial growth in the conjunctiva of diabetic patients with altered fasting blood glucose. There was no difference in the frequency of bacterial growth on the conjunctiva between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. In Sorocaba, conjunctival bacterial growth was similar to that observed in Rio Branco. The microorganism most frequently detected in the present study was Staphylococcus epidermidis, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. Conclusion: There was no difference between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. The microorganisms found were similar to those found in studies investigating the conjunctival bacterial flora of diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  18. Changes in Composition of the Gut Bacterial Microbiome after Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for RecurrentClostridium difficileInfection in a Pediatric Heart Transplant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, Kyle L; Rajbar, Taylor; Moffat, Andrew; McKenzie, Leanna S; Dicke, Frank; Rioux, Kevin; Workentine, Matthew L; Louie, Thomas J; Hirota, Simon A; Greenway, Steven C

    2017-01-01

    The microbiome is increasingly recognized as an important influence on human health and many of the comorbidities that affect patients after solid organ transplantation (SOT) have been shown to involve changes in gut bacterial populations. Thus, microbiome changes in an individual patient may have important health implications after SOT but this area remains understudied. We describe changes in the composition of the fecal microbiome from a pediatric heart transplant recipient before and >2.5 years after he underwent repeated fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). With both documented episodes of CDI, there was marked loss of bacterial diversity with overgrowth of Proteobacteria (>98.9% of phyla identified) associated with symptomatic colitis that was corrected after FMT. We hypothesize that a second CDI occurring after FMT was related to incomplete restoration of normal bowel flora post-FMT with relative deficiencies of the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes and the families Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae . Following the second FMT, there was a gradual shift in gut bacterial composition coincident with the recipient developing lymphonodular hyperplasia of the colon and painless hematochezia that resolved with discontinuation of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). This case documents dynamic changes in the bacterial microbiome after FMT and suggests that MMF may influence the gut microbiome with consequences for the patient.

  19. Profiles of antibiotic susceptibilities of bacterial isolates and physico ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Venda region of South Africa is predominantly rural and residents rely on untreated water sources for daily water needs. The physico-chemical quality of these water sources including antibiotic susceptibilities of enteric bacterial isolates which would guide clinicians in the empiric management of diarrhoea have ...

  20. Physicochemical conditions, metabolites and community structure of the bacterial microbiota in the gut of wood-feeding cockroaches (Blaberidae: Panesthiinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Eugen; Lampert, Niclas; Mikaelyan, Aram; Köhler, Tim; Maekawa, Kiyoto; Brune, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    While the gut microbiota of termites and its role in symbiotic digestion have been studied for decades, little is known about the bacteria colonizing the intestinal tract of the distantly related wood-feeding cockroaches (Blaberidae: Panesthiinae). Here, we show that physicochemical gut conditions and microbial fermentation products in the gut of Panesthia angustipennis resemble that of other cockroaches. Microsensor measurements confirmed that all gut compartments were anoxic at the center and had a slightly acidic to neutral pH and a negative redox potential. While acetate dominated in all compartments, lactate and hydrogen accumulated only in the crop. The high, hydrogen-limited rates of methane emission from living cockroaches were in agreement with the restriction of F420-fluorescent methanogens to the hindgut. The gut microbiota of both P. angustipennis and Salganea esakii differed strongly between compartments, with the highest density and diversity in the hindgut, but similarities between homologous compartments of both cockroaches indicated a specificity of the microbiota for their respective habitats. While some lineages were most closely related to the gut microbiota of omnivorous cockroaches and wood- or litter-feeding termites, others have been encountered also in vertebrates, reinforcing the hypothesis that strong environmental selection drives community structure in the cockroach gut. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Utilization of rye as energy source affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition, and bone mineralization in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of two different dietary cereal types, corn versus rye, on digesta viscosity, gut integrity, and gut microbiota composition in commercial broiler chickens. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, off-sex broiler chickens were randomly assigned ...

  2. Variation in the gut microbiota of laboratory mice is related to both genetic and environmental factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hufeldt, Majbritt Ravn; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2010-01-01

    microbiota in 8-wk-old NMRI and C57BL/6 mice by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to profile PCR-derived amplicons from bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Comparison of the cecal microbiotas revealed that the similarity index of the inbred C57BL/6Sca strain was 10% higher than that of the outbred Sca...... to intercage variation. These results show that denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis is a simple tool that can be used to characterize the gut microbiota of mice. Including such characterizations in future quality-control programs may increase the reproducibility of mouse studies....

  3. [Microbiota and gastrointestinal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco Allué, I

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial colonisation is established immediately after birth, through direct contact with maternal microbiota, and may be influenced during lactation. There is emerging evidence indicating that quantitative and qualitative changes on gut microbiota contribute to alterations in the mucosal activation of the immune system, leading to intra- or extra-intestinal diseases. A balance between pathogenic and beneficial microbiota throughout childhood and adolescence is important to gastrointestinal health, including protection against pathogens, inhibition of pathogens, nutrient processing (synthesis of vitamin K), stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of host fat storage. Probiotics can promote an intentional modulation of intestinal microbiota favouring the health of the host. A review is presented on the modulation of intestinal microbiota on prevention, and adjuvant treatment of some paediatric gastrointestinal diseases. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Childhood Acute Bacterial Meningitis: Clinical Spectrum, Bacteriological Profile and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Attia; Zeeshan, Fatima; Zafar, Aiza; Ejaz, Hassan; Iftikhar, Aisha; Rathore, Ahsan Waheed

    2016-10-01

    To determine the disease pattern, etiological agents and outcome of childhood acute bacterial meningitis. Adescriptive study. Department of Paediatric Medicine, The Children's Hospital, Lahore, from January to December 2012. Atotal of 199 children between the ages of 1 month and 5 years, admitted with the diagnosis of meningitis on the basis of clinical findings and positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), were included. In all patients, complete blood count (CBC), CSF culture sensitivity, and blood culture sensitivity were performed. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20. Out of 199 children, 127 (63.8%) were males with M:F ratio of 1.7:1. Mean age was 11.33 ±12 months. Maximum numbers of children were bacterial meningitis mostly affected children under the age of 1 year. CSF culture revealed both Grampositive and Gram-negative bacteria. The most common pathogen in children who died was streptococcus pneumoniae.

  5. REPARATION : ribosome profiling assisted (re-)annotation of bacterial genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ndah, Elvis; Jonckheere, Veronique; Giess, Adam; Valen, Eivind; Menschaert, Gerben; Van Damme, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Prokaryotic genome annotation is highly dependent on automated methods, as manual curation cannot keep up with the exponential growth of sequenced genomes. Current automated methods depend heavily on sequence composition and often underestimate the complexity of the proteome. We developed RibosomeE Profiling Assisted (re-)AnnotaTION (REPARATION), a de novo machine learning algorithm that takes advantage of experimental protein synthesis evidence from ribosome profiling (Ribo-seq) to delineate...

  6. REPARATION: ribosome profiling assisted (re-)annotation of bacterial genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ndah, Elvis; Jonckheere, Veronique; Giess, Adam; Valen, Eivind; Menschaert, Gerben; Van Damme, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Prokaryotic genome annotation is highly dependent on automated methods, as manual curation cannot keep up with the exponential growth of sequenced genomes. Current automated methods depend heavily on sequence composition and often underestimate the complexity of the proteome. We developed RibosomeE Profiling Assisted (re-)AnnotaTION (REPARATION), a de novo machine learning algorithm that takes advantage of experimental protein synthesis evidence from ribosome profiling (Ribo-seq) to ...

  7. Bacterial community profiles in low microbial abundance sponges

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, Emily C.; Kamke, Janine; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Taylor, Michael W.; Hentschel, Ute; Ravasi, Timothy; Schmitt, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    It has long been recognized that sponges differ in the abundance of associated microorganisms, and they are therefore termed either 'low microbial abundance' (LMA) or 'high microbial abundance' (HMA) sponges. Many previous studies concentrated on the dense microbial communities in HMA sponges, whereas little is known about microorganisms in LMA sponges. Here, two LMA sponges from the Red Sea, two from the Caribbean and one from the South Pacific were investigated. With up to only five bacteri...

  8. Profiling the lymphoid-resident T cell pool reveals modulation by age and microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Aurélie; Audemard-Verger, Alexandra; Guichard, Vincent; Mattiuz, Raphaël; Delpoux, Arnaud; Hamon, Pauline; Bonilla, Nelly; Rivière, Matthieu; Delon, Jérôme; Martin, Bruno; Auffray, Cédric; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Lucas, Bruno

    2018-01-04

    Despite being implicated in non-lymphoid tissues, non-recirculating T cells may also exist in secondary lymphoid organs (SLO). However, a detailed characterization of this lymphoid-resident T cell pool has not yet been done. Here we show that a substantial proportion of CD4 regulatory (Treg) and memory (Tmem) cells establish long-term residence in the SLOs of specific pathogen-free mice. Of these SLOs, only T cell residence within Peyer's patches is affected by microbiota. Resident CD4 Treg and CD4 Tmem cells from lymph nodes and non-lymphoid tissues share many phenotypic and functional characteristics. The percentage of resident T cells in SLOs increases considerably with age, with S1PR1 downregulation possibly contributing to this altered homeostasis. Our results thus show that T cell residence is not only a hallmark of non-lymphoid tissues, but can be extended to secondary lymphoid organs.

  9. Root microbiota dynamics of perennial Arabis alpina are dependent on soil residence time but independent of flowering time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Nina; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Agler, Matthew T; Hacquard, Stéphane; Kemen, Eric; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Wunder, Jörg; Coupland, George; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent field and laboratory experiments with perennial Boechera stricta and annual Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that the root microbiota influences flowering time. Here we examined in long-term time-course experiments the bacterial root microbiota of the arctic-alpine perennial Arabis alpina in natural and controlled environments by 16S rRNA gene profiling. We identified soil type and residence time of plants in soil as major determinants explaining up to 15% of root microbiota variation, whereas environmental conditions and host genotype explain maximally 11% of variation. When grown in the same soil, the root microbiota composition of perennial A. alpina is largely similar to those of its annual relatives A. thaliana and Cardamine hirsuta. Non-flowering wild-type A. alpina and flowering pep1 mutant plants assemble an essentially indistinguishable root microbiota, thereby uncoupling flowering time from plant residence time-dependent microbiota changes. This reveals the robustness of the root microbiota against the onset and perpetual flowering of A. alpina. Together with previous studies, this implies a model in which parts of the root microbiota modulate flowering time, whereas, after microbiota acquisition during vegetative growth, the established root-associated bacterial assemblage is structurally robust to perturbations caused by flowering and drastic changes in plant stature.

  10. Vaginal microbiota in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinus Tarina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human vagina together with its resident, microbiota, comprise a dynamic ecosystem. Normal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus species, and pathogen microbiota such as Gardnerella species and Bacteroides species can occur due to decrease in Lactobacillus domination. Lactobacillus plays an essential role in keeping normal vaginal microbiota in balance. Vaginal microbiota adapts to pH change and hormonal value. Changes in the vaginal microbiota over a woman’s lifespan will influence the colonization of pathogenic microbes. They include changes in child, puberty, reproductive state, menopause, and postmenopause. Estrogen levels change will affect the colonization of pathogenic microbium, leading to genitourinary syndrome of menopause. Vulvovaginal atrophy is often found in postmenopausal women, and dominated by L. iners, Anaerococcus sp, Peptoniphilus sp, Prevotella sp, and Streptococcus sp. The normal vaginal microbiota’s imbalance in menopause will cause diseases such as bacterial vaginosis, and recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis due to hormonal therapies. Changes in the vaginal microbiota due to bacterial vaginosis are characterized by decrease in H2O2-producing Lactobacillus. They are also caused by the increase in numbers and concentration of Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, and other anaerob species such as Peptostreptococci, Prevotella spp, and Mobiluncus spp.

  11. Fecal microbiota transplantation and bacterial consortium transplantation have comparable effects on the re-establishment of mucosal barrier function in mice with intestinal dysbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming eLi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a promising therapy, despite some reports of adverse side effects. Bacterial consortia transplantation (BCT for targeted restoration of the intestinal ecosystem is considered a relatively safe and simple procedure. However, no systematic research has assessed the effects of FMT and BCT on immune responses of intestinal mucosal barrier in patients. We conducted complementary studies in animal models on the effects of FMT and BCT, and provide recommendations for improving the clinical outcomes of these treatments. To establish the dysbiosis model, male BALB/c mice were treated with ceftriaxone intra-gastrically for 7 days. After that, FMT and BCT were performed on ceftriaxone-treated mice for 3 consecutive days to rebuild the intestinal ecosystem. Post-FMT and post-BCT changes of the intestinal microbial community and mucosal barrier functions were investigated and compared. Disruption of intestinal microbial homeostasis impacted the integrity of mucosal epithelial layer, resulting in increased intestinal permeability. These outcomes were accompanied by overexpression of Muc2, significant decrease of SIgA secretion, and overproduction of defensins and inflammatory cytokines. After FMT and BCT, the intestinal microbiota recovered quickly, this was associated with better reconstruction of mucosal barriers and re-establishment of immune networks compared with spontaneous recovery (SR. Although based on a short-term study, our results suggest that FMT and BCT promote the re-establishment of intestinal microbial communities in mice with antibiotic-induced dysbiosis, and contribute to the temporal and spatial interactions between microbiota and mucosal barriers. The effects of BCT are comparable to that of FMT, especially in normalizing the intestinal levels of Muc2, SIgA, and defensins.

  12. Fermentation Characteristics and Aromatic Profile of Plum Wines Produced with Indigenous Microbiota and Pure Cultures of Selected Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljić, Uroš; Puškaš, Vladimir; Vučurović, Vesna; Muzalevski, Ana

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare fermentation characteristics and aromatic profile of plum wines produced with indigenous microbiota and pure cultures of different selected yeast. Experiments were carried out with plum (Prunus domestica L.) varieties of different fruit ripening times (Čačanska rana, Čačanska lepotica, and Požegača). Wine fermentations were conducted by the activity of indigenous microbiota, commercially available Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus yeast strains and joint activity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. cerevisiae (sequential inoculation). Statistically significant differences in fermentative characteristics and the content of certain volatile compounds were observed as a result of metabolic activity of various indigenous and/or selected yeasts during fermentation of plum pomace. Minimal duration of fermentation (4 to 5 d) and fastest ethanol production rate (from 12.3 to 15.5 g/L/d) were the characteristics of the studied S. cerevisiae strains. Isobutanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-heptanol, and 1-octanol were the most prevalent higher alcohols in the tested plum wine samples. The predominant ester in plum wines was ethyl acetate, ethyl lactate, amyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, and ethyl palmitate, esters responsible for the floral and fruity olfactory tones, were also present in large amounts. Also, the use of S. cerevisiae strains resulted in the production of plum wines with better sensory characteristics than ones produced with other investigated yeasts. Obtained results are significant since there is limited data on the compounds responsible for the unique flavor of plum wine, as well as on the impact of different yeast starter cultures application on the overall quality of fruit wines. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  13. The gut microbiota as a modulator of innate immunity during melioidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; Scicluna, Brendon P.; Belzer, Clara; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; de Vos, Alex F.; van der Poll, Tom; Budding, Andries E.; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2017-01-01

    Background Melioidosis, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an emerging cause of pneumonia-derived sepsis in the tropics. The gut microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognized as a protective mediator in host defenses against systemic infection. Here, we aimed to characterize the composition and function of the intestinal microbiota during experimental melioidosis. Methodology/Principal findings C57BL/6 mice were infected intranasally with B. pseudomallei and sacrificed at different time points to assess bacterial loads and inflammation. In selected experiments, the gut microbiota was disrupted with broad-spectrum antibiotics prior to inoculation. Fecal bacterial composition was analyzed by means of IS-pro, a 16S-23S interspacer region-based profiling method. A marked shift in fecal bacterial composition was seen in all mice during systemic B. pseudomallei infection with a strong increase in Proteobacteria and decrease in Actinobacteria, with an increase in bacterial diversity. We found enhanced early dissemination of B. pseudomallei and systemic inflammation during experimental melioidosis in microbiota-disrupted mice compared with controls. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling of the lung identified several genes that were differentially expressed between mice with a normal or disrupted intestinal microbiota. Genes involved in acute phase signaling, including macrophage-related signaling pathways were significantly elevated in microbiota disrupted mice. Compared with controls, alveolar macrophages derived from antibiotic pretreated mice showed a diminished capacity to phagocytose B. pseudomallei. This might in part explain the observed protective effect of the gut microbiota in the host defense against pneumonia-derived melioidosis. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these data identify the gut microbiota as a potential modulator of innate immunity during B. pseudomallei infection. PMID:28422970

  14. Antimicrobial resistance profile in bacterial isolates from subclinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to investigate subclinical mastitis causing pathogens in dairy lactating cows and determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile in rural and peri-urban areas of Thika, Mathioya and Kieni East Sub County. California Mastitis Test (CMT) was used to screen one hundred and sixteen lactating ...

  15. Recovery of the gut microbiome following fecal microbiota transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekatz, Anna M; Aas, Johannes; Gessert, Charles E; Rubin, Timothy A; Saman, Daniel M; Bakken, Johan S; Young, Vincent B

    2014-06-17

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most common health care-associated infections, and up to 40% of patients suffer from recurrence of disease following standard antibiotic therapy. Recently, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been successfully used to treat recurrent C. difficile infection. It is hypothesized that FMT aids in recovery of a microbiota capable of colonization resistance to C. difficile. However, it is not fully understood how this occurs. Here we investigated changes in the fecal microbiota structure following FMT in patients with recurrent C. difficile infection, and imputed a hypothetical functional profile based on the 16S rRNA profile using a predictive metagenomic tool. Increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and decreased abundance of Proteobacteria were observed following FMT. The fecal microbiota of recipients following transplantation was more diverse and more similar to the donor profile than the microbiota prior to transplantation. Additionally, we observed differences in the imputed metagenomic profile. In particular, amino acid transport systems were overrepresented in samples collected prior to transplantation. These results suggest that functional changes accompany microbial structural changes following this therapy. Further identification of the specific community members and functions that promote colonization resistance may aid in the development of improved treatment methods for C. difficile infection. Within the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection has surpassed other bacterial infections to become the leading cause of nosocomial infections. Antibiotic use, which disrupts the gut microbiota and its capability in providing colonization resistance against C. difficile, is a known risk factor in C. difficile infection. In particular, recurrent C. difficile remains difficult to treat with standard antibiotic therapy. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has provided a successful treatment method for

  16. Salivary microbiota in individuals with different levels of caries experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2017-01-01

    This study compared salivary bacterial profiles in two groups having a 10-fold difference in levels of caries experience, as it was hypothesized that the composition of the salivary microbiota might associate with the levels of caries experience. Bacterial profiles in stimulated saliva samples from...... 85 individuals with low levels of caries experience (healthy group) and 79 individuals with high levels of caries experience (caries group) were analyzed by means of the Human Oral Microbiome Identification Next Generation Sequencing (HOMINGS) technique. Subsequently, saliva samples from caries......-free individuals in the healthy group (n = 57) and the caries group (n = 31) were compared. A significantly higher α-diversity (p caries group...

  17. Childhood acute bacterial meningitis: clinical spectrum, bacteriological profile and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.; Zeeshan, S.; Rathore, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the disease pattern, etiological agents and outcome of childhood acute bacterial meningitis. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Paediatric Medicine, The Children's Hospital, Lahore, from January to December 2012. Methodology: A total of 199 children between the ages of 1 month and 5 years, admitted with the diagnosis of meningitis on the basis of clinical findings and positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), were included. In all patients, complete blood count (CBC), CSF culture sensitivity, and blood culture sensitivity were performed. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20. Results: Out of 199 children, 127 (63.8%) were males with M:F ratio of 1.7:1. Mean age was 11.33 ± 12 months. Maximum numbers of children were < 1 year of age, 136 (68.3%). Only 90 (45.2%) children were fully vaccinated according to Expanded Program of Immunisation (EPI) schedule. Presentations with refusal to take feed (p=0.008) and with impaired conscious state were independent predictors of death (p=0.002). Complications were noted in 34 (17%) and were significantly associated with severe malnutrition (p=0.006) and altered conscious level at presentation (p < 0.001). The common pathogens identified on CSF culture were coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) in 11 (5.5%) and streptococcus pneumoniae in 5 (2.5%). Overall mortality was 10.1%. The commonest pathogen isolated from children who died was streptococcus pneumoniae (p=0.039). Conclusion: Acute bacterial meningitis mostly affected children under the age of 1 year. CSF culture revealed both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The most common pathogen in children who died was streptococcus pneumoniae. (author)

  18. Effects of Different Salt Treatments on the Fermentation Metabolites and Bacterial Profiles of Kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Bo-Min; Lee, Hyeon-Jeong; Jang, Gwang-Ju; Song, Seong Hwa; Lee, Jae-In; Lee, Sang Bong; Shim, Jae Min; Lee, Kang Wook; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Ham, Kyung-Sik; Chen, Feng; Kim, Hyun-Jin

    2017-05-01

    The effects of purified salt (PS) and mineral-rich sea salt (MRS), both with different mineral profiles, on kimchi fermentation were studied using a culture-dependent 16S rRNA sequencing technique and mass-based metabolomic analysis. The different mineral profiles in the fermentation medium caused changes in the bacterial profiles of the 2 kimchi products. An increase of Leuconostoc species in MRS-kimchi decreased the Lactobacillus/Leuconostoc ratio, which led to changes in metabolites (including sugars, amino acids, organic acids, lipids, sulfur compounds, and terpenoids) associated with kimchi quality. Although further studies on the relationship between these salt types and kimchi fermentation are needed, these results suggested that the MRS treatment had positively affected the changes of the kimchi mineral contents, bacterial growth, and metabolite profiles, which are linked to kimchi quality. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  19. Changes in vaginal microbiota following antimicrobial and probiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean M. Macklaim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The composition of the vaginal microbiota is known to be important for health. When infections occur, antimicrobial therapy is often poorly efficacious. Objective and design: We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize changes in the bacterial microbiota following oral antimicrobial and probiotic interventions. Results: While the bacterial vaginal profiles of women with vulvovaginal candidiasis were dominated by lactobacilli as in healthy women, and unchanged by therapy, Gardnerella vaginalis, Prevotella, Atopobium, Sneathia, and Megasphaera dominated the vagina of women with bacterial vaginosis (BV, and treatment with tinidazole plus Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14+L. rhamnosus GR-1 resulted in an increased relative abundance of indigenous L. iners or L. crispatus. Conclusions: The ability to restore homeostasis provides a rationale for conjoint use of probiotics with antibiotic treatment of BV.

  20. Effects of a simple or a complex starter microbiota on the gastric transcriptome profile of caesarean derived piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priori, D.; Colombo, M.; Koopmans, S.J.; Jansman, A.J.M.; Schiavo, G.; Trevisi, P.; Bosi, P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that early exposure of piglets to a diverse microbiota can shape the skills of gut-associated lymphoid tissue to respond to exogenous molecules (Lewis et al., 2012). In pig, a short encounter with a complex microbiota in the early life can be sufficient to influence the

  1. SIGIRR, a negative regulator of TLR/IL-1R signalling promotes Microbiota dependent resistance to colonization by enteric bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Pan Sham

    Full Text Available Enteric bacterial pathogens such as enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC and Salmonella Typhimurium target the intestinal epithelial cells (IEC lining the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. Despite expressing innate Toll-like receptors (TLRs, IEC are innately hypo-responsive to most bacterial products. This is thought to prevent maladaptive inflammatory responses against commensal bacteria, but it also limits antimicrobial responses by IEC to invading bacterial pathogens, potentially increasing host susceptibility to infection. One reason for the innate hypo-responsiveness of IEC is their expression of Single Ig IL-1 Related Receptor (SIGIRR, a negative regulator of interleukin (IL-1 and TLR signaling. To address whether SIGIRR expression and the innate hypo-responsiveness of IEC impacts on enteric host defense, Sigirr deficient (-/- mice were infected with the EHEC related pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Sigirr -/- mice responded with accelerated IEC proliferation and strong pro-inflammatory and antimicrobial responses but surprisingly, Sigirr -/- mice proved dramatically more susceptible to infection than wildtype mice. Through haematopoietic transplantation studies, it was determined that SIGIRR expression by non-haematopoietic cells (putative IEC regulated these responses. Moreover, the exaggerated responses were found to be primarily dependent on IL-1R signaling. Whilst exploring the basis for their susceptibility, Sigirr -/- mice were found to be unusually susceptible to intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium colonization, developing enterocolitis without the typical requirement for antibiotic based removal of competing commensal microbes. Strikingly, the exaggerated antimicrobial responses seen in Sigirr -/- mice were found to cause a rapid and dramatic loss of commensal microbes from the infected intestine. This depletion appears to reduce the ability of the microbiota to compete for space and nutrients (colonization resistance with the invading

  2. Effect of virgin olive oil and thyme phenolic compounds on blood lipid profile: implications of human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Peláez, Sandra; Mosele, Juana Ines; Pizarro, Neus; Farràs, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Subirana, Isaac; Pérez-Cano, Francisco José; Castañer, Olga; Solà, Rosa; Fernandez-Castillejo, Sara; Heredia, Saray; Farré, Magí; Motilva, María José; Fitó, Montserrat

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of virgin olive oil phenolic compounds (PC) alone or in combination with thyme PC on blood lipid profile from hypercholesterolemic humans, and whether the changes generated are related with changes in gut microbiota populations and activities. A randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover human trial (n = 12) was carried out. Participants ingested 25 mL/day for 3 weeks, preceded by 2-week washout periods, three raw virgin olive oils differing in the concentration and origin of PC: (1) a virgin olive oil (OO) naturally containing 80 mg PC/kg, (VOO), (2) a PC-enriched virgin olive oil containing 500 mg PC/kg, from OO (FVOO), and (3) a PC-enriched virgin olive oil containing a mixture of 500 mg PC/kg from OO and thyme, 1:1 (FVOOT). Blood lipid values and faecal quantitative changes in microbial populations, short chain fatty acids, cholesterol microbial metabolites, bile acids, and phenolic metabolites were analysed. FVOOT decreased seric ox-LDL concentrations compared with pre-FVOOT, and increased numbers of bifidobacteria and the levels of the phenolic metabolite protocatechuic acid compared to VOO (P thyme PC for 3 weeks, decreases blood ox-LDL in hypercholesterolemic humans. This cardio-protective effect could be mediated by the increases in populations of bifidobacteria together with increases in PC microbial metabolites with antioxidant activities.

  3. Perturbation of the intestinal microbiota of mice infected with Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ras, Refaat; Huynh, Kevin; Desoky, Enas; Badawy, Ahmed; Widmer, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the interaction between the intestinal microbiota (microbiome) and enteric pathogens is of interest in the development of alternative treatments that do not rely on chemotherapy and do not lead to drug resistance. We undertook research in a rodent model of cryptosporidiosis to assess whether the bacterial gut microbiota is impacted by infection with the protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum. The profile of the faecal bacterial microbiota in infected and uninfected animals was compared using 16S amplicon sequencing. In four independent experiments, the intestinal microbiota of infected mice differed from that of uninfected animals, regardless of the C. parvum isolate used to infect mice. The use of replicated treatment groups demonstrated that microbiota divergence between treatments was driven by the infection and did not result from spontaneous changes in the intestinal ecosystem unrelated to the infection. Microbiota perturbation induced by C. parvum appeared to be reversible, as we observed a tendency for the phylogenetic distance between infected and uninfected mice to diminish after mice cleared the infection. As mice infected with C. parvum do not develop diarrhoea, these observations indicate that microbiota perturbation results from other mechanisms than an accelerated movement of gut content. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Resilience of the intestinal microbiota following pathogenic bacterial infection is independent of innate immunity mediated by NOD1 or NOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Susan J; Geddes, Kaoru; Maisonneuve, Charles; Streutker, Catherine J; Philpott, Dana J

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune receptors, NOD1 and NOD2, are key regulators of intestinal homeostasis. NOD2 deficiency is linked to increased risk for Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel disease characterized by chronic inflammatory pathology and dysbiosis within resident microbial communities. However, the relationship between NOD protein-regulated immune functions and dysbiosis remains unclear. We hypothesized that the relationship between NOD1 or NOD2 deficiency and altered community structure during chronic disease may arise via NOD-dependent impairment of community resilience over time. Using the Salmonella ΔaroA model of chronic colitis with littermate mice to control for environmental influences on the microbiota, we show that NOD proteins exert a relatively minor impact on the chronic inflammatory environment and do not significantly contribute to bacterial abundance or community resilience following infection. Rather, temporal shifts in relative abundance of targeted bacterial groups correlated with inflammatory phenotype driven by presence of the pathogen and the ensuing complex immune response. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Diversity of cervicovaginal microbiota associated with female lower genital tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Chen, Xiaoyi; Zhu, Haibin; Nelson, Karen E; Xia, Yaxian; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie

    2011-04-01

    The female genital tract (FGT) harbors very large numbers of bacterial species that are known to play an important role on vaginal health. Previous studies have focused on bacterial diversity in the vagina, but little is known about the ectocervical microbiota associated with FGT infections. In our study, vaginal swabs and ectocervical swabs were collected from 100 participants in China, including 30 women with bacterial vaginosis (BV; BV group), 22 women with cervicitis (Cer group), 18 women with BV in combination with cervicitis (BC group) and 30 healthy control women (CN group). The diversity and richness of cervicovaginal microbiota were investigated with culture-independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting 11 microorganisms that have been associated with FGT infections. Despite significant interpersonal variations, the PCR-DGGE profiles revealed that vaginal microbiota and ectocervical microbiota were clearly much more complex in the BV group, while the ectocervical microbiota showed no significant difference between healthy and diseased participants. Using species-specific qPCR, BV and cervicitis were significantly associated with a dramatic decrease in Lactobacillus species (p  0.05) in ectocervical microbiota. The total numbers of bacteria were significantly lower in the ectocervix as compared in the vagina (p microbiota from participants with BV in combination with cervicitis was quite different from that of participants with BV or cervicitis alone. Our study demonstrated that the cervicovaginal microbiota was actively involved in the process of FGT infections. The predominant bacteria of the cervicovaginal communities were clearly associated with BV; however, there was not sufficient evidence that the ectocervical microbiota is directly involved in the development of cervicitis.

  6. Alteration of the gastrointestinal microbiota of mice by edible blue-green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H E; Martínez, I; Lee, J Y; Walter, J

    2009-10-01

    To characterize the effect of edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) on the gastrointestinal microbiota of mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed a diet supplemented with 0% or 5% dried Nostoc commune, Spirulina platensis or Afanizominon flos-aquae (w/w) for 4 weeks. Molecular fingerprinting of the colonic microbiota using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that administration of N. commune induced major alterations in colonic microbiota composition, while administration of S. platensis or A. flos-aquae had a more subtle impact. Community profile analysis revealed that administration of N. commune did not reduce microbial diversity indices of the colonic microbiota. Despite its pronounced effects on the bacterial composition in the colon, total bacterial numbers in the gut of mice fed N. commune were not reduced as assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and bacteriological culture. The results presented here show that administration of blue-green algae, and especially N. commune, alters colonic microbiota composition in mice with limited effects on total bacterial numbers or microbial diversity. Blue-green algae are consumed in many countries as a source of nutrients and to promote health, and they are intensively studied for their pharmaceutical value. Given the importance of the gut microbiota for many host functions, the effects of blue-green algae on gut microbial ecology revealed during this study should be considered when using them as food supplements or when studying their pharmaceutical properties.

  7. Linking Gut Microbiota to Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raskov, Hans; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2017-01-01

    and malignant transformation. Initiation and promotion of colorectal cancer may result from direct bacterial actions, bacterial metabolites and inflammatory pathways. Newer aspects of microbiota and colorectal cancer include quorum sensing, biofilm formation, sidedness and effects/countereffects of microbiota......Pre-clinical and clinical data produce mounting evidence that the microbiota is strongly associated with colorectal carcinogenesis. Dysbiosis may change the course of carcinogenesis as microbial actions seem to impact genetic and epigenetic alterations leading to dysplasia, clonal expansion...

  8. Fecal concentrations of bacterially derived vitamin K forms are associated with gut microbiota composition but not plasma or fecal cytokine concentrations in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, J Philip; Meydani, Mohsen; Barnett, Junaidah B; Vanegas, Sally M; Barger, Kathryn; Fu, Xueyan; Goldin, Barry; Kane, Anne; Rasmussen, Helen; Vangay, Pajau; Knights, Dan; Jonnalagadda, Satya S; Saltzman, Edward; Roberts, Susan B; Meydani, Simin N; Booth, Sarah L

    2017-10-01

    Background: Emerging evidence suggests novel roles for bacterially derived vitamin K forms known as menaquinones in health and disease, which may be attributable in part to anti-inflammatory effects. However, the relevance of menaquinones produced by gut bacteria to vitamin K requirements and inflammation is undetermined. Objective: This study aimed to quantify fecal menaquinone concentrations and identify associations between fecal menaquinone concentrations and serum vitamin K concentrations, gut microbiota composition, and inflammation. Design: Fecal and serum menaquinone concentrations, fecal microbiota composition, and plasma and fecal cytokine concentrations were measured in 80 men and postmenopausal women (48 men, 32 women, age 40-65 y) enrolled in a randomized, parallel-arm, provided-food trial. After consuming a run-in diet for 2 wk, participants were randomly assigned to consume a whole grain-rich (WG) or a refined grain-based (RG) diet for 6 wk. Outcomes were measured at weeks 2 and 8. Results: The median total daily excretion of menaquinones in feces was 850 nmol/d but was highly variable (range: 64-5358 nmol/d). The total median (IQR) fecal concentrations of menaquinones decreased in the WG diet compared with the RG diet [-6.8 nmol/g (13.0 nmol/g) dry weight for WG compared with 1.8 nmol/g (12.3 nmol/g) dry weight for RG; P < 0.01)]. However, interindividual variability in fecal menaquinone concentrations partitioned individuals into 2 distinct groups based on interindividual differences in concentrations of different menaquinone forms rather than the diet group or the time point. The relative abundances of several gut bacteria taxa, Bacteroides and Prevotella in particular, differed between these groups, and 42% of identified genera were associated with ≥1 menaquinone form. Menaquinones were not detected in serum, and neither fecal concentrations of individual menaquinones nor the menaquinone group was associated with any marker of inflammation

  9. Microscopic dynamics and velocity profiles of bacterial superfluids under oscillatory shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang; Guo, Shuo; Samanta, Devranjan; Peng, Yi; Xu, Xinliang

    Bacterial suspensions a premier example of active fluids show an unusual response to shear stresses. Rather than increasing the viscosity of the suspending fluid, swimming bacteria can self-organize into collective flows under shear, turning the suspension into a ``superfluid'' with zero apparent viscosity. Although the existence of the bacterial superfluid has been demonstrated in bulk rheology measurements, little is known about the microscopic dynamics of such an exotic phase. Here, by combining sensitive rheology measurements with high-speed confocal microscopy, we study the detailed 3D dynamics of concentrated bacterial suspensions confined in narrow gaps under oscillatory shear. We find that sheared bacterial suspensions in the superfluidic phase exhibit velocity profiles with strong spatial heterogeneity, unexpected from the established hydrodynamic theory of active fluids. We quantitatively explain the observed velocity profiles by considering a balance of active stresses and shear stresses in an ensemble average. Our experiments reveal a profound influence of shear flows on bacterial locomotion and provide new insights to the origin of the unique flow behaviors of active fluids.

  10. Characterisation of the bacterial microbiota of the vagina of dairy cows and isolation of pediocin-producing Pediococcus acidilactici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine infections in dairy cows lower profitability of dairy operations. Infections of the reproductive tract are related to the overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria during the first three weeks after parturition. However, alterations in the vaginal microbiota composition in the first weeks after parturition remain poorly documented. Results In this study, bacteria isolated from the vagina of healthy pregnant, and infected postpartum cows were characterised by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis and partial 16S ribosomal RNA (rDNA gene sequencing. Populations of bacilli and lactic acid bacteria of the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, and Pediococcus were present in both healthy and infected cows. Infected cows had a significant increase in the vaginal enteric bacteria population which consisted mainly of Escherichia coli. Three E. coli isolates harboured the gene coding for Shiga-like-toxin (SLT I or II. Several isolates of the Pediococcus acidilactici were found to produce the bacteriocin pediocin AcH/PA-1. Quantitative PCR analyses of vaginal mucus samples collected from ten metritic cows before and after parturition confirmed the presence of the Lactobacillus group (Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp., Leuconostoc spp., and Weissella spp.; Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, and bacilli. The presence of the pediocin AcH/PA-1 structural gene and SLT genes were also confirmed with qPCR. Conclusions In conclusion, overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria, particularly E. coli, after parturition likely contributes to the development of metritis. Our microbiota analysis extends the information related to the composition of commensal bacteria in the bovine female reproductive tract and may facilitate the development of novel intervention strategies for prevention of uterine infections in dairy cows.

  11. Characterisation of the bacterial microbiota of the vagina of dairy cows and isolation of pediocin-producing Pediococcus acidilactici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yvonne; Ametaj, Burim N; Ambrose, Divakar J; Gänzle, Michael G

    2013-01-29

    Uterine infections in dairy cows lower profitability of dairy operations. Infections of the reproductive tract are related to the overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria during the first three weeks after parturition. However, alterations in the vaginal microbiota composition in the first weeks after parturition remain poorly documented. In this study, bacteria isolated from the vagina of healthy pregnant, and infected postpartum cows were characterised by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and partial 16S ribosomal RNA (rDNA) gene sequencing. Populations of bacilli and lactic acid bacteria of the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, and Pediococcus were present in both healthy and infected cows. Infected cows had a significant increase in the vaginal enteric bacteria population which consisted mainly of Escherichia coli. Three E. coli isolates harboured the gene coding for Shiga-like-toxin (SLT) I or II. Several isolates of the Pediococcus acidilactici were found to produce the bacteriocin pediocin AcH/PA-1. Quantitative PCR analyses of vaginal mucus samples collected from ten metritic cows before and after parturition confirmed the presence of the Lactobacillus group (Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp., Leuconostoc spp., and Weissella spp.); Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, and bacilli. The presence of the pediocin AcH/PA-1 structural gene and SLT genes were also confirmed with qPCR. In conclusion, overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria, particularly E. coli, after parturition likely contributes to the development of metritis. Our microbiota analysis extends the information related to the composition of commensal bacteria in the bovine female reproductive tract and may facilitate the development of novel intervention strategies for prevention of uterine infections in dairy cows.

  12. Coral transcriptome and bacterial community profiles reveal distinct Yellow Band Disease states in Orbicella faveolata

    KAUST Repository

    Closek, Collin J.

    2014-06-20

    Coral diseases impact reefs globally. Although we continue to describe diseases, little is known about the etiology or progression of even the most common cases. To examine a spectrum of coral health and determine factors of disease progression we examined Orbicella faveolata exhibiting signs of Yellow Band Disease (YBD), a widespread condition in the Caribbean. We used a novel combined approach to assess three members of the coral holobiont: the coral-host, associated Symbiodinium algae, and bacteria. We profiled three conditions: (1) healthy-appearing colonies (HH), (2) healthy-appearing tissue on diseased colonies (HD), and (3) diseased lesion (DD). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed health state-specific diversity in Symbiodinium clade associations. 16S ribosomal RNA gene microarrays (PhyloChips) and O. faveolata complimentary DNA microarrays revealed the bacterial community structure and host transcriptional response, respectively. A distinct bacterial community structure marked each health state. Diseased samples were associated with two to three times more bacterial diversity. HD samples had the highest bacterial richness, which included components associated with HH and DD, as well as additional unique families. The host transcriptome under YBD revealed a reduced cellular expression of defense- and metabolism-related processes, while the neighboring HD condition exhibited an intermediate expression profile. Although HD tissue appeared visibly healthy, the microbial communities and gene expression profiles were distinct. HD should be regarded as an additional (intermediate) state of disease, which is important for understanding the progression of YBD. © 2014 International Society for Microbial Ecology. All rights reserved.

  13. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, Ppneumonia patients and their healthy controls. Clustering resulted in 11 (sub)clusters including 95% (386/405) of samples. We observed three microbiota profiles strongly associated with pneumonia (Ppneumoniae (n=42). In contrast, three other microbiota clusters (in total n=183) were correlated with health (Ppneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with disease status remains a question for future research.

  14. Altered metabolism of gut microbiota contributes to chronic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Castellanos, J F; Serrano-Villar, S; Latorre, A; Artacho, A; Ferrús, M L; Madrid, N; Vallejo, A; Sainz, T; Martínez-Botas, J; Ferrando-Martínez, S; Vera, M; Dronda, F; Leal, M; Del Romero, J; Moreno, S; Estrada, V; Gosalbes, M J; Moya, A

    2015-07-01

    Altered interplay between gut mucosa and microbiota during treated HIV infection may possibly contribute to increased bacterial translocation and chronic immune activation, both of which are predictors of morbidity and mortality. Although a dysbiotic gut microbiota has recently been reported in HIV+ individuals, the metagenome gene pool associated with HIV infection remains unknown. The aim of this study is to characterize the functional gene content of gut microbiota in HIV+ patients and to define the metabolic pathways of this bacterial community, which is potentially associated with immune dysfunction. We determined systemic markers of innate and adaptive immunity in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals on successful antiretroviral therapy without comorbidities and in healthy non-HIV-infected subjects. Metagenome sequencing revealed an altered functional profile, with enrichment of the genes involved in various pathogenic processes, lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, bacterial translocation, and other inflammatory pathways. In contrast, we observed depletion of genes involved in amino acid metabolism and energy processes. Bayesian networks showed significant interactions between the bacterial community, their altered metabolic pathways, and systemic markers of immune dysfunction. This study reveals altered metabolic activity of microbiota and provides novel insight into the potential host-microbiota interactions driving the sustained inflammatory state in successfully treated HIV-infected patients.

  15. Intestinal cytochromes P450 regulating the intestinal microbiota and its probiotic profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Elefterios Venizelos Bezirtzoglou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytochromes P450 (CYPs enzymes metabolize a large variety of xenobiotic substances. In this vein, a plethora of studies were conducted to investigate their role, as cytochromes are located in both liver and intestinal tissues. The P450 profile of the human intestine has not been fully characterized. Human intestine serves primarily as an absorptive organ for nutrients, although it has also the ability to metabolize drugs. CYPs are responsible for the majority of phase I drug metabolism reactions. CYP3A represents the major intestinal CYP (80% followed by CYP2C9. CYP1A is expressed at high level in the duodenum, together with less abundant levels of CYP2C8-10 and CYP2D6. Cytochromes present a genetic polymorphism intra- or interindividual and intra- or interethnic. Changes in the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug are associated with increased toxicity due to reduced metabolism, altered efficacy of the drug, increased production of toxic metabolites, and adverse drug interaction. The high metabolic capacity of the intestinal flora is due to its enormous pool of enzymes, which catalyzes reactions in phase I and phase II drug metabolism. Compromised intestinal barrier conditions, when rupture of the intestinal integrity occurs, could increase passive paracellular absorption. It is clear that high microbial intestinal charge following intestinal disturbances, ageing, environment, or food-associated ailments leads to the microbial metabolism of a drug before absorption. The effect of certain bacteria having a benefic action on the intestinal ecosystem has been largely discussed during the past few years by many authors. The aim of the probiotic approach is to repair the deficiencies in the gut flora and establish a protective effect. There is a tentative multifactorial association of the CYP (P450 cytochrome role in the different diseases states, environmental toxic effects or chemical exposures and nutritional status.

  16. Fungal microbiota dysbiosis in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Harry; Leducq, Valentin; Aschard, Hugues; Pham, Hang-Phuong; Jegou, Sarah; Landman, Cecilia; Cohen, David; Liguori, Giuseppina; Bourrier, Anne; Nion-Larmurier, Isabelle; Cosnes, Jacques; Seksik, Philippe; Langella, Philippe; Skurnik, David; Richard, Mathias L; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Objective The bacterial intestinal microbiota plays major roles in human physiology and IBDs. Although some data suggest a role of the fungal microbiota in IBD pathogenesis, the available data are scarce. The aim of our study was to characterise the faecal fungal microbiota in patients with IBD. Design Bacterial and fungal composition of the faecal microbiota of 235 patients with IBD and 38 healthy subjects (HS) was determined using 16S and ITS2 sequencing, respectively. The obtained sequences were analysed using the Qiime pipeline to assess composition and diversity. Bacterial and fungal taxa associated with clinical parameters were identified using multivariate association with linear models. Correlation between bacterial and fungal microbiota was investigated using Spearman's test and distance correlation. Results We observed that fungal microbiota is skewed in IBD, with an increased Basidiomycota/Ascomycota ratio, a decreased proportion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and an increased proportion of Candida albicans compared with HS. We also identified disease-specific alterations in diversity, indicating that a Crohn's disease-specific gut environment may favour fungi at the expense of bacteria. The concomitant analysis of bacterial and fungal microbiota showed a dense and homogenous correlation network in HS but a dramatically unbalanced network in IBD, suggesting the existence of disease-specific inter-kingdom alterations. Conclusions Besides bacterial dysbiosis, our study identifies a distinct fungal microbiota dysbiosis in IBD characterised by alterations in biodiversity and composition. Moreover, we unravel here disease-specific inter-kingdom network alterations in IBD, suggesting that, beyond bacteria, fungi might also play a role in IBD pathogenesis. PMID:26843508

  17. Bacterial communities in semen from men of infertile couples: metagenomic sequencing reveals relationships of seminal microbiota to semen quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Long Weng

    Full Text Available Some previous studies have identified bacteria in semen as being a potential factor in male infertility. However, only few types of bacteria were taken into consideration while using PCR-based or culturing methods. Here we present an analysis approach using next-generation sequencing technology and bioinformatics analysis to investigate the associations between bacterial communities and semen quality. Ninety-six semen samples collected were examined for bacterial communities, measuring seven clinical criteria for semen quality (semen volume, sperm concentration, motility, Kruger's strict morphology, antisperm antibody (IgA, Atypical, and leukocytes. Computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA was also performed. Results showed that the most abundant genera among all samples were Lactobacillus (19.9%, Pseudomonas (9.85%, Prevotella (8.51% and Gardnerella (4.21%. The proportion of Lactobacillus and Gardnerella was significantly higher in the normal samples, while that of Prevotella was significantly higher in the low quality samples. Unsupervised clustering analysis demonstrated that the seminal bacterial communities were clustered into three main groups: Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Prevotella predominant group. Remarkably, most normal samples (80.6% were clustered in Lactobacillus predominant group. The analysis results showed seminal bacteria community types were highly associated with semen health. Lactobacillus might not only be a potential probiotic for semen quality maintenance, but also might be helpful in countering the negative influence of Prevotella and Pseudomonas. In this study, we investigated whole seminal bacterial communities and provided the most comprehensive analysis of the association between bacterial community and semen quality. The study significantly contributes to the current understanding of the etiology of male fertility.

  18. Helicobacter bilis Infection Alters Mucosal Bacteria and Modulates Colitis Development in Defined Microbiota Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherly, Todd; Mosher, Curtis; Wang, Chong; Hostetter, Jesse; Proctor, Alexandra; Brand, Meghan W; Phillips, Gregory J; Wannemuehler, Michael; Jergens, Albert E

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter bilis infection of C3H/HeN mice harboring the altered Schaedler flora (ASF) triggers progressive immune responsiveness and the development of colitis. We sought to investigate temporal alterations in community structure of a defined (ASF-colonized) microbiota in normal and inflamed murine intestines and to correlate microbiota changes to histopathologic lesions. The colonic mucosal microbiota of healthy mice and ASF mice colonized with H. bilis for 3, 6, or 12 weeks were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA genes of total bacteria, group-specific organisms, and individual ASF bacterial species. Microbial profiling of ASF and H. bilis abundance was performed on cecal contents. Helicobacter bilis-colonized mice developed colitis associated with temporal changes in composition and spatial distribution of the mucosal microbiota. The number of total bacteria, ASF519, and helicobacter-positive bacteria were increased (P attachment, or by invasion, and this interaction is differentially expressed over time.

  19. The bacterial gut microbiota of wood- and humus-feeding termites: Diazotrophic populations and compartment-specific response of bacterial communities to environmental factors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wanyang; Brune, Andreas (Prof. Dr.)

    2018-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the influence of the microenvironment on the symbiosis between higher termites and their intestinal bacteria. The gut environmental factors pH, hydrogen partial pressure, redox potential and nitrogen pool size were measured. Bacterial gut community structure from each highly compartmentalized gut section was investigated. Furthermore, one specific function, nitrogen fixation, was comparatively analyzed in lower termites, higher termites and cockroaches. Hydrogen...

  20. Distinctive Feature of Microbial Communities and Bacterial Functional Profiles in Tricholoma matsutake Dominant Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Yoon; Fong, Jonathan J.; Park, Myung Soo; Lim, Young Woon

    2016-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake, the pine mushroom, is a valuable forest product with high economic value in Asia, and plays an important ecological role as an ectomycorrhizal fungus. Around the host tree, T. matsutake hyphae generate a distinctive soil aggregating environment called a fairy ring, where fruiting bodies form. Because T. matsutake hyphae dominate the soil near the fairy ring, this species has the potential to influence the microbial community. To explore the influence of T. matsutake on the microbial communities, we compared the microbial community and predicted bacterial function between two different soil types—T. matsutake dominant and T. matsutake minor. DNA sequence analyses showed that fungal and bacterial diversity were lower in the T. matsutake dominant soil compared to T. matsutake minor soil. Some microbial taxa were significantly more common in the T. matsutake dominant soil across geographic locations, many of which were previously identified as mycophillic or mycorrhiza helper bacteria. Between the two soil types, the predicted bacterial functional profiles (using PICRUSt) had significantly distinct KEGG modules. Modules for amino acid uptake, carbohydrate metabolism, and the type III secretion system were higher in the T. matsutake dominant soil than in the T. matsutake minor soil. Overall, similar microbial diversity, community structure, and bacterial functional profiles of the T. matsutake dominant soil across geographic locations suggest that T. matsutake may generate a dominance effect. PMID:27977803

  1. The Human Microbiota in Early Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Martin Steen

    knowledge concerning microbiota composition, development and function in other areas of human body. Lack of knowledge about the microbiota development in the airways is an example of such a deficiency. The work presented in this PhD thesis is based on the vast sample collection of the COPSAC2010 cohort......, with 700 mother-infant pairs. The objectives were to perform a detailed examination of the mothers’ vaginal microbiota, describe the early composition and development of the microbiota in the airways of their infants, and determine whether the infants’ microbiota are affected by that of their mothers...... or not. Manuscript I examines the composition and stability of vaginal microbiota, as well as how the mothers’ microbiota contribute to the early bacterial colonization of their infants. In this study, we first confirmed that the vaginal microbiota of the women in the COPSAC2010 cohort represent...

  2. Effect of Different Lignocellulosic Diets on Bacterial Microbiota and Hydrolytic Enzyme Activities in the Gut of the Cotton Boll Weevil (Anthonomus grandis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Guerrero, Emiliano; Soria, Marcelo; Salvador, Ricardo; Ceja-Navarro, Javier A; Campos, Eleonora; Brodie, Eoin L; Talia, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Cotton boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis , are omnivorous coleopteran that can feed on diets with different compositions, including recalcitrant lignocellulosic materials. We characterized the changes in the prokaryotic community structure and the hydrolytic activities of A. grandis larvae fed on different lignocellulosic diets. A. grandis larvae were fed on three different artificial diets: cottonseed meal (CM), Napier grass (NG) and corn stover (CS). Total DNA was extracted from the gut samples for amplification and sequencing of the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes dominated the gut microbiota followed by Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes and a small number of unclassified phyla in CM and NG microbiomes. In the CS feeding group, members of Spirochaetes were the most prevalent, followed by Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Bray-Curtis distances showed that the samples from the CS community were clearly separated from those samples of the CM and NG diets. Gut extracts from all three diets exhibited endoglucanase, xylanase, β-glucosidase and pectinase activities. These activities were significantly affected by pH and temperature across different diets. We observed that the larvae reared on a CM showed significantly higher activities than larvae reared on NG and CS. We demonstrated that the intestinal bacterial community structure varies depending on diet composition. Diets with more variable and complex compositions, such as CS, showed higher bacterial diversity and richness than the two other diets. In spite of the detected changes in composition and diversity, we identified a core microbiome shared between the three different lignocellulosic diets. These results suggest that feeding with diets of different lignocellulosic composition could be a viable strategy to discover variants of hemicellulose and cellulose breakdown systems.

  3. Exploring the bacterial microbiota of Colombian fermented maize dough “Masa Agria” (Maiz Añejo

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    Clemencia Chaves

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Masa Agria is a naturally fermented maize dough produced in Colombia, very common in the traditional gastronomy. In this study we used culture-dependent and RNA-based pyrosequencing to investigate the bacterial community structure of Masa Agria samples produced in the south west of Colombia. The mean value of cell density was 7.6 Log CFU/g of presumptive lactic acid bacteria (LAB, 5.4 Log cfu/g for presumptive acetic bacteria and 5.6 Log CFU/g for yeasts. The abundance of these microorganisms is also responsible for the low pH (3.1-3.7 registered. Although the 16S rRNA pyrosequencing revealed that the analyzed samples were different in bacteria richness and diversity, the genera Lactobacillus, Weissella and Acetobacter were predominant. In particular, the most common species were Lactobacillus plantarum and Acetobacter fabarum, followed by Lb. fermentum, Lb. vaccinostercus and Pediococcus argentinicus. Several microorganisms of environmental origin, such as Dechloromonas and most of all Sphingobium spp., revealed in each sample, were detected, and also bacteria related to maize, such as Phytoplasma. In conclusion, our results elucidated for the first time the structures of the bacterial communities of Masa Agria samples obtained from different producers, identifying the specific dominant species and revealing a complete picture of the bacterial consortium in this specific niche. The selective pressure of tropical environments may favour microbial biodiversity characterized by a useful technological potential.

  4. An uncooked vegan diet shifts the profile of human fecal microflora: computerized analysis of direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography profiles of bacterial cellular fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, R; Ling, W H; Hänninen, O; Eerola, E

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an uncooked extreme vegan diet on fecal microflora was studied by direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of bacterial cellular fatty acids and by quantitative bacterial culture by using classical microbiological techniques of isolation, identification, and enumeration of different bacterial species. Eighteen volunteers were divided randomly into two groups. The test group received an uncooked vegan diet for 1 month and a conventional diet of mixed Western type for the other month of the study. The control group consumed a conventional diet throughout the study period. Stool samples were collected. Bacterial cellular fatty acids were extracted directly from the stool samples and measured by GLC. Computerized analysis of the resulting fatty acid profiles was performed. Such a profile represents all bacterial cellular fatty acids in a sample and thus reflects its microflora and can be used to detect changes, differences, or similarities of bacterial flora between individual samples or sample groups. GLC profiles changed significantly in the test group after the induction and discontinuation of the vegan diet but not in the control group at any time, whereas quantitative bacterial culture did not detect any significant change in fecal bacteriology in either of the groups. The results suggest that an uncooked extreme vegan diet alters the fecal bacterial flora significantly when it is measured by direct stool sample GLC of bacterial fatty acids. PMID:1482187

  5. Alterations of microbiota in urine from women with interstitial cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Interstitial Cystitis (IC) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the bladder with unknown etiology. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbial community present in the urine from IC female patients by 454 high throughput sequencing of the 16S variable regions V1V2 and V6. The taxonomical composition, richness and diversity of the IC microbiota were determined and compared to the microbial profile of asymptomatic healthy female (HF) urine. Results The composition and distribution of bacterial sequences differed between the urine microbiota of IC patients and HFs. Reduced sequence richness and diversity were found in IC patient urine, and a significant difference in the community structure of IC urine in relation to HF urine was observed. More than 90% of the IC sequence reads were identified as belonging to the bacterial genus Lactobacillus, a marked increase compared to 60% in HF urine. Conclusion The 16S rDNA sequence data demonstrates a shift in the composition of the bacterial community in IC urine. The reduced microbial diversity and richness is accompanied by a higher abundance of the bacterial genus Lactobacillus, compared to HF urine. This study demonstrates that high throughput sequencing analysis of urine microbiota in IC patients is a powerful tool towards a better understanding of this enigmatic disease. PMID:22974186

  6. The enteric nervous system promotes intestinal health by constraining microbiota composition.

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    Annah S Rolig

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustaining a balanced intestinal microbial community is critical for maintaining intestinal health and preventing chronic inflammation. The gut is a highly dynamic environment, subject to periodic waves of peristaltic activity. We hypothesized that this dynamic environment is a prerequisite for a balanced microbial community and that the enteric nervous system (ENS, a chief regulator of physiological processes within the gut, profoundly influences gut microbiota composition. We found that zebrafish lacking an ENS due to a mutation in the Hirschsprung disease gene, sox10, develop microbiota-dependent inflammation that is transmissible between hosts. Profiling microbial communities across a spectrum of inflammatory phenotypes revealed that increased levels of inflammation were linked to an overabundance of pro-inflammatory bacterial lineages and a lack of anti-inflammatory bacterial lineages. Moreover, either administering a representative anti-inflammatory strain or restoring ENS function corrected the pathology. Thus, we demonstrate that the ENS modulates gut microbiota community membership to maintain intestinal health.

  7. The enteric nervous system promotes intestinal health by constraining microbiota composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittge, Erika K.; Ganz, Julia; Troll, Josh V.; Melancon, Ellie; Wiles, Travis J.; Alligood, Kristin; Stephens, W. Zac; Eisen, Judith S.; Guillemin, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Sustaining a balanced intestinal microbial community is critical for maintaining intestinal health and preventing chronic inflammation. The gut is a highly dynamic environment, subject to periodic waves of peristaltic activity. We hypothesized that this dynamic environment is a prerequisite for a balanced microbial community and that the enteric nervous system (ENS), a chief regulator of physiological processes within the gut, profoundly influences gut microbiota composition. We found that zebrafish lacking an ENS due to a mutation in the Hirschsprung disease gene, sox10, develop microbiota-dependent inflammation that is transmissible between hosts. Profiling microbial communities across a spectrum of inflammatory phenotypes revealed that increased levels of inflammation were linked to an overabundance of pro-inflammatory bacterial lineages and a lack of anti-inflammatory bacterial lineages. Moreover, either administering a representative anti-inflammatory strain or restoring ENS function corrected the pathology. Thus, we demonstrate that the ENS modulates gut microbiota community membership to maintain intestinal health. PMID:28207737

  8. Dynamics of gut microbiota in autoimmune lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Husen; Liao, Xiaofeng; Sparks, Joshua B; Luo, Xin M

    2014-12-01

    Gut microbiota has been recognized as an important environmental factor in health, as well as in metabolic and immunological diseases, in which perturbation of the host gut microbiota is often observed in the diseased state. However, little is known on the role of gut microbiota in systemic lupus erythematosus. We investigated the effects of host genetics, sex, age, and dietary intervention on the gut microbiome in a murine lupus model. In young, female lupus-prone mice resembling women at childbearing age, a population with the highest risk for lupus, we found marked depletion of lactobacilli, and increases in Lachnospiraceae and overall diversity compared to age-matched healthy controls. The predicted metagenomic profile in lupus-prone mice showed a significant enrichment of bacterial motility- and sporulation-related pathways. Retinoic acid as a dietary intervention restored lactobacilli that were downregulated in lupus-prone mice, and this correlated with improved symptoms. The predicted metagenomes also showed that retinoic acid reversed many lupus-associated changes in microbial functions that deviated from the control. In addition, gut microbiota of lupus-prone mice were different between sexes, and an overrepresentation of Lachnospiraceae in females was associated with an earlier onset of and/or more severe lupus symptoms. Clostridiaceae and Lachnospiraceae, both harboring butyrate-producing genera, were more abundant in the gut of lupus-prone mice at specific time points during lupus progression. Together, our results demonstrate the dynamics of gut microbiota in murine lupus and provide evidence to suggest the use of probiotic lactobacilli and retinoic acid as dietary supplements to relieve inflammatory flares in lupus patients. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The Gut Microbiota of Rural Papua New Guineans: Composition, Diversity Patterns, and Ecological Processes

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    Inés Martínez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although recent research revealed an impact of westernization on diversity and composition of the human gut microbiota, the exact consequences on metacommunity characteristics are insufficiently understood, and the underlying ecological mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here, we have compared the fecal microbiota of adults from two non-industrialized regions in Papua New Guinea (PNG with that of United States (US residents. Papua New Guineans harbor communities with greater bacterial diversity, lower inter-individual variation, vastly different abundance profiles, and bacterial lineages undetectable in US residents. A quantification of the ecological processes that govern community assembly identified bacterial dispersal as the dominant process that shapes the microbiome in PNG but not in the US. These findings suggest that the microbiome alterations detected in industrialized societies might arise from modern lifestyle factors limiting bacterial dispersal, which has implications for human health and the development of strategies aimed to redress the impact of westernization.

  10. The Effect of Oligofructose-Enriched Inulin on Faecal Bacterial Counts and Microbiota-Associated Characteristics in Celiac Disease Children Following a Gluten-Free Diet: Results of a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarocka-Cyrta, Elżbieta; Markiewicz, Lidia Hanna

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is associated with intestinal microbiota alterations. The administration of prebiotics could be a promising method of restoring gut homeostasis in CD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prolonged oligofructose-enriched inulin (Synergy 1) administration on the characteristics and metabolism of intestinal microbiota in CD children following a gluten-free diet (GFD). Thirty-four paediatric CD patients (mean age 10 years; 62% females) on a GFD were randomized into two experimental groups receiving Synergy 1 (10 g/day) or placebo (maltodextrin; 7 g/day) for 3 months. The quantitative gut microbiota characteristics and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) concentration were analysed. In addition, side effects were monitored. Generally, the administration of Synergy 1 in a GFD did not cause any side effects. After the intervention period, Bifidobacterium count increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the Synergy 1 group. Moreover, an increase in faecal acetate and butyrate levels was observed in the prebiotic group. Consequently, total SCFA levels were 31% higher than at the baseline. The presented trial shows that Synergy 1 applied as a supplement of a GFD had a moderate effect on the qualitative characteristics of faecal microbiota, whereas it stimulated the bacterial metabolite production in CD children. PMID:29439526

  11. The Effect of Oligofructose-Enriched Inulin on Faecal Bacterial Counts and Microbiota-Associated Characteristics in Celiac Disease Children Following a Gluten-Free Diet: Results of a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabińska, Natalia; Jarocka-Cyrta, Elżbieta; Markiewicz, Lidia Hanna; Krupa-Kozak, Urszula

    2018-02-12

    Celiac disease (CD) is associated with intestinal microbiota alterations. The administration of prebiotics could be a promising method of restoring gut homeostasis in CD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prolonged oligofructose-enriched inulin (Synergy 1) administration on the characteristics and metabolism of intestinal microbiota in CD children following a gluten-free diet (GFD). Thirty-four paediatric CD patients (mean age 10 years; 62% females) on a GFD were randomized into two experimental groups receiving Synergy 1 (10 g/day) or placebo (maltodextrin; 7 g/day) for 3 months. The quantitative gut microbiota characteristics and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) concentration were analysed. In addition, side effects were monitored. Generally, the administration of Synergy 1 in a GFD did not cause any side effects. After the intervention period, Bifidobacterium count increased significantly ( p < 0.05) in the Synergy 1 group. Moreover, an increase in faecal acetate and butyrate levels was observed in the prebiotic group. Consequently, total SCFA levels were 31% higher than at the baseline. The presented trial shows that Synergy 1 applied as a supplement of a GFD had a moderate effect on the qualitative characteristics of faecal microbiota, whereas it stimulated the bacterial metabolite production in CD children.

  12. Comparative analysis of bacterial profiles in unstimulated and stimulated saliva samples

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    Daniel Belstrøm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The microbial profiles of stimulated saliva samples have been shown to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, patients with dental caries, and orally healthy individuals. Saliva was stimulated to allow for easy and rapid collection; however, microbial composition may not reflect the more natural, unstimulated state. The purpose of this study was to validate whether stimulated saliva is an adequate surrogate for unstimulated saliva in determining salivary microbiomes. Design: Unstimulated (n=20 and stimulated (n=20 saliva samples were collected from 20 orally and systemically healthy, non-smoking participants. Salivary bacterial profiles were analyzed by means of the Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing (HOMINGS, and statistical analysis was performed using Mann–Whitney test with Benjamini–Hochberg's correction for multiple comparison, cluster analysis, principal component analysis, and correspondence analysis. Results: From a total of 40 saliva samples, 496 probe targets were identified with a mean number of targets per sample of 203 (range: 146–303, and a mean number of probe targets of 206 and 200 in unstimulated and stimulated saliva samples, respectively (p=0.62. Based on all statistical methods used for this study, the microbial profiles of unstimulated and stimulated saliva samples collected from the same person were not statistically significantly different. Conclusions: Analysis of bacterial salivary profiles in unstimulated and stimulated saliva samples collected from the same individual showed comparable results. Thus, the results verify that stimulated saliva is an adequate surrogate of unstimulated saliva for microbiome-related studies.

  13. Human intestinal microbiota composition is associated with local and systemic inflammation in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdam, Froukje J; Fuentes, Susana; de Jonge, Charlotte; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Erbil, Runi; Greve, Jan Willem; Buurman, Wim A; de Vos, Willem M; Rensen, Sander S

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal microbiota have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but the mechanism remains elusive. The relationship between microbiota composition, intestinal permeability, and inflammation in nonobese and obese subjects was investigated. Fecal microbiota composition of 28 subjects (BMI 18.6-60.3 kg m(-2) ) was analyzed by a phylogenetic profiling microarray. Fecal calprotectin and plasma C-reactive protein levels were determined to evaluate intestinal and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HbA1c , and plasma levels of transaminases and lipids were analyzed. Gastroduodenal, small intestinal, and colonic permeability were assessed by a multisaccharide test. Based on microbiota composition, the study population segregated into two clusters with predominantly obese (15/19) or exclusively nonobese (9/9) subjects. Whereas intestinal permeability did not differ between clusters, the obese cluster showed reduced bacterial diversity, a decreased Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio, and an increased abundance of potential proinflammatory Proteobacteria. Interestingly, fecal calprotectin was only detectable in subjects within the obese microbiota cluster (n = 8/19, P = 0.02). Plasma C-reactive protein was also increased in these subjects (P = 0.0005), and correlated with the Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio (rs = -0.41, P = 0.03). Intestinal microbiota alterations in obese subjects are associated with local and systemic inflammation, suggesting that the obesity-related microbiota composition has a proinflammatory effect. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  14. Stool microbiota composition is associated with the prospective risk of Plasmodium falciparum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yooseph, Shibu; Kirkness, Ewen F; Tran, Tuan M; Harkins, Derek M; Jones, Marcus B; Torralba, Manolito G; O'Connell, Elise; Nutman, Thomas B; Doumbo, Safiatou; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D; Nelson, Karen E

    2015-08-22

    In humans it is unknown if the composition of the gut microbiota alters the risk of Plasmodium falciparum infection or the risk of developing febrile malaria once P. falciparum infection is established. Here we collected stool samples from a cohort composed of 195 Malian children and adults just prior to an intense P. falciparum transmission season. We assayed these samples using massively parallel sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene to identify the composition of the gut bacterial communities in these individuals. During the ensuing 6-month P. falciparum transmission season we examined the relationship between the stool microbiota composition of individuals in this cohort and their prospective risk of both P. falciparum infection and febrile malaria. Consistent with prior studies, stool microbial diversity in the present cohort increased with age, although the overall microbiota profile was distinct from cohorts in other regions of Africa, Asia and North America. Age-adjusted Cox regression analysis revealed a significant association between microbiota composition and the prospective risk of P. falciparum infection; however, no relationship was observed between microbiota composition and the risk of developing febrile malaria once P. falciparum infection was established. These findings underscore the diversity of gut microbiota across geographic regions, and suggest that strategic modulation of gut microbiota composition could decrease the risk of P. falciparum infection in malaria-endemic areas, potentially as an adjunct to partially effective malaria vaccines.

  15. Microbiota activates IMD pathway and limits Sindbis infection in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Ana Beatriz Ferreira; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara L; Talyuli, Octávio A C; Oliveira, José Henrique M; Pereira, Luiza Oliveira Ramos; Oliveira, Pedro L; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique F

    2017-02-23

    Aedes aegypti is the main vector of important arboviruses such as dengue, Zika and chikungunya. During infections mosquitoes can activate the immune pathways Toll, IMD and JAK/STAT to limit pathogen replication. Here, we evaluate the immune response profile of Ae. aegypti against Sindbis virus (SINV). We analyzed gene expression of components of Toll, IMD and JAK/STAT pathways and showed that a blood meal and virus infection upregulated aaREL2 in a microbiota-dependent fashion, since this induction was prevented by antibiotic. The presence of the microbiota activates IMD and impaired the replication of SINV in the midgut. Constitutive activation of the IMD pathway, by Caspar depletion, leads to a decrease in microbiota levels and an increase in SINV loads. Together, these results suggest that a blood meal is able to activate innate immune pathways, through a nutrient induced growth of microbiota, leading to upregulation of aaREL2 and IMD activation. Microbiota levels seemed to have a reciprocal interaction, where the proliferation of the microbiota activates IMD pathway that in turn controls bacterial levels, allowing SINV replication in Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. The activation of the IMD pathway seems to have an indirect effect in SINV levels that is induced by the microbiota.

  16. High-resolution bacterial 16S rRNA gene profile meta-analysis and biofilm status reveal common colorectal cancer consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Julia L; White, James R; Dejea, Christine M; Fathi, Payam; Iyadorai, Thevambiga; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Roslani, April C; Wick, Elizabeth C; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Loke, Mun Fai; Thulasi, Kumar; Gan, Han Ming; Goh, Khean Lee; Chong, Hoong Yin; Kumar, Sandip; Wanyiri, Jane W; Sears, Cynthia L

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common cancer worldwide, with a growing incidence among young adults. Multiple studies have presented associations between the gut microbiome and CRC, suggesting a link with cancer risk. Although CRC microbiome studies continue to profile larger patient cohorts with increasingly economical and rapid DNA sequencing platforms, few common associations with CRC have been identified, in part due to limitations in taxonomic resolution and differences in analysis methodologies. Complementing these taxonomic studies is the newly recognized phenomenon that bacterial organization into biofilm structures in the mucus layer of the gut is a consistent feature of right-sided (proximal), but not left-sided (distal) colorectal cancer. In the present study, we performed 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and biofilm quantification in a new cohort of patients from Malaysia, followed by a meta-analysis of eleven additional publicly available data sets on stool and tissue-based CRC microbiota using Resphera Insight, a high-resolution analytical tool for species-level characterization. Results from the Malaysian cohort and the expanded meta-analysis confirm that CRC tissues are enriched for invasive biofilms (particularly on right-sided tumors), a symbiont with capacity for tumorigenesis ( Bacteroides fragilis ), and oral pathogens including Fusobacterium nucleatum , Parvimonas micra , and Peptostreptococcus stomatis . Considered in aggregate, species from the Human Oral Microbiome Database are highly enriched in CRC. Although no detected microbial feature was universally present, their substantial overlap and combined prevalence supports a role for the gut microbiota in a significant percentage (>80%) of CRC cases.

  17. Community level physiological profiles of bacterial communities inhabiting uranium mining impacted sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenarova, Anelia; Radeva, Galina; Traykov, Ivan; Boteva, Silvena

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial activity and physiological diversity were characterized in mining and milling impacted soils collected from three abandoned uranium mine sites, Senokos, Buhovo and Sliven, using bacterial dehydrogenase activity and Biolog (EcoPlate) tests. The elemental composition of soils revealed high levels of uranium and heavy metals (sum of technogenic coefficients of contamination; TCC(sum) pollution as follows: Sliven (uranium - 374 mg/kg; TCC(sum) - 23.40) >Buhovo (uranium - 139.20mg/kg; TCC(sum) - 3.93) >Senokos (uranium - 23.01 mg/kg; TCC(sum) - 0.86). The physiological profiles of the bacterial community level were site specific, and indicated intensive utilization of polyols, carbohydrates and carboxylic acids in low and medium polluted environments, and i-erithrytol and 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid in the highly polluted environment of Sliven waste pile. Enzymes which take part in the biodegradation of recalcitrant substances were more resistant to pollution than these from the pathways of the easily degradable carbon sources. The Shannon index indicated that the physiological diversity of bacteria was site specific but not in line with the levels of pollution. A general tendency of increasing the importance of the number of utilizable substrates to bacterial physiological diversity was observed at less polluted sites, whereas in highly polluted sites the evenness of substrate utilization rate was more significant. Dehydrogenase activity was highest in Senokos upper soil layer and positively correlated (puranium and heavy metals toxicity. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Temporal analysis of the effect of extruded flaxseed on the swine gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B; Baurhoo, Bushansingh; Chénier, Martin R

    2014-10-01

    Flaxseed is a rich source of α-linolenic acid, an essential ω-3 fatty acid reported to have beneficial health effects in humans. Feeding swine a diet supplemented with flaxseed has been found to enrich pork products with ω-3 fatty acids. However, the effect of flaxseed supplementation on the swine gut microbiota has not been assessed to date. The purpose of this study was to investigate if extruded flaxseed has any impact on the bacterial and archaeal microbiota in the feces of growing-finishing pigs over a 51-day period, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR. Bacterial DGGE profile analysis revealed major temporal shifts in the bacterial microbiota with only minor ones related to diet. The archaeal microbiota was significantly less diverse than that of Bacteria. The majority of bacterial DGGE bands sequenced belonged to the Firmicutes phylum while the archaeal DGGE bands were found to consist of only 2 species, Methanobrevibacter smithii and Methanosphaera stadtmanae. The abundance of Bacteroidetes decreased significantly from day 0 to day 21 in all diet groups while the abundance of Firmicutes was relatively stable across all diet cohorts and sampling times. There was also no significant correlation between pig mass and the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes. While the addition of extruded flaxseed to the feed of growing-finishing pigs was beneficial for improving ω-3 fatty acid content of pork, it had no detectable impact on the fecal bacterial and archaeal microbiota, suggesting that extruded flaxseed may be used to improve meat quality without adverse effect on the swine gut microbiota or animal performance.

  19. Characterization of depth-related changes in bacterial community compositions and functions of a paddy soil profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Sheng, Xiafang; He, Linyan; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Zhendong

    2013-10-01

    Depth-related changes in bacterial community structures and functions were analyzed in a paddy soil profile using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and a metabolic profiling technique (BIOLOG ECO plates). Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to analyze the correlations between the relative abundance of bacterial groups and soil-available elements. DGGE and sequencing analysis revealed 12 classes and one unknown bacterial group. At the family level, Comamonadaceae and Moraxellaceae dominated through the soil profile, while Acidobacteriaceae and Nitrospiraceae dominated in the deepest layer. In addition, Streptococcaceae dominated and was only observed in the deeper layers. Metabolic profiles revealed the greatest carbon source utilization capacity in the surface layer, and no significant differences between upper and deeper soil layers. The carbon sources utilized by microorganisms were different among the different layers. CCA indicated that soil-available Mn, Ca, Cu, Al, and K concentrations were positively correlated with the relative abundance of Comamonadaceae, Moraxellaceae, Streptococcaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Nocardioidaceae, and Nitrospiraceae in the profile. The results showed that the paddy soil profile harbored diverse bacterial communities and experienced depth-related changes in community structure and carbon source utilization. The bacterial communities and functions might be shaped by the soil edaphic characteristics along the soil profile. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modulation of the Bifidobacterial Communities of the Dog Microbiota by Zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbioni, Alberto; Ferrario, Chiara; Milani, Christian; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Riccardi, Enzo; Di Ianni, Francesco; Beretti, Valentino; Superchi, Paola; Ossiprandi, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    During last decades canine health and well being is becoming an important issue for human owners. In dogs, several factors including diet, pathogenic bacterial and stress conditions can affect the composition of the gut microbiota. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dietary chabazitic zeolitite (CZ) supplementation on the contribution of bifidobacteria to the fecal microbiota in training hunting dogs. Fecal microbiota cataloging based on 16S rRNA microbial profiling analyses highlighted an increase of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in animals treated with CZ, with a simultaneous decrease of pathogens associated with dog gastrointestinal infections, such as Klebsiella and Enterobacter . A detailed profiling of the bifidobacterial population of dogs receiving CZ based on the ITS-based sequencing approach, revealed an enhancement bifidobacterial of species typical of animals such as Bifidobacterium animalis and B. pseudolongum . Moreover, these analyses identified the occurrence of putative new bifidobacterial taxa in both treated and untreated samples.

  1. [Surveillance of antibiotic utilization and bacterial resistance profiles in tertiary level hospitals in Mexico City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides-Plascencia, Lilia; Aldama-Ojeda, Alejandro Leonardo; Javier Vázquez, Héctor

    2005-01-01

    To identify the levels of antibiotic utilization and the resistance profiles of nosocomial bacteria, as well as the strategies to diminish resistance to antibiotics. A descriptive, retrospective (1994-1995) study was conducted in six tertiary level hospitals in Mexico City. A total of 86% antibiotic resistance was observed in these hospitals. The overall consumption of antibiotics per hospital ranged between 44 and 195 Defined Daily Doses/100 day-beds. We identified the components to frame an integral surveillance system aimed at improving the use of antibiotics and the quality of the bacterial resistance assessment in these hospitals.

  2. Interactions between Innate Immunity, Microbiota, and Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    GianMarco Giorgetti; Giovanni Brandimarte; Federica Fabiocchi; Salvatore Ricci; Paolo Flamini; Giancarlo Sandri; Maria Cristina Trotta; Walter Elisei; Antonio Penna; Piera Giuseppina Lecca; Marcello Picchio; Antonio Tursi

    2015-01-01

    The term ?microbiota? means genetic inheritance associated with microbiota, which is about 100 times larger than the guest. The tolerance of the resident bacterial flora is an important key element of immune cell function. A key role in the interaction between the host and the microbiota is played by Paneth cell, which is able to synthesize and secrete proteins and antimicrobial peptides, such as ?/? defensins, cathelicidin, 14 ?-glycosidases, C-type lectins, and ribonuclease, in response to ...

  3. How deep is deep enough for RNA-Seq profiling of bacterial transcriptomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haas Brian J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput sequencing of cDNA libraries (RNA-Seq has proven to be a highly effective approach for studying bacterial transcriptomes. A central challenge in designing RNA-Seq-based experiments is estimating a priori the number of reads per sample needed to detect and quantify thousands of individual transcripts with a large dynamic range of abundance. Results We have conducted a systematic examination of how changes in the number of RNA-Seq reads per sample influences both profiling of a single bacterial transcriptome and the comparison of gene expression among samples. Our findings suggest that the number of reads typically produced in a single lane of the Illumina HiSeq sequencer far exceeds the number needed to saturate the annotated transcriptomes of diverse bacteria growing in monoculture. Moreover, as sequencing depth increases, so too does the detection of cDNAs that likely correspond to spurious transcripts or genomic DNA contamination. Finally, even when dozens of barcoded individual cDNA libraries are sequenced in a single lane, the vast majority of transcripts in each sample can be detected and numerous genes differentially expressed between samples can be identified. Conclusions Our analysis provides a guide for the many researchers seeking to determine the appropriate sequencing depth for RNA-Seq-based studies of diverse bacterial species.

  4. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Quach

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP, which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and -resistant (MRSA clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71 within 1–2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS S. aureus strains (n = 20 within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice.

  5. Timing of food intake impacts daily rhythms of human salivary microbiota: a randomized, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, María Carmen; Engen, Phillip A; Bandín, Cristina; Cabrera-Rubio, Raúl; Voigt, Robin M; Green, Stefan J; Naqib, Ankur; Keshavarzian, Ali; Scheer, Frank A J L; Garaulet, Marta

    2018-01-05

    The composition of the diet (what we eat) has been widely related to the microbiota profile. However, whether the timing of food consumption (when we eat) influences microbiota in humans is unknown. A randomized, crossover study was performed in 10 healthy normal-weight young women to test the effect of the timing of food intake on the human microbiota in the saliva and fecal samples. More specifically, to determine whether eating late alters daily rhythms of human salivary microbiota, we interrogated salivary microbiota in samples obtained at 4 specific time points over 24 h, to achieve a better understanding of the relationship between food timing and metabolic alterations in humans. Results revealed significant diurnal rhythms in salivary diversity and bacterial relative abundance ( i.e., TM7 and Fusobacteria) across both early and late eating conditions. More importantly, meal timing affected diurnal rhythms in diversity of salivary microbiota toward an inverted rhythm between the eating conditions, and eating late increased the number of putative proinflammatory taxa, showing a diurnal rhythm in the saliva. In a randomized, crossover study, we showed for the first time the impact of the timing of food intake on human salivary microbiota. Eating the main meal late inverts the daily rhythm of salivary microbiota diversity which may have a deleterious effect on the metabolism of the host.-Collado, M. C., Engen, P. A., Bandín, C., Cabrera-Rubio, R., Voigt, R. M., Green, S. J., Naqib, A., Keshavarzian, A., Scheer, F. A. J. L., Garaulet, M. Timing of food intake impacts daily rhythms of human salivary microbiota: a randomized, crossover study.

  6. Differential susceptibility to colorectal cancer due to naturally occurring gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Aaron C; Akter, Sadia; Hanson, Marina M; Busi, Susheel B; Parker, Taybor W; Schehr, Rebecca J; Hankins, Miriam A; Ahner, Carin E; Davis, Justin W; Franklin, Craig L; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Bryda, Elizabeth C

    2015-10-20

    Recent studies investigating the human microbiome have identified particular bacterial species that correlate with the presence of colorectal cancer. To evaluate the role of qualitatively different but naturally occurring gut microbiota and the relationship with colorectal cancer development, genetically identical embryos from the Polyposis in Rat Colon (Pirc) rat model of colorectal cancer were transferred into recipients of three different genetic backgrounds (F344/NHsd, LEW/SsNHsd, and Crl:SD). Tumor development in the pups was tracked longitudinally via colonoscopy, and end-stage tumor burden was determined. To confirm vertical transmission and identify associations between the gut microbiota and disease phenotype, the fecal microbiota was characterized in recipient dams 24 hours pre-partum, and in Pirc rat offspring prior to and during disease progression. Our data show that the gut microbiota varies between rat strains, with LEW/SsNHsd having a greater relative abundance of the bacteria Prevotella copri. The mature gut microbiota of pups resembled the profile of their dams, indicating that the dam is the primary determinant of the developing microbiota. Both male and female F344-Pirc rats harboring the Lewis microbiota had decreased tumor burden relative to genetically identical rats harboring F344 or SD microbiota. Significant negative correlations were detected between tumor burden and the relative abundance of specific taxa from samples taken at weaning and shortly thereafter, prior to observable adenoma development. Notably, this naturally occurring variation in the gut microbiota is associated with a significant difference in severity of colorectal cancer, and the abundance of certain taxa is associated with decreased tumor burden.

  7. Exploring the Impacts of Postharvest Processing on the Microbiota and Metabolite Profiles during Green Coffee Bean Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruyn, Florac; Zhang, Sophia Jiyuan; Pothakos, Vasileios; Torres, Julio; Lambot, Charles; Moroni, Alice V; Callanan, Michael; Sybesma, Wilbert; Weckx, Stefan; De Vuyst, Luc

    2017-01-01

    The postharvest treatment and processing of fresh coffee cherries can impact the quality of the unroasted green coffee beans. In the present case study, freshly harvested Arabica coffee cherries were processed through two different wet and dry methods to monitor differences in the microbial community structure and in substrate and metabolite profiles. The changes were followed throughout the postharvest processing chain, from harvest to drying, by implementing up-to-date techniques, encompassing multiple-step metagenomic DNA extraction, high-throughput sequencing, and multiphasic metabolite target analysis. During wet processing, a cohort of lactic acid bacteria (i.e., Leuconostoc, Lactococcus, and Lactobacillus) was the most commonly identified microbial group, along with enterobacteria and yeasts (Pichia and Starmerella). Several of the metabolites associated with lactic acid bacterial metabolism (e.g., lactic acid, acetic acid, and mannitol) produced in the mucilage were also found in the endosperm. During dry processing, acetic acid bacteria (i.e., Acetobacter and Gluconobacter) were most abundant, along with Pichia and non-Pichia (Candida, Starmerella, and Saccharomycopsis) yeasts. Accumulation of associated metabolites (e.g., gluconic acid and sugar alcohols) took place in the drying outer layers of the coffee cherries. Consequently, both wet and dry processing methods significantly influenced the microbial community structures and hence the composition of the final green coffee beans. This systematic approach to dissecting the coffee ecosystem contributes to a deeper understanding of coffee processing and might constitute a state-of-the-art framework for the further analysis and subsequent control of this complex biotechnological process. Coffee production is a long process, starting with the harvest of coffee cherries and the on-farm drying of their beans. In a later stage, the dried green coffee beans are roasted and ground in order to brew a cup of coffee

  8. Saccharin induced liver inflammation in mice by altering the gut microbiota and its metabolic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xiaoming; Tu, Pengcheng; Chi, Liang; Gao, Bei; Ru, Hongyu; Lu, Kun

    2017-09-01

    Maintaining the balance of the gut microbiota and its metabolic functions is vital for human health, however, this balance can be disrupted by various external factors including food additives. A range of food and beverages are sweetened by saccharin, which is generally considered to be safe despite controversial debates. However, recent studies indicated that saccharin perturbed the gut microbiota. Inflammation is frequently associated with disruptions of the gut microbiota. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between host inflammation and perturbed gut microbiome by saccharin. C57BL/6J male mice were treated with saccharin in drinking water for six months. Q-PCR was used to detect inflammatory markers in mouse liver, while 16S rRNA gene sequencing and metabolomics were used to reveal changes of the gut microbiota and its metabolomic profiles. Elevated expression of pro-inflammatory iNOS and TNF-α in liver indicated that saccharin induced inflammation in mice. The altered gut bacterial genera, enriched orthologs of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as LPS and bacterial toxins, in concert with increased pro-inflammatory metabolites suggested that the saccharin-induced liver inflammation could be associated with the perturbation of the gut microbiota and its metabolic functions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The role of the intestinal microbiota in pneumonia and sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Lankelma, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Humans carry with them trillions of bacteria, viruses and fungi that are collectively called the human microbiota. The intestinal microbiota fulfills essential functions in human physiology and has recently been suggested as a potential therapeutic target for several diseases. This thesis focuses on the role of the intestinal microbiota in pneumonia and sepsis. Our main hypothesis was that the gut microbiota plays a protective role in innate host defenses against systemic bacterial infections...

  10. A safflower oil-based high fat/high-sucrose diet modulates the gut microbiota and liver phospholipid profiles associated with early glucose intolerance in the absence of tissue inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos; Andersen, Daniel; Radulescu, Ilinca Daria

    2017-01-01

    acid and arachidonic acid in hepatic phospholipids. Intake of the HF/HS diet resulted in early changes in the gut microbiota, including an increased abundance of Blautia, while late changes coincided with altered inflammatory profiles and increased fasting plasma insulin. Analysis of immune cells...... in visceral fat and liver revealed no differences between diets before week 40, where the number of immune cells decreased in the liver of HF/HS-fed mice. We suggest that a diet-dependent increase in the n-6 to n-3 PUFA ratio in hepatic phospholipids together with gut microbiota changes contributed to early...

  11. Bacterial profile of aggressive periodontitis in Morocco: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahboun, Hanane; Arnau, Maria Minguez; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano; Ennibi, Oum Keltoum

    2015-02-24

    Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is one of the most severe forms of periodontal diseases. In Morocco, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been strongly associated with AgP, however limited knowledge is available about the implication of other periodontal pathogens in this entity. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to evaluate the composition of the subgingival microbiota in Moroccan patients with AgP. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from 50 aggressive, 13 localized and 37 generalized periodontitis patients. Samples from 20 chronic periodontitis (ChP) patients were taken as controls. Samples collected from the four deepest periodontal pockets in each patient were pooled in pre-reduced transport fluid and examined by culture. A. actinomycetemcomitans was significantly more frequent (p = 0.004) in generalised AgP compared to ChP, and Porphyromonas gingivalis was less prevalent in localized AgP, when compared with generalized AgP (p = 0.040) or ChP (p = 0.016). Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Tannerella forsythia were also frequently detected in all groups. Mean proportions of A. actinomycetemcomitans were significantly higher in AgP groups, when compared to ChP, and generalized AgP patients harbored significantly higher proportions of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia, when compared to localized AgP or ChP. A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, P. intermedia and F. nucleatum were frequently detected in this Moroccan population with AgP. Differences in frequency of detection, counts and proportions of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia suggests the presence of distinct microbiological profiles for localized AgP, generalized AgP and ChP patients.

  12. Inonotus obliquus polysaccharide regulates gut microbiota of chronic pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Teng, Chunying; Yu, Sumei; Wang, Xin; Liang, Jinsong; Bai, Xin; Dong, Liying; Song, Tao; Yu, Min; Qu, Juanjuan

    2017-12-01

    Polysaccharide is efficient in attenuation of metabolic ailments and modulation of gut microbiota as prebiotics. The therapeutic effect of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharide (IOP) on chronic pancreatitis (CP) in mice has been validated in our previous study. However, it is not clear whether IOP is conducive to maintaining the homeostasis between gut microbiota and host. The aim of this study is to testify the potential effects of IOP on gut microbiota composition and diversity in mice with CP. The changes in glutathione peroxidase (GSH-P X ), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), lipase and trypsin levels were measured by commercial assay kits, meanwhile the gut microbiota composition and diversity were analyzed by high throughput sequencing. The IOP treatment increased GSH-P X and TAOC levels, and decreased TNF-α, TGF-β, lipase and trypsin levels in CP mice. It was also observed that gut microbiota in IOP treated groups were less diverse than others in terms of lower Shannon diversity index and Chao 1 estimator. IOP increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and decreased that of Firmicutes at phylum level. Bacteroidetes was found positively correlated with GSH-P X and TAOC, and Firmicutes correlated with TNF-α, TGF-β, and lipase. In conclusion, administration of IOP could regulate gut microbiota composition and diversity to a healthy profile in mice with CP, and some bacterial phylum significantly correlated with characteristic parameters.

  13. Variations in bacterial and fungal community composition along the soil depth profiles determined by pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, D.; Yoo, G.; Jun, S. C.; Yun, S. T.; Chung, H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microorganisms play key roles in nutrient cycling, and are distributed throughout the soil profile. Currently, there is little information about the characteristics of the microbial communities along the soil depth because most studies focus on microorganisms inhabiting the soil surface. To better understand the functions and composition of microbial communities and the biogeochemical factors that shape them at different soil depth, we analyzed soil microbial activities and bacterial and fungal community composition in a soil profile of a fallow field located in central Korea. Soil samples were taken using 120-cm soil cores. To analyze the composition of bacterial and fungal communities, barcoded pyrosequnecing analysis of 16S rRNA genes (bacteria) and ITS region (fungi) was conducted. Among the bacterial groups, the abundance of Proteobacteria (38.5, 23.2, 23.3, 26.1 and 17.5%, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively) and Firmicutes (12.8, 11.3, 8.6, 4.3 and 0.4%, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively) decreased with soil depth. On the other hand, the abundance of Ascomycota (51.2, 48.6, 65.7, 46.1, and 45.7%, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively), a dominant fungal group at this site, showed no significant difference along the soil profile. To examine the vertical difference of microbial activities, activity of five extracellular enzymes that take part in cycling of C, N, and P in soil ecosystems, beta-1,4-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-1,4-xylosidase, beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase were analyzed. The soil enzyme activity declined with soil depth. For example, acid phosphatase activity was 88.5 (± 14.6 (± 1 SE)), 30.0 (± 5.9), 18.0 (± 3.5), 14.1 (± 3.7), and 10.7 (± 3.8) nmol g-1 hr-1, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively. These metagenomics studies, along with other studies on microbial functions, are expected to enhance our understanding on the complexity of

  14. Deviations in human gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casén, C; Vebø, H C; Sekelja, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dysbiosis is associated with many diseases, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), obesity and diabetes. Potential clinical impact of imbalance in the intestinal microbiota suggests need for new standardised diagnostic methods to facilitate...... microbiome profiling. AIM: To develop and validate a novel diagnostic test using faecal samples to profile the intestinal microbiota and identify and characterise dysbiosis. METHODS: Fifty-four DNA probes targeting ≥300 bacteria on different taxonomic levels were selected based on ability to distinguish......-determined highly relevant bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: The GA-map Dysbiosis Test identifies and characterises dysbiosis in IBS and IBD patients, and provides insight into a patient's intestinal microbiota. Evaluating microbiota as a diagnostic strategy may allow monitoring of prescribed treatment regimens...

  15. Microbiota and probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Corpino

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbiota, the collection of microorganisms peacefully coexisting with their human host, colonize virtually every surface of the human body exposed to the external environment. The complex community of microorganisms living in the digestive tract, the gut microbiota, is determined by the delivery mode, prematurity, sex, genetics and subsequent environmental exposures (diet, drugs. It has also been claimed that the constant interaction between the host and the gut microbiota influences the health of the host. Probiotics are defined as live non-pathogenic microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts can replicate and colonize in sufficient numbers the gastrointestinal tract. This is the main reason for the use of probiotics in different clinical settings where they may act as biomodulators of the intestinal microbiota. The therapeutic efficacy of probiotics has been evaluated in randomized controlled trials for various diseases. In this paper, the usage and the efficacy of probiotics in different conditions like necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, diarrhea, functional gastrointestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, allergies are analyzed.The usefulness of a probiotic treatment is affected by many factors including: bacterial strain, duration of administration, disease and age and not all products marketed as probiotics provide the same safety and efficacy. Therefore, comparative studies to assess the most effective formulations, timing and the optimal length of therapy are mandatory.

  16. Gut Microbiota and Energy Expenditure in Health and Obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Guido J.; Zhao, Jing; Herrema, Hilde; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of intestinal bacterial strains (gut microbiota) to the development of obesity and obesity-related disorders is increasingly recognized as a potential diagnostic and pharmacologic target. Alterations in the intestinal bacterial composition have been associated with presence of

  17. Composition and abundance of microbiota in the pharynx in patients with laryngeal carcinoma and vocal cord polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hongli; Wang, Boyan; Shi, Yi; Shi, Yong; Xiao, Xiyan; Cao, Pengyu; Tao, Lei; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhou, Liang

    2017-08-01

    The pharynx is an important site of microbiota colonization, but the bacterial populations at this site have been relatively unexplored by culture-independent approaches. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbiota structure of the pharynx. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries was used to characterize the pharyngeal microbiota using swab samples from 68 subjects with laryngeal cancer and 28 subjects with vocal cord polyps. Overall, the major phylum was Firmicutes, with Streptococcus as the predominant genus in the pharyngeal communities. Nine core operational taxonomic units detected from Streptococcus, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, Granulicatella, and Veillonella accounted for 21.3% of the total sequences detected. However, there was no difference in bacterial communities in the pharynx from patients with laryngeal cancer and vocal cord polyps. The relative abundance of Firmicutes was inversely correlated with Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The correlation was evident at the genus level, and the relative abundance of Streptococcus was inversely associated with Fusobacterium, Leptotrichia, Neisseria, Actinomyces, and Prevotella. This study presented a profile for the overall structure of the microbiota in pharyngeal swab samples. Inverse correlations were found between Streptococcus and other bacterial communities, suggesting that potential antagonism may exist among pharyngeal microbiota.

  18. Microarray analysis reveals marked intestinal microbiota aberrancy in infants having eczema compared to healthy children in at-risk for atopic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nylund Lotta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deviations in composition and diversity of intestinal microbiota in infancy have been associated with both the development and recurrence of atopic eczema. Thus, we decided to use a deep and global microarray-based method to characterize the diversity and temporal changes of the intestinal microbiota in infancy and to define specific bacterial signatures associated with eczema. Faecal microbiota at 6 and 18 months of age were analysed from 34 infants (15 with eczema and 19 healthy controls selected from a prospective follow-up study based on the availability of faecal samples. The infants were originally randomized to receive either Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG or placebo. Results Children with eczema harboured a more diverse total microbiota than control subjects as assessed by the Simpson’s reciprocal diversity index of the microarray profiles. Composition of the microbiota did not differ between study groups at age of 6 months, but was significantly different at age of 18 months as assessed by MCPP (p=0.01. At this age healthy children harboured 3 -fold greater amount of members of the Bacteroidetes (p=0.01. Microbiota of children suffering from eczema had increased abundance of the Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa, which are typically abundant in adults. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supplementation in early infancy was observed to have minor long-term effects on the microbiota composition. Conclusion A diverse and adult-type microbiota in early childhood is associated with eczema and it may contribute to the perpetuation of eczema.

  19. Gut Microbiota-Immune System Crosstalk and Pancreatic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pagliari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota is key to the development and modulation of the mucosal immune system. It plays a central role in several physiological functions, in the modulation of inflammatory signaling and in the protection against infections. In healthy states, there is a perfect balance between commensal and pathogens, and microbiota and the immune system interact to maintain gut homeostasis. The alteration of such balance, called dysbiosis, determines an intestinal bacterial overgrowth which leads to the disruption of the intestinal barrier with systemic translocation of pathogens. The pancreas does not possess its own microbiota, and it is believed that inflammatory and neoplastic processes affecting the gland may be linked to intestinal dysbiosis. Increasing research evidence testifies a correlation between intestinal dysbiosis and various pancreatic disorders, but it remains unclear whether dysbiosis is the cause or an effect. The analysis of specific alterations in the microbiome profile may permit to develop novel tools for the early detection of several pancreatic disorders, utilizing samples, such as blood, saliva, and stools. Future studies will have to elucidate the mechanisms by which gut microbiota is modulated and how it tunes the immune system, in order to be able to develop innovative treatment strategies for pancreatic disorders.

  20. The impact of freeze-drying infant fecal samples on measures of their bacterial community profiles and milk-derived oligosaccharide content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Zachery T; Davis, Jasmine C C; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Mills, David A

    2016-01-01

    Infant fecal samples are commonly studied to investigate the impacts of breastfeeding on the development of the microbiota and subsequent health effects. Comparisons of infants living in different geographic regions and environmental contexts are needed to aid our understanding of evolutionarily-selected milk adaptations. However, the preservation of fecal samples from individuals in remote locales until they can be processed can be a challenge. Freeze-drying (lyophilization) offers a cost-effective way to preserve some biological samples for transport and analysis at a later date. Currently, it is unknown what, if any, biases are introduced into various analyses by the freeze-drying process. Here, we investigated how freeze-drying affected analysis of two relevant and intertwined aspects of infant fecal samples, marker gene amplicon sequencing of the bacterial community and the fecal oligosaccharide profile (undigested human milk oligosaccharides). No differences were discovered between the fecal oligosaccharide profiles of wet and freeze-dried samples. The marker gene sequencing data showed an increase in proportional representation of Bacteriodes and a decrease in detection of bifidobacteria and members of class Bacilli after freeze-drying. This sample treatment bias may possibly be related to the cell morphology of these different taxa (Gram status). However, these effects did not overwhelm the natural variation among individuals, as the community data still strongly grouped by subject and not by freeze-drying status. We also found that compensating for sample concentration during freeze-drying, while not necessary, was also not detrimental. Freeze-drying may therefore be an acceptable method of sample preservation and mass reduction for some studies of microbial ecology and milk glycan analysis.

  1. The impact of freeze-drying infant fecal samples on measures of their bacterial community profiles and milk-derived oligosaccharide content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachery T. Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infant fecal samples are commonly studied to investigate the impacts of breastfeeding on the development of the microbiota and subsequent health effects. Comparisons of infants living in different geographic regions and environmental contexts are needed to aid our understanding of evolutionarily-selected milk adaptations. However, the preservation of fecal samples from individuals in remote locales until they can be processed can be a challenge. Freeze-drying (lyophilization offers a cost-effective way to preserve some biological samples for transport and analysis at a later date. Currently, it is unknown what, if any, biases are introduced into various analyses by the freeze-drying process. Here, we investigated how freeze-drying affected analysis of two relevant and intertwined aspects of infant fecal samples, marker gene amplicon sequencing of the bacterial community and the fecal oligosaccharide profile (undigested human milk oligosaccharides. No differences were discovered between the fecal oligosaccharide profiles of wet and freeze-dried samples. The marker gene sequencing data showed an increase in proportional representation of Bacteriodes and a decrease in detection of bifidobacteria and members of class Bacilli after freeze-drying. This sample treatment bias may possibly be related to the cell morphology of these different taxa (Gram status. However, these effects did not overwhelm the natural variation among individuals, as the community data still strongly grouped by subject and not by freeze-drying status. We also found that compensating for sample concentration during freeze-drying, while not necessary, was also not detrimental. Freeze-drying may therefore be an acceptable method of sample preservation and mass reduction for some studies of microbial ecology and milk glycan analysis.

  2. Deep sequencing of the vaginal microbiota of women with HIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.S. Hummelen (Ruben); A.D. Fernandes (Andrew); J.M. Macklaim (Jean); R.J. Dickson (Russell); J. Changalucha (John); G.B. Gloor (Gregory); G.K. Reid (Gregor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground:Women living with HIV and co-infected with bacterial vaginosis (BV) are at higher risk for transmitting HIV to a partner or newborn. It is poorly understood which bacterial communities constitute BV or the normal vaginal microbiota among this population and how the microbiota

  3. Variation in the gut microbiota of laboratory mice is related to both genetic and environmental factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hufeldt, Majbritt Ravn; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2010-01-01

    and reducing GM variation between laboratory animals may provide more consistent models. Both genetic and environmental aspects influence the composition of the GM and may vary between laboratory animal breeding centers and within an individual breeding center. This study investigated the variation in cecal......During recent years, the composition of the gut microbiota (GM) has received increasing attention as a factor in the development of experimental inflammatory disease in animal models. Because increased variation in the GM might lead to increased variation in disease parameters, determining...... microbiota in 8-wk-old NMRI and C57BL/6 mice by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to profile PCR-derived amplicons from bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Comparison of the cecal microbiotas revealed that the similarity index of the inbred C57BL/6Sca strain was 10% higher than that of the outbred Sca...

  4. Pyrosequencing analysis of the human microbiota of healthy Chinese undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Elucidating the biogeography of bacterial communities on the human body is critical for establishing healthy baselines from which to detect differences associated with disease; however, little is known about the baseline bacterial profiles from various human habitats of healthy Chinese undergraduates. Results Using parallel barcoded 454 pyrosequencing targeting on the 16S rRNA gene V3 region, the bacterial diversity of the nasopharynx, saliva, dominant hands, and feces were investigated from 10 healthy Chinese junior boarding undergraduates at Zhejiang University. The participants were 21–24 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) undergraduates. Our data represent an important step for determining the diversity of Chinese healthy microbiota, and can be used for more large-scale studies that focus on the interactions between healthy and diseases states for young Chinese adults in the same age range. PMID:23758874

  5. Modulating the Gut Microbiota Improves Glucose Tolerance, Lipoprotein Profile and Atherosclerotic Plaque Development in ApoE-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Rune

    Full Text Available The importance of the gut microbiota (GM in disease development has recently received increased attention, and numerous approaches have been made to better understand this important interplay. For example, metabolites derived from the GM have been shown to promote atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD, and to increase CVD risk factors. Popular interest in the role of the intestine in a variety of disease states has now resulted in a significant proportion of individuals without coeliac disease switching to gluten-free diets. The effect of gluten-free diets on atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk factors is largely unknown. We therefore investigated the effect of a gluten-free high-fat cholesterol-rich diet, as compared to the same diet in which the gluten peptide gliadin had been added back, on atherosclerosis and several cardiovascular risk factors in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe-/- mice. The gluten-free diet transiently altered GM composition in these mice, as compared to the gliadin-supplemented diet, but did not alter body weights, glucose tolerance, insulin levels, plasma lipids, or atherosclerosis. In parallel, other Apoe-/- mice fed the same diets were treated with ampicillin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic known to affect GM composition. Ampicillin-treatment had a marked and sustained effect on GM composition, as expected. Furthermore, although ampicillin-treated mice were slightly heavier than controls, ampicillin-treatment transiently improved glucose tolerance both in the absence or presence of gliadin, reduced plasma LDL and VLDL cholesterol levels, and reduced aortic atherosclerotic lesion area. These results demonstrate that a gluten-free diet does not seem to have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis or several CVD risk factors in this mouse model, but that sustained alteration of GM composition with a broad-spectrum antibiotic has beneficial effects on CVD risk factors and atherosclerosis

  6. Effects of hybrid and bacterial inoculation on fermentation quality and fatty acid profile of barley silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyeon; Amanullah, Sadar M; Lee, Hyuk Jun; Joo, Young Ho; Han, Ouk Kyu; Adesogan, Adegbola T; Kim, Sam Churl

    2018-01-01

    This study estimated the effects of hybrid and bacterial inoculant on fermentation quality and fatty acid profile of barley silages. Yuyeon (Silkless) and Youngyang (Silking) barley hybrids were harvested at 24.9 and 27.1% dry matter, respectively, and chopped to 10 cm lengths. Each hybrid was treated with or without an inoculant (2 × 10 4  colony-forming units/g of Lactobacillus plantarum). A total of 48 silos were prepared in an experiment with a 2 × 2 (hybrid × inoculant) treatment arrangement with four replications and three ensiling durations (2, 7 and 100 days). After 100 days of ensiling, Yuyeon silage had higher (P hybrids and increased (P hybrid might have better potential benefits on animal performances due to its smooth awn and silkless nature, and higher in vitro dry matter digestibility. Its higher C18:3n-3 would be better for improving fatty acid profile of meat or milk than Youngyang hybrid. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. Dietary supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy: outcome on vaginal microbiota and cytokine secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitali Beatrice

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vaginal microbiota of healthy women consists of a wide variety of anaerobic and aerobic bacterial genera and species dominated by the genus Lactobacillus. The activity of lactobacilli helps to maintain the natural healthy balance of the vaginal microbiota. This role is particularly important during pregnancy because vaginal dismicrobism is one of the most important mechanisms for preterm birth and perinatal complications. In the present study, we characterized the impact of a dietary supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3, a mixture of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Streptococcus strains, on the vaginal microbiota and immunological profiles of healthy women during late pregnancy. Results An association between the oral intake of the probiotic VSL#3 and changes in the composition of the vaginal microbiota of pregnant women was revealed by PCR-DGGE population profiling. Despite no significant changes were found in the amounts of the principal vaginal bacterial populations in women administered with VSL#3, qPCR results suggested a potential role of the probiotic product in counteracting the decrease of Bifidobacterium and the increase of Atopobium, that occurred in control women during late pregnancy. The modulation of the vaginal microbiota was associated with significant changes in some vaginal cytokines. In particular, the decrease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was observed only in control women but not in women supplemented with VSL#3. In addition, the probiotic consumption induced the decrease of the pro-inflammatory chemokine Eotaxin, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect on the vaginal immunity. Conclusion Dietary supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3 during the last trimester of pregnancy was associated to a modulation of the vaginal microbiota and cytokine secretion, with potential implications in preventing preterm birth. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01367470

  8. Evidence that the endometrial microbiota has an effect on implantation success or failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Inmaculada; Codoñer, Francisco M; Vilella, Felipe; Valbuena, Diana; Martinez-Blanch, Juan F; Jimenez-Almazán, Jorge; Alonso, Roberto; Alamá, Pilar; Remohí, Jose; Pellicer, Antonio; Ramon, Daniel; Simon, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    taxonomically assigned using QIIME. Data analysis was performed using R packages. The χ 2 test, Student t test, and analysis of variance were used for statistical analyses. When bacterial communities from paired endometrial fluid and vaginal aspirate samples within the same subjects were interrogated, different bacterial communities were detected between the uterine cavity and the vagina of some subjects. Based on its composition, the microbiota in the endometrial fluid, comprising up to 191 operational taxonomic units, was defined as a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota (>90% Lactobacillus spp.) or a non-Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota (10% of other bacteria). Although the endometrial microbiota was not hormonally regulated during the acquisition of endometrial receptivity, the presence of a non-Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota in a receptive endometrium was associated with significant decreases in implantation [60.7% vs 23.1% (P = .02)], pregnancy [70.6% vs 33.3% (P = .03)], ongoing pregnancy [58.8% vs 13.3% (P = .02)], and live birth [58.8% vs 6.7% (P = .002)] rates. Our results demonstrate the existence of an endometrial microbiota that is highly stable during the acquisition of endometrial receptivity. However, pathological modification of its profile is associated with poor reproductive outcomes for in vitro fertilization patients. This finding adds a novel microbiological dimension to the reproductive process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Indoor Heating Drives Water Bacterial Growth and Community Metabolic Profile Changes in Building Tap Pipes during the Winter Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Han Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The growth of the bacterial community harbored in indoor drinking water taps is regulated by external environmental factors, such as indoor temperature. However, the effect of indoor heating on bacterial regrowth associated with indoor drinking water taps is poorly understood. In the present work, flow cytometry and community-level sole-carbon-source utilization techniques were combined to explore the effects of indoor heating on water bacterial cell concentrations and community carbon metabolic profiles in building tap pipes during the winter season. The results showed that the temperature of water stagnated overnight (“before” in the indoor water pipes was 15–17 °C, and the water temperature decreased to 4–6 °C after flushing for 10 min (“flushed”. The highest bacterial cell number was observed in water stagnated overnight, and was 5–11 times higher than that of flushed water. Meanwhile, a significantly higher bacterial community metabolic activity (AWCD590nm was also found in overnight stagnation water samples. The significant “flushed” and “taps” values indicated that the AWCD590nm, and bacterial cell number varied among the taps within the flushed group (p < 0.01. Heatmap fingerprints and principle component analyses (PCA revealed a significant discrimination bacterial community functional metabolic profiles in the water stagnated overnight and flushed water. Serine, threonine, glucose-phosphate, ketobutyric acid, phenylethylamine, glycerol, putrescine were significantly used by “before” water samples. The results suggested that water stagnated at higher temperature should be treated before drinking because of bacterial regrowth. The data from this work provides useful information on reasonable utilization of drinking water after stagnation in indoor pipes during indoor heating periods.

  10. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Dittrich

    Full Text Available Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP. To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require 90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i time-to-result <10 min (but maximally <2 hrs; ii storage conditions at 0-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity with a minimal shelf life of 12 months; iii operational conditions of 5-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity; and iv minimal sample collection needs (50-100μL, capillary blood. This expert approach to define assay requirements for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial assay should guide product development, and enable targeted and timely efforts by industry partners and academic institutions.

  11. Etiological profile of early neonatal bacterial sepsis by multiplex qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Junior, Walter P; Martins, Almir S; Xavier, Paula C N; Appel, Kelly L A; Oliveira Junior, Silvio A; Palhares, Durval B

    2016-12-30

    Given the major impact in terms of morbidity and mortality that episodes of early neonatal sepsis (ENS) have on both newborns and health systems, this study aimed to identify the etiological profile of early neonatal bacterial sepsis by a multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Blood samples from newborns diagnosed with clinical ENS and hospitalized in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) were collected and analyzed using the multiplex qPCR method to detect Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter sp., Serratia sp., and Staphylococcus aureus. A universal primer was used in the analysis. A total of 150 neonates with clinical sepsis and 10 newborns as healthy controls were included in the study. The group with clinical sepsis was 100% positive for the presence of bacterial genomic DNA through the universal primer. The control group showed negativity by qPCR. The multiplex qPCR analysis showed that 76% of the samples were positive for Escherichia coli, 34% for Staphylococcus aureus, 13.3% for Streptococcus agalactiae, 7.3% for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 0.7% for Enterobacter sp. and Serratia sp. Multiplex qPCR of patients with clinical sepsis matched with 8.1% of the blood samples that tested positive by the microbiological method. Rapid and sensitive detection of the pathogens causing ENS by this new multi-target approach based on multiplex qPCR could potentially excel compared to microbiological methods, with the simple objective of facilitating the progression to a more rapid and specific antimicrobial therapy, avoiding the abuse of antibiotics in NICUs.

  12. MICROBIAL PROFILE AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE PATTERN OF THE BACTERIAL ISOLATES IN A TERTIARY CARE PSYCHIATRY HOSPITAL

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    Jyoti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance is a challenge for effective management of infections as it increases the morbidity, mortality and costs of treating infectious diseases. AIMS: This study was aimed to obtain the profile of the bacterial isolates and their antibiotic resistance pattern. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: It is a cross sectional study carried out in a tertiary care psychiatry hospital in India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Isolation and identification of the isolates were done by standard methods. Susceptibility patterns were checked by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Statistical analysis was done by using SPSS 16.0 version to calculate the frequencies as well as for cross tabulation. RESULTS: Significant bacterial growth observed in 43(25.6% samples, of which 39(90.7% showed resistant to at least one of the antibiotics used and 36(83.7% were multi-drug resistant. Gram negative organism accounted for the 25(58.14% of total significant isolates, Escherichia coli being the highest (76% in this group. Among multi-drug resistant (MDR isolates E.coli was the highest (44.4% and imipenem resistance was also observed in 1(5.3% of 19 E.coli isolates. Among the 43 isolates 18(41.86% were Gram positive with Streptococcus spp. showing incidence of 41.7% among the total MDR isolates. CONCLUSION: Increasing incidence of MDR strains seen in the population requires continuous monitoring and a restricted use of antibiotics to keep a check on resistance pattern, for effective treatment plan.

  13. Monitoring the Bacterial and Fungal Biota of Eleven Tobacco Grades Stored at Three Different Locations

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    Villemur R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco as many other plants has its own microbiota. There are very few studies determining the evolution of this microbiota during tobacco storage, which may affect the quality of tobacco. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE were used to determine changes in the microbiota of tobacco during the aging of eleven different tobacco grades stored at three different locations for twelve months. The microbial fraction of these tobacco grades was extracted, and the bacterial 16S and the fungal 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA sequences were PCR amplified before being segregated by DGGE. The bacterial complexity of the tobacco grades was represented by DGGE migrating banding profiles that varied between 20 and 30 bands. Some variations in the banding profiles were observed between the tobacco grades, but overall no substantial changes occurred in the bacterial population of the different grades during their storage at different locations. Most of the fungal DGGE profiles were identical and had only one dominating band related to the genus Aspergillus. Bacterial and fungal isolates were also derived from the microbial fractions of the tobacco, and part of their respective 16S and 18S rDNA sequences were determined. Bacterial isolates belonged to Bacillales and gamma Protobacteria. Fungal isolates belonged to the genus Aspergillus. Our results showed that the bacterial and fungal biota of tobacco are relatively stable throughout 12 months storage time.

  14. Gut microbiota and lipopolysaccharide content of the diet influence development of regulatory T cells: studies in germ-free mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrncir, Tomas; Stepankova, Renata; Kozakova, Hana; Hudcovic, Tomas; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena

    2008-11-06

    Mammals are essentially born germ-free but the epithelial surfaces are promptly colonized by astounding numbers of bacteria soon after birth. The most extensive microbial community is harbored by the distal intestine. The gut microbiota outnumber ~10 times the total number of our somatic and germ cells. The host-microbiota relationship has evolved to become mutually beneficial. Studies in germ-free mice have shown that gut microbiota play a crucial role in the development of the immune system. The principal aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the presence of gut microbiota and the quality of a sterile diet containing various amounts of bacterial contaminants, measured by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) content, can influence maturation of the immune system in gnotobiotic mice. We have found that the presence of gut microbiota and to a lesser extent also the LPS-rich sterile diet drive the expansion of B and T cells in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. The most prominent was the expansion of CD4+ T cells including Foxp3-expressing T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes. Further, we have observed that both the presence of gut microbiota and the LPS-rich sterile diet influence in vitro cytokine profile of spleen cells. Both gut microbiota and LPS-rich diet increase the production of interleukin-12 and decrease the production of interleukin-4. In addition, the presence of gut microbiota increases the production of interleukin-10 and interferon-gamma. Our data clearly show that not only live gut microbiota but also microbial components (LPS) contained in sterile diet stimulate the development, expansion and function of the immune system. Finally, we would like to emphasize that the composition of diet should be regularly tested especially in all gnotobiotic models as the LPS content and other microbial components present in the diet may significantly alter the outcome of experiments.

  15. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Sabine; Tadesse, Birkneh Tilahun; Moussy, Francis; Chua, Arlene; Zorzet, Anna; Tängdén, Thomas; Dolinger, David L; Page, Anne-Laure; Crump, John A; D'Acremont, Valerie; Bassat, Quique; Lubell, Yoel; Newton, Paul N; Heinrich, Norbert; Rodwell, Timothy J; González, Iveth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP). To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require 90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i) time-to-result targeted and timely efforts by industry partners and academic institutions.

  16. [The gut-brain axis in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: the role of the microbiota].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richarte, V; Rosales, K; Corrales, M; Bellina, M; Fadeuilhe, C; Calvo, E; Ibanez, P; Sanchez-Mora, C; Ribases, M; Ramos-Quiroga, J A

    2018-03-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has a complex aetiology, mainly attributed to a number of susceptibility genes and environmental factors. Genetic association studies, however, have been inconsistent and have identified genetic variants with a moderate effect that explain a small proportion of the estimated inheritability of the disorder (eating habits were performed in both groups. Samples of faecal material were obtained from which to extract bacterial DNA, then used to characterise the participants' gut microbiota. A meta-genomic association study was later performed to attempt to correlate the bacterial composition of the intestine with the clinical subtypes of the disorder. Comparing the gut microbiota profiles of subjects with ADHD and controls is expected to help account for the clinical heterogeneity of the disorder and identify new mechanisms involved in its development.

  17. Effects of obesity, energy restriction and neutering on the faecal microbiota of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Manuela M; Kessler, Alexandre M; Kieffer, Dorothy A; Knotts, Trina A; Kim, Kyoungmi; Wei, Alfreda; Ramsey, Jon J; Fascetti, Andrea J

    2017-10-01

    Surveys report that 25-57 % of cats are overweight or obese. The most evinced cause is neutering. Weight loss often fails; thus, new strategies are needed. Obesity has been associated with altered gut bacterial populations and increases in microbial dietary energy extraction, body weight and adiposity. This study aimed to determine whether alterations in intestinal bacteria were associated with obesity, energy restriction and neutering by characterising faecal microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in eight lean intact, eight lean neutered and eight obese neutered cats before and after 6 weeks of energy restriction. Lean neutered cats had a bacterial profile similar to obese rodents and humans, with a greater abundance (Pcats was due to a bloom in Peptostreptococcaceae. Obese cats had an 18 % reduction in fat mass after energy restriction (Pcats. Additional work is needed to understand how neutering, obesity and weight loss are related to changes in feline microbiota and how these microbial shifts affect host physiology.

  18. Dynamic alteration of the colonic microbiota in intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wang

    Full Text Available Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R plays an important role in critical illnesses. Gut flora participate in the pathogenesis of the injury. This study is aimed at unraveling colonic microbiota alteration pattern and identifying specific bacterial species that differ significantly as well as observing colonic epithelium change in the same injury model during the reperfusion time course.Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE was used to monitor the colonic microbiota of control rats and experimental rats that underwent 0.5 hour ischemia and 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 72 hours following reperfusion respectively. The microbiota similarity, bacterial diversity and species that characterized the dysbiosis were estimated based on the DGGE profiles using a combination of statistical approaches. The interested bacterial species in the gel were cut and sequenced and were subsequently quantified and confirmed with real-time PCR. Meanwhile, the epithelial barrier was checked by microscopy and D-lactate analysis. Colonic flora changed early and differed significantly at 6 hours after reperfusion and then started to recover. The shifts were characterized by the increase of Escherichia coli and Prevotella oralis, and Lactobacilli proliferation together with epithelia healing.This study shows for the first time that intestinal ischemia-reperfusion results in colonic flora dysbiosis that follows epithelia damage, and identifies the bacterial species that contribute most.

  19. Evaluation of a Bacillus direct-fed microbial candidate on digesta viscosity, bacterial translocation, microbiota composition and bone mineralisation in broiler chickens fed on a rye-based diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, J D; Hernandez-Velasco, X; Bielke, L R; Vicente, J L; Wolfenden, R; Menconi, A; Hargis, B M; Tellez, G

    2015-01-01

    1. The effects of the dietary inclusion of a Bacillus-based direct-fed microbial (DFM) candidate on digesta viscosity, bacterial translocation, microbiota composition and bone mineralisation were evaluated in broilers consuming rye-based diets. 2. In the present study, control mash rye-based diets (CON) or Bacillus-DFM supplemented diets (TRT) were administered ad libitum to male broilers in three independent experiments. 3. In Experiments 1 and 2 (n = 25/group), liver samples were taken to evaluate bacterial translocation, digesta samples were used for viscosity measurements and the intestinal microbial flora was evaluated from different intestinal sections to enumerate total recovered gram-negative bacteria (TGB), lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and anaerobic bacteria (TAB). Additionally, both tibias were removed for assessment of bone quality. 4. In Experiment 3, each experimental group had 8 replicates of 20 chickens (n = 160/group). Weekly, body weight (BW), feed intake (FI) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were evaluated. At d 28-of-age, samples were taken to determine bacterial translocation, digesta viscosity and bone quality characteristics. 5. In all experiments, consumption of Bacillus-DFM reduced bacterial translocation to the liver and digesta viscosity. Additionally, DFM supplementation improved BW, bone quality measurements and FCR. Moreover, chickens fed on the Bacillus-DFM diet in Experiments 1 and 2 showed a significant reduction in the number of gram-negative and anaerobic bacteria in the duodenal content compared to control. 6. In summary, chickens fed on a rye-based diet without DFM inclusion showed an increase in bacterial translocation and digesta viscosity, accompanied by reduced performance and bone quality variables relative to the Bacillus-DFM candidate group. Hence, incorporation into the feed of a selected DFM ameliorated the adverse anti-nutritional effects related to utilisation of rye-based diets in broilers chickens.

  20. Indoor Heating Drives Water Bacterial Growth and Community Metabolic Profile Changes in Building Tap Pipes during the Winter Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Han; Chen, Sheng-Nan; Huang, Ting-Lin; Shang, Pan-Lu; Yang, Xiao; Ma, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-27

    The growth of the bacterial community harbored in indoor drinking water taps is regulated by external environmental factors, such as indoor temperature. However, the effect of indoor heating on bacterial regrowth associated with indoor drinking water taps is poorly understood. In the present work, flow cytometry and community-level sole-carbon-source utilization techniques were combined to explore the effects of indoor heating on water bacterial cell concentrations and community carbon metabolic profiles in building tap pipes during the winter season. The results showed that the temperature of water stagnated overnight ("before") in the indoor water pipes was 15-17 °C, and the water temperature decreased to 4-6 °C after flushing for 10 min ("flushed"). The highest bacterial cell number was observed in water stagnated overnight, and was 5-11 times higher than that of flushed water. Meanwhile, a significantly higher bacterial community metabolic activity (AWCD590nm) was also found in overnight stagnation water samples. The significant "flushed" and "taps" values indicated that the AWCD590nm, and bacterial cell number varied among the taps within the flushed group (p heating periods.

  1. Differences in gastric mucosal microbiota profiling in patients with chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer using pyrosequencing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Chang Soo; Kim, Byung Kwon; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Seon Young; Kim, Kyung Mo; Choi, Bo Youl; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Jihyun F

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays an important role in the early stage of cancer development. However, various bacteria that promote the synthesis of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species may be involved in the later stages. We aimed to determine the microbial composition of gastric mucosa from the patients with chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer using 454 GS FLX Titanium. Gastric mucosal biopsy samples were collected from 31 patients during endoscopy. After the extraction of genomic DNA, variable region V5 of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified. PCR products were sequenced using 454 high-throughput sequencer. The composition, diversity, and richness of microbial communities were compared between three groups. The composition of H. pylori-containing Epsilonproteobacteria class appeared to be the most prevalent, but the relative increase in the Bacilli class in the gastric cancer group was noticed, resulting in a significant difference compared with the chronic gastritis group. By analyzing the Helicobacter-dominant group at a family level, the relative abundance of Helicobacteraceae family was significantly lower in the gastric cancer group compared with chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia groups, while the relative abundance of Streptococcaceae family significantly increased. In a UPGMA clustering of Helicobacter-dominant group based on UniFrac distance, the chronic gastritis group and gastric cancer group were clearly separated, while the intestinal metaplasia group was distributed in between the two groups. The evenness and diversity of gastric microbiota in the gastric cancer group was increased compared with other groups. In Helicobacter predominant patients, the microbial compositions of gastric mucosa from gastric cancer patients are significantly different to chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia patients. These alterations of gastric microbial composition may play an important, as-yet-undetermined role in

  2. Faecal microbiota composition and host-microbe cross-talk following gastroenteritis and in postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalanka-Tuovinen, Jonna; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Salonen, Anne; Immonen, Outi; Garsed, Klara; Kelly, Fiona M; Zaitoun, Abed; Palva, Airi; Spiller, Robin C; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-11-01

    About 10% of patients with IBS report the start of the syndrome after infectious enteritis. The clinical features of postinfectious IBS (PI-IBS) resemble those of diarrhoea-predominant IBS (IBS-D). While altered faecal microbiota has been identified in other IBS subtypes, composition of the microbiota in patients with PI-IBS remains uncharacterised. To characterise the microbial composition of patients with PI-IBS, and to examine the associations between the faecal microbiota and a patient's clinical features. Using a phylogenetic microarray and selected qPCR assays, we analysed differences in the faecal microbiota of 57 subjects from five study groups: patients with diagnosed PI-IBS, patients who 6 months after gastroenteritis had either persisting bowel dysfunction or no IBS symptoms, benchmarked against patients with IBS-D and healthy controls. In addition, the associations between the faecal microbiota and health were investigated by correlating the microbial profiles to immunological markers, quality of life indicators and host gene expression in rectal biopsies. Microbiota analysis revealed a bacterial profile of 27 genus-like groups, providing an Index of Microbial Dysbiosis (IMD), which significantly separated patient groups and controls. Within this profile, several members of Bacteroidetes phylum were increased 12-fold in patients, while healthy controls had 35-fold more uncultured Clostridia. We showed correlations between the IMD and expression of several host gene pathways, including amino acid synthesis, cell junction integrity and inflammatory response, suggesting an impaired epithelial barrier function in IBS. The faecal microbiota of patients with PI-IBS differs from that of healthy controls and resembles that of patients with IBS-D, suggesting a common pathophysiology. Moreover, our analysis suggests a variety of host-microbe associations that may underlie intestinal symptoms, initiated by gastroenteritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  3. Levan Enhances Associated Growth of Bacteroides, Escherichia, Streptococcus and Faecalibacterium in Fecal Microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaarel Adamberg

    Full Text Available The role of dietary fiber in supporting healthy gut microbiota and overall well-being of the host has been revealed in several studies. Here, we show the effect of a bacterial polyfructan levan on the growth dynamics and metabolism of fecal microbiota in vitro by using isothermal microcalorimetry. Eleven fecal samples from healthy donors were incubated in phosphate-buffered defined medium with or without levan supplementation and varying presence of amino acids. The generation of heat, changes in pH and microbiota composition, concentrations of produced and consumed metabolites during the growth were determined. The composition of fecal microbiota and profile of metabolites changed in response to substrate (levan and amino acids availability. The main products of levan metabolism were acetic, lactic, butyric, propionic and succinic acids and carbon dioxide. Associated growth of levan-degrading (e.g. Bacteroides and butyric acid-producing (e.g. Faecalibacterium taxa was observed in levan-supplemented media. The study shows that the capacity of levan and possibly also other dietary fibers/prebiotics to modulate the composition and function of colon microbiota can be predicted by using isothermal microcalorimetry of fecal samples linked to metabolite and consortia analyses.

  4. Does microbiota composition affect thyroid homeostasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virili, Camilla; Centanni, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for the host to ensure digestive and immunologic homeostasis. When microbiota homeostasis is impaired and dysbiosis occurs, the malfunction of epithelial barrier leads to intestinal and systemic disorders, chiefly immunologic and metabolic. The role of the intestinal tract is crucial in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, and hormones, including exogenous and endogenous iodothyronines as well as micronutrients involved in thyroid homeostasis. However, the link between thyroid homeostasis and microbiota composition is not yet completely ascertained. A pathogenetic link with dysbiosis has been described in different autoimmune disorders but not yet fully elucidated in autoimmune thyroid disease which represents the most frequent of them. Anyway, it has been suggested that intestinal dysbiosis may trigger autoimmune thyroiditis. Furthermore, hypo- and hyper-thyroidism, often of autoimmune origin, were respectively associated to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and to changes in microbiota composition. Whether some steps of this thyroid network may be affected by intestinal microbiota composition is briefly discussed below.

  5. High-fat diet alters gut microbiota physiology in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Hannelore; Gholami, Amin Moghaddas; Berry, David; Desmarchelier, Charles; Hahne, Hannes; Loh, Gunnar; Mondot, Stanislas; Lepage, Patricia; Rothballer, Michael; Walker, Alesia; Böhm, Christoph; Wenning, Mareike; Wagner, Michael; Blaut, Michael; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Kuster, Bernhard; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is known to regulate host energy homeostasis and can be influenced by high-calorie diets. However, changes affecting the ecosystem at the functional level are still not well characterized. We measured shifts in cecal bacterial communities in mice fed a carbohydrate or high-fat (HF) diet for 12 weeks at the level of the following: (i) diversity and taxa distribution by high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing; (ii) bulk and single-cell chemical composition by Fourier-transform infrared- (FT-IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy and (iii) metaproteome and metabolome via high-resolution mass spectrometry. High-fat diet caused shifts in the diversity of dominant gut bacteria and altered the proportion of Ruminococcaceae (decrease) and Rikenellaceae (increase). FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that the impact of the diet on cecal chemical fingerprints is greater than the impact of microbiota composition. Diet-driven changes in biochemical fingerprints of members of the Bacteroidales and Lachnospiraceae were also observed at the level of single cells, indicating that there were distinct differences in cellular composition of dominant phylotypes under different diets. Metaproteome and metabolome analyses based on the occurrence of 1760 bacterial proteins and 86 annotated metabolites revealed distinct HF diet-specific profiles. Alteration of hormonal and anti-microbial networks, bile acid and bilirubin metabolism and shifts towards amino acid and simple sugars metabolism were observed. We conclude that a HF diet markedly affects the gut bacterial ecosystem at the functional level. PMID:24030595

  6. Microbiota, inflammation and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Yolanda; Moya-Pérez, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between metabolism and immunity play a pivotal role in the development of obesity-associated chronic co-morbidities. Obesity involves impairment of immune function affecting both the innate and adaptive immune system. This leads to increased risk of infections as well as chronic low-grade inflammation, which in turn causes metabolic dysfunction (e.g. insulin resistance) and chronic disease (e.g. type-2 diabetes). Gut microbiota has emerged as one of the key factors regulating early events triggering inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic dysfunction. This effect seems to be related to diet- and obesity-associated changes in gut microbiota composition and to increased translocation of immunogenic bacterial products, which activate innate and adaptive immunity in the gut and beyond, contributing to an increase in inflammatory tone. Innate immune receptors, like Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are known to be up-regulated in the tissue affected by most inflammatory disorders and activated by both specific microbial components and dietary lipids. This triggers several signaling transduction pathways (e.g. JNK and IKKβ/NF-κB), leading to inflammatory cytokine and chemokine (TNF-α, IL-1, MCP1) production and to inflammatory cell recruitment, causing insulin resistance. T-cell differentiation into effector inflammatory or regulatory T cells also depends on the type of TLR activated and on cytokine production, which in turn depends upon gut microbiota-diet interactions. Here, we update and discuss our current understanding of how gut microbiota could contribute to defining whole-body metabolism by influencing diverse components of the innate and adaptive immune system, both locally and systemically.

  7. Rhizosphere bacterial communities of potato cultivars evaluated through PCR-DGGE profiles Comunidades bacterianas associadas à rizosfera de cultivares de batata avaliadas por perfis de PCR-DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enderson Petrônio de Brito Ferreira

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the shifts on the PCR-DGGE profiles of bacterial communities associated to the rhizosphere of potato cultivars, in order to generate baseline information for further studies of environmental risk assessment of genetically modified potato plants. A greenhouse experiment was carried out with five potato cultivars (Achat, Bintje, Agata, Monalisa and Asterix, cultivated in pots containing soil from an integrated system for agroecological production. The experiment was conducted in a split plot randomized block design with five cultivars, three sampling periods and five replicates. Rhizosphere samples were collected in three sampling dates during plant development. DNA of rhizosphere microorganisms was extracted, amplified by PCR using bacterial universal primers, and analyzed through DGGE. Shifts on the rhizosphere bacterial communities associated to rhizosphere of different cultivars were related to both cultivar and plant age. Differences among rhizosphere bacterial communities were clearest at the earliest plant age, tending to decrease in later stages. This variation was detected among bacterial communities of the five tested cultivars. The characterization of soil microbial communities can be part of plant breeding programs to be used on studies of environmental risk assessment of genetically modified potatoes.O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar as alterações nos perfis de PCR-DGGE das comunidades bacterianas associadas à rizosfera de cultivares de batata, para obter informações para futuros estudos de avaliação de risco ambiental de plantas de batatas geneticamente modificadas. Foi conduzido experimento em casa de vegetação com cinco cultivares de batata (Achat, Bintje, Ágata, Monalisa e Asterix, cultivadas em vasos com solo de um sistema integrado de produção agroecológica. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos ao acaso, em parcelas subdivididas, com cinco cultivares, tr

  8. Survival of Listeria innocua in dry fermented sausages and changes in the typical microbiota and volatile profile as affected by the concentration of nitrate and nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospital, Xavier F; Hierro, Eva; Fernández, Manuela

    2012-02-15

    The involvement of nitrate and nitrite in the formation of N-nitrosamines in foods is a matter of great concern. This situation has led to revise the real amount of nitrate and nitrite needed in meat products to exert proper technological and safety activities, and also to extensive research to find alternatives to their use. The present study addresses the possibility of reducing the ingoing amounts of these additives below the legal limits established by the current European regulations. Different concentrations of nitrate and nitrite were tested on Spanish salchichón-type dry fermented sausages concerning their role in the microbiota and volatile profile. Sausages were manufactured with the maximum ingoing amounts established by the EU regulations (150 ppm NaNO(3) and 150 ppm NaNO(2)), a 25% reduction and a 50% reduction; control sausages with no nitrate/nitrite addition were also prepared. The mixtures were inoculated with 5 log cfu/g of Listeria innocua as a surrogate for Listeria monocytogenes. L. innocua numbers in the final product were approximately 1.5 log cfu/g lower in the batch with the maximum nitrate/nitrite concentration when compared to 25 and 50% reduced batches, and about 2 log cfu/g in comparison to the control sausages. The final numbers of catalase-positive cocci were 1 log cfu/g higher in the 50% nitrate/nitrite reduced batch and 2 log cfu/g higher in the control sausages, compared to products manufactured with the maximum nitrate/nitrite concentration. This increase was related to a higher amount of volatile compounds derived from carbohydrate fermentation and amino acid degradation. Sausages with no addition of nitrate/nitrite showed higher amount of volatiles from lipid oxidation. Enterobacteriaceae counts reached detectable values (1-2 log cfu/g) in both nitrate/nitrite reduced sausages and in the control batch, while these organisms were not detected in the batch with the maximum ingoing amount. Nitrate and nitrite exerted a significant

  9. An in vitro evaluation of the effects of a Yucca schidigera extract and chestnut tannins on composition and metabolic profiles of canine and feline faecal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Carlo; Vecchiato, Carla Giuditta; Cardenia, Vladimiro; Rodriguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Stefanelli, Claudio; Grandi, Monica; Gatta, Pier Paolo; Biagi, Giacomo

    2017-10-01

    The in vitro effect of a Yucca schidigera extract (YSE) and tannins from chestnut wood on composition and metabolic activity of canine and feline faecal microbiota was evaluated. Four treatments were carried out: control diet, chestnut tannins (CT), YSE and CT + YSE. The YSE was added to canine and feline faecal cultures at 0.1 g/l, while CT were added at 0.3 g/l for a 24-h incubation. A total of 130 volatile compounds were detected by means of headspace-solid phase microextraction gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. Several changes in the metabolite profiles of fermentation fluids were found, including a decrease of alcohols (-19%) and esters (-42%) in feline and canine inoculum, respectively, which was due to the antibacterial properties of tannins. In canine inoculum, after 6 h, YSE + CT caused lower cadaverine concentrations (-37%), while ammonia (-4%) and quinolone (-27%) were reduced by addition of CT. After 24 h, the presence of CT resulted in a decrease of sulphur compounds, such as dimethyl sulphide (-69%) and dimethyl disulphide (-20%). In feline faecal cultures, after 6 h, CT lowered the amount of indole (-48%), whereas YSE tended to decrease trimethylamine levels (-16%). Both in canine and feline inoculum, addition of CT and, to a minor extent, YSE affected volatile fatty acids patterns. In canine faecal cultures, CT exerted a marginal inhibitory effect on Escherichia coli population (-0.45 log 10 numbers of DNA copies/ml), while enterococci were increased (+2.06 log 10 numbers of DNA copies/ml) by YSE. The results from the present study show that YSE and tannins from chestnut wood exert different effects on the composition and metabolism of canine and feline faecal microbiota. In particular, the supplementation of YSE and tannins to diets for dogs and cats may be beneficial due to the reduction of the presence of some potentially toxic volatile metabolites in the animals' intestine.

  10. Root nodule symbiosis in Lotus japonicus drives the establishment of distinctive rhizosphere, root, and nodule bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Jensen, Dorthe Bodker; Koprivova, Anna; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Radutoiu, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Legumes are known as pioneer plants colonizing marginal soils, and as enhancers of the nutritional status in cultivated soils. This beneficial activity has been explained by their capacity to engage in symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. We performed a community profiling analysis of Lotus japonicus wild type and mutants to investigate the role of the nodulation pathway on the structure of the root-associated bacterial microbiota. We found that several bacterial orders were ...

  11. Systems biology analysis of omeprazole therapy in cirrhosis demonstrates significant shifts in gut microbiota composition and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Cox, I Jane; Betrapally, Naga S; Heuman, Douglas M; Schubert, Mitchell L; Ratneswaran, Maiyuran; Hylemon, Phillip B; White, Melanie B; Daita, Kalyani; Noble, Nicole A; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Williams, Roger; Crossey, Mary M E; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2014-11-15

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) have been associated with infectious complications in cirrhosis, but their impact on distal gut microbiota composition and function is unclear. We aimed to evaluate changes in stool microbiota composition and function in patients with cirrhosis and healthy controls after omeprazole therapy. Both 15 compensated cirrhotic patients and 15 age-matched controls underwent serum gastrin measurement, stool microbiota profiling with multitagged pyrosequencing, and urinary metabolic profiling with NMR spectroscopy to assess microbial cometabolites before/after a 14-day course of 40 mg/day omeprazole under constant diet conditions. Results before (pre) and after PPI were compared in both groups, compared with baseline by systems biology techniques. Adherence was >95% without changes in diet or MELD (model for end-stage liver disease) score during the study. Serum gastrin concentrations significantly increased after PPI in cirrhosis (pre 38.3 ± 35.8 vs. 115.6 ± 79.3 pg/ml P microbiota change was seen in both controls and cirrhosis after omeprazole (QIIME P microbiota shift and functional change in the distal gut in patients with compensated cirrhosis that could set the stage for bacterial overgrowth. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Bacterial Community Profiling of Plastic Litter in the Belgian Part of the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tender, Caroline A; Devriese, Lisa I; Haegeman, Annelies; Maes, Sara; Ruttink, Tom; Dawyndt, Peter

    2015-08-18

    Bacterial colonization of marine plastic litter (MPL) is known for over four decades. Still, only a few studies on the plastic colonization process and its influencing factors are reported. In this study, seafloor MPL was sampled at different locations across the Belgian part of the North Sea to study bacterial community structure using 16S metabarcoding. These marine plastic bacterial communities were compared with those of sediment and seawater, and resin pellets sampled on the beach, to investigate the origin and uniqueness of plastic bacterial communities. Plastics display great variation of bacterial community composition, while each showed significant differences from those of sediment and seawater, indicating that plastics represent a distinct environmental niche. Various environmental factors correlate with the diversity of MPL bacterial composition across plastics. In addition, intrinsic plastic-related factors such as pigment content may contribute to the differences in bacterial colonization. Furthermore, the differential abundance of known primary and secondary colonizers across the various plastics may indicate different stages of bacterial colonization, and may confound comparisons of free-floating plastics. Our studies provide insights in the factors that shape plastic bacterial colonization and shed light on the possible role of plastic as transport vehicle for bacteria through the aquatic environment.

  13. Epidemiological, Clinical and Prognostic Profile of Acute Bacterial Meningitis among Children in Alexandria, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farag HF

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To address the epidemiological characteristics and clinical indices that may predict the prognostic profile of meningitis among children. Methods: Children admitted to Alexandria fever hospital with clinical diagnosis of meningitis/meningoencephalitis during the period 2002-2003 were recruited for the study. They were subjected to clinical examination as well as CSF bacteriological and serological investigations Results: Three hundred and ten patients (195 males and 115 females were included. About 65.2% of them were infected with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM and 34.8% were infected with aseptic meningitis. In this study, ABM was caused by Haemophilus influenzae (21%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (13.9%, Neisseria meningitidis (14.2% and other undetermined bacteria (16.1%. ABM showed significant association with age group 1-9 years (66.3%, low socio-economic class (96%, working mother (83.2%, more than two smokers in the family (62.9% and cold seasons(fall 35.1% and winter 48.5%. Aseptic meningitis showed significant association with age group 3-15 months (100% and previous immunization(81.5%. The overall case fatality rate was 10.3%; 13.9% for ABM and 3.4% for aseptic meningitis. 7.1% of all survivors developed epileptic attacks. Predictors for death or epilepsy events were high WHO meningitis score (> 9, decreased CSF glucose level (Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of several predictors of the outcome of meningitis in children. It is concluded that quick and simple scoring scales, such as the WHO scale, are not only applicable but valuable prognostic tools for meningitis in children.

  14. Diet, microbiota, and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Hakan; Tözün, Nurdan

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world causing nearly 500,000 deaths every year. In addition to genetic background, environmental factors including diet and lifestyle are accepted as major contributors to adenoma and CRC development. Lifestyle factors include high BMI, obesity, and reduced physical activity. Growing interest and accumulating data on human microbiota implicate that host-microbe interplay has an important role in the development of metabolic, neoplastic, and inflammatory diseases. Findings from recent studies suggest that colon cancer risk is determined by the interaction between diet and gut microbiota. Dietary changes affect gut microbiota and conversely microbiota mediates the generation of dietary factors triggering colon cancer. Identification of the microbial communities associated with carcinogenesis is of crucial importance. Nowadays, with the evolvement of culture-independent molecular techniques, it has become possible to identify main bacterial species in healthy individuals, inflammatory conditions, and CRC. Some recent studies have shown the differences in intestinal microbiota between colon cancer patients and healthy individuals. Animal studies have provided a better understanding of interaction between pathobionts and symbionts in the development of colon cancer. There is no single causative organism identified in CRC; however, there is strong evidence that reduction of protective bacteria, increase in some bacteria (ie, fusobacterium members; Bacteroides/Prevotella), and age-related changes in microbiota have an impact on adenoma or cancer development. Future studies will enable us to understand procarcinogenic and anticarcinogenic mechanisms and give insights to rational manipulation of the microbiota with prebiotics, probiotics, or dietary modifications.

  15. Prebiotic inulin-type fructans induce specific changes in the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeputte, Doris; Falony, Gwen; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Wang, Jun; Sailer, Manuela; Theis, Stephan; Verbeke, Kristin; Raes, Jeroen

    2017-11-01

    Contrary to the long-standing prerequisite of inducing selective (ie, bifidogenic) effects, recent findings suggest that prebiotic interventions lead to ecosystem-wide microbiota shifts. Yet, a comprehensive characterisation of this process is still lacking. Here, we apply 16S rDNA microbiota profiling and matching (gas chromatography mass spectrometry) metabolomics to assess the consequences of inulin fermentation both on the composition of the colon bacterial ecosystem and faecal metabolites profiles. Faecal samples collected during a double-blind, randomised, cross-over intervention study set up to assess the effect of inulin consumption on stool frequency in healthy adults with mild constipation were analysed. Faecal microbiota composition and metabolite profiles were linked to the study's clinical outcome as well as to quality-of-life measurements recorded. While faecal metabolite profiles were not significantly altered by inulin consumption, our analyses did detect a modest effect on global microbiota composition and specific inulin-induced changes in relative abundances of Anaerostipes , Bilophila and Bifidobacterium were identified. The observed decrease in Bilophila abundances following inulin consumption was associated with both softer stools and a favourable change in constipation-specific quality-of-life measures. Ecosystem-wide analysis of the effect of a dietary intervention with prebiotic inulin-type fructans on the colon microbiota revealed that this effect is specifically associated with three genera, one of which ( Bilophila ) representing a promising novel target for mechanistic research. NCT02548247. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. The bamboo-eating giant panda harbors a carnivore-like gut microbiota, with excessive seasonal variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhengsheng; Zhang, Wenping; Wang, Linghua; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Menghui; Fei, Lisong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Huang, He; Bridgewater, Laura C; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Chenglin; Zhao, Liping; Pang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zhihe

    2015-05-19

    The giant panda evolved from omnivorous bears. It lives on a bamboo-dominated diet at present, but it still retains a typical carnivorous digestive system and is genetically deficient in cellulose-digesting enzymes. To find out whether this endangered mammalian species, like other herbivores, has successfully developed a gut microbiota adapted to its fiber-rich diet, we conducted a 16S rRNA gene-based large-scale structural profiling of the giant panda fecal microbiota. Forty-five captive individuals were sampled in spring, summer, and late autumn within 1 year. Significant intraindividual variations in the diversity and structure of gut microbiota across seasons were observed in this population, which were even greater than the variations between individuals. Compared with published data sets involving 124 gut microbiota profiles from 54 mammalian species, these giant pandas, together with 9 captive and 7 wild individuals investigated previously, showed extremely low gut microbiota diversity and an overall structure that diverged from those of nonpanda herbivores but converged with those of carnivorous and omnivorous bears. The giant panda did not harbor putative cellulose-degrading phylotypes such as Ruminococcaceae and Bacteroides bacteria that are typically enriched in other herbivores, but instead, its microbiota was dominated by Escherichia/Shigella and Streptococcus bacteria. Members of the class Clostridia were common and abundant in the giant panda gut microbiota, but most of the members present were absent in other herbivores and were not phylogenetically related with known cellulolytic lineages. Therefore, the giant panda appears not to have evolved a gut microbiota compatible with its newly adopted diet, which may adversely influence the coevolutionary fitness of this herbivore. The giant panda, an endangered mammalian species endemic to western China, is well known for its unique bamboo diet. Unlike other herbivores that have successfully evolved

  17. Vaginal microbiota in menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Martinus Tarina; Wresti Indriatmi; Larisa Paramitha; Evita Halim Effendi; Shannaz Nadia Yusharyahya; Hanny Nilasari

    2016-01-01

    The human vagina together with its resident, microbiota, comprise a dynamic ecosystem. Normal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus species, and pathogen microbiota such as Gardnerella species and Bacteroides species can occur due to decrease in Lactobacillus domination. Lactobacillus plays an essential role in keeping normal vaginal microbiota in balance. Vaginal microbiota adapts to pH change and hormonal value. Changes in the vaginal microbiota over a woman’s lifespan will influence the...

  18. Diversified microbiota of meconium is affected by maternal diabetes status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Hu

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to assess the diversity of the meconium microbiome and determine if the bacterial community is affected by maternal diabetes status.The first intestinal discharge (meconium was collected from 23 newborns stratified by maternal diabetes status: 4 mothers had pre-gestational type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM including one mother with dizygotic twins, 5 developed gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM and 13 had no diabetes. The meconium microbiome was profiled using multi-barcode 16S rRNA sequencing followed by taxonomic assignment and diversity analysis.All meconium samples were not sterile and contained diversified microbiota. Compared with adult feces, the meconium showed a lower species diversity, higher sample-to-sample variation, and enrichment of Proteobacteria and reduction of Bacteroidetes. Among the meconium samples, the taxonomy analyses suggested that the overall bacterial content significantly differed by maternal diabetes status, with the microbiome of the DM group showing higher alpha-diversity than that of no-diabetes or GDM groups. No global difference was found between babies delivered vaginally versus via Cesarean-section. Regression analysis showed that the most robust predictor for the meconium microbiota composition was the maternal diabetes status that preceded pregnancy. Specifically, Bacteroidetes (phyla and Parabacteriodes (genus were enriched in the meconium in the DM group compared to the no-diabetes group.Our study provides evidence that meconium contains diversified microbiota and is not affected by the mode of delivery. It also suggests that the meconium microbiome of infants born to mothers with DM is enriched for the same bacterial taxa as those reported in the fecal microbiome of adult DM patients.

  19. Diversity of the skin microbiota of fishes: evidence for host species specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Andrea; Tao, Zhen; Bullard, Stephen A; Arias, Covadonga R

    2013-09-01

    Skin microbiota of Gulf of Mexico fishes were investigated by ribosomal internal spacer analysis (RISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A total of 102 fish specimens representing six species (Mugil cephalus, Lutjanus campechanus, Cynoscion nebulosus, Cynoscion arenarius, Micropogonias undulatus, and Lagodon rhomboides) were sampled at regular intervals throughout a year. The skin microbiota from each individual fish was analyzed by RISA and produced complex profiles with 23 bands on average. Similarities between RISA profiles ranged from 97.5% to 4.0%. At 70% similarity, 11 clusters were defined, each grouping individuals from the same fish species. Multidimensional scaling and analysis of similarity correlated the RISA-defined clusters with geographic locality, date, and fish species. Global R values indicated that fish species was the most indicative variable for group separation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences (from pooled samples of 10 individual fish for each fish species) showed that the Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum in skin microbiota, followed by the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria. The distribution and abundance of bacterial sequences were different among all species analyzed. Aeribacillus was found in all fish species representing 19% of all clones sequenced, while some genera were fish species-specific (Neorickettsia in M. cephalus and Microbacterium in L. campechanus). Our data provide evidence for the existence of specific skin microbiota associated with particular fish species. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gut microbiota composition and its effects on obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricilli, Andrea M; Saad, Mario J A

    2014-07-01

    Rising evidence suggest that variation in the gut microbiome at gene and species levels defines subsets of individuals who have increased risk of obesity-related metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which is influenced by diet and genetic profile of the host. Our goal in this review is gathering the newest findings concerning gut microbiota composition and effects on host's metabolism. Dietary changes have been shown as the most prominent shaper of gut microbiota composition, reflecting major phenotypes, which can also be transmitted to other individuals, in spite of genetic variances. Gut microbiota composition has also been presented as diversity, which may have important implications in metabolite production and consequent interference with inflammatory activation, insulin resistance, and obesity. Specific approaches made it possible to comprehend some of the interactions between certain bacterial strains and their host, and how their metabolites may interfere with host's cell signaling, changing its metabolic profile. Herein, we discuss some of the mechanisms by which alterations in the gut microbiota composition may contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity and its related comorbidities.

  1. Development of Upper Respiratory Tract Microbiota in Infancy is Affected by Mode of Delivery

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    Astrid A.T.M. Bosch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Birth by Caesarian section is associated with short- and long-term respiratory morbidity. We hypothesized that mode of delivery affects the development of the respiratory microbiota, thereby altering its capacity to provide colonization resistance and consecutive pathobiont overgrowth and infections. Therefore, we longitudinally studied the impact of mode of delivery on the nasopharyngeal microbiota development from birth until six months of age in a healthy, unselected birth cohort of 102 children (n = 761 samples. Here, we show that the respiratory microbiota develops within one day from a variable mixed bacterial community towards a Streptococcus viridans-predominated profile, regardless of mode of delivery. Within the first week, rapid niche differentiation had occurred; initially with in most infants Staphylococcus aureus predominance, followed by differentiation towards Corynebacterium pseudodiphteriticum/propinquum, Dolosigranulum pigrum, Moraxella catarrhalis/nonliquefaciens, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and/or Haemophilus influenzae dominated communities. Infants born by Caesarian section showed a delay in overall development of respiratory microbiota profiles with specifically reduced colonization with health-associated commensals like Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum, thereby possibly influencing respiratory health later in life.

  2. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall extract and poplar propolis ethanol extract supplementation on growth performance, digestibility, blood profile, fecal microbiota and fecal noxious gas emissions in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Kim, In H

    2014-06-01

    A total of 105 growing pigs (24.91 ± 1.06 kg) were used in a 6-week trial to investigate the effects of including Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall extract and poplar propolis ethanol extract (SPE) in the diet on growth performance, digestibility, blood profiles, fecal microbiota and fecal noxious gas emissions. Pigs were randomly allocated to one of three dietary treatments (seven pens/treatment, five pigs/pen) according to initial body weight and sex (two gilts and three barrows). Treatments consisted of a corn soybean meal basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.05 or 0.10% SPE. There was a significant linear improvement (P  0.05) affected by SPE supplementation in the diets. In conclusion, results indicate that dietary SPE supplementation can improve growth performance, digestibility and fecal microbiota, and decrease fecal gas emissions in growing pigs. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Microbiota-Mediated Inflammation and Antimicrobial Defense in the Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Silvia; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The diverse microbial populations constituting the intestinal microbiota promote immune development and differentiation, but because of their complex metabolic requirements and the consequent difficulty culturing them, they remained, until recently, largely uncharacterized and mysterious. In the last decade, deep nucleic acid sequencing platforms, new computational and bioinformatics tools, and full-genome characterization of several hundred commensal bacterial species facilitated studies of the microbiota and revealed that differences in microbiota composition can be associated with inflammatory, metabolic, and infectious diseases, that each human is colonized by a distinct bacterial flora, and that the microbiota can be manipulated to reduce and even cure some diseases. Different bacterial species induce distinct immune cell populations that can play pro- and anti-inflammatory roles, and thus the composition of the microbiota determines, in part, the level of resistance to infection and susceptibility to inflammatory diseases. This review summarizes recent work characterizing commensal microbes that contribute to the antimicrobial defense/inflammation axis. PMID:25581310

  4. Functional gene profiling through metaRNAseq approach reveals diet-dependent variation in rumen microbiota of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsu, Ankit T; Parmar, Nidhi R; Nathani, Neelam M; Pandit, Ramesh J; Patel, Anand B; Patel, Amrutlal K; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances in next generation sequencing technology have enabled analysis of complex microbial community from genome to transcriptome level. In the present study, metatranscriptomic approach was applied to elucidate functionally active bacteria and their biological processes in rumen of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) adapted to different dietary treatments. Buffaloes were adapted to a diet containing 50:50, 75:25 and 100:0 forage to concentrate ratio, each for 6 weeks, before ruminal content sample collection. Metatranscriptomes from rumen fiber adherent and fiber-free active bacteria were sequenced using Ion Torrent PGM platform followed by annotation using MG-RAST server and CAZYmes (Carbohydrate active enzymes) analysis toolkit. In all the samples Bacteroidetes was the most abundant phylum followed by Firmicutes. Functional analysis using KEGG Orthology database revealed Metabolism as the most abundant category at level 1 within which Carbohydrate metabolism was dominating. Diet treatments also exerted significant differences in proportion of enzymes involved in metabolic pathways for VFA production. Carbohydrate Active Enzyme(CAZy) analysis revealed the abundance of genes encoding glycoside hydrolases with the highest representation of GH13 CAZy family in all the samples. The findings provide an overview of the activities occurring in the rumen as well as active bacterial population and the changes occurring through different dietary treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamic correlations between microbiota succession and flavor development involved in the ripening of Kazak artisanal cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoji; Liu, Fei; Shi, Xuewei; Wang, Bin; Li, Kaixiong; Li, Baokun; Zhuge, Bin

    2018-03-01

    Cheese is a typical handcrafted fermented food in Kazak minority from the Uighur Autonomy Region in China. The ripening process of the cheese is crucial for quality and flavor. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper knowledge on the bacterial and fungal community diversity at different time points during the post-ripening of the cheese and to understand the relationship between bacterial and fungal profiles and the chemical components including amino acids, fatty acids and volatile compounds related the cheese flavor. Cheese samples were collected from days 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 after the starting point of post-ripening. The bacterial and fungal compositions were analyzed with next generation sequencing targeting the 16S rDNA loci for bacteria and ITS loci for fungi. The amino acids contents were analyzed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography combined with UV detection. The fatty acids and the volatile components were analyzed by Solid Phase Micro Extraction followed by Gas Chromatography/Mass spectrometry. We found that Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Kluyveromyces and Torulaspora were the dominant cheese's population. Bidirectional orthogonal partial least squares (O2PLS) based correlation analysis between microbiota succession and flavor dynamics showed that bacteria made more contributions to flavor formation than fungi. Eight bacteria genera and seven fungi genera were determined as functional core microbiota for the flavor production based on their dominance and functionality in microbial community. This study provided a comprehensive picture of the dynamic changes of microbiota profiles through the post-ripening process. The elucidation of the causal relationship between microbiota and the flavor components has advanced our understanding of the mechanism underlying the cheese development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-Term Green Tea Supplementation Does Not Change the Human Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Pilou L H R; Penders, John; Hursel, Rick; Budding, Andries E; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2016-01-01

    Green tea catechins may play a role in body weight regulation through interactions with the gut microbiota. We examined whether green tea supplementation for 12 weeks induces changes in composition of the human gut microbiota. 58 Caucasian men and women were included in a randomized, placebo-controlled design. For 12 weeks, subjects consumed either green tea (>0.56 g/d epigallocatechin-gallate + 0.28 ∼ 0.45 g/d caffeine) or placebo capsules. Fecal samples were collected twice (baseline, vs. week 12) for analyses of total bacterial profiles by means of IS-profiling, a 16S-23S interspacer region-based profiling method. No significant changes between baseline and week 12 in subjects receiving green tea or placebo capsules, and no significant interactions between treatment (green tea or placebo) and time (baseline and week 12) were observed for body composition. Analysis of the fecal samples in subjects receiving green tea and placebo showed similar bacterial diversity and community structures, indicating there were no significant changes in bacterial diversity between baseline and week 12 in subjects receiving green tea capsules or in subjects receiving placebo capsules. No significant interactions were observed between treatment (green tea or placebo) and time (baseline and week 12) for the gut microbial diversity. Although, there were no significant differences between normal weight and overweight subjects in response to green tea, we did observe a reduced bacterial alpha diversity in overweight as compared to normal weight subjects (p = 0.002). Green tea supplementation for 12 weeks did not have a significant effect on composition of the gut microbiota. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01556321.

  7. Quantitative analyses of the bacterial microbiota of rearing environment, tilapia and common carp cultured in earthen ponds and inhibitory activity of its lactic acid bacteria on fish spoilage and pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaktcham, Pierre Marie; Temgoua, Jules-Bocamdé; Ngoufack Zambou, François; Diaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Wacher, Carmen; Pérez-Chabela, María de Lourdes

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the bacterial load of water, Nile Tilapia and common Carp intestines from earthen ponds, isolate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and assess their antimicrobial activity against fish spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. Following enumeration and isolation of microorganisms the antimicrobial activity of the LAB isolates was evaluated. Taxonomic identification of selected antagonistic LAB strains was assessed, followed by partial characterisation of their antimicrobial metabolites. Results showed that high counts (>4 log c.f.u ml -1 or 8 log c.f.u g -1 ) of total aerobic bacteria were recorded in pond waters and fish intestines. The microbiota were also found to be dominated by Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Escherichia coli. LAB isolates (5.60%) exhibited potent direct and extracellular antimicrobial activity against the host-derived and non host-derived spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. These antagonistic isolates were identified and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis was found as the predominant (42.85%) specie. The strains displayed the ability to produce lactic, acetic, butyric, propionic and valeric acids. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances with activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative (Vibrio spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria were produced by three L. lactis subsp. lactis strains. In this study, the LAB from the microbiota of fish and pond water showed potent antimicrobial activity against fish spoilage or pathogenic bacteria from the same host or ecological niche. The studied Cameroonian aquatic niche is an ideal source of antagonistic LAB that could be appropriate as new fish biopreservatives or disease control agents in aquaculture under tropical conditions in particular or worldwide in general.

  8. Diversity of Cervical Microbiota in Asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis Genital Infection: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Filardo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection continues to be an important public health problem worldwide due to its increasing incidence. C. trachomatis infection can lead to severe sequelae, such as pelvic inflammatory disease, obstructive infertility, and preterm birth. Recently, it has been suggested that the cervico-vaginal microbiota may be an important defense factor toward C. trachomatis infection as well as the development of chronic sequelae. Therefore, the investigation of microbial profiles associated to chlamydial infection is of the utmost importance. Here we present a pilot study aiming to characterize, through the metagenomic analysis of sequenced 16s rRNA gene amplicons, the cervical microbiota from reproductive age women positive to C. trachomatis infection. The main finding of our study showed a marked increase in bacterial diversity in asymptomatic C. trachomatis positive women as compared to healthy controls in terms of Shannon's diversity and Shannon's evenness (P = 0.031 and P = 0.026, respectively. More importantly, the cervical microbiota from C. trachomatis positive women and from healthy controls significantly separated into two clusters in the weighted UniFrac analysis (P = 0.0027, suggesting that differences between the two groups depended entirely on the relative abundance of bacterial taxa rather than on the types of bacterial taxa present. Furthermore, C. trachomatis positive women showed an overall decrease in Lactobacillus spp. and an increase in anaerobes. These findings are part of an ongoing larger epidemiological study that will evaluate the potential role of distinct bacterial communities of the cervical microbiota in C. trachomatis infection.

  9. Gut Microbiota in Cardiovascular Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W H Wilson; Kitai, Takeshi; Hazen, Stanley L

    2017-03-31

    Significant interest in recent years has focused on gut microbiota-host interaction because accumulating evidence has revealed that intestinal microbiota play an important role in human health and disease, including cardiovascular diseases. Changes in the composition of gut microbiota associated with disease, referred to as dysbiosis, have been linked to pathologies such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition to alterations in gut microbiota composition, the metabolic potential of gut microbiota has been identified as a contributing factor in the development of diseases. Recent studies revealed that gut microbiota can elicit a variety of effects on the host. Indeed, the gut microbiome functions like an endocrine organ, generating bioactive metabolites, that can impact host physiology. Microbiota interact with the host through many pathways, including the trimethylamine/trimethylamine N -oxide pathway, short-chain fatty acids pathway, and primary and secondary bile acids pathways. In addition to these metabolism-dependent pathways, metabolism-independent processes are suggested to also potentially contribute to cardiovascular disease pathogenesis. For example, heart failure-associated splanchnic circulation congestion, bowel wall edema, and impaired intestinal barrier function are thought to result in bacterial translocation, the presence of bacterial products in the systemic circulation and heightened inflammatory state. These are thought to also contribute to further progression of heart failure and atherosclerosis. The purpose of the current review is to highlight the complex interplay between microbiota, their metabolites, and the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We will also discuss the roles of gut microbiota in normal physiology and the potential of modulating intestinal microbial inhabitants as novel therapeutic targets. © 2017 American Heart

  10. Bacterial diversity is strongly associated with historical penguin activity in an Antarctic lake sediment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Renbin; Shi, Yu; Ma, Dawei; Wang, Can; Xu, Hua; Chu, Haiyan

    2015-11-25

    Current penguin activity in Antarctica affects the geochemistry of sediments and their microbial communities; the effects of historical penguin activity are less well understood. Here, bacterial diversity in ornithogenic sediment was investigated using high-throughput pyrosequencing. The relative abundances of dominant phyla were controlled by the amount of historical penguin guano deposition. Significant positive correlations were found between both the bacterial richness and diversity, and the relative penguin number (p penguin activity drove the vertical distribution of the bacterial communities. The lowest relative abundances of individual phyla corresponded to lowest number of penguin population at 1,800-2,300 yr BP during a drier and colder period; the opposite was observed during a moister and warmer climate (1,400-1,800 yr BP). This study shows that changes in the climate over millennia affected penguin populations and the outcomes of these changes affect the sediment bacterial community today.

  11. Invertebrate footprints on detritus processing, bacterial community structure, and spatiotemporal redox profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunting, E.R.; Whatley, M.H.; van der Geest, H.G.; Mulder, C.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Breure, A.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2012-01-01

    Detritus processing is driven by a complex interplay between macroinvertebrate and microbial activities. Bioturbation/feeding activities of invertebrates in sediments are known to influence decomposition rates. However, direct effects of invertebrates on bacterial communities and detritus processing

  12. Aberrant intestinal microbiota in individuals with prediabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H.; Tremaroli, Valentina; Caesar, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Individuals with type 2 diabetes have aberrant intestinal microbiota. However, recent studies suggest that metformin alters the composition and functional potential of gut microbiota, thereby interfering with the diabetes-related microbial signatures. We tested whether specific gut...... microbiota profiles are associated with prediabetes (defined as fasting plasma glucose of 6.1–7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c of 42–48 mmol/mol [6.0–6.5%]) and a range of clinical biomarkers of poor metabolic health. Methods: In the present case–control study, we analysed the gut microbiota of 134 Danish adults...... impaired glucose regulation in recipient mice. Conclusions/interpretation: Collectively, our data show that individuals with prediabetes have aberrant intestinal microbiota characterised by a decreased abundance of the genus Clostridium and the mucin-degrading bacterium A. muciniphila. Our findings...

  13. Medición de cambios cuantitativos de la microbiota subgingival posterior a la remoción de placa bacteriana supragingival Measurement of quantitative changes of the microbiota subgingival after to removal of bacterial plaque supragingival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Godoy

    2010-04-01

    possible that the microorganisms responsible for the origin and progression of the disease periodontal that live on the margin gingival (supragingival and under this (subgingival they have a direct relation that allows to support influential interactions in the growth and development of the different bacterial species that they live in the tissue periodontal.Therefore having removed the microorganisms that are located supragingivalmente would be possible to find changes in the way subgingival when an exchange not to exist between the aerobic environments (supragingival and anaerobic (subgingival once disorganized the bacterial plate supragingival. To demonstrate this relation 7 individuals selected with diagnosis of periodontitis chronicle moderate and severe to which they there was realized a destartraje supragingival of complete mouth to achieve supragingival to disorganize the bacterial plate. In turn microbiological samples of the sacks took periodontales deeper of every quadrant of these individuals, being the first taken sample before the destartraje supragingival considered as sample basal (the 0th, then they took at to 1, 7 and 21 days of removed the bacterial plate supragingival anaerobios (subgingival once disorganized the bacterial plate supragingival Of the results of the present study we could conclude that on having disorganized the biofilm supragingival a decrease is observed in the total quantity of microorganisms subgingivales, as well as also it diminishes in a considerable way the proportion of present Porphyoromona gingivalis in the way subgingival. Which would lead to thinking that there exists a direct and dependent relation between the microorganisms that live the way supragingival and subgingival.

  14. Divergent pro-inflammatory profile of human dendritic cells in response to commensal and pathogenic bacteria associated with the airway microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Steen-Jensen, Daniel Bisgaard; Laursen, Janne Marie

    2012-01-01

    of individual bacterial species are unknown. In this study, we compared the immune stimulatory capacity on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of selected airway commensal and pathogenic bacteria predominantly associated with lungs of asthma or COPD patients (pathogenic Haemophillus spp. and Moraxella...... spp.), healthy lungs (commensal Prevotella spp.) or both (commensal Veillonella spp. and Actinomyces spp.). All bacteria were found to induce activation of DCs as demonstrated by similar induction of CD83, CD40 and CD86 surface expression. However, asthma and COPD-associated pathogenic bacteria...... provoked a 3-5 fold higher production of IL-23, IL-12p70 and IL-10 cytokines compared to the commensal bacteria. Based on the differential cytokine production profiles, the studied airway bacteria could be segregated into three groups (Haemophilus spp. and Moraxella spp. vs. Prevotella spp. and Veillonella...

  15. Features of the bronchial bacterial microbiome associated with atopy, asthma, and responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durack, Juliana; Lynch, Susan V; Nariya, Snehal; Bhakta, Nirav R; Beigelman, Avraham; Castro, Mario; Dyer, Anne-Marie; Israel, Elliot; Kraft, Monica; Martin, Richard J; Mauger, David T; Rosenberg, Sharon R; Sharp-King, Tonya; White, Steven R; Woodruff, Prescott G; Avila, Pedro C; Denlinger, Loren C; Holguin, Fernando; Lazarus, Stephen C; Lugogo, Njira; Moore, Wendy C; Peters, Stephen P; Que, Loretta; Smith, Lewis J; Sorkness, Christine A; Wechsler, Michael E; Wenzel, Sally E; Boushey, Homer A; Huang, Yvonne J

    2017-07-01

    Compositional differences in the bronchial bacterial microbiota have been associated with asthma, but it remains unclear whether the findings are attributable to asthma, to aeroallergen sensitization, or to inhaled corticosteroid treatment. We sought to compare the bronchial bacterial microbiota in adults with steroid-naive atopic asthma, subjects with atopy but no asthma, and nonatopic healthy control subjects and to determine relationships of the bronchial microbiota to phenotypic features of asthma. Bacterial communities in protected bronchial brushings from 42 atopic asthmatic subjects, 21 subjects with atopy but no asthma, and 21 healthy control subjects were profiled by using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacterial composition and community-level functions inferred from sequence profiles were analyzed for between-group differences. Associations with clinical and inflammatory variables were examined, including markers of type 2-related inflammation and change in airway hyperresponsiveness after 6 weeks of fluticasone treatment. The bronchial microbiome differed significantly among the 3 groups. Asthmatic subjects were uniquely enriched in members of the Haemophilus, Neisseria, Fusobacterium, and Porphyromonas species and the Sphingomonodaceae family and depleted in members of the Mogibacteriaceae family and Lactobacillales order. Asthma-associated differences in predicted bacterial functions included involvement of amino acid and short-chain fatty acid metabolism pathways. Subjects with type 2-high asthma harbored significantly lower bronchial bacterial burden. Distinct changes in specific microbiota members were seen after fluticasone treatment. Steroid responsiveness was linked to differences in baseline compositional and functional features of the bacterial microbiome. Even in subjects with mild steroid-naive asthma, differences in the bronchial microbiome are associated with immunologic and clinical features of the disease. The specific differences identified

  16. Members of the Oral Microbiota Are Associated with IL-8 Release by Gingival Epithelial Cells in Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, Katharina; Riva, Alessandra; Pfeiffer, Stefanie; Berry, David; Somoza, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    The triggers for the onset of oral diseases are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to characterize the oral bacterial community in healthy humans and its association with nutrition, oral hygiene habits, and the release of the inflammatory marker IL-8 from gingival epithelial cells (GECs) with and without stimulation by bacterial endotoxins to identify possible indicator operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with inflammatory marker status. GECs from 21 healthy participants (13 females, 8 males) were incubated with or without addition of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), and the oral microbiota was profiled using 16S rRNA gene-targeted sequencing. The basal IL-8 release after 6 h was between 9.9 and 98.2 pg/ml, and bacterial communities were characteristic for healthy oral microbiota. The composition of the oral microbiota was associated with basal IL-8 levels, the intake of meat, tea, white wine, sweets and the use of chewing gum, as well as flossing habits, allergies, gender and body mass index. Additionally, eight OTUs were associated with high basal levels of IL-8 and GEC response to LPS, with high basal levels of IL-8, and 1 with low basal levels of IL8. The identification of indicator bacteria in healthy subjects with high levels of IL-8 release is of importance as they may be promising early warning indicators for the possible onset of oral diseases.

  17. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation.Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene.B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats.B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to the identification of novel microbial targets

  18. Long Term Development of Gut Microbiota Composition in Atopic Children: Impact of Probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, N. B. M. M.; Gorissen, D. M. W.; Eck, A.; Niers, L. E. M.; Vlieger, A. M.; Besseling-van der Vaart, I.; Budding, A. E.; Savelkoul, P. H. M.; van der Ent, C. K.; Rijkers, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Imbalance of the human gut microbiota in early childhood is suggested as a risk factor for immune-mediated disorders such as allergies. With the objective to modulate the intestinal microbiota, probiotic supplementation during infancy has been used for prevention of allergic diseases in infants, with variable success. However, not much is known about the long-term consequences of neonatal use of probiotics on the microbiota composition. The aim of this study was to assess the composition and microbial diversity in stool samples of infants at high-risk for atopic disease, from birth onwards to six years of age, who were treated with probiotics or placebo during the first year of life. Methods In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, a probiotic mixture consisting of B. bifidum W23, B. lactis W52 and Lc. Lactis W58 (Ecologic® Panda) was administered to pregnant women during the last 6 weeks of pregnancy and to their offspring during the first year of life. During follow-up, faecal samples were collected from 99 children over a 6-year period with the following time points: first week, second week, first month, three months, first year, eighteen months, two years and six years. Bacterial profiling was performed by IS-pro. Differences in bacterial abundance and diversity were assessed by conventional statistics. Results The presence of the supplemented probiotic strains in faecal samples was confirmed, and the probiotic strains had a higher abundance and prevalence in the probiotic group during supplementation. Only minor and short term differences in composition of microbiota were found between the probiotic and placebo group and between children with or without atopy. The diversity of Bacteroidetes was significantly higher after two weeks in the placebo group, and at the age of two years atopic children had a significantly higher Proteobacteria diversity (p < 0.05). Gut microbiota development continued between two and six years, whereby

  19. Long Term Development of Gut Microbiota Composition in Atopic Children: Impact of Probiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N B M M Rutten

    Full Text Available Imbalance of the human gut microbiota in early childhood is suggested as a risk factor for immune-mediated disorders such as allergies. With the objective to modulate the intestinal microbiota, probiotic supplementation during infancy has been used for prevention of allergic diseases in infants, with variable success. However, not much is known about the long-term consequences of neonatal use of probiotics on the microbiota composition. The aim of this study was to assess the composition and microbial diversity in stool samples of infants at high-risk for atopic disease, from birth onwards to six years of age, who were treated with probiotics or placebo during the first year of life.In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, a probiotic mixture consisting of B. bifidum W23, B. lactis W52 and Lc. Lactis W58 (Ecologic® Panda was administered to pregnant women during the last 6 weeks of pregnancy and to their offspring during the first year of life. During follow-up, faecal samples were collected from 99 children over a 6-year period with the following time points: first week, second week, first month, three months, first year, eighteen months, two years and six years. Bacterial profiling was performed by IS-pro. Differences in bacterial abundance and diversity were assessed by conventional statistics.The presence of the supplemented probiotic strains in faecal samples was confirmed, and the probiotic strains had a higher abundance and prevalence in the probiotic group during supplementation. Only minor and short term differences in composition of microbiota were found between the probiotic and placebo group and between children with or without atopy. The diversity of Bacteroidetes was significantly higher after two weeks in the placebo group, and at the age of two years atopic children had a significantly higher Proteobacteria diversity (p < 0.05. Gut microbiota development continued between two and six years, whereby microbiota

  20. Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease in a comparative coral species framework.

    KAUST Repository

    Roder, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs are threatened throughout the world. A major factor contributing to their decline is outbreaks and propagation of coral diseases. Due to the complexity of coral-associated microbe communities, little is understood in terms of disease agents, hosts and vectors. It is known that compromised health in corals is correlated with shifts in bacterial assemblages colonizing coral mucus and tissue. However, general disease patterns remain, to a large extent, ambiguous as comparative studies over species, regions, or diseases are scarce. Here, we compare bacterial assemblages of samples from healthy (HH) colonies and such displaying signs of White Plague Disease (WPD) of two different coral species (Pavona duerdeni and Porites lutea) from the same reef in Koh Tao, Thailand, using 16S rRNA gene microarrays. In line with other studies, we found an increase of bacterial diversity in diseased (DD) corals, and a higher abundance of taxa from the families that include known coral pathogens (Alteromonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Vibrionaceae). In our comparative framework analysis, we found differences in microbial assemblages between coral species and coral health states. Notably, patterns of bacterial community structures from HH and DD corals were maintained over species boundaries. Moreover, microbes that differentiated the two coral species did not overlap with microbes that were indicative of HH and DD corals. This suggests that while corals harbor distinct species-specific microbial assemblages, disease-specific bacterial abundance patterns exist that are maintained over coral species boundaries.

  1. Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease across corals and oceans indicates a conserved and distinct disease microbiome

    KAUST Repository

    Roder, C.

    2014-01-29

    Coral diseases are characterized by microbial community shifts in coral mucus and tissue, but causes and consequences of these changes are vaguely understood due to the complexity and dynamics of coral-associated bacteria. We used 16S rRNA gene microarrays to assay differences in bacterial assemblages of healthy and diseased colonies displaying White Plague Disease (WPD) signs from two closely related Caribbean coral species, Orbicella faveolata and Orbicella franksi. Analysis of differentially abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed strong differences between healthy and diseased specimens, but not between coral species. A subsequent comparison to data from two Indo-Pacific coral species (Pavona duerdeni and Porites lutea) revealed distinct microbial community patterns associated with ocean basin, coral species and health state. Coral species were clearly separated by site, but also, the relatedness of the underlying bacterial community structures resembled the phylogenetic relationship of the coral hosts. In diseased samples, bacterial richness increased and putatively opportunistic bacteria were consistently more abundant highlighting the role of opportunistic conditions in structuring microbial community patterns during disease. Our comparative analysis shows that it is possible to derive conserved bacterial footprints of diseased coral holobionts that might help in identifying key bacterial species related to the underlying etiopathology. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that similar-appearing disease phenotypes produce microbial community patterns that are consistent over coral species and oceans, irrespective of the putative underlying pathogen. Consequently, profiling coral diseases by microbial community structure over multiple coral species might allow the development of a comparative disease framework that can inform on cause and relatedness of coral diseases. 2013 The Authors Molecular Ecology John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The ELDERMET biobank: Isolation and characterization of the intestinal microbiota from elderly Irish subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshminarayanan, Bhuvaneswari

    2014-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is colonized by a dense and diverse bacterial community, the commensal microbiota, which plays an important role in the overall health of individuals. This microbiota is relatively stable throughout adult life, but may fluctuate over time with aging and disease. The adaptation of the gut microbiota to our changing life-style is probably the reason for the large inter-individual variation observed among different people. Since the gut microbiota plays an e...

  3. Fecal concentrations of bacterially-derived vitamin K forms are associated with gut microbiota composition but not plasma or fecal cytokine concentrations in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Emerging evidence suggests novel roles for bacterially-derived vitamin K forms known as menaquinones (MKn) in health and disease which may be attributable in part to anti-inflammatory effects. However, the relevance of MKn produced by gut bacteria to vitamin K requirements and inflammati...

  4. The Mouse Intestinal Bacterial Collection (miBC) provides host-specific insight into cultured diversity and functional potential of the gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Pukall, Rüdiger; Abt, Birte

    2016-01-01

    BC), a public repository of bacterial strains and associated genomes from the mouse gut, and studied host-specificity of colonization and sequence-based relevance of the resource. The collection includes several strains representing novel species, genera and even one family. Genomic analyses showed that certain...

  5. New Insights into the Microbiota of Moth Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Mereghetti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, next generation sequencing (NGS technologies have helped to improve our understanding of the bacterial communities associated with insects, shedding light on their wide taxonomic and functional diversity. To date, little is known about the microbiota of lepidopterans, which includes some of the most damaging agricultural and forest pests worldwide. Studying their microbiota could help us better understand their ecology and offer insights into developing new pest control strategies. In this paper, we review the literature pertaining to the microbiota of lepidopterans with a focus on pests, and highlight potential recurrent patterns regarding microbiota structure and composition.

  6. Stomach microbiota composition varies between patients with non-atrophic gastritis and patients with intestinal type of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles-Jimenez, Francisco; Vazquez-Jimenez, Flor; Medrano-Guzman, Rafael; Mantilla, Alejandra; Torres, Javier

    2014-02-26

    We aimed to characterize microbiota of the gastric mucosa as it progress to intestinal type of cancer. Study included five patients each of non-atrophic gastritis (NAG), intestinal metaplasia (IM) and intestinal-type gastric cancer (GC). Gastric tissue was obtained and DNA extracted for microbiota analyses using the microarray G3 PhyloChip. Bacterial diversity ranged from 8 to 57, and steadily decreased from NAG to IM to GC (p = 0.004). A significant microbiota difference was observed between NAG and GC based on Unifrac-presence/absence and weighted-Unifrac-abundance metrics of 283 taxa (p < 0.05). HC-AN analyses based on presence/absence of 238 taxa revealed that GC and NAG grouped apart, whereas IM overlapped with both. An ordinated analyses based on weighted-Unifrac distance given abundance of 44 taxa showing significance across categories revealed significant microbiota separation between NAG and GC. This study is the first to show a gradual shift in gastric microbiota profile from NAG to IM to GC.

  7. Alterations in the gut microbiota of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youlian; Ou, Zhitao; Tang, Xiaoping; Zhou, Yongjian; Xu, Haoming; Wang, Xianfei; Li, Kang; He, Jie; Du, Yanlei; Wang, Hong; Chen, Ye; Nie, Yuqiang

    2018-02-07

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), caused by infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is associated with gastrointestinal disease, systemic immune activation and changes in the gut microbiota. Here, we aim to investigate the gut microbiota patterns of HIV-infected individuals and HIV-uninfected individuals in populations from South China. We enrolled 33 patients with HIV (14 participants treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy [HAART] for more than 3 months; the remaining 19 individuals had not received treatment) and 35 healthy controls (HC) for a cross-sectional comparison of gut microbiota using stool samples. Gut microbial communities were profiled by sequencing the bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Dysbiosis was more common among patients with AIDS compared with healthy individuals. Dysbiosis was characterized by decreased α-diversity, low mean counts of Bacteroidetes, Faecalibacterium, Prevotella, Bacteroides vulgatus, Dialister and Roseburia inulnivorans, and high mean counts of Proteobacteria, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Lachnociostridium, Ruminococcus gnavus and Streptococcus vestibularis. Increased abundance of Bacilli was observed in homosexual patients. Proteobacteria were higher among heterosexual patients with HIV infections. Tenericutes were higher among patients with history of intravenous drug abuse. Restoration of gut microbiota diversity and a significant increase in abundance of Faecalibacterium, Blautia and Bacteroides were found in patients receiving HAART compared to those who did not receive. HIV infection-associated dysbiosis is characterized by decreased levels of α-diversity and Bacteroidetes, increased levels of Proteobacteria and the alterations of gut microbiota correlate with the route of HIV transmission. The imbalanced faecal microbiota of HIV infection is partially restored after therapy. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and

  8. Carbohydrates and the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassard, Christophe; Lacroix, Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Due to its scale and its important role in maintaining health, the gut microbiota can be considered as a 'new organ' inside the human body. Many complex carbohydrates are degraded and fermented by the human gut microbiota in the large intestine to both yield basic energy salvage and impact gut health through produced metabolites. This review will focus on the gut microbes and microbial mechanisms responsible for polysaccharides degradation and fermentation in the large intestine. Gut microbes and bacterial metabolites impact the host at many levels, including modulation of inflammation, and glucose and lipid metabolisms. A complex relationship occurs in the intestine between the human gut microbiota, diet and the host. Research on carbohydrates and gut microbiota composition and functionality is fast developing and will open opportunities for prevention and treatment of obesity, diabetes and other related metabolic disorders through manipulation of the gut ecosystem.

  9. Intestinal microbiota and HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. S. M. Trindade

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota consists of a qualitatively and quantitatively diverse range of microorganisms dynamically interacting with the host. It is remarkably stable with regard to the presence of microorganisms and their roles which, however, can be altered due to pathological conditions, diet composition, gastrointestinal disturbances and/or drug ingestion. The present review aimed at contributing to the discussion about changes in the intestinal microbiota due to HIV-1 infection, focusing on the triad infection-microbiota-nutrition as factors that promote intestinal bacterial imbalance. Intestinal microbiota alterations can be due to the HIV-1 infection as a primary factor or the pharmacotherapy employed, or they can be one of the consequences of the disease.

  10. Gut Microbiota and Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Han

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D has increased rapidly and became a major public health concern worldwide. Various factors are associated with the development of T1D, such as diet, genome, and intestinal microbiota. The gastrointestinal (GI tract harbors a complex and dynamic population of microorganisms, the gut microbiota, which exert a marked influence on the host homeostasis and metabolic diseases. Recent evidence shows that altered gut bacterial composition (dysbiosis is highly associated with the pathogenesis of insulin dysfunction and T1D and, thus, targeting gut microbiota may serve as a therapeutic potential for T1D patients. In this study, we updated the effect of gut microbiota on T1D and potential mechanisms were discussed.

  11. Enrichment of beneficial bacteria in the skin microbiota of bats persisting with white-nose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux-Labonté, Virginie; Simard, Anouk; Willis, Craig K R; Lapointe, François-Joseph

    2017-09-05

    Infectious diseases of wildlife are increasing worldwide with implications for conservation and human public health. The microbiota (i.e. microbial community living on or in a host) could influence wildlife disease resistance or tolerance. White-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), has killed millions of hibernating North American bats since 2007. We characterized the skin microbiota of naïve, pre-WNS little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) from three WNS-negative hibernation sites and persisting, previously exposed bats from three WNS-positive sites to test the hypothesis that the skin microbiota of bats shifts following WNS invasion. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing on 66 bats and 11 environmental samples, we found that hibernation site strongly influenced the composition and diversity of the skin microbiota. Bats from WNS-positive and WNS-negative sites differed in alpha and beta diversity, as well as in microbiota composition. Alpha diversity was reduced in persisting, WNS-positive bats, and the microbiota profile was enriched with particular taxa such Janthinobacterium, Micrococcaceae, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, and Rhodococcus. Some of these taxa are recognized for their antifungal activity, and specific strains of Rhodococcus and Pseudomonas are known to inhibit Pd growth. Composition of the microbial community in the hibernaculum environment and the community on bat skin was superficially similar but differed in relative abundance of some bacterial taxa. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that Pd invasion leads to a shift in the skin microbiota of surviving bats and suggest the possibility that the microbiota plays a protective role for bats facing WNS. The detection of what appears to be enrichment of beneficial bacteria in the skin microbiota of persisting bats is a promising discovery for species re-establishment. Our findings highlight not only the potential value of management actions that

  12. Identification of an Intestinal Microbiota Signature Associated With Severity of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tap, Julien; Derrien, Muriel; Törnblom, Hans; Brazeilles, Rémi; Cools-Portier, Stéphanie; Doré, Joël; Störsrud, Stine; Le Nevé, Boris; Öhman, Lena; Simrén, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    We have limited knowledge about the association between the composition of the intestinal microbiota and clinical features of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We collected information on the fecal and mucosa-associated microbiota of patients with IBS and evaluated whether these were associated with symptoms. We collected fecal and mucosal samples from adult patients who met the Rome III criteria for IBS at a secondary/tertiary care outpatient clinics in Sweden, as well as from healthy subjects. The exploratory set comprised 149 subjects (110 with IBS and 39 healthy subjects); 232 fecal samples and 59 mucosal biopsy samples were collected and analyzed by 16S ribosomal RNA targeted pyrosequencing. The validation set comprised 46 subjects (29 with IBS and 17 healthy subjects); 46 fecal samples, but no mucosal samples, were collected and analyzed. For each subject, we measured exhaled H 2 and CH 4 , oro-anal transit time, and the severity of psychological and gastrointestinal symptoms. Fecal methanogens were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Numerical ecology analyses and a machine learning procedure were used to analyze the data. Fecal microbiota showed covariation with mucosal adherent microbiota. By using classic approaches, we found no differences in fecal microbiota abundance or composition between patients with IBS vs healthy patients. A machine learning procedure, a computational statistical technique, allowed us to reduce the 16S ribosomal RNA data complexity into a microbial signature for severe IBS, consisting of 90 bacterial operational taxonomic units. We confirmed the robustness of the intestinal microbial signature for severe IBS in the validation set. The signature was able to discriminate between patients with severe symptoms, patients with mild/moderate symptoms, and healthy subjects. By using this intestinal microbiota signature, we found IBS symptom severity to be associated negatively with microbial richness, exhaled CH 4 , presence

  13. Distinct Effects of the Cervicovaginal Microbiota and Herpes Simplex Type 2 Infection on Female Genital Tract Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, B; Gajer, P; Yi, T J; Ma, B; Humphrys, M S; Thomas-Pavanel, J; Chieza, L; Janakiram, P; Saunders, M; Tharao, W; Huibner, S; Shahabi, K; Ravel, J; Kaul, R

    2017-05-01

    Genital inflammation is a key determinant of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission, and may increase HIV-susceptible target cells and alter epithelial integrity. Several genital conditions that increase HIV risk are more prevalent in African, Caribbean, and other black (ACB) women, including bacterial vaginosis and herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) infection. Therefore, we assessed the impact of the genital microbiota on mucosal immunology in ACB women and microbiome-HSV-2 interactions. Cervicovaginal secretions and endocervical cells were collected by cytobrush and Instead Softcup, respectively. T cells and dendritic cells were assessed by flow cytometry, cytokines by multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the microbiota by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene sequencing. The cervicovaginal microbiota of 51 participants were composed of community state types (CSTs) showing diversity (20/51; 39%) or predominated by Lactobacillus iners (22/51; 42%), L. crispatus (7/51; 14%), or L. gasseri (2/51; 4%). High-diversity CSTs and specific bacterial phyla (Gardnerella vaginalis and Prevotella bivia) were strongly associated with cervicovaginal inflammatory cytokines, but not with altered endocervical immune cells. However, cervical CD4+ T-cell number was associated with HSV-2 infection and a distinct cytokine profile. This suggests that the genital microbiota and HSV-2 infection may influence HIV susceptibility through independent biological mechanisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Nasopharyngeal microbiota composition of children is related to the frequency of upper respiratory infection and acute sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santee, Clark A; Nagalingam, Nabeetha A; Faruqi, Ali A; DeMuri, Gregory P; Gern, James E; Wald, Ellen R; Lynch, Susan V

    2016-07-01

    Upper respiratory infections (URI) and their complications are a major healthcare burden for pediatric populations. Although the microbiology of the nasopharynx is an important determinant of the complications of URI, little is known of the nasopharyngeal (NP) microbiota of children, the factors that affect its composition, and its precise relationship with URI. Healthy children (n = 47) aged 49-84 months from a prospective cohort study based in Wisconsin, USA, were examined. Demographic and clinical data and NP swab samples were obtained from participants upon entry to the study. All NP samples were profiled for bacterial microbiota using a phylogenetic microarray, and these data were related to demographic characteristics and upper respiratory health outcomes. The composition of the NP bacterial community of children was significantly related prior to the history of acute sinusitis (R (2) = 0.070, P microbiota diversity (P ≤ 0.05). These preliminary data suggest that previous history of acute sinusitis influences the composition of the NP microbiota, characterized by a depletion in relative abundance of specific taxa. Diminished diversity was associated with more frequent URIs.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF BACTERIAL BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCTION THROUGH AXISYMMETRICAL DROP SHAPE-ANALYSIS BY PROFILE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERVEGT, W; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    Axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile (ADSA-P) is a technique developed in colloid and surface science to simultaneously determine the contact angle and liquid surface tension from the profile of a droplet resting on a solid surface. In this paper is described how ADSA-P can be employed to

  16. The relation between oral candida load and bacterial microbiome profiles in dutch older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraneveld, E.A.; Buijs, M.J.; Bonder, M.J.; Visser, M.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.

    2012-01-01

    Currently there are no evidence-based ecological measures for prevention of overgrowth and subsequent infection by fungi in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to increase our knowledge on fungal-bacterial ecological interactions. Salivary Candida abundance of 82 Dutch adults aged 58-80 years

  17. Antibiotic resistance profile of bacterial isolates from food sold on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Table 1. Distribution and proportion of bacterial contaminants in food. Isolates Identified. Prevalence. E. coli. 23 (29.4%). Klebsiella spp. 20 (25.64%). Proteus spp. 14 (17.95%). Pseudomonas spp. 9 (11.54%). Salmonella spp. 19 (12.82%) analysed from February to July 2005. The food items sampled were.

  18. Tissue-associated bacterial alterations in rectal carcinoma patients revealed by 16S rRNA community profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Maltez Thomas

    2016-12-01

    by digital droplet PCR. Our findings point to increased bacterial richness and diversity in rectal cancer, along with several differences in microbial community composition. Our work is the first to present evidence for a possible role of bacteria such as Bacteroides fragilis and the phylum Parcubacteria in rectal cancer, emphasizing the need to study tissue-associated bacteria and specific regions of the gastrointestinal tract in order to better understand the possible links between the microbiota and rectal cancer.

  19. The Anti-Oxidant Drug Tempol Promotes Functional Metabolic Changes in the Gut Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jingwei; Zhang, Limin; Jones, Richard A.; Correll, Jared B.; Hatzakis, Emmanuel; Smith, Philip B.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Patterson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have identified the important role of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis and progression of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The antioxidant tempol was shown to prevent or reduce weight gain and modulate the gut microbiota community in mice; however, the mechanism by which tempol modulates weight gain/loss with respect to the host and gut microbiota has not been clearly established. Here we show that tempol (0, 1, 10, and 50 mg/kg p.o. for 5 days) decreased cecal bacterial fermentation and increased fecal energy excretion in a dose-dependent manner. Liver 1H NMR-based metabolomics identified a dose-dependent decrease in glycogen and glucose, enhanced glucogenic and ketogenic activity (tyrosine and phenylalanine), and increased activation of the glycolysis pathway. Serum 1H NMR-based metabolomics indicated that tempol promotes enhanced glucose catabolism. Hepatic gene expression was significantly altered as demonstrated by an increase in Pepck and G6pase and a decrease in Hnf4a, ChREBP, Fabp1, and Cd36 mRNAs. No significant change in the liver and serum metabolomic profiles were observed in germ-free mice thus establishing a significant role for the gut microbiota in mediating the beneficial metabolic effects of tempol. These results demonstrate that tempol modulates the gut microbial community and its function resulting in reduced host energy availability and a significant shift in liver metabolism towards a more catabolic state. PMID:26696396

  20. Antioxidant Drug Tempol Promotes Functional Metabolic Changes in the Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jingwei; Zhang, Limin; Jones, Richard A; Correll, Jared B; Hatzakis, Emmanuel; Smith, Philip B; Gonzalez, Frank J; Patterson, Andrew D

    2016-02-05

    Recent studies have identified the important role of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis and progression of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The antioxidant tempol was shown to prevent or reduce weight gain and modulate the gut microbiota community in mice; however, the mechanism by which tempol modulates weight gain/loss with respect to the host and gut microbiota has not been clearly established. Here we show that tempol (0, 1, 10, and 50 mg/kg p.o. for 5 days) decreased cecal bacterial fermentation and increased fecal energy excretion in a dose-dependent manner. Liver (1)H NMR-based metabolomics identified a dose-dependent decrease in glycogen and glucose, enhanced glucogenic and ketogenic activity (tyrosine and phenylalanine), and increased activation of the glycolysis pathway. Serum (1)H NMR-based metabolomics indicated that tempol promotes enhanced glucose catabolism. Hepatic gene expression was significantly altered as demonstrated by an increase in Pepck and G6pase and a decrease in Hnf4a, ChREBP, Fabp1, and Cd36 mRNAs. No significant change in the liver and serum metabolomic profiles was observed in germ-free mice, thus establishing a significant role for the gut microbiota in mediating the beneficial metabolic effects of tempol. These results demonstrate that tempol modulates the gut microbial community and its function, resulting in reduced host energy availability and a significant shift in liver metabolism toward a more catabolic state.

  1. Linezolid Exerts Greater Bacterial Clearance but No Modification of Host Lung Gene Expression Profiling: A Mouse MRSA Pneumonia Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwang Chen

    Full Text Available Linezolid (LZD is beneficial to patients with MRSA pneumonia, but whether and how LZD influences global host lung immune responses at the mRNA level during MRSA-mediated pneumonia is still unknown.A lethal mouse model of MRSA pneumonia mediated by USA300 was employed to study the influence of LZD on survival, while the sublethal mouse model was used to examine the effect of LZD on bacterial clearance and lung gene expression during MRSA pneumonia. LZD (100mg/kg/day, IP was given to C57Bl6 mice for three days. On Day 1 and Day 3 post infection, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF protein concentration and levels of cytokines including IL6, TNFα, IL1β, Interferon-γ and IL17 were measured. In the sublethal model, left lungs were used to determine bacterial clearance and right lungs for whole-genome transcriptional profiling of lung immune responses.LZD therapy significantly improved survival and bacterial clearance. It also significantly decreased BALF protein concentration and levels of cytokines including IL6, IL1β, Interferon-γ and IL17. No significant gene expression changes in the mouse lungs were associated with LZD therapy.LZD is beneficial to MRSA pneumonia, but it does not modulate host lung immune responses at the transcriptional level.

  2. Comparative Metagenomic Profiling of Symbiotic Bacterial Communities Associated with Ixodes persulcatus, Ixodes pavlovskyi and Dermacentor reticulatus Ticks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kurilshikov

    Full Text Available Ixodes persulcatus, Ixodes pavlovskyi, and Dermacentor reticulatus ticks inhabiting Western Siberia are responsible for the transmission of a number of etiological agents that cause human and animal tick-borne diseases. Because these ticks are abundant in the suburbs of large cities, agricultural areas, and popular tourist sites and frequently attack people and livestock, data regarding the microbiomes of these organisms are required. Using metagenomic 16S profiling, we evaluate bacterial communities associated with I. persulcatus, I. pavlovskyi, and D. reticulatus ticks collected from the Novosibirsk region of Russia. A total of 1214 ticks were used for this study. DNA extracted from the ticks was pooled according to tick species and sex. Sequencing of the V3-V5 domains of 16S rRNA genes was performed using the Illumina Miseq platform. The following bacterial genera were prevalent in the examined communities: Acinetobacter (all three tick species, Rickettsia (I. persulcatus and D. reticulatus and Francisella (D. reticulatus. B. burgdorferi sensu lato and B. miyamotoi sequences were detected in I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi but not in D. reticulatus ticks. The pooled samples of all tick species studied contained bacteria from the Anaplasmataceae family, although their occurrence was low. DNA from A. phagocytophilum and Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis was first observed in I. pavlovskyi ticks. Significant inter-species differences in the number of bacterial taxa as well as intra-species diversity related to tick sex were observed. The bacterial communities associated with the I. pavlovskyi ticks displayed a higher biodiversity compared with those of the I. persulcatus and D. reticulatus ticks. Bacterial community structure was also diverse across the studied tick species, as shown by permutational analysis of variance using the Bray-Curtis dissimilarity metric (p = 0.002. Between-sex variation was confirmed by PERMANOVA testing in I

  3. The dysbiosis of the bacterial population of the digestive system ( intestinal microbiota ) in patients with metabolic syndrome improves after two models of healthy diets: a diet rich in complex carbohydrates and a Mediterranean diet. CORDIOPREV study

    OpenAIRE

    Haro Mariscal, Carmen María

    2017-01-01

    The microbial community harbored in the human intestine, commonly known as the gut microbiota, is considered an organ fully integrated in the host which plays an important role in metabolism, physiology, nutrition and the immune function. The gut microbiota has coevolved with us and the changes in its composition and/or structure can have major consequences for human health and disease. At present, it is known that microbial imbalance or dysbiosis of the gut microbiota is assoc...

  4. Effect of room temperature transport vials on DNA quality and phylogenetic composition of faecal microbiota of elderly adults and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Cian J; Brown, Jillian R M; Lynch, Denise B; Jeffery, Ian B; Ryan, C Anthony; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; O'Toole, Paul W

    2016-05-10

    Alterations in intestinal microbiota have been correlated with a growing number of diseases. Investigating the faecal microbiota is widely used as a non-invasive and ethically simple proxy for intestinal biopsies. There is an urgent need for collection and transport media that would allow faecal sampling at distance from the processing laboratory, obviating the need for same-day DNA extraction recommended by previous studies of freezing and processing methods for stool. We compared the faecal bacterial DNA quality and apparent phylogenetic composition derived using a commercial kit for stool storage and transport (DNA Genotek OMNIgene GUT) with that of freshly extracted samples, 22 from infants and 20 from older adults. Use of the storage vials increased the quality of extracted bacterial DNA by reduction of DNA shearing. When infant and elderly datasets were examined separately, no differences in microbiota composition were observed due to storage. When the two datasets were combined, there was a difference according to a Wilcoxon test in the relative proportions of Faecalibacterium, Sporobacter, Clostridium XVIII, and Clostridium XlVa after 1 week's storage compared to immediately extracted samples. After 2 weeks' storage, Bacteroides abundance was also significantly different, showing an apparent increase from week 1 to week 2. The microbiota composition of infant samples was more affected than that of elderly samples by storage, with significantly higher Spearman distances between paired freshly extracted and stored samples (p < 0.001). When the microbiota profiles were analysed at the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level, three infant datasets in the study did not cluster together, while only one elderly dataset did not. The lower microbiota diversity of the infant gut microbiota compared to the elderly gut microbiota (p < 0.001) means that any alteration in the infant datasets has a proportionally larger effect. The commercial storage vials appear

  5. Effect of β-glucanase and xylanase supplementation of barley- and rye-based diets on caecal microbiota of broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefiak, Damian; Rutkowski, A; Kaczmarek, S

    2010-01-01

    fragment-length polymorphism (T-RFLP)). 2. Plate counting revealed higher total numbers of anaerobic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in caecal contents of birds fed with rye-based diets than in birds fed with barley-based diets. 3. As assessed by FISH analysis, the most abundant bacterial groups......1. The aim was to investigate the effect of grain type (barley or rye) and exogenous enzymes (β-glucanase or xylanase) on the composition of chicken caecal microbiota as examined by classical culturing and molecular techniques (fluorescent in-situ hybridisation (FISH) and terminal-restriction......-RFLP profiles indicated that the caecal microbiota of birds receiving rye-based diets was more diverse than that of birds fed on barley-based diets. 5. Irrespective of the method applied, the results indicate that the cereal type as well as the exogenous enzyme supplementation influence the microbiota...

  6. Comparative analysis of fecal microbiota in infants with and without eczema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying Hong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Eczema is a chronic form of childhood disorder that is gaining in prevalence in affluent societies. Previous studies hypothesized that the development of eczema is correlated with changes in microbial profile and composition of early life endemic microbiota, but contradictory conclusions were obtained, possibly due to the lack of minimization of apparent non-health related confounders (e.g., age, antibiotic consumption, diet and mode of delivery. In this study, we recruited seven caesarean-delivered and total formula-fed infants, and comparatively examined the early-life endemic microbiota in these infants with and without eczema. Using 16S pyrosequencing, infants' fecal microbiota were observed to comprise Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes as the four main phyla, and the presence and absence of specific populations within these four phyla are primarily mediated by ageing. Quantitative analysis of bacterial targets on a larger sample size (n = 36 at 1, 3, and 12 months of age revealed that the abundances of Bifidobacterium and Enterobacteriaceae were different among caesarean-delivered infants with and without eczema, and the bacterial targets may be potential biomarkers that can correlate to the health status of these infants. Our overall findings suggest that the minimization of possible confounders is essential prior to comparative evaluation and correlation of fecal microbiota to health status, and that stool samples collected from caesarean-delivered infants at less than 1 year of age may represent a good cohort to study for potential biomarkers that can distinguish infants with eczema from those without. These findings would greatly facilitate future efforts in understanding the possible pathogenesis behind certain bacterial targets, and may lead to a timely intervention that reduces the occurrence of early life eczema and possibly allergic disorders in later life.

  7. Gut microbiota related to Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba spp. and Blastocystis hominis infections in humans from Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iebba, Valerio; Santangelo, Floriana; Totino, Valentina; Pantanella, Fabrizio; Monsia, Anatole; Di Cristanziano, Veronica; Di Cave, David; Schippa, Serena; Berrilli, Federica; D'Alfonso, Rossella

    2016-09-30

    Literature data provide little information about protozoa infections and gut microbiota compositional shifts in humans. This preliminary study aimed to describe the fecal bacterial community composition of people from Côte d'Ivoire harboring Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba spp., and Blastocystis hominis, in trying to discover possible alterations in their fecal microbiota structure related to the presence of such parasites. Twenty fecal samples were collected from people inhabiting three different localities of Côte d'Ivoire for copromicroscopic analysis and molecular identification of G. duodenalis, Entamoeba spp., and B. hominis. Temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) was used to obtain a fingerprint of the overall bacterial community; quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to define the relative abundances of selected bacterial species/group, and multivariate statistical analyses were employed to correlate all data. Cluster analysis revealed a significant separation of TTGE profiles into four clusters (p Entamoeba spp./B. hominis-positive subjects were linked to a eubiotic condition, as shown by a significantly higher Faecalibacterium prausnitzii-Escherichia coli ratio. This preliminary investigation demonstrates a differential fecal microbiota structure in subjects infected with G. duodenalis or Entamoeba spp./B. hominis, paving the way for using further next-generation DNA technologies to better understand host-parasite-bacteria interactions, aimed at identifying potential indicators of microbiota changes.

  8. Comparison of the effects of five dietary fibers on mucosal transcriptional profiles, and luminal microbiota composition and SCFA concentrations in murine colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Katja; Hugenholtz, Floor; Jonathan, Melliana C.; Schols, Henk A.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Müller, Michael; Hooiveld, Guido J.E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Scope: The aim of our study was to investigate and compare the effects of five fibers on the mucosal transcriptome, together with alterations in the luminal microbiota composition and SCFA concentrations in the colon. Methods and results: Mice were fed fibers that differed in carbohydrate

  9. Bacterial profile and antibiogram of otitis media among children in yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanna, M.A.B.

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media is a worldwide disease and is higher in developing countries, particularly among the low socioeconomic levels of the society. The aim of the study is to identify the bacterial etiologic agents of otitis media (OM) and their antibiotics sensitivity patterns among children in Specialized Sam Paediatric Centre (SSPC) and Al-Mamoon Diagnostic Medical Centre (AMDC), in Sana'a city. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done in SSPC and AMDC from January to October 2015. A total of 150 patients who had ear pus discharge and clinically diagnosed as OM were included in this study. Samples of ear discharge were collected, bacteriologically tested by standard methods and bacterial strains were identified using biochemical testes. Questionnaire was administered on patients or parents that cover the age, gender and the duration of symptoms. Results: A total of 150 children with OM, their age ranged from below 1-15 years (85 males and 65 females). Children less than 5 years of age were 100 and 50 with age ranged from 6-15 years. Bacterial isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (44%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12.67%), Enterococcus species (12.67%), and Streptococcus pneumonia (10%). Bacterial culture revealed that, Staphylococcus aureus sensitivity to cefotaxime and azithromycin was 98%, to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was 92% and it was 85% to gentamicin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitivity to cefotaxime was 100%, to azithromycin and gentamicin was 98% and it was 80% to cefaclor. Enterococcus sensitivity to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was 85%, to azithromycin was 80%, and it was 75% to cefotaxime, and gentamicin. Conclusion: The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus aureus followed by Pseudomonas, Enterococcus species, and then Streptococcus pneumonia. The most effective antibiotics were cefotaxime, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, azithromycin and gentamicin. Therefore, knowledge of antimicrobial susceptibility test is essential for guiding appropriate

  10. Epidemiological, clinical and prognostic profile of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in a resource poor setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuti, Bankole Peter; Bello, Emmanuel Olasehinde; Jegede, Tolulope Opeoluwa; Olubosede, Omolayo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency that continues to kill and maims children particularly in developing countries with poor immunization coverage. Objective: This study set out to assess the hospital incidence, pattern of presentation, etiologic agents, outcome and determinants of mortality among the children admitted with bacterial meningitis at the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH), Ilesa. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of admitted cases of bacterial meningitis in children aged one month to 15 years at the WGH, Ilesa over a three year period by looking at the hospital records. Factors in the history and examinations were compared among survivors and those that died to determine factors significantly associated with mortality in these children. Results: Eighty-one (5.5%) of the 1470 childhood admissions during the study period had bacterial meningitis. Male preponderance was observed and two-thirds of the children were infants. More cases were admitted during the wet rainy season than during the dry harmattan season. Haemophilus influenzae type B and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the leading etiologic agents and ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone adequately cover for these organisms. Twenty-two (27.2%) of the 81 children died, while 34 (42.0%) survived with neurologic deficits. Children with multiple seizures, coma, neck retraction, hyponatremia, hypoglycorrhachia, turbid CSF as well as Gram positive meningitis at presentation were found to more likely to die (P meningitis often results in death and neurologic deficit among infants and young children admitted at the WGH, Ilesa. Children diagnosed with meningitis who in addition had multiple seizures, neck retraction and coma at presentation are at increased risk of dying. PMID:26752902

  11. Bacterial Profile And Antibiogram Of Otitis Media Among Children In Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Mohanna, Mabrook Aidah; Bahannan, Abdurrahman Ali

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media is a worldwide disease and is higher in developing countries, particularly among the low socioeconomic levels of the society. The aim of the study is to identify the bacterial etiologic agents of otitis media (OM) and their antibiotics sensitivity patterns among children in Specialized Sam Paediatric Centre (SSPC) and Al-Mamoon Diagnostic Medical Centre (AMDC), in Sana'a city. A cross-sectional study was done in SSPC and AMDC from January to October 2015. A total of 150 patients who had ear pus discharge and clinically diagnosed as OM were included in this study. Samples of ear discharge were collected, bacteriologically tested by standard methods and bacterial strains were identified using biochemical testes. Questionnaire was administered on patients or parents that cover the age, gender and the duration of symptoms. A total of 150 children with OM, their age ranged from below 1-15 years (85 males and 65 females). Children less than 5 years of age were 100 and 50 with age ranged from 6-15 years. Bacterial isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (44%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12.67%), Enterococcus species (12.67%), and Streptococcus pneumonia (10%). Bacterial culture revealed that, Staphylococcus aureus sensitivity to cefotaxime and azithromycin was 98%, to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was 92% and it was 85% to gentamicin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitivity to cefotaxime was 100%, to azithromycin and gentamicin was 98% and it was 80% to cefaclor. Enterococcus sensitivity to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was 85%, to azithromycin was 80%, and it was 75% to cefotaxime, and gentamicin. The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus aureus followed by Pseudomonas, Enterococcus species, and then Streptococcus pneumonia. The most effective antibiotics were cefotaxime, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, azithromycin and gentamicin. Therefore, knowledge of antimicrobial susceptibility test is essential for guiding appropriate antibacterial therapy.

  12. The Relation between Oral Candida Load and Bacterial Microbiome Profiles in Dutch Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraneveld, Eefje A.; Buijs, Mark J.; Bonder, Marc J.; Visser, Marjolein; Keijser, Bart J. F.; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2012-01-01

    Currently there are no evidence-based ecological measures for prevention of overgrowth and subsequent infection by fungi in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to increase our knowledge on fungal–bacterial ecological interactions. Salivary Candida abundance of 82 Dutch adults aged 58–80 years was established relative to the bacterial load by quantitative PCR analysis of the Internal Transcribed (ITS) region (Candida) and 16S rDNA gene (bacteria). The salivary microbiome was assessed using barcoded pyrosequencing of the bacterial hypervariable regions V5–V7 of 16S rDNA. Sequencing data was preprocessed by denoising and chimera removal, clustered in Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) and assigned to taxonomy. Both OTU-based (PCA, diversity statistics) and phylogeny-based analyses (UniFrac, PCoA) were performed. Saliva of Dutch older adults contained 0–4 × 108 CFU/mL Candida with a median Candida load of 0.06%. With increased Candida load the diversity of the salivary microbiome decreased significantly (pCandida load correlated positively with class Bacilli, and negatively with class Fusobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Bacteroidia. Microbiomes with high Candida load were less diverse and had a distinct microbial composition towards dominance by saccharolytic and acidogenic bacteria - streptococci. The control of the acidification of the oral environment may be a potential preventive measure for Candida outgrowth that should be evaluated in longitudinal clinical intervention trials. PMID:22900048

  13. Profiling bacterial communities associated with sediment-based aquaculture bioremediation systems under contrasting redox regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgina; Caldwell, Gary S.; Wade, Matthew J.; Free, Andrew; Jones, Clifford L. W.; Stead, Selina M.

    2016-12-01

    Deposit-feeding invertebrates are proposed bioremediators in microbial-driven sediment-based aquaculture effluent treatment systems. We elucidate the role of the sediment reduction-oxidation (redox) regime in structuring benthic bacterial communities, having direct implications for bioremediation potential and deposit-feeder nutrition. The sea cucumber Holothuria scabra was cultured on sediments under contrasting redox regimes; fully oxygenated (oxic) and redox stratified (oxic-anoxic). Taxonomically, metabolically and functionally distinct bacterial communities developed between the redox treatments with the oxic treatment supporting the greater diversity; redox regime and dissolved oxygen levels were the main environmental drivers. Oxic sediments were colonised by nitrifying bacteria with the potential to remediate nitrogenous wastes. Percolation of oxygenated water prevented the proliferation of anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacteria, which were prevalent in the oxic-anoxic sediments. At the predictive functional level, bacteria within the oxic treatment were enriched with genes associated with xenobiotics metabolism. Oxic sediments showed the greater bioremediation potential; however, the oxic-anoxic sediments supported a greater sea cucumber biomass. Overall, the results indicate that bacterial communities present in fully oxic sediments may enhance the metabolic capacity and bioremediation potential of deposit-feeder microbial systems. This study highlights the benefits of incorporating deposit-feeding invertebrates into effluent treatment systems, particularly when the sediment is oxygenated.

  14. Physico-chemical Profile and Microbial Diversity During Bioconversion of Sugarcane Press Mud Using Bacterial Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Chandra SARKER

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at investigating the physico-chemical and microbial diversity for rapid composting of sugarcane press mud (PM leading to organic manure. Five bacterial strains (Cellulomonas sp., Klebsiella sp., Proteus sp., Enterobacter sp., Salmonella sp. were tested under in vivo conditions for bioconversion of PM using pile method. Results revealed that combined inoculation of bacterial consortia was found to be the best decomposer of PM resulting reduction of organic carbon content (26.75%, C:N ratio (12.44%. In parallel, it increased the nitrogen (2.34%, phosphorous (1.15% and potassium (1.37% content along with the population of microorganisms i.e. bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes. However, the population of tested bacteria was gradually depleted after completion of PM decomposition together with pathogenic bacteria and fungi due to full conversion of carbon component into other minerals, i.e. N, P, K etc. Taken together, these findings certainly pinpoints the effective role of bacterial suspension for composting sugarcane press mud which the eventually be used as organic manure.

  15. The same microbiota and a potentially discriminant metabolome in the saliva of omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and Vegan individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca De Filippis

    Full Text Available The salivary microbiota has been linked to both oral and non-oral diseases. Scant knowledge is available on the effect of environmental factors such as long-term dietary choices on the salivary microbiota and metabolome. This study analyzed the microbial diversity and metabolomic profiles of the saliva of 161 healthy individuals who followed an omnivore or ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet. A large core microbiota was identified, including 12 bacterial genera, found in >98% of the individuals. The subjects could be stratified into three "salivary types" that differed on the basis of the relative abundance of the core genera Prevotella, Streptococcus/Gemella and Fusobacterium/Neisseria. Statistical analysis indicated no effect of dietary habit on the salivary microbiota. Phylogenetic beta-diversity analysis consistently showed no differences between omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan individuals. Metabolomic profiling of saliva using (1H-NMR and GC-MS/SPME identified diet-related biomarkers that enabled a significant discrimination between the 3 groups of individuals on the basis of their diet. Formate, urea, uridine and 5-methyl-3-hexanone could discriminate samples from omnivores, whereas 1-propanol, hexanoic acid and proline were characteristic of non-omnivore diets. Although the salivary metabolome can be discriminating for diet, the microbiota has a remarkable inter-individual stability and did not vary with dietary habits. Microbial homeostasis might be perturbed with sub-standard oral hygiene or other environmental factors, but there is no current indication that a choice of an omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet can lead to a specific composition of the oral microbiota with consequences on the oral homeostasis.

  16. The same microbiota and a potentially discriminant metabolome in the saliva of omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and Vegan individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Francesca; Vannini, Lucia; La Storia, Antonietta; Laghi, Luca; Piombino, Paola; Stellato, Giuseppina; Serrazanetti, Diana I; Gozzi, Giorgia; Turroni, Silvia; Ferrocino, Ilario; Lazzi, Camilla; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    The salivary microbiota has been linked to both oral and non-oral diseases. Scant knowledge is available on the effect of environmental factors such as long-term dietary choices on the salivary microbiota and metabolome. This study analyzed the microbial diversity and metabolomic profiles of the saliva of 161 healthy individuals who followed an omnivore or ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet. A large core microbiota was identified, including 12 bacterial genera, found in >98% of the individuals. The subjects could be stratified into three "salivary types" that differed on the basis of the relative abundance of the core genera Prevotella, Streptococcus/Gemella and Fusobacterium/Neisseria. Statistical analysis indicated no effect of dietary habit on the salivary microbiota. Phylogenetic beta-diversity analysis consistently showed no differences between omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan individuals. Metabolomic profiling of saliva using (1)H-NMR and GC-MS/SPME identified diet-related biomarkers that enabled a significant discrimination between the 3 groups of individuals on the basis of their diet. Formate, urea, uridine and 5-methyl-3-hexanone could discriminate samples from omnivores, whereas 1-propanol, hexanoic acid and proline were characteristic of non-omnivore diets. Although the salivary metabolome can be discriminating for diet, the microbiota has a remarkable inter-individual stability and did not vary with dietary habits. Microbial homeostasis might be perturbed with sub-standard oral hygiene or other environmental factors, but there is no current indication that a choice of an omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet can lead to a specific composition of the oral microbiota with consequences on the oral homeostasis.

  17. The effect of high-fat diet on the composition of the gut microbiota in cloned and non-cloned pigs of lean and obese phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rebecca; Andersen, Anders Daniel; Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise; Stagsted, Jan; Boye, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-far-high-energy diet on cloned and non-cloned domestic pigs of both lean and obese phenotype and to evaluate if the lean cloned pigs had a lower inter-individual variation as compared with non-cloned pigs. The microbiota of colon and terminal ileum was investigated in cloned and non-cloned pigs that received a high-far-high-energy diet with either restricted or ad libitum access to feed, resulting in lean and obese phenotypes, respectively. The fecal microbiota of lean pigs was investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The intestinal microbiota of lean and obese cloned and non-cloned pigs was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR and a novel high-throughput qPCR platform (Fluidigm). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the T-RFLP profiles revealed that lean cloned and non-cloned pigs had a different overall composition of their gut microbiota. The colon of lean cloned pigs contained relatively more bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes and less from the phylum Bacteroidetes than obese cloned pigs as estimated by qPCR. Fluidigm qPCR results revealed differences in specific bacterial groups in the gut microbiota of both lean and obese pigs. Our results suggest that high-far-high-energy diet is associated with changes in the gut microbiota even in the absence of obesity. Overall, the cloned pigs had a different gut microbiota from that of non-cloned pigs. To our knowledge this is the first study to investigate the gut microbiota of cloned domestic pigs of lean and obese phenotype.

  18. Dominant culturable bacterial microbiota in the digestive tract of the American black vulture (Coragyps atratus Bechstein 1793 and search for antagonistic substances Microbiota bacteriana dominante cultivável no trato digestivo do urubu (Coragyps atratus Bechstein 1793

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydston Rodrigues de Carvalho

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Strict and facultative culturable anaerobic bacteria from the digestive tract of six American black vultures (Coragyps atratus Bechstein 1793 were isolated and identified. After capture, the birds received a non-contaminated diet for one week to eliminate possible allochthonous microorganisms. Then, specimens collected from tongue, stomach and intestines were weighed, submitted to decimal dilution in an anaerobic chamber, inoculated into culture media and incubated aerobically and anaerobically at 37ºC for enumeration, isolation and identification. Isolated bacteria were submitted to tests to detect possible antagonisms between them. The total bacterial population along the digestive tract ranged from 3.46 ± 0.39 log CFU/g in the stomach to 10.75 ± 0.37 log CFU/g in the distal intestine. Some bacteria were isolated for the first time from the digestive tract of C. atratus: Actinomyces bovis, Lactobacillus cellobiosus, Micrococcus luteus, Neisseria sicca, Clostridium bifermentans, Enterobacter agglomerans, Peptostreptococcus sp., Sarcina sp., Serratia odorifera, and Shigella flexneri. Associations between microorganisms were observed during isolation on two occasions, one involving A. bovis and N. sicca, and the other involving A. bovis and a Gram-negative rod. Hetero-, iso- and autoantagonisms were observed, suggesting the ecological role of these indigenous microorganisms in terms of population auto-control and environmental barrier in the digestive tract of carrion-feeding birds.As bactérias anaeróbias estritas e facultativas cultiváveis do trato digestivo de seis urubus (Coragyps atratus Bechstein 1793 foram isoladas e identificadas. Após a captura, as aves receberam uma alimentação de baixa contaminação durante uma semana para eliminar possíveis microorganismos alóctonos. A seguir, amostras colhidas na língua, estomago e intestinos foram pesadas, submetidas a diluições decimais numa câmara anaeróbia, inoculadas em meios de

  19. The Characterization of Novel Tissue Microbiota Using an Optimized 16S Metagenomic Sequencing Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluch, Jérôme; Servant, Florence; Païssé, Sandrine; Valle, Carine; Valière, Sophie; Kuchly, Claire; Vilchez, Gaëlle; Donnadieu, Cécile; Courtney, Michael; Burcelin, Rémy; Amar, Jacques; Bouchez, Olivier; Lelouvier, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress in high-throughput metagenomic sequencing methodologies has enabled the characterisation of bacteria from various origins (for example gut and skin). However, the recently-discovered bacterial microbiota present within animal internal tissues has remained unexplored due to technical difficulties associated with these challenging samples. We have optimized a specific 16S rDNA-targeted metagenomics sequencing (16S metabarcoding) pipeline based on the Illumina MiSeq technology for the analysis of bacterial DNA in human and animal tissues. This was successfully achieved in various mouse tissues despite the high abundance of eukaryotic DNA and PCR inhibitors in these samples. We extensively tested this pipeline on mock communities, negative controls, positive controls and tissues and demonstrated the presence of novel tissue specific bacterial DNA profiles in a variety of organs (including brain, muscle, adipose tissue, liver and heart). The high throughput and excellent reproducibility of the method ensured exhaustive and precise coverage of the 16S rDNA bacterial variants present in mouse tissues. This optimized 16S metagenomic sequencing pipeline will allow the scientific community to catalogue the bacterial DNA profiles of different tissues and will provide a database to analyse host/bacterial interactions in relation to homeostasis and disease.

  20. The Characterization of Novel Tissue Microbiota Using an Optimized 16S Metagenomic Sequencing Pipeline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Lluch

    Full Text Available Substantial progress in high-throughput metagenomic sequencing methodologies has enabled the characterisation of bacteria from various origins (for example gut and skin. However, the recently-discovered bacterial microbiota present within animal internal tissues has remained unexplored due to technical difficulties associated with these challenging samples.We have optimized a specific 16S rDNA-targeted metagenomics sequencing (16S metabarcoding pipeline based on the Illumina MiSeq technology for the analysis of bacterial DNA in human and animal tissues. This was successfully achieved in various mouse tissues despite the high abundance of eukaryotic DNA and PCR inhibitors in these samples. We extensively tested this pipeline on mock communities, negative controls, positive controls and tissues and demonstrated the presence of novel tissue specific bacterial DNA profiles in a variety of organs (including brain, muscle, adipose tissue, liver and heart.The high throughput and excellent reproducibility of the method ensured exhaustive and precise coverage of the 16S rDNA bacterial variants present in mouse tissues. This optimized 16S metagenomic sequencing pipeline will allow the scientific community to catalogue the bacterial DNA profiles of different tissues and will provide a database to analyse host/bacterial interactions in relation to homeostasis and disease.

  1. Differential effects of antiretrovirals on microbial translocation and gut microbiota composition of HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Millán, María J; Pérez-Matute, Patricia; Recio-Fernández, Emma; Lezana Rosales, José M; Oteo, José A

    2017-03-09

    Increased bacterial translocation and alterations to gut microbiota composition have been described in HIV infection and contribute to immune activation and inflammation. These effects persist despite combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, the contribution of different cART combinations has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to analyse the long-term effects of different combinations of cART on bacterial translocation and gut microbiota composition in HIV-infected patients. We carried out a cross-sectional study of 45 HIV-infected patients on cART, classified as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)+ protease inhibitors (PIs) (n = 15), NRTIs+ non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) (n = 22), and NRTIs+ integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) (n = 8). Untreated HIV-infected patients (n = 5) and non-infected volunteers (n = 21) were also included. Soluble markers of bacterial translocation and inflammation were measured and gut microbiota composition was analysed using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing (Illumina MiSeq). The NRTIs+INSTIs regimen was associated with levels of systemic inflammation that were similar to uninfected controls. The reduction in faecal bacterial diversity induced by HIV infection was also restored by this regimen. HIV infection was more closely related to changes in lower taxonomic units and diversity rather than at the phylum level. The NRTIs+PIs regimen showed the highest reduction in bacterial species, whereas NRTIs+INSTIs induced a minor loss of bacterial species and a significant increase in others. Our study demonstrated that INSTI-based ART was associated with levels of systemic inflammation and microbial diversity similar to that of uninfected controls. The role of INSTIs other than raltegravir needs to be further investigated. Patients on the NRTIs+PIs regimen presented the highest reduction in bacterial species compared with other antiretrovirals and naive patients

  2. Fecal microbiota in pouchitis and ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai-Yu; Wang, Jian-Lin; Wei, Jiang-Peng; Gao, Sen-Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Li-Tian; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the changes in microbiota in feces of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and pouchitis using genomic technology. METHODS Fecal samples were obtained from UC patients with or without an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) procedure, as well as healthy controls. The touchdown polymerase chain reaction technique was used to amplify the whole V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene, which was transcribed from DNA extracted from fecal samples. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to separate the amplicons. The band profiles and similarity indices were analyzed digitally. The predominant microbiota in different groups was confirmed by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. RESULTS Microbial biodiversity in the healthy controls was significantly higher compared with the UC groups (P UC patients in remission and those in the mildly active stage, the predominant species in patients with moderately and severely active UC changed obviously. In addition, the proportion of the dominant microbiota, which was negatively correlated with the disease activity of UC (r = -6.591, P UC. Patients with pouchitis had an altered microbiota composition compared with UC patients. The microbiota from pouchitis patients was less diverse than that from severely active UC patients. Sequencing results showed that similar microbiota, such as Clostridium perfringens, were shared in both UC and pouchitis. CONCLUSION Less diverse fecal microbiota was present in patients with UC and pouchitis. Increased C. perfringens in feces suggest its role in the exacerbation of UC and pouchitis. PMID:27833384

  3. Long Term Development of Gut Microbiota Composition in Atopic Children: Impact of Probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, N B M M; Gorissen, D M W; Eck, A; Niers, L E M; Vlieger, A M; Besseling-van der Vaart, I; Budding, A E; Savelkoul, P H M; van der Ent, C K; Rijkers, G T

    2015-01-01

    Imbalance of the human gut microbiota in early childhood is suggested as a risk factor for immune-mediated disorders such as allergies. With the objective to modulate the intestinal microbiota, probiotic supplementation during infancy has been used for prevention of allergic diseases in infants, with variable success. However, not much is known about the long-term consequences of neonatal use of probiotics on the microbiota composition. The aim of this study was to assess the composition and microbial diversity in stool samples of infants at high-risk for atopic disease, from birth onwards to six years of age, who were treated with probiotics or placebo during the first year of life. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, a probiotic mixture consisting of B. bifidum W23, B. lactis W52 and Lc. Lactis W58 (Ecologic® Panda) was administered to pregnant women during the last 6 weeks of pregnancy and to their offspring during the first year of life. During follow-up, faecal samples were collected from 99 children over a 6-year period with the following time points: first week, second week, first month, three months, first year, eighteen months, two years and six years. Bacterial profiling was performed by IS-pro. Differences in bacterial abundance and diversity were assessed by conventional statistics. The presence of the supplemented probiotic strains in faecal samples was confirmed, and the probiotic strains had a higher abundance and prevalence in the probiotic group during supplementation. Only minor and short term differences in composition of microbiota were found between the probiotic and placebo group and between children with or without atopy. The diversity of Bacteroidetes was significantly higher after two weeks in the placebo group, and at the age of two years atopic children had a significantly higher Proteobacteria diversity (p development continued between two and six years, whereby microbiota composition at phylum level evolved more

  4. Profiling of antibiotic resistance of bacterial species recovered from routine clinical isolates in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hove, Robert-Jan; Tesfaye, Melaku; Ten Hove, Witold Frederik; Nigussie, Mesfin

    2017-06-26

    With the alarming rise in antibiotic resistance in African countries, the need for a surveillance system in the region has become pressing. The rapid expansion of data networks makes it possible to set up healthcare applications that can be both cost-efficient and effective. Large data sets are available for assessment of current antibiotic resistance among Ethiopian patients. Based on the data-presentation, a practical approach is proposed on how diagnostic laboratories can participate remedial action against antibiotic resistance in Ethiopia. In Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), raw data comprising bacterial species name, specimen type and antibiograms covering the period January 2014 to May 2015 was accessed from the laboratory information management system. Using R code, the data was read and fitted into data-frames and analyzed to assess antibiotic resistance in the Ethiopian patient population. Susceptibility to an antibiotic was tested with 14.983 cultures of 54 different bacterial species or subgroups, isolated from 16 types of specimen. Half of the cultures (n = 6444) showed resistance to an antibiotic. Resistance against penicillin was highest with, on average, 91.1% of 79 bacterial cultures showing resistance. Very high resistance rates were also observed for ampicillin, whereas resistance was lowest with cefoxitin. Extraction and analysis of raw-data from the laboratory database is relatively simple and can provide valuable insight into the relationships between type of sample and drug-resistance in countries where such data is still scarce. With the largest number of antibiotic resistance tests described for Ethiopia, a tool is proposed for consistent data collection with specified core variables. Trends in antibiotic resistance can be revealed and treatment failures avoided when used as an easy accessible reference application for healthcare providers.

  5. Bacterial cytological profiling : : a shortcut for determining mechanism of action of antibacterial molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Nonejuie, Poochit

    2014-01-01

    After the golden era of antibiotic discovery, we have been falling behind in stocking up our arsenal to fight against bacterial pathogens. If this trend continues, we will eventually return to the pre-antibiotic era and millions of lives will be at risk. An alarming increase in the rate of multidrug resistant pathogens and the lack of new antibiotics are a nightmare combination that we have to conquer in order to alleviate the current dire situation and regain control over pathogens. In order...

  6. The active human gut microbiota differs from the total microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Peris-Bondia

    Full Text Available The human gut microbiota is considered one of the most fascinating reservoirs of microbial diversity hosting between 400 to 1000 bacterial species distributed among nine phyla with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria representing around 75% of the diversity. One of the most intriguing issues relates to understanding which microbial groups are active players in the maintenance of the microbiota homeostasis.Here, we describe the diversity of active microbial fractions compared with the whole community from raw human fecal samples. We studied four healthy volunteers by 16S rDNA gene pyrosequencing. The fractions were obtained by cell sorting based on bacterial RNA concentration. Bacterial families were observed to appear or disappear on applying a cell sorting method in which flow cytometry was used to evaluate the active cells by pyronin-Y staining of RNA. This method was able to detect active bacteria, indicating that the active players differed from that observed in raw fecal material. Generally, observations showed that in the active fractions, the number of reads related to Bacteroidetes decreased whereas several families from Clostridiales (Firmicutes were more highly represented. Moreover, a huge number of families appeared as part of the active fraction when cell sorting was applied, indicating reads that are simply statistically hidden by the total reads.

  7. Profiling the Succession of Bacterial Communities throughout the Life Stages of a Higher Termite Nasutitermes arborum (Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae) Using 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, Michel; Roy, Virginie; Mora, Philippe; Frechault, Sophie; Lefebvre, Thomas; Hervé, Vincent; Rouland-Lefèvre, Corinne; Miambi, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Previous surveys of the gut microbiota of termites have been limited to the worker caste. Termite gut microbiota has been well documented over the last decades and consists mainly of lineages specific to the gut microbiome which are maintained across generations. Despite this intimate relationship, little is known of how symbionts are transmitted to each generation of the host, especially in higher termites where proctodeal feeding has never been reported. The bacterial succession across life stages of the wood-feeding higher termite Nasutitermes arborum was characterized by 16S rRNA gene deep sequencing. The microbial community in the eggs, mainly affiliated to Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, was markedly different from the communities in the following developmental stages. In the first instar and last instar larvae and worker caste termites, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were less abundant than Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes, Fibrobacteres and the candidate phylum TG3 from the last instar larvae. Most of the representatives of these phyla (except Firmicutes) were identified as termite-gut specific lineages, although their relative abundances differed. The most salient difference between last instar larvae and worker caste termites was the very high proportion of Spirochaetes, most of which were affiliated to the Treponema Ic, Ia and If subclusters, in workers. The results suggest that termite symbionts are not transmitted from mother to offspring but become established by a gradual process allowing the offspring to have access to the bulk of the microbiota prior to the emergence of workers, and, therefore, presumably through social exchanges with nursing workers. PMID:26444989

  8. Household siblings and nasal and fecal microbiota in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Linnemann, Rachel W; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Ajami, Nadim J; Espinola, Janice A; Fiechtner, Lauren G; Petrosino, Joseph F; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-04-01

    Early-life exposure to older siblings is associated with a lower risk of asthma. To date, no study has addressed the impact of having siblings on both the airway and fecal microbiota during infancy. The aim of this study was therefore to profile the nasal airway and fecal microbiota in infants, and to examine the association between having siblings and microbiota profile. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 105 healthy infants (aged microbiota profiles and then determined the association between having siblings and microbiome profile. Overall, the median age was 3.4 months (IQR, 2.0-4.7 months); 43% had siblings in the household. Unbiased clustering of nasal airway microbiota identified three profiles: Moraxella dominant (43%), Corynebacterium/Dolosigranulum dominant (36%), and mixed (21%). Infants with siblings were more likely to have a Moraxella-dominant profile than Corynebacterium/Dolosigranulum-dominant profile (76% vs 18%), while those without siblings had the opposite pattern (18% vs 50%; P microbiota consisted of three profiles: Bifidobacterium dominant (39%), Escherichia dominant (31%), and Enterobacter dominant (30%). Infants with siblings were more likely to have a Bifidobacterium-dominant profile than Escherichia-dominant profile (49% vs 24%) while those without siblings had the opposite pattern (32% vs 37%; P = 0.04, multivariable-adjusted). In this cross-sectional study, infants with siblings were more likely to have a Moraxella-dominant nasal microbiota profile and Bifidobacterium-dominant fecal microbiota profile. These findings should facilitate further investigation of the interplay between early-life environmental exposure, the microbiome, and childhood asthma. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Host adaptive immunity alters gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Husen; Sparks, Joshua B; Karyala, Saikumar V; Settlage, Robert; Luo, Xin M

    2015-03-01

    It has long been recognized that the mammalian gut microbiota has a role in the development and activation of the host immune system. Much less is known on how host immunity regulates the gut microbiota. Here we investigated the role of adaptive immunity on the mouse distal gut microbial composition by sequencing 16 S rRNA genes from microbiota of immunodeficient Rag1(-/-) mice, versus wild-type mice, under the same housing environment. To detect possible interactions among immunological status, age and variability from anatomical sites, we analyzed samples from the cecum, colon, colonic mucus and feces before and after weaning. High-throughput sequencing showed that Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia dominated mouse gut bacterial communities. Rag1(-) mice had a distinct microbiota that was phylogenetically different from wild-type mice. In particular, the bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila was highly enriched in Rag1(-/-) mice compared with the wild type. This enrichment was suppressed when Rag1(-/-) mice received bone marrows from wild-type mice. The microbial community diversity increased with age, albeit the magnitude depended on Rag1 status. In addition, Rag1(-/-) mice had a higher gain in microbiota richness and evenness with increase in age compared with wild-type mice, possibly due to the lack of pressure from the adaptive immune system. Our results suggest that adaptive immunity has a pervasive role in regulating gut microbiota's composition and diversity.

  10. [Gut microbiota: Description, role and pathophysiologic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, C; Quévrain, E

    2016-06-01

    The human gut contains 10(14) bacteria and many other micro-organisms such as Archaea, viruses and fungi. Studying the gut microbiota showed how this entity participates to gut physiology and beyond this to human health, as a real "hidden organ". In this review, we aimed to bring information about gut microbiota, its structure, its roles and its implication in human pathology. After bacterial colonization in infant, intestinal microbial composition is unique for each individual although more than 95% can be assigned to four major phyla. The use of culture independent methods and more recently the development of high throughput sequencing allowed to depict precisely gut microbiota structure and diversity as well as its alteration in diseases. Gut microbiota is implicated in the maturation of the host immune system and in many fundamental metabolic pathways including sugars and proteins fermentation and metabolism of bile acids and xenobiotics. Imbalance of gut microbial populations or dysbiosis has important functional consequences and is implicated in many digestive diseases (inflammatory bowel diseases, colorectal cancer, etc.) but also in obesity and autism. These observations have led to a surge of studies exploring therapeutics which aims to restore gut microbiota equilibrium such as probiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation. But recent research also investigates biological activity of microbial products which could lead to interesting therapeutics leads. Copyright © 2015 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota and Allergic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyburz, Andreas; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract microbiota is required for optimal digestion of foods, for the development of resistance against pathogens (termed colonization resistance), for the development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, and for local as well as systemic immune homeostasis. Certain constituents of the GI tract microbiota are widely recognized as critical regulators and modulators of their host's immune response. These include bacterial members of the microbiota as well as parasitic nematodes. Immune regulation by immunomodulatory members of the GI microbiota primarily serves to subvert host antimicrobial immune defenses and promote persistent colonization, but as a side effect may prevent or suppress immunological disorders resulting from inappropriate responses to harmless antigens, such as allergy, colitis or autoimmunity. Many of the best understood GI-resident immunomodulatory species have co-evolved with their mammalian hosts for tens of thousands of years and masterfully manipulate host immune responses. In this review, we discuss the epidemiological evidence for the role of the GI tract microbiota as a whole, and of specific members, in protection against allergic and other immunological disorders. We then focus on the mechanistic basis of microbial immunomodulation, which is presented using several well-understood paradigmatic examples, that is, helminths, Helicobacter pylori, Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. In a final chapter, we highlight past and ongoing attempts at harnessing the immunomodulatory properties of GI microbiota species and their secreted products for intervention studies and describe the promises and limitations of these experimental approaches. The effects of pro- and prebiotics, bacterial lysates, as well as of fecal microbiota transplantation are presented and compared. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Indoor microbiota in severely moisture damaged homes and the impact of interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, Balamuralikrishna; Adams, Rachel I; Kirjavainen, Pirkka; Karvonen, Anne; Vepsäläinen, Asko; Valkonen, Maria; Järvi, Kati; Sulyok, Michael; Pekkanen, Juha; Hyvärinen, Anne; Täubel, Martin

    2017-10-13

    The limited understanding of microbial characteristics in moisture-damaged buildings impedes efforts to clarify which adverse health effects in the occupants are associated with the damage and to develop effective building intervention strategies. The objectives of this current study were (i) to characterize fungal and bacterial microbiota in house dust of severely moisture-damaged residences, (ii) to identify microbial taxa associated with moisture damage renovations, and (iii) to test whether the associations between the identified taxa and moisture damage are replicable in another cohort of homes. We applied bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal ITS amplicon sequencing complemented with quantitative PCR and chemical-analytical approaches to samples of house dust, and also performed traditional cultivation of bacteria and fungi from building material samples. Active microbial growth on building materials had significant though small influence on the house dust bacterial and fungal communities. Moisture damage interventions-including actual renovation of damaged homes and cases where families moved to another home-had only a subtle effect on bacterial community structure, seen as shifts in abundance weighted bacterial profiles after intervention. While bacterial and fungal species richness were reduced in homes that were renovated, they were not reduced for families that moved houses. Using different discriminant analysis tools, we were able identify taxa that were significantly reduced in relative abundance during renovation of moisture damage. For bacteria, the majority of candidates belonged to different families within the Actinomycetales order. Results for fungi were overall less consistent. A replication study in approximately 400 homes highlighted some of the identified taxa, confirming associations with observations of moisture damage and mold. The present study is one of the first studies to analyze changes in microbiota due to moisture damage interventions

  13. Bacterial Growth State Distinguished by Single-Cell Protein Profiling: Does Chlorination Kill Coliforms in Municipal Effluent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockabrand, David; Austin, Teresa; Kaiser, Robyn; Blum, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Municipal effluent is the largest reservoir of human enteric bacteria. Its public health significance, however, depends upon the physiological status of the wastewater bacterial community. A novel immunofluorescence assay was developed and used to examine the bacterial growth state during wastewater disinfection. Quantitative levels of three highly conserved cytosolic proteins (DnaK, Dps, and Fis) were determined by using enterobacterium-specific antibody fluorochrome-coupled probes. Enterobacterial Fis homologs were abundant in growing cells and nearly undetectable in stationary-phase cells. In contrast, enterobacterial Dps homologs were abundant in stationary-phase cells but virtually undetectable in growing cells. The range of variation in the abundance of both proteins was at least 100-fold as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis. Enterobacterial DnaK homologs were nearly invariant with growth state, enabling their use as permeabilization controls. The cellular growth states of individual enterobacteria in wastewater samples were determined by measurement of Fis, Dps, and DnaK abundance (protein profiling). Intermediate levels of Fis and Dps were evident and occurred in response to physiological transitions. The results indicate that chlorination failed to kill coliforms but rather elicited nutrient starvation and a reversible nonculturable state. These studies suggest that the current standard procedures for wastewater analysis which rely on detection of culturable cells likely underestimate fecal coliform content. PMID:10473432

  14. Biases during DNA extraction affect bacterial and archaeal community profile of anaerobic digestion samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarain, Ashira; Mukhuba, Mashudu; Adeleke, Rasheed; Moeletsi, Mokhele

    2017-12-01

    The anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic waste for biogas production has received much attention in recent years due to the increasing need for renewable energy and environmentally friendly waste management systems. Identification of the microbial community involved in AD aids in better understanding and optimising of the process. The choice of DNA extraction method is an integral step in any molecular biodiversity study. In the present study, potential biases introduced by DNA extraction methods were examined by comparing quality, quantity and representability of DNA extracted from AD samples using various extraction methods. In spite of the non-kit based method (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) yielding the largest quantity of DNA (approximately 44 µg DNA per gram dry weight), the extracted DNA contained PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, the quantity of extracted DNA was not proportional to species diversity. Diversity, determined using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), was strongly linked to the type of extraction method used. The spin-column filter-based kit that incorporated mechanical and chemical lysis (Macherey-Nagel kit) gave the best results in terms of bacterial and archaeal diversity (Shannon-Wiener indices: average 2.5 and 2.6, respectively). Furthermore, this kit was the most effective at lysing hard-to-lyse bacterial and archaeal cells. The choice of DNA extraction method significantly influences the reliability and comparability of results obtained during AD microbial ecology investigations. Moreover, the careful selection of the DNA extraction method is of particular importance when analysing AD samples since these samples are rich in PCR inhibitors and hard-to-lyse cells such as archaea and gram-positive bacteria.

  15. Dysbiosis of the gut microbiota in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Carding

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that dysbiosis of the gut microbiota is associated with the pathogenesis of both intestinal and extra-intestinal disorders. Intestinal disorders include inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, and coeliac disease, while extra-intestinal disorders include allergy, asthma, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and obesity.In many of these conditions, the mechanisms leading to disease development involves the pivotal mutualistic relationship between the colonic microbiota, their metabolic products, and the host immune system. The establishment of a ‘healthy’ relationship early in life appears to be critical to maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Whilst we do not yet have a clear understanding of what constitutes a ‘healthy’ colonic microbiota, a picture is emerging from many recent studies identifying particular bacterial species associated with a healthy microbiota. In particular, the bacterial species residing within the mucus layer of the colon, either through direct contact with host cells, or through indirect communication via bacterial metabolites, may influence whether host cellular homeostasis is maintained or whether inflammatory mechanisms are triggered. In addition to inflammation, there is some evidence that perturbations in the gut microbiota is involved with the development of colorectal cancer. In this case, dysbiosis may not be the most important factor, rather the products of interaction between diet and the microbiome. High-protein diets are thought to result in the production of carcinogenic metabolites from the colonic microbiota that may result in the induction of neoplasia in the colonic epithelium.Ever more sensitive metabolomics methodologies reveal a suite of small molecules produced in the microbiome which mimic or act as neurosignallers or neurotransmitters. Coupled with evidence that probiotic interventions may alter psychological endpoints in both humans and in

  16. The microbiota of water buffalo milk during mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catozzi, Carlotta; Sanchez Bonastre, Armand; Francino, Olga; Lecchi, Cristina; De Carlo, Esterina; Vecchio, Domenico; Martucciello, Alessandra; Fraulo, Pasquale; Bronzo, Valerio; Cuscó, Anna; D'Andreano, Sara; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the microbiota of water buffalo milk during sub-clinical and clinical mastitis, as compared to healthy status, by using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 137 quarter samples were included in the experimental design: 27 samples derived from healthy, culture negative quarters, with a Somatic Cell Count (SCC) of less than 200,000 cells/ml; 27 samples from quarters with clinical mastitis; 83 samples were collected from quarters with subclinical mastitis, with a SCC number greater of 200,000 cells/ml and/or culture positive for udder pathogens, without clinical signs of mastitis. Bacterial DNA was purified and the 16S rRNA genes were individually amplified and sequenced. Significant differences were found in milk samples from healthy quarters and those with sub-clinical and clinical mastitis. The microbiota diversity of milk from healthy quarters was richer as compared to samples with sub-clinical mastitis, whose microbiota diversity was in turn richer as compared to those from clinical mastitis. The core microbiota of water buffalo milk, defined as the asset of microorganisms shared by all healthy milk samples, includes 15 genera, namely Micrococcus, Propionibacterium, 5-7N15, Solibacillus, Staphylococcus, Aerococcus, Facklamia, Trichococcus, Turicibacter, 02d06, SMB53, Clostridium, Acinetobacter, Psychrobacter and Pseudomonas. Only two genera (Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas) were present in all the samples from sub-clinical mastitis, and no genus was shared across all in clinical mastitis milk samples. The presence of mastitis was found to be related to the change in the relative abundance of genera, such as Psychrobacter, whose relative abundance decreased from 16.26% in the milk samples from healthy quarters to 3.2% in clinical mastitis. Other genera, such as SMB53 and Solibacillus, were decreased as well. Discriminant analysis presents the evidence that the microbial community of healthy and clinical

  17. Does the maternal vaginal microbiota play a role in seeding the microbiota of neonatal gut and nose?

    OpenAIRE

    Sakwinska, O.; Foata, F.; Berger, B.; Brussow, H.; Combremont, S.; Mercenier, A.; Dogra, S.; Soh, S.E.; Yen, J.C.K.; Yeo, George Seow Heong; Lee, Yung Seng; Yap, Fabian; Meaney, M.J.; Chong, Yap-Seng; Godfrey, Keith

    2017-01-01

    The acquisition and early maturation of infant microbiota is not well understood despite its likely influence on later health. We investigated the contribution of the maternal microbiota to the microbiota of infant gut and nose in the context of mode of delivery and feeding. Using 16S rRNA sequencing and specific qPCR, we profiled microbiota of 42 mother-infant pairs from the GUSTO birth cohort, at body sites including maternal vagina, rectum and skin; and infant stool and nose. In our study,...

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms in microbial members of the human microbiota: current knowledge and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cureau, Natacha; AlJahdali, Nesreen; Vo, Nguyen; Carbonero, Franck

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiota and epigenetic processes have both been shown to play a crucial role in health and disease. However, there is extremely scarce information on epigenetic modulation of microbiota members except for a few pathogens. Mainly DNA adenine methylation has been described extensively in modulating the virulence of pathogenic bacteria in particular. It would thus appear likely that such mechanisms are widespread for most bacterial members of the microbiota. This review will present briefly the current knowledge on epigenetic processes in bacteria, give examples of known methylation processes in microbial members of the human microbiota and summarize the knowledge on regulation of host epigenetic processes by the human microbiota.

  19. PCR-TTGE analysis of 16S rRNA from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gut microbiota reveals host-specific communities of active bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Paola; Magne, Fabien; Araneda, Cristian; Fuentes, Pamela; Barros, Luis; Opazo, Rafael; Espejo, Romilio; Romero, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the relative contributions of host genetics and diet in shaping the gut microbiota of rainbow trout. Full sibling fish from four unrelated families, each consisting of individuals derived from the mating of one male and one female belonging to a breeding program, were fed diets containing either vegetable proteins or vegetable oils for two months in comparison to a control diet consisting of only fish protein and fish oil. Two parallel approaches were applied on the same samples: transcriptionally active bacterial populations were examined based on RNA analysis and were compared with bacterial populations obtained from DNA analysis. Comparison of temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) profiles from DNA and RNA showed important differences, indicating that active bacterial populations were better described by RNA analysis. Results showed that some bacterial groups were significantly (P<0.05) associated with specific families, indicating that microbiota composition may be influenced by the host. In addition, the effect of diet on microbiota composition was dependent on the trout family.

  20. PCR-TTGE analysis of 16S rRNA from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gut microbiota reveals host-specific communities of active bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Navarrete

    Full Text Available This study assessed the relative contributions of host genetics and diet in shaping the gut microbiota of rainbow trout. Full sibling fish from four unrelated families, each consisting of individuals derived from the mating of one male and one female belonging to a breeding program, were fed diets containing either vegetable proteins or vegetable oils for two months in comparison to a control diet consisting of only fish protein and fish oil. Two parallel approaches were applied on the same samples: transcriptionally active bacterial populations were examined based on RNA analysis and were compared with bacterial populations obtained from DNA analysis. Comparison of temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE profiles from DNA and RNA showed important differences, indicating that active bacterial populations were better described by RNA analysis. Results showed that some bacterial groups were significantly (P<0.05 associated with specific families, indicating that microbiota composition may be influenced by the host. In addition, the effect of diet on microbiota composition was dependent on the trout family.

  1. The gut microbiota elicits a profound metabolic reorientation in the mouse jejunal mucosa during conventionalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aidy, Sahar; Merrifield, Claire A; Derrien, Muriel; van Baarlen, Peter; Hooiveld, Guido; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joel; Dekker, Jan; Holmes, Elaine; Claus, Sandrine P; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-09-01

    Proper interactions between the intestinal mucosa, gut microbiota and nutrient flow are required to establish homoeostasis of the host. Since the proximal part of the small intestine is the first region where these interactions occur, and since most of the nutrient absorption occurs in the jejunum, it is important to understand the dynamics of metabolic responses of the mucosa in this intestinal region. Germ-free mice aged 8-10 weeks were conventionalised with faecal microbiota, and responses of the jejunal mucosa to bacterial colonisation were followed over a 30-day time course. Combined transcriptome, histology, (1)H NMR metabonomics and microbiota phylogenetic profiling analyses were used. The jejunal mucosa showed a two-phase response to the colonising microbiota. The acute-phase response, which had already started 1 day after conventionalisation, involved repression of the cell cycle and parts of the basal metabolism. The secondary-phase response, which was consolidated during conventionalisation (days 4-30), was characterised by a metabolic shift from an oxidative energy supply to anabolic metabolism, as inferred from the tissue transcriptome and metabonome changes. Detailed transcriptome analysis identified tissue transcriptional signatures for the dynamic control of the metabolic reorientation in the jejunum. The molecular components identified in the response signatures have known roles in human metabolic disorders, including insulin sensitivity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study elucidates the dynamic jejunal response to the microbiota and supports a prominent role for the jejunum in metabolic control, including glucose and energy homoeostasis. The molecular signatures of this process may help to find risk markers in the declining insulin sensitivity seen in human type 2 diabetes mellitus, for instance.

  2. Comparative analysis of bacterial profiles in unstimulated and stimulated saliva samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Jensen, Allan Bardow

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The microbial profiles of stimulated saliva samples have been shown to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, patients with dental caries, and orally healthy individuals. Saliva was stimulated to allow for easy and rapid collection; however, microbial...... composition may not reflect the more natural, unstimulated state. The purpose of this study was to validate whether stimulated saliva is an adequate surrogate for unstimulated saliva in determining salivary microbiomes. DESIGN: Unstimulated (n=20) and stimulated (n=20) saliva samples were collected from 20...

  3. Dietary carbohydrate source influences molecular fingerprints of the rat faecal microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragsted Lars O

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A study was designed to elucidate effects of selected carbohydrates on composition and activity of the intestinal microbiota. Five groups of eight rats were fed a western type diet containing cornstarch (reference group, sucrose, potato starch, inulin (a long- chained fructan or oligofructose (a short-chained fructan. Fructans are, opposite sucrose and starches, not digestible by mammalian gut enzymes, but are known to be fermentable by specific bacteria in the large intestine. Results Animals fed with diets containing potato starch, or either of the fructans had a significantly (p Principal Component Analysis of profiles of the faecal microbiota obtained by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE of PCR amplified bacterial 16S rRNA genes as well as of Reverse Transcriptase-PCR amplified bacterial 16S rRNA resulted in different phylogenetic profiles for each of the five animal groups as revealed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA of band patterns. Conclusion Even though sucrose and cornstarch are both easily digestible and are not expected to reach the large intestine, the DGGE band patterns obtained indicated that these carbohydrates indeed affected the composition of bacteria in the large gut. Also the two fructans resulted in completely different molecular fingerprints of the faecal microbiota, indicating that even though they are chemically similar, different intestinal bacteria ferment them. Comparison of DNA-based and RNA-based profiles suggested that two species within the phylum Bacteroidetes were not abundant in numbers but had a particularly high ribosome content in the animals fed with inulin.

  4. Microbiome/microbiota and allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuzaburo; Shimojo, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Allergies are characterized by a hypersensitive immune reaction to originally harmless antigens. In recent decades, the incidence of allergic diseases has markedly increased, especially in developed countries. The increase in the frequency of allergic diseases is thought to be primarily due to environmental changes related to a westernized lifestyle, which affects the commensal microbes in the human body. The human gut is the largest organ colonized by bacteria and contains more than 1000 bacterial species, called the "gut microbiota." The recent development of sequencing technology has enabled researchers to genetically investigate and clarify the diversity of all species of commensal microbes. The collective genomes of commensal microbes are together called the "microbiome." Although the detailed mechanisms remain unclear, it has been proposed that the microbiota/microbiome, especially that in the gut, impacts the systemic immunity and metabolism, thus affecting the development of various immunological diseases, including allergies. In this review, we summarize the recent findings regarding the importance of the microbiome/microbiota in the development of allergic diseases and also the results of interventional studies using probiotics or prebiotics to prevent allergies.

  5. Metabolomics analysis identifies intestinal microbiota-derived biomarkers of colonization resistance in clindamycin-treated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L P Jump

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota protect the host against enteric pathogens through a defense mechanism termed colonization resistance. Antibiotics excreted into the intestinal tract may disrupt colonization resistance and alter normal metabolic functions of the microbiota. We used a mouse model to test the hypothesis that alterations in levels of bacterial metabolites in fecal specimens could provide useful biomarkers indicating disrupted or intact colonization resistance after antibiotic treatment.To assess in vivo colonization resistance, mice were challenged with oral vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus or Clostridium difficile spores at varying time points after treatment with the lincosamide antibiotic clindamycin. For concurrent groups of antibiotic-treated mice, stool samples were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to assess changes in the microbiota and using non-targeted metabolic profiling. To assess whether the findings were applicable to another antibiotic class that suppresses intestinal anaerobes, similar experiments were conducted with piperacillin/tazobactam.Colonization resistance began to recover within 5 days and was intact by 12 days after clindamycin treatment, coinciding with the recovery bacteria from the families Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, both part of the phylum Firmicutes. Clindamycin treatment caused marked changes in metabolites present in fecal specimens. Of 484 compounds analyzed, 146 (30% exhibited a significant increase or decrease in concentration during clindamycin treatment followed by recovery to baseline that coincided with restoration of in vivo colonization resistance. Identified as potential biomarkers of colonization resistance, these compounds included intermediates in carbohydrate or protein metabolism that increased (pentitols, gamma-glutamyl amino acids and inositol metabolites or decreased (pentoses, dipeptides with clindamycin treatment. Piperacillin

  6. Epidemiological and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of infectious bacterial diarrhoea in Juba, South Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juma John Hassen Mogga

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diarrhoeal diseases have remained a major health problem in South Sudan where they accounted 45% prevalence in under five-year olds. Between 2006 and 2007, the country reported a morbidity of 8,337 cases and 176 deaths due to diarrhoeal outbreaks. Methodology: We investigated causative agents of diarrhoeal diseases and their antibiogram in persons presenting with diarrhoea to selected health facilities in Juba. Results: Bacterial agents were prevalent in 20(6.9% of the 286 patients with 5.7%(4/70 in under five-year olds alone. S. dysenteriae 50% (10/20 accounted for the majority of the identified pathogens followed S. flexneri 25% (5/20 and S. typh 25% (5/20. Antibiotic testing showed that S. flexneri (5/5 and S. typhi (5/5 were all 100% sensitive to ceftriaxone, and gentamicin while S. dysenteriae had varying sensitivity to ciprofloxacin (70%, nalidixic acid (90%, and ceftriaxone(100%. These pathogens had 100% resistance to amoxicillin, ampicillin, tetracycline and cotrimoxazole. No difference existed in isolation rates among different age groups, educational status, gender, water drank, use of chlorine, toilet use, exposure at home to diarrhoea patient, hand washing with soap and location of residence. However, diarrhoeagenic bacteria isolation was higher for participants with no source of income (OR=6.08, p<0.05. Conclusion: With emerging menace of resistance to commonly used antibiotics in South Sudan we recommend antibiotic resistance monitoring and regulation of antibiotic use.

  7. Habitual dietary fibre intake influences gut microbiota response to an inulin-type fructan prebiotic: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, human intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Genelle; Murphy, Rinki; Butts, Christine; Brough, Louise; Whelan, Kevin; Coad, Jane

    2018-01-01

    Dysbiotic gut microbiota have been implicated in human disease. Diet-based therapeutic strategies have been used to manipulate the gut microbiota towards a more favourable profile. However, it has been demonstrated that large inter-individual variability exists in gut microbiota response to a dietary intervention. The primary objective of this study was to investigate whether habitually low dietary fibre (LDF) v. high dietary fibre (HDF) intakes influence gut microbiota response to an inulin-type fructan prebiotic. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, thirty-four healthy participants were classified as LDF or HDF consumers. Gut microbiota composition (16S rRNA bacterial gene sequencing) and SCFA concentrations were assessed following 3 weeks of daily prebiotic supplementation (Orafti® Synergy 1; 16 g/d) or placebo (Glucidex® 29 Premium; 16 g/d), as well as after 3 weeks of the alternative intervention, following a 3-week washout period. In the LDF group, the prebiotic intervention led to an increase in Bifidobacterium (P=0·001). In the HDF group, the prebiotic intervention led to an increase in Bifidobacterium (Pinulin-type fructan prebiotic than those with LDF intakes. Future studies aiming to modulate the gut microbiota and improve host health, using an inulin-type fructan prebiotic, should take habitual dietary fibre intake into account.

  8. Comparing the impact of ultrafine particles from petrodiesel and biodiesel combustion to bacterial metabolism by targeted HPLC-MS/MS metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Fanyi; Xu, Mengyang; Schelli, Katie; Rutowski, Joshua; Holmén, Britt A; Zhu, Jiangjiang

    2017-08-01

    Alterations of gut bacterial metabolism play an important role in their host metabolism, and can result in diseases such as obesity and diabetes. While many factors were discovered influencing the gut bacterial metabolism, exposure to ultrafine particles (UFPs) from engine combustions were recently proposed to be a potential risk factor for the perturbation of gut bacterial metabolism, and consequentially to obesity and diabetes development. This study focused on evaluation of how UFPs from diesel engine combustions impact gut bacterial metabolism. We hypothesize that UFPs from different type of diesel (petrodiesel vs. biodiesel) will both impact bacterial metabolism, and the degree of impact is also diesel type-dependent. Targeted metabolic profiling of 221 metabolites were applied to three model gut bacteria in vitro, Streptococcus salivarius, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus fermentum. UFPs from two types of fuels, petrodiesel (B0) and a biodiesel blend (B20: 20% soy biodiesel/80% B0 by volume), were exposed to the bacteria and their metabolic changes were compared. For each bacterial strain, metabolites with significantly changed abundance were observed in both perturbations, and all three strains have increased number of altered metabolites detected from B20 UFPs perturbation in comparison to B0 UFPs. Multivariate statistical analysis further confirmed that the metabolic profiles were clearly different between testing groups. Metabolic pathway analyses also demonstrated several important metabolic pathways, including pathways involves amino acids biosynthesis and sugar metabolism, were significantly impacted by UFPs exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prebiotic Wheat Bran Fractions Induce Specific Microbiota Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D’hoe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat bran fibers are considered beneficial to human health through their impact on gut microbiota composition and activity. Here, we assessed the prebiotic potential of selected bran fractions by performing a series of fecal slurry anaerobic fermentation experiments using aleurone as well as total, ultrafine, and soluble wheat bran (swb as carbon sources. By combining amplicon-based community profiling with a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH approach, we found that incubation conditions favor the growth of Proteobacteria such as Escherichia and Bilophila. These effects were countered in all but one [total wheat bran (twb] fermentation experiments. Growth of Bifidobacterium species was stimulated after fermentation using ultrafine, soluble, and twb, in the latter two as part of a general increase in bacterial load. Both ultrafine and swb fermentation resulted in a trade-off between Bifidobacterium and Bilophila, as previously observed in human dietary supplementation studies looking at the effect of inulin-type fructans on the human gut microbiota. Aleurone selectively stimulated growth of Dorea and butyrate-producing Roseburia. All fermentation experiments induced enhanced gas production; increased butyrate concentrations were only observed following soluble bran incubation. Our results open perspectives for the development of aleurone as a complementary prebiotic selectively targeting colon butyrate producers.

  10. Prebiotic Wheat Bran Fractions Induce Specific Microbiota Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'hoe, Kevin; Conterno, Lorenza; Fava, Francesca; Falony, Gwen; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Vermeiren, Joan; Tuohy, Kieran; Raes, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    Wheat bran fibers are considered beneficial to human health through their impact on gut microbiota composition and activity. Here, we assessed the prebiotic potential of selected bran fractions by performing a series of fecal slurry anaerobic fermentation experiments using aleurone as well as total, ultrafine, and soluble wheat bran (swb) as carbon sources. By combining amplicon-based community profiling with a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) approach, we found that incubation conditions favor the growth of Proteobacteria such as Escherichia and Bilophila . These effects were countered in all but one [total wheat bran (twb)] fermentation experiments. Growth of Bifidobacterium species was stimulated after fermentation using ultrafine, soluble, and twb, in the latter two as part of a general increase in bacterial load. Both ultrafine and swb fermentation resulted in a trade-off between Bifidobacterium and Bilophila , as previously observed in human dietary supplementation studies looking at the effect of inulin-type fructans on the human gut microbiota. Aleurone selectively stimulated growth of Dorea and butyrate-producing Roseburia . All fermentation experiments induced enhanced gas production; increased butyrate concentrations were only observed following soluble bran incubation. Our results open perspectives for the development of aleurone as a complementary prebiotic selectively targeting colon butyrate producers.

  11. Composition of gut microbiota in obese and normal-weight Mexican school-age children and its association with metabolic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Contreras, B E; Morán-Ramos, S; Villarruel-Vázquez, R; Macías-Kauffer, L; Villamil-Ramírez, H; León-Mimila, P; Vega-Badillo, J; Sánchez-Muñoz, F; Llanos-Moreno, L E; Canizalez-Román, A; Del Río-Navarro, B; Ibarra-González, I; Vela-Amieva, M; Villarreal-Molina, T; Ochoa-Leyva, A; Aguilar-Salinas, C A; Canizales-Quinteros, S

    2017-12-05

    Childhood obesity is a serious public health problem in Mexico. Adult gut microbiota composition has been linked to obesity, but few studies have addressed the role of gut microbiota in childhood obesity. The aim of this study is to compare gut microbiota composition in obese and normal-weight children and to associate gut microbiota profiles with amino acid serum levels and obesity-related metabolic traits. Microbial taxa relative abundance was determined by 16S rRNA sequencing in 67 normal-weight and 71 obese children aged 6-12 years. Serum amino acid levels were measured by mass spectrometry. Associations between microbiota composition, metabolic parameters and amino acid serum levels were tested. No significant differences in phyla abundances or Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratios were observed between normal-weight and obese children. However, Bacteroides eggerthii abundance was significantly higher in obese children and correlated positively with body fat percentage and negatively with insoluble fibre intake. Additionally, Bacteroides plebeius and unclassified Christensenellaceae abundances were significantly higher in normal-weight children. Abundance of both these species correlated negatively with phenylalanine serum levels, a metabolite also found to be associated with obesity in Mexican children. The study identified bacterial species associated with obesity, metabolic complications and amino acid serum levels in Mexican children. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  12. Intestinal Microbiota and Microbial Metabolites Are Changed in a Pig Model Fed a High-Fat/Low-Fiber or a Low-Fat/High-Fiber Diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja N Heinritz

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota and its metabolites appear to be an important factor for gastrointestinal function and health. However, research is still needed to further elaborate potential relationships between nutrition, gut microbiota and host's health by means of a suitable animal model. The present study examined the effect of two different diets on microbial composition and activity by using the pig as a model for humans. Eight pigs were equally allotted to two treatments, either fed a low-fat/high-fiber (LF, or a high-fat/low-fiber (HF diet for 7 weeks. Feces were sampled at day 7 of every experimental week. Diet effects on fecal microbiota were assessed using quantitative real-time PCR, DNA fingerprinting and metaproteomics. Furthermore, fecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA profiles and ammonia concentrations were determined. Gene copy numbers of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria (P0.05. Results provide evidence that beginning from the start of the experiment, the LF diet stimulated beneficial bacteria and SCFA production, especially butyrate (P<0.05, while the HF diet fostered those bacterial groups which have been associated with a negative impact on health conditions. These findings correspond to results in humans and might strengthen the hypothesis that the response of the porcine gut microbiota to a specific dietary modulation is in support of using the pig as suitable animal model for humans to assess diet-gut-microbiota interactions. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003447.

  13. Safety assessment of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis rice T1c-19 in Sprague-Dawley rats from metabonomics and bacterial profile perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Sishuo; He, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Yuan, Yanfang; Liu, Pengfei; Cao, Bo; Shi, Hui; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis rice is facing commercialization as the main food source in the near future. The unintended effects of genetically modified (GM) organisms are the most important barriers to their promotion. We aimed to establish a new in vivo evaluation model for genetically modified foods by using metabonomics and bacterial profile approaches. T1c-19 rice flour or its transgenic parent MH63 was used at 70% wt/wt to produce diets that were fed to rats for ∼ 90 days. Urine metabolite changes were detected using (1)H NMR. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to detect the bacterial profiles between the two groups. The metabonomics was analyzed for metabolite changes in rat urine, when compared with the non-GM rice group, where rats were fed a GM rice diet. Several metabolites correlated with rat age and sex but not with GM rice diet. Significant biological differences were not identified between the GM rice diet and the non-GM rice diet. The bacteria related to rat urine metabolites were also discussed. The results from metabonomics and bacterial profile analyses were comparable with the results attained using the traditional method. Because metabonomics and bacterial profiling offer noninvasive, dynamic approaches for monitoring food safety, they provide a novel process for assessing the safety of GM foods. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effect of diet on the human gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain

    The gut microbiota plays an important role for humans in both health and disease. It is therefore important to understand how and to what extent choice of diet may influence the microbial community and the effects this has on the host. The variation in the normal human gut microbiota may however...... that induced shifts in gut microbiota show large inter-individual variations. It thus seems plausible that knowing the microbiota composition could facilitate predictions as to how the community will react to dietary interventions thus moving towards some degree of personalised dietary recommendations. During...... a 6-month randomised, controlled dietary intervention following either the New Nordic Diet recommendations or Average Danish Diet (n=62) almost no significant differences in the gut microbiota composition caused by the different diets were observed using qPCR analysis of 33 selected bacterial groups...

  15. Microbiota and Human Health: characterization techniques and transference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo-Moreno, Rosa; Alarcón-Cavero, Teresa; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Delgado-Palacio, Susana; Ferrer-Martínez, Manuel

    2017-03-31

    The human microbiota comprises all the microorganisms of our body, which can also be categorised as commensals, mutualists and pathogens according to their behaviour. Our knowledge of the human microbiota has considerably increased since the introduction of 16S rRNA next generation sequencing (16S rDNA gene). This technological breakthrough has seen a revolution in the knowledge of the microbiota composition and its implications in human health. This article details the different human bacterial ecosystems and the scientific evidence of their involvement in different diseases. The faecal microbiota transplant procedure, particularly used to treat recurrent diarrhoea caused by Clostridium difficile, and the methodological bases of the new molecular techniques used to characterise microbiota are also described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Gut Microbiota Analysis Results Are Highly Dependent on the 16S rRNA Gene Target Region, Whereas the Impact of DNA Extraction Is Minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintala, Anniina; Pietilä, Sami; Munukka, Eveliina; Eerola, Erkki; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Laiho, Asta; Pekkala, Satu; Huovinen, Pentti

    2017-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is currently the method of choice for analyzing gut microbiota composition. As gut microbiota composition is a potential future target for clinical diagnostics, it is of utmost importance to enhance and optimize the NGS analysis procedures. Here, we have analyzed the impact of DNA extraction and selected 16S rDNA primers on the gut microbiota NGS results. Bacterial DNA from frozen stool specimens was extracted with 5 commercially available DNA extraction kits. Special attention was paid to the semiautomated DNA extraction methods that could expedite the analysis procedure, thus being especially suitable for clinical settings. The microbial composition was analyzed with 2 distinct protocols: 1 targeting the V3-V4 and the other targeting the V4-V5 area of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The overall effect of DNA extraction on the gut microbiota 16S rDNA profile was relatively small, whereas the 16S rRNA gene target region had an immense impact on the results. Furthermore, semiautomated DNA extraction methods clearly appeared suitable for NGS procedures, proposing that application of these methods could importantly reduce hands-on time and human errors without compromising the validity of results.

  17. Impact of coffee consumption on the gut microbiota: a human volunteer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquet, Muriel; Rochat, Isabelle; Moulin, Julie; Cavin, Christophe; Bibiloni, Rodrigo

    2009-03-31

    The impact of a moderate consumption of an instant coffee on the general composition of the human intestinal bacterial population was assessed in this study. Sixteen (16) healthy adult volunteers consumed a daily dose of 3 cups of coffee during 3 weeks. Faecal samples were collected before and after the consumption of coffee, and the impact of the ingestion of the product on the intestinal bacteria as well as the quantification of specific bacterial groups was assessed using nucleic acid-based methods. Although faecal profiles of the dominant microbiota were not significantly affected after the consumption of the coffee (Dice's similarity index=92%, n=16), the population of Bifidobacterium spp. increased after the 3-week test period (P=0.02). Moreover, in some subjects, there was a specific increase in the metabolic activity of Bifidobacterium spp. Our results show that the consumption of the coffee preparation resulting from water co-extraction of green and roasted coffee beans produce an increase in the metabolic activity and/or numbers of the Bifidobacterium spp. population, a bacterial group of reputed beneficial effects, without major impact on the dominant microbiota.

  18. In vitro and in vivo profiles of ACH-702, an isothiazoloquinolone, against bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Michael J; Podos, Steven D; Thanassi, Jane A; Leggio, Melissa J; Bradbury, Barton J; Deshpande, Milind

    2011-06-01

    ACH-702, a novel isothiazoloquinolone (ITQ), was assessed for antibacterial activity against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical isolates and found to possess broad-spectrum activity, especially against antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). For Gram-negative bacteria, ACH-702 showed exceptional potency against Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a Neisseria sp. but was less active against members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Good antibacterial activity was also evident against several anaerobes as well as Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Excellent bactericidal activity was observed for ACH-702 against several bacterial pathogens in time-kill assays, and postantibiotic effects (PAEs) of >1 h were evident with both laboratory and clinical strains of staphylococci at 10 × MIC and similar in most cases to those observed for moxifloxacin at the same MIC multiple. In vivo efficacy was demonstrated against S. aureus with murine sepsis and thigh infection models, with decreases in the number of CFU/thigh equal to or greater than those observed after vancomycin treatment. Macromolecular synthesis assays showed specific dose-dependent inhibition of DNA replication in staphylococci, and biochemical analyses indicated potent dual inhibition of two essential DNA replication enzymes: DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Additional biological data in support of an effective dual targeting mechanism of action include the following: low MIC values (≤0.25 μg/ml) against staphylococcal strains with single mutations in both gyrA and grlA (parC), retention of good antibacterial activity (MICs of ≤0.5 μg/ml) against staphylococcal strains with two mutations in both gyrA and grlA, and low frequencies for the selection of higher-level resistance (<10⁻¹⁰). These promising initial data support further study of isothiazoloquinolones as potential clinical candidates.

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Profiles of ACH-702, an Isothiazoloquinolone, against Bacterial Pathogens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Michael J.; Podos, Steven D.; Thanassi, Jane A.; Leggio, Melissa J.; Bradbury, Barton J.; Deshpande, Milind

    2011-01-01

    ACH-702, a novel isothiazoloquinolone (ITQ), was assessed for antibacterial activity against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical isolates and found to possess broad-spectrum activity, especially against antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). For Gram-negative bacteria, ACH-702 showed exceptional potency against Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a Neisseria sp. but was less active against members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Good antibacterial activity was also evident against several anaerobes as well as Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Excellent bactericidal activity was observed for ACH-702 against several bacterial pathogens in time-kill assays, and postantibiotic effects (PAEs) of >1 h were evident with both laboratory and clinical strains of staphylococci at 10× MIC and similar in most cases to those observed for moxifloxacin at the same MIC multiple. In vivo efficacy was demonstrated against S. aureus with murine sepsis and thigh infection models, with decreases in the number of CFU/thigh equal to or greater than those observed after vancomycin treatment. Macromolecular synthesis assays showed specific dose-dependent inhibition of DNA replication in staphylococci, and biochemical analyses indicated potent dual inhibition of two essential DNA replication enzymes: DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Additional biological data in support of an effective dual targeting mechanism of action include the following: low MIC values (≤0.25 μg/ml) against staphylococcal strains with single mutations in both gyrA and grlA (parC), retention of good antibacterial activity (MICs of ≤0.5 μg/ml) against staphylococcal strains with two mutations in both gyrA and grlA, and low frequencies for the selection of higher-level resistance (<10−10). These promising initial data support further study of isothiazoloquinolones as potential clinical candidates. PMID

  20. BACTERIAL PROFILE OF NECROTIC PULPS IN CHEETAH (ACINONYX JUBATUS) CANINE TEETH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansa Ruiz, José C; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Steenkamp, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    The role of microbes and their antimicrobial susceptibilities in both acute and chronic infections of the dental pulp in humans has been well studied. Presently, no data are available on endodontic pathogens in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). The aim of this study was to isolate and identify the bacteria found in the canine teeth of cheetahs, where the pulp was necrotic and exposed due to a complicated crown fracture. Thirty-six microbiologic samples were taken from root canals (RCs) of the canine teeth of 19 cheetahs: one pulp sample was taken from 10 cheetahs, four samples from 2 cheetahs, two samples from 3 cheetahs, and three samples from 4 cheetahs. Exposed pulps were cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria; an additional screening with a 16S rRNA-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the last six samples. Antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates was determined by use of the Kirby-Bauer diffusion test. In total, 59 cultivable isolates belonging to 19 microbial species and 13 genera were recovered from the 36 RCs sampled. Only two samples yielded no cultivable bacteria. Thirty-two (54.49%) of the cultivable isolates were Gram positive and 27 (45.71%) were Gram negative. The maximum number of isolates cultivated from an individual RC was six. Facultative anaerobes (62.72%) were the most common bacteria of the RCs that yielded cultivable bacteria. Of the isolates, 28.81% were aerobic and 8.47% were strict anaerobes. The antimicrobials that showed the greatest efficacy in vitro against the different bacteria isolates were amikacin and gentamicin. The more common bacterial species isolated by PCR were anaerobes (60.8%), facultative anaerobes (30.2%), and aerobes (8.6%).

  1. Wholly Rickettsia! Reconstructed Metabolic Profile of the Quintessential Bacterial Parasite of Eukaryotic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Driscoll

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Reductive genome evolution has purged many metabolic pathways from obligate intracellular Rickettsia (Alphaproteobacteria; Rickettsiaceae. While some aspects of host-dependent rickettsial metabolism have been characterized, the array of host-acquired metabolites and their cognate transporters remains unknown. This dearth of information has thwarted efforts to obtain an axenic Rickettsia culture, a major impediment to conventional genetic approaches. Using phylogenomics and computational pathway analysis, we reconstructed the Rickettsia metabolic and transport network, identifying 51 host-acquired metabolites (only 21 previously characterized needed to compensate for degraded biosynthesis pathways. In the absence of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway, cell envelope glycoconjugates are synthesized from three imported host sugars, with a range of additional host-acquired metabolites fueling the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid and glycerophospholipid pathways also initiate from host precursors, and import of both isoprenes and terpenoids is required for the synthesis of ubiquinone and the lipid carrier of lipid I and O-antigen. Unlike metabolite-provisioning bacterial symbionts of arthropods, rickettsiae cannot synthesize B vitamins or most other cofactors, accentuating their parasitic nature. Six biosynthesis pathways contain holes (missing enzymes; similar patterns in taxonomically diverse bacteria suggest alternative enzymes that await discovery. A paucity of characterized and predicted transporters emphasizes the knowledge gap concerning how rickettsiae import host metabolites, some of which are large and not known to be transported by bacteria. Collectively, our reconstructed metabolic network offers clues to how rickettsiae hijack host metabolic pathways. This blueprint for growth determinants is an important step toward the design of axenic media to rescue rickettsiae from the eukaryotic cell.

  2. Bacterial Profiling Reveals Novel "Ca. Neoehrlichia", Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma Species in Australian Human-Biting Ticks.

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    Alexander W Gofton

    Full Text Available In Australia, a conclusive aetiology of Lyme disease-like illness in human patients remains elusive, despite growing numbers of people presenting with symptoms attributed to tick bites. In the present study, we surveyed the microbial communities harboured by human-biting ticks from across Australia to identify bacteria that may contribute to this syndrome. Universal PCR primers were used to amplify the V1-2 hyper-variable region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in DNA samples from individual Ixodes holocyclus (n = 279, Amblyomma triguttatum (n = 167, Haemaphysalis bancrofti (n = 7, and H. longicornis (n = 7 ticks. The 16S amplicons were sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform and analysed in USEARCH, QIIME, and BLAST to assign genus and species-level taxonomies. Nested PCR and Sanger sequencing were used to confirm the NGS data and further analyse novel findings. All 460 ticks were negative for Borrelia spp. by both NGS and nested PCR analysis. Two novel "Candidatus Neoehrlichia" spp. were identified in 12.9% of I. holocyclus ticks. A novel Anaplasma sp. was identified in 1.8% of A. triguttatum ticks, and a novel Ehrlichia sp. was identified in both A. triguttatum (1.2% ticks and a single I. holocyclus (0.6% tick. Further phylogenetic analysis of novel "Ca. Neoehrlichia", Anaplasma and Ehrlichia based on 1,265 bp 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that these are new species. Determining whether these newly discovered organisms cause disease in humans and animals, like closely related bacteria do abroad, is of public health importance and requires further investigation.

  3. Host–Microbiota Mutualism in Metabolic Diseases

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    Salvatore Fabbiano

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota is a plastic ecosystem that is shaped by environmental and genetic factors, interacting with virtually all tissues of the host. Many signals result from the interplay between the microbiota with its mammalian symbiont that can lead to altered metabolism. Disruptions in the microbial composition are associated with a number of comorbidities linked to the metabolic syndrome. Promoting the niche expansion of beneficial bacteria through diet and supplements can improve metabolic disorders. Reintroducing bacteria through probiotic treatment or fecal transplant is a strategy under active investigation for multiple pathological conditions. Here, we review the recent knowledge of microbiota’s contribution to host pathology, the modulation of the microbiota by dietary habits, and the potential therapeutic benefits of reshaping the gut bacterial landscape in context of metabolic disorders such as obesity.

  4. Interactions between Innate Immunity, Microbiota, and Probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgetti, GianMarco; Brandimarte, Giovanni; Fabiocchi, Federica; Ricci, Salvatore; Flamini, Paolo; Sandri, Giancarlo; Trotta, Maria Cristina; Elisei, Walter; Penna, Antonio; Lecca, Piera Giuseppina; Picchio, Marcello; Tursi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The term "microbiota" means genetic inheritance associated with microbiota, which is about 100 times larger than the guest. The tolerance of the resident bacterial flora is an important key element of immune cell function. A key role in the interaction between the host and the microbiota is played by Paneth cell, which is able to synthesize and secrete proteins and antimicrobial peptides, such as α/β defensins, cathelicidin, 14 β-glycosidases, C-type lectins, and ribonuclease, in response to various stimuli. Recent studies found probiotics able to preserve intestinal homeostasis by downmodulating the immune response and inducing the development of T regulatory cells. Specific probiotic strain, as well as probiotic-driven metabolic products called "postbiotics," has been recently recognized and it is able to influence innate immunity. New therapeutic approaches based on probiotics are now available, and further treatments based on postbiotics will come in the future.

  5. Host–Microbiota Mutualism in Metabolic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiano, Salvatore; Suárez-Zamorano, Nicolas; Trajkovski, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is a plastic ecosystem that is shaped by environmental and genetic factors, interacting with virtually all tissues of the host. Many signals result from the interplay between the microbiota with its mammalian symbiont that can lead to altered metabolism. Disruptions in the microbial composition are associated with a number of comorbidities linked to the metabolic syndrome. Promoting the niche expansion of beneficial bacteria through diet and supplements can improve metabolic disorders. Reintroducing bacteria through probiotic treatment or fecal transplant is a strategy under active investigation for multiple pathological conditions. Here, we review the recent knowledge of microbiota’s contribution to host pathology, the modulation of the microbiota by dietary habits, and the potential therapeutic benefits of reshaping the gut bacterial landscape in context of metabolic disorders such as obesity. PMID:29056925

  6. Composition and temporal stability of the gut microbiota in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Ian B; Lynch, Denise B; O'Toole, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    The composition and function of the human gut microbiota has been linked to health and disease. We previously identified correlations between habitual diet, microbiota composition gradients and health gradients in an unstratified cohort of 178 elderly subjects. To refine our understanding of diet-microbiota associations and differential taxon abundance, we adapted an iterative bi-clustering algorithm (iterative binary bclustering of gene sets (iBBiG)) and applied it to microbiota composition data from 732 faecal samples from 371 ELDERMET cohort subjects, including longitudinal samples. We thus identified distinctive microbiota configurations associated with ageing in both community and long-stay residential care elderly subjects. Mixed-taxa populations were identified that had clinically distinct associations. Microbiota temporal instability was observed in both community-dwelling and long-term care subjects, particularly in those with low initial microbiota diversity. However, the stability of the microbiota of subjects had little impact on the directional change of the microbiota as observed for long-stay subjects who display a gradual shift away from their initial microbiota. This was not observed in community-dwelling subjects. This directional change was associated with duration in long-stay. Changes in these bacterial populations represent the loss of the health-associated and youth-associated microbiota components and gain of an elderly associated microbiota. Interestingly, community-associated microbiota configurations were impacted more by the use of antibiotics than the microbiota of individuals in long-term care, as the community-associated microbiota showed more loss but also more recovery following antibiotic treatment. This improved definition of gut microbiota composition patterns in the elderly will better inform the design of dietary or antibiotic interventions targeting the gut microbiota.

  7. Composition and temporal stability of the gut microbiota in older persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Ian B; Lynch, Denise B; O'Toole, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    The composition and function of the human gut microbiota has been linked to health and disease. We previously identified correlations between habitual diet, microbiota composition gradients and health gradients in an unstratified cohort of 178 elderly subjects. To refine our understanding of diet–microbiota associations and differential taxon abundance, we adapted an iterative bi-clustering algorithm (iterative binary bclustering of gene sets (iBBiG)) and applied it to microbiota composition data from 732 faecal samples from 371 ELDERMET cohort subjects, including longitudinal samples. We thus identified distinctive microbiota configurations associated with ageing in both community and long-stay residential care elderly subjects. Mixed-taxa populations were identified that had clinically distinct associations. Microbiota temporal instability was observed in both community-dwelling and long-term care subjects, particularly in those with low initial microbiota diversity. However, the stability of the microbiota of subjects had little impact on the directional change of the microbiota as observed for long-stay subjects who display a gradual shift away from their initial microbiota. This was not observed in community-dwelling subjects. This directional change was associated with duration in long-stay. Changes in these bacterial populations represent the loss of the health-associated and youth-associated microbiota components and gain of an elderly associated microbiota. Interestingly, community-associated microbiota configurations were impacted more by the use of antibiotics than the microbiota of individuals in long-term care, as the community-associated microbiota showed more loss but also more recovery following antibiotic treatment. This improved definition of gut microbiota composition patterns in the elderly will better inform the design of dietary or antibiotic interventions targeting the gut microbiota. PMID:26090993

  8. Aged Gut Microbiota Contributes to Systemical Inflammaging after Transfer to Germ-Free Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris Fransen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced age is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, which is usually referred to as inflammaging. Elderly are also known to have an altered gut microbiota composition. However, whether inflammaging is a cause or consequence of an altered gut microbiota composition is not clear. In this study, gut microbiota from young or old conventional mice was transferred to young germ-free (GF mice. Four weeks after gut microbiota transfer immune cell populations in spleen, Peyer’s patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes from conventionalized GF mice were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, whole-genome gene expression in the ileum was analyzed by microarray. Gut microbiota composition of donor and recipient mice was analyzed with 16S rDNA sequencing. Here, we show by transferring aged microbiota to young GF mice that certain bacterial species within the aged microbiota promote inflammaging. This effect was associated with lower levels of Akkermansia and higher levels of TM7 bacteria and Proteobacteria in the aged microbiota after transfer. The aged microbiota promoted inflammation in the small intestine in the GF mice and enhanced leakage of inflammatory bacterial components into the circulation was observed. Moreover, the aged microbiota promoted increased T cell activation in the systemic compartment. In conclusion, these data indicate that the gut microbiota from old mice contributes to inflammaging after transfer to young GF mice.

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae Colonization Is Required To Alter the Nasal Microbiota in Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Pamela; Whelan, Fiona J; Schenck, L Patrick; McGrath, Joshua J C; Vanderstocken, Gilles; Bowdish, Dawn M E; Surette, Michael G; Stämpfli, Martin R

    2017-10-01

    Smokers have nasal microbiota dysbiosis, with an increased frequency of colonizing bacterial pathogens. It is possible that cigarette smoke increases pathogen acquisition by perturbing the microbiota and decreasing colonization resistance. However, it is difficult to disentangle microbiota dysbiosis due to cigarette smoke exposure from microbiota changes caused by increased pathogen acquisition in human smokers. Using an experimental mouse model, we investigated the impact of cigarette smoke on the nasal microbiota in the absence and presence of nasal pneumococcal colonization. We observed that cigarette smoke exposure alone did not alter the nasal microbiota composition. The microbiota composition was also unchanged at 12 h following low-dose nasal pneumococcal inoculation, suggesting that the ability of the microbiota to resist initial nasal pneumococcal acquisition was not impaired in smoke-exposed mice. However, nasal microbiota dysbiosis occurred as a consequence of established high-dose nasal pneumococcal colonization at day 3 in smoke-exposed mice. Similar to clinical reports on human smokers, an enrichment of potentially pathogenic bacterial genera such as Fusobacterium , Gemella , and Neisseria was observed. Our findings suggest that cigarette smoke exposure predisposes to pneumococcal colonization independent of changes to the nasal microbiota and that microbiota dysbiosis observed in smokers may occur as a consequence of established pathogen colonization. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Changes in cecal microbiota and mucosal gene expression revealed new aspects of epizootic rabbit enteropathy.

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    Christine Bäuerl

    Full Text Available Epizootic Rabbit Enteropathy (ERE is a severe disease of unknown aetiology that mainly affects post-weaning animals. Its incidence can be prevented by antibiotic treatment suggesting that bacterial elements are crucial for the development of the disease. Microbial dynamics and host responses during the disease were studied. Cecal microbiota was characterized in three rabbit groups (ERE-affected, healthy and healthy pretreated with antibiotics, followed by transcriptional analysis of cytokines and mucins in the cecal mucosa and vermix by q-rtPCR. In healthy animals, cecal microbiota with or without antibiotic pretreatment was very similar and dominated by Alistipes and Ruminococcus. Proportions of both genera decreased in ERE rabbits whereas Bacteroides, Akkermansia and Rikenella increased, as well as Clostridium, γ-Proteobacteria and other opportunistic and pathogenic species. The ERE group displayed remarkable dysbiosis and reduced taxonomic diversity. Transcription rate of mucins and inflammatory cytokines was very high in ERE rabbits, except IL-2, and its analysis revealed the existence of two clearly different gene expression patterns corresponding to Inflammatory and (mucin Secretory Profiles. Furthermore, these profiles were associated to different bacterial species, suggesting that they may correspond to different stages of the disease. Other data obtained in this work reinforced the notion that ERE morbidity and mortality is possibly caused by an overgrowth of different pathogens in the gut of animals whose immune defence mechanisms seem not to be adequately responding.

  11. Bacterial Profile, Antibacterial Resistance Pattern, and Associated Factors from Women Attending Postnatal Health Service at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebaw Bitew Kifilie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Surgical site infection is a vital cause of maternal mortality and morbidity, especially in resource-limited countries. The rise of antibiotic resistance bacterial infection poses a big threat to this vulnerable population. However, there is lack of studies around the study area. Objective. The purpose of this study was to identify bacterial profile, antibacterial resistance pattern, and associated factors among mothers attending postnatal care health service. Methods. Institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted on 107 study participants at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital from 1 January 2016 to 30 May 2016. Wound swab, aspirate, and biopsy were collected and performed for culture and drug resistance testing. Data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to determine the associated factors for bacterial infection. Odds ratio (95% CI was calculated to determine the strength of statistically significant associated factors. Result. Bacterial growth was confirmed in 90 (84.1% of 107 study participants suspected to have surgical site infection. The predominant bacterial isolates were S. aureus (41.6%, E. coli (19.8%, K. pneumoniae (13.9%, coagulase negative Staphylococcus (12.9%, and Enterobacter spp. (4%. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, and tetracycline but susceptible to ceftriaxone and amikacin. Multidrug-resistant bacteria species were isolated. Using a procedure such as cesarean section and episiotomy for delivery and premature rapture of membrane had strong association with bacterial infection. Conclusion. The high prevalence of bacterial profile and isolation of multidrug-resistant bacteria pose a big threat to postnatal mothers and their children. Factors such as cesarean section, episiotomy for delivery, and premature rapture of membrane were predictors for bacterial infection. Therefore, there

  12. [Profile of bacterial resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections in 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammang, A; Morello, R; Vergnaud, M; Brouard, J; Eckart, P

    2017-03-01

    In pediatric units, bacteria-producing extended-spectrum-betalactamase (ESBL) have an increasing prevalence among bacteria causing febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of bacteria resistance patterns observed in UTIs, in order to assess the current antibiotic treatment protocols. This study is based upon a single-center retrospective chart review of the cytobacteriological urine cultures performed in UTIs between 1 January and 31 December 2014, in the medical pediatric unit of the Caen University Hospital. Out of the total of 219 cases of UTI, 26.9% were recurrences of UTI, 18.3% were infections in infants less than 3 months old, 21% of the patients suffered from underlying uropathy, and 16.4% of the patients had recently been exposed to antibiotics. In 80.3% of the cases, Escherichia coli was found, while Enterococcus faecalis was found in 5.6%. The antibiograms proved that 33.5% of the bacteria were sensitive. Half of E. coli were resistant to ampicillin, 4.9% to cefixime, 4.9% to ceftriaxone, 1.1% to gentamicin, and 27.8% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Nine E. coli and one Enterobacter cloacae produced ESBL, accounting for 4.6% of the UTIs. We did not find any bacteria-producing high-level cephalosporinase. Cefixime resistance was statistically linked to ongoing antibiotic treatment (OR=5.98; 95% CI [1.44; 24.91], P=0.014) and underlying uropathy (OR=6.24; 95% CI [1.47; 26.42], P=0.013). Ceftriaxone resistance was statistically related to ongoing antibiotic treatment (OR=6.93; 95% CI [1.45; 33.13], P=0.015). These results argue in favor of maintaining intravenous ceftriaxone for probabilistic ambulatory treatment. However, in case of hospitalization, cefotaxime can replace ceftriaxone, due to its lower ecological impact. Moreover, it is necessary to continue monitoring bacterial resistance and regularly review our treatment protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Intrauterine bacterial findings and hormonal profiles in post-partum cows with normal puerperium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekana, M; Jonsson, P; Kindahl, H

    1996-01-01

    The post-partum intrauterine bacterial flora, prostaglandin release, uterine involution and resumption of ovarian activity were studied in 9 Swedish dairy cows during the first 8-week period. Uterine involution was monitored by transrectal examinations of the reproductive tract 3 times weekly. Bacteriological examination was performed from twice weekly uterine biopsies. The main PGF2 alpha metabolite (15-ketodihydro-PGF2 alpha) was monitored from twice daily blood plasma samples, while morning samples were used for progesterone determinations. The cows were assigned to 2 groups: Group I (n = 7) with an uncomplicated puerperal period and Group II (n = 2) with signs of intrauterine infections. A total of 143 biopsies were collected, of which 129 (90.2%) were found to be bacteriologically negative. Thirteen (9.1%) of the remaining 14 biopsies were bacteriologically positive, while one (0.7%) was probably a contamination on a single occasion. The 13 bacteriologically positive biopsies belonged to the Group II cows from which 31 isolates contained 6 different genera of facultative and obligate anaerobic bacteria. Actinomyces pyogenes along with Bacteroides sp. and Fusobacterium necrophorum were found to predominate in a mixed flora. The bacteria were rapidly eliminated and disappeared completely from the uteri towards the end of the third week post-partum. The average number of days required for completion of uterine involution was 21.8 +/- 3.0 for all animals. The plasma levels of the PGF2 alpha metabolite were significantly elevated for the first 12-18, and 18 and 27 days in Group I and Group II, respectively. There was no significant relationship between the duration of PGF2 alpha release and the time required for completion of uterine involution (p > 0.05). Progesterone analysis showed resumption of ovarian activity and subsequent ovulation in 4 of the 9 cows 44-55 days post-partum. Thus, intrauterine infections are not commonly seen in cows with normal calving and

  14. The Role of the Gut Microbiota in Childhood Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Andreas Friis; Fonvig, Cilius Esmann; Stjernholm, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood and adolescent obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. The pathogenesis of obesity is complex and multifactorial, in which genetic and environmental contributions seem important. The gut microbiota is increasingly documented to be involved in the dysmetabolism...... component of the human gut microbiota in childhood and adolescent-onset obesity, with a special focus on the factors involved in the early development of the gut bacterial ecosystem, and how modulation of this microbial community might serve as a basis for new therapeutic strategies in combating childhood...... the role of the gut microbiota in the development of childhood obesity may potentially reveal new strategies for obesity prevention and treatment....

  15. Panamanian frog species host unique skin bacterial communities

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    Lisa K. Belden

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrates, including amphibians, host diverse symbiotic microbes that contribute to host disease resistance. Globally, and especially in montane tropical systems, many amphibian species are threatened by a chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, that causes a lethal skin disease. Bd therefore may be a strong selective agent on the diversity and function of the microbial communities inhabiting amphibian skin. In Panamá, amphibian population declines and the spread of Bd have been tracked. In 2012, we completed a field survey in Panamá to examine frog skin microbiota in the context of Bd infection. We focused on three frog species and collected two skin swabs per frog from a total of 136 frogs across four sites that varied from west to east in the time since Bd arrival. One swab was used to assess bacterial community structure using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and to determine Bd infection status, and one was used to assess metabolite diversity, as the bacterial production of anti-fungal metabolites is an important disease resistance function. The skin microbiota of the three Panamanian frog species differed in OTU (operational taxonomic unit, ~bacterial species community composition and metabolite profiles, although the pattern was less strong for the metabolites. Comparisons between frog skin bacterial communities from Panamá and the US suggest broad similarities at the phylum level, but key differences at lower taxonomic levels. In our field survey in Panamá, across all four sites, only 35 individuals (~26% were Bd infected. There was no clustering of OTUs or metabolite profiles based on Bd infection status and no clear pattern of west-east changes in OTUs or metabolite profiles across the four sites. Overall, our field survey data suggest that different bacterial communities might be producing broadly similar sets of metabolites across frog hosts and sites. Community structure and function may not be as tightly coupled in

  16. Neuropeptides, Microbiota, and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, P

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota and the brain interact with each other through multiple bidirectional signaling pathways in which neuropeptides and neuroactive peptide messengers play potentially important mediator roles. Currently, six particular modes of a neuropeptide link are emerging. (i) Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters contribute to the mutual microbiota-host interaction. (ii) The synthesis of neuroactive peptides is influenced by microbial control of the availability of amino acids. (iii) The activity of neuropeptides is tempered by microbiota-dependent autoantibodies. (iv) Peptide signaling between periphery and brain is modified by a regulatory action of the gut microbiota on the blood-brain barrier. (v) Within the brain, gut hormones released under the influence of the gut microbiota turn into neuropeptides that regulate multiple aspects of brain activity. (vi) Cerebral neuropeptides participate in the molecular, behavioral, and autonomic alterations which the brain undergoes in response to signals from the gut microbiota. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Scott N; Meissner, Tobias; Su, Andrew I; Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C; Schork, Nicholas J; Bretz, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free) or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota's transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  18. [Microbiota in women; clinical applications of probiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Calatayud, Guillermo; Suárez, Evaristo; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Pérez-Moreno, Jimena

    2015-07-18

    The main function of vaginal microbiota is to protect the mucosa against the colonization and growth of pathogenic microorganisms. This microbiota is modified by hormonal activity. Its maximum concentration and effectiveness occurs during the fertile period, where there is a predominance of lactobacilli. When it is reduced (microbiota dysbiosis) leads to bacterial vaginosis and candida vaginitis which are common diseases in women. Consequently, instillation of lactobacilli in the vagina has beneficial effects on the symptomatology and prognosis of these illnesses. Breast milk is one of the key factors in the development of gut microbiota of the infant. There is an enteric-breast circulation, which is higher at the end of pregnancy and during breastfeeding. This circulation could explain the modulation of the breast microbiota by using probiotics. It could have a positive impact not only for the health of the mother, who would reduce the incidence of mastitis, but also for their infant. The use of probiotics is a hopeful alternative in various gynecological pathologies. However, it's is necessary first some well-designed, randomized trials with standardized methods and with a significant number of patients in order to confirm its benefits and allow us its use in protocols. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Bacterial flora of the sigmoid neovagina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Toolenaar; I. Freundt (Ingrid); J.H. Wagenvoort; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); M. Vogel; J. Jeekel (Hans); A.C. Drogendijk

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe bacterial microbiota of 15 sigmoid neovaginas, created in patients with congenital vaginal aplasia or male transsexualism, was studied. No specimen was sterile, and only normal inhabitants of the colon were cultured. The total counts of bacteria were

  20. Introduction to the human gut microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thursby, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract harbours a complex and dynamic population of microorganisms, the gut microbiota, which exert a marked influence on the host during homeostasis and disease. Multiple factors contribute to the establishment of the human gut microbiota during infancy. Diet is considered as one of the main drivers in shaping the gut microbiota across the life time. Intestinal bacteria play a crucial role in maintaining immune and metabolic homeostasis and protecting against pathogens. Altered gut bacterial composition (dysbiosis) has been associated with the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases and infections. The interpretation of these studies relies on a better understanding of inter-individual variations, heterogeneity of bacterial communities along and across the GI tract, functional redundancy and the need to distinguish cause from effect in states of dysbiosis. This review summarises our current understanding of the development and composition of the human GI microbiota, and its impact on gut integrity and host health, underlying the need for mechanistic studies focusing on host–microbe interactions. PMID:28512250

  1. Introduction to the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thursby, Elizabeth; Juge, Nathalie

    2017-05-16

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract harbours a complex and dynamic population of microorganisms, the gut microbiota, which exert a marked influence on the host during homeostasis and disease. Multiple factors contribute to the establishment of the human gut microbiota during infancy. Diet is considered as one of the main drivers in shaping the gut microbiota across the life time. Intestinal bacteria play a crucial role in maintaining immune and metabolic homeostasis and protecting against pathogens. Altered gut bacterial composition (dysbiosis) has been associated with the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases and infections. The interpretation of these studies relies on a better understanding of inter-individual variations, heterogeneity of bacterial communities along and across the GI tract, functional redundancy and the need to distinguish cause from effect in states of dysbiosis. This review summarises our current understanding of the development and composition of the human GI microbiota, and its impact on gut integrity and host health, underlying the need for mechanistic studies focusing on host-microbe interactions. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Dynamics of bacterial metabolic profile and community structure during the mineralization of organic carbon in intensive swine farm wastewater

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    Xiaoyan Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Land application of intensive swine farm wastewater has raised serious environmental concerns due to the accumulation and microbially mediated transformation of large amounts of swine wastewater organic C (SWOC. Therefore, the study of SWOC mineralization and dynamics of wastewater microorganisms is essential to understand the environmental impacts of swine wastewater application. We measured the C mineralization of incubated swine wastewaters with high (wastewater H and low (wastewater L organic C concentrations. The dynamics of bacteria metabolic profile and community structure were also investigated. The results showed that SWOC mineralization was properly fitted by the two-simultaneous reactions model. The initial potential rate of labile C mineralization of wastewater H was 46% higher than that of wastewater L, whereas the initial potential rates of recalcitrant C mineralization of wastewaters H and L were both around 23 mg L-1 d-1. The bacterial functional and structural diversities significantly decreased for both the wastewaters during SWOC mineralization, and were all negatively correlated to specific UV absorbance (SUVA254; P < 0.01. The bacteria in the raw wastewaters exhibited functional similarity, and both metabolic profile and community structure changed with the mineralization of SWOC, mainly under the influence of SUVA254 (P < 0.001. These results suggested that SWOC mineralization was characterized by rapid mineralization of labile C and subsequent slow decomposition of recalcitrant C pool, and the quality of SWOC varied between the wastewaters with different amounts of organic C. The decreased bio-availability of dissolved organic matter affected the dynamics of wastewater bacteria during SWOC mineralization.

  3. Metabolic signatures of bacterial vaginosis.

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    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Morgan, Martin T; Fiedler, Tina L; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Fredricks, David N

    2015-04-14

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common but highly enigmatic condition that is associated with adverse outcomes for women and their neonates. Small molecule metabolites in the

  4. Rectal swabs for analysis of the intestinal microbiota.

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    Andries E Budding

    Full Text Available The composition of the gut microbiota is associated with various disease states, most notably inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and malnutrition. This underlines that analysis of intestinal microbiota is potentially an interesting target for clinical diagnostics. Currently, the most commonly used sample types are feces and mucosal biopsy specimens. Because sampling method, storage and processing of samples impact microbiota analysis, each sample type has its own limitations. An ideal sample type for use in routine diagnostics should be easy to obtain in a standardized fashion without perturbation of the microbiota. Rectal swabs may satisfy these criteria, but little is known about microbiota analysis on these sample types. In this study we investigated the characteristics and applicability of rectal swabs for gut microbiota profiling in a clinical routine setting in patients presenting with various gastro-intestinal disorders. We found that rectal swabs appeared to be a convenient means of sampling the human gut microbiota. Swabs can be performed on demand, whenever a patient presents; swab-derived microbiota profiles are reproducible, whether they are gathered at home by patients or by medical professionals in an outpatient setting and may be ideally suited for clinical diagnostics and large-scale studies.

  5. Disruption of the human gut microbiota following Norovirus infection.

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    Adam M Nelson

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota, the collection of all bacterial members in the intestinal tract, plays a key role in health. Disruption of the indigenous microbiota by a variety of stressors, including antibiotic therapy and intestinal infections, is associated with multiple health problems. We sought to determine if infection with Norovirus disrupts the gut microbiota. Barcoded pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA-encoding gene was used to characterize the stool microbiota in Norovirus-infected human patients (n = 38. While the microbiota in most infected patients (n = 31 resembled that seen in uninfected healthy controls, a minority of patients (n = 7 possessed a significantly altered microbiota characterized by reduced relative numbers of Bacteriodetes and a corresponding increase in Proteobacteria. In these patients, the increase in Proteobacteria was due to a single operational taxonomic unit (OTU of Escherichia coli. We cultured E. coli from Norovirus-infected patients and characterized them using PCR-ribotyping and virulence factor analysis. Multiple ribotypes were encountered, but none possessed typical virulence factors commonly carried by enteropathogenic E. coli strains. Microbiota disruption and elevated Proteobacteria were not significantly correlated to patient age, gender, sampling time following illness onset, or overall gut inflammation. These results demonstrate that some patients have a disrupted microbiota following Norovirus infection, and therefore may be at elevated risk for long-term health complications.

  6. Data Mining of Lung Microbiota in Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Hao, Chunyan; Ren, Lili; Xiao, Yan; Wang, Jianwei; Qin, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    The major therapeutic strategy used to treat exacerbated cystic fibrosis (CF) is antibiotic treatment. As this approach easily generates antibiotic-resistant strains of opportunistic bacteria, optimized antibiotic therapies are required to effectively control chronic and recurrent bacterial infections in CF patients. A promising future for the proper use of antibiotics is the management of lung microbiota. However, the impact of antibiotic treatments on CF microbiota and vice versa is not fully understood. This study analyzed 718 sputum samples from 18 previous studies to identify differences between CF and uninfected lung microbiota and to evaluate the effects of antibiotic treatments on exacerbated CF microbiota. A reference-based OTU (operational taxonomic unit) picking method was used to combine analyses of data generated using different protocols and platforms. Findings show that CF microbiota had greater richness and lower diversity in the community structure than uninfected control (NIC) microbiota. Specifically, CF microbiota showed higher levels of opportunistic bacteria and dramatically lower levels of commensal bacteria. Antibiotic treatment affected exacerbated CF microbiota notably but only transiently during the treatment period. Limited decrease of the dominant opportunistic bacteria and a dramatic decrease of commensal bacteria were observed during the antibiotic treatment for CF exacerbation. Simultaneously, low abundance opportunistic bacteria were thriving after the antibiotic treatment. The inefficiency of the current antibiotic treatment against major opportunistic bacteria and the detrimental effects on commensal bacteria indicate that the current empiric antibiotic treatment on CF exacerbation should be reevaluated and optimized.

  7. Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome.

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    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible causes. The human intestinal microbiota are composed of more than 1000 different bacterial species and 10(14) cells, and are essential for the development, function, and homeostasis of the intestine, and for individual health. The putative mechanisms that explain the role of microbiota in the development of IBS include altered composition or metabolic activity of the microbiota, mucosal immune activation and inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and impaired mucosal barrier function, sensory-motor disturbances provoked by the microbiota, and a disturbed gut-microbiota-brain axis. Therefore, modulation of the intestinal microbiota through dietary changes, and use of antibiotics, probiotics, and anti-inflammatory agents has been suggested as strategies for managing IBS symptoms. This review summarizes and discusses the accumulating evidence that intestinal microbiota play a role in the pathophysiology and management of IBS.

  8. Application of bacterial cytological profiling to crude natural product extracts reveals the antibacterial arsenal of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonejuie, Poochit; Trial, Rachelle M.; Newton, Gerald L.; Lamsa, Anne; Perera, Varahenage Ranmali; Aguilar, Julieta; Liu, Wei-Ting; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Kit

    2016-01-01

    Although most clinically used antibiotics are derived from natural products, identifying new antibacterial molecules from natural product extracts is difficult due to the complexity of these extracts and the limited tools to correlate biological activity with specific molecules. Here, we show that bacterial cytological profiling (BCP) provides a rapid method for mechanism of action determination on plates and in complex natural product extracts and for activity-guided purification. We prepared an extract from Bacillus subtilis 3610 that killed the Escherichia coli lptD mutant and used BCP to observe two types of bioactivities in the unfractionated extract: inhibition of translation and permeablization of the cytoplasmic membrane. We used BCP to guide purification of the molecules responsible for each activity, identifying the translation inhibitors bacillaene and bacillaene B (glycosylated bacillaene) and demonstrating that two molecules contribute to cell permeabilitization, the bacteriocin subtilosin and the cyclic peptide sporulation killing factor. Our results suggest that bacillaene mediates translational arrest, and show that bacillaene B has a minimum inhibitory concentration 10 × higher than unmodified bacillaene. Finally, we show that BCP can be used to screen strains on an agar plate without the need for extract preparation, greatly saving time and improving throughput. Thus, BCP simplifies the isolation of novel natural products, by identifying strains, crude extracts and fractions with interesting bioactivities even when multiple activities are present, allowing investigators to focus labor-intensive steps on those with desired activities. PMID:26648120

  9. The microbiota of pigs influenced by diet texture and severity of Lawsonia intracellularis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølbak, Lars; Johnsen, Kaare; Boye, Mette; Jensen, Tim K; Johansen, Markku; Møller, Kristian; Leser, Thomas D

    2008-04-01

    Pigs with and without naturally occurring Lawsonia intracellularis infection were fed diets with different texture. In a previous study from 79 pig herds using a similar feeding on pelleted or non-pelleted form showed that the non-pelleted diet was associated with a reduced prevalence of L. intracellularis. In this study a mechanistic approach was taken for explaining and testing this observation by studying the microbiota and the occurrence of L. intracellularis in the distal ileum of 54 pigs by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, Real-Time PCR and in situ hybridization. The texture of the diet influenced the microbiota, and from a quantitative discriminative analysis of the terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs) of ileum samples it was deduced that Clostridium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were associated with the non-pelleted diet and Streptococcus spp. with the pelleted diet. In experimentally infected pigs it was verified that 89bp and 90bp sized T-RFs (HhaI) from ileum represented L. intracellularis. The non-pelleted diet seemed to reduce the relative amount of L. intracellularis in the total microbiota of the ileum, but the number of pigs detected positive with L. intracellularis by Real-Time PCR was not influenced. The five pigs with highest L. intracellularis content showed T-RFs that were not present in profiles from less or non-infected pigs, which may indicate that some bacterial species were associated with L. intracellularis infection.

  10. Metaproteomics as a Complementary Approach to Gut Microbiota in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriz, Bernardo A.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-01-01

    Classic studies on phylotype profiling are limited to the identification of microbial constituents, where information is lacking about the molecular interaction of these bacterial communities with the host genome and the possible outcomes in host biology. A range of OMICs approaches have provided great progress linking the microbiota to health and disease. However, the investigation of this context through proteomic mass spectrometry-based tools is still being improved. Therefore, metaproteomics or community proteogenomics has emerged as a complementary approach to metagenomic data, as a field in proteomics aiming to perform large-scale characterization of proteins from environmental microbiota such as the human gut. The advances in molecular separation methods coupled with mass spectrometry (e.g. LC-MS/MS) and proteome bioinformatics have been fundamental in these novel large-scale metaproteomic studies, which have further been performed in a wide range of samples including soil, plant and human environments. Metaproteomic studies will make major progress if a comprehensive database covering the genes and expresses proteins from all gut microbial species is developed. To this end, we here present some of the main limitations of metaproteomic studies in complex microbiota environments such as the gut, also addressing the up-to-date pipelines in sample preparation prior to fractionation/separation and mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, a novel approach to the limitations of metagenomic databases is also discussed. Finally, prospects are addressed regarding the application of metaproteomic analysis using a unified host-microbiome gene database and other meta-OMICs platforms.

  11. Implication of the mosquito midgut microbiota in the defense against malaria parasites.

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    Yuemei Dong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria-transmitting mosquitoes are continuously exposed to microbes, including their midgut microbiota. This naturally acquired microbial flora can modulate the mosquito's vectorial capacity by inhibiting the development of Plasmodium and other human pathogens through an unknown mechanism. We have undertaken a comprehensive functional genomic approach to elucidate the molecular interplay between the bacterial co-infection and the development of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in its natural vector Anopheles gambiae. Global transcription profiling of septic and aseptic mosquitoes identified a significant subset of immune genes that were mostly up-regulated by the mosquito's microbial flora, including several anti-Plasmodium factors. Microbe-free aseptic mosquitoes displayed an increased susceptibility to Plasmodium infection while co-feeding mosquitoes with bacteria and P. falciparum gametocytes resulted in lower than normal infection levels. Infection analyses suggest the bacteria-mediated anti-Plasmodium effect is mediated by the mosquitoes' antimicrobial immune responses, plausibly through activation of basal immunity. We show that the microbiota can modulate the anti-Plasmodium effects of some immune genes. In sum, the microbiota plays an essential role in modulating the mosquito's capacity to sustain Plasmodium infection.

  12. Impact of human milk bacteria and oligosaccharides on neonatal gut microbiota establishment and gut health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Ted; Lacroix, Christophe; Braegger, Christian; Chassard, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal gut microbiota establishment represents a crucial stage for gut maturation, metabolic and immunologic programming, and consequently short- and long-term health status. Human milk beneficially influences this process due to its dynamic profile of age-adapted nutrients and bioactive components and by providing commensal maternal bacteria to the neonatal gut. These include Lactobacillus spp., as well as obligate anaerobes such as Bifidobacterium spp., which may originate from the maternal gut via an enteromammary pathway as a novel form of mother-neonate communication. Additionally, human milk harbors a broad range of oligosaccharides that promote the growth and activity of specific bacterial populations, in particular, Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides spp. This review focuses on the diversity and origin of human milk bacteria, as well as on milk oligosaccharides that influence neonatal gut microbiota establishment. This knowledge can be used to develop infant formulae that more closely mimic nature's model and sustain a healthy gut microbiota. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. MALINA: a web service for visual analytics of human gut microbiota whole-genome metagenomic reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyakht, Alexander V; Popenko, Anna S; Belenikin, Maxim S; Altukhov, Ilya A; Pavlenko, Alexander V; Kostryukova, Elena S; Selezneva, Oksana V; Larin, Andrei K; Karpova, Irina Y; Alexeev, Dmitry G

    2012-12-07

    MALINA is a web service for bioinformatic analysis of whole-genome metagenomic data obtained from human gut microbiota sequencing. As input data, it accepts metagenomic reads of various sequencing technologies, including long reads (such as Sanger and 454 sequencing) and next-generation (including SOLiD and Illumina). It is the first metagenomic web service that is capable of processing SOLiD color-space reads, to authors' knowledge. The web service allows phylogenetic and functional profiling of metagenomic samples using coverage depth resulting from the alignment of the reads to the catalogue of reference sequences which are built into the pipeline and contain prevalent microbial genomes and genes of human gut microbiota. The obtained metagenomic composition vectors are processed by the statistical analysis and visualization module containing methods for clustering, dimension reduction and group comparison. Additionally, the MALINA database includes vectors of bacterial and functional composition for human gut microbiota samples from a large number of existing studies allowing their comparative analysis together with user samples, namely datasets from Russian Metagenome project, MetaHIT and Human Microbiome Project (downloaded from http://hmpdacc.org). MALINA is made freely available on the web at http://malina.metagenome.ru. The website is implemented in JavaScript (using Ext JS), Microsoft .NET Framework, MS SQL, Python, with all major browsers supported.

  14. The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuijt, Tim J; Lankelma, Jacqueline M; Scicluna, Brendon P; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Roelofs, Joris J T H; de Boer, J Daan; Hoogendijk, Arjan J; de Beer, Regina; de Vos, Alex; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia, however, is unknown. Here, we investigate the function of the gut microbiota in the host defence against Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. Design We depleted the gut microbiota in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently infected them intranasally with S. pneumoniae. We then performed survival and faecal microbiota