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Sample records for bacterial iron transport

  1. The Siderocalin/Enterobactin Interaction: A Link between Mammalian Immunity and Bacterial Iron Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meux, Susan C.

    2008-05-12

    The siderophore enterobactin (Ent) is produced by enteric bacteria to mediate iron uptake. Ent scavenges iron and is taken up by the bacteria as the highly stable ferric complex [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-}. This complex is also a specific target of the mammalian innate immune system protein, Siderocalin (Scn), which acts as an anti-bacterial agent by specifically sequestering siderophores and their ferric complexes during infection. Recent literature suggesting that Scn may also be involved in cellular iron transport has increased the importance of understanding the mechanism of siderophore interception and clearance by Scn; Scn is observed to release iron in acidic endosomes and [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} is known to undergo a change from catecholate to salicylate coordination in acidic conditions, which is predicted to be sterically incompatible with the Scn binding pocket (also referred to as the calyx). To investigate the interactions between the ferric Ent complex and Scn at different pH values, two recombinant forms of Scn with mutations in three residues lining the calyx were prepared: Scn-W79A/R81A and Scn-Y106F. Binding studies and crystal structures of the Scn-W79A/R81A:[Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} and Scn-Y106F:[Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} complexes confirm that such mutations do not affect the overall conformation of the protein but do weaken significantly its affinity for [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-}. Fluorescence, UV-Vis and EXAFS spectroscopies were used to determine Scn/siderophore dissociation constants and to characterize the coordination mode of iron over a wide pH range, in the presence of both mutant proteins and synthetic salicylate analogs of Ent. While Scn binding hinders salicylate coordination transformation, strong acidification results in the release of iron and degraded siderophore. Iron release may therefore result from a combination of Ent degradation and coordination change.

  2. Human iron transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Garrick, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Human iron transporters manage iron carefully because tissues need iron for critical functions, but too much iron increases the risk of reactive oxygen species. Iron acquisition occurs in the duodenum via divalent metal transporter (DMT1) and ferroportin. Iron trafficking depends largely on the transferrin cycle. Nevertheless, non-digestive tissues have a variety of other iron transporters that may render DMT1 modestly redundant, and DMT1 levels exceed those needed for the just-mentioned task...

  3. Iron Transport Systems in Neisseria meningitidis†

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins-Balding, Donna; Ratliff-Griffin, Melanie; Stojiljkovic, Igor

    2004-01-01

    Acquisition of iron and iron complexes has long been recognized as a major determinant in the pathogenesis of Neisseria meningitidis. In this review, high-affinity iron uptake systems, which allow meningococci to utilize the human host proteins transferrin, lactoferrin, hemoglobin, and haptoglobin-hemoglobin as sources of essential iron, are described. Classic features of bacterial iron transport systems, such as regulation by the iron-responsive repressor Fur and TonB-dependent transport act...

  4. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  5. Iron transport in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, E C

    2009-12-01

    Dopaminergic cell death in the substantia nigra (SN) is central to Parkinson's disease (PD) but the neurodegenerative mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. Iron accumulation in dopaminergic neurons and glial cells in the SN of PD patients may contribute to the generation of oxidative stress, protein aggregation and neuronal death. However, the mechanisms involved in iron accumulation remain unclear. In previous studies we excluded a role of transferrin and its receptor in iron accumulation while we showed that lactoferrin receptors were overexpressed in blood vessels and dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. We recently also described an increase in the expression of the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1/Nramp2/Slc11a2) in the SN of PD patients. Using the PD animal model of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) intoxication in mice, we showed that DMT1 expression increased in the ventral mesencephalon of intoxicated animals, concomitant with iron accumulation, oxidative stress and dopaminergic cell loss. A mutation in DMT1 that impairs iron transport protected rodents against parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxins MPTP and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). This study supports a critical role for DMT1 in iron-mediated neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:20082992

  6. Coordination Chemistry of Microbial Iron Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Allred, Benjamin E; Sia, Allyson K

    2015-09-15

    with the characterization of what are now called siderocalins. Initially found as a protein of the human innate immune system, these proteins bind both ferric and apo-siderophores to inactivate the siderophore transport system and hence deny iron to an invading pathogenic microbe. Siderocalins also can play a role in iron transport of the host, particularly in the early stages of fetal development. Finally, it is speculated that the molecular targets of siderocalins in different species differ based on the siderophore structures of the most important bacterial pathogens of those species.

  7. Iron uptake and transport across physiological barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Kari A; Connor, James R

    2016-08-01

    Iron is an essential element for human development. It is a major requirement for cellular processes such as oxygen transport, energy metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, and myelin synthesis. Despite its crucial role in these processes, iron in the ferric form can also produce toxic reactive oxygen species. The duality of iron's function highlights the importance of maintaining a strict balance of iron levels in the body. As a result, organisms have developed elegant mechanisms of iron uptake, transport, and storage. This review will focus on the mechanisms that have evolved at physiological barriers, such as the intestine, the placenta, and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), where iron must be transported. Much has been written about the processes for iron transport across the intestine and the placenta, but less is known about iron transport mechanisms at the BBB. In this review, we compare the established pathways at the intestine and the placenta as well as describe what is currently known about iron transport at the BBB and how brain iron uptake correlates with processes at these other physiological barriers. PMID:27457588

  8. Bacterial siderophores efficiently provide iron to iron-starved tomato plants in hydroponics culture

    OpenAIRE

    Radzki, W.; Gutierrez Mañero, F. J.; Algar, E.; Lucas García, J. A.; García-Villaraco, A.; Ramos Solano, B.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements for a proper plant development. Providing plants with an accessible form of iron is crucial when it is scant or unavailable in soils. Chemical chelates are the only current alternative and are highly stable in soils, therefore, posing a threat to drinking water. The aim of this investigation was to quantify siderophores produced by two bacterial strains and to determine if these bacterial siderophores would palliate chlorotic symptoms of iron-starved toma...

  9. Ferrous iron transport in Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, S.L.; Arcenaeux, J.E.L.; Byers, B.R.; Martin, M.E.; Aranha, H.

    1986-12-01

    Radioiron uptake from /sup 59/FeCl/sub 3/ by Streptococcus mutans OMZ176 was increased by anaerobiosis, sodium ascorbate, and phenazine methosulfate (PMS), although there was a 10-min lag before PMS stimulation was evident. The reductant ascorbate may have provided ferrous iron. The PMS was reduced by the cells, and the reduced PMS then may have generated ferrous iron for transport; reduced PMS also may have depleted dissolved oxygen. It was concluded that S. mutans transports only ferrous iron, utilizing reductants furnished by glucose metabolism to reduce iron prior to its uptake.

  10. Bacterial iron-sulfur cluster sensors in mammalian pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Halie K.; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters act as important cofactors for a number of transcriptional regulators in bacteria, including many mammalian pathogens. The sensitivity of iron-sulfur clusters to iron availability, oxygen tension, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species enables bacteria to use such regulators to adapt their gene expression profiles rapidly in response to changing environmental conditions. In this review, we discuss how the [4Fe-4S] or [2Fe-2S] cluster-containing regulators FNR, Wbl, aconitase, IscR, NsrR, SoxR, and AirSR contribute to bacterial pathogenesis through control of both metabolism and classical virulence factors. In addition, we briefly review mammalian iron homeostasis as well as oxidative/nitrosative stress to provide context for understanding the function of bacterial iron-sulfur cluster sensors in different niches within the host. PMID:25738802

  11. Effect of heavy metals on bacterial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Olson, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    Adsorption of metals onto bacteria and soil takes place as stormwater runoff infiltrates into the subsurface. Changes in both bacterial surfaces and soil elemental content have been observed, and may alter the attachment of bacteria to soil surfaces. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) analyses were performed on soil samples equilibrated with synthetic stormwater amended with copper, lead and zinc. The results demonstrate the presence of copper and zinc on soil surfaces. To investigate bacterial attachment behavior, sets of batch sorption experiments were conducted on Escherichia Coli (E. coli) under different chemical conditions by varying solution compositions (nutrient solution vs synthetic stormwater). The adsorption data is best described using theoretical linear isotherms. The equilibrium coefficient (Kd) of E. coli is higher in synthetic stormwater than in nutrient solution without heavy metals. The adsorption of heavy metals onto bacterial surfaces significantly decreases their negative surface charge as determined via zeta potential measurements (-17.0±5.96mv for E. coli equilibrated with synthetic stormwater vs -21.6±5.45mv for E. coli equilibrated with nutrient solution), indicating that bacterial attachment may increase due to the attachment of metals onto bacterial surfaces and their subsequent change in surface charge. The attachment efficiency (α) of bacteria was also calculated and compared for both solution chemistries. Bacterial attachment efficiency (α) in synthetic stormwater is 0.997, which is twice as high as that in nutrient solution(α 0.465). The ratio of bacterial diameter : collector diameter suggests minimal soil straining during bacterial transport. Results suggest that the presence of metals in synthetic stormwater leads to an increase in bacterial attachment to soil surfaces. In terms of designing stormwater infiltration basins, the presence of heavy metals seems to

  12. Bacterial heme-transport proteins and their heme-coordination modes

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Yong; Guo, Maolin

    2008-01-01

    Efficient iron acquisition is critical for an invading microbe’s survival and virulence. Most of the iron in mammals is incorporated into heme, which can be plundered by certain bacterial pathogens as a nutritional iron source. Utilization of exogenous heme by bacteria involves the binding of heme or hemoproteins to the cell surface receptors, followed by the transport of heme into cells. Once taken into the cytosol, heme is presented to heme oxygenases where the tetrapyrrole ring is cleaved ...

  13. BACTERIAL TRANSPORT THROUGH HOMOGENEOUS SOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transport of microorganisms in soils is of major importance for bioremediation of subsurface polluted zones and for pollution of groundwater with pathogens. A procedure for evaluating the relative mobility and recovery of bacteria in the soil matrix was developed. In the meth...

  14. Iron and Zinc Exploitation during Bacterial Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Terwilliger, Austen; Maresso, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    Ancient bacteria originated from metal-rich environments. Billions of years of evolution directed these tiny single cell creatures to exploit the versatile properties of metals in catalyzing chemical reactions and biological responses. The result is an entire metallome of proteins that use metal co-factors to facilitate key cellular process that range from the production of energy to the replication of DNA. Two key metals in this regard are iron and zinc, both abundant on Earth but not readily accessible in a human host. Instead, pathogenic bacteria must employ clever ways to acquire these metals. In this review we describe the many elegant ways these bacteria mine, regulate, and craft the use of two key metals (iron and zinc) to build a virulence arsenal that challenges even the most sophisticated immune response. PMID:26497057

  15. Structural transformations of heat-treated bacterial iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bacterial siliceous iron oxide microtubule (diameter: ca. 1 μm, 15Fe2O3·8SiO2·P2O5·30H2O) produced by Leptothrix ochracea was heat treated in air and its structural transformation was investigated in detail by microscopy, diffractometry, and spectroscopy. Although the heat-treated bacterial iron oxide retained its original microtubular structure, its nanoscopic, middle-range, and local structures changed drastically. Upon heat treatment, nanosized pores were formed and their size changed depending on temperature. The Fe–O–Si linkages were gradually cleaved with increasing temperature, causing the progressive separation of Fe and Si ions into iron oxide and amorphous silicate phases, respectively. Concomitantly, global connectivity and local structure of FeO6 octahedra in the iron oxide nanoparticles systematically changed depending on temperature. These comprehensive investigations clearly revealed various structural changes of the bacterial iron oxide which is an important guideline for the future exploration of novel bio-inspired materials. - Highlights: • Structural transformation of a bacterial iron oxide microtubule was investigated. • Si–O–Fe was cleaved with increasing temperature to form α-Fe2O3/silicate composite. • Crystallization to 2Fh started at 500 °C to give α-Fe2O3 >700 °C. • FeO6 octahedra were highly distorted <500 °C. • Formation of face-sharing FeO6 was promoted >500 °C, releasing the local strain of FeO6

  16. Structural transformations of heat-treated bacterial iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hideki, E-mail: hideki-h@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); JST, CREST, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Fujii, Tatsuo [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Nakanishi, Koji [Office of Society-Academia Collaboration for Innovation, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Yogi, Chihiro [SR Center, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Peterlik, Herwig [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nakanishi, Makoto [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Takada, Jun [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); JST, CREST, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    A bacterial siliceous iron oxide microtubule (diameter: ca. 1 μm, 15Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}·8SiO{sub 2}·P{sub 2}O{sub 5}·30H{sub 2}O) produced by Leptothrix ochracea was heat treated in air and its structural transformation was investigated in detail by microscopy, diffractometry, and spectroscopy. Although the heat-treated bacterial iron oxide retained its original microtubular structure, its nanoscopic, middle-range, and local structures changed drastically. Upon heat treatment, nanosized pores were formed and their size changed depending on temperature. The Fe–O–Si linkages were gradually cleaved with increasing temperature, causing the progressive separation of Fe and Si ions into iron oxide and amorphous silicate phases, respectively. Concomitantly, global connectivity and local structure of FeO{sub 6} octahedra in the iron oxide nanoparticles systematically changed depending on temperature. These comprehensive investigations clearly revealed various structural changes of the bacterial iron oxide which is an important guideline for the future exploration of novel bio-inspired materials. - Highlights: • Structural transformation of a bacterial iron oxide microtubule was investigated. • Si–O–Fe was cleaved with increasing temperature to form α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/silicate composite. • Crystallization to 2Fh started at 500 °C to give α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} >700 °C. • FeO{sub 6} octahedra were highly distorted <500 °C. • Formation of face-sharing FeO{sub 6} was promoted >500 °C, releasing the local strain of FeO{sub 6}.

  17. Bacterial siderophores efficiently provide iron to iron-starved tomato plants in hydroponics culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzki, W; Gutierrez Mañero, F J; Algar, E; Lucas García, J A; García-Villaraco, A; Ramos Solano, B

    2013-09-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements for a proper plant development. Providing plants with an accessible form of iron is crucial when it is scant or unavailable in soils. Chemical chelates are the only current alternative and are highly stable in soils, therefore, posing a threat to drinking water. The aim of this investigation was to quantify siderophores produced by two bacterial strains and to determine if these bacterial siderophores would palliate chlorotic symptoms of iron-starved tomato plants. For this purpose, siderophore production in MM9 medium by two selected bacterial strains was quantified, and the best was used for biological assay. Bacterial culture media free of bacteria (S) and with bacterial cells (BS), both supplemented with Fe were delivered to 12-week-old plants grown under iron starvation in hydroponic conditions; controls with full Hoagland solution, iron-free Hoagland solution and water were also conducted. Treatments were applied twice along the experiment, with a week in between. At harvest, plant yield, chlorophyll content and nutritional status in leaves were measured. Both the bacterial siderophore treatments significantly increased plant yield, chlorophyll and iron content over the positive controls with full Hoagland solution, indicating that siderophores are effective in providing Fe to the plant, either with or without the presence of bacteria. In summary, siderophores from strain Chryseobacterium C138 are effective in supplying Fe to iron-starved tomato plants by the roots, either with or without the presence of bacteria. Based on the amount of siderophores produced, an effective and economically feasible organic Fe chelator could be developed. PMID:23812968

  18. Bacterial siderophores efficiently provide iron to iron-starved tomato plants in hydroponics culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzki, W; Gutierrez Mañero, F J; Algar, E; Lucas García, J A; García-Villaraco, A; Ramos Solano, B

    2013-09-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements for a proper plant development. Providing plants with an accessible form of iron is crucial when it is scant or unavailable in soils. Chemical chelates are the only current alternative and are highly stable in soils, therefore, posing a threat to drinking water. The aim of this investigation was to quantify siderophores produced by two bacterial strains and to determine if these bacterial siderophores would palliate chlorotic symptoms of iron-starved tomato plants. For this purpose, siderophore production in MM9 medium by two selected bacterial strains was quantified, and the best was used for biological assay. Bacterial culture media free of bacteria (S) and with bacterial cells (BS), both supplemented with Fe were delivered to 12-week-old plants grown under iron starvation in hydroponic conditions; controls with full Hoagland solution, iron-free Hoagland solution and water were also conducted. Treatments were applied twice along the experiment, with a week in between. At harvest, plant yield, chlorophyll content and nutritional status in leaves were measured. Both the bacterial siderophore treatments significantly increased plant yield, chlorophyll and iron content over the positive controls with full Hoagland solution, indicating that siderophores are effective in providing Fe to the plant, either with or without the presence of bacteria. In summary, siderophores from strain Chryseobacterium C138 are effective in supplying Fe to iron-starved tomato plants by the roots, either with or without the presence of bacteria. Based on the amount of siderophores produced, an effective and economically feasible organic Fe chelator could be developed.

  19. Bacterial Growth in Amniotic Fluid Is Dependent on the Iron-Availability and the Activity of Bacterial Iron-Uptake System

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Young-Joon; Park, Sang-Kee; Oh, Jae-Wook; Sun, Hui-Yu; Shin, Sung-Heui

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the relationship among iron-availability, antibacterial activity, role of meconium as an iron source and the activity of bacterial iron-uptake system (IUS) for bacterial growth in amniotic fluid (AF) were investigated. Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 and its streptonigrin-resistant (SR) mutant with defective IUS were used as the test strains. The growth of S. aureus in AF was stimulated dosedependently by addition of meconium. Bacterial growth stimulated by meconium was ...

  20. Iron Limitation Triggers Early Egress by the Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Tamara J; Zheng, Huaixin; VanRheenen, Susan M; Ghosh, Soma; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Isberg, Ralph R

    2016-08-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that replicates in alveolar macrophages, causing a severe form of pneumonia. Intracellular growth of the bacterium depends on its ability to sequester iron from the host cell. In the L. pneumophila strain 130b, one mechanism used to acquire this essential nutrient is the siderophore legiobactin. Iron-bound legiobactin is imported by the transport protein LbtU. Here, we describe the role of LbtP, a paralog of LbtU, in iron acquisition in the L. pneumophila strain Philadelphia-1. Similar to LbtU, LbtP is a siderophore transport protein and is required for robust growth under iron-limiting conditions. Despite their similar functions, however, LbtU and LbtP do not contribute equally to iron acquisition. The Philadelphia-1 strain lacking LbtP is more sensitive to iron deprivation in vitro Moreover, LbtP is important for L. pneumophila growth within macrophages while LbtU is dispensable. These results demonstrate that LbtP plays a dominant role over LbtU in iron acquisition. In contrast, loss of both LbtP and LbtU does not impair L. pneumophila growth in the amoebal host Acanthamoeba castellanii, demonstrating a host-specific requirement for the activities of these two transporters in iron acquisition. The growth defect of the ΔlbtP mutant in macrophages is not due to alterations in growth kinetics. Instead, the absence of LbtP limits L. pneumophila replication and causes bacteria to prematurely exit the host cell. These results demonstrate the existence of a preprogrammed exit strategy in response to iron limitation that allows L. pneumophila to abandon the host cell when nutrients are exhausted. PMID:27185787

  1. Transporters Contributing to Iron Trafficking in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah S. Conte; Elsbeth L. Walker

    2011-01-01

    T This review will discuss recent progress in understanding the many roles of transporters in the whole-plant physiological processes that maintain iron (Fe) homeostasis. These processes include uptake from the soil via roots, control of transport from roots to above-ground parts of the plant, unloading of Fe from the xylem in above-ground parts, loading of Fe into mitochondria and plastids, transport of Fe to reproductive parts of the plant, and Fe mobilization during seed germination. In addition, we will discuss the mechanisms that plants use to cope with an apparently unintended consequence of Fe acquisition: the uptake of toxic heavy metals via Fe transporters. Rapid progress has been made in understanding the transport processes involved in each of these areas in the last 5 years and this review will focus on this recent progress. We will also highlight the key questions regarding transport steps that remain to be elucidated.

  2. Iron bacterial phylogeny and their execution towards iron availability in Equatorial Indian Ocean and Coastal Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajasabapathy, R.; Mohandass, C.; VijayRaj, A.S.; Madival, V.V.; Meena, R.M.

    Author version: Polish J. Microbiol., vol.62(4); 2013; 391-400 Iron bacterial phylogeny and their execution towards iron availability in Equatorial Indian Ocean and Coastal Arabian Sea RAJU RAJASABAPATHY, CHELLANDI MOHANDASS*, AJAKKALAMOOLE...

  3. Molecular mechanism of regulation of iron transport across placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Hanif, R.

    2012-01-01

    During the third trimester of pregnancy, iron transport from mother to the foetus against a concentration gradient determines the iron endowment in foetal and neonatal life. Hfe functions as an upstream regulator of liver hepcidin which has been demonstrated to be a negative regulator of intestinal absorption of dietary iron and macrophage efflux of recycled iron. Hepcidin has also been proposed to be a negative regulator of iron efflux from the placenta, however it is not k...

  4. Effect of cell physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.W.; Collins, S.A.; Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater were examined in flow-through columns. Four strains of bacteria isolated from a crystalline rock groundwater system were investigated, with carboxylate-modified and amidine-modified latex microspheres and bromide as reference tracers. The bacterial isolates included a gram-positive rod (ML1), a gram-negative motile rod (ML2), a nonmotile mutant of ML2 (ML2m), and a gram-positive coccoid (ML3). Experiments were repeated at two flow velocities, in a glass column packed with glass beads, and in another packed with iron-oxyhydroxide coated glass beads. Bacteria breakthrough curves were interpreted using a transport equation that incorporates a sorption model from microscopic observation of bacterial deposition in flow-cell experiments. The model predicts that bacterial desorption rate will decrease exponentially with the amount of time the cell is attached to the solid surface. Desorption kinetics appeared to influence transport at the lower flow rate, but were not discernable at the higher flow rate. Iron-oxyhydroxide coatings had a lower-than-expected effect on bacterial breakthrough and no effect on the microsphere recovery in the column experiments. Cell wall type and shape also had minor effects on breakthrough. Motility tended to increase the adsorption rate, and decrease the desorption rate. The transport model predicts that at field scale, desorption rate kinetics may be important to the prediction of bacteria transport rates. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Vibrio Iron Transport: Evolutionary Adaptation to Life in Multiple Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Shelley M; Mey, Alexandra R; Wyckoff, Elizabeth E

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential element for Vibrio spp., but the acquisition of iron is complicated by its tendency to form insoluble ferric complexes in nature and its association with high-affinity iron-binding proteins in the host. Vibrios occupy a variety of different niches, and each of these niches presents particular challenges for acquiring sufficient iron. Vibrio species have evolved a wide array of iron transport systems that allow the bacteria to compete for this essential element in each of its habitats. These systems include the secretion and uptake of high-affinity iron-binding compounds (siderophores) as well as transport systems for iron bound to host complexes. Transporters for ferric and ferrous iron not complexed to siderophores are also common to Vibrio species. Some of the genes encoding these systems show evidence of horizontal transmission, and the ability to acquire and incorporate additional iron transport systems may have allowed Vibrio species to more rapidly adapt to new environmental niches. While too little iron prevents growth of the bacteria, too much can be lethal. The appropriate balance is maintained in vibrios through complex regulatory networks involving transcriptional repressors and activators and small RNAs (sRNAs) that act posttranscriptionally. Examination of the number and variety of iron transport systems found in Vibrio spp. offers insights into how this group of bacteria has adapted to such a wide range of habitats.

  6. The placenta: the forgotten essential organ of iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang; Fleming, Mark D

    2016-07-01

    Optimal iron nutrition in utero is essential for development of the fetus and helps establish birth iron stores adequate to sustain growth in early infancy. In species with hemochorial placentas, such as humans and rodents, iron in the maternal circulation is transferred to the fetus by directly contacting placental syncytiotrophoblasts. Early kinetic studies provided valuable data on the initial uptake of maternal transferrin, an iron-binding protein, by the placenta. However, the remaining steps of iron trafficking across syncytiotrophoblasts and through the fetal endothelium into the fetal blood remain poorly characterized. Over the last 20 years, identification of transmembrane iron transporters and the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin has greatly expanded the knowledge of cellular iron transport and its regulation by systemic iron status. In addition, emerging human and animal data demonstrating comprised fetal iron stores in severe maternal iron deficiency challenge the classic dogma of exclusive fetal control over the transfer process and indicate that maternal and local signals may play a role in regulating this process. This review compiles current data on the kinetic, molecular, and regulatory aspects of placental iron transport and considers new questions and knowledge gaps raised by these advances. PMID:27261274

  7. Iron-clay reactivity in radioactive waste disposal - Impacts of bacterial activities and heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on the interactions between two materials that may be introduced in a geological disposal of radioactive waste: metallic materials such as the high-level waste overpack, and clay materials such as the clay host rock. Indeed, the interactions between these two materials in such conditions could induce a change of their initial confinement properties. This work aimed at determining the influence of heterogeneities (technological gaps and fractures) and bacterial activities on these interactions, in terms of evolution of chemical and hydraulic properties of clayey materials. To this end, two percolation cells have been conducted during 13 months: the first one with two bacteria (SRB, IRB), the second one without bacteria. These experiments, carried out at 60 C, involved circulating synthetic water representative of the Tournemire pore water through iron powder and through Toarcian artificially cracked argillite from Tournemire. An iron rod was also placed into the argillite. Thus, solid characterizations (SEM, SEM/EDS, Raman, XRD, X-ray tomography) allowed the study of both interfaces: the iron powder/argillite interface and the iron rod/argillite interface. The water probably circulated into the crack during the entire test, which was confirmed by reactive transport modeling with the HYTEC reactive transport code. However, no secondary phase was identified in the crack. In addition, bacteria survival in the biotic cell was confirmed during the experiment by monitoring their population and by analyzing their genetic diversity at the end of the experiment. A strong decrease in sulfate concentration was measured in the output, which confirms the SRB activity. Solid characterization conducted at the end of the experiments have highlighted, with and without bacteria, the occurrence of magnetite and chukanovite in the iron powder, the latter being mainly located close to the argillite interface. In the argillite, a Fe-enriched zone (10 μm) was

  8. Intestinal Bacterial Flora that Compete on the Haem Precursor Iron Fumarate in Iron Deficiency Anemia Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim, S. A. H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The study focused on finding if there is any possible relation between the intestinal bacterial population quantitative and qualitative and the deficiency of the most important iron compounds as haem precursors. Methodology and Results: Blood complete picture and stool analyses were done to 750 volunteer cases whom were asked for these analyses by their physicians. Analyses proved that 560 cases representing 75.2 % were anemic as the RBC(s based on counts of the total studied cases of less than 263 x 104 and the haemoglobin amount ranged between 7.2 and 11.3 g/dl, while the remainder 24.8 % of the volunteer sample was not anemic. A high male/female ratio ofanemic cases, 1:27 was also documented. Considering that all the studied stool samples should be completely free from any parasites or any other anemia-related diseases was a priority. Bacteriological analysis of stool samples of the anemic cases resulted in the detection of high counts of total viable bacteria, exceeded 42 x 109 cfu/g, while it was never more than 26 x 106 cfu/g and decreased to 4 x 106 cfu/g in many cases in this study. Identifying of the 361 bacterial isolates, were found to belong to 12 genera and 19 species, 6 of them; Pseudomonas putrefaciens, Micrococcus luteus, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus coagulans , were found and in high counts in the stool samples of only anemic cases. The ability of these isolates to compete for iron compounds such as ferrous fumarate alone or with glucose and phytate as activators or inhibitors to these abilities was investigated. Results proved 11 species out of the 19 identified species are capable to use and compete on ferrous fumarate as a haemprecursor. Sensitivity test for the representatives of the 19 species and 6 of the most commonly used antibiotics in the Egyptian pharmacy, using standard disc method, revealed variable susceptibilities of almost all of them to more than one of

  9. Quantitative NME microscopy of iron transport in methanogenic aggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Vergeldt, F.J.; Bartacek, J.; Gerkema, E.; Osuma, B.; Philippi, J.G.M.; Lens, P.; As, van, H.

    2009-01-01

    Transport of micronutrients (iron, cobalt, nickel, etc.) within biofilms matrixes such as methanogenic granules is of high importance, because these are either essential or toxic for the microorganisms living inside the biofilm. The present study demonstrates quantitative measurements of metal transport inside these biofilms using T1 weighted 3D RARE. It is shown that iron(II)-EDTA diffusion within the granule is independent of direction or the inner structure of the granules. Assuming positi...

  10. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., FeII release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  11. Vacuolar Iron Transporter BnMEB2 Is Involved in Enhancing Iron Tolerance of Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Zuo, Rong; Zhou, Rongfang; Huang, Junyan; Tang, Minqiang; Cheng, Xiaohui; Liu, Yueying; Tong, Chaobo; Xiang, Yang; Dong, Caihua; Liu, Shengyi

    2016-01-01

    Iron toxicity is a nutrient disorder that severely affects crop development and yield in some soil conditions. Vacuolar detoxification of metal stress is an important strategy for plants to survive and adapt to this adverse environment. Vacuolar iron transporter (VIT) members are involved in this process and play essential roles in iron storage and transport. In this study, we identified a rapeseed VIT gene BnMEB2 (BnaC07g30170D) homologs to Arabidopsis MEB2 (At5g24290). Transient expression analysis revealed that BnMEB2 was localized to the vacuolar membrane. Q-PCR detection showed a high expression of BnMEB2 in mature (60-day-old) leaves and could be obviously induced by exogenous iron stress in both roots and leaves. Over-expressed BnMEB2 in both Arabidopsis wild type and meb2 mutant seedlings resulted in greatly improved iron tolerability with no significant changes in the expression level of other VIT genes. The mutant meb2 grew slowly and its root hair elongation was inhibited under high iron concentration condition while BnMEB2 over-expressed transgenic plants of the mutant restored the phenotypes with apparently higher iron storage in roots and dramatically increased iron content in the whole plant. Taken together, these results suggested that BnMEB2 was a VIT gene in rapeseed which was necessary for safe storage and vacuole detoxification function of excess iron to enhance the tolerance of iron toxicity. This research sheds light on a potentially new strategy for attenuating hazardous metal stress from environment and improving iron biofortification in Brassicaceae crops.

  12. Active Transport of Phosphorylated Carbohydrates Promotes Intestinal Colonization and Transmission of a Bacterial Pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Sit

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient acquisition of extracellular nutrients is essential for bacterial pathogenesis, however the identities and mechanisms for transport of many of these substrates remain unclear. Here, we investigate the predicted iron-binding transporter AfuABC and its role in bacterial pathogenesis in vivo. By crystallographic, biophysical and in vivo approaches, we show that AfuABC is in fact a cyclic hexose/heptose-phosphate transporter with high selectivity and specificity for a set of ubiquitous metabolites (glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate and sedoheptulose-7-phosphate. AfuABC is conserved across a wide range of bacterial genera, including the enteric pathogens EHEC O157:H7 and its murine-specific relative Citrobacter rodentium, where it lies adjacent to genes implicated in sugar sensing and acquisition. C. rodentium ΔafuA was significantly impaired in an in vivo murine competitive assay as well as its ability to transmit infection from an afflicted to a naïve murine host. Sugar-phosphates were present in normal and infected intestinal mucus and stool samples, indicating that these metabolites are available within the intestinal lumen for enteric bacteria to import during infection. Our study shows that AfuABC-dependent uptake of sugar-phosphates plays a critical role during enteric bacterial infection and uncovers previously unrecognized roles for these metabolites as important contributors to successful pathogenesis.

  13. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Expresses Antimicrobial Activity by Interfering with l-Norepinephrine-Mediated Bacterial Iron Acquisition▿

    OpenAIRE

    Miethke, Marcus; Skerra, Arne

    2010-01-01

    l-norepinephrine (NE) is a neuroendocrine catecholamine that supports bacterial growth by mobilizing iron from a primary source such as holotransferrin to increase its bioavailability for cellular uptake. Iron complexes of NE resemble those of bacterial siderophores that are scavenged by human neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as part of the innate immune defense. Here, we show that NGAL binds iron-complexed NE, indicating physiological relevance for both bacterial and human i...

  14. Geochemical investigation of iron transport into bentonite as steel corrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Fiona; Bate, Fiona; Heath, Tim; Hoch, Andrew [Serco Assurance, Harwe ll (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    some experiments. Using the experimental data as a guide, a modelling investigation has been carried out. The objectives of the modelling investigation were: To develop a geochemical model of the transport of iron into bentonite based on the clear experimental evidence of the penetration of iron into bentonite. To improve our understanding of the desaturation of the bentonite as water is consumed during the corrosion process and the resultant gas(es) escapes. The production of iron from the corroding source was modelled using a rate of gas evolution that had been fitted. It was shown that ion exchange and surface complexation processes do not provide sufficient sorption to predict the high amount of iron observed in the solid phase. Therefore alternative processes, such as iron-containing mineral formation or mineral transformations, were also suggested to account for the amount of iron observed within the bentonite phase. Magnetite was identified as the most thermodynamically stable solubility limiting phase under the experimental conditions. A one-dimensional transport model was constructed to include all relevant processes. The simulations considered the diffusive transport of Fe{sup 2+} ions away from a corroding source, using the rate of gas evolution resulting from the corrosion process. Ion exchange and surface complexation processes were allowed within the bentonite which would provide sorption of iron onto and within the bentonite solid. The pH was buffered by allowing protonation and deprotonation of the surface sites of the bentonite solid. In addition, saturation of iron-containing minerals was permitted. The base case model suggests that about 4.4 wt % of iron could form in the bentonite if the formation of magnetite was allowed. However, the maximum theoretical amount of iron available from the source term is limited to 4.5 wt % of iron by the cumulative gas evolution rate, which is lower than the observed amount of iron in the bulk bentonite (6.6 wt

  15. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, V.; Sijbrandi, R.; Kol, M.A.; Swiezewska, E.; de Kruijff, B.; Breukink, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced b

  16. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ho Shin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM. Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes.

  17. Transgenic petunia with the iron(III-phytosiderophore transporter gene acquires tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Murata

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient for all plants. However, terrestrial plants often suffer from iron deficiency in alkaline soil due to its extremely low solubility. Alkaline soil accounts for about 30% of all cultivated ground in the world. Plants have evolved two distinct strategies, I and II, for iron uptake from the soil. Dicots and non-graminaceous monocots use Strategy I, which is primarily based on the reduction of iron(III to iron(II and the uptake of iron(II by the iron-regulated transporter, IRT1. In contrast, graminaceous plants use Strategy II to efficiently acquire insoluble iron(III. Strategy II comprises the synthesis and secretion of iron-chelating phytosiderophores, such as mugineic acids and the Yellow Stripe 1 transporter proteins of the iron(III-phytosiderophore complex. Barley, which exhibits the highest tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline soil among graminaceous plants, utilizes mugineic acids and the specific iron(III-mugineic acids transporter, HvYS1. In this study, we established the transgenic plant Petunia hybrida, which originally had only Strategy I, by introducing the HvYS1 transporter gene derived from barley. When the transgenic plants were grown hydroponically in media containing the iron(III-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex, free 2'-deoxymugineic acid and its iron(III complex were detected in the root extract of the transgenic plant by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The growth of the transgenic petunia was significantly better than that of the control host in alkaline conditions. Consequently, the transgenic plant acquired a significantly enhanced tolerance to alkaline hydroponic media in the presence of the iron(III-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex. Furthermore, the flower color of the transgenic plant deepened. The results showed that iron-phytosiderophore complexes and their transporters can potentially be utilized to overcome the worldwide iron uptake problems

  18. Divalent metal transporter 1 (Dmt1) Mediates Copper Transport in the Duodenum of Iron-Deficient Rats and When Overexpressed in Iron-Deprived HEK-293 Cells12

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Lingli; Garrick, Michael D.; Garrick, Laura M.; Zhao, Lin; Collins, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular copper-binding proteins (metallothionein I/II) and a copper exporter (Menkes copper-transporting ATPase) are upregulated in duodenal enterocytes from iron-deficient rats, consistent with copper accumulation in the intestinal mucosa. How copper enters enterocytes during iron deficiency is, however, not clear. Divalent metal transporter 1 (Dmt1), the predominant iron importer in the mammalian duodenum, also transports other metal ions, possibly including copper. Given this possibi...

  19. Subclinical iron deficiency is a strong predictor of bacterial vaginosis in early pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claeys Geert

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV is the single most common vaginal infection in women of childbearing age and associated with a sizeable infectious disease burden among both non-pregnant and pregnant women, including a significantly elevated risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. Overall, little progress has been made in identifying causal factors involved in BV acquisition and persistence. We sought to evaluate maternal iron status in early pregnancy as a putative risk factor for BV, considering that micronutrients, and iron deficiency in particular, affect the host response against bacterial colonization, even in the setting of mild micronutrient deficiencies. Methods In a nested case-control study, we compared maternal iron status at entry to prenatal care (mean gestational age 9.2 ± 2.6 weeks between eighty women with healthy vaginal microflora and eighteen women with vaginosis-like microflora. Vaginal microflora status was assessed by assigning a modified Nugent score to a Gram-stained vaginal smear. Maternal iron status was assayed by an array of conventional erythrocyte and serum indicators for iron status assessment, but also by more sensitive and more specific indicators of iron deficiency, including soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR as an accurate measure of cellular and tissue iron deficiency and the iron deficiency log10[sTfR/ferritin] index as the presently most accurate measure of body storage iron available. Results We found no statistically significant correlation between vaginal microflora status and routinely assessed iron parameters. In contrast, a highly significant difference between the healthy and vaginosis-like microflora groups of women was shown in mean values of sTfR concentrations (1.15 ± 0.30 mg/L versus 1.37 ± 0.38 mg/L, p = 0.008 and in mean iron deficiency log10[sTfR/ferritin] index values (1.57 ± 0.30 versus 1.08 ± 0.56, p = 0.003, indicating a strong association between iron deficiency and

  20. Mechanism of increased iron absorption in murine model of hereditary hemochromatosis: Increased duodenal expression of the iron transporter DMT1

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Robert E.; Migas, Mary C.; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Jinxing; Britton, Robert S.; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Tomatsu, Shunji; Waheed, Abdul; Bacon, Bruce R; Sly, William S.

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a common autosomal recessive disorder characterized by tissue iron deposition secondary to excessive dietary iron absorption. We recently reported that HFE, the protein defective in HH, was physically associated with the transferrin receptor (TfR) in duodenal crypt cells and proposed that mutations in HFE attenuate the uptake of transferrin-bound iron from plasma by duodenal crypt cells, leading to up-regulation of transporters for dietary iron. Here, we tes...

  1. Modeling the processing of mineral iron during dust transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsberg, Ulrike; Wolke, Ralf; Tilgner, Andreas; Tegen, Ina; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    The Saharan desert and the Gobi desert are the main contributors to Aeolian desert dust, which is a major source of micronutrients to the remote ocean regions. Micronutrients, such as transition metals like iron or copper, are regarded essential for biological processes of different marine species. In this context recent studies have shown that soluble iron, since it is generally the most abundant transition metal in dust particles, has the ability to control marine productivity and thereby likely influence the CO2- budget. Nevertheless, the processing of desert dust leading to the release of soluble iron still lacks sufficient understanding since several factors control the solubilization process. Especially anthropogenic emissions are regarded to significantly add to the amount of soluble iron by acidification of dust particles or by the direct emission of soluble iron comprised, e.g. in coal fly ash. For the investigation of the dissolution process of iron that takes place during dust transportation the spectral air parcel model SPACCIM is used. A mechanism describing the precipitation and dissolution of mineral particles by heterogeneous surface reactions has been implemented. Trajectory properties were derived from COSMO-MUSCAT simulations or from re-analysis data by HYSPLIT. Differences in the chemical composition and the amount of anthropogenic and naturally emitted species on the North African continent and the highly industrialized region of South-East Asia have considerable impact on the acidification of the desert dust. Under this aspect, special cases of dust outbreaks of the Saharan desert and the Gobi desert are investigated and compared with focus on soluble iron produced.

  2. Bacterial Pathogen Indicator Transport from Livestock Mortality Biopiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michitsch, Robert; Jamieson, Rob; Gordon, Robert; Stratton, Glenn; Lake, Craig

    2015-09-01

    Biopiles can be used to dispose of slaughterhouse residuals (SLRs); however, the fate of pathogenic bacteria (e.g., pathogenic strains of , ) in these systems is not well understood. The transport of these bacteria in water leaching from the biopile could represent a significant contamination source. This research examined the transport of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae indicator bacteria from SLR biopiles. Three biopiles (2.6 m wide by 4.6 m long by 1.8 m high) were formed on soil layers in concrete cells that allowed for real-time monitoring of environmental parameters, hydrologic flux, and indicator bacteria levels in effluent leaching from the piles. In biopile effluent, indicator bacteria populations decreased exponentially following biopile formation. Indicator bacteria loads in effluent constituted 15 mm d). Movement of the indicator bacteria through the biopiles and underlying soil appeared to be consistent with preferential flow phenomena. The populations of the Enterobacteriaceae indicators remained low in conditions of higher soil water content and lower biopile temperatures, whereas the Enterococcaceae indicator appeared to regrow in these conditions. This indicated that bacterial pathogen transport from a biopile could be a concern after the disappearance of conventional bacterial indicators, such as . Management considerations should attempt to divert excess water from entering a biopile, such as locating a biopile under a roof. Unsaturated biopile and soil conditions should be maintained to impede water flow through preferential pathways in the soil underneath a biopile. PMID:26436253

  3. Low dietary iron intake restrains the intestinal inflammatory response and pathology of enteric infection by food-borne bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortman, Guus A M; Mulder, Michelle L M; Richters, Thijs J W; Shanmugam, Nanda K N; Trebicka, Estela; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Roelofs, Rian; Wiegerinck, Erwin T; Laarakkers, Coby M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bolhuis, Albert; Cherayil, Bobby J; Tjalsma, Harold

    2015-09-01

    Orally administrated iron is suspected to increase susceptibility to enteric infections among children in infection endemic regions. Here we investigated the effect of dietary iron on the pathology and local immune responses in intestinal infection models. Mice were held on iron-deficient, normal iron, or high iron diets and after 2 weeks they were orally challenged with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Microbiome analysis by pyrosequencing revealed profound iron- and infection-induced shifts in microbiota composition. Fecal levels of the innate defensive molecules and markers of inflammation lipocalin-2 and calprotectin were not influenced by dietary iron intervention alone, but were markedly lower in mice on the iron-deficient diet after infection. Next, mice on the iron-deficient diet tended to gain more weight and to have a lower grade of colon pathology. Furthermore, survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was prolonged after iron deprivation. Together, these data show that iron limitation restricts disease pathology upon bacterial infection. However, our data also showed decreased intestinal inflammatory responses of mice fed on high iron diets. Thus additionally, our study indicates that the effects of iron on processes at the intestinal host-pathogen interface may highly depend on host iron status, immune status, and gut microbiota composition.

  4. Widespread Iron Oxidizing Bacterial Communities in a late Paleoproterozoic Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, N.; Rouxel, O.; Bekker, A.

    2007-12-01

    Discovery of exceptionally well-preserved microfossils in the Gunflint Iron Formation provided the first evidence for diverse and abundant life in the Precambrian oceans. However, whether the Gunflint microbial communities were dominated by cyanobacteria or represent an archaic, lithotrophic ecosystem is a matter of longstanding debate. Here, we present Fe isotope and rare earth element (REE) data for microfossiliferous stromatolites that are consistent with the Gunflint biota being an iron-oxidizing bacterial community. The lack of or positive Ce anomalies in REE data indicate that the benthic community grew below a redoxcline and positive iron isotope compositions reveal that the microbial community only oxidized a fraction of the dissolved iron load. This depositional setting and Fe isotope evidence for incomplete iron oxidation are inconsistent with a cyanobacterial interpretation and provide strong support that the Gunflint biota was indeed a microaerophilic lithotrophic microbial ecosystem. An apparently restricted temporal distribution of the Gunflint biota coupled with a widespread spatial distribution signals a significant ecosystem evolutionary event in the late Paleoproterozoic when the ocean was redox-stratified and Fe-rich anoxic waters impinged onto the shallow shelf.

  5. Fabrication of a Functionalized Magnetic Bacterial Nanocellulose with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Sandra L; Shetty, Akshath R; Senpan, Angana; Echeverry-Rendón, Mónica; Reece, Lisa M; Allain, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) produced by the bacteria Gluconacetobacter xylinus is synthesized and impregnated in situ with iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) (Fe3O4) to yield a magnetic bacterial nanocellulose (MBNC). The synthesis of MBNC is a precise and specifically designed multi-step process. Briefly, bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) pellicles are formed from preserved G. xylinus strain according to our experimental requirements of size and morphology. A solution of iron(III) chloride hexahydrate (FeCl3·6H2O) and iron(II) chloride tetrahydrate (FeCl2·4H2O) with a 2:1 molar ratio is prepared and diluted in deoxygenated high purity water. A BNC pellicle is then introduced in the vessel with the reactants. This mixture is stirred and heated at 80 °C in a silicon oil bath and ammonium hydroxide (14%) is then added by dropping to precipitate the ferrous ions into the BNC mesh. This last step allows forming in situ magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) inside the bacterial nanocellulose mesh to confer magnetic properties to BNC pellicle. A toxicological assay was used to evaluate the biocompatibility of the BNC-IONP pellicle. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used to cover the IONPs in order to improve their biocompatibility. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the IONP were located preferentially in the fibril interlacing spaces of the BNC matrix, but some of them were also found along the BNC ribbons. Magnetic force microscope measurements performed on the MBNC detected the presence magnetic domains with high and weak intensity magnetic field, confirming the magnetic nature of the MBNC pellicle. Young's modulus values obtained in this work are also in a reasonable agreement with those reported for several blood vessels in previous studies. PMID:27285589

  6. Calcium channel blockers ameliorate iron overload-associated hepatic fibrosis by altering iron transport and stellate cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Xin; Chang, Yanzhong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chu, Xi; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Zhenyi; Guo, Hui; Wang, Na; Gao, Yonggang; Zhang, Jianping; Chu, Li

    2016-06-15

    Liver fibrosis is the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with iron overload. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) can antagonize divalent cation entry into renal and myocardial cells and inhibit fibrogenic gene expression. We investigated the potential of CCBs to resolve iron overload-associated hepatic fibrosis. Kunming mice were assigned to nine groups (n=8 per group): control, iron overload, deferoxamine, high and low dose verapamil, high and low dose nimodipine, and high and low dose diltiazem. Iron deposition and hepatic fibrosis were measured in mouse livers. Expression levels of molecules associated with transmembrane iron transport were determined by molecular biology approaches. In vitro HSC-T6 cells were randomized into nine groups (the same groups as the mice). Changes in proliferation, apoptosis, and metalloproteinase expression in cells were detected to assess the anti-fibrotic effects of CCBs during iron overload conditions. We found that CCBs reduced hepatic iron content, intracellular iron deposition, the number of hepatic fibrotic areas, collagen expression levels, and hydroxyproline content. CCBs rescued abnormal expression of α1C protein in L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (LVDCC) and down-regulated divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT-1) expression in mouse livers. In iron-overloaded HSC-T6 cells, CCBs reduced iron deposition, inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). CCBs are potential therapeutic agents that can be used to address hepatic fibrosis during iron overload. They resolve hepatic fibrosis probably correlated with regulating transmembrane iron transport and inhibiting HSC growth. PMID:27095094

  7. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Expresses Antimicrobial Activity by Interfering with l-Norepinephrine-Mediated Bacterial Iron Acquisition▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miethke, Marcus; Skerra, Arne

    2010-01-01

    l-norepinephrine (NE) is a neuroendocrine catecholamine that supports bacterial growth by mobilizing iron from a primary source such as holotransferrin to increase its bioavailability for cellular uptake. Iron complexes of NE resemble those of bacterial siderophores that are scavenged by human neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as part of the innate immune defense. Here, we show that NGAL binds iron-complexed NE, indicating physiological relevance for both bacterial and human iron metabolism. The fluorescence titration of purified recombinant NGAL with the FeIII·(NE)3 iron complex revealed high affinity for this ligand, with a KD of 50.6 nM. In contrast, the binding protein FeuA of Bacillus subtilis, which is involved in the bacterial uptake of triscatecholate iron complexes, has a KD for FeIII·(NE)3 of 1.6 μM, indicating that NGAL is an efficient competitor. Furthermore, NGAL was shown to inhibit the NE-mediated growth of both E. coli and B. subtilis strains that either are capable or incapable of producing their native siderophores enterobactin and bacillibactin, respectively. These experiments suggest that iron-complexed NE directly serves as an iron source for bacterial uptake systems, and that NGAL can function as an antagonist of this iron acquisition process. Interestingly, a functional FeuABC uptake system was shown to be necessary for NE-mediated growth stimulation as well as its NGAL-dependent inhibition. This study demonstrates for the first time that human NGAL not only neutralizes pathogen-derived virulence factors but also can effectively scavenge an iron-chelate complex abundant in the host. PMID:20086155

  8. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. PMID:17501931

  9. Acquisition, Transport, and Storage of Iron by Pathogenic Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Dexter H.

    1999-01-01

    Iron is required by most living systems. A great variety of means of acquisition, avenues of uptake, and methods of storage are used by pathogenic fungi to ensure a supply of the essential metal. Solubilization of insoluble iron polymers is the first step in iron assimilation. The two methods most commonly used by microorganisms for solubilization of iron are reduction and chelation. Reduction of ferric iron to ferrous iron by enzymatic or nonenzymatic means is a common mechanism among pathog...

  10. Competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of organic matter on iron oxide: II. Displacement and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Baohua; Mehlhorn, Tonia L.; Liang, Liyuan; McCarthy, John F.

    1996-08-01

    The competitive interactions between organic matter compounds and mineral surfaces are poorly understood, yet these interactions may play a significant role in the stability and co-transport of mineral colloids and/or environmental contaminants. In this study, the processes of competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SR-NOM) are investigated with several model organic compounds in packed beds of iron oxide-coated quartz columns. Results demonstrated that strongly-binding organic compounds are competitively adsorbed and displace those weakly-bound organic compounds along the flow path. Among the four organic compounds studied, polyacrylic acid (PAA) appeared to be the most competitive, whereas SR-NOM was more competitive than phthalic and salycylic acids. The transport of SR-NOM is found to involve a complex competitive interaction and displacement of different NOM subcomponents. A diffuse adsorption and sharp desorption front (giving an appearance of irreversible adsorption) of the SR-NOM breakthrough curves are explained as being a result of the competitive time-dependent adsorption and displacement processes between different organic components within the SR-NOM. The stability and transport of iron oxide colloids varied as one organic component competitively displaces another. Relatively large quantities of iron oxide colloids are transported when the more strongly-binding PAA competitively displaces the weakly-binding SR-NOM or when SR-NOM competitively displaces phthalic and salicylic acids. Results of this study suggest that the chemical composition and hence the functional behavior of NOM (e.g., in stabilizing mineral colloids and in complexing contaminants) can change along its flow path as a result of the dynamic competitive interactions between heterogeneous NOM subcomponents. Further studies are needed to better define and quantify these NOM components as well as their roles in contaminant partitioning

  11. Divalent metal transporter, iron, and Parkinson's disease:A pathological relationship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun-pil Lee; Xiongwei Zhu; Gang Liu; Shu G Chen; George Perry; Mark A Smith; Hyoung-gon Lee

    2010-01-01

    @@ Iron is an essential component of oxidative metabolism and a cofactor for a variety of enzymes. Because of its chemical properties as a transition metal, iron can serve both as an electron donor and acceptor and, as such, excess levels of free iron are toxic. Given this potential for toxicity, a number of pro-teins, including transferrin, transferrin receptor, and ferritin, tightly control iron transport, uptake, and storage in the central nervous system.

  12. Controls on radium transport by adsorption to iron minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Wang, T.; Kocar, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Radium is a naturally occurring radioactive metal found in many subsurface environments. Radium isotopes are generated by uranium and thorium decay, and are particularly abundant within groundwaters where minimal porewater flux leads to accumulation. These isotopes are used as natural tracers for estimating submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) [1], allowing for large scale estimation of GW fluxes into and out of the ocean [2]. They also represent a substantial hazard in wastewater produced after hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction [3], resulting in a significant risk of environmental release to surface and near-surface waters, and increased cost for water treatment or disposal. Adsorption to mineral surfaces represents a dominant pathway of radium retention in subsurface environments. For SGD studies, adsorption processes impact estimates of GW fluxes, while in hydraulic fracturing, radium adsorption to aquifer solids mediates wastewater radium activities. Analysis of past sorption studies revealed large variability in partition coefficients [4], while examination of radium adsorption kinetics and surface complexation have only recently started [5]. Accordingly, we present the results of sorption and column experiments of radium with a suite of iron minerals representative of those found within deep saline and near-surface (freshwater) aquifers, and evaluate impacts of varying salinity solutions through artificial waters. Further, we explore the impacts of pyrite oxidation and ferrihydrite transformation to other iron-bearing secondary minerals on the transport and retention of radium. These results will provide critical information on the mineralogical controls on radium retention in subsurface environments, and will therefore improve predictions of radium groundwater transport in natural and contaminated systems. [1] Charette, M.A., Buesseler, K.O. & Andrews, J.E., Limnol. Oceanogr. (2001). [2] Moore, W.S., Ann. Rev. Mar. Sci. (2010). [3] Vengosh, A

  13. Two iron-regulated transporter (IRT) genes showed differential expression in poplar trees under iron or zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danqiong; Dai, Wenhao

    2015-08-15

    Two iron-regulated transporter (IRT) genes were cloned from the iron chlorosis resistant (PtG) and susceptible (PtY) Populus tremula 'Erecta' lines. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed no significant difference between PtG and PtY. The predicted proteins contain a conserved ZIP domain with 8 transmembrane (TM) regions. A ZIP signature sequence was found in the fourth TM domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PtIRT1 was clustered with tomato and tobacco IRT genes that are highly responsible to iron deficiency. The PtIRT3 gene was clustered with the AtIRT3 gene that was related to zinc and iron transport in plants. Tissue specific expression indicated that PtIRT1 only expressed in the root, while PtIRT3 constitutively expressed in all tested tissues. Under iron deficiency, the expression of PtIRT1 was dramatically increased and a significantly higher transcript level was detected in PtG than in PtY. Iron deficiency also enhanced the expression of PtIRT3 in PtG. On the other hand, zinc deficiency down-regulated the expression of PtIRT1 and PtIRT3 in both PtG and PtY. Zinc accumulated significantly under iron-deficient conditions, whereas the zinc deficiency showed no significant effect on iron accumulation. A yeast complementation test revealed that the PtIRT1 and PtIRT3 genes could restore the iron uptake ability under the iron uptake-deficiency condition. The results will help understand the mechanisms of iron deficiency response in poplar trees and other woody species.

  14. Enriched iron(III-reducing bacterial communities are shaped by carbon substrate and iron oxide mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Lentini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe oxides exist in a spectrum of structures in the environment, with ferrihydrite widely considered the most bioavailable phase. Yet, ferrihydrite is unstable and rapidly transforms to more crystalline Fe(III oxides (e.g., goethite, hematite, which are poorly reduced by model dissimilatory Fe(III-reducing microorganisms. This begs the question, what processes and microbial groups are responsible for reduction of crystalline Fe(III oxides within sedimentary environments? Further, how do changes in Fe mineralogy shape oxide-hosted microbial populations? To address these questions, we conducted a large-scale cultivation effort using various Fe(III oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite and carbon substrates (glucose, lactate, acetate along a dilution gradient to enrich for microbial populations capable of reducing Fe oxides spanning a wide range of crystallinities and reduction potentials. While carbon source was the most important variable shaping community composition within Fe(III-reducing enrichments, both Fe oxide type and sediment dilution also had a substantial influence. For instance, with acetate as the carbon source, only ferrihydrite enrichments displayed a significant amount of Fe(III reduction and the well known dissimilatory metal reducer Geobacter sp. was the dominant organism enriched. In contrast, when glucose and lactate were provided, all three Fe oxides were reduced and reduction coincided with the presence of fermentative (e.g. Enterobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g. Desulfovibrio spp.. Thus, changes in Fe oxide structure and resource availability may shift Fe(III-reducing communities between dominantly metal-respiring to fermenting and/or sulfate-reducing organisms which are capable of reducing more recalcitrant Fe phases. These findings highlight the need for further targeted investigations into the composition and activity of speciation-directed metal-reducing populations within natural environments.

  15. Using Reactive Transport Modeling to Understand Changes in Electrical Conductivity Associated with Bacterial Growth and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regberg, A. B.; Singha, K.; Picardal, F.; Brantley, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Previous research has linked measured changes in the bulk electrical conductivity (σb) of water-saturated sediments to the respiration and growth of anaerobic bacteria. If the mechanism causing this signal is understood and characterized it could be used to identify and monitor zones of bacterial activity in the subsurface. The 1-D reactive transport model PHREEQC was used to understand σb signals by modeling chemical gradients within two column reactors and corresponding changes in effluent chemistry. The flow-through column reactors were packed with Fe(III)-bearing sediment from Oyster, VA and inoculated with an environmental consortia of microorganisms. Influent in the first reactor was amended with 1mM Na-acetate to encourage the growth of iron-reducing bacteria. Influent in the second reactor was amended with 0.1mM Na-Acetate and 2mM NaNO3 to encourage the growth of nitrate-reducing bacteria. While effluent concentrations of acetate, Fe(II), NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ remained at steady state, we measured a 3-fold increase (0.055 S/m - 0.2 S/m) in σb in the iron-reducing column and a 10-fold increase in σb (0.07 S/m - 0.8 S/m) in the nitrate-reducing column over 198 days. The ionic strength in both reactors remained constant through time indicating that the measured increases in σb were not caused by changing effluent concentrations. PHREEQC successfully matched the measured changes in effluent concentrations for both columns when the reaction database was modified in the following manner. For the iron-reducing column, kinetic expressions governing the rate of iron reduction, the rate of bacterial growth, and the production of methane were added to the reaction database. Additionally, surface adsorption and cation exchange reactions were added so that the model was consistent with measured effluent chemistry. For the nitrate-reducing column, kinetic expressions governing nitrate reduction and bacterial growth were added to the reaction database. Additionally

  16. Analysis of high iron rice lines reveals new miRNAs that target iron transporters in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Soumitra; Gayen, Dipak; Datta, Swapan K.; Datta, Karabi

    2016-01-01

    The present study highlights the molecular regulation of iron transport in soyFER1-overexpressing transgenic rice. Accumulation of iron in three different seed developmental stages, milk, dough, and mature, has been examined. The transgenic seeds of the milk stage showed significant augmentation of iron and zinc levels compared with wild-type seeds, and similar results were observed throughout the dough and mature stages. To investigate the regulation of iron transport, the role of miRNAs was studied in roots of transgenic rice. Sequencing of small RNA libraries revealed 153 known and 41 novel miRNAs in roots. Among them, 59 known and 14 novel miRNAs were found to be significantly expressed. miR166, miR399, and miR408 were identified as playing a vital role in iron uptake in roots of transgenic plants . Most importantly, four putative novel miRNAs, namely miR11, miR26, miR30, and miR31, were found to be down-regulated in roots of transgenic plants. For all these four novel miRNAs, natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 4 (NRAMP4), encoding a metal transporter, was predicted as a target gene. It is hypothesized that the NRAMP4 transporter is activated in roots of transgenic plants due to the lower abundance of its corresponding putative novel miRNAs. The relative transcript level of the NRAMP4 transcript was increased from 0.107 in the wild type to 65.24 and 55.39 in transgenic plants, which demonstrates the elevated amount of iron transport in transgenic plants. In addition, up-regulation of OsYSL15, OsFRO2, and OsIRT1 in roots also facilitates iron loading in transgenic seeds. PMID:27729476

  17. Hepcidin Regulation of Iron Transport1–3

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, James F.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Knutson, Mitchell D.

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of hepcidin as a key regulator of iron homeostasis has advanced our current knowledge of this field. Liver-derived hepcidin peptide is secreted in response to iron and inflammation and interacts with the iron export protein ferroportin. This review summarizes recent advances discussed at the Symposium. A particular focus is on molecular interactions between hepcidin and ferroportin, the regulation of hepcidin expression by iron and inflammation, and emerging methods to measure s...

  18. Mineralization of Iron Oxyhydroxides in the Presence and in the Absence of Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Châtellier, X.; West, M.; Rose, J.; Fortin, D.; Leppard, G. G.; Ferris, G.

    2001-12-01

    Because of their small size, iron oxides have a large surface area per unit weight ratio and are believed to play an important role as an adsorbing phase in lake sediments for various molecules, including potentially dangerous ones like heavy metals. They have been observed to form in close association with bacterial cells, by oxidation of ferrous ions. It is thus important to determine whether the presence of the bacterial cells can affect the mineralogy and the mesoscopic structure of the Fe-oxides particles, as well as their reactivity towards heavy metals. We synthesized in the lab nanoparticles of Fe-oxides by oxidation of ferrous ions. This was done in the presence and in the absence of various bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and Bacillus licheniformis) and of inorganic ligands (sulfate, phosphate, silicate). The Fe-oxides particles were then observed by TEM on thin sections and on whole mounts. The chemical composition was estimated by wet chemistry and by EDS. The mineralogy was determined by XRD, SAED and EXAFS. Surface area was investigated by BET. And adsorption of cadmium was also measured at various pH. We observed that the size and the morphology of the particles as well as their mesoscopic spatial organization can be affected by the presence of the cells, whereas the mineralogy is controlled by the chemistry of the solution. The adsorption isotherms of cadmium on the various Fe-oxides will be discussed at the light of these observations.

  19. Optimization for vehicle scheduling in iron and steel works based on semi-trailer swap transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yao-rong; LIANG Bo; ZHOU Mei-hua

    2010-01-01

    In order to solve internal logistics problems of iron and steel works,such as low transportation efficiency of cehicles and high transportation cost,the production process and traditional transportation style of iron and steel work were introduced.The internal transport tasks of iron and steel works were grouped based on cluster analysis according to demand time of the transportation. An improved vehicle scheduling model of semi-trailer swap transport among loading nodes and unloading nodes in one task group was set up.The algorithm was designed to silve the vehicle routing problem with simultaneous pick-up and delivery (CRPSPD)problem based on semi-trailer swap transport.A solving program was written by MATLAB software and the method to figure out the optimal path of each grouping was obtainde.The dropping and pulling transportation plan of the tractor wan designed.And an decerase the numbers of semi-trailer swap transport in iron and steel works was given.The results indicate that semi-trailer swap transport can steel works,and the total distance traveled reduces by 43.5%.The semi-trailer swap transport can help the iron and steel works develop the productiong in intension.

  20. Iron/argillite interactions in radioactive waste disposal context: Oxidising transient and bacterial activities influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal facility developed by Andra (2005) in France involves emplacing metallic materials (containers, overpacks, liner) into a geological argillaceous formation. During the operational phase, ventilation of handling drifts will keep oxidising conditions at the front of disposal tunnels. Therefore, an oxidising transient may take place in parts of these tunnels in the post-closure phase possibly over several years. During this transient period, the environment of the disposal cell will evolve towards reducing and saturated conditions close to the equilibrium state of the original underground argillaceous formation. Moreover, high temperature conditions above 50 deg. C may be encountered in this environment over a few hundred years. Uniform corrosion represents the main type of degradation of metallic materials for the long term. The oxidising transient will be characterised by high corrosion rates (e.g. localised corrosion) due to the presence of oxygen whereas during the following anoxic stage, the main alteration factor will originate from the pore water associated with lower corrosion rates. In any case, metallic materials corrosion will lead to the release of aqueous iron, which may induce alteration of the favourable confining properties of the clayey materials. In this context, reactive pathways related to the metal corrosion under oxidising conditions and then followed by reducing conditions remain to be further understood (evolution of pH, redox and influence of temperature). Furthermore, some other significant issues remain open, in particular the dissolution/precipitation processes, the argillite perturbation extent and the effects of these transformations on the confining properties of materials. The presence of micro-organisms in deep argillaceous environment and the introduction of new bacterial species in the repository during the operational phase raise the question of their survival under real

  1. Changes of ferrous iron and its transporters after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gaiqing; Shao, Anwen; Hu, Weimin; Xue, Fang; Zhao, Hongping; JIN Xiaojie; Li, Guanglai; Sun, Zhitang; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ferrous iron is a major source inducing oxidative stress after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Divalent metal transporter1 (DMT1) is the important and well-known plasma membrane transport protein which was proved to be involved in the transport of free ferrous iron in mammals. Ferroportin 1 (FPN1) is the unique exporter of ferrous iron from mammalian cells. The role of DMT1 and FPN1 in brain after ICH is still not elucidated. Therefore, we measure the expression of DMT1 and FPN1, t...

  2. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  3. Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron by lead nitrate in sulfate-rich systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongmei; Gong, Linfeng; Cravotta, Charles A.; Yang, Xiaofen; Tuovinen, Olli H.; Dong, Hailiang; Fu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) by Pb(NO3)2 was investigated with a mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The culture was incubated at 30 °C in ferrous-sulfate medium amended with 0–24.2 mM Pb(II) added as Pb(NO3)2. Anglesite (PbSO4) precipitated immediately upon Pb addition and was the only solid phase detected in the abiotic controls. Both anglesite and jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6) were detected in inoculated cultures. Precipitation of anglesite maintained dissolved Pb concentrations at 16.9–17.6 μM regardless of the concentrations of Pb(NO3)2 added. Fe(II) oxidation was suppressed by 24.2 mM Pb(NO3)2 addition even when anglesite was removed before inoculation. Experiments with 0–48 mM KNO3 demonstrated that bacterial Fe(II) oxidation decreased as nitrate concentration increased. Therefore, inhibition of Fe(II) oxidation at 24.2 mM Pb(NO3)2 addition resulted from nitrate toxicity instead of Pb addition. Geochemical modeling that considered the initial precipitation of anglesite to equilibrium followed by progressive oxidation of Fe(II) and the precipitation of jarosite and an amorphous iron hydroxide phase, without allowing plumbojarosite to precipitate were consistent with the experimental time-series data on Fe(II) oxidation under biotic conditions. Anglesite precipitation in mine tailings and other sulfate-rich systems maintains dissolved Pb concentrations below the toxicity threshold of A. ferrooxidans.

  4. Regulation of the transferrin-independent iron transport system in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J; Jordan, I; Sturrock, A

    1991-02-15

    Mammalian cells accumulate iron via the binding of transferrin to high affinity surface receptors, or through a transferrin-independent pathway which involves the uptake of iron-organic anion chelates by a membrane-based transport system. Previously we determined that the transferrin-independent transport system was present on a wide variety of cultured cells (Sturrock, A., Alexander, J., Lamb, J., Craven, C. M., and Kaplan, J. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 3139-3145). In this communication we demonstrate that the transferrin-independent iron uptake system is regulated differently than the transferrin-mediated pathway. The activity of the transferrin-independent system was unaffected by changes in cellular growth rate, induction of DNA synthesis and cell division, or depletion of cellular iron. Exposure of cells to ferric or ferrous iron, however, resulted in a time-dependent increase in transport activity, due to a change in Vmax with no change in Km. Increased transport activity was seen in a variety of cultured cell types, occurred in the presence of cycloheximide, and persisted for hours after removal of iron. The ability of other transition metals to induce changes in transport, or to compete with iron for accumulation by the transferrin-independent uptake system, was critically dependent on the composition of the media in which the cells were incubated. Metals such as Cu2+ or Zn2+, but not Cd2+ or Mn2+, when dissolved in a balanced salt solution buffered with 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid, induced changes in the transferrin-independent iron transport system. The same metals which induced changes in transport were ineffective in media containing amino acids, ascorbate, or N-[2-hydroxy-1,1-bis(hydroxymethyl)ethyl]glycine. The Vmax of the transferrin-independent iron transport system was also elevated by increases in intracellular Ca2+. The effect of iron on transport activity, however, did not result from an iron-induced release of

  5. Bacterial-type oxygen detoxification and iron-sulfur cluster assembly in amoebal relict mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maralikova, Barbora; Ali, Vahab; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; van der Giezen, Mark; Henze, Katrin; Tovar, Jorge

    2010-03-01

    The assembly of vital reactive iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cofactors in eukaryotes is mediated by proteins inherited from the original mitochondrial endosymbiont. Uniquely among eukaryotes, however, Entamoeba and Mastigamoeba lack such mitochondrial-type Fe-S cluster assembly proteins and possess instead an analogous bacterial-type system acquired by lateral gene transfer. Here we demonstrate, using immunomicroscopy and biochemical methods, that beyond their predicted cytosolic distribution the bacterial-type Fe-S cluster assembly proteins NifS and NifU have been recruited to function within the relict mitochondrial organelles (mitosomes) of Entamoeba histolytica. Both Nif proteins are 10-fold more concentrated within mitosomes compared with their cytosolic distribution suggesting that active Fe-S protein maturation occurs in these organelles. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy showed that amoebal mitosomes are minute but highly abundant cellular structures that occupy up to 2% of the total cell volume. In addition, protein colocalization studies allowed identification of the amoebal hydroperoxide detoxification enzyme rubrerythrin as a mitosomal protein. This protein contains functional Fe-S centres and exhibits peroxidase activity in vitro. Our findings demonstrate the role of analogous protein replacement in mitochondrial organelle evolution and suggest that the relict mitochondrial organelles of Entamoeba are important sites of metabolic activity that function in Fe-S protein-mediated oxygen detoxification. PMID:19888992

  6. Comparative genomics of iron-transporting systems in Bacillus cereus strains and impact of iron sources on growth and biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Siezen, Roland; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an important element for bacterial viability, however it is not readily available in most environments. We studied the ability of 20 undomesticated food isolates of Bacillus cereus and two reference strains for capacity to use different (complex) iron sources for growth and biofilm format

  7. Effect of iron and phosphate on bacterial cyanide formation determined by methemoglobin in two-dimensional gradient microcultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf von Rohr, Matthias; Furrer, Gerhard; Brandl, Helmut

    2009-10-01

    Cyanide formation by microorganisms is typically observed during early stationary growth phase and is facilitated by the presence of iron(III) and inorganic phosphate. Extracellular free cyanide in aqueous solutions might readily react with methemoglobin added and can be determined by UV/VIS spectroscopy. As alternative to existing methods, this provided the basis for an analytical method which has not been used previously for the determination of cyanide in bacterial cultivations. We successfully applied the technique to study the combined effect of both iron(III) and phosphate on the cyanide formation by Pseudomonas fluorescens, which we used as model organism known for its ability to form HCN. Information on the combined effect of iron and phosphate was obtained by using commercially available 24-well microtiter plates as two-dimensional gradient systems. After its reaction with methemoglobin, cyanide was measured reproducibly at the wavelength of 427 nm. We found a combined effect of both iron and phosphate. In the absence of inorganic phosphate, cyanide formation was stimulated considerably by increasing concentrations of iron(III), although the effect on the bacterial growth of P. fluorescens was almost insignificant. This suggests that iron is more important than inorganic phosphate for the cyanogenesis by P. fluorescens.

  8. Reactive transport modeling at uranium in situ recovery sites: uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Tutu, Hlanganani; Brown, Adrian; Figueroa, Linda; Wolkersdorfer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical changes that can occur down gradient from uranium in situ recovery (ISR) sites are important for various stakeholders to understand when evaluating potential effects on surrounding groundwater quality. If down gradient solid-phase material consists of sandstone with iron hydroxide coatings (no pyrite or organic carbon), sorption of uranium on iron hydroxides can control uranium mobility. Using one-dimensional reactive transport models with PHREEQC, two different geochemical databases, and various geochemical parameters, the uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides are evaluated, because these oxidized zones create a greater risk for future uranium transport than fully reduced zones where uranium generally precipitates.

  9. Expression of Iron-Related Proteins at the Neurovascular Unit Supports Reduction and Reoxidation of Iron for Transport Through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkhart, Annette; Skjørringe, Tina; Johnsen, Kasper Bendix;

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms for iron transport through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain a controversy. We analyzed for expression of mRNA and proteins involved in oxidation and transport of iron in isolated brain capillaries from dietary normal, iron-deficient, and iron-reverted rats. The expression...... cells provide the machinery for receptor-mediated uptake of ferric iron-containing transferrin. Ferric iron can then undergo reduction to ferrous iron by ferrireductases inside endosomes followed by DMT1-mediated pumping into the cytosol and subsequently cellular export by ferroportin. The expression...... of soluble ceruloplasmin by brain endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes that together form the neurovascular unit (NVU) provides the ferroxidase activity necessary to reoxidize ferrous iron once released inside the brain....

  10. Helium, Iron and Electron Particle Transport and Energy Transport Studies on the TFTR Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synakowski, E. J.; Efthimion, P. C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B. C.; Tang, W. M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Johnson, D .W.; Mansfield, D. K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M. C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kissick, M. W. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  11. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  12. Bacterial multidrug resistance mediated by a homologue of the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, WN; Poelarends, GJ

    2002-01-01

    Most ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters known to date are of eukaryotic origin, such as the P-glycoproteins (Pgps) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs). Only one well-characterized ABC multidrug transporter, LmrA, is of bacterial origin. On the basis of its structural a

  13. Transport of peptidoglycan sub-units across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, V.

    2009-01-01

    Transport of peptidoglycan sub-units across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane Vincent van Dam The work described in this thesis focuses on the mechanism by which the lipid-linked cell wall precursor molecule Lipid II is transported from the inner leaflet to the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic memb

  14. The role of Na/+/ in transport processes of bacterial membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    Until recently it was generally held that transport in bacteria was linked exclusively to proton circulation, in contrast to most eucaryotic systems, which depended on Na(+) circulation. The present review is intended to trace recent developments which have led to the discarding of this idea. The discussion covers transport of Na(+) and other cations, effects of Na(+) and Na(+) gradients on metabolite transport, properties of Na(+)-dependent transport carriers, and evolutionary considerations of Na(+) transport. It is now apparent that the transport of Na(+) is an important part of energy metabolism in bacteria, and that Na(+) gradients as well as H(+) gradients are used in these systems for the conservation and transmission of energy. Two hypotheses are proposed to explain the evolution of Na/K systems, and it is presently difficult to decide between them.

  15. Unusual Heme Binding in the Bacterial Iron Response Regulator Protein (Irr): Spectral Characterization of Heme Binding to Heme Regulatory Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Haruto; Nakagaki, Megumi; Bamba, Ai; Uchida, Takeshi; Hori, Hiroshi; O'Brian, Mark R.; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    We characterized heme binding in the bacterial iron response regulator (Irr) protein, which is a simple heme-regulated protein having a single “heme-regulatory motif”, HRM, and plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of a nitrogen fixing bacterium. The heme titration to wild-type and mutant Irr clearly showed that Irr has two heme binding sites: one of the heme binding sites is in the HRM, where 29Cys is the axial ligand, and the other one, the secondary heme binding site, is located outside...

  16. Determination of serum iron and of the transport capacity of iron by transferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three methods were standardized in order to determine the iron level in serum, the total iron binding capacity of transferrin and the iron binding capacity of free transferrin. The first of them, appropriate to estimate iron and total transferrin level, is based on the development of color as a consequence of iron binding to bathophenanthrolin (BATO); the second, used for the same purposes, employs atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AA); the third, used to estimate free transferrin, is a radioassay (RE). It was known that the methods employing atomic absorption espectrophotometry and radioassay are precise and especific, while the use of bathophenanthrolin constantly provides differing results. This was the reason why statistic analysis of the results showed significant differences between the first method (BATO) and the remaining two (RE and AA). Nevertheless, the fluctuation of results observed with the use of bathophenanthrolin is small (less than 10%), the method is easy to perform and it is not dispendious concerning reagents as well as equipament. Therefore it was concluded that the BATO method is very safe when used for diagnosis of iron deficiency or excess of storage, even of low magnitude. (Author)

  17. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  18. Interactions between bacteria and solid surfaces in relation to bacterial transport in porous media.

    OpenAIRE

    Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    1994-01-01

    Interactions between bacteria and solid surfaces strongly influence the behaviour of bacteria in natural and engineered ecosystems. Many biofilm reactors and terrestrial environments are porous media. The purpose of the research presented in this thesis is to gain a better insight into the basic mechanims of bacterial adhesion and transport in such systems. This knowledge is essential for bacterial adhesion science in general, and important for practical applications such as the bioremediatio...

  19. Sources, transport and deposition of iron in the global atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Boucher, O.; Bopp, L.; Chappell, A.; Ciais, P.; Hauglustaine, D.; Peñuelas, J.; Tao, S.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric deposition of iron (Fe) plays an important role in controlling oceanic primary productivity. However, the sources of Fe in the atmosphere are not well understood. In particular, the combustion sources of Fe and the subsequent deposition to the oceans have been accounted for in only few ocean biogeochemical models of the carbon cycle. Here we used a mass-balance method to estimate the emissions of Fe from the combustion of fossil fuels and biomass by accounting for the Fe contents in fuel and the partitioning of Fe during combustion. The emissions of Fe attached to aerosols from combustion sources were estimated by particle size, and their uncertainties were quantified by a Monte Carlo simulation. The emissions of Fe from mineral sources were estimated using the latest soil mineralogical database to date. As a result, the total Fe emissions from combustion averaged for 1960-2007 were estimated to be 5.3 Tg yr-1 (90% confidence of 2.3 to 12.1). Of these emissions, 1, 27 and 72% were emitted in particles 10 μm (PM> 10), respectively, compared to a total Fe emission from mineral dust of 41.0 Tg yr-1 in a log-normal distribution with a mass median diameter of 2.5 μm and a geometric standard deviation of 2. For combustion sources, different temporal trends were found in fine and medium-to-coarse particles, with a notable increase in Fe emissions in PM1 since 2000 due to an increase in Fe emission from motor vehicles (from 0.008 to 0.0103 Tg yr-1 in 2000 and 2007, respectively). These emissions have been introduced in a global 3-D transport model run at a spatial resolution of 0.94° latitude by 1.28° longitude to evaluate our estimation of Fe emissions. The modelled Fe concentrations as monthly means were compared with the monthly (57 sites) or daily (768 sites) measured concentrations at a total of 825 sampling stations. The deviation between modelled and observed Fe concentrations attached to aerosols at the surface was within a factor of 2 at most

  20. Sources, transport and deposition of iron in the global atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric deposition of iron (Fe plays an important role in controlling oceanic primary productivity. However, the sources of Fe in the atmosphere are not well understood. In particular, the combustion sources of Fe and their deposition over oceans are not accounted for in current biogeochemical models of the carbon cycle. Here we used a mass-balance method to estimate the emissions of Fe from the combustion of fossil fuels and biomass by accounting for the Fe contents in fuel and the partitioning of Fe during combustion. The emissions of Fe attached to aerosols from combustion sources were estimated by particle size, and their uncertainties were quantified by a Monte Carlo simulation. The emissions of Fe from mineral sources were estimated using the latest soil mineralogical database to date. As a result, the total Fe emissions from combustion averaged for 1960–2007 were estimated to be 5.1 Tg yr−1 (90% confidence of 2.2 to 11.5. Of these emissions, 2, 33 and 65% were emitted in particles 1, 1–10 μm (PM1−10, and >10 μm (PM>10, respectively, compared to total Fe emissions from mineral sources of 41.0 Tg yr−1. For combustion sources, different temporal trends were found in fine and medium-to-coarse particles, with a notable increase in Fe emissions in PM1 and PM1−10 since 2000 due to a rapid increase from motor vehicles. These emissions have been introduced in a global 3-D transport model run at a spatial resolution of of 0.94° latitude by 1.28° longitude to evaluate our estimation of Fe emissions. The modelled Fe concentrations were compared to measurements at 825 sampling stations. The deviation between modelled and observed Fe concentrations attached to aerosols at the surface was within a factor of two at most sampling stations, and the deviation was within a factor of 1.5 at sampling stations dominated by combustion sources. We analyzed the relative contribution of combustion sources to total Fe concentrations over

  1. Hepatocyte divalent metal-ion transporter-1 is dispensable for hepatic iron accumulation and non-transferrin-bound iron uptake in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Knutson, Mitchell D.

    2013-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is required for iron uptake by the intestine and developing erythroid cells. DMT1 is also present in the liver, where it has been implicated in the uptake of transferrin-bound iron (TBI) and non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI), which appears in the plasma during iron overload. To test the hypothesis that DMT1 is required for hepatic iron uptake, we examined mice with the Dmt1 gene selectively inactivated in hepatocytes (Dmt1liv/liv). We found that Dmt1liv...

  2. Lessons learned from bacterial transport research at the South Oyster Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibe, T.; Hubbard, S.S.; Onstott, T.C.; DeFlaun, M.F.

    2011-04-01

    This paper provides a review of bacterial transport experiments conducted by a multi-investigator, multi-institution, multi-disciplinary team of researchers under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The experiments were conducted during the time period 1999-2001 at a field site near the town of Oyster, Virginia known as the South Oyster Site, and included four major experimental campaigns aimed at understanding and quantifying bacterial transport in the subsurface environment. Several key elements of the research are discussed here: (1) quantification of bacterial transport in physically, chemically and biologically heterogeneous aquifers, (2) evaluation of the efficacy of conventional colloid filtration theory, (3) scale effects in bacterial transport, (4) development of new methods for microbial enumeration and screening for low adhesion strains, (5) application of novel hydrogeophysical techniques for aquifer characterization, and (6) experiences regarding management of a large field research effort. Lessons learned are summarized in each of these areas. The body of literature resulting from South Oyster Site research has been widely cited and continues to influence research into the controls exerted by aquifer heterogeneity on reactive transport (including microbial transport). It also served as a model (and provided valuable experience) for subsequent and ongoing highly-instrumented field research efforts conducted by DOE-sponsored investigators.

  3. Influence of short distance transportation on tracheal bacterial content and lower airway cytology in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allano, Marion; Labrecque, Olivia; Rodriguez Batista, Edisleidy; Beauchamp, Guy; Bédard, Christian; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Leclere, Mathilde

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of short distance transportation on airway mucus, cytology and bacterial culture to identify potential biases in the diagnosis of airway diseases in referral centres. Eight healthy adult horses were studied using a prospective cross-over design. Mucus scores, tracheal wash (cytology, bacterial culture) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF; cytology) were obtained while stabled and following 2.5 h transportation (with and without hay). Neutrophil counts, percentages and BALF neutrophilia frequency increased following transport without hay (P  0.05). BALF neutrophilia could develop solely as a result of transportation or due to interactions between repeated transports, ambient temperature, head position or other environmental factors. PMID:27387726

  4. Ndfip2 is a potential regulator of the iron transporter DMT1 in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Natalie J.; Gembus, Kelly M.; Mackenzie, Kimberly; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of divalent metal ion transporter DMT1, the primary non-heme iron importer in mammals, is critical for maintaining iron homeostasis. Previously we identified ubiquitin-dependent regulation of DMT1 involving the Nedd4 family of ubiquitin ligases and the Ndfip1 and Ndfip2 adaptors. We also established the in vivo function of Ndfip1 in the regulation of DMT1 in the duodenum of mice. Here we have studied the function of Ndfip2 using Ndfip2-deficient mice. The DMT1 protein levels in the duodenum were comparable in wild type and Ndfip2−/− mice, as was the transport activity of isolated enterocytes. A complete blood examination showed no significant differences between wild type and Ndfip2−/− mice in any of the hematological parameters measured. However, when fed a low iron diet, female Ndfip2−/− mice showed a decrease in liver iron content, although they maintained normal serum iron levels and transferrin saturation, compared to wild type female mice that showed a reduction in serum iron and transferrin saturation. Ndfip2−/− female mice also showed an increase in DMT1 expression in the liver, with no change in male mice. We suggest that Ndfip2 controls DMT1 in the liver with female mice showing a greater response to altered dietary iron than the male mice. PMID:27048792

  5. Mucosal lipocalin 2 has pro-inflammatory and iron-sequestering effects in response to bacterial enterobactin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Bachman

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nasal colonization by both gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens induces expression of the innate immune protein lipocalin 2 (Lcn2. Lcn2 binds and sequesters the iron-scavenging siderophore enterobactin (Ent, preventing bacterial iron acquisition. In addition, Lcn2 bound to Ent induces release of IL-8 from cultured respiratory cells. As a countermeasure, pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae family such as Klebsiella pneumoniae produce additional siderophores such as yersiniabactin (Ybt and contain the iroA locus encoding an Ent glycosylase that prevents Lcn2 binding. Whereas the ability of Lcn2 to sequester iron is well described, the ability of Lcn2 to induce inflammation during infection is unknown. To study each potential effect of Lcn2 on colonization, we exploited K. pneumoniae mutants that are predicted to be susceptible to Lcn2-mediated iron sequestration (iroA ybtS mutant or inflammation (iroA mutant, or to not interact with Lcn2 (entB mutant. During murine nasal colonization, the iroA ybtS double mutant was inhibited in an Lcn2-dependent manner, indicating that the iroA locus protects against Lcn2-mediated growth inhibition. Since the iroA single mutant was not inhibited, production of Ybt circumvents the iron sequestration effect of Lcn2 binding to Ent. However, colonization with the iroA mutant induced an increased influx of neutrophils compared to the entB mutant. This enhanced neutrophil response to Ent-producing K. pneumoniae was Lcn2-dependent. These findings suggest that Lcn2 has both pro-inflammatory and iron-sequestering effects along the respiratory mucosa in response to bacterial Ent. Therefore, Lcn2 may represent a novel mechanism of sensing microbial metabolism to modulate the host response appropriately.

  6. Transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbons adsorbed with single iron atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉娥; 肖杨; 颜晓红; 戴昌杰

    2015-01-01

    We have performed density-functional calculations of the transport properties of the zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) adsorbed with a single iron atom. Two adsorption configurations are considered, i.e., iron adsorbed on the edge and on the interior of the nanoribbon. The results show that the transport features of the two configurations are similar. However, the transport properties are modified due to the scattering effects induced by coupling of the ZGNR band states to the localized 3d-orbital state of the iron atom. More importantly, one can find that several dips appear in the transmission curve, which is closely related to the above mentioned coupling. We expect that our results will have potential applications in graphene-based spintronic devices.

  7. BACTERIAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT PROTEINS IN THEIR LIPID ENVIRONMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TVELD, GI; DRIESSEN, AJM; KONINGS, WN; Veld, Gerda in 't

    1993-01-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria is a selective barrier that restricts entry and exit of solutes. Transport of solutes across this membrane is catalyzed by specific membrane proteins. Integral membrane proteins usually require specific lipids for optimal activity and are inhibited by other lipid

  8. Draft ASME code case on ductile cast iron for transport packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saegusa, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko (Japan); Arai, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka (Japan); Hirose, M. [Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Nippon Chuzo, Kawasaki (Japan); Tezuka, Y. [Mitsubishi Materials Co., Tokyo (Japan); Urabe, N. [Kokan Keisoku K. K., Kawasaki (Japan); Hueggenberg, R. [GNB, Essen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The current Rules for Construction of ''Containment Systems for Storage and Transport Packagings of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Radioactive Material and Waste'' of Division 3 in Section III of ASME Code (2001 Edition) does not include ductile cast iron in its list of materials permitted for use. The Rules specify required fracture toughness values of ferritic steel material for nominal wall thickness 5/8 to 12 inches (16 to 305 mm). New rule for ductile cast iron for transport packaging of which wall thickness is greater than 12 inches (305mm) is required.

  9. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  10. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 (angstrom) above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  11. Antidepressant binding site in a bacterial homologue of neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satinder K; Yamashita, Atsuko; Gouaux, Eric

    2007-08-23

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 A above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational design of

  12. The diversity of membrane transporters encoded in bacterial arsenic-resistance operons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiren Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Transporter-facilitated arsenite extrusion is the major pathway of arsenic resistance within bacteria. So far only two types of membrane-bound transporter proteins, ArsB and ArsY (ACR3, have been well studied, although the arsenic transporters in bacteria display considerable diversity. Utilizing accumulated genome sequence data, we searched arsenic resistance (ars operons in about 2,500 bacterial strains and located over 700 membrane-bound transporters which are encoded in these operons. Sequence analysis revealed at least five distinct transporter families, with ArsY being the most dominant, followed by ArsB, ArsP (a recently reported permease family, Major Facilitator protein Superfamily (MFS and Major Intrinsic Protein (MIP. In addition, other types of transporters encoded in the ars operons were found, but in much lower frequencies. The diversity and evolutionary relationships of these transporters with regard to arsenic resistance will be discussed.

  13. Homeostatic interplay between bacterial cell-cell signaling and iron in virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronen Hazan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria use interconnected multi-layered regulatory networks, such as quorum sensing (QS networks to sense and respond to environmental cues and external and internal bacterial cell signals, and thereby adapt to and exploit target hosts. Despite the many advances that have been made in understanding QS regulation, little is known regarding how these inputs are integrated and processed in the context of multi-layered QS regulatory networks. Here we report the examination of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs MvfR regulatory network and determination of its interaction with the QS acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL RhlR network. The aim of this work was to elucidate paradigmatically the complex relationships between multi-layered regulatory QS circuitries, their signaling molecules, and the environmental cues to which they respond. Our findings revealed positive and negative homeostatic regulatory loops that fine-tune the MvfR regulon via a multi-layered dependent homeostatic regulation of the cell-cell signaling molecules PQS and HHQ, and interplay between these molecules and iron. We discovered that the MvfR regulon component PqsE is a key mediator in orchestrating this homeostatic regulation, and in establishing a connection to the QS rhlR system in cooperation with RhlR. Our results show that P. aeruginosa modulates the intensity of its virulence response, at least in part, through this multi-layered interplay. Our findings underscore the importance of the homeostatic interplay that balances competition within and between QS systems via cell-cell signaling molecules and environmental cues in the control of virulence gene expression. Elucidation of the fine-tuning of this complex relationship offers novel insights into the regulation of these systems and may inform strategies designed to limit infections caused by P. aeruginosa and related human pathogens.

  14. Impact of bacterial NO3- transport on sediment biogeochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayama, Mikio; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter;

    2005-01-01

    Experiments demonstrated that Beggiatoa could induce a H2S-depleted suboxic zone of more than 10 mm in marine sediments and cause a divergence in sediment NO3– reduction from denitrification to dissimilatory NO3– reduction to ammonium. pH, O2, and H2S profiles indicated that the bacteria oxidized......2S with NO3– and transported S0 to the sediment surface for aerobic oxidation....

  15. Interdependence between iron ore production and maritime transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Todorut

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The maritime industry plays an important role in international trade, transporting a total of 10,1 billion tons of merchandise in 2015, representing over 80% of all global trade, with dry cargo estimated to account for over two thirds of the total seaborne trade. Bulk carriers supply the raw materials needed by the steel industry and container ships transport the steel products. Demand and supply for seaborne transport is influenced by trends in global economy and worldwide demand for commodities. The paper analyzes the most important economic determinants in the supply of metallurgical raw materials, highlighting the importance of the shipping sector.

  16. Impact of biofilm on bacterial transport and deposition in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorg, Ali; Gates, Ian D; Sen, Arindom

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted to obtain insights into factors that influence bacterial transport and deposition in porous media. According to colloidal filtration theory, the removal efficiency of a filter medium is characterized by two main factors: collision efficiency and sticking efficiency. In the case of bacterial transport in porous media, bacteria attached to a solid surface can establish a thin layer of biofilm by excreting extracellular polymeric substances which can significantly influence both of these factors in a porous medium, and thus, affect the overall removal efficiency of the filter medium. However, such polymeric interactions in bacterial adhesion are not well understood and a method to calculate polymeric interactions is not yet available. Here, to determine how the migration of bacteria flowing within a porous medium is affected by the presence of surface-associated extracellular polymeric substances previously produced and deposited by the same bacterial species, a commonly used colloidal filtration model was applied to study transport and deposition of Pseudomonas fluorescens in small-scale columns packed with clean and biofilm coated glass beads. Bacterial recoveries were monitored in column effluents and used to quantify biofilm interactions and sticking efficiencies of the biofilm coated packed-beds. The results indicated that, under identical hydraulic conditions, the sticking efficiencies in packed-beds were improved consistently by 36% when covered by biofilm. PMID:26583740

  17. Impact of biofilm on bacterial transport and deposition in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorg, Ali; Gates, Ian D.; Sen, Arindom

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted to obtain insights into factors that influence bacterial transport and deposition in porous media. According to colloidal filtration theory, the removal efficiency of a filter medium is characterized by two main factors: collision efficiency and sticking efficiency. In the case of bacterial transport in porous media, bacteria attached to a solid surface can establish a thin layer of biofilm by excreting extracellular polymeric substances which can significantly influence both of these factors in a porous medium, and thus, affect the overall removal efficiency of the filter medium. However, such polymeric interactions in bacterial adhesion are not well understood and a method to calculate polymeric interactions is not yet available. Here, to determine how the migration of bacteria flowing within a porous medium is affected by the presence of surface-associated extracellular polymeric substances previously produced and deposited by the same bacterial species, a commonly used colloidal filtration model was applied to study transport and deposition of Pseudomonas fluorescens in small-scale columns packed with clean and biofilm coated glass beads. Bacterial recoveries were monitored in column effluents and used to quantify biofilm interactions and sticking efficiencies of the biofilm coated packed-beds. The results indicated that, under identical hydraulic conditions, the sticking efficiencies in packed-beds were improved consistently by 36% when covered by biofilm.

  18. A Trypanosomatid Iron Transporter that Regulates Mitochondrial Function Is Required for Leishmania amazonensis Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidyottam Mittra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron, an essential co-factor of respiratory chain proteins, is critical for mitochondrial function and maintenance of its redox balance. We previously reported a role for iron uptake in differentiation of Leishmania amazonensis into virulent amastigotes, by a mechanism that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS production and is independent of the classical pH and temperature cues. Iron import into mitochondria was proposed to be essential for this process, but evidence supporting this hypothesis was lacking because the Leishmania mitochondrial iron transporter was unknown. Here we describe MIT1, a homolog of the mitochondrial iron importer genes mrs3 (yeast and mitoferrin-1 (human that is highly conserved among trypanosomatids. MIT1 expression was essential for the survival of Trypanosoma brucei procyclic but not bloodstream forms, which lack functional respiratory complexes. L. amazonensis LMIT1 null mutants could not be generated, suggesting that this mitochondrial iron importer is essential for promastigote viability. Promastigotes lacking one LMIT1 allele (LMIT1/Δlmit1 showed growth defects and were more susceptible to ROS toxicity, consistent with the role of iron as the essential co-factor of trypanosomatid mitochondrial superoxide dismutases. LMIT1/Δlmit1 metacyclic promastigotes were unable to replicate as intracellular amastigotes after infecting macrophages or cause cutaneous lesions in mice. When induced to differentiate axenically into amastigotes, LMIT1/Δlmit1 showed strong defects in iron content and function of mitochondria, were unable to upregulate the ROS-regulatory enzyme FeSOD, and showed mitochondrial changes suggestive of redox imbalance. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial iron uptake in trypanosomatid parasites, and highlight the role of LMIT1 in the iron-regulated process that orchestrates differentiation of L. amazonensis into infective amastigotes.

  19. Assessment of Two Alternative Sample Transport and Fixation Methods in the Microbiological Diagnosis of Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Eason

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The standard method for specimen collection and transport for microbiological diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis is an air-dried smear of vaginal secretions, promptly heat- or alcohol-fixed, Gram-stained and scored by Nugent's criteria.

  20. Numerical prediction of diffusion and electric field-induced iron nanoparticle transport

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Helena I.; Rodríguez-Maroto, José Miguel; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Pamukcu, Sibel; Dias-Ferreira, Celia

    2014-01-01

    Zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) are considered very promising for the remediation of contaminated soils and groundwaters. However, an important issue related to their limited mobility remains unsolved. Direct current can be used to enhance the nanoparticles transport, based on the same principles of electrokinetic remediation. In this work, a generalized physicochemical model was developed and solved numerically to describe the nZVI transport through porous media under electric field, a...

  1. The impact of engineered cobalt, iron, nickel and silver nanoparticles on soil bacterial diversity under field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our understanding of how engineered nanoparticles (NPs) migrate through soil and affect microbial communities is scarce. In the current study we examined how metal NPs, including those from the iron triad (iron, cobalt and nickel), moved through pots of soil maintained under winter field conditions for 50 days, when mesophilic bacteria may not be dividing. Based on total metal analysis, cobalt and nickel were localized in the top layer of soil, even after exposure to high precipitation and freeze–thaw cycles. In contrast, a bimodal distribution of silver was observed. Due to high endogenous levels of iron, the migration pattern of these NPs could not be determined. Pyrosequence analysis of the bacterial communities revealed that there was no significant engineered NP-mediated decline in microbial richness. However, analysis of individual genera showed that Sphingomonas and Lysobacter were represented by fewer sequences in horizons containing elevated metal levels whereas there was an increase in the numbers of Flavobacterium and Niastella. Collectively, the results indicate that along with the differential migration behavior of NPs in the soil matrix, their impact on soil bacterial diversity appears to be dependent on environmental parameters. (paper)

  2. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  3. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum Ferrous Iron Transporter FeoAB Is Required for Ferric Iron Utilization in Free Living Aerobic Cells and for Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankari, Siva; O'Brian, Mark R

    2016-07-22

    The bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 does not synthesize siderophores for iron utilization in aerobic environments, and the mechanism of iron uptake within symbiotic soybean root nodules is unknown. An mbfA bfr double mutant defective in iron export and storage activities cannot grow aerobically in very high iron medium. Here, we found that this phenotype was suppressed by loss of function mutations in the feoAB operon encoding ferrous (Fe(2+)) iron uptake proteins. Expression of the feoAB operon genes was elevated under iron limitation, but mutants defective in either gene were unable to grow aerobically over a wide external ferric (Fe(3+)) iron (FeCl3) concentration range. Thus, FeoAB accommodates iron acquisition under iron limited and iron replete conditions. Incorporation of radiolabel from either (55)Fe(2+) or (59)Fe(3+) into cells was severely defective in the feoA and feoB strains, suggesting Fe(3+) reduction to Fe(2+) prior to traversal across the cytoplasmic membrane by FeoAB. The feoA or feoB deletion strains elicited small, ineffective nodules on soybean roots, containing few bacteria and lacking nitrogen fixation activity. A feoA(E40K) mutant contained partial iron uptake activity in culture that supported normal growth and established an effective symbiosis. The feoA(E40K) strain had partial iron uptake activity in situ within nodules and in isolated cells, indicating that FeoAB is the iron transporter in symbiosis. We conclude that FeoAB supports iron acquisition under limited conditions of soil and in the iron-rich environment of a symbiotic nodule. PMID:27288412

  4. Localisation of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) to the microvillus membrane of rat duodenal enterocytes in iron deficiency, but to hepatocytes in iron overload

    OpenAIRE

    Trinder, D.; P.; Oates; Thomas, C; Sadleir, J.; Morgan, E.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of iron absorption by the intestine and its transfer to the main iron storage site, the liver, is poorly understood. Recently an iron carrier was cloned and named DMT1 (divalent metal transporter 1).
AIMS—To determine the level of DMT1 gene expression and protein distribution in duodenum and liver.
METHODS—A DMT1 cRNA and antibody were produced and used in in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in rats in which the iron stores were altered by fe...

  5. Change of iron species and iron solubility in Asian dust during the long-range transport from western China to Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Takahashi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the North Pacific, transport and deposition of mineral dust from Asia appear to be one of major sources of iron which can regulate growth of phytoplankton in the ocean. In this process, it is essential to identify chemical species of iron contained in Asian dust, because bioavailability of iron in the ocean is strongly influenced by the solubility of iron, which in turn is dependent on iron species in the dust. Here, we report that clay minerals (illite and chlorite in the dusts near the source (western China are transformed into ferrihydrite by atmospheric chemical processes during their long-range transport to eastern China and Japan based on the speciation by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS and other methods such as X-ray diffraction and chemical extraction. Moreover, it was found that iron in the dust after the transport becomes more soluble in our leaching experiments conducted for 24 h compared with those for initial dusts possibly due to the formation of ferrihydrite in the atmosphere. Our findings suggested that ferrihydrite secondarily formed during the transport is an important source of soluble iron species, which can be more soluble than clay minerals initially contained in the mineral dust such as illite and chlorite.

  6. Facilitated transport of heavy metals by bacterial colloids in sand columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiné, V.; Martins, J.; Gaudet, J. P.

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the ability of biotic collois (e.g. bacterial cells) to facilitate the transport of heavy metals in soils. and to identify the main factors influencing colloid transport in order to detelmine the geo-chemical conditions where this secondary transport process may become dominant. The model colloids studied here are living cells of Escherichia coli and Ralstonia metallidurans. We studied the transport of mercury zinc, and cadmium in columns of Fontainebleau sand. The properties (i.e. optical and morphological properties, charge (zeta potential, zeta) and hydrophobia (water/hexadecane distribution parameter, K_{hw})) of the bacterial cells surface were characterised, as well as their potential for heavy metals sorption (kinetic and isotherm). Both surface charge (zeta=-54 and -14 mV) and hydrophobia (K_{hw} = 0.25 and 0.05) differ strongly for the two bacteria. Column studies were conducted with bacteria and heavy metals separately or simultaneously. The cell surface differences led to different transport behaviour of the two bacteria, although the retardation factor is close to 1 for both. We observed that colloid mobility increases when increasing bacterial cells concentration and when decreasing the ionic strength. We also observed that bacterial colloids appeared as excellent vectors for Hg, Zn and Cd. Indeed, heavy metals adsorbed on the Fontainebleau sand when injected alone in columns (retardation factors of 1.4 ; 2.9 and 3.8 for Hg, Zn and Cd, respectively); whereas no retardation (R≈1) is observed when injected in the presence of both bacteria. Moreover, transport of bio-sorbed metal appears to be 4 to 6 times higher than dissolved heavy-metal.

  7. Maize ZmFDR3 localized in chloroplasts is involved in iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for plant metabolism such that Fe-limited plants display chlorosis and suffer from reduced photosynthetic efficiency. Differential display previously identified genes whose expression was elevated in Fe-deficient maize roots. Here,we describe the functional characterization of one of the genes identified in the screen,ZmFDR3 (Zea maize Fe-deficiency-related). Heterologous functional complementation assays using a yeast iron uptake mutant showed that ZmFDR3 functions in iron transport. ZmFDR3 contains a domain found in FliN-proteins of the type III secretion system and is predicted to localize to the thylakoid of plastids. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry showed that ZmFDR3 is localized in the plastids of roots,stems and leaves,with high expression found in guard cell chloroplasts. Transgenic tobacco expressing a 35S-ZmFDR3 construct contains elevated iron content,displays well arranged thylakoid membranes and has photosynthetic indices that are higher than those of the wild type. Together,these results suggest that ZmFDR3 functions in chloroplast iron transport.

  8. Maize ZmFDR3 localized in chloroplasts is involved in iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN JianHui; SONG XiuFang; LI Peng; YANG HuiJun; YIN LiPing

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for plant metabolism such that Fe-limited plants display chlorosis and suffer from reduced photosynthetic efficiency. Differential display previously identified genes whose expression was elevated in Fe-deficient maize roots. Here, we describe the functional characterization of one of the genes identified in the screen, ZmFDR3 (Zea maize Fe-deficiency-related). Heterologous functional complementation assays using a yeast iron uptake mutant showed that ZmFDR3 functions in iron transport. ZmFDR3 contains a domain found in FliN-proteins of the type Ⅲ secretion system and is predicted to localize to the thylakoid of plastids. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry showed that ZmFDR3 is localized in the plastids of roots, stems and leaves, with high expression found in guard cell chloroplasts. Transgenic tobacco expressing a 355-ZmFDR3 construct contains elevated iron content, displays well arranged thylakoid membranes and has photosynthetic indices that are higher than those of the wild type. Together, these results suggest that ZmFDR3 functions in chloroplast iron transport.

  9. Change of iron species and iron solubility in Asian dust during the long-range transport from western China to Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Takahashi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the North Pacific, transport and deposition of mineral dust from Asia appear to be one of major sources of iron which can regulate growth of phytoplankton in the ocean. In this process, it is essential to identify chemical species of iron contained in Asian dust, because bioavailability of iron in the ocean is strongly influenced by the solubility of iron, which in turn is dependent on iron species in the dust. Here, we report that clay minerals (illite and chlorite in the dusts near the source collected at Aksu (western China can be transformed into ferrihydrite by atmospheric chemical processes during their long-range transport to eastern China (Qingdao and Japan (Tsukuba based on the speciation by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS and other methods such as X-ray diffraction and chemical extraction. As a result, Fe molar ratio in Aksu (illite : chlorite : ferrihydrite = 70 : 25 : 5 was changed to that in Tsukuba (illite : chlorite : ferrihydrite = 65 : 10 : 25. Moreover, leaching experiments were conducted to study the change of iron solubility. It was found that the iron solubility for the dust in Tsukuba (soluble iron fraction: 11.8 % and 1.10 % for synthetic rain water and seawater, respectively was larger than that in Aksu (4.1 % and 0.28 %, respectively, showing that iron in the dust after the transport becomes more soluble possibly due to the formation of ferrihydrite in the atmosphere. Our findings suggested that secondary formation of ferrihydrite during the transport should be considered as one of important processes in evaluating the supply of soluble iron to seawater.

  10. Influence of hydrogen chemisorption kinetics on the interpretation of hydrogen transport through iron membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanabarger, M. R.; Taslami, A.; Nelson, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of a specific surface reaction on the transport of gas-phase hydrogen through iron membranes has been investigated on the basis of model calculations. The surface reaction involves an adsorbed molecular hydrogen precursor between the gas phase and the dissociated chemisorbed state. The calculations demonstrate that the surface reaction for the H2/Fe system makes significant contributions to the time delay associated with the transient hydrogen transport through iron membranes, even under conditions where the steady-state hydrogen transport is independent of the surface reaction. These contributions to the time delay are interpreted in terms of an effective diffusivity, which is a function of the pressure on the entrance side and the thickness of the membrane.

  11. Structure of the basal components of a bacterial transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, Jeffrey; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; André, Ingemar; Dunham, Christine M.; Moran, Jr., Charles P. (Emory-MED); (Lund)

    2012-12-10

    Proteins SpoIIQ and SpoIIIAH interact through two membranes to connect the forespore and the mother cell during endospore development in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. SpoIIIAH consists of a transmembrane segment and an extracellular domain with similarity to YscJ proteins. YscJ proteins form large multimeric rings that are the structural scaffolds for the assembly of type III secretion systems in Gram-negative bacteria. The predicted ring-forming motif of SpoIIIAH and other evidence led to the model that SpoIIQ and SpoIIIAH form the core components of a channel or transporter through which the mother cell nurtures forespore development. Therefore, to understand the roles of SpoIIIAH and SpoIIQ in channel formation, it is critical to determine whether SpoIIIAH adopts a ring-forming structural motif, and whether interaction of SpoIIIAH with SpoIIQ would preclude ring formation. We report a 2.8-{angstrom} resolution structure of a complex of SpoIIQ and SpoIIIAH. SpoIIIAH folds into the ring-building structural motif, and modeling shows that the structure of the SpoIIQ-SpoIIIAH complex is compatible with forming a symmetrical oligomer that is similar to those in type III systems. The inner diameters of the two most likely ring models are large enough to accommodate several copies of other integral membrane proteins. SpoIIQ contains a LytM domain, which is found in metalloendopeptidases, but lacks residues important for metalloprotease activity. Other LytM domains appear to be involved in protein-protein interactions. We found that the LytM domain of SpoIIQ contains an accessory region that interacts with SpoIIIAH.

  12. Rice OsYSL15 is an iron-regulated iron(III)-deoxymugineic acid transporter expressed in the roots and is essential for iron uptake in early growth of the seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Takanori; Nozoye, Tomoko; Takahashi, Michiko; Kakei, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kazumasa; Nakazono, Mikio; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Mori, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2009-02-01

    Graminaceous plants take up iron through YS1 (yellow stripe 1) and YS1-like (YSL) transporters using iron-chelating compounds known as mugineic acid family phytosiderophores. We examined the expression of 18 rice (Oryza sativa L.) YSL genes (OsYSL1-18) in the epidermis/exodermis, cortex, and stele of rice roots. Expression of OsYSL15 in root epidermis and stele was induced by iron deficiency and showed daily fluctuation. OsYSL15 restored a yeast mutant defective in iron uptake when supplied with iron(III)-deoxymugineic acid and transported iron(III)-deoxymugineic acid in Xenopus laevis oocytes. An OsYSL15-green fluorescent protein fusion was localized to the plasma membrane when transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. OsYSL15 promoter-beta-glucuronidase analysis revealed that OsYSL15 expression in roots was dominant in the epidermis/exodermis and phloem cells under conditions of iron deficiency and was detected only in phloem under iron sufficiency. These results strongly suggest that OsYSL15 is the dominant iron(III)-deoxymugineic acid transporter responsible for iron uptake from the rhizosphere and is also responsible for phloem transport of iron. OsYSL15 was also expressed in flowers, developing seeds, and in the embryonic scutellar epithelial cells during seed germination. OsYSL15 knockdown seedlings showed severe arrest in germination and early growth and were rescued by high iron supply. These results demonstrate that rice OsYSL15 plays a crucial role in iron homeostasis during the early stages of growth. PMID:19049971

  13. Ndfip2 is a potential regulator of the iron transporter DMT1 in the liver

    OpenAIRE

    Foot, Natalie J.; Kelly M. Gembus; Kimberly Mackenzie; Sharad Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of divalent metal ion transporter DMT1, the primary non-heme iron importer in mammals, is critical for maintaining iron homeostasis. Previously we identified ubiquitin-dependent regulation of DMT1 involving the Nedd4 family of ubiquitin ligases and the Ndfip1 and Ndfip2 adaptors. We also established the in vivo function of Ndfip1 in the regulation of DMT1 in the duodenum of mice. Here we have studied the function of Ndfip2 using Ndfip2-deficient mice. The DMT1 protein levels in...

  14. Divalent metal transporter 1 regulates iron-mediated ROS and pancreatic ß cell fate in response to cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Tonnesen, Morten Fog; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard;

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to target-cell damage in inflammatory and iron-overload diseases. Little is known about iron transport regulation during inflammatory attack. Through a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies, we show that the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1ß induces...... divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) expression correlating with increased ß cell iron content and ROS production. Iron chelation and siRNA and genetic knockdown of DMT1 expression reduce cytokine-induced ROS formation and cell death. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the absence of cytokines in Dmt1...

  15. Molecular comparison of bacterial communities within iron-containing flocculent mats associated with submarine volcanoes along the Kermadec Arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Tyler W; Olson, Julie B

    2009-03-01

    Iron oxide sheaths and filaments are commonly found in hydrothermal environments and have been shown to have a biogenic origin. These structures were seen in the flocculent material associated with two submarine volcanoes along the Kermadec Arc north of New Zealand. Molecular characterization of the bacterial communities associated with the flocculent samples indicated that no known Fe-oxidizing bacteria dominated the recovered clone libraries. However, clones related to the recently described Fe-oxidizing bacterium Mariprofundus ferrooxydans were obtained from both the iron-containing flocculent (Fe-floc) and sediment samples, and peaks corresponding to Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, as well as the related clones, were observed in several of our terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles. A large group of epsilonproteobacterial sequences, for which there is no cultured representative, dominated clones from the Fe-floc libraries and were less prevalent in the sediment sample. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that several operational taxonomic units appeared to be site specific, and statistical analyses of the clone libraries found that all samples were significantly different from each other. Thus, the bacterial communities in the Fe-floc samples were not more closely related to each other than to the sediment communities.

  16. Integrity of the iron transport process in mice with X-linked anaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The defect in iron (Fe) absorption in X-linked anaemia (sla) remains an enigma; absorption of a tracer dose of Fe is impaired in mice raised on an iron-containing cube diet but not in those raised on an iron-deficient diet. Because cobalt (Co) shares a similar intestinal transport pathway with Fe, a study was made of the effect of iron deficient diet on Co absorption. The duodenum of sla and genetically normal mice was perfused for 30 min with labelled solutions containing Co or Fe. Co uptake and transfer were similar in sla and normals fed cubes whereas Fe uptake and transfer were less in sla than in normals. The iron deficient diet caused an increase in the uptake and transfer of Co and Fe in sla and normals. When Co and Fe were perfused together in sla fed deficient diet, the uptake and transfer of each metal was less than when perfused alone. The distribution of Fe and Co in subcellular mucosal fractions was determined by a differential centrifugation technique. Deficient diet resulted in a directionally similar change in the subcellular distribution of Co and Fe in sla and normals. The increase in Co as well as Fe absorption in the sla on an iron deficient diet to the same high level found in genetically normal animals, and the inhibitory effect of each metal on the absorption of the other suggests that the absorption defect in sla is unlikely to be due to a primary defect in the function of the transport carrier. (author)

  17. Structural characterization of encapsulated ferritin provides insight into iron storage in bacterial nanocompartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Didi; Hughes, Sam; Vanden-Hehir, Sally; Georgiev, Atanas; Altenbach, Kirsten; Tarrant, Emma; Mackay, C Logan; Waldron, Kevin J; Clarke, David J; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous proteins that oxidise and store iron within a protein shell to protect cells from oxidative damage. We have characterized the structure and function of a new member of the ferritin superfamily that is sequestered within an encapsulin capsid. We show that this encapsulated ferritin (EncFtn) has two main alpha helices, which assemble in a metal dependent manner to form a ferroxidase center at a dimer interface. EncFtn adopts an open decameric structure that is topologically distinct from other ferritins. While EncFtn acts as a ferroxidase, it cannot mineralize iron. Conversely, the encapsulin shell associates with iron, but is not enzymatically active, and we demonstrate that EncFtn must be housed within the encapsulin for iron storage. This encapsulin nanocompartment is widely distributed in bacteria and archaea and represents a distinct class of iron storage system, where the oxidation and mineralization of iron are distributed between two proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18972.001 PMID:27529188

  18. The transport mechanism of bacterial Cu+-ATPases: distinct efflux rates adapted to different function

    OpenAIRE

    Raimunda, Daniel; González-Guerrero, Manuel; Leeber, Blaise W.; Argüello, José M.

    2011-01-01

    Cu+-ATPases play a key role in bacterial Cu+ homeostasis by participating in Cu+ detoxification and cuproprotein assembly. Characterization of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA, a model protein within the subfamily of P1B-1 type ATPases, has provided structural and mechanistic details on this group of transporters. Atomic resolution structures of cytoplasmic regulatory metal binding domains (MBDs) and catalytic actuator, phosphorylation, and nucleotide binding domains are available. These, in combi...

  19. DNA Protection by the Bacterial Ferritin Dps via DNA Charge Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Anna R.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    Dps proteins, bacterial mini-ferritins that protect DNA from oxidative stress, are implicated in the survival and virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Here we examine the mechanism of E. coli Dps protection of DNA, specifically whether this DNA-binding protein can utilize DNA charge transport through the base pair π-stack to protect the genome from a distance. An intercalating ruthenium photooxidant was employed to generate DNA damage localized to guanine repeats, the sites of lowest potential i...

  20. Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaire, Caroline; van Genuchten, Case M; Amrose, Susan E; Gadgil, Ashok J

    2016-10-15

    Iron electrocoagulation (Fe-EC) is a low-cost process in which Fe(II) generated from an Fe(0) anode reacts with dissolved O2 to form (1) Fe(III) precipitates with an affinity for bacterial cell walls and (2) bactericidal reactive oxidants. Previous work suggests that Fe-EC is a promising treatment option for groundwater containing arsenic and bacterial contamination. However, the mechanisms of bacteria attenuation and the impact of major groundwater ions are not well understood. In this work, using the model indicator Escherichia coli (E. coli), we show that physical removal via enmeshment in EC precipitate flocs is the primary process of bacteria attenuation in the presence of HCO3(-), which significantly inhibits inactivation, possibly due to a reduction in the lifetime of reactive oxidants. We demonstrate that the adhesion of EC precipitates to cell walls, which results in bacteria encapsulation in flocs, is driven primarily by interactions between EC precipitates and phosphate functional groups on bacteria surfaces. In single solute electrolytes, both P (0.4 mM) and Ca/Mg (1-13 mM) inhibited the adhesion of EC precipitates to bacterial cell walls, whereas Si (0.4 mM) and ionic strength (2-200 mM) did not impact E. coli attenuation. Interestingly, P (0.4 mM) did not affect E. coli attenuation in electrolytes containing Ca/Mg, consistent with bivalent cation bridging between bacterial phosphate groups and inorganic P sorbed to EC precipitates. Finally, we found that EC precipitate adhesion is largely independent of cell wall composition, consistent with comparable densities of phosphate functional groups on Gram-positive and Gram-negative cells. Our results are critical to predict the performance of Fe-EC to eliminate bacterial contaminants from waters with diverse chemical compositions.

  1. Characterizing the role of rice NRAMP5 in Manganese, Iron and Cadmium Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhiro Ishimaru; Ryuichi Takahashi; Khurram Bashir; Hugo Shimo; Takeshi Senoura; Kazuhiko Sugimoto; Kazuko Ono; Masahiro Yano; Satoru Ishikawa; Tomohito Arao; Hiromi Nakanishi; Naoko K. Nishizawa

    2012-01-01

    Metals like manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) are essential for metabolism, while cadmium (Cd) is toxic for virtually all living organisms. Understanding the transport of these metals is important for breeding better crops. We have identified that OsNRAMP5 contributes to Mn, Fe and Cd transport in rice. OsNRAMP5 expression was restricted to roots epidermis, exodermis, and outer layers of the cortex as well as in tissues around the xylem. OsNRAMP5 localized to the plasma membrane, and complemented ...

  2. Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur coupled to chemical reduction of iron or manganese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler;

    1993-01-01

    the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO(3). Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO(2), instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant...... significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO(2) was high, > 10 cm in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic...... sulfide oxidation to sulfate in anoxic sediments....

  3. Bacterial composition and survival on Sahara dust particles transported to the European Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eMeola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of Sahara dust (SD particles is a frequent phenomenon in Europe, but little is known about the viability and composition of the bacterial community transported with SD. The goal of this study was to characterize SD-associated bacteria transported to the European Alps, deposited and entrapped in snow. During two distinct events in February and May 2014, SD particles were deposited and promptly covered by falling snow, thus preserving them in distinct ochre layers within the snowpack. In June 2014, we collected samples at different depths from a snow profile at the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps; 3621 m a.s.l.. After filtration, we performed various microbiological and physicochemical analyses of the snow and dust particles therein that originated in Algeria.Our results show that bacteria survive and are metabolically active after the transport to the European Alps. Using high throughput sequencing, we observed distinct differences in bacterial community composition and structure in SD-layers as compared to clean snow layers. Sporulating bacteria were not enriched in the SD-layers; however, phyla with low abundance such as Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococcus-Thermus appeared to be specific bio-indicators for SD. Since many members of these phyla are known to be adapted to arid oligotrophic environments and UV radiation, they are well suited to survive the harsh conditions of long-range airborne transport.

  4. Directed transport of bacteria-based drug delivery vehicles: bacterial chemotaxis dominates particle shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahari, Ali; Traore, Mahama A; Scharf, Birgit E; Behkam, Bahareh

    2014-10-01

    Several attenuated and non-pathogenic bacterial species have been demonstrated to actively target diseased sites and successfully deliver plasmid DNA, proteins and other therapeutic agents into mammalian cells. These disease-targeting bacteria can be employed for targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging cargos in the form of a bio-hybrid system. The bio-hybrid drug delivery system constructed here is comprised of motile Escherichia coli MG1655 bacteria and elliptical disk-shaped polymeric microparticles. The transport direction for these vehicles can be controlled through biased random walk of the attached bacteria in presence of chemoattractant gradients in a process known as chemotaxis. In this work, we utilize a diffusion-based microfluidic platform to establish steady linear concentration gradients of a chemoattractant and investigate the roles of chemotaxis and geometry in transport of bio-hybrid drug delivery vehicles. Our experimental results demonstrate for the first time that bacterial chemotactic response dominates the effect of body shape in extravascular transport; thus, the non-spherical system could be more favorable for drug delivery applications owing to the known benefits of using non-spherical particles for vascular transport (e.g. relatively long circulation time).

  5. Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition influences motility and is required for full virulence of the xylem-dwelling bacterial phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey; Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Iron is a key micronutrient for microbial growth but is often present in low concentrations or in biologically unavailable forms. Many microorganisms overcome this challenge by producing siderophores, which are ferric-iron chelating compounds that enable the solubilization and acquisition of iron in a bioactive form. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. The proteins involved in the biosynthesis and export of this siderophore are encoded by the iucABCD-iutA operon, which is homologous to the aerobactin biosynthetic gene cluster found in a number of enteric pathogens. Mutations in iucA and iutA resulted in a decrease in surface-based motility that P. stewartii utilizes during the early stages of biofilm formation, indicating that active iron acquisition impacts surface motility for P. stewartii. Furthermore, bacterial movement in planta is also dependent on a functional siderophore biosynthesis and uptake pathway. Most notably, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition is required for full virulence in the sweet corn host, indicating that active iron acquisition is essential for pathogenic fitness for this important xylem-dwelling bacterial pathogen. PMID:25326304

  6. Uptake and transport of iron and phosphate by Vallisneria spiralis L. [/sup 59/Fe, /sup 32/P tracer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentner, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    Using /sup 59/Fe/sup 3 +/ and /sup 32/PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ as tracers, the uptake and transport of iron and phosphate from a water environment by roots and shoots of the vascular aquatic plant Vallisneria spiralis L. were studied. Phosphate is taken up equally by roots and shoots, while roots take up more iron than shoots. Transport within the plant occurs principally in the shoot to root direction. Excretion of both iron and phosphate from the plant was detected.

  7. Effects of electron correlations on transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Cohen, R E; Haule, K

    2015-01-29

    Earth's magnetic field has been thought to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in the outer core, but recent density functional theory calculations have suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, resulting in the investigation of chemically driven convection. These calculations for resistivity were based on electron-phonon scattering. Here we apply self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT + DMFT) to iron and find that at high temperatures electron-electron scattering is comparable to the electron-phonon scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core. The conventional thermal dynamo picture is safe. We find that electron-electron scattering of d electrons is important at high temperatures in transition metals, in contrast to textbook analyses since Mott, and that 4s electron contributions to transport are negligible, in contrast to numerous models used for over fifty years. The DFT+DMFT method should be applicable to other high-temperature systems where electron correlations are important.

  8. Binding of f-elements to the iron-transport protein transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, D.M.; Yule, L.; Gaskin, P.W.; Unalkat, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Genetik und Toxikologie von Sfaltstoffen); Taylor, D.M. (Heidelberg Univ. (DE)); Duffield, J.R.; Williams, D.R.; Yule, L.; Gaskin, P.W.; Unalkat, P. (University Coll. of Cardiff (UK)); Duffield, J.R. (Manchester Polytechnic, (UK). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Chromatographic studies of in vivo and in vitro labelled blood serum indicate that the f-elements Th(IV), Pu(IV), Np(IV, V), Am(III), Cm(III), Eu(III), Gd(III) and Yb(III) bind to and are transported on transferrin (Tf). Spectroscopic studies indicate that 2 f-metal atoms are bound to each Tf molecule, thus implicating the N- and C-terminal iron binding sites of transferrin in f-element binding. However, the stability of the f-metal-Tf complexes, especially those with M(III), is lower than that of the Fe(III) complex. In some cells Fe(III) binding to transferrin facilitates cellular iron uptake via a receptor mechanism, but with Pu(IV) transferrin binding appears to inhibit cellular uptake.

  9. The Role of the Iron Transporter ABCB7 in Refractory Anemia with Ring Sideroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikpour, Maryam; Pushkaran, Beena; Fidler, Carrie; Cattan, Helen; Littlewood, Tim J.; Malcovati, Luca; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Jädersten, Martin; Killick, Sally; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Bowen, David; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cazzola, Mario; Wainscoat, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Refractory Anemia with Ring Sideroblasts (RARS) is an acquired myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) characterized by an excess iron accumulation in the mitochondria of erythroblasts. The pathogenesis of RARS and the cause of this unusual pattern of iron deposition remain unknown. We considered that the inherited X-linked sideroblastic anemia with ataxia (XLSA/A) might be informative for the acquired disorder, RARS. XLSA/A is caused by partial inactivating mutations of the ABCB7 ATP-binding cassette transporter gene, which functions to enable transport of iron from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, ABCB7 gene silencing in HeLa cells causes an accumulation of iron in the mitochondria. We have studied the role of ABCB7 in RARS by DNA sequencing, methylation studies, and gene expression studies in primary CD34+ cells and in cultured erythroblasts. The DNA sequence of the ABCB7 gene is normal in patients with RARS. We have investigated ABCB7 gene expression levels in the CD34+ cells of 122 MDS cases, comprising 35 patients with refractory anemia (RA), 33 patients with RARS and 54 patients with RA with excess blasts (RAEB), and in the CD34+ cells of 16 healthy controls. We found that the expression levels of ABCB7 are significantly lower in the RARS group. RARS is thus characterized by lower levels of ABCB7 gene expression in comparison to other MDS subtypes. Moreover, we find a strong relationship between increasing percentage of bone marrow ring sideroblasts and decreasing ABCB7 gene expression levels. Erythroblast cell cultures confirm the low levels of ABCB7 gene expression levels in RARS. These data provide an important link between inherited and acquired forms of sideroblastic anemia and indicate that ABCB7 is a strong candidate gene for RARS. PMID:18398482

  10. The role of the iron transporter ABCB7 in refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Boultwood

    Full Text Available Refractory Anemia with Ring Sideroblasts (RARS is an acquired myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS characterized by an excess iron accumulation in the mitochondria of erythroblasts. The pathogenesis of RARS and the cause of this unusual pattern of iron deposition remain unknown. We considered that the inherited X-linked sideroblastic anemia with ataxia (XLSA/A might be informative for the acquired disorder, RARS. XLSA/A is caused by partial inactivating mutations of the ABCB7 ATP-binding cassette transporter gene, which functions to enable transport of iron from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, ABCB7 gene silencing in HeLa cells causes an accumulation of iron in the mitochondria. We have studied the role of ABCB7 in RARS by DNA sequencing, methylation studies, and gene expression studies in primary CD34(+ cells and in cultured erythroblasts. The DNA sequence of the ABCB7 gene is normal in patients with RARS. We have investigated ABCB7 gene expression levels in the CD34(+ cells of 122 MDS cases, comprising 35 patients with refractory anemia (RA, 33 patients with RARS and 54 patients with RA with excess blasts (RAEB, and in the CD34(+ cells of 16 healthy controls. We found that the expression levels of ABCB7 are significantly lower in the RARS group. RARS is thus characterized by lower levels of ABCB7 gene expression in comparison to other MDS subtypes. Moreover, we find a strong relationship between increasing percentage of bone marrow ring sideroblasts and decreasing ABCB7 gene expression levels. Erythroblast cell cultures confirm the low levels of ABCB7 gene expression levels in RARS. These data provide an important link between inherited and acquired forms of sideroblastic anemia and indicate that ABCB7 is a strong candidate gene for RARS.

  11. Effects of altered groundwater chemistry upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial attachment during transport within an organically contaminated sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Barber, L.B.; Aiken, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a dilute (ionic strength = 5 ?? 10-3 M) plume of treated sewage, with elevated levels (3.9 mg/L) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial transport through an iron-laden, quartz sand aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) were evaluated using sets of replicate, static minicolumns. Compared with uncontaminated groundwater, the plume chemistry diminished bacterial attachment under mildly acidic (pH 5.0-6.5) in-situ conditions, in spite of the 5-fold increase in ionic strength and substantively enhanced attachment under more alkaline conditions. The effects of the hydrophobic neutral and total fractions of the plume DOC; modest concentrations of fulvic and humic acids (1.5 mg/L); linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) (25 mg/L); Imbentin (200 ??g/L), a model nonionic surfactant; sulfate (28 mg/L); and calcium (20 mg/L) varied sharply in response to relatively small changes in pH, although the plume constituents collectively decreased the pH-dependency of bacterial attachment. LAS and other hydrophobic neutrals (collectively representing only ???3% of the plume DOC) had a disproportionately large effect upon bacterial attachment, as did the elevated concentrations of sulfate within the plume. The findings further suggest that the roles of organic plume constituents in transport or bacteria through acidic aquifer sediments can be very different than would be predicted from column studies performed at circumneutral pH and that the inorganic constituents within the plume cannot be ignored.

  12. Shotgun proteome analysis of Bordetella pertussis reveals a distinct influence of iron availability on the bacterial metabolism, virulence, and defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Hayes, Jimena; Lamberti, Yanina; Surmann, Kristin; Schmidt, Frank; Völker, Uwe; Rodriguez, Maria Eugenia

    2015-07-01

    One of the mechanisms involved in host immunity is the limitation of iron accessibility to pathogens, which in turn provokes the corresponding physiological adaptation of pathogens. This study reports a gel-free nanoLC-MS/MS-based comparative proteome analysis of Bordetella pertussis grown under iron-excess and iron-depleted conditions. Out of the 926 proteins covered 98 displayed a shift in their abundance in response to low iron availability. Forty-seven of them were found to be increased in level while 58 were found with decreased protein levels under iron starvation. In addition to proteins previously reported to be influenced by iron in B. pertussis, we observed changes in metabolic proteins involved in fatty acid utilization and poly-hydroxybutyrate production. Additionally, many bacterial virulence factors regulated by the BvgAS two-component system were found at decreased levels in response to iron limitation. These results, together with the increased production of proteins potentially involved in oxidative stress resistance, seem to indicate that iron starvation provokes changes in B. pertussis phenotype that might shape host-pathogen interaction.

  13. Bacterial and archaeal diversity in an iron-rich coastal hydrothermal field in Yamagawa, Kagoshima, Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaichi, Satoshi; Ito, Norihiro; Yoshida, Takashi;

    2013-01-01

    . The environmental settings of the coastal hydrothermal field were similar in some degree to those of deep-sea hydrothermal environments because of its emission of H2, CO2, and sulfide from the bottom of the hot spot. The results of clone analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene led us to speculate the presence...... of a chemo-synthetic microbial ecosystem, where chemolithoautotrophic thermophiles, primarily the bacterial order Aquificales, function as primary producers using H2 or sulfur compounds as their energy source and CO2 as their carbon source, and the organic compounds synthesized by them support the growth...... of chemoheterotrophic thermophiles, such as members of the order Thermales and the family Desulfurococcaceae. In addition, the dominance of members of the bacterial genus Herbaspirillum in the high temperature bottom layer led us to speculate the temporal formation of mesophilic zones where they can also function...

  14. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as recommended by an obstetrician or other health care provider. Infants and toddlers Iron deficiency anemia in infancy can lead to delayed psychological development, social withdrawal, and less ability to pay attention. By age 6 to 9 months, full-term infants could ...

  15. Characterization of corrosive bacterial consortia isolated from petroleum-product-transporting pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Anandkumar, Balakrishnan [Sourashtra Coll., Madurai (India). Dept. of Biotechnology; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India). Biocorrosion Group; Rahman, Pattanathu K.S.M. [Teesside Univ., Tees Valley (United Kingdom). Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering Group

    2010-01-15

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion is a problem commonly encountered in facilities in the oil and gas industries. The present study describes bacterial enumeration and identification in diesel and naphtha pipelines located in the northwest and southwest region in India, using traditional cultivation technique and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences of the isolates was carried out, and the samples obtained from the diesel and naphtha-transporting pipelines showed the occurrence of 11 bacterial species namely Serratia marcescens ACE2, Bacillus subtilis AR12, Bacillus cereus ACE4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI1, Klebsiella oxytoca ACP, Pseudomonas stutzeri AP2, Bacillus litoralis AN1, Bacillus sp., Bacillus pumilus AR2, Bacillus carboniphilus AR3, and Bacillus megaterium AR4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were not detected in samples from both pipelines. The dominant bacterial species identified in the petroleum pipeline samples were B. cereus and S. marcescens in the diesel and naphtha pipelines, respectively. Therefore, several types of bacteria may be involved in biocorrosion arising from natural biofilms that develop in industrial facilities. In addition, localized (pitting) corrosion of the pipeline steel in the presence of the consortia was observed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. The potential role of each species in biofilm formation and steel corrosion is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Modeling Polymer Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron Transport Experiments in Porous Media to Understand the Transport Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, P.; Krol, M.; Sleep, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    A wide variety of groundwater contaminants can be treated with nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). However, delivery of nZVI in the subsurface to the treatment zones is challenging as the bare nZVI particles have a higher tendency to agglomerate. The subsurface mobility of nZVI can be enhanced by stabilizing nZVI with polymer, such as carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). In this study, numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate CMC stabilized nZVI transport behavior in porous media. The numerical simulations were based on a set of laboratory-scale transport experiments that were conducted in a two-dimensional water-saturated glass-walled sandbox (length - 55 cm; height - 45 cm; width - 1.4 cm), uniformly packed with silica sand. In the transport experiments: CMC stabilized nZVI and a non-reactive dye tracer Lissamine Green B (LGB) were used; water specific discharge and CMC concentration were varied; movements of LGB, and CMC-nZVI in the sandbox were tracked using a camera, a light source and a dark box. The concentrations of LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI at the sandbox outlet were analyzed. A 2D multiphase flow and transport model was applied to simulate experimental results. The images from LGB dye transport experiments were used to determine the pore water velocities and media permeabilities in various layers in the sand box. These permeability values were used in the subsequent simulations of CMC-nZVI transport. The 2D compositional simulator, modified to include colloid filtration theory (CFT), treated CMC as a solute and nZVI as a colloid. The simulator included composition dependent viscosity to account for CMC injection and mixing, and attachment efficiency as a fitting parameter for nZVI transport modeling. In the experiments, LGB and CMC recoveries were greater than 95%; however, CMC residence time was significantly higher than the LGB residence time and the higher CMC concentration caused higher pressure drops in the sandbox. The nZVI recovery was lower than 40

  17. Ab initio study of spin-dependent transport in carbon nanotubes with iron and vanadium adatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Brandbyge, Mads; Jauho, Antti-Pekka;

    2008-01-01

    We present an ab initio study of spin-dependent transport in armchair carbon nanotubes with transition metal adsorbates: iron or vanadium. The method based on density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions is used to compute the electronic structure and zero-bias conductance...... (majority or minority) being scattered depends on the adsorbate and is explained in terms of d-state filling. We contrast the single-walled carbon nanotube results to the simpler case of the adsorbate on a flat graphene sheet with periodic boundary conditions and corresponding width in the zigzag direction...

  18. Structure, biosynthesis, and function of bacterial capsular polysaccharides synthesized by ABC transporter-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lisa M; Whitfield, Chris

    2013-08-30

    Bacterial capsules are formed primarily from long-chain polysaccharides with repeat-unit structures. A given bacterial species can produce a range of capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) with different structures and these help distinguish isolates by serotyping, as is the case with Escherichia coli K antigens. Capsules are important virulence factors for many pathogens and this review focuses on CPSs synthesized via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent processes in Gram-negative bacteria. Bacteria utilizing this pathway are often associated with urinary tract infections, septicemia, and meningitis, and E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis provide well-studied examples. CPSs from ABC transporter-dependent pathways are synthesized at the cytoplasmic face of the inner membrane through the concerted action of glycosyltransferases before being exported across the inner membrane and translocated to the cell surface. A hallmark of these CPSs is a conserved reducing terminal glycolipid composed of phosphatidylglycerol and a poly-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) linker. Recent discovery of the structure of this conserved lipid terminus provides new insights into the early steps in CPS biosynthesis.

  19. The Bacillus subtilis EfeUOB transporter is essential for high-affinity acquisition of ferrous and ferric iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miethke, Marcus; Monteferrante, Carmine G; Marahiel, Mohamed A; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2013-10-01

    Efficient uptake of iron is of critical importance for growth and viability of microbial cells. Nevertheless, several mechanisms for iron uptake are not yet clearly defined. Here we report that the widely conserved transporter EfeUOB employs an unprecedented dual-mode mechanism for acquisition of ferrous (Fe[II]) and ferric (Fe[III]) iron in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We show that the binding protein EfeO and the permease EfeU form a minimal complex for ferric iron uptake. The third component EfeB is a hemoprotein that oxidizes ferrous iron to ferric iron for uptake by EfeUO. Accordingly, EfeB promotes growth under microaerobic conditions where ferrous iron is more abundant. Notably, EfeB also fulfills a vital role in cell envelope stress protection by eliminating reactive oxygen species that accumulate in the presence of ferrous iron. In conclusion, the EfeUOB system contributes to the high-affinity uptake of iron that is available in two different oxidation states. PMID:23764491

  20. Arabidopsis copper transport protein COPT2 participates in the cross talk between iron deficiency responses and low-phosphate signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea-García, Ana; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Andrés-Colás, Nuria; Vera-Sirera, Francisco; Pérez-Amador, Miguel A; Puig, Sergi; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2013-05-01

    Copper and iron are essential micronutrients for most living organisms because they participate as cofactors in biological processes, including respiration, photosynthesis, and oxidative stress protection. In many eukaryotic organisms, including yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and mammals, copper and iron homeostases are highly interconnected; yet, such interdependence is not well established in higher plants. Here, we propose that COPT2, a high-affinity copper transport protein, functions under copper and iron deficiencies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). COPT2 is a plasma membrane protein that functions in copper acquisition and distribution. Characterization of the COPT2 expression pattern indicates a synergic response to copper and iron limitation in roots. We characterized a knockout of COPT2, copt2-1, that leads to increased resistance to simultaneous copper and iron deficiencies, measured as reduced leaf chlorosis and improved maintenance of the photosynthetic apparatus. We propose that COPT2 could play a dual role under iron deficiency. First, COPT2 participates in the attenuation of copper deficiency responses driven by iron limitation, possibly to minimize further iron consumption. Second, global expression analyses of copt2-1 versus wild-type Arabidopsis plants indicate that low-phosphate responses increase in the mutant. These results open up new biotechnological approaches to fight iron deficiency in crops.

  1. Bacterial glyphosate resistance conferred by overexpression of an E. coli membrane efflux transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Jeffrey M; Brand, Leslie; Tran, Minhtien; Kong, Yifei; Rogers, Stephen G

    2012-04-01

    Glyphosate herbicide-resistant crop plants, introduced commercially in 1994, now represent approximately 85% of the land area devoted to transgenic crops. Herbicide resistance in commercial glyphosate-resistant crops is due to expression of a variant form of a bacterial 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase with a significantly decreased binding affinity for glyphosate at the target site of the enzyme. As a result of widespread and recurrent glyphosate use, often as the only herbicide used for weed management, increasing numbers of weedy species have evolved resistance to glyphosate. Weed resistance is most often due to changes in herbicide translocation patterns, presumed to be through the activity of an as yet unidentified membrane transporter in plants. To provide insight into glyphosate resistance mechanisms and identify a potential glyphosate transporter, we screened Escherichia coli genomic DNA for alternate sources of glyphosate resistance genes. Our search identified a single non-target gene that, when overexpressed in E. coli and Pseudomonas, confers high-level glyphosate resistance. The gene, yhhS, encodes a predicted membrane transporter of the major facilitator superfamily involved in drug efflux. We report here that an alternative mode of glyphosate resistance in E. coli is due to reduced accumulation of glyphosate in cells that overexpress this membrane transporter and discuss the implications for potential alternative resistance mechanisms in other organisms such as plants.

  2. The transport mechanism of bacterial Cu+-ATPases: distinct efflux rates adapted to different function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimunda, Daniel; González-Guerrero, Manuel; Leeber, Blaise W; Argüello, José M

    2011-06-01

    Cu(+)-ATPases play a key role in bacterial Cu(+) homeostasis by participating in Cu(+) detoxification and cuproprotein assembly. Characterization of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA, a model protein within the subfamily of P(1B-1) type ATPases, has provided structural and mechanistic details on this group of transporters. Atomic resolution structures of cytoplasmic regulatory metal binding domains (MBDs) and catalytic actuator, phosphorylation, and nucleotide binding domains are available. These, in combination with whole protein structures resulting from cryo-electron microscopy analyses, have enabled the initial modeling of these transporters. Invariant residues in helixes 6, 7 and 8 form two transmembrane metal binding sites (TM-MBSs). These bind Cu(+) with high affinity in a trigonal planar geometry. The cytoplasmic Cu(+) chaperone CopZ transfers the metal directly to the TM-MBSs; however, loading both of the TM-MBSs requires binding of nucleotides to the enzyme. In agreement with the classical transport mechanism of P-type ATPases, occupancy of both transmembrane sites by cytoplasmic Cu(+) is a requirement for enzyme phosphorylation and subsequent transport into the periplasmic or extracellular milieus. Recent transport studies have shown that all Cu(+)-ATPases drive cytoplasmic Cu(+) efflux, albeit with quite different transport rates in tune with their various physiological roles. Archetypical Cu(+)-efflux pumps responsible for Cu(+) tolerance, like the Escherichia coli CopA, have turnover rates ten times higher than those involved in cuproprotein assembly (or alternative functions). This explains the incapability of the latter group to significantly contribute to the metal efflux required for survival in high copper environments. PMID:21210186

  3. Transport of nano zero-valent iron supported by mesoporous silica microspheres in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhangmei; Qiu, Xinhong; Fang, Zhanqiang; Pokeung, Tsang

    2015-01-01

    Effective in situ remediation of groundwater requires the successful delivery of reactive iron particles through sand. However, the agglomeration of nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles limits the migration distance, which inhibits their usefulness. In the study described herein, NZVI supported by mesoporous silica microspheres covered with FeOOH (SiO2@FeOOH@Fe) was synthesized, and its mobility was demonstrated on the basis of transport in porous media. Degradation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) was more efficient by SiO2@FeOOH@Fe than by 'bare' NZVI. Breakthrough curves and mass recovery showed the mobility of SiO2@FeOOH@Fe in granular media was better than that of bare NZVI. It increased greatly in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and decreased when high Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations were encountered. Analysis of the transport data on the basis of filtration theory showed diffusion to be the main mechanism for particle removal in silicon sand. Increasing the NOM may decrease agglomeration of the grains of sand, which has a positive effect on the mobility of SiO2@FeOOH@Fe. Presumably, increasing the concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ compresses the diffuse double layer of SiO2@FeOOH@Fe, resulting in a reduction of mobility. PMID:26067499

  4. Enhanced transport of Si-coated nanoscale zero-valent iron particles in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HonetschlÄgerová, Lenka; Janouškovcová, Petra; Kubal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory column experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of previously described silica coating method on the transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in porous media. The silica coating method showed the potential to prevent the agglomeration of nZVI. Transport experiments were conducted using laboratory-scale sand-packed columns at conditions that were very similar of natural groundwater. Transport properties of non-coated and silica-coated nZVI are investigated in columns of 40 cm length, which were filled with porous media. A suspension was injected in three different Fe particle concentrations (100, 500, and 1000 mg/L) at flow 5  mL/min. Experimental results were compared using nanoparticle attachment efficiency and travel distances which were calculated by classical particle filtration theory. It was found that non-coated particles were essentially immobile in porous media. In contrast, silica-coated particles showed significant transport distances at the tested conditions. Results of this study suggest that silica can increase nZVI mobility in the subsurface. PMID:26582314

  5. Influence of food tannins on certain aspects of iron metabolism : Part 2 -- Storage and transport in normal and anemic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Administration of tannin (0.5 mg/kg body wt/day) from fruits and vegetables lowers the iron content in liver, spleen and bone marrow with an elevation in Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) of serum and serum iron concentration in normal rats. The same dose of tannin increases the iron content in storage tissues, particularly bone marrow of hemolytic anemic rats. In anemic rats, TIBC is decreased and serum iron concentration is raised from anemic level to approximately normal value due to ingestion of tannin. Radioiron administration, either by oral or by intravenous route, also elicits similar results. Recovery of iron storage and transport values from the anemic to the normal condition by tannin (0.5 mg/kg) varies with the source of tannin used. Thus more iron required for compensating the anemic conditions is retained within their body by tannin (0.5 mg/kg) which appears to reduce the loss of peripheral iron probably by protecting the lysis of red cells. (auth.)

  6. Induction of cystine/glutamate transporter in bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced endotoxemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bannai Shiro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystine/glutamate transporter, system xc-, contributes to the maintenance of intracellular glutathione levels and the redox balance in the extracellular space. The main component of the transporter, xCT, is known to be strongly induced by various stimuli like oxidative stress in mammalian cultured cells. We examined the expression of xCT mRNA in vivo in the experimental endotoxemia. Methods Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization were used to investigate the expression of xCT mRNA in the tissues of the mice exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Results Northern blot analysis revealed that xCT mRNA was constitutively expressed in the brain, thymus, and spleen, and that the expression of xCT mRNA was strongly up-regulated in thymus and spleen by the administration of a sublethal dose of LPS. In addition to brain, thymus, and spleen, xCT mRNA was detected also in the bronchiolar epithelium of the lung by the administration of the lethal dose of LPS. Conclusion xCT is induced in some specific tissues by the administration of LPS. The results suggest that cystine/glutamate transporter plays an important role under the inflammatory conditions.

  7. Transport of zero-valent iron nanoparticles in carbonate-rich porous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumann, S.; Micic, V.; Hofmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for in situ dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in groundwater is a promising remediation technology, due to a high dechlorination efficiency of nZVI and possible applications in e.g., great depth or under above-ground infrastructure. The success of the in situ nZVI dechlorination strongly depends on the particle delivery to the contaminants. Previous studies reported a limited transport of nZVI through porous media (cm- to dm-range) and this has been recognized as one of the major obstacles in a widespread utilization of this technology (TRATNYEK & JOHNSON, 2006). Factors that limit the transport are particle aggregation and deposition onto the aquifer solids. Both depend on particle properties (e.g., size, shape, iron content, surface coating, surface charge), on concentrations of suspensions, and on site-specific parameters, such as the groundwater chemistry and the properties and inhomogeneity of the aquifer material. Adsorbed anionic polyelectrolyte coatings provide electrostatic double layer repulsions between negatively charged nZVI particles (SALEH ET AL., 2007), hindering their aggregation and also deposition on the negatively charged quartz surfaces (usually prevailing in aquifers). However, it is shown that the presence of surface charge heterogeneities in the aquifer effects the particle transport (JOHNSON ET AL., 1996). Carbonates, iron oxides, and the edges of clay minerals, for instance, carry a positive surface charge at neutral pH (often encountered in groundwater). This leads to a favorable deposition of negatively charged nZVI particles onto carbonates, metal oxide impurities or clay edges, and finally to a decreased particle transport. Considering the high proportion of carbonates commonly encountered in Alpine porous aquifers, in this study we aimed to evaluate the transport of commercially available polyelectrolyte coated nZVI (polyacrylic acid coated-nZVI, NANOIRON s.r.o., CZ) in both quartz and

  8. Modelling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shieldings by the Monte Carlo method - Version 2

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaite, A; Plukiene, R; Plukis, A

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC and ISIS-800 – high energy neutrons (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The results were then compared with experimental data.

  9. Pseudomonas fluorescens filamentous hemagglutinin, an iron-regulated protein, is an important virulence factor that modulates bacterial pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity.

  10. Pseudomonas fluorescens Filamentous Hemagglutinin, an Iron-Regulated Protein, Is an Important Virulence Factor that Modulates Bacterial Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Chi, Heng; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i) exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii) displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii) was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv) displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity. PMID:27602029

  11. Low temperature charge transport and microwave absorption of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polymer composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Carbon coated Fe nanoparticle–PVC composite films were prepared by solution casting method. ► A low electrical percolation threshold of 2.2 was achieved. ► The low temperature electrical conductivity follows variable range hopping type conduction. ► An EMI shielding of 18 dB was achieved in 200 micron thick film. -- Abstract: In this paper, the low temperature electrical conductivity and microwave absorption properties of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polyvinyl chloride composite films are investigated for different filler fractions. The filler particles are prepared by the pyrolysis of ferrocene at 980 °C and embedded in polyvinyl chloride matrix. The high resolution transmission electron micrographs of the filler material have shown a 5 nm thin layer graphitic carbon covering over iron particles. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the composite film changes by 10 orders of magnitude with the increase of filler concentration. A percolation threshold of 2.2 and an electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency (EMI SE) of ∼18.6 dB in 26.5–40 GHz range are observed for 50 wt% loading. The charge transport follows three dimensional variable range hopping conduction.

  12. Using Bacterial Surrogates to Assess Pathogen Transport in the Subsurface: Laboratory and Field Indications of Co-Transport Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelko, M.; Stimson, J. R.; McLellan, N. L.; Mesquita, M.

    2009-12-01

    Prediction of the transport and fate of colloids and nanoparticles in porous media environments remains challenging because factors such as experimental scale, subsurface heterogeneity, and variable flow paths and fluxes have made it difficult to relate laboratory outcomes to field performance. Moreover, field studies have been plagued with inadequate consideration of ground water flow, reliance on unproven “surrogate” parameters, non-detects at the extraction well, and limited sampling. Riverbank filtration (RBF) is an example of an application for which some predictive capacity regarding colloid transport is desirable. RBF is a relatively low-cost, natural water treatment technology in which surface water contaminants are removed or degraded as the infiltrating water flows from a surface source to abstraction wells. RBF has been used for water treatment for at least 200 years and its potential to provide a significant barrier to microorganisms has been demonstrated. Assignment of microbial treatment credits for RBF remains a regulatory challenge because strategies for demonstrating effective subsurface filtration of organisms are not standardized. The potential passage of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum through RBF systems is of particular regulatory concern because these pathogens are known to be resistant to conventional disinfection processes. The transport or relatively small, pathogenic viruses through RBF systems is also a common concern. To comply with the U.S. Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, utilities with sufficiently high levels of Cryptosporidium oocysts in their source water must amend existing treatment by choosing from a ‘‘toolbox’’ of technologies, including RBF. Aerobic bacterial spores have been evaluated and proposed by some as surrogates for evaluating drinking water treatment plant performance; they also have been proposed as potential surrogates for Cryptosporidium removal during subsurface filtration

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of the bacterial ABC transporter SAV1866 in the closed form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Bunker, Alex; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-03-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family of proteins contains members involved in ATP-mediated import or export of ligands at the cell membrane. For the case of exporters, the translocation mechanism involves a large-scale conformational change that involves a clothespin-like motion from an inward-facing open state, able to bind ligands and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to an outward-facing closed state. Our work focuses on SAV1866, a bacterial member of the ABC transporter family for which the structure is known for the closed state. To evaluate the ability of this protein to undergo conformational changes at physiological temperature, we first performed conventional molecular dynamics (MD) on the cocrystallized adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound structure and on a nucleotide-free structure. With this assessment of SAV1866's stability, conformational changes were induced by steered molecular dynamics (SMD), in which the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) were pushed apart, simulating the ATP hydrolysis energy expenditure. We found that the transmembrane domain is not easily perturbed by large-scale motions of the NBDs. PMID:22339391

  14. Effect of Transport and Aging Processes on Metal Speciation in Iron Oxyhydroxide Aggregates, Tar Creek Superfund Site, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, E. R.; Schaider, L. A.; Shine, J. P.; Brabander, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Following the cessation of mining activity in the late 20th century, Tar Creek Superfund Site was left highly contaminated by Pb, Zn, and Cd. Tar Creek, which flows through the site and into the Neosho River, has been studied extensively because of its potential to transport metals from the mining site to downstream communities. Previous research identified aggregated iron oxyhydroxide material, which forms when mine seepage mixes with Tar Creek surface water, as a major transport vector of metals. Frequent flooding in Tar Creek deposits aggregates on downstream floodplains, where wetting and drying processes alter the speciation of iron and other metals. This study seeks to better quantify those changes and to determine how transport and aging affects the human and ecological health risk. Sequential extractions of aggregate samples collected from the creek demonstrate that Fe is present in both amorphous (10-35% of Fe extracted) and more crystalline (8-23% of Fe extracted) phases. Substantial portions of heavy metals sorb to amorphous iron oxyhydroxide phases (accounting for 10-30% of Pb and Zn extracted) but are not associated with more crystalline iron oxide phases (representing only 1% or less of the Pb and Zn extracted). Samples have a high organic matter content (18-25% mass loss on ignition), but only Fe was significantly extracted by the oxidizing step targeting organic matter (1-2% of Pb and Zn extracted, but 10-26% of Fe extracted). The majority of metals were extracted by the soluble or residual steps. If metals and organic matter inhibit transformation of amorphous iron oxyhydroxide material to nano and crystalline iron oxides, then a steady-state volume of amorphous iron oxyhydroxide material with a high total sorption capacity may exist within Tar Creek, enhancing the metal flux accommodated by this transport mechanism. Once transported downstream and deposited on floodplains, however, it is hypothesized that repeated changes in soil matrix

  15. Formation and Release Behavior of Iron Corrosion Products under the Influence of Bacterial Communities in a Simulated Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the effects of biofilm on the iron corrosion, iron release and associated corrosion by-products is critical for maintaining the water quality and the integrity of drinking water distribution system (DWDS). In this work, iron corrosion experiments under sterilized a...

  16. Evaluation of the effect of divalent metal transporter 1 gene polymorphism on blood iron, lead and cadmium levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), a member of the proton-coupled metal ion transporter family, mediates transport of ferrous iron from the lumen of the intestine into the enterocyte and export of iron from endocytic vesicles. It has an affinity not only for iron but also for other divalent cations including manganese, cobalt, nickel, cadmium, lead, copper, and zinc. DMT1 is encoded by the SLC11a2 gene that is located on chromosome 12q13 in humans and express four major mammalian isoforms (1A/+IRE, 1A/-IRE, 2/+IRE and 2/-IRE). Mutations or polymorphisms of DMT1 gene may have an impact on human health by disturbing metal trafficking. To study the possible association of DMT1 gene with the blood levels of some divalent cations such as iron, lead and cadmium, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (IVS4+44C/A) in DMT1 gene was investigated in 486 unrelated and healthy individuals in a Turkish population by method of polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP). The genotype frequencies were found as 49.8% homozygote typical (CC), 38.3% heterozygote (CA) and 11.9% homozygote atypical (AA). Metal levels were analyzed by dual atomic absorption spectrometer system and the average levels of iron, lead and cadmium in the blood samples were 446.01±81.87 ppm, 35.59±17.72 ppb and 1.25±0.87 ppb, respectively. Individuals with the CC genotype had higher blood iron, lead and cadmium levels than those with AA and CA genotypes. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism in the DMT1 gene and iron and lead levels (p=0.001 and p=0.036, respectively), but no association was found with cadmium level (p=0.344). This study suggested that DMT1 IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism is associated with inter-individual variations in blood iron, lead and cadmium levels. - Highlights: • DMT1 IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism is associated with inter-individual variations in blood iron, cadmium and lead levels.

  17. Evaluation of the effect of divalent metal transporter 1 gene polymorphism on blood iron, lead and cadmium levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayaaltı, Zeliha, E-mail: kayaalti@ankara.edu.tr; Akyüzlü, Dilek Kaya; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2015-02-15

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), a member of the proton-coupled metal ion transporter family, mediates transport of ferrous iron from the lumen of the intestine into the enterocyte and export of iron from endocytic vesicles. It has an affinity not only for iron but also for other divalent cations including manganese, cobalt, nickel, cadmium, lead, copper, and zinc. DMT1 is encoded by the SLC11a2 gene that is located on chromosome 12q13 in humans and express four major mammalian isoforms (1A/+IRE, 1A/-IRE, 2/+IRE and 2/-IRE). Mutations or polymorphisms of DMT1 gene may have an impact on human health by disturbing metal trafficking. To study the possible association of DMT1 gene with the blood levels of some divalent cations such as iron, lead and cadmium, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (IVS4+44C/A) in DMT1 gene was investigated in 486 unrelated and healthy individuals in a Turkish population by method of polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP). The genotype frequencies were found as 49.8% homozygote typical (CC), 38.3% heterozygote (CA) and 11.9% homozygote atypical (AA). Metal levels were analyzed by dual atomic absorption spectrometer system and the average levels of iron, lead and cadmium in the blood samples were 446.01±81.87 ppm, 35.59±17.72 ppb and 1.25±0.87 ppb, respectively. Individuals with the CC genotype had higher blood iron, lead and cadmium levels than those with AA and CA genotypes. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism in the DMT1 gene and iron and lead levels (p=0.001 and p=0.036, respectively), but no association was found with cadmium level (p=0.344). This study suggested that DMT1 IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism is associated with inter-individual variations in blood iron, lead and cadmium levels. - Highlights: • DMT1 IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism is associated with inter-individual variations in blood iron, cadmium and lead levels.

  18. Reactive transport modelling of iron-bentonite interaction within the KBS-3H disposal concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    been shown to lead to a drastic effect on Kunipia F bentonite in long contact with iron powder in batch experiments. It may be explained by rapid scavenging of Fe(II) by the clay and the concurrent slow precipitation of iron corrosion products, such as magnetite or green rust. This effect was systematically evaluated by considering precipitation of various potential corrosion products and neo-formed silicate minerals. The modelling was carried out in 3 steps: 1) Setup of modelling strategy by selecting appropriate thermodynamic and kinetic mineral data and by chemical equilibrium and kinetic modelling using the PHREEQC code 2) Setup and run of a 1D reactive transport model with the CrunchFlow code with a corroding iron source in contact with a 35 cm thick MX-80 bentonite buffer. A number of test cases were defined including a base case and various less likely as well bounding cases. 3) Evaluation of data and uncertainties in an iterative procedure leading to an optimized set of test cases and boundary conditions. In the Base Case, kinetic precipitation of different iron oxides and siderite was considered. The results after a 5000 year interaction period are depicted in Fig. 1. These indicate that the iron source is completely corroded to green rust, probably the thermodynamic most stable phase under KBS-3H type conditions. The transformation of smectite is negligible. The corrosion reaction stabilizes pH to slightly alkaline conditions. The simulations also indicate that later changes are only minor which is explained by the low solubility of the corrosion product and the very slow kinetics of the smectite transformation reactions. The results from the other test cases largely confirm the findings from the Base Case. The largest impact arises from sulphate reduction in case of microbial activity at the iron/buffer interface. In combination with corrosion- produced hydrogen acting as electron donor this may lead to considerable pH increase and thus indirectly affect

  19. Catchment and in-stream influences on iron-deposit chemistry, algal-bacterial biomass and invertebrate richness in upland streams, Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintosh, Katrina Ann; Griffiths, David

    2013-04-01

    The density and composition of upland stream bed iron-deposits is affected by physical, chemical and biological processes. The basic chemical processes producing ochre deposits are well known. Mobilisation of iron and manganese is influenced by bedrock weathering, the presence of acidic and/or reducing conditions and the concentration of dissolved organic carbon. Ferromanganese-depositing bacteria are significant biogenic agents and can cause/enhance the deposition of metals in streams as (hydr)oxides. Metal concentrations from stream waters in two geological blocks in Northern Ireland were compared to determine the contributions of catchment characteristics and in-stream conditions. One block is composed of metamorphosed schist and unconsolidated glacial drift, with peat or peaty podzol (mainly humic) soils, while the other block consists of tertiary basalt with brown earth and gley soils. Water samples were collected from 52 stream sites and analysed for iron, manganese and aluminium as well as a range of other chemical determinands known to affect metal solubility. Stone deposit material was analysed for metal concentrations, organic matter content and epilithic algae, chlorophyll a concentration. Invertebrates were collected by area-standardised kick samples and animals identified to family and numbers counted. Higher conductivities and concentrations of bicarbonate, alkalinity, calcium and magnesium occurred on basalt than on schist. Despite higher iron and manganese oxide concentrations in basalt-derived non-humic soils, stream water concentrations were much lower and stone deposit concentrations only one third of those occurring on schist overlain by humic soils. Peat-generated acidity and the limited acid neutralising capacity of base-poor metamorphosed schist has resulted in elevated concentrations of metals and ochre deposit in surface waters. Algal biomass was determined by catchment level factors whereas in-stream conditions affected bacterial biomass

  20. Effects of Iron on Hydrogen-producing Capacity,Hydrogenase and NADH-fd Reductase Activities of a Fermentative Hydrogen-producing Bacterial Strain B49

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiangjing(王相晶); Ren Nanqi; Xiang Wensheng

    2004-01-01

    Iron plays an important role in hydrogen production, cell growth, hydrogenase and NADH-fd reductase activities of hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49 (AF481148 in EMBL). At the end of fermentation from 10 g/L glucose, for the culture containing 10 mg/L FeSO4*7H2O the cell growth in terms of optical density (OD) at 600nm was 1.13, the ratio of ethanol amount (mg/L) to acetate amount (mg/L) was 1.55, and the accumulated hydrogen volume was 1816.3 ml H2/L culture; whereas for the culture of 80 mg/L FeSO4*7H2O OD600nm was increased to 1.34, the accumulated hydrogen volume was increased to 2360.5 ml H2/L culture, and the ratio of ethanol amount (mg/L) to acetate amount (mg/L) decreased to 1.31. Moreover, the iron addition to the medium at different fermentation time could affect hydrogen-producing ability. However, the later the addition time of FeSO4*7H2O was postponed, the less the effect on hydrogen evolution was. In the course of fermentation, the specific activities of hydrogenase and NADH-fd reductase of hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49 decreased with the consumption of iron.

  1. Antagonistic effects of humic acid and iron oxyhydroxide grain-coating on biochar nanoparticle transport in saturated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dengjun; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Dongmei

    2013-05-21

    Biochar land application may result in multiple agronomic and environmental benefits (e.g., carbon sequestration, improving soil quality, and immobilizing environmental contaminants). However, our understanding of biochar particle transport is largely unknown in natural environments with significant heterogeneity in solid (e.g., patches of iron oxyhydroxide coating) and solution chemistry (e.g., the presence of natural organic matter), which represents a critical knowledge gap in assessing the environmental impact of biochar land application. Transport and retention kinetics of nanoparticles (NPs) from wheat straw biochars produced at two pyrolysis temperatures (i.e., 350 and 550 °C) were investigated in water-saturated sand columns at environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved humic acid (HA, 0, 1, 5, and 10 mg L(-1)) and fractional surface coverage of iron oxyhydroxide coatings on sand grains (ω, 0.16, 0.28, and 0.40). Transport of biochar NPs increased with increasing HA concentration, largely because of enhanced repulsive interaction energy between biochar NPs and sand grains. Conversely, transport of biochar NPs decreased significantly with increasing ω due to enhanced electrostatic attraction between negatively charged biochar NPs and positively charged iron oxyhydroxides. At a given ω of 0.28, biochar NPs were less retained with increasing HA concentration due to increased electrosteric repulsion between biochar NPs and sand grains. Experimental breakthrough curves and retention profiles were well described using a two-site kinetic retention model that accounted for Langmuirian blocking or random sequential adsorption at one site. Consistent with the blocking effect, the often observed flat retention profiles stemmed from decreased retention rate and/or maximum retention capacity at a higher HA concentration or smaller ω. The antagonistic effects of HA and iron oxyhydroxide grain-coating imparted on the mobility of biochar NPs suggest that

  2. Performance evaluation of cast iron pipe for crude oil and salt water transportation; Avaliacao e desempenho de duto de aco fundido no transporte de petroleo com aguas salgadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carlos Alexandre Martins da [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mainier, Fernando B. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The present paper aims to study and to evaluate the performance of casting iron pipe for transportation of salty and produced waters, presented in the oil industry, where salt contents ranging on very large values. The cast iron above mentioned has an yield strength of 23 kg/mm{sup 2}, tensile strength of de 46 kg/mm{sup 2} (minimum) and an elongation of 15%, and contents of some chemical alloys, such as Cr (0,8 -1,3 %), Mn (1,5 % max) and Si (1,%). Nevertheless it is an exploratory study, the dynamic tests of weight loss carried out in laboratory, with specimens machined from a used pipe piece, with salty solution (3,5 % NaCl) aerated media, has shown very promising results, enabling to qualify, satisfactorily, such material for using in transportation and transferring operations of fluids with a high salty contents, such as crude oil. (author)

  3. A Bacterial Component to Alzheimer's-Type Dementia Seen via a Systems Biology Approach that Links Iron Dysregulation and Inflammagen Shedding to Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Kell, Douglas B

    2016-06-18

    The progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by a great many observable changes, both molecular and physiological. These include oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and (more proximal to cognitive decline) the death of neuronal and other cells. A systems biology approach seeks to organize these observed variables into pathways that discriminate those that are highly involved (i.e., causative) from those that are more usefully recognized as bystander effects. We review the evidence that iron dysregulation is one of the central causative pathway elements here, as this can cause each of the above effects. In addition, we review the evidence that dormant, non-growing bacteria are a crucial feature of AD, that their growth in vivo is normally limited by a lack of free iron, and that it is this iron dysregulation that is an important factor in their resuscitation. Indeed, bacterial cells can be observed by ultrastructural microscopy in the blood of AD patients. A consequence of this is that the growing cells can shed highly inflammatory components such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS). These too are known to be able to induce (apoptotic and pyroptotic) neuronal cell death. There is also evidence that these systems interact with elements of vitamin D metabolism. This integrative systems approach has strong predictive power, indicating (as has indeed been shown) that both natural and pharmaceutical iron chelators might have useful protective roles in arresting cognitive decline, and that a further assessment of the role of microbes in AD development is more than highly warranted. PMID:27340854

  4. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda

    2014-05-01

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  5. Synthesis of Surface-Modified Iron Oxides for the Solvent-Free Recovery of Bacterial Bioactive Compound Prodigiosin and Its Algicidal Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivizhivendhan, K V; Mahesh, M; Boopathy, R; Patchaimurugan, K; Maharaja, P; Swarnalatha, S; Regina Mary, R; Sekaran, G

    2016-09-15

    Prodigiosin (PG) is a bioactive compound produced by several bacterial species. Currently, many technologies are being developed for the production of PG by fermentation processes. However, new challenges are being faced with regard to the production of PG in terms of the recovery and purification steps, owing to the labile nature of PG molecules and the cost of the purification steps. Conventional methods have limitations due to high cost, low reusability, and health hazards. Hence, the present investigation was focused on the development of surface-functionalized magnetic iron oxide ([Fe3O4]F) for solvent-free extraction of bioactive PG from the bacterial fermented medium. Fe3O4 was functionalized with diethanolamine and characterized by FT-IR, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy. The various process parameters, such as contact time, temperature, pH, and mass of Fe3O4, were optimized for the extraction of PG using functionalized Fe3O4. Instrumental analyses confirmed that the PG molecules were cross-linked with functional groups on [Fe3O4]F through van der Waals forces of attraction. PG extracted through Fe3O4 or [Fe3O4]F was separated from the fermentation medium by applying an external electromagnetic field and regenerated for successive reuse cycles. The purity of the extracted PG was characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, FT-IR, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The iron oxide-diethanolamine-PG cross-linked ([Fe3O4]F-PG) composite matrix effectively deactivates harmful fouling by cyanobacterial growth in water-treatment plants. The present investigation provides the possibility of solvent-free extraction of bacterial bioactive PG from a fermented medium using functionalized magnetic iron oxide. PMID:27487290

  6. Comparison of the transport of the aggregates of nanoscale zerovalent iron under vertical and horizontal flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2016-02-01

    Direct injection of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles is being considered for remediation of contaminated sites. However, the transport characteristics of NZVI under horizontal flow conditions are not fully understood. In this study, NZVI particles were stabilized with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and injected in vertical and horizontal columns to compare the effects of the flow direction on the transport. Columns were packed with sand of mean grain diameters of 180, 340 or 1140 µm (referred to as fine, intermediate and coarse sand, respectively), and were injected with CMC-NZVI suspensions of 0.3, 1 or 3 g Fe L(-1). Experimental breakthrough curves showed that with the coarse and intermediate sands, the steady-state effluent concentration in the horizontal column were up to 84% lower than those in the vertical column regardless of the initial NZVI concentration. However, in the fine sand the differences were insignificant, except at the highest NZVI particle concentration. Additionally, in the horizontally-oriented columns containing the coarse or intermediated sand, NZVI aggregates particles were non-uniformly distributed in the cross-section of the columns and there higher deposition in the bottom-half of the cross-section due to gravity effects. These deposition patterns can be accounted for, in part, by the gravitational settling of the large aggregates of NZVI, especially at high NZVI concentrations. A particle trajectory analysis in three dimensions demonstrated that under horizontal flow, gravity forces resulted in lower deposition of NZVI on the bottom-half of a single collector, as particles approaching the bottom-half of the collector were deflected by gravity to collectors below. PMID:26498094

  7. Modeling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shields by using Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaitėa, A; Plukienė, R; Ridikas, D

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 (AVF cyclotron of Research Center of Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Japan) – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC (heavy-ion synchrotron of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan) and ISIS-800 (ISIS intensive spallation neutron source facility of the Rutherford Appleton laboratory, UK) – high energy neutron (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The calculation results were then compared with experimental data.compared with experimental data.

  8. Humic acid facilitates the transport of ARS-labeled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in iron oxyhydroxide-coated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dengjun; Bradford, Scott A; Harvey, Ronald W; Gao, Bin; Cang, Long; Zhou, Dongmei

    2012-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) have been widely used to remediate soil and wastewater contaminated with metals and radionuclides. However, our understanding of nHAP transport and fate is limited in natural environments that exhibit significant variability in solid and solution chemistry. The transport and retention kinetics of Alizarin red S (ARS)-labeled nHAP were investigated in water-saturated packed columns that encompassed a range of humic acid concentrations (HA, 0-10 mg L(-1)), fractional surface coverage of iron oxyhydroxide coatings on sand grains (λ, 0-0.75), and pH (6.0-10.5). HA was found to have a marked effect on the electrokinetic properties of ARS-nHAP, and on the transport and retention of ARS-nHAP in granular media. The transport of ARS-nHAP was found to increase with increasing HA concentration because of enhanced colloidal stability and the reduced aggregate size. When HA = 10 mg L(-1), greater ARS-nHAP attachment occurred with increasing λ because of increased electrostatic attraction between negatively charged nanoparticles and positively charged iron oxyhydroxides, although alkaline conditions (pH 8.0 and 10.5) reversed the surface charge of the iron oxyhydroxides and therefore decreased deposition. The retention profiles of ARS-nHAP exhibited a hyperexponential shape for all test conditions, suggesting some unfavorable attachment conditions. Retarded breakthrough curves occurred in sands with iron oxyhydroxide coatings because of time-dependent occupation of favorable deposition sites. Consideration of the above effects is necessary to improve remediation efficiency of nHAP for metals and actinides in soils and subsurface environments. PMID:22316080

  9. Uptake of biotin by Chlamydia Spp. through the use of a bacterial transporter (BioY and a host-cell transporter (SMVT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J Fisher

    Full Text Available Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that cause disease in humans and animals. Minor variations in metabolic capacity between species have been causally linked to host and tissue tropisms. Analysis of the highly conserved genomes of Chlamydia spp. reveals divergence in the metabolism of the essential vitamin biotin with genes for either synthesis (bioF_2ADB and/or transport (bioY. Streptavidin blotting confirmed the presence of a single biotinylated protein in Chlamydia. As a first step in unraveling the need for divergent biotin acquisition strategies, we examined BioY (CTL0613 from C. trachomatis 434/Bu which is annotated as an S component of the type II energy coupling-factor transporters (ECF. Type II ECFs are typically composed of a transport specific component (S and a chromosomally unlinked energy module (AT. Intriguingly, Chlamydia lack recognizable AT modules. Using (3H-biotin and recombinant E. coli expressing CTL0613, we demonstrated that biotin was transported with high affinity (a property of Type II ECFs previously shown to require an AT module and capacity (apparent K(m of 3.35 nM and V(max of 55.1 pmol×min(-1×mg(-1. Since Chlamydia reside in a host derived membrane vacuole, termed an inclusion, we also sought a mechanism for transport of biotin from the cell cytoplasm into the inclusion vacuole. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the mammalian sodium multivitamin transporter (SMVT, which transports lipoic acid, biotin, and pantothenic acid into cells, localizes to the inclusion. Since Chlamydia also are auxotrophic for lipoic and pantothenic acids, SMVT may be subverted by Chlamydia to move multiple essential compounds into the inclusion where BioY and another transporter(s would be present to facilitate transport into the bacterium. Collectively, our data validates the first BioY from a pathogenic organism and describes a two-step mechanism by which Chlamydia transport biotin

  10. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Seckin; Meier, Bastian; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. PMID:26668333

  11. Transport characteristics of nanoscale zero-valent iron carried by three different "vehicles" in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan; Zhao, Yong S; Li, Lu L; Qin, Chuan Y; Wu, Fan; Geng, Nan N; Lei, Jian S

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the transport properties of nanoscale zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) (nZVI) carried by three vehicles: water, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, and SDS foam. Batch experiments were conducted to assess the sedimentation capability of nZVI particles in these three vehicles. Column experiments were conducted to investigate the transport properties of nZVI in porous media formed with different sizes of sand (0.25 mm to 0.5 mm, 0.5 mm to 0.9 mm, and 0.9 mm to 1.4 mm). Three main results were obtained. First, the batch experiments revealed that the stabilities of nZVI particles in SDS solution and SDS foam were improved, compared with that of nZVI particles in water. Moreover, the sedimentation of nZVI in foam was closely associated with the foam drainage volume. The nZVI content in foam was similar to that in the original foaming suspension, and the nZVI particle distribution in foam became significantly more uniform at a stirring speed of 3000 r/min. Second, the transport of nZVI was enhanced by foam compared with water and SDS solution for 0.25 mm to 0.5 mm diameter sand. For sand with diameters of 0.5 mm to 0.9 mm and 0.9 mm to 1.4 mm, the mobility of nZVI carried by SDS solution was optimal, followed by that of nZVI carried by foam and water. Thus, the mobility of nZVI in finer sand was significantly enhanced by foam, compared with that in coarse sand. In contrast, compared with the bare nZVI suspension and nZVI-laden foam, the spatial distribution of nZVI particles carried by SDS solution was significantly uniform along the column length. Third, the SDS concentration significantly influenced the migration of nZVI in porous media. The enhancement in the migration of nZVI carried by SDS solution was greater at an SDS dose of 0.25% compared with that at the other three doses (0.2%, 0.5%, and 1%) for sand with a 0.25 mm to 0.5 mm diameter. Increased SDS concentrations positively affected the transport of nZVI by foam for sand with a

  12. The endocytic receptor megalin binds the iron transporting neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin with high affinity and mediates its cellular uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Jacobsen, Christian; Strong, Roland K;

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a prominent protein of specific granules of human neutrophils also synthesized by epithelial cells during inflammation. NGAL binds bacterial siderophores preventing bacteria from retrieving iron from this source. Also, NGAL may be important in ...

  13. Interacting Effects of Light and Iron Availability on the Coupling of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and CO2-Assimilation in Marine Phytoplankton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Schuback

    Full Text Available Iron availability directly affects photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth over vast oceanic regions. For this reason, the availability of iron is a crucial variable to consider in the development of active chlorophyll a fluorescence based estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity. These bio-optical approaches require a conversion factor to derive ecologically-relevant rates of CO2-assimilation from estimates of electron transport in photosystem II. The required conversion factor varies significantly across phytoplankton taxa and environmental conditions, but little information is available on its response to iron limitation. In this study, we examine the role of iron limitation, and the interacting effects of iron and light availability, on the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and CO2-assimilation in marine phytoplankton. Our results show that excess irradiance causes increased decoupling of carbon fixation and electron transport, particularly under iron limiting conditions. We observed that reaction center II specific rates of electron transport (ETR(RCII, mol e- mol RCII(-1 s(-1 increased under iron limitation, and we propose a simple conceptual model for this observation. We also observed a strong correlation between the derived conversion factor and the expression of non-photochemical quenching. Utilizing a dataset from in situ phytoplankton assemblages across a coastal--oceanic transect in the Northeast subarctic Pacific, this relationship was used to predict ETR(RCII: CO2-assimilation conversion factors and carbon-based primary productivity from FRRF data, without the need for any additional measurements.

  14. Survival and viability of cells from iron depositing bacterial strains in pretests for the EXPOSE-R2-Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Feyh, N.; de Vera, J.P.; Szewzyk, U

    2014-01-01

    Five environmental isolates (Pseudomonas sp. BS1, Hyphomonas sp. BS2, Tetrasphaera sp. FL1, Pedomicrobium sp. FL6 and Leptothrix sp. OT_B_406) were chosen for EXPOSE-R2 including pretests (EVT1/2, SVT) due to their ability to form Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide-containing biofilms as observed for natural communities of iron depositing bacteria. Samples were produced by drying iron-containing cell aggregates on Mars regolith simulant mixtures (S-/P-MRS) (Böttger et al., 2012). Different Mars- and ...

  15. Simultaneous transport of two bacterial strains in intact cores from Oyster, Virginia: biological effects and numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hailiang; Rothmel, Randi; Onstott, Tullis C; Fuller, Mark E; DeFlaun, Mary F; Streger, Sheryl H; Dunlap, Robb; Fletcher, Madilyn

    2002-05-01

    The transport characteristics of two adhesion-deficient, indigenous groundwater strains, Comamonas sp. strain DA001 and Erwinia herbicola OYS2-A, were studied by using intact sediment cores (7 by 50 cm) from Oyster, Va. Both strains are gram-negative rods (1.10 by 0.56 and 1.56 by 0.46 microm, respectively) with strongly hydrophilic membranes and a slightly negative surface charge. The two strains exhibited markedly different behaviors when they were transported through granular porous sediment. To eliminate any effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on bacterial transport and thus isolate the biological effect, the two strains were simultaneously injected into the same core. DA001 cells were metabolically labeled with (35)S and tagged with a vital fluorescent stain, while OYS2-A cells were metabolically labeled with (14)C. The fast decay of (35)S allowed deconvolution of the two isotopes (and therefore the two strains). Dramatic differences in the transport behaviors were observed. The breakthrough of DA001 and the breakthrough of OYS2-A both occurred before the breakthrough of a conservative tracer (termed differential advection), with effluent recoveries of 55 and 30%, respectively. The retained bacterial concentration of OYS2-A in the sediment was twofold higher than that of DA001. Among the cell properties analyzed, the statistically significant differences between the two strains were cell length and diameter. The shorter, larger-diameter DA001 cells displayed a higher effluent recovery than the longer, smaller-diameter OYS2-A cells. CXTFIT modeling results indicated that compared to the DA001 cells, the OYS2-A cells experienced lower pore velocity, higher porosity, a higher attachment rate, and a lower detachment rate. All these factors may contribute to the observed differences in transport. PMID:11976080

  16. 3-D analysis of bacterial cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using complementary microscopy tomography approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, G; Zeitvogel, F; Hao, L; Ingino, P; Floetenmeyer, M; Stierhof, Y-D; Schroeppel, B; Burkhardt, C J; Kappler, A; Obst, M

    2014-07-01

    The formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates as a consequence of bacterial iron oxidation is an environmentally widespread process with a number of implications for processes such as sorption and coprecipitation of contaminants and nutrients. Whereas the overall appearance of such aggregates is easily accessible using 2-D microscopy techniques, the 3-D and internal structure remain obscure. In this study, we examined the 3-D structure of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using a combination of advanced 3-D microscopy techniques. We obtained 3-D structural and chemical information on different cellular encrustation patterns at high spatial resolution (4-200 nm, depending on the method): more specifically, (1) cells free of iron minerals, (2) periplasm filled with iron minerals, (3) spike- or platelet-shaped iron mineral structures, (4) bulky structures on the cell surface, (5) extracellular iron mineral shell structures, (6) cells with iron mineral filled cytoplasm, and (7) agglomerations of extracellular globular structures. In addition to structural information, chemical nanotomography suggests a dominant role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in controlling the formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates. Furthermore, samples in their hydrated state showed cell-(iron)mineral aggregates in pristine conditions free of preparation (i.e., drying/dehydration) artifacts. All these results were obtained using 3-D microscopy techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tomography, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography, scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) tomography, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). It turned out that, due to the various different contrast mechanisms of the individual approaches, and due to the required sample preparation steps, only the combination of these techniques was able to provide a

  17. Aphid amino acid transporter regulates glutamine supply to intracellular bacterial symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel R G; Feng, Honglin; Baker, James D; Bavan, Selvan; Luetje, Charles W; Wilson, Alex C C

    2014-01-01

    Endosymbiotic associations have played a major role in evolution. However, the molecular basis for the biochemical interdependence of these associations remains poorly understood. The aphid-Buchnera endosymbiosis provides a powerful system to elucidate how these symbioses are regulated. In aphids, the supply of essential amino acids depends on an ancient nutritional symbiotic association with the gamma-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola. Buchnera cells are densely packed in specialized aphid bacteriocyte cells. Here we confirm that five putative amino acid transporters are highly expressed and/or highly enriched in Acyrthosiphon pisum bacteriocyte tissues. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, two bacteriocyte amino acid transporters displayed significant levels of glutamine uptake, with transporter ACYPI001018, LOC100159667 (named here as Acyrthosiphon pisum glutamine transporter 1, ApGLNT1) functioning as the most active glutamine transporter. Transporter ApGLNT1 has narrow substrate selectivity, with high glutamine and low arginine transport capacity. Notably, ApGLNT1 has high binding affinity for arginine, and arginine acts as a competitive inhibitor for glutamine transport. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that ApGLNT1 is localized predominantly to the bacteriocyte plasma membrane, a location consistent with the transport of glutamine from A. pisum hemolymph to the bacteriocyte cytoplasm. On the basis of functional transport data and localization, we propose a substrate feedback inhibition model in which the accumulation of the essential amino acid arginine in A. pisum hemolymph reduces the transport of the precursor glutamine into bacteriocytes, thereby regulating amino acid biosynthesis in the bacteriocyte. Structural similarities in the arrangement of hosts and symbionts across endosymbiotic systems suggest that substrate feedback inhibition may be mechanistically important in other endosymbioses.

  18. Structure and Mechanism of the S Component of a Bacterial ECF Transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Zhang; J Wang; Y Shi

    2011-12-31

    The energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters, responsible for vitamin uptake in prokaryotes, are a unique family of membrane transporters. Each ECF transporter contains a membrane-embedded, substrate-binding protein (known as the S component), an energy-coupling module that comprises two ATP-binding proteins (known as the A and A' components) and a transmembrane protein (known as the T component). The structure and transport mechanism of the ECF family remain unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of RibU, the S component of the ECF-type riboflavin transporter from Staphylococcus aureus at 3.6-{angstrom} resolution. RibU contains six transmembrane segments, adopts a previously unreported transporter fold and contains a riboflavin molecule bound to the L1 loop and the periplasmic portion of transmembrane segments 4-6. Structural analysis reveals the essential ligand-binding residues, identifies the putative transport path and, with sequence alignment, uncovers conserved structural features and suggests potential mechanisms of action among the ECF transporters.

  19. Nutrient and Bacterial Transport From Agricultural Lands Fertlized With Different Animal Manures

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Anurag

    2003-01-01

    The increase of animal agriculture coupled with excess manure production, and the reduced availability of land has led to the over application of animal manure on agricultural fields. The excessive application of manure is responsible for nutrient and bacterial pollution of downstream waterbodies. Manure application based on the crop phosphorus (P) requirements has been recommended as a viable method to reduce nutrient pollution. A plot scale study was conducted to measure the loss of nutrien...

  20. [A flavinogenic mutant of the yeast Pichia guilliermondii with impaired iron transport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavlovskiĭ, G M; Fedorovich, D V; Zviagil'skais, R A

    1976-01-01

    A mutant of the yeast Pichia guilliermondii was produced by means of UV; the mutant was capable of riboflavin overproduction in the presence of high concentrations of iron in the medium. The content of total and non-hemin iron and cytochrome c, and the activity of catalase, were lower in the cells of the mutant than in the parent cells, while the activity of riboflavin synthetase was higher. The content of iron in the cells increased when the mutant was cultivated on media with citric acid, siderochromes of Klebsiella aerogenes, Neurospora crassa, Rhodotorula glutinis, cultural broth of Pichia ohmeri, and autolysate of brewer's yeast, whereas the flavinogenous activity of the cells decreased. Rotenone inhibited respiration of the intact cells of the mutant producing elevated amounts of riboflavin; therefore, flavinogenesis was not regulated by non-hemin iron on the first segment of the respiratory chain. Overproduction of riboflavin in the mutant of Pichia guilliermondii was proved to be a recessive property. PMID:933879

  1. Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Deborah; Crocket, Kirsty; Brand, Tim; Stutter, Marc; Wilson, Clare; Schröder, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers Wood, D.A¹, Crocket, K², Brand, T², Stutter, M³, Wilson, C¹ & Schröder, C¹ ¹Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA ²Scottish Association for Marine Science, University of the Highlands and Islands, Dunbeg, Oban, PA37 1QA ³James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH The biogeochemical iron cycle exerts significant control on the carbon cycle¹. Iron is a limiting nutrient in large areas of the world's oceans and its bioavailability controls CO2 uptake by marine photosynthesizing microorganisms. While atmospheric iron inputs to the open ocean have been extensively measured, global river inputs have likely been underestimated because most major world rivers exhibit extensive iron removal by flocculation and sedimentation during seawater mixing. Iron minerals and organic matter mutually stabilise each other², which results in a 'rusty carbon sink' in sediments³ on the one hand but may also enhance transport beyond the salinity gradient on the other. Humic-rich, high latitude rivers have a higher iron-carrying capacity⁴-⁶ but are underrepresented in iron flux calculations. The West Coast sea lochs in Scotland are fed by predominantly peatland drainage catchments, and the rivers entering the sea lochs carry a high load of organic matter. The short distance between many of these catchments and the coastal ocean facilitates source-to-sea research investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids providing a good analogue for similar high latitude fjordic systems. We use SeaFAST+ICP-MS and Mössbauer spectroscopy to survey trace metal concentrations, with emphasis on iron concentrations, speciation and mineralogy, across salinity gradients. In combination with ultra-filtration techniques, this allows

  2. The bacterial dicarboxylate transporter VcINDY uses a two-domain elevator-type mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Christopher; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Fitzgerald, Gabriel A; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Kaufmann, Desirée; Li, Yan; Forrest, Lucy R; Mindell, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    Secondary transporters use alternating-access mechanisms to couple uphill substrate movement to downhill ion flux. Most known transporters use a 'rocking bundle' motion, wherein the protein moves around an immobile substrate-binding site. However, the glutamate-transporter homolog GltPh translocates its substrate-binding site vertically across the membrane, through an 'elevator' mechanism. Here, we used the 'repeat swap' approach to computationally predict the outward-facing state of the Na(+)/succinate transporter VcINDY, from Vibrio cholerae. Our model predicts a substantial elevator-like movement of VcINDY's substrate-binding site, with a vertical translation of ~15 Å and a rotation of ~43°. Our observation that multiple disulfide cross-links completely inhibit transport provides experimental confirmation of the model and demonstrates that such movement is essential. In contrast, cross-links across the VcINDY dimer interface preserve transport, thus revealing an absence of large-scale coupling between protomers. PMID:26828963

  3. Zinc transporter ZIP14 functions in hepatic zinc, iron and glucose homeostasis during the innate immune response (endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolunay Beker Aydemir

    Full Text Available ZIP14 (slc39A14 is a zinc transporter induced in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. ZIP14 induction accompanies the reduction in serum zinc (hypozincemia of acute inflammation. ZIP14 can transport Zn(2+ and non-transferrin-bound Fe(2+ in vitro. Using a Zip14(-/- mouse model we demonstrated that ZIP14 was essential for control of phosphatase PTP1B activity and phosphorylation of c-Met during liver regeneration. In the current studies, a global screening of ZIP transporter gene expression in response to LPS-induced endotoxemia was conducted. Following LPS, Zip14 was the most highly up-regulated Zip transcript in liver, but also in white adipose tissue and muscle. Using ZIP14(-/- mice we show that ZIP14 contributes to zinc absorption from the gastrointestinal tract directly or indirectly as zinc absorption was decreased in the KOs. In contrast, Zip14(-/- mice absorbed more iron. The Zip14 KO mice did not exhibit hypozincemia following LPS, but do have hypoferremia. Livers of Zip14-/- mice had increased transcript abundance for hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1, ferritin and transferrin receptor-1 and greater accumulation of iron. The Zip14(-/- phenotype included greater body fat, hypoglycemia and higher insulin levels, as well as increased liver glucose and greater phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and increased GLUT2, SREBP-1c and FASN expression. The Zip14 KO mice exhibited decreased circulating IL-6 with increased hepatic SOCS-3 following LPS, suggesting SOCS-3 inhibited insulin signaling which produced the hypoglycemia in this genotype. The results are consistent with ZIP14 ablation yielding abnormal labile zinc pools which lead to increased SOCS-3 production through G-coupled receptor activation and increased cAMP production as well as signaled by increased pSTAT3 via the IL-6 receptor, which inhibits IRS 1/2 phosphorylation. Our data show the role of ZIP14 in the hepatocyte is multi-functional since zinc and iron trafficking are

  4. KBS-3H. Reactive transport modelling of iron-bentonite interactions, an update for the Olkiluoto case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated cylinder. The originally planned material for the perforated steel cylinder shell has been carbon steel. After emplacement, the steel material will corrode anaerobically in contact with water and generate hydrogen, iron species and hydroxyl ions. Iron corrosion products will be formed at the steel surface, but in addition, the released species may interact with the clay and lead to undesirable effects, such as montmorillonite transformation and cementation. The impact of corrosion and iron-bentonite interactions has been assessed for Olkiluoto-specific conditions by reactive transport modelling using the CrunchFlow code. The main focus of this modelling exercise was to update the previous modelling study of Wersin et al. (2007). by accounting for new thermodynamic data on clays and uncertainties in precipitation rates of iron reaction products. The modelling strategy was first to select appropriate thermodynamic and kinetic mineral by review of current data, in particular of the THERMODDEM database, and by chemical equilibrium modelling. Second, a 1D reactive transport model which includes a corroding iron source from which solutes can diffuse into the buffer and interact with the clay and accessory minerals was set up in a similar way as that applied in Wersin et al. (2007). A number of test cases were defined, including a Base Case and various less likely as well as bounding cases. The modelling results largely confirmed previous findings in that the zone of alteration was predicted to remain spatially limited for very long times. However, they highlighted that under unfavourable conditions during the initial corrosion phase (before complete corrosion of the shell), pronounced increase in pH might occur, which would lead to enhanced dissolution of the montmorillonite clay. Factors favouring pH increase were found to be slow

  5. Gene expression profiling in Entamoeba histolytica identifies key components in iron uptake and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cuevas, Nora Adriana; Weber, Christian; Hon, Chung-Chau; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron), low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron), iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron), and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters) and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite.

  6. Gene expression profiling in Entamoeba histolytica identifies key components in iron uptake and metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Adriana Hernández-Cuevas

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron, low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron, iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron, and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus redirects central metabolism to increase iron availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Friedman

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is significantly influenced by the iron status of the host. However, the regulatory impact of host iron sources on S. aureus gene expression remains unknown. In this study, we combine multivariable difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses to systematically cluster cellular protein response across distinct iron-exposure conditions. Quadruplicate samples were simultaneously analyzed for alterations in protein abundance and/or post-translational modification state in response to environmental (iron chelation, hemin treatment or genetic (Deltafur alterations in bacterial iron exposure. We identified 120 proteins representing several coordinated biochemical pathways that are affected by changes in iron-exposure status. Highlighted in these experiments is the identification of the heme-regulated transport system (HrtAB, a novel transport system which plays a critical role in staphylococcal heme metabolism. Further, we show that regulated overproduction of acidic end-products brought on by iron starvation decreases local pH resulting in the release of iron from the host iron-sequestering protein transferrin. These findings reveal novel strategies used by S. aureus to acquire scarce nutrients in the hostile host environment and begin to define the iron and heme-dependent regulons of S. aureus.

  8. Integration of Genome-Scale Metabolic Nodels of Iron-Reducing Bacteria With Subsurface Flow and Geochemical Reactive Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Mahadevan, R.; Fang, Y.; Garg, S.; Long, P. E.; Lovley, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Several field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the growth and activity of iron-reducing bacteria can be stimulated in many subsurface environments by amendment of groundwater with a soluble electron donor. Under strong iron-reducing conditions, these organisms mediate reactions that can impact a wide range of subsurface contaminants including chlorinated hydrocarbons, metals, and radionuclides. Therefore there is strong interest in in-situ bioremediation as a potential technology for cleanup of contaminated aquifers. To evaluate and design bioremediation systems, as well as to evaluate the viability of monitored natural attenuation as an alternative, quantitative models of biogeochemically reactive transport are needed. To date, most such models represent microbial activity in terms of kinetic rate (e.g., Monod- type) formulations. Such models do not account for fundamental changes in microbial functionality (such as utilization of alternative respiratory pathways) that occur as the result of spatial and temporal variations in the geochemical environment experienced by microorganisms. Constraint-based genome-scale in silico models of microbial metabolism present an alternative to simplified rate formulations that provide flexibility to account for changes in microbial function in response to local geochemical conditions. We have developed and applied a methodology for coupling a constraint-based in silico model of Geobacter sulfurreducens with a conventional model of groundwater flow, transport, and geochemical reaction. Two uses of the in silico model are tested: 1) incorporation of modified microbial growth yield coefficients based on the in silico model, and 2) variation of reaction rates in a reactive transport model based on in silico modeling of a range of local geochemical conditions. Preliminary results from this integrated model will be presented.

  9. Structure, function, evolution, and application of bacterial Pnu-type vitamin transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jähme, Michael; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria can take up vitamins from the environment via specific transport machineries. Uptake is essential for organisms that lack complete vitamin biosynthesis pathways, but even in the presence of biosynthesis routes uptake is likely preferred, because it is energetically less costly. Pnu tra

  10. Analysis of Bacterial and Archaeal Communities along a High-Molecular-Weight Polyacrylamide Transportation Pipeline System in an Oil Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Yun Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viscosity loss of high-molecular-weight partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM solution was observed in a water injection pipeline before being injected into subterranean oil wells. In order to investigate the possible involvement of microorganisms in HPAM viscosity loss, both bacterial and archaeal community compositions of four samples collected from different points of the transportation pipeline were analyzed using PCR-amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and clone library construction method together with the analysis of physicochemical properties of HPAM solution and environmental factors. Further, the relationship between environmental factors and HPAM properties with microorganisms were delineated by canonical correspondence analysis (CCA. Diverse bacterial and archaeal groups were detected in the four samples. The microbial community of initial solution S1 gathered from the make-up tank is similar to solution S2 gathered from the first filter, and that of solution S3 obtained between the first and the second filter is similar to that of solution S4 obtained between the second filter and the injection well. Members of the genus Acinetobacter sp. were detected with high abundance in S3 and S4 in which HPAM viscosity was considerably reduced, suggesting that they likely played a considerable role in HPAM viscosity loss. This study presents information on microbial community diversity in the HPAM transportation pipeline and the possible involvement of microorganisms in HPAM viscosity loss and biodegradation. The results will help to understand the microbial community contribution made to viscosity change and are beneficial for providing information for microbial control in oil fields.

  11. Cadmium and iron transport by members of a plant metal transporter family in Arabidopsis with homology to Nramp genes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomine, Sébastien; Wang, Rongchen; Ward, John M.; Crawford, Nigel M.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2000-01-01

    Metal cation homeostasis is essential for plant nutrition and resistance to toxic heavy metals. Many plant metal transporters remain to be identified at the molecular level. In the present study, we have isolated AtNramp cDNAs from Arabidopsis and show that these genes complement the phenotype of a metal uptake deficient yeast strain, smf1. AtNramps show homology to the Nramp gene family in bacteria, yeast, plants, and animals. Expression of AtNramp cDNAs increases Cd2+ sensitivity and Cd2+ a...

  12. Impact of Bacterial NO3- Transport on Sediment Biogeochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2005-01-01

    Experiments demonstrated that Beggiatoa could induce a H2S-depleted suboxic zone of more than 10 mm in marine sediments and cause a divergence in sediment NO3- reduction from denitrification to dissimilatory NO3- reduction to ammonium. pH, O2, and H2S profiles indicated that the bacteria oxidized H......2S with NO3- and transported S0 to the sediment surface for aerobic oxidation....

  13. Atmospheric transport of mineral dust from the Indo-Gangetic Plain: Temporal variability, acid processing, and iron solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Bikkina; Sarin, M. M.; Rengarajan, R.

    2014-08-01

    transport of chemical constituents from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) to the Bay of Bengal is a conspicuous seasonal feature that occurs during the late NE-monsoon (December-March). With this perspective, aerosol composition and abundance of mineral dust have been studied during November 2009 to March 2010 from a sampling site (Kharagpur: 22.3°N, 87.3°E) in the IGP, representing the atmospheric outflow to the Bay of Bengal. The chemical composition of PM2.5 suggests the dominance of nss-SO42- (6.9-24.3 µg m-3); whereas the abundance of mineral dust varied from 3 to 18 µg m-3. The concentration of aerosol iron (FeTot) and its fractional solubility (Fews % = Fews/FeTot *100, where Fews is the water-soluble fraction of FeTot) varied from 60 to 1144 ng m-3 and from 6.7 to 26.5%, respectively. A striking similarity in the temporal variability of total inorganic acidity (TIA = NO3- + nss-SO42-) and Fews (%) provides evidence for acid processing of mineral dust (alluvium) during atmospheric transport from the IGP. The contribution of TIA to water-soluble inorganic species [(nss-SO42- + NO3-)/ΣWSIS], mass ratios of Ca/Al and Fe/Al, and abundance of dust (%) and Fews (%) in the IGP-outflow are similar to the aerosol composition over the Bay of Bengal. With the rapid increase in anthropogenic activities over south and south-east Asia, the enhanced fractional solubility of aerosol iron (attributed to acid processing of mineral dust) has implications to further increase in the air-sea deposition of Fe to the Ocean surface.

  14. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-25

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, some evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin that are proposed to mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MV•+)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of secreted flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 µM) by MELs ([MV•+] ~ 42 µM and MtrABC ≤ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MV•+ and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 seconds. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (≤ 1 µM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. However, at higher FMN concentrations (> 1 µM), the reaction rates for both steps decreased and varied inversely with FMN concentration, indicating that FMN inhibited the MEL to Fe(III)-oxide electron transfer

  15. Nano-scale zero valent iron transport in a variable aperture dolomite fracture and a glass fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, P.; Sleep, B. E.; Cui, Z.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations are being performed to understand the transport behavior of carboxymethyl cellulose polymer stabilized nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) in a variable aperture dolomite rock fracture and a variable aperture glass replica of a fractured slate. The rock fracture was prepared by artificially inducing a fracture in a dolomite block along a stylolite, and the glass fracture was prepared by creating molds with melted glass on two opposing sides of a fractured slate rock block. Both of the fractures were 0.28 m in length and 0.21 m in width. Equivalent hydraulic apertures are about 110 microns for the rock fracture and 250 microns for the glass replica fracture. Sodium bromide and lissamine green B (LGB) serve as conservative tracers in the rock fracture and glass replica fracture, respectively. A dark box set-up with a light source and digital camera is being used to visualize the LGB and CMC-nZVI movement in the glass fracture. Experiments are being performed to determine the effects of water specific discharge and CMC concentration on nZVI transport in the fractures. Transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-visual spectrophotometry were performed to determine the stability and characteristics of the CMC-nZVI mixture. The transport of bromide, LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI in both fractures is being evaluated through analysis of the effluent concentrations. Time-lapse images are also being captured for the glass fracture. Bromide, LGB, and CMC recoveries have exceeded 95% in both fractures. Significant channeling has been observed in the fractures for CMC transport due to viscous effects.

  16. Iron content of ferritin modulates its uptake by intestinal epithelium: implications for co-transport of prions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunkesula Solomon RB

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The spread of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD in the deer and elk population has caused serious public health concerns due to its potential to infect farm animals and humans. Like other prion disorders such a sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob-disease of humans and Mad Cow Disease of cattle, CWD is caused by PrP-scrapie (PrPSc, a β-sheet rich isoform of a normal cell surface glycoprotein, the prion protein (PrPC. Since PrPSc is sufficient to cause infection and neurotoxicity if ingested by a susceptible host, it is important to understand the mechanism by which it crosses the stringent epithelial cell barrier of the small intestine. Possible mechanisms include co-transport with ferritin in ingested food and uptake by dendritic cells. Since ferritin is ubiquitously expressed and shares considerable homology among species, co-transport of PrPSc with ferritin can result in cross-species spread with deleterious consequences. We have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models of intestinal epithelial cell barrier to understand the role of ferritin in mediating PrPSc uptake and transport. In this report, we demonstrate that PrPSc and ferritin from CWD affected deer and elk brains and scrapie from sheep resist degradation by digestive enzymes, and are transcytosed across a tight monolayer of human epithelial cells with significant efficiency. Likewise, ferritin from hamster brains is taken up by mouse intestinal epithelial cells in vivo, indicating that uptake of ferritin is not limited by species differences as described for prions. More importantly, the iron content of ferritin determines its efficiency of uptake and transport by Caco-2 cells and mouse models, providing insight into the mechanism(s of ferritin and PrPSc uptake by intestinal epithelial cells.

  17. Iron content of ferritin modulates its uptake by intestinal epithelium: implications for co-transport of prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhupanapadu Sunkesula, Solomon Raju; Luo, Xiu; Das, Dola; Singh, Ajay; Singh, Neena

    2010-01-01

    The spread of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in the deer and elk population has caused serious public health concerns due to its potential to infect farm animals and humans. Like other prion disorders such a sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob-disease of humans and Mad Cow Disease of cattle, CWD is caused by PrP-scrapie (PrPSc), a beta-sheet rich isoform of a normal cell surface glycoprotein, the prion protein (PrPC). Since PrPSc is sufficient to cause infection and neurotoxicity if ingested by a susceptible host, it is important to understand the mechanism by which it crosses the stringent epithelial cell barrier of the small intestine. Possible mechanisms include co-transport with ferritin in ingested food and uptake by dendritic cells. Since ferritin is ubiquitously expressed and shares considerable homology among species, co-transport of PrPSc with ferritin can result in cross-species spread with deleterious consequences. We have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models of intestinal epithelial cell barrier to understand the role of ferritin in mediating PrPSc uptake and transport. In this report, we demonstrate that PrPSc and ferritin from CWD affected deer and elk brains and scrapie from sheep resist degradation by digestive enzymes, and are transcytosed across a tight monolayer of human epithelial cells with significant efficiency. Likewise, ferritin from hamster brains is taken up by mouse intestinal epithelial cells in vivo, indicating that uptake of ferritin is not limited by species differences as described for prions. More importantly, the iron content of ferritin determines its efficiency of uptake and transport by Caco-2 cells and mouse models, providing insight into the mechanism(s) of ferritin and PrPSc uptake by intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:20429907

  18. The properties and transport phenomena in oxide films on iron, nickel, chromium and their alloys in aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.; Betova, I.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-01-01

    The construction materials used in coolant systems in nuclear power plants become covered with oxide films as a result of exposure to the aqueous environment. The susceptibility of the materials to different forms of corrosion, as well as the extent of the incorporation of radioactive species on the surfaces of the primary circuit, are greatly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of these oxide films. The composition and characteristics of the oxide films in turn depend on the applied water chemistry. This work was undertaken in order to collect and evaluate the present views on the structure and behaviour of oxide films formed on iron- and nickel-based materials in aqueous environments. This survey should serve to recognise the areas in which more understanding and research effort is needed. The review begins with a discussion on the bulk oxides of iron, nickel and chromium, as well as their mixed oxides. In addition to bulk oxides, the structure and properties of oxide films forming on pure iron, nickel and chromium and on iron- and nickel-based engineering alloys are considered. General approaches to model the structure and growth of oxide films on metals are discussed in detail. The specific features of the oxide structures, properties and growth at high temperatures are presented with special focus on the relevance of existing models. Finally, the role of oxide films in localised corrosion, oxide breakdown pitting. Stress corrosion cracking and related phenomena is considered. The films formed on the surfaces of iron- and nickel-based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments generally comprise two layers, i.e. the so-called duplex structure. The inner part is normally enriched in chromium and has a more compact structure, while the outer part is enriched in iron and has a cracked or porous structure. The information collected clearly indicates the effect of the chemical environment on the properties of oxide films growing on metal surfaces

  19. Transport implications resulting from internal redistribution of arsenic and iron within constructed soil aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masue-Slowey, Yoko; Kocar, Benjamin D; Jofré, Sergio Andrés Bea; Mayer, K Ulrich; Fendorf, Scott

    2011-01-15

    Soils are an aggregate-based structured media that have a multitude of pore domains resulting in varying degrees of advective and diffusive solute and gas transport. Consequently, a spectrum of biogeochemical processes may function at the aggregate scale that collectively, and coupled with solute transport, determine element cycling in soils and sediments. To explore how the physical structure impacts biogeochemical processes influencing the fate and transport of As, we examined temporal changes in speciation and distribution of As and Fe within constructed aggregates through experimental measurement and reactive transport simulations. Spherical aggregates were made with As(V)-bearing ferrihydrite-coated sand inoculated with Shewanella sp. ANA-3; aerated solute flow around the aggregate was then induced. Despite the aerated aggregate exterior, where As(V) and ferrihydrite persist as the dominant species, anoxia develops within the aggregate interior. As a result, As and Fe redox gradients emerge, and the proportion of As(III) and magnetite increases toward the aggregate interior. Arsenic(III) and Fe(II) produced in the interior migrate toward the aggregated exterior and result in coaccumulation of As and Fe(III) proximal to preferential flow paths as a consequence of oxygenic precipitation. The oxidized rind of aggregates thus serves as a barrier to As release into advecting pore-water, but also leads to be a buildup of this hazardous element at preferential flow boundaries that could be released upon shifting geochemical conditions. PMID:21158450

  20. Effects of symmetry and spin configuration on spin-dependent transport properties of iron-phthalocyanine-based devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Li-Ling [Institute of Super Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Science, Hunan University of Technology, Zhuzhou 412007 (China); Yang, Bing-Chu, E-mail: bingchuyang@csu.edu.cn; Li, Xin-Mei; Cao, Can [Institute of Super Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Long, Meng-Qiu, E-mail: mqlong@csu.edu.cn [Institute of Super Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-07-21

    Spin-dependent transport properties of nanodevices constructed by iron-phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule sandwiched between two zigzag graphene nanoribbon electrodes are studied using first-principles quantum transport calculations. The effects of the symmetry and spin configuration of electrodes have been taken into account. It is found that large magnetoresistance, large spin polarization, dual spin-filtering, and negative differential resistance (NDR) can coexist in these devices. Our results show that 5Z-FePc system presents well conductive ability in both parallel (P) and anti-parallel (AP) configurations. For 6Z-FePc-P system, spin filtering effect and large spin polarization can be found. A dual spin filtering and NDR can also be shown in 6Z-FePc-AP. Our studies indicate that the dual spin filtering effect depends on the orbitals symmetry of the energy bands and spin mismatching of the electrodes. And all the effects would open up possibilities for their applications in spin-valve, spin-filter as well as effective spin diode devices.

  1. Iron, cobalt and gadolinium transport in methanogenic granules measured by 3D magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eBartacek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Description of processes such as bioaccumulation, bioavailability and biosorption of heavy metals in biofilm matrixes requires the quantification of their transport. This study shows 3D MRI measurements of the penetration of free (Fe2+, Co2+ and Gd3+ and complexed ([FeEDTA]2- and [GdDTPA]2- metal ions in a single methanogenic granule. Interactions (sorption or precipitation between free metals and the biofilm matrix result in extreme shortening of the spin-spin relaxation time (T2 and a decrease of the amplitude (A0 of the MRI signal, which hampers the quantification of the metal concentration inside the granular sludge matrix. MRI images clearly showed the presence of distinct regions (dead or living biomass, cracks and precipitates in the granular matrix, which influenced the metal transport. For the free metal ions, a reactive barrier was formed that moved through the granule, especially in the case of Gd3+. Chelated metals penetrated faster and without reaction front. Diffusion of [GdDTPA]2- could be quantified, revealing the course of its transport and the uneven (0.2 – 0.4 mmol·L-1 distribution of the final [GdDTPA]2- concentration within the granular biofilm matrix at equilibrium.

  2. Bacterial clearance, heterophil function, and hematological parameters of transport-stressed turkey poults supplemented with dietary yeast extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, G R; Huff, W E; Farnell, M B; Rath, N C; Solis de Los Santos, F; Donoghue, A M

    2010-03-01

    Yeast extracts (YE) contain biological response modifiers that may be useful as alternatives to antibiotics for controlling pathogens in poultry production and mitigating the deleterious effects of production stressors. The objective of the present study was to determine the ability of a commercial dietary YE (Alphamune) to modulate the immune response in male turkey poults challenged with Escherichia coli and subjected to transport stress. Alphamune was added to turkey poult diets at 0, 500, or 1,000 g/ton. Poults were challenged by air sac injection with 60 cfu of E. coli at 1 wk of age. At 3 wk of age, these challenged birds were subjected to transport stress and birds were bled and necropsied the following morning. Blood cell numbers and percentages, hematological parameters, and clinical chemistry values were determined. Oxidative burst activity of isolated heterophils was measured using stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate and a 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay. Data were analyzed using GLM and least squares means procedures of the SAS program. The numbers and percentages of heterophils in peripheral blood were increased and their oxidative burst activity was stimulated by YE. The stress challenge dramatically increased oxidative burst and this increase was significantly modulated by YE treatment. Serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, and triglycerides were decreased and uric acid levels, erythrocyte numbers, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were increased by YE supplementation. Bacteria were isolated from the air sac and liver of a lower percentage of birds provided with YE. These results suggest that dietary YE has potential as a nonantibiotic alternative for decreasing bacterial pathogens in turkey production. PMID:20181859

  3. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  4. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Acquisition Influences Motility and Is Required for Full Virulence of the Xylem-Dwelling Bacterial Phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii

    OpenAIRE

    Burbank, Lindsey; Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Roper, M Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Iron is a key micronutrient for microbial growth but is often present in low concentrations or in biologically unavailable forms. Many microorganisms overcome this challenge by producing siderophores, which are ferric-iron chelating compounds that enable the solubilization and acquisition of iron in a bioactive form. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. The proteins involved in the biosy...

  5. MavN is a Legionella pneumophila vacuole-associated protein required for efficient iron acquisition during intracellular growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Dervla T.; Laguna, Rita K.; Valtz, Nicole; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and virulence of most intravacuolar pathogens. The mechanisms by which microbes bypass host iron restriction to gain access to this metal across the host vacuolar membrane are poorly characterized. In this work, we identify a unique intracellular iron acquisition strategy used by Legionella pneumophila. The bacterial Icm/Dot (intracellular multiplication/defect in organelle trafficking) type IV secretion system targets the bacterial-derived MavN (more regions allowing vacuolar colocalization N) protein to the surface of the Legionella-containing vacuole where this putative transmembrane protein facilitates intravacuolar iron acquisition. The ΔmavN mutant exhibits a transcriptional iron-starvation signature before its growth is arrested during the very early stages of macrophage infection. This intracellular growth defect is rescued only by the addition of excess exogenous iron to the culture medium and not a variety of other metals. Consistent with MavN being a translocated substrate that plays an exclusive role during intracellular growth, the mutant shows no defect for growth in broth culture, even under severe iron-limiting conditions. Putative iron-binding residues within the MavN protein were identified, and point mutations in these residues resulted in defects specific for intracellular growth that are indistinguishable from the ΔmavN mutant. This model of a bacterial protein inserting into host membranes to mediate iron transport provides a paradigm for how intravacuolar pathogens can use virulence-associated secretion systems to manipulate and acquire host iron. PMID:26330609

  6. Iron and Iron Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Melike Sezgin Evim; Birol Baytan; Adalet Meral Güneş

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for almost all living organisms except some bacteria. A great number of new articles related to the iron metabolism have been published in recent years explaining new findings. Hepsidine, a peptide hormon, that is recently found, regulates iron methabolism by effecting iron absorbsion from gut, secreting iron from hepatic store and flows iron from macrophages. Hepsidin blockes to effluxe iron from cells by bounding to ferroportin and by inducing ferroportin destru...

  7. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting, E-mail: qixiaoting@cnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd{sup 2+} uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  8. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd2+ uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance

  9. Effect of sulfur addition on the transport properties of semiconducting iron phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Desoky, M.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Suez (Egypt); Ibrahim, F.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Suez Canal University, Al-Arish (Egypt); Hassaan, M.Y. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City, 11884 Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-08-15

    The present paper focuses on a quantitative analysis of the metallic and semiconducting behavior of electrical resistivity in La{sub 0.91}Rb{sub 0.06}Mn{sub 0.94}O{sub 3} manganites. The contribution of inherent low-frequency acoustic phonons as well as high-frequency optical phonons, to the electron-phonon resistivity is estimated following Bloch-Gruneisen model. The computed phonon resistivity is compared with that of reported metallic resistivity, accordingly {rho}diff. [{rho}exp. - {l_brace}{rho}0 + {rho}e-ph (={rho}ac + {rho}op){r_brace}] have been analysed through electron-electron scattering. Also, the difference can be varies linearly with T{sup 4.5} in accordance with the electron-magnon scattering in the double exchange process. The results reveal important aspects transport mechanism as well as point out that it is not only dominated by electron-phonon scattering, but also by electron-electron and electron-magnon scattering process. Alternatively, in high temperature regime (T {>=} T{sub P}) the semiconducting nature is discussed with Mott's variable range hopping (VRH) and small polaron conduction (SPC) model. (authors)

  10. Minor effect of physical size sorting on iron solubility of transported mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. B. Shi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Observations show that the fractional solubility of Fe (FS-Fe, percentage of dissolved to total Fe in dust aerosol increases considerably from 0.1 % in regions of high dust mass concentration to 80 % in remote regions where concentrations are low. Here, we combined laboratory geochemical measurements with global aerosol model simulations to test the hypothesis that the increase in FS-Fe is due to physical size sorting during transport. We determined the FS-Fe and fractional solubility of Al (FS-Al in size-fractionated dust generated from two representative soil samples collected from known Saharan dust source regions using a customized dust re-suspension and collection system. The results show that the FS-Fe is size-dependent and ranges from 0.1–0.3 % in the coarse size fractions (>1 μm to ~0.2–0.8 % in the fine size fractions (<1 μm. The FS-Al shows a similar size distribution to that of the FS-Fe. The size-resolved FS-Fe data were then combined with simulated dust mass concentration and size distribution data from a global aerosol model, GLOMAP, to calculate the FS-Fe of dust aerosol over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. We find that the calculated FS-Fe in the dust aerosol increases systematically from ~0.1 % at high dust mass concentrations (e.g., >100 μg m−3 to ~0.2 % at low concentrations (<100 μg m–3 due to physical size sorting (i.e., particle gravitational settling. These values are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than those observed on cruises across the tropical and sub-tropical North Atlantic Ocean under an important pathway of Saharan dust plumes for similar dust mass concentrations. Even when the FS-Fe of sub-micrometer size fractions (0.18–0.32 μm, 0.32–0.56 μm, and 0.56–1.0 μm in the model is increased by a factor of 10 over the measured values, the calculated FS-Fe of the dust is still more than an order of magnitude lower than that measured in the field

  11. Minor effect of physical size sorting on iron solubility of transported mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. B. Shi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Observations show that the fractional solubility of Fe (FS-Fe, ratio of dissolved to total Fe in dust aerosol increases dramatically from ~0.1% in regions of high dust mass concentration to 80% in remote regions where concentrations are low. Here, we combined laboratory geochemical measurements with global aerosol model simulations to test the hypothesis that the increase in FS-Fe is due to physical size sorting during transport. We determined the FS-Fe and fractional solubility of Al (FS-Al in size-fractionated dust generated from two representative soil samples collected from known Saharan dust source regions using a customized dust re-suspension and collection system. The results show that the FS-Fe is size-dependent and ranges from 0.1–0.3 % in the coarse size fractions (>1 μm to ~0.2–0.8 % in the fine size fractions (<1 μm. The FS-Al shows a similar size distribution to that of FS-Fe. The size-resolved FS-Fe data were then combined with simulated dust mass concentration and size distribution data from a global aerosol model, GLOMAP, to calculate the FS-Fe of dust aerosol over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. We find that the calculated FS-Fe in the dust aerosol increases systematically from ~0.1 % at high dust mass concentrations (e.g., >100 μg m−3 to ~0.2 % at low concentrations (<100 μg m−3 due to physical size sorting (i.e., particle gravitational settling. These values are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than those observed on cruises across the tropical and sub-tropical North Atlantic Ocean under an important pathway of Saharan dust plumes for similar dust mass concentrations. Even when the FS-Fe of sub-micrometer size fractions (0.18–0.32 μm, 0.32–0.56 μm, and 0.56–1.0 μm in the model is increased by a factor of 10 over the measured values, the calculated FS-Fe of the dust is still more than an order of magnitude lower than that measured in the field. Therefore, the

  12. Deficiency of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2 Beta Induces Brain Iron Accumulation through Upregulation of Divalent Metal Transporter 1

    OpenAIRE

    Goichi Beck; Koei Shinzawa; Hideki Hayakawa; Kousuke Baba; Toru Yasuda; Hisae Sumi-Akamaru; Yoshihide Tsujimoto; Hideki Mochizuki

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PLA2G6 have been proposed to be the cause of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation type 2. The present study aimed to clarify the mechanism underlying brain iron accumulation during the deficiency of calcium-independent phospholipase A2 beta (iPLA2β), which is encoded by the PLA2G6 gene. Perl's staining with diaminobenzidine enhancement was used to visualize brain iron accumulation. Western blotting was used to investigate the expression of molecules involved in iron hom...

  13. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  14. Genetics Home Reference: African iron overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shedding of excess iron through blood loss in menstruation and childbirth. The prevalence of increased iron stores ... is absorbed through the walls of the small intestine. Ferroportin then transports iron from the small intestine ...

  15. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  16. Effect of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense on serum iron levels in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Setayesh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The Magnetotactic bacteria Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense (MSR-1 mineralizes the magnetite (Fe3 O4 crystals and organizes a highly ordered intracellular structure, called the magnetosome. Iron transport system supports the biogenesis of magnetite. Although iron is an essential trace element for many metabolic pathways of the body, increase or decrease in iron will cause many diseases. Mice were infected by MSR-1 to study survival of bacteria in mice when injected by different routes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether bacterial magnetite formation could take up Fe2+ ions from the blood an animal model.Materials and Methods: In this study, MSR-1 at a dose lower than LD50 in 200 μl volume of PBS buffer was injected as intravascular (i.v, peritoneal (i.p and subcutaneous (s.c in mice. Number of viable bacterial was determined in organs such as liver, spleen and lymph node by measuring colony-forming unit (CFU. Moreover, serum iron level was evaluated by using commercial kits.Results and Conclusion: According to CFU measurements, after 96 hours, mice can clear MSR-1 from their body with different routes of injection. We have also shown that MSR-1 bacteria can affect the blood iron level in mice. The serum iron level decreased from control level in the first 24 h after i.v injection (P < 0.05. Our research on optimizing the biological magnetic system is still continuing.

  17. Transport and retention of xanthan gum-stabilized microscale zero-valent iron particles in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jia; Tang, Fenglin; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Microscale zero valent iron (mZVI) is a promising material for in-situ contaminated groundwater remediation. However, its usefulness has been usually inhibited by mZVI particles' low mobility in saturated porous media for sedimentation and deposition. In our study, laboratory experiments, including sedimentation studies, rheological measurements and transport tests, were conducted to investigate the feasibility of xanthan gum (XG) being used as a coating agent for mZVI particle stabilization. In addition, the effects of XG concentration, flow rate, grain diameter and water chemistry on XG-coated mZVI (XG-mZVI) particle mobility were explored by analyzing its breakthrough curves and retention profiles. It was demonstrated that XG worked efficiently to enhance the suspension stability and mobility of mZVI particles through the porous media as a shear thinning fluid, especially at a higher concentration level (3 g/L). The results of the column study showed that the mobility of XG-mZVI particles increased with an increasing flow rate and larger grain diameter. At the highest flow rate (2.30 × 10(-3) m/s) within the coarsest porous media (0.8-1.2 mm), 86.52% of the XG-mZVI flowed through the column. At the lowest flow rate (0.97 × 10(-4) m/s) within the finest porous media (0.3-0.6 mm), the retention was dramatically strengthened, with only 48.22% of the particles flowing through the column. The XG-mZVI particles appeared to be easily trapped at the beginning of the column especially at a low flow rate. In terms of two representative water chemistry parameters (ion strength and pH value), no significant influence on XG-mZVI particle mobility was observed. The experimental results suggested that straining was the primary mechanism of XG-mZVI retention under saturated condition. Given the above results, the specific site-related conditions should be taken into consideration for the design of a successful delivery system to achieve a compromise between

  18. Brain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging reveals detailed spatial and temporal distribution of iron-based nanoparticles transported through water-saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, Laure; Herrling, Maria Pia; Guthausen, Gisela; Horn, Harald; Delay, Markus

    2015-11-01

    The application of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) such as iron-based ENP in environmental systems or in the human body inevitably raises the question of their mobility. This also includes aspects of product optimization and assessment of their environmental fate. Therefore, the key aim was to investigate the mobility of iron-based ENP in water-saturated porous media. Laboratory-scale transport experiments were conducted using columns packed with quartz sand as model solid phase. Different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were selected to study the influence of primary particle size (dP = 20 nm and 80 nm) and surface functionalization (plain, -COOH and -NH2 groups) on particle mobility. In particular, the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the transport and retention behaviour of SPION was investigated. In our approach, a combination of conventional breakthrough curve (BTC) analysis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively and non-destructively visualize the SPION inside the column was applied. Particle surface properties (surface functionalization and resulting zeta potential) had a major influence while their primary particle size turned out to be less relevant. In particular, the mobility of SPION was significantly increased in the presence of NOM due to the sorption of NOM onto the particle surface resulting in a more negative zeta potential. MRI provided detailed spatially resolved information complementary to the quantitative BTC results. The approach can be transferred to other porous systems and contributes to a better understanding of particle transport in environmental porous media and porous media in technical applications.

  20. Two Isoforms of a Divalent Metal Transporter (DMT1) in Schistosoma mansoni Suggest a Surface-associated Pathway for Iron Absorption in Schistosomes*

    OpenAIRE

    Smyth, Danielle J.; Glanfield, Amber; McManus, Donald P; Hacker, Elke; Blair, David; Anderson, Greg J.; Jones, Malcolm K.

    2005-01-01

    We describe two homologues of the mammalian divalent metal transporter (DMT1) for Schistosoma mansoni, a pathogenic intravascular parasite of humans. Schistosomes have a high nutritional and metabolic demand for iron. Nucleotide sequences of the parasite homologues, designated SmDMT1A and -B, are identical in all but the 5′-regions. The predicted amino acid sequences share at least 60% identity with DMT1 (=Nramp2) of humans, mice, and rats, and at least 55% identity with Nramp1 from mice, hum...

  1. Hepcidin: an emerging biomarker for iron disorders, inflammatory diseases, and infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Mark E.; Olbina, Gordana; Ostland, Vaughn E.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2010-04-01

    The peptide hormone hepcidin, has emerged as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of hepcidin is a principal or contributing factor in most genetic and acquired systemic iron disorders, including anemia of inflammation (anemia of chronic disease). Hepcidin maintains healthy blood iron levels by regulating dietary iron absorption and transport from body iron stores to plasma. High serum hepcidin levels observed in chronic and acute inflammatory conditions can cause anemia by limiting plasma iron available for erythropoiesis. Chronically low serum hepcidin levels cause iron-overload and ultimately, accumulation of iron in liver and heart. We recently validated the first immunoassay for serum hepcidin and established the normal ranges in adults. Hepcidin has excellent potential as a biomarker and has a known mechanism of action, good stability, and rapid response to iron stores, inflammatory stimuli, and bacterial infections. Hepcidin can be measured in blood, urine, and saliva, and is generally not measurable in iron deficient/anemic patients and highly elevated in inflammatory diseases and infections. Intrinsic LifeSciences (ILS) is developing second generation hepcidin immunoassays and lateral-flow POC devices for hepcidin, a well characterized multi-purpose biomarker with applications in global health security.

  2. The effect of iron limitation on the transcriptome and proteome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kent Lim

    Full Text Available One of the most important micronutrients for bacterial growth is iron, whose bioavailability in soil is limited. Consequently, rhizospheric bacteria such as Pseudomonas fluorescens employ a range of mechanisms to acquire or compete for iron. We investigated the transcriptomic and proteomic effects of iron limitation on P. fluorescens Pf-5 by employing microarray and iTRAQ techniques, respectively. Analysis of this data revealed that genes encoding functions related to iron homeostasis, including pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis, a number of TonB-dependent receptor systems, as well as some inner-membrane transporters, were significantly up-regulated in response to iron limitation. Transcription of a ribosomal protein L36-encoding gene was also highly up-regulated during iron limitation. Certain genes or proteins involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG, orfamide A and pyrrolnitrin, as well as a chitinase, were over-expressed under iron-limited conditions. In contrast, we observed that expression of genes involved in hydrogen cyanide production and flagellar biosynthesis were down-regulated in an iron-depleted culture medium. Phenotypic tests revealed that Pf-5 had reduced swarming motility on semi-solid agar in response to iron limitation. Comparison of the transcriptomic data with the proteomic data suggested that iron acquisition is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  3. Route and Regulation of Zinc, Cadmium, and Iron Transport in Rice Plants (Oryza sativa L.) during Vegetative Growth and Grain Filling: Metal Transporters, Metal Speciation, Grain Cd Reduction and Zn and Fe Biofortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Ishikawa, Satoru; Fujimaki, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) are essential but are sometimes deficient in humans, while cadmium (Cd) is toxic if it accumulates in the liver and kidneys at high levels. All three are contained in the grains of rice, a staple cereal. Zn and Fe concentrations in rice grains harvested under different levels of soil/hydroponic metals are known to change only within a small range, while Cd concentrations show greater changes. To clarify the mechanisms underlying such different metal contents, we synthesized information on the routes of metal transport and accumulation in rice plants by examining metal speciation, metal transporters, and the xylem-to-phloem transport system. At grain-filling, Zn and Cd ascending in xylem sap are transferred to the phloem by the xylem-to-phloem transport system operating at stem nodes. Grain Fe is largely derived from the leaves by remobilization. Zn and Fe concentrations in phloem-sap and grains are regulated within a small range, while Cd concentrations vary depending on xylem supply. Transgenic techniques to increase concentrations of the metal chelators (nicotianamine, 2'-deoxymugineic acid) are useful in increasing grain Zn and Fe concentrations. The elimination of OsNRAMP5 Cd-uptake transporter and the enhancement of root cell vacuolar Cd sequestration reduce uptake and root-to-shoot transport, respectively, resulting in a reduction of grain Cd accumulation. PMID:26287170

  4. Route and Regulation of Zinc, Cadmium, and Iron Transport in Rice Plants (Oryza sativa L. during Vegetative Growth and Grain Filling: Metal Transporters, Metal Speciation, Grain Cd Reduction and Zn and Fe Biofortification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadakatsu Yoneyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn and iron (Fe are essential but are sometimes deficient in humans, while cadmium (Cd is toxic if it accumulates in the liver and kidneys at high levels. All three are contained in the grains of rice, a staple cereal. Zn and Fe concentrations in rice grains harvested under different levels of soil/hydroponic metals are known to change only within a small range, while Cd concentrations show greater changes. To clarify the mechanisms underlying such different metal contents, we synthesized information on the routes of metal transport and accumulation in rice plants by examining metal speciation, metal transporters, and the xylem-to-phloem transport system. At grain-filling, Zn and Cd ascending in xylem sap are transferred to the phloem by the xylem-to-phloem transport system operating at stem nodes. Grain Fe is largely derived from the leaves by remobilization. Zn and Fe concentrations in phloem-sap and grains are regulated within a small range, while Cd concentrations vary depending on xylem supply. Transgenic techniques to increase concentrations of the metal chelators (nicotianamine, 2′-deoxymugineic acid are useful in increasing grain Zn and Fe concentrations. The elimination of OsNRAMP5 Cd-uptake transporter and the enhancement of root cell vacuolar Cd sequestration reduce uptake and root-to-shoot transport, respectively, resulting in a reduction of grain Cd accumulation.

  5. Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage as an ecosystem service for Brussels, Belgium: investigating iron (hydr)oxide precipitation with reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibas, Christian; Possemiers, Mathias; Huysmans, Marijke

    2016-04-01

    In an evolving energy system it is important that urbanized areas contribute to their own energy demands. To reduce greenhouse gas emissions sustainable energy systems with a high efficiency are required, e.g. using urban aquifers as an ecosystem service. Here the potential of seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage and recovery (ATES) for the Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium is investigated. An important shallow geologic formation in the Brussels Capital Region is the Brussels Sand formation, a 20-60 m thick phreatic aquifer. The Brussels Sand Formation is known for its potential for ATES systems, but also for its varying redox and hydraulic conditions. Important limiting factors for ATES systems in the Brussels Sand Formation therefore are the hydraulic conductivity and the geochemical composition of the groundwater. Near the redox boundary iron hydroxide precipitation can negatively influence ATES well performance due to clogging. The interactions between physical processes (e.g. particle transport and clogging in the wider proximity of the ATES well) and chemical processes (e.g. influence of the operation temperatures on precipitation processes) during ATES operation are complex but not well understood. Therefore we constructed numerical groundwater flow models in MODFLOW to estimate maximum pumping and injection rates of different hydraulic conditions and competing water uses in the Brussels Sand Formation. In further steps the thermal potential for ATES was quantified using MT3DMS and the reactive transport model PHT3D was applied to assess the effects of operating ATES systems near the redox boundary. Results show that initial mixing plays an important role in the development of iron(hydr)oxide precipitation around the ATES wells, with the highest concentrations around the cold wells. This behavior is enhanced by the temperature effect; temperature differences of ΔT≈10°C already influence the iron (hydr)oxide concentration. The initial injection into the

  6. MgAtr7, a new type of ABC transporter from Mycosphaerella graminicola involved in iron homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, L.H.; Roohparvar, R.; Waard, de M.A.

    2007-01-01

    The ABC transporter-encoding gene MgAtr7 from the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola was cloned based upon its high homology to ABC transporters involved in azole-fungicide sensitivity. Genomic and cDNA sequences indicated that the N-terminus of this ABC transporter contains a motif character

  7. Spray washing, absorbent cornstarch powder, and dry time to reduce bacterial numbers on soiled transport cage flooring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broiler transport cages are often used repeatedly without washing and fecal matter deposited on the floor surface can transfer Campylobacter from one flock to another. Allowing feces to dry is an effective but slow and logistically impractical means to kill Campylobacter in soiled transport cages. ...

  8. Iron Regulatory Proteins Mediate Host Resistance to Salmonella Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairz, Manfred; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Casarrubea, Daniela; Sonnweber, Thomas; Viatte, Lydie; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Fang, Ferric C; Hentze, Matthias W; Weiss, Guenter; Galy, Bruno

    2015-08-12

    Macrophages are essential for systemic iron recycling, and also control iron availability to pathogens. Iron metabolism in mammalian cells is orchestrated posttranscriptionally by iron-regulatory proteins (IRP)-1 and -2. Here, we generated mice with selective and combined ablation of both IRPs in macrophages to investigate the role of IRPs in controlling iron availability. These animals are hyperferritinemic but otherwise display normal clinical iron parameters. However, mutant mice rapidly succumb to systemic infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogenic bacterium that multiplies within macrophages, with increased bacterial burdens in liver and spleen. Ex vivo infection experiments indicate that IRP function restricts bacterial access to iron via the EntC and Feo bacterial iron-acquisition systems. Further, IRPs contain Salmonella by promoting the induction of lipocalin 2, a host antimicrobial factor that inhibits bacterial uptake of iron-laden siderophores, and by suppressing the ferritin iron pool. This work reveals the importance of the IRPs in innate immunity.

  9. A field investigation on transport of carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, J; Meißner, T; Potthoff, A; Bleyl, S; Georgi, A; Mackenzie, K; Trabitzsch, R; Werban, U; Oswald, S E

    2015-10-01

    The application of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for subsurface remediation of groundwater contaminants is a promising new technology, which can be understood as alternative to the permeable reactive barrier technique using granular iron. Dechlorination of organic contaminants by zero-valent iron seems promising. Currently, one limitation to widespread deployment is the fast agglomeration and sedimentation of nZVI in colloidal suspensions, even more so when in soils and sediments, which limits the applicability for the treatment of sources and plumes of contamination. Colloid-supported nZVI shows promising characteristics to overcome these limitations. Mobility of Carbo-Iron Colloids (CIC) - a newly developed composite material based on finely ground activated carbon as a carrier for nZVI - was tested in a field application: In this study, a horizontal dipole flow field was established between two wells separated by 5.3m in a confined, natural aquifer. The injection/extraction rate was 500L/h. Approximately 1.2kg of CIC was suspended with the polyanionic stabilizer carboxymethyl cellulose. The suspension was introduced into the aquifer at the injection well. Breakthrough of CIC was observed visually and based on total particle and iron concentrations detected in samples from the extraction well. Filtration of water samples revealed a particle breakthrough of about 12% of the amount introduced. This demonstrates high mobility of CIC particles and we suggest that nZVI carried on CIC can be used for contaminant plume remediation by in-situ formation of reactive barriers. PMID:25864966

  10. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models.

  11. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal from Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent via Bacterial Sulfate Reduction in an Anoxic Bioreactor Packed with Wood and Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Yamashita

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the removal of nitrogen and phosphate from the effluent of a sewage treatment plant over a long-term operation in bioreactors packed with different combinations of wood and iron, with a trickling filter packed with foam ceramics for nitrification. The average nitrification rate in the trickling filter was 0.17 kg N/m3∙day and remained at 0.11 kg N/m3∙day even when the water temperature was below 15 °C. The denitrification and phosphate removal rates in the bioreactor packed with aspen wood and iron were higher than those in the bioreactor packed with cedar chips and iron. The bioreactor packed with aspen wood and iron continued to remove nitrate and phosphate for >1200 days of operation. The nitrate removal activity of a biofilm attached to the aspen wood from the bioreactor after 784 days of operation was 0.42 g NO3-N/kg dry weight wood∙ day. There was no increase in the amount of dissolved organic matter in the outflow from the bioreactors.

  12. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal from wastewater treatment plant effluent via bacterial sulfate reduction in an anoxic bioreactor packed with wood and iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Yamamoto-Ikemoto, Ryoko

    2014-09-22

    We investigated the removal of nitrogen and phosphate from the effluent of a sewage treatment plant over a long-term operation in bioreactors packed with different combinations of wood and iron, with a trickling filter packed with foam ceramics for nitrification. The average nitrification rate in the trickling filter was 0.17 kg N/m3∙day and remained at 0.11 kg N/m3∙day even when the water temperature was below 15 °C. The denitrification and phosphate removal rates in the bioreactor packed with aspen wood and iron were higher than those in the bioreactor packed with cedar chips and iron. The bioreactor packed with aspen wood and iron continued to remove nitrate and phosphate for >1200 days of operation. The nitrate removal activity of a biofilm attached to the aspen wood from the bioreactor after 784 days of operation was 0.42 g NO3-N/kg dry weight wood∙ day. There was no increase in the amount of dissolved organic matter in the outflow from the bioreactors.

  13. Effects of iron supplementation on dominant bacterial groups in the gut, faecal SCFA and gut inflammation: a randomised, placebo-controlled intervention trial in South African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, Alexandra; Baumgartner, Jeannine; Riesen, Nathalie; Chassard, Christophe; Smuts, Cornelius M; Zimmermann, Michael B; Lacroix, Christophe

    2014-08-28

    Fe supplementation is a common strategy to correct Fe-deficiency anaemia in children; however, it may modify the gut microbiota and increase the risk for enteropathogenic infection. In the present study, we studied the impact of Fe supplementation on the abundance of dominant bacterial groups in the gut, faecal SCFA concentration and gut inflammation in children living in rural South Africa. In a randomised, placebo-controlled intervention trial of 38 weeks, 6- to 11-year-old children with Fe deficiency received orally either tablets containing 50 mg Fe as FeSO₄ (n 22) for 4 d/week or identical placebo (n 27). In addition, Fe-sufficient children (n 24) were included as a non-treated reference group. Faecal samples were analysed at baseline and at 2, 12 and 38 weeks to determine the effects of Fe supplementation on ten bacterial groups in the gut (quantitative PCR), faecal SCFA concentration (HPLC) and gut inflammation (faecal calprotectin concentration). At baseline, concentrations of bacterial groups in the gut, faecal SCFA and faecal calprotectin did not differ between Fe-deficient and Fe-sufficient children. Fe supplementation significantly improved Fe status in Fe-deficient children and did not significantly increase faecal calprotectin concentration. Moreover, no significant effect of Fe treatment or time × treatment interaction on the concentrations of bacterial groups in the gut or faecal SCFA was observed compared with the placebo treatment. Also, there were no significant differences observed in the concentrations of any of the bacterial target groups or faecal SCFA at 2, 12 or 38 weeks between the three groups of children when correcting for baseline values. The present study suggests that in African children with a low enteropathogen burden, Fe status and dietary Fe supplementation did not significantly affect the dominant bacterial groups in the gut, faecal SCFA concentration or gut inflammation.

  14. Bacterial Siderophores and their Biotechnological applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohandass, C.

    phytoplankton growth. Marine bacteria can successfully compete for this limited nutrient using a specialized iron transport system, including the production and release of siderophores, which mediate iron transport into the cell by specific membrane receptor... is excreted from the cell and the elaboration of a membrane receptor molecule, which binds the iron complex and transport the metal to the cell?s interior. Membrane receptor and enzymes that synthesize the iron binding molecules are coded by five genes in one...

  15. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Uijterschout

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  16. A Versatile Strategy for Production of Membrane Proteins with Diverse Topologies: Application to Investigation of Bacterial Homologues of Human Divalent Metal Ion and Nucleoside Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cheng; Hao, Zhenyu; Huysmans, Gerard; Lesiuk, Amelia; Bullough, Per; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Phillips, Simon E; Young, James D; Goldman, Adrian; Baldwin, Stephen A; Postis, Vincent L G

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many biological processes, from acquisition of nutrients to neurotransmission, and are targets for more than 50% of current therapeutic drugs. However, their investigation is hampered by difficulties in their production and purification on a scale suitable for structural studies. In particular, the nature and location of affinity tags introduced for the purification of recombinant membrane proteins can greatly influence their expression levels by affecting their membrane insertion. The extent of such effects typically depends on the transmembrane topologies of the proteins, which for proteins of unknown structure are usually uncertain. For example, attachment of oligohistidine tags to the periplasmic termini of membrane proteins often interferes with folding and drastically impairs expression in Escherichia coli. To circumvent this problem we have employed a novel strategy to enable the rapid production of constructs bearing a range of different affinity tags compatible with either cytoplasmic or periplasmic attachment. Tags include conventional oligohistidine tags compatible with cytoplasmic attachment and, for attachment to proteins with a periplasmic terminus, either tandem Strep-tag II sequences or oligohistidine tags fused to maltose binding protein and a signal sequence. Inclusion of cleavage sites for TEV or HRV-3C protease enables tag removal prior to crystallisation trials or a second step of purification. Together with the use of bioinformatic approaches to identify members of membrane protein families with topologies favourable to cytoplasmic tagging, this has enabled us to express and purify multiple bacterial membrane transporters. To illustrate this strategy, we describe here its use to purify bacterial homologues of human membrane proteins from the Nramp and ZIP families of divalent metal cation transporters and from the concentrative nucleoside transporter family. The proteins are expressed in E. coli in a

  17. Transport of sucrose-modified nanoscale zero-valent iron in saturated porous media: role of media size, injection rate and input concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhao, Yong-sheng; Han, Zhan-tao; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) in the remediation of contaminated groundwater raises concerns regarding its transport in aquifers. Laboratory-scale sand-packed column experiments were conducted with bare and sucrose-modified NZVI (SM-NZVI) to improve our understanding of the transport of the nanoparticles in saturated porous media, as well as the role of media size, suspension injection rate and concentration on the nanoparticle behavior. As the main indicative parameters, the normalized effluent concentration was measured and the deposition rate coefficient (k) was calculated for different simulated conditions. Overall, compared to the high retention of bare NZVI in the saturated silica column, SM-NZVI suspension could travel through the coarse sand column easily. However, the transport of SM-NZVI particles was not very satisfactory in a smaller size granular matrix especially in fine silica sand. Furthermore, the value of k regularly decreased with the increasing injection rate of suspension but increased with suspension concentration, which could reflect the role of these factors in the SM-NZVI travel process. The calculation of k-value at the tests condition adequately described the experimental results from the point of deposition dynamics, which meant the assumption of first-order deposition kinetics for the transport of NZVI particles was reasonable and feasible. PMID:26524436

  18. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  19. Simultaneous Transport of Two Bacterial Strains in Intact Cores from Oyster, Virginia: Biological Effects and Numerical Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Hailiang; Rothmel, Randi; Onstott, Tullis C.; Fuller, Mark E.; DeFlaun, Mary F.; Streger, Sheryl H.; Dunlap, Robb; Fletcher, Madilyn

    2002-01-01

    The transport characteristics of two adhesion-deficient, indigenous groundwater strains, Comamonas sp. strain DA001 and Erwinia herbicola OYS2-A, were studied by using intact sediment cores (7 by 50 cm) from Oyster, Va. Both strains are gram-negative rods (1.10 by 0.56 and 1.56 by 0.46 μm, respectively) with strongly hydrophilic membranes and a slightly negative surface charge. The two strains exhibited markedly different behaviors when they were transported through granular porous sediment. ...

  20. Quantitative analysis of dietary iron utilization for erythropoiesis in response to body iron status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo-Tezuka, Yukari; Noguchi-Sasaki, Mariko; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yorozu, Keigo; Shimonaka, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis. There are two sources of iron for erythropoiesis, dietary and stored iron; however, their relative contributions to erythropoiesis remain unknown. In this study, we used the stable iron isotope (57)Fe to quantify synthesis of hemoglobin derived from dietary iron. Using this method, we investigated the activities of dietary iron absorption and the utilization of dietary iron for erythropoiesis in responses to stimulated erythropoiesis and to interventions to alter body iron status. Under iron-loaded conditions, the activity of dietary iron absorption was clearly lowered in response to up-regulation of hepcidin, although the estimated activity of iron release from stored iron was not compared with that under control conditions. This result was supported by the observation that two duodenal iron transporters, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin, were downregulated by iron loading, although the levels of expression of ferroportin in iron storage tissues were not changed by iron loading under erythropoietic stimulation by epoetin-β pegol (C.E.R.A., a long-acting erythropoiesis-stimulating agent). These results indicate that the dietary iron absorption system is more sensitive to body iron status than are reticuloendothelial iron- release mechanisms. Our data indicated that there could be a regulatory mechanism favoring use of stored iron over dietary iron under iron-loaded conditions. PMID:26911670

  1. Evaluating the mobility of polymer-stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles and their potential to co-transport contaminants in intact soil cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekli, L; Brunetti, G; Marzouk, E R; Maoz-Shen, A; Smith, E; Naidu, R; Shon, H K; Lombi, E; Donner, E

    2016-09-01

    The use of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) has been advocated for the remediation of both soils and groundwater. A key parameter affecting nZVI remediation efficacy is the mobility of the particles as this influences the reaction zone where remediation can occur. However, by engineering nZVI particles with increased stability and mobility we may also inadvertently facilitate nZVI-mediated contaminant transport away from the zone of treatment. Previous nZVI mobility studies have often been limited to model systems as the presence of background Fe makes detection and tracking of nZVI in real systems difficult. We overcame this problem by synthesising Fe-59 radiolabelled nZVI. This enabled us to detect and quantify the leaching of nZVI-derived Fe-59 in intact soil cores, including a soil contaminated by Chromated-Copper-Arsenate. Mobility of a commercially available nZVI was also tested. The results showed limited mobility of both nanomaterials; mobility of nZVI below the injection/remediation zone was very limited. This Fe-59 experimental approach can be further extended to test nZVI transport in a wider range of contaminated soil types and textures and using different application methods and rates. The resulting database could then be used to develop and validate modelling of nZVI-facilitated contaminant transport on an individual soil basis suitable for site specific risk assessment prior to nZVI remediation.

  2. Differential Regulation of Ferritin Subunits and Iron Transport Proteins: An Effect of Targeted Hepatic X-Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Naila Naz; Shakil Ahmad; Silke Cameron; Federico Moriconi; Margret Rave-Fränk; Hans Christiansen; Clemens Friedrich Hess; Giuliano Ramadori; Malik, Ihtzaz A.

    2013-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate radiation-induced regulation of iron proteins including ferritin subunits in rats. Rat livers were selectively irradiated in vivo at 25 Gy. This dose can be used to model radiation effects to the liver without inducing overt radiation-induced liver disease. Sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Isolated hepatocytes were irradiated at 8 Gy. Ferritin light polypeptide (FTL) was detectable in the serum of sham-irradiated rats with an increase after irrad...

  3. Stabilisation of nanoscale zero-valent iron with biochar for enhanced transport and in-situ remediation of hexavalent chromium in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huijie; Fang, Zhanqiang; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Fang, Jianzhang; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a biochar-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI@BC) material was used for in situ remediation of hexavalent chromium-contaminated soil. Sedimentation tests and column experiments were used to compare the stability and mobility of nZVI@BC and bare-nZVI. The immobilisation efficiency of chromium, toxic effect of chromium and the content of iron were assessed through leaching tests and pot experiments. Sedimentation tests and transport experiments indicated that nZVI@BC with nZVI to BC mass ratio of 1:1 exhibited better stability and mobility than that of bare-nZVI. The immobilisation efficiency of Cr(VI) and Crtotal was 100% and 92.9%, respectively, when the soil was treated with 8 g/kg of nZVI@BC for 15 days. Moreover, such remediation effectively reduced the leachability of Fe caused by bare-nZVI. In addition, pot experiments showed that such remediation reduced the phytotoxicity of Cr and the leachable Fe and was favourable for plant growth. PMID:27064615

  4. Sources and transport of dissolved iron and manganese along the continental margin of the Bay of Biscay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Laës

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved iron (DFe; <0.2 µm and dissolved manganese (DMn; <0.2 µm concentrations were determined in the water column of the Bay of Biscay (eastern North Atlantic Ocean in March 2002. The samples were collected along a transect traversing from the European continental shelf over the continental slope. The highest DFe and DMn concentrations (2.39 nM and 6.10 nM, respectively were observed in the bottom waters on the shelf at stations closest to the coast. The release of trace metal from resuspended particles and the diffusion from pore waters were probably at the origin of elevated DFe and DMn concentrations in the Bottom Boundary Layer (BBL. In the slope region, the highest total dissolvable iron (TDFe, DFe and DMn values (24.6 nM, 1.58 nM and 2.12 nM, respectively were observed close to the bottom at depth of ca.~600–700 m. Internal wave activity and slope circulation are thought to be at the origin of this phenomenon. These processes were also very likely the cause of elevated concentrations (DFe: 1.27 nM, DMn: 2.34 nM measured in surface waters of stations located in the same area. At stations off the continental slope, the vertical distribution of both metals were typical of open ocean conditions, indicating that inputs from the continental margin did not impact the metal distributions in the offshore waters.

  5. Differential Regulation of Ferritin Subunits and Iron Transport Proteins: An Effect of Targeted Hepatic X-Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Naz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to investigate radiation-induced regulation of iron proteins including ferritin subunits in rats. Rat livers were selectively irradiated in vivo at 25 Gy. This dose can be used to model radiation effects to the liver without inducing overt radiation-induced liver disease. Sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Isolated hepatocytes were irradiated at 8 Gy. Ferritin light polypeptide (FTL was detectable in the serum of sham-irradiated rats with an increase after irradiation. Liver irradiation increased hepatic protein expression of both ferritin subunits. A rather early increase (3 h was observed for hepatic TfR1 and Fpn-1 followed by a decrease at 12 h. The increase in TfR2 persisted over the observed time. Parallel to the elevation of AST levels, a significant increase (24 h in hepatic iron content was measured. Complete blood count analysis showed a significant decrease in leukocyte number with an early increase in neutrophil granulocytes and a decrease in lymphocytes. In vitro, a significant increase in ferritin subunits at mRNA level was detected after irradiation which was further induced with a combination treatment of irradiation and acute phase cytokine. Irradiation can directly alter the expression of ferritin subunits and this response can be strongly influenced by radiation-induced proinflammatory cytokines. FTL can be used as a serum marker for early phase radiation-induced liver damage.

  6. Effect of injection velocity and particle concentration on transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron and hydraulic conductivity in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutz, Tessa J; Hornbruch, Götz; Dahmke, Andreas; Köber, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Successful groundwater remediation by injecting nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles requires efficient particle transportation and distribution in the subsurface. This study focused on the influence of injection velocity and particle concentration on the spatial NZVI particle distribution, the deposition processes and on quantifying the induced decrease in hydraulic conductivity (K) as a result of particle retention by lab tests and numerical simulations. Horizontal column tests of 2m length were performed with initial Darcy injection velocities (q0) of 0.5, 1.5, and 4.1m/h and elemental iron input concentrations (Fe(0)in) of 0.6, 10, and 17g/L. Concentrations of Fe(0) in the sand were determined by magnetic susceptibility scans, which provide detailed Fe(0) distribution profiles along the column. NZVI particles were transported farther at higher injection velocity and higher input concentrations. K decreased by one order of magnitude during injection in all experiments, with a stronger decrease after reaching Fe(0) concentrations of about 14-18g/kg(sand). To simulate the observed nanoparticle transport behavior the existing finite-element code OGS has been successfully extended and parameterized for the investigated experiments using blocking, ripening, and straining as governing deposition processes. Considering parameter relationships deduced from single simulations for each experiment (e.g. deposition rate constants as a function of flow velocity) one mean parameter set has been generated reproducing the observations in an adequate way for most cases of the investigated realistic injection conditions. An assessment of the deposition processes related to clogging effects showed that the percentage of retention due to straining and ripening increased during experimental run time resulting in an ongoing reduction of K. Clogging is mainly evoked by straining which dominates particle deposition at higher flow velocities, while blocking and ripening play a

  7. Effect of injection velocity and particle concentration on transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron and hydraulic conductivity in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutz, Tessa J.; Hornbruch, Götz; Dahmke, Andreas; Köber, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Successful groundwater remediation by injecting nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles requires efficient particle transportation and distribution in the subsurface. This study focused on the influence of injection velocity and particle concentration on the spatial NZVI particle distribution, the deposition processes and on quantifying the induced decrease in hydraulic conductivity (K) as a result of particle retention by lab tests and numerical simulations. Horizontal column tests of 2 m length were performed with initial Darcy injection velocities (q0) of 0.5, 1.5, and 4.1 m/h and elemental iron input concentrations (Fe0in) of 0.6, 10, and 17 g/L. Concentrations of Fe0 in the sand were determined by magnetic susceptibility scans, which provide detailed Fe0 distribution profiles along the column. NZVI particles were transported farther at higher injection velocity and higher input concentrations. K decreased by one order of magnitude during injection in all experiments, with a stronger decrease after reaching Fe0 concentrations of about 14-18 g/kg(sand). To simulate the observed nanoparticle transport behavior the existing finite-element code OGS has been successfully extended and parameterized for the investigated experiments using blocking, ripening, and straining as governing deposition processes. Considering parameter relationships deduced from single simulations for each experiment (e.g. deposition rate constants as a function of flow velocity) one mean parameter set has been generated reproducing the observations in an adequate way for most cases of the investigated realistic injection conditions. An assessment of the deposition processes related to clogging effects showed that the percentage of retention due to straining and ripening increased during experimental run time resulting in an ongoing reduction of K. Clogging is mainly evoked by straining which dominates particle deposition at higher flow velocities, while blocking and ripening play a

  8. The Role of Transition Metal Transporters for Iron, Zinc, Manganese, and Copper in the Pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Robert D.; Bobrov, Alexander G.; Fetherston, Jacqueline D.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, septicemic and pneumonic plague, encodes a multitude of Fe transport systems. Some of these are defective due to frameshift or IS element insertions, while others are functional in vitro but have no established role in causing infections. Indeed only 3 Fe transporters (Ybt, Yfe and Feo) have been shown to be important in at least one form of plague. The yersiniabactin (Ybt) system is essential in the early dermal/lymphatic stages of bubonic plague, irrelevant in the septicemic stage, and critical in pneumonic plague. Two Mn transporters have been characterized (Yfe and MntH). These two systems play a role in bubonic plague but the double yfe mntH mutant is fully virulent in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. The same in vivo phenotype occurs with a mutant lacking two (Yfe and Feo) of four ferrous transporters. A role for the Ybt siderophore in Zn acquisition has been revealed. Ybt-dependent Zn acquisition uses a transport system completely independent of the Fe-Ybt uptake system. Together Ybt components and ZnuABC play a critical role in Zn acquisition in vivo. Single mutants in either system retain high virulence in a mouse model of septicemic plague while the double mutant is completely avirulent. PMID:25891079

  9. Reduction of Mn-oxides by ferrous iron in a flow system: column experiment and reactive transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Appelo, C. A. J.

    2000-01-01

    of Mn21, Al31, Fe31, and Fe21 in the column outlet solution. However, the initial breakthrough of a peak of Ca21 and the observed pH buffering indicated that exchange processes were of importance as well. The amount of potential exchangers, such as birnessite and ferrihydrite, did vary in the course...... of understanding the interplay between chemical reactions and transport in addition to interactions between redox, proton buffering, and adsorption processes when dealing with natural sediments. Reactive transport modeling is a powerful tool to analyze and quantify such interactions. Copyright © 2000 Elsevier...

  10. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  11. Denitrification-Coupled Iron(II) Oxidation: A Key Process Regulating the Fate and Transport of Nitrate, Phosphate, and Arsenic in a Wastewater-Contaminated Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. L.; Kent, D. B.; Repert, D. A.; Hart, C. P.

    2007-12-01

    Denitrification in the subsurface is often viewed as a heterotrophic process. However, some denitrifiers can also utilize inorganic electron donors. In particular, Fe(II), which is common in many aquifers, could be an important reductant for contaminant nitrate. Anoxic iron oxidation would have additional consequences, including decreased mobility for species like arsenic and phosphate, which bind strongly to hydrous Fe(III) oxide. A study was conducted in a wastewater contaminant plume on Cape Cod to assess the potential for denitrification- coupled Fe(II) oxidation. Previous changes in wastewater disposal upgradient of the study area had resulted in nitrate being transported into a portion of the anoxic zone of the plume and decreased concentrations of Fe(II), phosphate, and arsenic. A series of anoxic tracers (groundwater + nitrate + bromide) were injected into the unaffected, Fe(II)-containing zone under natural gradient conditions. Denitrification was stimulated within 1 m of transport (4 days) for both low and high (100 & 1000 μM) nitrate additions, initially producing stiochiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N) and trace amounts of nitrite. Subsequent injections at the same site reduced nitrate even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and this was accompanied by an increase in colloidal Fe(III) and decreases in pH, total arsenic, and phosphate concentrations. All plume constituents returned to background levels several weeks after the tracer tests were completed. Groundwater microorganisms collected on filters during the tracer test rapidly and immediately reduced nitrite and oxidized Fe(II) in 3-hr laboratory incubations. Several pure cultures of Fe(II)-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were isolated from core material and subsequently characterized. All of the isolates were mixotrophic, simultaneously oxidizing organic carbon and Fe

  12. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  13. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  14. Efficiency of Vanilla, Patchouli and Ylang Ylang Essential Oils Stabilized by Iron Oxide@C14 Nanostructures against Bacterial Adherence and Biofilms Formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Bilcu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14 in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties.

  15. Efficiency of vanilla, patchouli and ylang ylang essential oils stabilized by iron oxide@C14 nanostructures against bacterial adherence and biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcu, Maxim; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Mogoșanu, George Dan; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A; Mihailescu, Dan Florin; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14) in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h) and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties.

  16. Efficiency of vanilla, patchouli and ylang ylang essential oils stabilized by iron oxide@C14 nanostructures against bacterial adherence and biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcu, Maxim; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Mogoșanu, George Dan; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A; Mihailescu, Dan Florin; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14) in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h) and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties. PMID:25375335

  17. Genome-wide analysis of copper, iron and zinc transporters in the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Elisabeth; Gómez-Gallego, Tamara; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción; Ferrol, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), belonging to the Glomeromycota, are soil microorganisms that establish mutualistic symbioses with the majority of higher plants. The efficient uptake of low mobility mineral nutrients by the fungal symbiont and their further transfer to the plant is a major feature of this symbiosis. Besides improving plant mineral nutrition, AMF can alleviate heavy metal toxicity to their host plants and are able to tolerate high metal concentrations in the soil. Nevertheless, we are far from understanding the key molecular determinants of metal homeostasis in these organisms. To get some insights into these mechanisms, a genome-wide analysis of Cu, Fe and Zn transporters was undertaken, making use of the recently published whole genome of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis. This in silico analysis allowed identification of 30 open reading frames in the R. irregularis genome, which potentially encode metal transporters. Phylogenetic comparisons with the genomes of a set of reference fungi showed an expansion of some metal transporter families. Analysis of the published transcriptomic profiles of R. irregularis revealed that a set of genes were up-regulated in mycorrhizal roots compared to germinated spores and extraradical mycelium, which suggests that metals are important for plant colonization. PMID:25352857

  18. Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes use different proteins to transport bacterial DNA into the plant cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, Walt

    2009-07-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes transport single-stranded DNA (ssDNA; T-strands) and virulence proteins into plant cells through a type IV secretion system. DNA transfer initiates when VirD2 nicks border sequences in the tumour-inducing plasmid, attaches to the 5' end, and pilots T-strands into plant cells. Agrobacterium tumefaciens translocates ssDNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells where it targets T-strands into the nucleus. Some A. rhizogenes strains lack VirE2 but transfer T-strands efficiently due to the GALLS gene, which complements an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant. VirE2 and full-length GALLS (GALLS-FL) contain nuclear localization sequences that target these proteins to the plant cell nucleus. VirE2 binds cooperatively to T-strands allowing it to move ssDNA without ATP hydrolysis. Unlike VirE2, GALLS-FL contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. VirE2 may accumulate in the nucleus and pull T-strands into the nucleus using the force generated by cooperative DNA binding. GALLS-FL accumulates inside the nucleus where its predicted ATP-dependent strand transferase may pull T-strands into the nucleus. These different mechanisms for nuclear import of T-strands may affect the efficiency and quality of transgenic events in plant biotechnology applications. PMID:21255274

  19. Foliar-applied glyphosate substantially reduced uptake and transport of iron and manganese in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eker, Selim; Ozturk, Levent; Yazici, Atilla; Erenoglu, Bulent; Romheld, Volker; Cakmak, Ismail

    2006-12-27

    Evidence clearly shows that cationic micronutrients in spray solutions reduce the herbicidal effectiveness of glyphosate for weed control due to the formation of metal-glyphosate complexes. The formation of these glyphosate-metal complexes in plant tissue may also impair micronutrient nutrition of nontarget plants when exposed to glyphosate drift or glyphosate residues in soil. In the present study, the effects of simulated glyphosate drift on plant growth and uptake, translocation, and accumulation (tissue concentration) of iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) were investigated in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants grown in nutrient solution under controlled environmental conditions. Glyphosate was sprayed on plant shoots at different rates between 1.25 and 6.0% of the recommended dosage (i.e., 0.39 and 1.89 mM glyphosate isopropylamine salt). Glyphosate applications significantly decreased root and shoot dry matter production and chlorophyll concentrations of young leaves and shoot tips. The basal parts of the youngest leaves and shoot tips were severely chlorotic. These effects became apparent within 48 h after the glyphosate spray. Glyphosate also caused substantial decreases in leaf concentration of Fe and Mn while the concentration of Zn and Cu was less affected. In short-term uptake experiments with radiolabeled Fe (59Fe), Mn (54Mn), and Zn (65Zn), root uptake of 59Fe and 54Mn was significantly reduced in 12 and 24 h after application of 6% of the recommended dosage of glyphosate, respectively. Glyphosate resulted in almost complete inhibition of root-to-shoot translocation of 59Fe within 12 h and 54Mn within 24 h after application. These results suggest that glyphosate residues or drift may result in severe impairments in Fe and Mn nutrition of nontarget plants, possibly due to the formation of poorly soluble glyphosate-metal complexes in plant tissues and/or rhizosphere interactions.

  20. Metallomics approach for the identification of the iron transport protein transferrin in the blood of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebe, Mechthild; Pröfrock, Daniel; Kakuschke, Antje; Broekaert, Jose A C; Prange, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    The health status of marine mammals such as harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) represents an indirect but powerful way for the assessment of environmental changes. The present work illustrates the first investigation and characterisation of Tf isolated from blood samples of North Sea harbour seals with a view to using changes in Tf isoform patterns as an additional parameter in extended studies of their health status. Therefore, an HPLC-ICP-MS approach has been developed which allows the highly resolved separation and fractionation of up to eight different Tf isoforms, as well as their sensitive and specific detection on the basis of their characteristic iron content. Molecule-specific detection techniques such as nanoLC-ESI-QTRAP-MS or MALDI-TOF-MS were used as complementary techniques to unambiguously identify the isolated proteins as Tf via cross species protein identification and to further characterise the molecular weight as well as the sialic acid content, which is responsible for the elution behaviour of the different isoforms during their ion exchange separation. A molecular mass above 80 kDa has been measured for the different seal Tf isoforms, which is in good agreement with the known molecular mass in other mammalian species, while the estimated pI of the different isoforms indicates some differences in comparison to other species. A number of homologies to known Tf sequences have been observed, which finally allows the cross species protein identification. The combined metallomics orientated analytical approach, which includes the complementary application of element and molecule-specific detection techniques, opens up interesting possibilities for the fast and targeted isolation and identification of a diagnostically relevant metal containing protein from an un-sequenced mammalian species prior to its utilisation in extended studies.

  1. Modeling water flow and bacterial transport in undisturbed lysimeters under irrigations of dairy shed effluent and water using HYDRUS-1D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuang; Pang, Liping; Buchan, Graeme D; Simůnek, Jirí; Noonan, Mike J; Close, Murray E

    2010-02-01

    HYDRUS-1D was used to simulate water flow and leaching of fecal coliforms and bromide (Br) through six undisturbed soil lysimeters (70 cm depth by 50 cm diameter) under field conditions. Dairy shed effluent (DSE) spiked with Br was applied to the lysimeters, which contained fine sandy loam layers. This application was followed by fortnightly spray or flood water irrigation. Soil water contents were measured at four soil depths over 171 days, and leachate was collected from the bottom. The post-DSE period simulations yielded a generally decreased saturated water content compared to the pre-DSE period, and an increased saturated hydraulic conductivity and air-entry index, suggesting that changes in soil hydraulic properties (e.g. via changes in structure) can be induced by irrigation and seasonal effects. The single-porosity flow model was successful in simulating water flow under natural climatic conditions and spray irrigation. However, for lysimeters under flood irrigation, when the effect of preferential flow paths becomes more significant, the good agreement between predicted and observed water contents could only be achieved by using a dual-porosity flow model. Results derived from a mobile-immobile transport model suggest that compared to Br, bacteria were transported through a narrower pore-network with less mass exchange between mobile and immobile water zones. Our study suggests that soils with higher topsoil clay content and soils under flood irrigation are at a high risk of bacteria leaching through preferential flow paths. Irrigation management strategies must minimize the effect of preferential flow to reduce bacterial leaching from land applications of effluent. PMID:19775719

  2. Influence of Iron Supplementation on DMT1 (IRE)-induced Transport of Lead by Brain Barrier Systems in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Dai Zhi; AI Jun Tao; FANG Hong Juan; SUN Ru Bao; SHI Yun; WANG Li Li; WANG Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential involvement of DMT1 (IRE) protein in the brain vascular system in vivo during Pb exposure. Methods Three groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to Pb in drinking water, among which two groups were concurrently administered by oral gavage once every other day as the low and high Fe treatment group, respectively, for 6 weeks. At the same time, the group only supplied with high Fe was also set as a reference. The animals were decapitated, then brain capillary-rich fraction was isolate from cerebral cortex. Western blot method was used to identify protein expression, and RT-PCR to detect the change of the mRNA. Results Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in cerebral cortex. Low Fe dose significantly reduced the cortex Pb levels, However, high Fe dose increased the cortex Pb levels. Interestingly, changes of DMT1 (IRE) protein in brain capillary-rich fraction were highly related to the Pb level, but those of DMT1 (IRE) mRNA were not significantly different. Moreover, the consistent changes in the levels of p-ERK1/2 or IRP1 with the changes in the levels of DMT1 (IRE). Conclusion These results suggest that Pb is transported into the brain through DMT1 (IRE), and the ERK MAPK pathway is involved in DMT1 (IRE)-mediated transport regulation in brain vascular system in vivo.

  3. Impact of Temperature and Hydrological Residence Time on the Fate and Transport of Iron and Organic Carbon in Subalpine Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, L. M.; Borch, T.; Rhoades, C.; Pallud, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Wetlands contain one third of the planet's soil carbon (C) and are characterized by markedly different chemical and physical environments than terrestrial ecosystems. The hydrologic residence time and temperature in wetlands influences their redox conditions and thus biogeochemical reaction rates. In these environments, transformation and movement of C and iron (Fe) are closely linked due to the sorption of organic C by solid Fe(III)-phases. Therefore, changes in Fe biogeochemical cycling will influence the size and turnover rate of soil C pools, which could negatively impact water quality and C storage. We examined the effects of hydrologic residence time and temperature on reduction of autochtonous Fe(III)-oxides. Fe(II)-export rates, used as a lower bound for bulk Fe(III)-reduction rates, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export rates were measured on intact mineral soil cores using flow-through reactor experiments exposed to temperatures based on mean annual conditions (6°, 12°, and 18°C). Soils were from a slope and a depressional subalpine wetland (USDA Fraser Experimental Forest, CO, USA), characterized by different hydrologic residence times, were compared. In the depressional wetland we observed the shallower soil depths have higher overall Fe(II)-export rates than the deeper soil depths. As temperature increases, Fe(II)-export rate increases, with a more than doubling in magnitude from 12 to 18° C. In comparing sites that are continuously inundated to those that are seasonally inundated, surprisingly we see higher Fe(II)-export rates in the seasonally inundated sites for all temperatures and depths. In the slope wetland we observed an opposite trend with depth and with temperature, with Fe(II)-export rates declining by almost an order of magnitude between 6 and 12°C. In addition, our results showed a positive correlation between Fe(II)-export rates and DOC export rates suggesting Fe(III)-reduction exerts a biogeochemical control on water quality

  4. [Neutrophilic lithotrophic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the biogeochemical processes of the iron cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Biology of lithotrophic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the processes of the biogeochemical cycle of iron are discussed. This group of microorganisms is phylogenetically, taxonomically, and physiologically heterogeneous, comprising three metabolically different groups: aerobes, nitrate-dependent anaerobes, and phototrophs; the latter two groups have been revealed relatively recently. Their taxonomy and metabolism are described. Materials on the structure and functioning of the electron transport chain in the course of Fe(II) oxidation by members of various physiological groups are discussed. Occurrence of iron oxidizers in freshwater and marine ecosystems, thermal springs, areas of hydrothermal activity, and underwater volcanic areas are considered. Molecular genetic techniques were used to determine the structure of iron-oxidizing microbial communities in various natural ecosystems. Analysis of stable isotope fractioning of 56/54Fe in pure cultures and model experiments revealed predominance of biological oxidation over abiotic ones in shallow aquatic habitats and mineral springs, which was especially pronounced under microaerobic conditions at the redox zone boundary. Discovery of anaerobic bacterial Fe(II) oxidation resulted in development of new hypotheses concerning the possible role of microorganisms and the mechanisms of formation of the major iron ore deposits in Precambrian and early Proterozoic epoch. Paleobiological data are presented on the microfossils and specific biomarkers retrieved from ancient ore samples and confirming involvement of anaerobic biogenic processes in their formation.

  5. Interaction between Cu2+ and different types of surface-modified nanoscale zero-valent iron during their transport in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haoran; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Chang; Liang, Jie; Ahmad, Kito; Xu, Piao; He, Xiaoxiao; Lai, Mingyong

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the interaction between Cu2+ and nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) coated with three types of stabilizers (i.e., polyacrylic acid [PAA], Tween-20 and starch) by examining the Cu2+ uptake, colloidal stability and mobility of surface-modified NZVI (SM-NZVI) in the presence of Cu2+. The uptake of Cu2+ by SM-NZVI and the colloidal stability of the Cu-bearing SM-NZVI were examined in batch tests. The results showed that NZVI coated with different modifiers exhibited different affinities for Cu2+, which resulted in varying colloidal stability of different SM-NZVI in the presence of Cu2+. The presence of Cu2+ exerted a slight influence on the aggregation and settling of NZVI modified with PAA or Tween-20. However, the presence of Cu2+ caused significant aggregation and sedimentation of starch-modified NZVI, which is due to Cu2+ complexation with the starch molecules coated on the surface of the particles. Column experiments were conducted to investigate the co-transport of Cu2+ in association with SM-NZVI in water-saturated quartz sand. It was presumed that a physical straining mechanism accounted for the retention of Cu-bearing SM-NZVI in the porous media. Moreover, the enhanced aggregation of SM-NZVI in the presence of Cu2+ may be contributing to this straining effect. PMID:26040744

  6. A review of the environmental implications of in situ remediation by nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI): Behavior, transport and impacts on microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Emilie; Bossa, Nathan; Wiesner, Mark R; Gunsch, Claudia K

    2016-09-15

    The increasing use of strategies incorporating nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) for soil and groundwater in situ remediation is raising some concerns regarding the potential adverse effects nZVI could have on indigenous microbial communities and ecosystem functioning. This review provides an overview of the current literature pertaining to the impacts of nZVI applications on microbial communities. Toxicity studies suggest that cell membrane disruption and oxidative stress through the generation of Fe(2+) and reactive oxygen species by nZVI are the main mechanisms contributing to nZVI cytotoxicity. In addition, nZVI has been shown to substantially alter the taxonomic and functional composition of indigenous microbial communities. However, because the physico-chemical conditions encountered in situ highly modulate nZVI toxicity, a better understanding of the environmental factors affecting nZVI toxicity and transport in the environment is of primary importance in evaluating the ecological consequences that could result from a more extensive use of nZVI. PMID:26897610

  7. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Burckhardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3−4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II (ferrous salts or iron(III (ferric complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  8. Public good dynamics drive evolution of iron acquisition strategies in natural bacterioplankton populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Otto X; Ventouras, Laure-Anne; DeLong, Edward F; Polz, Martin F

    2012-12-01

    A common strategy among microbes living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. Such siderophore-iron complexes can be thought of as public goods that can be exploited by local communities and drive diversification, for example by the evolution of "cheating." However, it is unclear whether bacterial populations in the environment form stable enough communities such that social interactions significantly impact evolutionary dynamics. Here we show that public good games drive the evolution of iron acquisition strategies in wild populations of marine bacteria. We found that within nonclonal but ecologically cohesive genotypic clusters of closely related Vibrionaceae, only an intermediate percentage of genotypes are able to produce siderophores. Nonproducers within these clusters exhibited selective loss of siderophore biosynthetic pathways, whereas siderophore transport mechanisms were retained, suggesting that these nonproducers can act as cheaters that benefit from siderophore producers in their local environment. In support of this hypothesis, these nonproducers in iron-limited media suffer a significant decrease in growth, which can be alleviated by siderophores, presumably owing to the retention of transport mechanisms. Moreover, using ecological data of resource partitioning, we found that cheating coevolves with the ecological specialization toward association with larger particles in the water column, suggesting that these can harbor stable enough communities for dependencies among organisms to evolve.

  9. The ttpC Gene Is Contained in Two of Three TonB Systems in the Human Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus, but Only One Is Active in Iron Transport and Virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Kustusch, Ryan J.; Kuehl, Carole J.; Crosa, Jorge H.

    2012-01-01

    The TonB system of proteins is required for the energy-dependent active transport of iron-bound substrates across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. We have identified three TonB systems within the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus. The TonB1 system contains the TonB1, ExbD1, and ExbB1 proteins, whereas both the TtpC2-TonB2 and TtpC3-TonB3 systems contain an additional fourth protein, TtpC. Here we report that TtpC3, although highly related to TtpC2, is inactive in iron transport, w...

  10. Characterizing reactive oxygen generation and bacterial inactivation by a zerovalent iron-fullerene nano-composite device at neutral pH under UV-A illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdim, Esra [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Environmental Engineering Department, Marmara University, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey); Badireddy, Appala Raju [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Wiesner, Mark R., E-mail: wiesner@duke.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • We synthesized a novel ZVI/nC{sub 60} nano-composite device for multi-ROS generation. • O{sub 2}·{sup −} (UV-A independent) and {sup 1}O{sub 2} (UV-A dependent) are generated at neutral pH. • At low Fe concentration, ZVI/nC{sub 60} device is a better ROS generator than ZVI alone. • C{sub 60} mediates electron transfer from ZVI surface to dissolved O{sub 2} to produce O{sub 2}·{sup −}. • Bacteria are rapidly inactivated by O{sub 2}·{sup −} even at low ZVI/nC{sub 60} ratio. - Abstract: A nano-composite device composed of nano-scale zerovalent iron (ZVI) and C{sub 60} fullerene aggregates (ZVI/nC{sub 60}) was produced via a rapid nucleation method. The device was conceived to deliver reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by photosensitization and/or electron transfer to targeted contaminants, including waterborne pathogens under neutral pH conditions. Certain variations of the nano-composite were fabricated differing in the amounts of (1) ZVI (0.1 mM and 2 mM) but not nC{sub 60} (2.5 mg-C/L), and (2) nC{sub 60} (0–25 mg-C/L) but not ZVI (0.1 mM). The generation of ROS by the ZVI/nC{sub 60} nano-composites and ZVI nanoparticles was quantified using organic probe compounds. 0.1 mM ZVI/2.5 mg-C/L C{sub 60} generated 3.74-fold higher O{sub 2}·{sup −} concentration and also resulted in an additional 2-log inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa when compared to 0.1 mM ZVI (3-log inactivation). 2 mM ZVI/2.5 mg-C/L nC{sub 60} showed negligible improvement over 2 mM ZVI in terms of O{sub 2}·{sup −} generation or inactivation. Further, incremental amounts of nC{sub 60} in the range of 0–25 mg-C/L in 0.1 mM ZVI/nC{sub 60} led to increased O{sub 2}·{sup −} concentration, independent of UV-A. This study demonstrates that ZVI/nC{sub 60} device delivers (1) enhanced O{sub 2}·{sup −} with nC{sub 60} as a mediator for electron transfer, and (2) {sup 1}O{sub 2} (only under UV-A illumination) at neutral pH conditions.

  11. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  12. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  13. HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-12-04

    The infrastructure for transportation in the United States allows for a high level of mobility and freight activity for the current population of 300 million residents, and several million business establishments. According to a Department of Transportation study, more than 230 million motor vehicles, ships, airplanes, and railroads cars were used on 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles) of highways, railroads, airports, and waterways in 1998. Pipelines and storage tanks were considered to be part of this deteriorating infrastructure. The annual direct cost of corrosion in the infrastructure category was estimated to be approximately $22.6 billion in 1998. There were 583,000 bridges in the United States in 1998. Of this total, 200,000 bridges were steel, 235,000 were conventional reinforced concrete, 108,000 bridges were constructed using pre-stressed concrete, and the balance was made using other materials of construction. Approximately 15 percent of the bridges accounted for at this point in time were structurally deficient, primarily due to corrosion of steel and steel reinforcement. Iron-based amorphous metals, including SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been developed, and have very good corrosion resistance. These materials have been prepared as a melt-spun ribbons, as well as gas atomized powders and thermal-spray coatings. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stabilities of these materials were found to be comparable to that of more expensive high-performance alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. These materials also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation

  14. Iron budgets for three distinct biogeochemical sites around the Kerguelen archipelago (Southern Ocean during the natural fertilisation experiment KEOPS-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bowie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron availability in the Southern Ocean controls phytoplankton growth, community composition and the uptake of atmospheric CO2 by the biological pump. The KEOPS-2 experiment took place around the Kerguelen plateau in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, a region naturally fertilised with iron at the scale of hundreds to thousands of square kilometres, producing a mosaic of spring blooms which showed distinct biological and biogeochemical responses to fertilisation. This paper presents biogeochemical iron budgets (incorporating vertical and lateral supply, internal cycling, and sinks for three contrasting sites: an upstream high-nutrient low-chlorophyll reference, over the plateau, and in the offshore plume east of Kerguelen Island. These budgets show that distinct regional environments driven by complex circulation and transport pathways are responsible for differences in the mode and strength of iron supply, with vertical supply dominant on the plateau and lateral supply dominant in the plume. Iron supply from "new" sources to surface waters of the plume was double that above the plateau and 20 times greater than at the reference site, whilst iron demand (measured by cellular uptake in the plume was similar to the plateau but 40 times greater than the reference. "Recycled" iron supply by bacterial regeneration and zooplankton grazing was a relative minor component at all sites (<8% of "new" supply, in contrast to earlier findings from other biogeochemical iron budgets in the Southern Ocean. Over the plateau, a particulate iron dissolution term of 2.5% was invoked to balance the budget; this approximately doubled the standing stock of dissolved iron in the mixed layer. The exchange of iron between dissolved, biogenic and lithogenic particulate pools was highly dynamic in time and space, resulting in a decoupling of iron supply and carbon export and, importantly, controlling the efficiency of fertilisation.

  15. Iron budgets for three distinct biogeochemical sites around the Kerguelen archipelago (Southern Ocean) during the natural fertilisation experiment KEOPS-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, A. R.; van der Merwe, P.; Quéroué, F.; Trull, T.; Fourquez, M.; Planchon, F.; Sarthou, G.; Chever, F.; Townsend, A. T.; Obernosterer, I.; Sallée, J.-B.; Blain, S.

    2014-12-01

    Iron availability in the Southern Ocean controls phytoplankton growth, community composition and the uptake of atmospheric CO2 by the biological pump. The KEOPS-2 experiment took place around the Kerguelen plateau in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, a region naturally fertilised with iron at the scale of hundreds to thousands of square kilometres, producing a mosaic of spring blooms which showed distinct biological and biogeochemical responses to fertilisation. This paper presents biogeochemical iron budgets (incorporating vertical and lateral supply, internal cycling, and sinks) for three contrasting sites: an upstream high-nutrient low-chlorophyll reference, over the plateau, and in the offshore plume east of Kerguelen Island. These budgets show that distinct regional environments driven by complex circulation and transport pathways are responsible for differences in the mode and strength of iron supply, with vertical supply dominant on the plateau and lateral supply dominant in the plume. Iron supply from "new" sources to surface waters of the plume was double that above the plateau and 20 times greater than at the reference site, whilst iron demand (measured by cellular uptake) in the plume was similar to the plateau but 40 times greater than the reference. "Recycled" iron supply by bacterial regeneration and zooplankton grazing was a relative minor component at all sites (<8% of "new" supply), in contrast to earlier findings from other biogeochemical iron budgets in the Southern Ocean. Over the plateau, a particulate iron dissolution term of 2.5% was invoked to balance the budget; this approximately doubled the standing stock of dissolved iron in the mixed layer. The exchange of iron between dissolved, biogenic and lithogenic particulate pools was highly dynamic in time and space, resulting in a decoupling of iron supply and carbon export and, importantly, controlling the efficiency of fertilisation.

  16. Iron budgets for three distinct biogeochemical sites around the Kerguelen Archipelago (Southern Ocean) during the natural fertilisation study, KEOPS-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, A. R.; van der Merwe, P.; Quéroué, F.; Trull, T.; Fourquez, M.; Planchon, F.; Sarthou, G.; Chever, F.; Townsend, A. T.; Obernosterer, I.; Sallée, J.-B.; Blain, S.

    2015-07-01

    Iron availability in the Southern Ocean controls phytoplankton growth, community composition and the uptake of atmospheric CO2 by the biological pump. The KEOPS-2 (KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study 2) "process study", took place around the Kerguelen Plateau in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. This is a region naturally fertilised with iron on the scale of hundreds to thousands of square kilometres, producing a mosaic of spring blooms which show distinct biological and biogeochemical responses to fertilisation. This paper presents biogeochemical iron budgets (incorporating vertical and lateral supply, internal cycling, and sinks) for three contrasting sites: an upstream high-nutrient low-chlorophyll reference, over the plateau and in the offshore plume east of the Kerguelen Islands. These budgets show that distinct regional environments driven by complex circulation and transport pathways are responsible for differences in the mode and strength of iron supply, with vertical supply dominant on the plateau and lateral supply dominant in the plume. Iron supply from "new" sources (diffusion, upwelling, entrainment, lateral advection, atmospheric dust) to the surface waters of the plume was double that above the plateau and 20 times greater than at the reference site, whilst iron demand (measured by cellular uptake) in the plume was similar to that above the plateau but 40 times greater than at the reference site. "Recycled" iron supply by bacterial regeneration and zooplankton grazing was a relatively minor component at all sites (< 8 % of new supply), in contrast to earlier findings from other biogeochemical iron budgets in the Southern Ocean. Over the plateau, a particulate iron dissolution term of 2.5 % was invoked to balance the budget; this approximately doubled the standing stock of dissolved iron in the mixed layer. The exchange of iron between dissolved, biogenic particulate and lithogenic particulate pools was highly dynamic in time and space

  17. The ferric enterobactin transporter Fep is required for persistent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Toni A; Moreland, Sarah M; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2013-11-01

    Most bacterial pathogens require iron to grow and colonize host tissues. The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes a natural systemic infection of mice that models acute and chronic human typhoid fever. S. Typhimurium resides in tissues within cells of the monocyte lineage, which limit pathogen access to iron, a mechanism of nutritional immunity. The primary ferric iron import system encoded by Salmonella is the siderophore ABC transporter FepBDGC. The Fep system has a known role in acute infection, but it is unclear whether ferric iron uptake or the ferric iron binding siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required for persistent infection. We defined the role of the Fep iron transporter and siderophores in the replication of Salmonella in macrophages and in mice that develop acute followed by persistent infections. Replication of wild-type and iron transporter mutant Salmonella strains was quantified in cultured macrophages, fecal pellets, and host tissues in mixed- and single-infection experiments. We show that deletion of fepB attenuated Salmonella replication and colonization within macrophages and mice. Additionally, the genes required to produce and transport enterobactin and salmochelin across the outer membrane receptors, fepA and iroN, are needed for colonization of all tissues examined. However, salmochelin appears to be more important than enterobactin in the colonization of the spleen and liver, both sites of dissemination. Thus, the FepBDGC ferric iron transporter and the siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required by Salmonella to evade nutritional immunity in macrophages and cause persistent infection in mice.

  18. Identification of high levels of phytochelatins, glutathione and cadmium in the phloem sap of Brassica napus. A role for thiol-peptides in the long-distance transport of cadmium and the effect of cadmium on iron translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Butko, Emerald; Springer, Franziska; Torpey, Justin W; Komives, Elizabeth A; Kehr, Julia; Schroeder, Julian I

    2008-04-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides that function in heavy metal detoxification in plants and certain fungi. Recent research in Arabidopsis has shown that PCs undergo long-distance transport between roots and shoots. However, it remains unknown which tissues or vascular systems, xylem or phloem, mediate PC translocation and whether PC transport contributes to physiologically relevant long-distance transport of cadmium (Cd) between shoots and roots. To address these questions, xylem and phloem sap were obtained from Brassica napus to quantitatively analyze which thiol species are present in response to Cd exposure. High levels of PCs were identified in the phloem sap within 24 h of Cd exposure using combined mass spectrometry and fluorescence HPLC analyses. Unexpectedly, the concentration of Cd was more than four-fold higher in phloem sap compared to xylem sap. Cadmium exposure dramatically decreased iron levels in xylem and phloem sap whereas other essential heavy metals such as zinc and manganese remained unchanged. Data suggest that Cd inhibits vascular loading of iron but not nicotianamine. The high ratios [PCs]/[Cd] and [glutathione]/[Cd] in the phloem sap suggest that PCs and glutathione (GSH) can function as long-distance carriers of Cd. In contrast, only traces of PCs were detected in xylem sap. Our results suggest that, in addition to directional xylem Cd transport, the phloem is a major vascular system for long-distance source to sink transport of Cd as PC-Cd and glutathione-Cd complexes.

  19. Iron metabolism in the mononuclear phagocyte system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weina Kong; Xianglin Duan; Zhenhua Shi; Yanzhong Chang

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of body iron homeostasis requires the coordination of multiple regulatory mechanisms of iron metabolism.The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS,composed of monocytes,macrophages,and their precursor cells) is crucial in the maintenance of iron homeostasis.Recycling of iron is carried out by specialized macrophages via engulfment of aged erythrocytes.The iron stores of macrophages depend on the levels of recovered and exported iron.However,the molecular mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis in macrophages are poorly understood.Recent studies characterizing the function and regulation of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nrampl),divalent metal transporter 1 (DMTI),HLA-linked hemechromatosis gene (HFE),ferroportin 1 (FPN1),and hepcidin are rapidly expanding our knowledge on the molecular level of MPS iron handling.These studies are deepening our understanding about the molecular mechanism of iron homeostasis and iron-related diseases.

  20. Severe bacterial infections in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: prevalence and clinical risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattiya Teawtrakul

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients with NTDT was found to be moderate. Time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and iron overload may be clinical risk factors for severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. Bacterial infection should be recognized in splenectomized patients with NTDT, particularly those who have an iron overload.

  1. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2001-08-15

    The overall purpose of the project was to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addressed how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  2. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  3. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  4. Bacterial community of biofilms developed under different water supply conditions in a distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Bai, Yaohui; Wang, Dongsheng

    2014-02-15

    In order to understand the bacterial community characteristics of biofilms developed under different finished water supply histories in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS), biofilm samples on different type of iron corrosion scales in a real DWDS were collected and systematically investigated using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene. The richness and diversity estimators showed that biofilms formed in DWDS transporting finished groundwater (GW) had the lowest level of bacterial diversity. From phylum to genus level, the dominant bacterial groups found in the biofilms under finished surface water (SW) and GW conditions were distinct. Proteobacteria was the dominant group in all biofilm samples (in the range of 40%-97%), but was relatively higher in biofilms with GW. The relative abundance of Firmicutes in biofilms with SW (28%-35%) was significantly higher (psupply condition. Several potential opportunistic pathogens, such as Burkholderia fungorum, Mycobacterium neoaurum, Mycobacterium frederiksbergense were detected in the biofilms.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Can Utilize Heme as an Iron Source▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Christopher M.; Niederweis, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Most iron in mammals is found within the heme prosthetic group. Consequently, many bacterial pathogens possess heme acquisition systems to utilize iron from the host. Here, we demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis can utilize heme as an iron source, suggesting that M. tuberculosis possesses a yet-unknown heme acquisition system.

  6. Identification of an iron-hepcidin complex

    OpenAIRE

    Farnaud, Sébastien Jean-Claude; Rapisarda, Chiara; Tam T T Bui; Drake, Alex F.; Cammack, Richard; Evans, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Following its identification as a liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide, the hepcidin peptide was later shown to be a key player in iron homoeostasis. It is now proposed to be the 'iron hormone' which, by interacting with the iron transporter ferroportin, prevents further iron import into the circulatory system. This conclusion was reached using the corresponding synthetic peptide, emphasizing the functional importance of the mature 25-mer peptide, but omitting the possible functionality of i...

  7. Impact of carboxymethyl cellulose coating on iron sulphide nanoparticles stability, transport, and mobilization potential of trace metals present in soils and sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Koetsem, Frederik; Van Havere, Lynn; Du Laing, Gijs

    2016-03-01

    The stability and transport behaviour of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized iron sulphide (FeS) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) as well as their concurrent scavenging and mobilization of trace metal contaminants from field-contaminated soils and sediment was studied through a series of batch and column experiments. The synthesized CMC-FeS ENPs were shown to have a hydrodynamic diameter of 154.5 ± 5.8 nm and remained stable in suspension for a prolonged period of time (several weeks) when kept under anaerobic conditions. In the absence of CMC, much larger FeS particles were formed, which quickly aggregated and precipitated within minutes. Batch experiments indicated that the CMC-FeS ENPs have a high affinity for metal contaminants (e.g., Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn), as high amounts of these trace metals could be retrieved in the aqueous phase after treatment of the soils with the nanoparticles (i.e., up to 29 times more compared to the water-leachable metal contents). Furthermore, batch retention of the nanoparticles by the solid soil phase was low (Nanoparticle treatment of the soils also affected the CaCl2-, TCLP-, and SPLP-leachability of trace metals, although no clear trend could be observed and metal leaching appeared to depend on the specific element under consideration, the type of extraction liquid, as well as on soil properties. Column breakthrough tests demonstrated that the CMC-FeS ENPs were highly mobile in the tested soil, even without the use of an external pressure (i.e., just via gravitational percolation). Maximal breakthrough of the nanoparticles was observed after approximately 10 or 16 pore volumes (PVs) for 83.3 or 500 mg L(-1) CMC-FeS ENPs, respectively, and only about 7% of the nanoparticles were retained by the soil after 22.7 PVs. Simultaneous elution of trace elements showed that up to 19, 8.7, or 11% of the respective Cd, Pb, or Zn content originally present in the soil was extracted after 22.7 PVs, with initial peaking

  8. Within-host evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward iron acquisition from hemoglobin in polymicrobial CF infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær;

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens require iron to survive and colonize a human host but their access to free iron is often limited by iron-withholding process where free iron is bound by proteins such as hemoglobin. Although most pathogens have developed tactics to acquire iron from host proteins, little is...

  9. Overcoming the Heme Paradox: Heme Toxicity and Tolerance in Bacterial Pathogens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Anzaldi, Laura L.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all bacterial pathogens require iron to infect vertebrates. The most abundant source of iron within vertebrates is in the form of heme as a cofactor of hemoproteins. Many bacterial pathogens have elegant systems dedicated to the acquisition of heme from host hemoproteins. Once internalized, heme is either degraded to release free iron or used intact as a cofactor in catalases, cytochromes, and other bacterial hemoproteins. Paradoxically, the high redox potential of heme makes it a l...

  10. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a...

  11. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe{sup +2}) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron.

  12. Shigella dysenteriae ShuS Promotes Utilization of Heme as an Iron Source and Protects against Heme Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E.; Lopreato, Gregory F.; Tipton, Kimberly A.; Shelley M Payne

    2005-01-01

    Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1, a major cause of bacillary dysentery in humans, can use heme as a source of iron. Genes for the transport of heme into the bacterial cell have been identified, but little is known about proteins that control the fate of the heme molecule after it has entered the cell. The shuS gene is located within the heme transport locus, downstream of the heme receptor gene shuA. ShuS is a heme binding protein, but its role in heme utilization is poorly understood. In this...

  13. Transferrin as a source of iron for Campylobacter rectus

    OpenAIRE

    Grenier, Daniel; Tanabe, Shin-Ichi

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective: Campylobacter rectus is considered as one of the bacterial species of etiological importance in periodontitis. Iron-containing proteins such as transferrin are found in periodontal sites and may serve as a source of iron for periodontopathogens. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of C. rectus to assimilate transferrin-bound iron to support its growth. Design: Growth studies were performed in broth media pretreated with an iron-chelating resin and s...

  14. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  15. Neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M;

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....../or glial cells: the solute carrier (SLC)1 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of glutamate, and the SLC6 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of dopamine, 5-HT, norepinephrine, glycine and GABA....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters...

  16. Bacterial deposition in a parallel plate and a stagnation point flow chamber : microbial adhesion mechanisms depend on the mass transport conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, DP; Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    2002-01-01

    Deposition onto glass in a parallel plate (PP) and in a stagnation point (SP) flow chamber of Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Psychrobacter sp. and Halomonas pacifica, suspended in artificial seawater, was compared in order to determine the influence of methodology on bacterial adhesion mechanis

  17. Iron and zinc complexation in wild-type and ferritin-expressing wheat grain: implications for mineral transport into developing grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neal, Andrew L; Geraki, Kalotina; Borg, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    We have used synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and absorption techniques to establish both metal distribution and complexation in mature wheat grains. In planta, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy reveals iron phytate and zinc phytate structures in aleurone cells...... and in modified aleurone cells in the transfer region of the grain: iron is coordinated octahedrally by six oxygen atoms and fewer than two phosphorous atoms. Zinc is coordinated tetrahedrally by four oxygen atoms and approximately 1.5 phosphorus atoms in an asymmetric coordination shell. We also present evidence...

  18. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  19. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  20. Iron, hepcidin and the metal connection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier eLoréal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Identification of new players in iron metabolism, such as hepcidin, which regulates ferroportin and divalent metal transporter 1 expression, has improved our knowledge of iron metabolism and iron-related diseases. However, from both experimental data and clinical findings, iron-related proteins appear to also be involved in the metabolism of other metals, especially divalent cations. Reports have demonstrated that some metals may affect, directly or indirectly, the expression of proteins involved in iron metabolism. Throughout their lives, individuals are exposed to various metals during personal and/or occupational activities. Therefore, better knowledge of the connections between iron and other metals could improve our understanding of iron-related diseases, especially the variability in phenotypic expression, as well as a variety of diseases in which iron metabolism is secondarily affected. Controlling the metabolism of other metals could represent a promising innovative therapeutic approach.

  1. H(+)-coupled divalent metal-ion transporter-1: functional properties, physiological roles and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawki, Ali; Knight, Patrick B; Maliken, Bryan D; Niespodzany, Eric J; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a widely expressed, iron-preferring membrane transport protein. Animal models establish that DMT1 plays indispensable roles in intestinal nonheme-iron absorption and iron acquisition by erythroid precursor cells. Rare mutations in human DMT1 result in severe microcytic-hypochromic anemia. When we express DMT1 in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes, we observe rheogenic Fe(2+) transport that is driven by the proton electrochemical potential gradient. In that same preparation, DMT1 also transports cadmium and manganese but not copper. Whether manganese metabolism relies upon DMT1 remains unclear but DMT1 contributes to the effects of overexposure to cadmium and manganese in some tissues. There exist at least four DMT1 isoforms that arise from variant transcription of the SLC11A2 gene. Whereas these isoforms display identical functional properties, N- and C-terminal variations contain cues that direct the cell-specific targeting of DMT1 isoforms to discrete subcellular compartments (plasma membrane, endosomes, and lysosomes). An iron-responsive element (IRE) in the mRNA 3'-untranslated region permits the regulation of some isoforms by iron status, and additional mechanisms by which DMT1 is regulated are emerging. Natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein-1 (NRAMP1)-the only other member of the mammalian SLC11 gene family-contributes to antimicrobial function by extruding from the phagolysosome divalent metal ions (e.g. Mn(2+)) that may be essential cofactors for bacteria-derived enzymes or required for bacterial growth. The principal or only intestinal nonheme-iron transporter, DMT1 is a validated therapeutic target in hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) and other iron-overload disorders.

  2. Iron Regulatory Proteins Control a Mucosal Block to Intestinal Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Galy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated “mucosal block.” We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin “mucosal block” and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  3. Intramolecular cross-linking in a bacterial homolog of mammalian SLC6 neurotransmitter transporters suggests an evolutionary conserved role of transmembrane segments 7 and 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kniazeff, Julie; Loland, Claus Juul; Goldberg, Naomi;

    2005-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, GABA and glycine is tightly controlled by plasma membrane transporters belonging to the SLC6 gene family. A very large number of putative transport proteins with a remarkable homology to the SLC6...... transporters has recently been identified in prokaryotes. Here we have probed structural relationships in a 'microdoman' corresponding to the extracellular ends of transmembrane segments (TM) 7 and 8 in one of these homologs, the tryptophan transporter TnaT from Symbiobacterium thermophilum. We found...... proximity between TM 7 and 8 in the tertiary structure of TnaT as previously suggested for the mammalian counterparts. Furthermore, the inhibition of uptake upon cross-linking the two cysteines provides indirect support for a conserved conformational role of these transmembrane domains in the transport...

  4. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  5. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  6. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 147. Liebelt EL. Iron. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  7. Mechanisms of heme iron absorption: Current questions and controversies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Iron is a critical micronutrient, and iron derived from heme contributes a large proportion of the total iron absorbed in a typical Western diet. Heine iron is absorbed by different mechanisms than non-heine iron, but despite considerable study over many years these mechanisms remain poorly understood. This review provides an overview of the importance of heme iron in the diet and discusses the two prevailing hypotheses of heine absorption; namely receptor mediated endocytosis of heme, and direct transport into the intestinal enterocyte by recently discovered heine transporters. A specific emphasis is placed on the questions surrounding the site of heme catabolism and the identity of the enzyme that performs this task. Additionally, we present the hypothesis that a nonheme iron transport protein may be required for heine iron absorption and discuss the experiences of our laboratory in examining this hypothesis.

  8. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  9. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  10. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubal, Mark; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan; Jay, Z.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Beam, Jake; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P.

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicate that the replicate assemblies represent a new phylum-level lineage referred to here as 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I CO dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogues active in YNP today.

  11. Iron, transferrin and myelinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Baron, B.; Guillou, F.

    2003-09-01

    Transferrin (Tf), the iron binding protein of vertebrates serum, is known to be synthesized by oligodendrocytes (Ols) in the central nervous system. It has been postulated that Tf is involved in Ols maturation and myelinogenesis. This link is particularly important in the understanding of a severe human pathology: the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. We generated transgenic mice containing the complete human Tf gene and extensive regulatory sequences from the 5 ' and 3 ' untranslated regions that specifically overexpress Tf in Ols. Brain cytoarchitecture of the transgenic mice appears to be normal in all brain regions examined, total myelin content is increased by 30% and motor coordination is significantly improved when compared with non-transgenic littermates. Tf role in the central nervous system may be related to its affinity for metallic cations. Normal and transgenic mice were used for determination of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) concentration in cerebellum and corpus callosum. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow proton-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. Preliminary results were obtained and carbon distribution was revealed as a very good analysis to distinguish precisely the white matter region. A comparison of metallic and mineral elements contents in brain between normal and transgenic mice shows that iron, copper and zinc levels remained constant. This result provides evidence that effects of Tf overexpression in the brain do not solely relate to iron transport.

  12. Speciation of the elements and compositions on the surfaces of dust storm particles: The evidence for the coupling of iron with sulfur in aerosol during the long-range transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xingying; ZHUANG Guoshun; CHEN Jianmin; XUE Huaxin

    2005-01-01

    The speciation of the elements on the surface of the particles collected during dust storm and non-dust storm in Beijing and Inner Mongolia was studied by XPS. The major species of iron on the surface were oxides, sulfate, silicate, FeOOH and minor part sorbed on SiO2/Al2O3. Sulfate is the dominant species of sulfur on the surface. SiO2 and Al2O3 are the main components of Si and Al on the surface respectively. One of the most important findings was that the Fe(II) (FeS and FeSO4) produced could account for up to 44.3% and 45.6% of the total Fe on the surface in the aerosol sample collected at that night and next day of the "peak" time of the dust storm occurring on March 20, 2002, while Fe2(SO4)3, one of the Fe(III) species on the surface decreased from 67.1% to 49.5% and 48.0% respectively. Both S and Fe enriched on the surface of aerosol particles. Fe(II) accounted for 1.3%-5.3% of total Fe in bulk aerosol samples during dust storm. These results provided strong evidence to support the hypothesis of the coupling between iron and sulfur in aerosols during the long-range transport, which would have important impact on the global biogeochemical cycle.

  13. Route and Regulation of Zinc, Cadmium, and Iron Transport in Rice Plants (Oryza sativa L.) during Vegetative Growth and Grain Filling: Metal Transporters, Metal Speciation, Grain Cd Reduction and Zn and Fe Biofortification

    OpenAIRE

    Tadakatsu Yoneyama; Satoru Ishikawa; Shu Fujimaki

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) are essential but are sometimes deficient in humans, while cadmium (Cd) is toxic if it accumulates in the liver and kidneys at high levels. All three are contained in the grains of rice, a staple cereal. Zn and Fe concentrations in rice grains harvested under different levels of soil/hydroponic metals are known to change only within a small range, while Cd concentrations show greater changes. To clarify the mechanisms underlying such different metal contents, we synt...

  14. A novel mode of ferric ion coordination by the periplasmic ferric ion-binding subunit FbpA of an ABC-type iron transporter from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shipeng; Ogata, Misaki; Horita, Shoichiro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Crystal structures of FbpA, the periplasmic ferric ion-binding protein of an iron-uptake ABC transporter, from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtFbpA) have been solved in apo and ferric ion-bound forms at 1.8 and 1.7 Å resolution, respectively. The latter crystal structure shows that the bound ferric ion forms a novel six-coordinated complex with three tyrosine side chains, two bicarbonates and a water molecule in the metal-binding site. The results of gel-filtration chromatography and dynamic light scattering show that TtFbpA exists as a monomer in solution regardless of ferric ion binding and that TtFbpA adopts a more compact conformation in the ferric ion-bound state than in the apo state in solution.

  15. Iron-Tolerant Cyanobacteria: Ecophysiology and Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Lindsey, J.; McKay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    Although the iron-dependent physiology of marine and freshwater cyanobacterial strains has been the focus of extensive study, very few studies dedicated to the physiology and diversity of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs have been conducted. One of the few studies that have been conducted [B. Pierson, 1999] found that cyanobacterial members of iron depositing bacterial mat communities might increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ and that ferrous iron concentrations up to 1 mM significantly stimulated light dependent consumption of bicarbonate, suggesting a specific role for elevated iron in photosynthesis of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs. Our recent studies pertaining to the diversity and physiology of cyanobacteria populating iron-depositing hot springs in Great Yellowstone area (Western USA) indicated a number of different isolates exhibiting elevated tolerance to Fe(3+) (up to 1 mM). Moreover, stimulation of growth was observed with increased Fe(3+) (0.02-0.4 mM). Molecular fingerprinting of unialgal isolates revealed a new cyanobacterial genus and species Chroogloeocystis siderophila, an unicellular cyanobacterium with significant EPS sheath harboring colloidal Fe(3+) from iron enriched media. Our preliminary data suggest that some filamentous species of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria are capable of exocytosis of iron precipitated in cytoplasm. Prior to 2.4 Ga global oceans were likely significantly enriched in soluble iron [Lindsay et al, 2003], conditions which are not conducive to growth of most contemporary oxygenic cyanobacteria. Thus, iron-tolerant CB may have played important physiological and evolutionary roles in Earths history.

  16. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...... biogeochemical processes are carried exclusively by bacteria. * Bacteria play an important role in all types of habitats including some that cannot support eukaryotic life....

  17. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron and ... enough iron in their daily diets. How Much Iron Do Kids Need? Kids require different amounts of ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, ... iron supplements and multivitamins to improve her iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such ...

  19. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  20. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  1. Influence of Atmospheric Processes on the Solubility and Composition of Iron in Saharan Dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Amelia F; Feng, Yan; Lai, Barry; Landing, William M; Shelley, Rachel U; Nenes, Athanasios; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Violaki, Kalliopi; Ingall, Ellery D

    2016-07-01

    Aerosol iron was examined in Saharan dust plumes using a combination of iron near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical techniques. Aerosol samples were collected at three sites located in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and Bermuda to characterize iron at different atmospheric transport lengths and time scales. Iron(III) oxides were a component of aerosols at all sampling sites and dominated the aerosol iron in Mediterranean samples. In Atlantic samples, iron(II and III) sulfate, iron(III) phosphate, and iron(II) silicates were also contributors to aerosol composition. With increased atmospheric transport time, iron(II) sulfates are found to become more abundant, aerosol iron oxidation state became more reduced, and aerosol acidity increased. Atmospheric processing including acidic reactions and photoreduction likely influence the form of iron minerals and oxidation state in Saharan dust aerosols and contribute to increases in aerosol-iron solubility. PMID:27286140

  2. EPR spectroscopy of MolB2C2-a reveals mechanism of transport for a bacterial type II molybdate importer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Austin J; Alvarez, Frances J D; Schultz, Kathryn M; Klug, Candice S; Davidson, Amy L; Pinkett, Heather W

    2013-07-19

    In bacteria, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are vital for the uptake of nutrients and cofactors. Based on differences in structure and activity, ABC importers are divided into two types. Type I transporters have been well studied and employ a tightly regulated alternating access mechanism. Less is known about Type II importers, but much of what we do know has been observed in studies of the vitamin B12 importer BtuC2D2. MolB2C2 (formally known as HI1470/71) is also a Type II importer, but its substrate, molybdate, is ∼10-fold smaller than vitamin B12. To understand mechanistic differences among Type II importers, we focused our studies on MolBC, for which alternative conformations may be required to transport its relatively small substrate. To investigate the mechanism of MolBC, we employed disulfide cross-linking and EPR spectroscopy. From these studies, we found that nucleotide binding is coupled to a conformational shift at the periplasmic gate. Unlike the larger conformational changes in BtuCD-F, this shift in MolBC-A is akin to unlocking a swinging door: allowing just enough space for molybdate to slip into the cell. The lower cytoplasmic gate, identified in BtuCD-F as "gate I," remains open throughout the MolBC-A mechanism, and cytoplasmic gate II closes in the presence of nucleotide. Combining our results, we propose a peristaltic mechanism for MolBC-A, which gives new insight in the transport of small substrates by a Type II importer.

  3. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  4. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. PMID:26475190

  5. PfeT, a P1B4 -type ATPase, effluxes ferrous iron and protects Bacillus subtilis against iron intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guohua; Pinochet-Barros, Azul; Gaballa, Ahmed; Patel, Sarju J; Argüello, José M; Helmann, John D

    2015-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for nearly all cells and limited iron availability often restricts growth. However, excess iron can also be deleterious, particularly when cells expressing high affinity iron uptake systems transition to iron rich environments. Bacillus subtilis expresses numerous iron importers, but iron efflux has not been reported. Here, we describe the B. subtilis PfeT protein (formerly YkvW/ZosA) as a P1B4 -type ATPase in the PerR regulon that serves as an Fe(II) efflux pump and protects cells against iron intoxication. Iron and manganese homeostasis in B. subtilis are closely intertwined: a pfeT mutant is iron sensitive, and this sensitivity can be suppressed by low levels of Mn(II). Conversely, a pfeT mutant is more resistant to Mn(II) overload. In vitro, the PfeT ATPase is activated by both Fe(II) and Co(II), although only Fe(II) efflux is physiologically relevant in wild-type cells, and null mutants accumulate elevated levels of intracellular iron. Genetic studies indicate that PfeT together with the ferric uptake repressor (Fur) cooperate to prevent iron intoxication, with iron sequestration by the MrgA mini-ferritin playing a secondary role. Protection against iron toxicity may also be a key role for related P1B4 -type ATPases previously implicated in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:26261021

  6. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the

  7. Transcriptional response of Leptospira interrogans to iron limitation and characterization of a PerR homolog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptospira interrogans is the causative agent of leptospirosis, a zoonosis of global significance. Iron is essential for growth of most bacterial species. Since availability of iron is low in the host, pathogens have evolved complex iron acquisition mechanisms to survive and establish infection. In ...

  8. Effects of Iron in Neonates and Young Infants: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential to erythrocyte oxygen transport and is a catalyst for oxidative metabolism in all cells. Iron is absorbed by the duodenum and requires an acidic environment for optimal absorption. Iron is found for 70% in erythrocytes, and 30% in storage, and a small amount in myoglobin and cytochromes. Iron supplementation reduces anemia in breastfed infants and increases in significant dose-dependent effects hemoglobin and ferritin levels, transferrin saturation, mean cell volume, and tra...

  9. Computational modeling and analysis of iron release from macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka A Potdar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A major process of iron homeostasis in whole-body iron metabolism is the release of iron from the macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Macrophages recognize and phagocytose senescent or damaged erythrocytes. Then, they process the heme iron, which is returned to the circulation for reutilization by red blood cell precursors during erythropoiesis. The amount of iron released, compared to the amount shunted for storage as ferritin, is greater during iron deficiency. A currently accepted model of iron release assumes a passive-gradient with free diffusion of intracellular labile iron (Fe2+ through ferroportin (FPN, the transporter on the plasma membrane. Outside the cell, a multi-copper ferroxidase, ceruloplasmin (Cp, oxidizes ferrous to ferric ion. Apo-transferrin (Tf, the primary carrier of soluble iron in the plasma, binds ferric ion to form mono-ferric and di-ferric transferrin. According to the passive-gradient model, the removal of ferrous ion from the site of release sustains the gradient that maintains the iron release. Subcellular localization of FPN, however, indicates that the role of FPN may be more complex. By experiments and mathematical modeling, we have investigated the detailed mechanism of iron release from macrophages focusing on the roles of the Cp, FPN and apo-Tf. The passive-gradient model is quantitatively analyzed using a mathematical model for the first time. A comparison of experimental data with model simulations shows that the passive-gradient model cannot explain macrophage iron release. However, a facilitated-transport model associated with FPN can explain the iron release mechanism. According to the facilitated-transport model, intracellular FPN carries labile iron to the macrophage membrane. Extracellular Cp accelerates the oxidation of ferrous ion bound to FPN. Apo-Tf in the extracellular environment binds to the oxidized ferrous ion, completing the release process. Facilitated-transport model can

  10. Molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal iron absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul Sharp; Surjit Kaila Srai

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace metal in the human diet due to its obligate role in a number of metabolic processes.In the diet, iron is present in a number of different forms, generally described as haem (from haemoglobin and myoglobin in animal tissue) and non-haem iron (including ferric oxides and salts, ferritin and lactoferrin).This review describes the molecular mechanisms that co-ordinate the absorption of iron from the diet and its release into the circulation. While many components of the iron transport pathway have been elucidated, a number of key issues still remain to be resolved. Future work in this area will provide a clearer picture regarding the transcellular flux of iron and its regulation by dietary and humoral factors.

  11. Iron and the female athlete: a review of dietary treatment methods for improving iron status and exercise performance

    OpenAIRE

    Alaunyte, Ieva; Stojceska, Valentina; Plunkett, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Iron is a functional component of oxygen transport and energy production in humans and therefore is a critically important micronutrient for sport and exercise performance. Athletes, particularly female athletes participating in endurance sport, are at increased risk of compromised iron status due to heightened iron losses through menstruation and exercise-induced mechanisms associated with endurance activity. Conventionally oral iron supplementation is used in prevention or/and treatment of ...

  12. Physiological considerations in applying laboratory-determined buoyant densities to predictions of bacterial and protozoan transport in groundwater: Results of in-situ and laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Kinner, N.; Mayberry, N.

    1997-01-01

    Buoyant densities were determined for groundwater bacteria and microflagellates (protozoa) from a sandy aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) using two methods: (1) density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) and (2) Stoke's law approximations using sedimentation rates observed during natural-gradient injection and recovery tests. The dwarf (average cell size, 0.3 ??m), unattached bacteria inhabiting a pristine zone just beneath the water table and a majority (~80%) of the morphologically diverse community of free- living bacteria inhabiting a 5-km-long plume of organically-contaminated groundwater had DGC-determined buoyant densities <1.019 g/cm3 before culturing. In the aquifer, sinking rates for the uncultured 2-??m size class of contaminant plume bacteria were comparable to that of the bromide tracer (1.9 x 10-3 M), also suggesting a low buoyant density. Culturing groundwater bacteria resulted in larger (0.8-1.3 ??m), less neutrally- buoyant (1.043-1.081 g/cm3) cells with potential sedimentation rates up to 64-fold higher than those predicted for the uncultured populations. Although sedimentation generally could be neglected in predicting subsurface transport for the community of free-living groundwater bacteria, it appeared to be important for the cultured isolates, at least until they readapt to aquifer conditions. Culturing-induced alterations in size of the contaminant-plume microflagellates (2-3 ??m) were ameliorated by using a lower nutrient, acidic (pH 5) porous growth medium. Buoyant densities of the cultured microflagellates were low, i.e., 1.024-1.034 g/cm3 (using the DGC assay) and 1.017-1.039 g/cm3 (estimated from in-situ sedimentation rates), suggesting good potential for subsurface transport under favorable conditions.

  13. Sorption of PAHs to humic acid- and iron(III)carbon ate particles by using passive dosing vials for investigating the transport of organic contamination in stormwater runoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Katrine; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Baun, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    ) has been foun d to facilitate transport of organic contaminants and metals in stormwater runoff system s, but little is known about the role of the colloidal fraction including nano-sized particl es (0.001-1 μm). Based on the large specific surface area of colloids and nanosized particles, t heir...... (lakes, rivers or sea) have been raised by researchers throughout the world (e.g. Broman et. al., 1987, and Xanthopoulos et. al., 1990), and have in Europe gained increased interest in relation to the implementatio n of the Water Framework Directive (WFD, 2000/60/EC). Particles (often defined as >0.45 μm...... abundance, and knowledge about their facilitated transport of persistent organic polluti on in natural waters, they are likely to diminish the efficiency of engineered treatment sys tems unless appropriately accounted for. In this work organic and inorganic nanosized partic les were investigated...

  14. Bacterioplankton responses to iron enrichment during the SAGE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuparinen, J.; Hall, J.; Ellwood, M.; Safi, K.; Peloquin, J.; Katz, D.

    2011-03-01

    We studied the microbial food web in the upper 100 m of the water column in iron-limited sub-Antarctic HNLC waters south-east of New Zealand in the SAGE experiment in 2004, with focus on bacterioplankton. Samples were collected daily from inside and outside the iron enriched patch. Short term enrichment experiments were conducted on board in 4 L polycarbonate bottles with water outside the iron enriched patch to study single and combined effects of micronutrient additions on microbial food web. Low bacterial growth was recorded in the study area with community turnover times of 50 h or more during the study period. Measurements of bacterial standing stocks and production rates in the study show minor responses to the large scale iron enrichment, with increase in rates and stocks after the first enrichment and at the end of the study period after the third iron enrichment when solar radiation increased and wind mixing decreased. The average daily bacterial production rates were 31.5 and 33.7 mgCm -2 d -1 for the OUT and IN stations, respectively; thus overall there was not a significant difference between the control and the iron-enriched patch. In the bottle experiments bacterial thymidine incorporation showed responses to single iron and silicic acid enrichments and a major growth response to the combined iron and sucrose enrichments. Phytoplankton chlorophyll- a showed clear stimulation by single additions of iron and silicic acid and silicic acid enhanced the iron impact. Cobalt additions had no effect on bacteria growth and a negative effect on phytoplankton growth. Low bacterial in situ growth rates and the enrichment experiments suggest that bacteria are co-limited by iron and carbon, and that bacterial iron uptake is dependent on carbon supply by the food web. With the high iron quota (μmol Fe mol C -1) bacteria may scavenge considerable amounts of the excess iron, and thus influence the relative importance of the microbial food web as a carbon sink.

  15. Cellular distribution of ferric iron, ferritin, transferrin and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in substantia nigra and basal ganglia of normal and β2-microglobulin deficient mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moos, Torben; Trinder, D.; Morgan, E.H.

    2000-01-01

    beta-2-microglobulin, blood-brain barrier, gene knock out, iron, neurodegenerative disorders, oxidative damage, subthalamic nucleus......beta-2-microglobulin, blood-brain barrier, gene knock out, iron, neurodegenerative disorders, oxidative damage, subthalamic nucleus...

  16. Effects of Pregnancy and Lactation on Iron Metabolism in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofen Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In female, inadequate iron supply is a highly prevalent problem that often leads to iron-deficiency anemia. This study aimed to understand the effects of pregnancy and lactation on iron metabolism. Rats with different days of gestation and lactation were used to determine the variations in iron stores and serum iron level and the changes in expression of iron metabolism-related proteins, including ferritin, ferroportin 1 (FPN1, ceruloplasmin (Cp, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, and the major iron-regulatory molecule—hepcidin. We found that iron stores decline dramatically at late-pregnancy period, and the low iron store status persists throughout the lactation period. The significantly increased FPN1 level in small intestine facilitates digestive iron absorption, which maintains the serum iron concentration at a near-normal level to meet the increase of iron requirements. Moreover, a significant decrease of hepcidin expression is observed during late-pregnancy and early-lactation stages, suggesting the important regulatory role that hepcidin plays in iron metabolism during pregnancy and lactation. These results are fundamental to the understanding of iron homeostasis during pregnancy and lactation and may provide experimental bases for future studies to identify key molecules expressed during these special periods that regulate the expression of hepcidin, to eventually improve the iron-deficiency status.

  17. Special Delivery: Distributing Iron in the Cytosol of Mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C Philpott

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of proteins that require iron cofactors for activity. These iron enzymes are located in essentially every subcellular compartment; thus, iron cofactors must travel to every compartment in the cell. Iron cofactors exist in three basic forms: Heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions (also called non-heme iron. Iron ions taken up by the cell initially enter a kinetically labile, exchangeable pool that is referred to as the labile iron pool. The majority of the iron in this pool is delivered to mitochondria, where it is incorporated into heme and iron-sulfur clusters, as well as non-heme iron enzymes. These cofactors must then be distributed to nascent proteins in the mitochondria, cytosol, and membrane-bound organelles. Emerging evidence suggests that specific systems exist for the distribution of iron cofactors within the cell. These systems include membrane transporters, protein chaperones, specialized carriers, and small molecules. This review focuses on the distribution of iron ions in the cytosol and will highlight differences between the iron distribution systems of simple eukaryotes and mammalian cells.

  18. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Christides, Tatiana; Wray, David; McBride, Richard; Fairweather, Rose; Sharp, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including th...

  19. Iron Overload in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Pullarkat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT frequently have iron overload resulting from chronic transfusion therapy for anemia. In some cases, for example, in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and thalassemia, this can be further exacerbated by increased absorption of iron from the gut as a result of ineffective erythropoiesis. Accumulating evidence has established the negative impact of elevated pretransplantation serum ferritin, a surrogate marker of iron overload, on overall survival and nonrelapse mortality after HSCT. Complications of HSCT associated with iron overload include increased bacterial and fungal infections as well as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome and possibly other regimen-related toxicities. Based on current evidence, particular attention should be paid to prevention and management of iron overload in allogeneic HSCT candidates, especially in patients with thalassemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. The pathophysiology of iron overload in the HSCT patient and optimum strategies to deal with iron overload during and after HSCT require further study.

  20. Baicalin suppresses iron accumulation after substantia nigra injury:relationship between iron concentration and transferrin expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Guo; Xin Chen; Pei Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that baicalin prevented iron accumulation after substantia nigra injury, reduced divalent metal transporter 1 expression, and increased ferroportin 1 expression in the substantia nigra of rotenone-induced Parkinson’s disease rats. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between iron accumulation and transferrin expression in C6 cells, to explore the mechanisms of the inhibitory effect of baicalin on iron accumulation observed in Parkinson’s disease rats. Iron content was detected using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Results showed that iron content decreased 41%after blocking divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin 1 proteins. After treatment with ferric ammonium citrate of differing concentrations (10, 50, 100, 400 µg/mL) in C6 glioma cells, cell survival rate and ferroportin 1 expression were negatively correlated with ferric ammonium citrate concentration, but divalent metal transporter 1 expression positively correlated with ferric ammonium citrate concentration. Baicalin or deferoxamine reduced divalent metal transporter 1 expression, but increased ferroportin 1 expression in the 100 µg/mL ferric ammonium citrate-loaded C6 cells. These results indicate that baicalin down-regulated iron concentration, which positively regulat-ed divalent metal transporter 1 expression and negatively regulated ferroportin 1 expression, and decreased iron accumulation in the substantia nigra.

  1. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  2. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  3. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe+2) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron

  4. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to engineer this system are likely to

  6. Electric transport of a single-crystal iron chalcogenide FeSe superconductor: Evidence of symmetry-breakdown nematicity and additional ultrafast Dirac cone-like carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, K. K.; Tanabe, Y.; Urata, T.; Oguro, H.; Heguri, S.; Watanabe, K.; Tanigaki, K.

    2014-10-01

    An SDW antiferromagnetic (SDW-AF) low-temperature phase transition is generally observed and the AF spin fluctuations are considered to play an important role for the superconductivity pairing mechanism in FeAs superconductors. However, a similar magnetic phase transition is not observed in FeSe superconductors, which has caused considerable discussion. We report on the intrinsic electronic states of FeSe as elucidated by electric transport measurements under magnetic fields using a high quality single crystal. A mobility spectrum analysis, an ab initio method that does not make assumptions on the transport parameters in a multicarrier system, provides very important and clear evidence that another hidden order, most likely the symmetry broken from the tetragonal C4 symmetry to the C2 symmetry nematicity associated with the selective d -orbital splitting, exists in the case of superconducting FeSe other than the AF magnetic order spin fluctuations. The intrinsic low-temperature phase in FeSe is in the almost compensated semimetallic states but is additionally accompanied by Dirac cone-like ultrafast electrons ˜104cm2(VS) -1 as minority carriers.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies against the iron regulated outer membrane Proteins of Acinetobacter baumannii are bactericidal

    OpenAIRE

    Goel, Vikas Kumar; Kapil, Arti

    2001-01-01

    Background Iron is an important nutrient required by all forms of life.In the case of human hosts,the free iron availability is 10-18M,which is far less than what is needed for the survival of the invading bacterial pathogen.To survive in such conditions, bacteria express new proteins in their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Results/ Discussion Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, a nosocomial pathogen which grows under iron restricted conditions, expresses ...

  8. Estimating Bacterial Loadings to Surface Waters from Agricultural Watersheds

    OpenAIRE

    Panhorst, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    Fecal bacteria and pathogens are a major source of surface water impairment. In Virginia alone, approximately 73% of impaired waters are impaired due to fecal coliforms (FC). Because bacteria are a significant cause of water body impairment and existing bacterial models are predominantly based upon laboratory-derived information, bacterial models are needed that describe bacterial die-off and transport processes under field conditions. Before these bacterial models can be developed, more f...

  9. Role of Sulfhydryl Sites on Bacterial Cell Walls in the Biosorption, Mobility and Bioavailability of Mercury and Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myneni, Satish C.; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Fein, Jeremy

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this exploratory study is to provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of the impact of bacterial sulfhydryl groups on the bacterial uptake, speciation, methylation and bioavailability of Hg and redox changes of uranium. The relative concentration and reactivity of different functional groups present on bacterial surfaces will be determined, enabling quantitative predictions of the role of biosorption of Hg under the physicochemical conditions found at contaminated DOE sites.The hypotheses we propose to test in this investigation are as follows- 1) Sulfhydryl groups on bacterial cell surfaces modify Hg speciation and solubility, and play an important role, specifically in the sub-micromolar concentration ranges of metals in the natural and contaminated systems. 2) Sulfhydryl binding of Hg on bacterial surfaces significantly influences Hg transport into the cell and the methylation rates by the bacteria. 3) Sulfhydryls on cell membranes can interact with hexavalent uranium and convert to insoluble tetravalent species. 4) Bacterial sulfhydryl surface groups are inducible by the presence of metals during cell growth. Our studies focused on the first hypothesis, and we examined the nature of sulfhydryl sites on three representative bacterial species: Bacillus subtilis, a common gram-positive aerobic soil species; Shewanella oneidensis, a facultative gram-negative surface water species; and Geobacter sulfurreducens, an anaerobic iron-reducing gram-negative species that is capable of Hg methylation; and at a range of Hg concentration (and Hg:bacterial concentration ratio) in which these sites become important. A summary of our findings is as follows- Hg adsorbs more extensively to bacteria than other metals. Hg adsorption also varies strongly with pH and chloride concentration, with maximum adsorption occurring under circumneutral pH conditions for both Cl-bearing and Cl-free systems. Under these conditions, all bacterial species tested exhibit

  10. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2013-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world's population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes) has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains) and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA) metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings (NTS). Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of yellow stripe like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II) complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  11. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eWang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world’s population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings. Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of Yellow Stripe-like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  12. High-rate behaviour of iron ore pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Gustaf; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Nishida, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore pellets are sintered, centimetre-sized spheres of ore with high iron content. Together with carbonized coal, iron ore pellets are used in the production of steel. In the transportation from the pelletizing plants to the customers, the iron ore pellets are exposed to different loading situations, resulting in degradation of strength and in some cases fragmentation. For future reliable numerical simulations of the handling and transportation of iron ore pellets, knowledge about their mechanical properties is needed. This paper describes the experimental work to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of blast furnace iron ore pellets. To study the dynamic fracture of iron ore pellets a number of split Hopkinson pressure bar tests are carried out and analysed.

  13. High-rate behaviour of iron ore pellet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron ore pellets are sintered, centimetre-sized spheres of ore with high iron content. Together with carbonized coal, iron ore pellets are used in the production of steel. In the transportation from the pelletizing plants to the customers, the iron ore pellets are exposed to different loading situations, resulting in degradation of strength and in some cases fragmentation. For future reliable numerical simulations of the handling and transportation of iron ore pellets, knowledge about their mechanical properties is needed. This paper describes the experimental work to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of blast furnace iron ore pellets. To study the dynamic fracture of iron ore pellets a number of split Hopkinson pressure bar tests are carried out and analysed.

  14. A high-fidelity multiphysics model for the new solid oxide iron-air redox battery part I: Bridging mass transport and charge transfer with redox cycle kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, XF; Zhao, X; Huang, K

    2015-04-15

    A high-fidelity two-dimensional axial symmetrical multi-physics model is described in this paper as an effort to simulate the cycle performance of a recently discovered solid oxide metal-air redox battery (SOMARB). The model collectively considers mass transport, charge transfer and chemical redox cycle kinetics occurring across the components of the battery, and is validated by experimental data obtained from independent research. In particular, the redox kinetics at the energy storage unit is well represented by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JIVIAK) and Shrinking Core models. The results explicitly show that the reduction of Fe3O4 during the charging cycle limits the overall performance. Distributions of electrode potential, overpotential, Nernst potential, and H-2/H2O-concentration across various components of the battery are also systematically investigated. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A high-fidelity multiphysics model for the new solid oxide iron-air redox battery. part I: Bridging mass transport and charge transfer with redox cycle kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xinfang; Zhao, Xuan; Huang, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    A high-fidelity two-dimensional axial symmetrical multi-physics model is described in this paper as an effort to simulate the cycle performance of a recently discovered solid oxide metal-air redox battery (SOMARB). The model collectively considers mass transport, charge transfer and chemical redox cycle kinetics occurring across the components of the battery, and is validated by experimental data obtained from independent research. In particular, the redox kinetics at the energy storage unit is well represented by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) and Shrinking Core models. The results explicitly show that the reduction of Fe3O4 during the charging cycle limits the overall performance. Distributions of electrode potential, overpotential, Nernst potential, and H2/H2O-concentration across various components of the battery are also systematically investigated.

  16. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called ...

  17. Steam iron cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cleaner is a substance used to clean steam irons. Poisoning occurs when someone swallows steam iron cleaner. This ... Below are symptoms of steam iron cleaner poisoning in different ... AND THROAT Severe pain in the throat Severe pain in the mouth ...

  18. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... refers to a condition in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood ... iron, your body starts using the iron it has stored. Soon, the stored iron gets used up. ...

  20. Epigenetic regulation of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jiewen; Wang, Tianya; Ni, Zhongfu

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is one of the most important microelement required for plant growth and development because of its unique property of catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions. Iron deficiency impairs fundamental processes which could lead to a decrease in chlorophyll production and pollen fertility, thus influencing crop productivity and quality. However, iron in excess is toxic to the cell and is harmful to the plant. To exactly control the iron content in all tissues, plants have evolved many strategies to regulate iron homeostasis, which refers to 2 successive steps: iron uptake at the root surface, and iron distribution in vivo. In the last decades, a number of transporters and regulatory factors involved in this process have been isolated and identified. To cope with the complicated flexible environmental conditions, plants apply diverse mechanisms to regulate the expression and activity of these components. One of the most important mechanisms is epigenetic regulation of iron homeostasis. This review has been presented to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of histone modifications in iron homeostasis and possible future course of the field. PMID:26313698

  1. Transferrin as a source of iron for Campylobacter rectus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Grenier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Campylobacter rectus is considered as one of the bacterial species of etiological importance in periodontitis. Iron-containing proteins such as transferrin are found in periodontal sites and may serve as a source of iron for periodontopathogens. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of C. rectus to assimilate transferrin-bound iron to support its growth. Design: Growth studies were performed in broth media pretreated with an iron-chelating resin and supplemented with various iron sources. The uptake of iron by C. rectus was monitored using 55Fe-transferrin. Transferrin-binding activity was assessed using a microplate assay while the degradation of transferrin and iron removal was evaluated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A colorimetric assay was used to determine ferric reductase activity. Results: Holotransferrin (iron-saturated form but not apotransferrin (iron-free form was found to support growth of C. rectus in an iron-restricted culture medium. Incubation of holotransferrin with cells of C. rectus resulted in removal of iron from the protein. A time dependent intracellular uptake of iron by C. rectus cells from 55Fe-transferrin was demonstrated. This uptake was significantly increased when bacteria were grown under an iron-limiting condition. Cells of C. rectus did not show transferrin-binding activity or proteolytic activity toward transferrin. However, a surface-associated ferric reductase activity was demonstrated. Conclusion: To survive and multiply in periodontal sites, periodontopathogens must possess efficient iron-scavenging mechanisms. In this study, we showed the capacity of C. rectus to assimilate iron from transferrin to support its growth. The uptake of iron appears to be dependent on a ferric reductive pathway.

  2. Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center, Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled 'Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center', which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. William Burgos (The Pennsylvania State University) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Brian Dempsey (Penn State), Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh (Central Florida University), and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The project focused on development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. The work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and was directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. ORNL FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  3. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in iron metabolism have allowed a novel classification of iron disorders and to identify previously unknown diseases. These disorders include genetic iron overload (hemochromatosis and inherited iron-related anemias, in some cases accompanied by iron overload. Rare inherited anemias may affect the hepcidin pathway, iron absorption, transport, utilization and recycling. Among the genetic iron-related anemias the most common form is likely the iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA, due to mutations of the hepcidin inhibitor TMPRSS6 encoding the serine protease matriptase-2. IRIDA is characterized by hepcidin up-regulation, decrease iron absorption and macrophage recycling and by microcytic- hypochromic anemia, unresponsive to oral iron. High serum hepcidin levels may suggest the diagnosis, which requires demonstrating the causal TMPRSS6 mutations by gene sequencing. Other rare microcytic hypochromic anemias associated with defects of iron transport-uptake are the rare hypotransferrinemia, and DMT1 and STEAP3 mutations. The degree of anemia is variable and accompanied by secondary iron overload even in the absence of blood transfusions. This is due to the iron-deficient or expanded erythropoiesis that inhibits hepcidin transcription, increases iron absorption, through the erythroid regulator, as in untransfused beta-thalassemia. Sideroblastic anemias are due to decreased mitochondrial iron utilization for heme or sulfur cluster synthesis. Their diagnosis requires demonstrating ringed sideroblasts by Perl’s staining of the bone marrow smears. The commonest X-linked form is due to deltaamino- levulinic-synthase-2-acid (ALAS2 mutations. The recessive, more severe form, affects SLC25A38, which encodes a potential mitochondrial importer of glycine, an amino acid essential for ALA synthesis and thus results in heme deficiency. Two disorders affect iron/sulfur cluster biogenesis: deficiency of the ATP-binding cassette B7 (ABCB7 causes X

  4. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  5. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  6. Emergence of high-mobility minority holes in the electrical transport of the Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Huynh, K. K.; Heguri, S.; Oguro, H.; Watanabe, K.; Tanigaki, K.

    2015-05-01

    In Fe pnictide (Pn) superconducting materials, neither Mn nor Cr doping to the Fe site induces superconductivity, even though hole carriers are generated. This is in strong contrast with the superconductivity appearing when holes are introduced by alkali-metal substitution on the insulating blocking layers. We investigate in detail the effects of Mn doping on magnetotransport properties in Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 for elucidating the intrinsic reason. The negative Hall coefficient for x =0 estimated in the low magnetic field (B ) regime gradually increases as x increases, and its sign changes to a positive one at x =0.020 . Hall resistivities as well as simultaneous interpretation using the magnetoconductivity tensor including both longitudinal and transverse transport components clarify that minority holes with high mobility are generated by the Mn doping via spin-density wave transition at low temperatures, while original majority electrons and holes residing in the paraboliclike Fermi surfaces of the semimetallic Ba (FeAs )2 are negligibly affected. Present results indicate that the mechanism of hole doping in Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 is greatly different from that of the other superconducting FePn family.

  7. Influence of DMT1 and iron status on inflammatory responses in the lung

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jonghan; Molina, Ramon M.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Buckett, Peter D.; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) is the major iron transporter responsible for duodenal dietary iron absorption and is required for erythropoiesis. Recent studies suggest that loss of DMT1 activity could be involved in metal-related lung injury, but little is known about the effects of iron status and DMT1 function on pulmonary inflammation. To better define the role of DMT1 and iron status in pulmonary inflammatory responses, we performed bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) following intratrache...

  8. Influence of microRNA on the Maintenance of Human Iron Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Clarke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient critical for many cellular functions including DNA synthesis, ATP generation, and cellular proliferation. Though essential, excessive iron may contribute to the generation of free radicals capable of damaging cellular lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. As such, the maintenance and control of cellular iron homeostasis is critical to prevent either iron deficiency or iron toxicity conditions. The maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis is largely coordinated by a family of cytosolic RNA binding proteins known as Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRP that function to post-transcriptionally control the translation and/or stability of mRNA encoding proteins required for iron uptake, storage, transport, and utilization. More recently, a class of small non-coding RNA known as microRNA (miRNA has also been implicated in the control of iron metabolism. To date, miRNA have been demonstrated to post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of genes associated with iron acquisition (transferrin receptor and divalent metal transporter, iron export (ferroportin, iron storage (ferritin, iron utilization (ISCU, and coordination of systemic iron homeostasis (HFE and hemojevelin. Given the diversity of miRNA and number of potential mRNA targets, characterizing factors that contribute to alterations in miRNA expression, biogenesis, and processing will enhance our understanding of mechanisms by which cells respond to changes in iron demand and/or iron availability to control cellular iron homeostasis.

  9. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  10. Iron supply of enterococci by 2-oxoacids and hydroxyacids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisiecki, Paweł; Mikucki, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Only 9 (11.2%) out of 80 studied bacterial strains were able to utilize iron saturated 2-oxo acids and hydroxyacids and grow on o-phenantroline containing media. These strains belonged to Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium species and were isolated from clinical material. Iron sources utilized by all of these strains were Fe(III) complexes with pyruvic, 2-oxobutyric, 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric, 2-oxo-3-methylvaleric, 2-oxoisocaproic and 2-oxoadipic acids. None of the nine strains released 2-oxoacids to environment during growth in iron excess Fe+ medium and iron deficient--Fe- (Chelex) medium. In Fe- (phenantroline) medium, when the growth was strongly inhibited, only pyruvic acid was released. Iron uptake from 59Fe(III)-pyruvate was depended on iron deficiency during growth: cells harvested from Fe- (phenantroline) medium have acquired the most amount of iron. 2,4-Dinitrofenol was a strong inhibitor of 59Fe(III) iron uptake. Release of pyruvic acid is not subject to negative derepression and does not require the presense of iron as its inductor. It appears in the environment as a response to growth inhibiting stress caused by the iron deficiency but contrary to siderophores are not specially synthesized for iron assimilation. Therefore, it is only primary metabolism products released by damaged, but metabolic active cells.

  11. Structural, Transport and Electrochemical Properties of LiFePO4 Substituted in Lithium and Iron Sublattices (Al, Zr, W, Mn, Co and Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Świerczek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available LiFePO4 is considered to be one of the most promising cathode materials for lithium ion batteries for electric vehicle (EV application. However, there are still a number of unsolved issues regarding the influence of Li and Fe-site substitution on the physicochemical properties of LiFePO4. This is a review-type article, presenting results of our group, related to the possibility of the chemical modification of phosphoolivine by introduction of cation dopants in Li and Fe sublattices. Along with a synthetic review of previous papers, a large number of new results are included. The possibility of substitution of Li+ by Al3+, Zr4+, W6+ and its influence on the physicochemical properties of LiFePO4 was investigated by means of XRD, SEM/EDS, electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements. The range of solid solution formation in Li1−3xAlxFePO4, Li1−4xZrxFePO4 and Li1−6xWxFePO4 materials was found to be very narrow. Transport properties of the synthesized materials were found to be rather weakly dependent on the chemical composition. The battery performance of selected olivines was tested by cyclic voltammetry (CV. In the case of LiFe1−yMyPO4 (M = Mn, Co and Ni, solid solution formation was observed over a large range of y (0 0.25 leads to considerably lower values of σ. The activated character of electrical conductivity with a rather weak temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient suggests a small polaron-type conduction mechanism. The electrochemical properties of LiFe1−yMyPO4 strongly depend on the Fe substitution level.

  12. Iron-responsive olfactory uptake of manganese improves motor function deficits associated with iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghan Kim

    Full Text Available Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl(2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl(2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT and dopamine receptor D(1 (D1R levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D(2 (D2R levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed "rescue response" with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status.

  13. Duodenal Absorption and Tissue Utilization of Dietary Heme and Nonheme Iron Differ in Rats123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang; Thomas, Carrie E.; Insogna, Karl L.; O'Brien, Kimberly O.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dietary heme contributes to iron intake, yet regulation of heme absorption and tissue utilization of absorbed heme remains undefined. Objectives: In a rat model of iron overload, we used stable iron isotopes to examine heme- and nonheme-iron absorption in relation to liver hepcidin and to compare relative utilization of absorbed heme and nonheme iron by erythroid (RBC) and iron storage tissues (liver and spleen). Methods: Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to groups for injections of either saline or iron dextran (16 or 48 mg Fe over 2 wk). After iron loading, rats were administered oral stable iron in the forms of 57Fe-ferrous sulfate and 58Fe-labeled hemoglobin. Expression of liver hepcidin and duodenal iron transporters and tissue stable iron enrichment was determined 10 d postdosing. Results: High iron loading increased hepatic hepcidin by 3-fold and reduced duodenal expression of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) by 76%. Nonheme-iron absorption was 2.5 times higher than heme-iron absorption (P = 0.0008). Absorption of both forms of iron was inversely correlated with hepatic hepcidin expression (heme-iron absorption: r = −0.77, P = 0.003; nonheme-iron absorption: r = −0.80, P = 0.002), but hepcidin had a stronger impact on nonheme-iron absorption (P = 0.04). Significantly more 57Fe was recovered in RBCs (P = 0.02), and more 58Fe was recovered in the spleen (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Elevated hepcidin significantly decreased heme- and nonheme-iron absorption but had a greater impact on nonheme-iron absorption. Differential tissue utilization of heme vs. nonheme iron was evident between erythroid and iron storage tissues, suggesting that some heme may be exported into the circulation in a form different from that of nonheme iron. PMID:25332470

  14. Porous Iron Structure Fabrication and Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Taewoo

    2015-01-01

    Porous iron or steel structures can be useful as light- weight materials for transportation and structural applications. We have created such porous iron metallic structures by utilizing a composite of Fe2O3 nanoparticles(NPs), poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) beads and polyethylene glycol(PEG) binder resin. Final optimized porous iron structure contains micro-pores of 15-20 µm size and nano-pores of 100-500 nm with strong connections between Fe grains. The results indicate that further effort...

  15. Evolution of the iron-responsive element

    OpenAIRE

    Piccinelli, Paul; Samuelsson, Tore

    2007-01-01

    An RNA hairpin structure referred to as the iron-responsive element (IRE) and iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) are key players in the control of iron metabolism in animal cells. They regulate translation initiation or mRNA stability, and the IRE is found in a variety of mRNAs, such as those encoding ferritin, transferrin receptor (Tfr), erythroid aminolevulinic acid synthase (eALAS), mitochondrial aconitase (mACO), ferroportin, and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1). We have studied the evolu...

  16. The bacterial magnetosome: a unique prokaryotic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial magnetosome is a unique prokaryotic organelle comprising magnetic mineral crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer. These inclusions are biomineralized by the magnetotactic bacteria which are ubiquitous, aquatic, motile microorganisms. Magnetosomes cause cells of magnetotactic bacteria to passively align and swim along the Earth's magnetic field lines, as miniature motile compass needles. These specialized compartments consist of a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounding magnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The morphology of these membrane-bound crystals varies by species with a nominal magnetic domain size between 35 and 120 nm. Almost all magnetotactic bacteria arrange their magnetosomes in a chain within the cell there by maximizing the magnetic dipole moment of the cell. It is presumed that magnetotactic bacteria use magnetotaxis in conjunction with chemotaxis to locate and maintain an optimum position for growth and survival based on chemistry, redox and physiology in aquatic habitats with vertical chemical concentration and redox gradients. The biosynthesis of magnetosomes is a complex process that involves several distinct steps including cytoplasmic membrane modifications, iron uptake and transport, initiation of crystallization, crystal maturation and magnetosome chain formation. While many mechanistic details remain unresolved, magnetotactic bacteria appear to contain the genetic determinants for magnetosome biomineralization within their genomes in clusters of genes that make up what is referred to as the magnetosome gene island in some species. In addition, magnetosomes contain a unique set of proteins, not present in other cellular fractions, which control the biomineralization process. Through the development of genetic systems, proteomic and genomic work, and the use of molecular and biochemical tools, the functions of a number of magnetosome membrane proteins have been demonstrated and the molecular

  17. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, ‘model’ organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria. PMID:26000653

  18. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  19. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  20. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  1. Special thermite cast irons

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. Zhiguts; I. Kurytnik

    2008-01-01

    The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  2. Iron isotope composition of some Archean and Proterozoic iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, Noah; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Bekker, Andrey; Hofmann, Axel; Little, Crispin T. S.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2012-03-01

    Fe isotopes can provide new insight into redox-dependent biogeochemical processes. Precambrian iron formations (IF) are deserving targets for Fe isotope studies because they are composed predominantly of authigenic Fe phases and record a period of unprecedented iron deposition in Earth's history. We present Fe isotope data for bulk samples from 24 Archean and Proterozoic IF and eight Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich deposits. These data reveal that many Archean and early Paleoproterozoic iron formations were a sink for isotopically heavy Fe, in contrast to later Proterozoic and Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich rocks. The positive δ56Fe values in IF are best explained by delivery of particulate ferric oxides formed in the water column to the sediment-water interface. Because IF are a net sink for isotopically heavy Fe, there must be a corresponding pool of isotopically light Fe in the sedimentary record. Earlier work suggested that Archean pyritic black shales were an important part of this light sink before 2.35 billion years ago (Ga). It is therefore likely that the persistently and anomalously low δ56Fe values in shales are linked with the deposition of isotopically heavy Fe in IF in the deeper parts of basins. IF deposition produced a residual isotopically light dissolved Fe pool that was captured by pyritic Fe in shales. Local dissimilatory Fe reduction in porewater and associated diagenetic reactions resulting in pyrite and carbonate precipitation may have further enhanced Fe isotope heterogeneity in marine sediments, and an 'iron shuttle' may have transported isotopically light Fe from shelf sediments to the basin. Nevertheless, water-column processing of hydrothermally delivered Fe likely had the strongest influence on the bulk iron isotope composition of Archean and Paleoproterozoic iron formations and other marine sediments.

  3. Obesity Promotes Alterations in Iron Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Citelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is a key hormone that induces the degradation of ferroportin (FPN, a protein that exports iron from reticuloendothelial macrophages and enterocytes. The aim of the present study was to experimentally evaluate if the obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD modifies the expression of FPN in macrophages and enterocytes, thus altering the iron bioavailability. In order to directly examine changes associated with iron metabolism in vivo, C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or a HFD. Serum leptin levels were evaluated. The hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1, FPN and ferritin genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of iron present in both the liver and spleen was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Ferroportin localization within reticuloendothelial macrophages was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Obese animals were found to exhibit increased hepcidin gene expression, while iron accumulated in the spleen and liver. They also exhibited changes in the sublocation of splenic cellular FPN and a reduction in the FPN expression in the liver and the spleen, while no changes were observed in enterocytes. Possible explanations for the increased hepcidin expression observed in HFD animals may include: increased leptin levels, the liver iron accumulation or endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Together, the results indicated that obesity promotes changes in iron bioavailability, since it altered the iron recycling function.

  4. Iron and genome stability: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron is an essential micronutrient which is required in a relatively narrow range for maintaining metabolic homeostasis and genome stability. Iron participates in oxygen transport and mitochondrial respiration as well as in antioxidant and nucleic acid metabolism. Iron deficiency impairs these biological pathways, leading to oxidative stress and possibly carcinogenesis. Iron overload has been linked to genome instability as well as to cancer risk increase, as seen in hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron is an extremely reactive transition metal that can interact with hydrogen peroxide to generate hydroxyl radicals that form the 8-hydroxy-guanine adduct, cause point mutations as well as DNA single and double strand breaks. Iron overload also induces DNA hypermethylation and can reduce telomere length. The current Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for iron, according with Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intake (DRI), is based in the concept of preventing anemia, and ranges from 7 mg/day to 18 mg/day depending on life stage and gender. Pregnant women need 27 mg/day. The maximum safety level for iron intake, the Upper Level (UL), is 40–45 mg/day, based on the prevention of gastrointestinal distress associated to high iron intakes. Preliminary evidence indicates that 20 mg/day iron, an intake slightly higher than the RDA, may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer in the elderly as well as increasing genome stability in lymphocytes of children and adolescents. Current dietary recommendations do not consider the concept of genome stability which is of concern because damage to the genome has been linked to the origin and progression of many diseases and is the most fundamental pathology. Given the importance of iron for homeostasis and its potential influence over genome stability and cancer it is recommended to conduct further studies that conclusively define these relationships.

  5. Iron and genome stability: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pra, Daniel, E-mail: daniel_pra@yahoo.com [PPG em Promocao da Saude, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); PPG em Saude e Comportamento, Universidade Catolica de Pelotas, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech [PPG em Promocao da Saude, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Henriques, Joao Antonio Pegas [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Fenech, Michael [CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2012-05-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient which is required in a relatively narrow range for maintaining metabolic homeostasis and genome stability. Iron participates in oxygen transport and mitochondrial respiration as well as in antioxidant and nucleic acid metabolism. Iron deficiency impairs these biological pathways, leading to oxidative stress and possibly carcinogenesis. Iron overload has been linked to genome instability as well as to cancer risk increase, as seen in hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron is an extremely reactive transition metal that can interact with hydrogen peroxide to generate hydroxyl radicals that form the 8-hydroxy-guanine adduct, cause point mutations as well as DNA single and double strand breaks. Iron overload also induces DNA hypermethylation and can reduce telomere length. The current Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for iron, according with Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intake (DRI), is based in the concept of preventing anemia, and ranges from 7 mg/day to 18 mg/day depending on life stage and gender. Pregnant women need 27 mg/day. The maximum safety level for iron intake, the Upper Level (UL), is 40-45 mg/day, based on the prevention of gastrointestinal distress associated to high iron intakes. Preliminary evidence indicates that 20 mg/day iron, an intake slightly higher than the RDA, may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer in the elderly as well as increasing genome stability in lymphocytes of children and adolescents. Current dietary recommendations do not consider the concept of genome stability which is of concern because damage to the genome has been linked to the origin and progression of many diseases and is the most fundamental pathology. Given the importance of iron for homeostasis and its potential influence over genome stability and cancer it is recommended to conduct further studies that conclusively define these relationships.

  6. TLR4-dependent hepcidin expression by myeloid cells in response to bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Peyssonnaux, Carole; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Datta, Vivekanand; Lauth, Xavier; Johnson, Randall S; Nizet, Victor

    2006-01-01

    Hepcidin is an antimicrobial peptide secreted by the liver during inflammation that plays a central role in mammalian iron homeostasis. Here we demonstrate the endogenous expression of hepcidin by macrophages and neutrophils in vitro and in vivo. These myeloid cell types produced hepcidin in response to bacterial pathogens in a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent fashion. Conversely, bacterial stimulation of macrophages triggered a TLR4-dependent reduction in the iron exporter ferroportin. ...

  7. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis high-affinity iron importer, IrtA, contains an FAD-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryndak, Michelle B; Wang, Shuishu; Smith, Issar; Rodriguez, G Marcela

    2010-02-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient not freely available to microorganisms infecting mammals. To overcome iron deficiency, bacteria have evolved various strategies including the synthesis and secretion of high-affinity iron chelators known as siderophores. The siderophores produced and secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, exomycobactins, compete for iron with host iron-binding proteins and, together with the iron-regulated ABC transporter IrtAB, are required for the survival of M. tuberculosis in iron deficient conditions and for normal replication in macrophages and in mice. This study further characterizes the role of IrtAB in M. tuberculosis iron acquisition. Our results demonstrate a role for IrtAB in iron import and show that the amino terminus domain of IrtA is a flavin-adenine dinucleotide-binding domain essential for iron acquisition. These results suggest a model in which the amino terminus of IrtA functions to couple iron transport and assimilation.

  8. Cast iron - a predictable material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg C. Sturm

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High strength compacted graphite iron (CGI or alloyed cast iron components are substituting previously used non-ferrous castings in automotive power train applications. The mechanical engineering industry has recognized the value in substituting forged or welded structures with stiff and light-weight cast iron castings. New products such as wind turbines have opened new markets for an entire suite of highly reliable ductile iron cast components. During the last 20 years, casting process simulation has developed from predicting hot spots and solidification to an integral assessment tool for foundries for the entire manufacturing route of castings. The support of the feeding related layout of the casting is still one of the most important duties for casting process simulation. Depending on the alloy poured, different feeding behaviors and self-feeding capabilities need to be considered to provide a defect free casting. Therefore, it is not enough to base the prediction of shrinkage defects solely on hot spots derived from temperature fields. To be able to quantitatively predict these defects, solidification simulation had to be combined with density and mass transport calculations, in order to evaluate the impact of the solidification morphology on the feeding behavior as well as to consider alloy dependent feeding ranges. For cast iron foundries, the use of casting process simulation has become an important instrument to predict the robustness and reliability of their processes, especially since the influence of alloying elements, melting practice and metallurgy need to be considered to quantify the special shrinkage and solidification behavior of cast iron. This allows the prediction of local structures, phases and ultimately the local mechanical properties of cast irons, to asses casting quality in the foundry but also to make use of this quantitative information during design of the casting. Casting quality issues related to thermally driven

  9. Targeted Delivery of Amoxicillin to C. trachomatis by the Transferrin Iron Acquisition Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Jun; Serradji, Nawal; Mouton, Ludovic; Redeker, Virginie; Cornu, David; El Hage Chahine, Jean-Michel; Verbeke, Philippe; Hémadi, Miryana

    2016-01-01

    Weak intracellular penetration of antibiotics makes some infections difficult to treat. The Trojan horse strategy for targeted drug delivery is among the interesting routes being explored to overcome this therapeutic difficulty. Chlamydia trachomatis, as an obligate intracellular human pathogen, is responsible for both trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases. Chlamydia develops in a vacuole and is therefore protected by four membranes (plasma membrane, bacterial inclusion membrane, and bacterial membranes). In this work, the iron-transport protein, human serum-transferrin, was used as a Trojan horse for antibiotic delivery into the bacterial vacuole. Amoxicillin was grafted onto transferrin. The transferrin-amoxicillin construct was characterized by mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy. Its affinity for transferrin receptor 1, determined by fluorescence emission titration [KaffTf-amox = (1.3 ± 1.0) x 108], is very close to that of transferrin [4.3 x 108]. Transmission electron and confocal microscopies showed a co-localization of transferrin with the bacteria in the vacuole and were also used to evaluate the antibiotic capability of the construct. It is significantly more effective than amoxicillin alone. These promising results demonstrate targeted delivery of amoxicillin to suppress Chlamydia and are of interest for Chlamydiaceae and maybe other intracellular bacteria therapies. PMID:26919720

  10. Targeted Delivery of Amoxicillin to C. trachomatis by the Transferrin Iron Acquisition Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hai

    Full Text Available Weak intracellular penetration of antibiotics makes some infections difficult to treat. The Trojan horse strategy for targeted drug delivery is among the interesting routes being explored to overcome this therapeutic difficulty. Chlamydia trachomatis, as an obligate intracellular human pathogen, is responsible for both trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases. Chlamydia develops in a vacuole and is therefore protected by four membranes (plasma membrane, bacterial inclusion membrane, and bacterial membranes. In this work, the iron-transport protein, human serum-transferrin, was used as a Trojan horse for antibiotic delivery into the bacterial vacuole. Amoxicillin was grafted onto transferrin. The transferrin-amoxicillin construct was characterized by mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy. Its affinity for transferrin receptor 1, determined by fluorescence emission titration [KaffTf-amox = (1.3 ± 1.0 x 108], is very close to that of transferrin [4.3 x 108]. Transmission electron and confocal microscopies showed a co-localization of transferrin with the bacteria in the vacuole and were also used to evaluate the antibiotic capability of the construct. It is significantly more effective than amoxicillin alone. These promising results demonstrate targeted delivery of amoxicillin to suppress Chlamydia and are of interest for Chlamydiaceae and maybe other intracellular bacteria therapies.

  11. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release. PMID:25150521

  12. Iron casein succinylate-chitosan coacervate for the liquid oral delivery of iron with bioavailability and stability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Cho, Jung-Hye; Song, Yun-Kyoung; Kim, Chong-Kook

    2016-01-01

    Iron casein succinylate (ICS) liquid oral preparation as iron supplement has uncomfortable taste after a long period of storage because of its stability, and poor bioavailability of iron compared to any other iron preparations. To improve the chemical stability of ICS and enhance the bioavailability of iron, chitosan-ICS nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by complex coacervation method and stabilized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400. NPs were spherical (mean diameter of 830-1070 nm) with positive charge (+30-60 mV) depending on the composition of NPs. Addition of PEG400 (2 w/v %) increased the zeta potential (26-50 %) and physical stability of chitosan-ICS NPs suspension. Also, NPs decreased iron release compared to ICS after 7-weeks of storage at 4 °C. NPs markedly increased the permeability of iron in Caco-2 cell up to 32-38-fold compared to ICS, while physical mixture of chitosan and ICS increased the iron permeability only 2.5-fold. In summary, NPs improved the physicochemical stability and enhanced the transport of iron compared to other iron preparations in Caco-2 cell model. Thus, chitosan-ICS coacervate might be a promising candidate as a liquid oral iron delivery system for iron deficiency patients with stability and bioavailability enhancement.

  13. Reversing Sports-Related Iron and Zinc Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosli, Alvin R.

    1993-01-01

    Many active athletes do not consume enough zinc or iron, which are important for oxygen activation, electron transport, and injury healing. Subclinical deficiencies may impair performance and impair healing times. People who exercise regularly need counseling about the importance of adequate dietary intake of iron and zinc. (SM)

  14. Biogeochemistry of pyrite and iron sulfide oxidation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippers, A.; Jørgensen, BB

    2002-01-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) and iron monosulfide (FeS) play a central role in the sulfur and iron cycles of marine sediments, They may be buried in the sediment or oxidized by O-2 after transport by bioturbation to the sediment surface. FeS2 and FeS may also be oxidized within the anoxic sediment in which NO3-...

  15. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...

  16. Like Iron in the Blood of the People: The Requirement for Heme Trafficking in Iron Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal eHamza; Tamara eKorolnek

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an iron-containing porphyrin ring that serves as a prosthetic group in proteins that function in diverse metabolic pathways. Heme is also a major source of bioavailable iron in the human diet. While the synthesis of heme has been well-characterized, the pathways for heme trafficking remain poorly understood. It is likely that heme transport across membranes is highly regulated, as free heme is toxic to cells. This review outlines the requirement for heme delivery to various subcellula...

  17. Like iron in the blood of the people: the requirement for heme trafficking in iron metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Korolnek, Tamara; Hamza, Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an iron-containing porphyrin ring that serves as a prosthetic group in proteins that function in diverse metabolic pathways. Heme is also a major source of bioavailable iron in the human diet. While the synthesis of heme has been well-characterized, the pathways for heme trafficking remain poorly understood. It is likely that heme transport across membranes is highly regulated, as free heme is toxic to cells. This review outlines the requirement for heme delivery to various subcellula...

  18. The structure of glutamate transporters shows channel-like features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotboom, DJ; Konings, WN; Lolkema, JS

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal and glial glutamate transporters remove the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft and thus prevent neurotoxicity, The proteins belong to a large family of secondary transporters, which includes transporters from a variety of bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic organis

  19. Structure and activity of lacustrine sediment bacteria involved in nutrient and iron cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Martins, Gilberto Jorge; Terada, Akihiko; Ribeiro, Daniel C;

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the bacterial community structure in sediments is essential to better design restoration strategies for eutrophied lakes. In this regard, the aim of this study was to quantify the abundance and activity of bacteria involved in nutrient and iron cycling in sediments from four Azorean.......5-6.8%), iron-reducing bacteria (0.2-1.4%) and phosphorus-accumulating organisms (...

  20. Two MATE Proteins Play a Role in Iron Efficiency in Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a necessary but often limiting nutrient for plant growth and development. Soybeans grown on the high-pH calcareous soils are especially prone to developing iron deficiency chlorosis and suffering the resultant yield losses. Once iron is transported into the root, it must be translocated from...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ...

  2. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  3. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  5. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, ... EJ, Gardner LB. Anemia of chronic diseases. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from ... iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such as focusing more on green leafy vegetables, ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  8. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength

  9. Gastrointestinal bleeding and iron absorption in the experimental blind loop syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannella, R A; Toskes, P P

    1976-07-01

    Rats with surgically created self-filling jejunal blind loops and the blind loop syndrome manifested gastrointestinal bleeding and hyperabsorption of iron. Although the mean hematocrit and serum iron levels of rats with self-filling blind loops became overtly anemic and manifested low-serum iron levels. It is suggested that the documented gastrointestinal bleeding in these rats with the experimental blind loop syndrome is another manifestation of damage to the intestinal epithelium in conditions of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

  10. Impaired neutrophil function in 24p3 null mice contributes to enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhuoming; Petersen, Robert; Devireddy, L.

    2013-01-01

    Lipocalin 24p3 (24p3) is a neutrophil secondary granule protein. 24p3 is also a siderocalin, which binds several bacterial siderophores. It was therefore proposed that synthesis and secretion of 24p3 by stimulated macrophages or release of 24p3 upon neutrophil degranulation sequesters iron-laden siderophores to attenuate bacterial growth. Accordingly, 24p3-deficient mice are susceptible to bacterial pathogens whose siderophores would normally be chelated by 24p3. Specific granule deficiency (...

  11. Binding and entry of DNA in bacterial transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Bacterial transformation in relation to DNA transport and competence in Streptococcus pneumoniae (also called Diplococcus pneumoniae) is discussed. This species will serve as a model with which to compare transformation in other bacterial species, particularly Bacillus subtilis and Haemophilus influenzae, with emphasis on the many similarities as well as differences.

  12. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  13. Special thermite cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Zhiguts

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  14. Iron deficiency and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Hulthén, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder in the world. One of the most worrying consequences of iron deficiency in children is the alteration of behaviour and cognitive performance. In iron-deficient children, striking behavioural changes are observed, such as reduced attention span, reduced emotional responsiveness and low scores on tests of intelligence. Animal studies on nutritional iron deficiency show effects on learning ability that parallel the human studies. Despite ...

  15. Alternative iron making routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, P.; Sharma, T. [Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India)

    2002-07-01

    The versatile route of iron production 'blast furnace' technique is being replaced by widely accepted Corex technology, Midrex process using Fastmelt ironmaking, eco-friendly Romelt process, more innovative Ausmelt & Hismelt technology, TATA KORF Mini blast furnace improvement, 'quickest iron through Orbiting Plasma', Direct iron ore smelting process, Conred, AISI-Hyl, Inred processes, Direct iron ore reduction methods, their comparison and proposed modifications. 18 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... Institutes of Health—shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  20. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  1. Delivery of tobramycin coupled to iron oxide nanoparticles across the biofilm of mucoidal Pseudonomas aeruginosa and investigation of its efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Kopciuch, Michael; Olszá½¹wka, Zuzia; Wawrzyniec, Stephen J.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Plumley, John B.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Huber, Dale L.; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterium is a deadly pathogen, leading to respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis and nosocomial pneumonia, and responsible for high mortality rates in these diseases. P. aeruginosa has inherent as well as acquired resistance to many drug classes. In this paper, we investigate the effectiveness of two classes; aminoglycoside (tobramycin) and fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin) administered alone, as well as conjugated to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles. P. aeruginosa possesses the ability to quickly alter its genetics to impart resistance to the presence of new, unrecognized treatments. As a response to this impending public health threat, we have synthesized and characterized magnetite nanoparticles capped with biodegradable short-chain carboxylic acid derivatives conjugated to common antibiotic drugs. The functionalized nanoparticles may carry the drug past the mucus and biofilm layers to target the bacterial colonies via magnetic gradient-guided transport. Additionally, the magnetic ferrofluid may be used under application of an oscillating magnetic field to raise the local temperature, causing biofilm disruption, slowed growth, and mechanical disruption. These abilities of the ferrofluid would also treat multi-drug resistant strains, which appear to be increasing in many nosocomial as well as acquired opportunistic infections. In this in vitro model, we show that the iron oxide alone can also inhibit bacterial growth and biofilm formation.

  2. Formation and occurrence of biogenic iron-rich minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Danielle; Langley, Sean

    2005-09-01

    Iron cycling in the Earth's crust depends on redox reactions, which often trigger the precipitation and dissolution of Fe-rich minerals. Microbial activity is also an integral part of iron cycling, through carbon fixation, respiration and passive sorption reactions. Iron oxides formed in close association with bacteria (either as internal or external precipitates) are referred to as biogenic minerals. They form in several types of environments on Earth, from freshwater to marine systems, aquifers, soils and mining impacted systems. Biogenic iron oxides generally occur as nanocrystals and show a wide range of morphology and mineralogy. These minerals form as a result of the direct metabolic activity of bacteria or as a result of passive sorption and nucleation reactions. The metabolic activity of acidophilic and neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria under oxic conditions promotes the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) and the precipitation of biogenic iron oxides as extracellular precipitates near or on the bacterial cells. Iron oxidation under anoxic conditions can also occur, as a result of the activity of nitrate-reducers and photoautotrophic bacteria using Fe(II) as an electron donor. Secondary Fe-oxide formation has been reported during the microbial reduction of iron oxides. Passive Fe sorption and nucleation onto bacterial cell walls represents another important mechanism leading to iron oxide formation. The surface reactivity of the bacterial surface under environmental pH conditions confers a net negative charge to the cell wall, which leads to the binding of soluble iron and eventually to the precipitation of iron oxides under saturation conditions. Extracellular polymers produced by bacteria can act as a template for iron sorption and Fe-oxide nucleation. Intracellular iron oxide formation has been observed in natural environments. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetosomes, occurring as chains of magnetite crystals within the cells, and an

  3. Nonredundant Roles of Iron Acquisition Systems in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Eric D; Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Mey, Alexandra R; Fisher, Carolyn R; Payne, Shelley M

    2015-12-07

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the severe diarrheal disease cholera, thrives in both marine environments and the human host. To do so, it must encode the tools necessary to acquire essential nutrients, including iron, under these vastly different conditions. A number of V. cholerae iron acquisition systems have been identified; however, the precise role of each system is not fully understood. To test the roles of individual systems, we generated a series of mutants in which only one of the four systems that support iron acquisition on unsupplemented LB agar, Feo, Fbp, Vct, and Vib, remains functional. Analysis of these mutants under different growth conditions showed that these systems are not redundant. The strain carrying only the ferrous iron transporter Feo grew well at acidic, but not alkaline, pH, whereas the ferric iron transporter Fbp promoted better growth at alkaline than at acidic pH. A strain defective in all four systems (null mutant) had a severe growth defect under aerobic conditions but accumulated iron and grew as well as the wild type in the absence of oxygen, suggesting the presence of an additional, unidentified iron transporter in V. cholerae. In support of this, the null mutant was only moderately attenuated in an infant mouse model of infection. While the null mutant used heme as an iron source in vitro, we demonstrate that heme is not available to V. cholerae in the infant mouse intestine.

  4. Iron and the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrangelo, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Humans have evolved to retain iron in the body and are exposed to a high risk of iron overload and iron-related toxicity. Excess iron in the blood, in the absence of increased erythropoietic needs, can saturate the buffering capacity of serum transferrin and result in non-transferrin-bound highly reactive forms of iron that can cause damage, as well as promote fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis in the parenchymatous organs. A number of hereditary or acquired diseases are associated with systemic or local iron deposition or iron misdistribution in organs or cells. Two of these, the HFE- and non-HFE hemochromatosis syndromes represent the paradigms of genetic iron overload. They share common clinical features and the same pathogenic basis, in particular, a lack of synthesis or activity of hepcidin, the iron hormone. Before hepcidin was discovered, the liver was simply regarded as the main site of iron storage and, as such, the main target of iron toxicity. Now, as the main source of hepcidin, it appears that the loss of the hepcidin-producing liver mass or genetic and acquired factors that repress hepcidin synthesis in the liver may also lead to iron overload. Usually, there is low-grade excess iron which, through oxidative stress, is sufficient to worsen the course of the underlying liver disease or other chronic diseases that are apparently unrelated to iron, such as chronic metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In the future, modulation of hepcidin synthesis and activity or hepcidin hormone-replacing strategies may become therapeutic options to cure iron-related disorders.

  5. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles affects iron absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Esch, Mandy B.; Tako, Elad; Southard, Teresa L.; Archer, Shivaun D.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2012-04-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron transport in an in vitro model of the intestinal epithelium and an in vivo chicken intestinal loop model. Intestinal cells that are exposed to high doses of nanoparticles showed increased iron transport due to nanoparticle disruption of the cell membrane. Chickens acutely exposed to carboxylated particles (50 nm in diameter) had a lower iron absorption than unexposed or chronically exposed birds. Chronic exposure caused remodelling of the intestinal villi, which increased the surface area available for iron absorption. The agreement between the in vitro and in vivo results suggests that our in vitro intestinal epithelium model is potentially useful for toxicology studies.

  6. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-04-26

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation. PMID:27078093

  7. Structure of the Hemoglobin-IsdH Complex Reveals the Molecular Basis of Iron Capture by Staphylococcus aureus*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F.; Kumar, Kaavya Krishna; Jacques, David A.; Malmirchegini, G. Reza; Spirig, Thomas; Mackay, Joel P.; Clubb, Robert T.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Gell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening disease in humans. The S. aureus surface protein iron-regulated surface determinant H (IsdH) binds to mammalian hemoglobin (Hb) and extracts heme as a source of iron, which is an essential nutrient for the bacteria. However, the process of heme transfer from Hb is poorly understood. We have determined the structure of IsdH bound to human Hb by x-ray crystallography at 4.2 Å resolution, revealing the structural basis for heme transfer. One IsdH molecule is bound to each α and β Hb subunit, suggesting that the receptor acquires iron from both chains by a similar mechanism. Remarkably, two near iron transporter (NEAT) domains in IsdH perform very different functions. An N-terminal NEAT domain binds α/β globin through a site distant from the globin heme pocket and, via an intervening structural domain, positions the C-terminal heme-binding NEAT domain perfectly for heme transfer. These data, together with a 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal domain bound to Hb and small-angle x-ray scattering of free IsdH, reveal how multiple domains of IsdH cooperate to strip heme from Hb. Many bacterial pathogens obtain iron from human hemoglobin using proteins that contain multiple NEAT domains and other domains whose functions are poorly understood. Our results suggest that, rather than acting as isolated units, NEAT domains may be integrated into higher order architectures that employ multiple interaction interfaces to efficiently extract heme from host proteins. PMID:24425866

  8. Structure of the hemoglobin-IsdH complex reveals the molecular basis of iron capture by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F; Kumar, Kaavya Krishna; Jacques, David A; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Spirig, Thomas; Mackay, Joel P; Clubb, Robert T; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening disease in humans. The S. aureus surface protein iron-regulated surface determinant H (IsdH) binds to mammalian hemoglobin (Hb) and extracts heme as a source of iron, which is an essential nutrient for the bacteria. However, the process of heme transfer from Hb is poorly understood. We have determined the structure of IsdH bound to human Hb by x-ray crystallography at 4.2 Å resolution, revealing the structural basis for heme transfer. One IsdH molecule is bound to each α and β Hb subunit, suggesting that the receptor acquires iron from both chains by a similar mechanism. Remarkably, two near iron transporter (NEAT) domains in IsdH perform very different functions. An N-terminal NEAT domain binds α/β globin through a site distant from the globin heme pocket and, via an intervening structural domain, positions the C-terminal heme-binding NEAT domain perfectly for heme transfer. These data, together with a 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal domain bound to Hb and small-angle x-ray scattering of free IsdH, reveal how multiple domains of IsdH cooperate to strip heme from Hb. Many bacterial pathogens obtain iron from human hemoglobin using proteins that contain multiple NEAT domains and other domains whose functions are poorly understood. Our results suggest that, rather than acting as isolated units, NEAT domains may be integrated into higher order architectures that employ multiple interaction interfaces to efficiently extract heme from host proteins.

  9. Wastewater engineering applications of BioIronTech process based on the biogeochemical cycle of iron bioreduction and (bio)oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Volodymyr Ivanov; Viktor Stabnikov; Chen Hong Guo; Olena Stabnikova; Zubair Ahmed; In S. Kim; Eng-Ban Shuy

    2014-01-01

    Bioreduction of Fe(III) and biooxidation of Fe(II) can be used in wastewater engineering as an innovative biotechnology BioIronTech, which is protected for commercial applications by US patent 7393452 and Singapore patent 106658 “Compositions and methods for the treatment of wastewater and other waste”. The BioIronTech process comprises the following steps: 1) anoxic bacterial reduction of Fe(III), for example in iron ore powder; 2) surface renovation of iron ore particles due to the formatio...

  10. Pathophysiology in Medicine: Hepcidin and iron regulation in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Means, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    A decade ago hepcidin, an antimicrobial peptide with iron-regulatory properties, was discovered and proposed as playing a significant role in the pathogenesis of the anemia of chronic disease. Subsequent studies have demonstrated that hepcidin is the keystone of the linked systems of iron balance and iron transport in health and in disease. The definition of the role of hepcidin and of its regulation has permitted the mechanisms of disorders of iron homeostasis to be understood at a molecular...

  11. The DtxR protein acting as dual transcriptional regulator directs a global regulatory network involved in iron metabolism of Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüser Andrea T

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The knowledge about complete bacterial genome sequences opens the way to reconstruct the qualitative topology and global connectivity of transcriptional regulatory networks. Since iron is essential for a variety of cellular processes but also poses problems in biological systems due to its high toxicity, bacteria have evolved complex transcriptional regulatory networks to achieve an effective iron homeostasis. Here, we apply a combination of transcriptomics, bioinformatics, in vitro assays, and comparative genomics to decipher the regulatory network of the iron-dependent transcriptional regulator DtxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results A deletion of the dtxR gene of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 led to the mutant strain C. glutamicum IB2103 that was able to grow in minimal medium only under low-iron conditions. By performing genome-wide DNA microarray hybridizations, differentially expressed genes involved in iron metabolism of C. glutamicum were detected in the dtxR mutant. Bioinformatics analysis of the genome sequence identified a common 19-bp motif within the upstream region of 31 genes, whose differential expression in C. glutamicum IB2103 was verified by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Binding of a His-tagged DtxR protein to oligonucleotides containing the 19-bp motifs was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. At least 64 genes encoding a variety of physiological functions in iron transport and utilization, in central carbohydrate metabolism and in transcriptional regulation are controlled directly by the DtxR protein. A comparison with the bioinformatically predicted networks of C. efficiens, C. diphtheriae and C. jeikeium identified evolutionary conserved elements of the DtxR network. Conclusion This work adds considerably to our currrent understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network of C. glutamicum genes that are controlled by DtxR. The DtxR protein has a major role in controlling the

  12. Ceruloplasmin-ferroportin system of iron traffic in vertebrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni; Musci; Fabio; Polticelli; Maria; Carmela; Bonaccorsi; di; Patti

    2014-01-01

    Safe trafficking of iron across the cell membrane is a delicate process that requires specific protein carriers. While many proteins involved in iron uptake by cells are known, only one cellular iron export protein has been identified in mammals: ferroportin(SLC40A1). Ceruloplasmin is a multicopper enzyme endowed with ferroxidase activity that is found as a soluble isoform in plasma or as a membrane-associated isoform in specific cell types. According to the currently accepted view, ferrous iron transported out of the cell by ferroportin would be safely oxidized by ceruloplasmin to facilitate loading on transferrin. Therefore, the ceruloplasminferroportin system represents the main pathway for cellular iron egress and it is responsible for physiological regulation of cellular iron levels. The most recent findings regarding the structural and functional features of ceruloplasmin and ferroportin and their relationship will be described in this review.

  13. Nitric Oxide Improves Internal Iron Availability in Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Magdalena; Beligni, María Verónica; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Iron deficiency impairs chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast development. In leaves, most of the iron must cross several biological membranes to reach the chloroplast. The components involved in the complex internal iron transport are largely unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), a bioactive free radical, can react with transition metals to form metal-nitrosyl complexes. Sodium nitroprusside, an NO donor, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize (Zea mays) plants growing with an iron concentration as low as 10 μm Fe-EDTA in the nutrient solution. S-Nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, another NO donor, as well as gaseous NO supply in a translucent chamber were also able to revert the iron deficiency symptoms. A specific NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, blocked the effect of the NO donors. The effect of NO treatment on the photosynthetic apparatus of iron-deficient plants was also studied. Electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize plants revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. In contrast, in NO-treated maize plants, mesophyll chloroplast appeared completely developed. NO treatment did not increase iron content in plant organs, when expressed in a fresh matter basis, suggesting that root iron uptake was not enhanced. NO scavengers 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide and methylene blue promoted interveinal chlorosis in iron-replete maize plants (growing in 250 μm Fe-EDTA). Even though results support a role for endogenous NO in iron nutrition, experiments did not establish an essential role. NO was also able to revert the chlorotic phenotype of the iron-inefficient maize mutants yellow stripe1 and yellow stripe3, both impaired in the iron uptake mechanisms. All together, these results support a biological action of NO on the availability and/or delivery of metabolically active iron within the plant. PMID:12481068

  14. Enhanced formation of silver nanoparticles in Ag+-NOM-iron(II, III) systems and antibacterial activity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboyega, Nathaniel F; Sharma, Virender K; Siskova, Karolina M; Vecerova, Renata; Kolar, Milan; Zbořil, Radek; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2014-03-18

    This work reports the role of iron redox pair (Fe(3+)/Fe(2+)) in the formation of naturally occurring silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the aquatic environment. The results showed that Fe(3+) or Fe(2+) ions in the mixtures of Ag(+) and natural organic matter enhanced the formation of AgNPs. The formation of AgNPs depended on pH and types of organic matter. Increase in pH enhanced the formation of AgNPs, and humic acids as ligands showed higher formation of AgNPs compared to fulvic acids. The observed results were described by considering the potentials of redox pairs of silver and iron species and the possible species involved in reducing silver ions to AgNPs. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy measurements of AgNPs revealed mostly bimodal size distribution with decrease in size of AgNPs due to iron species in the reaction mixture. Minimum inhibitory concentration of AgNPs needed to inhibit the growth of various bacterial species suggested the role of surfaces of tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Stability study of AgNPs, formed in Ag(+)-humic acid/fulvic acids-Fe(3+) mixtures over a period of several months showed high stability of the particles with significant increase in surface plasmon resonance peak. The environmental implications of the results in terms of fate, transport, and ecotoxicity of organic-coated AgNPs are briefly presented. PMID:24524189

  15. Role of dust alkalinity in acid mobilization of iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ito

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by acid gases (e.g., SO2, HNO3, N2O5, and HCl may play a key role in the transformation of insoluble iron (Fe in the oxidized or ferric (III form to soluble forms (e.g., Fe(II, inorganic soluble species of Fe(III, and organic complexes of iron. On the other hand, mineral dust particles have a potential of neutralizing the acidic species due to the alkaline buffer ability of carbonate minerals (e.g., CaCO3 and MgCO3. Here we demonstrate the impact of dust alkalinity on the acid mobilization of iron in a three-dimensional aerosol chemistry transport model that includes a mineral dissolution scheme. In our model simulations, most of the alkaline dust minerals cannot be entirely consumed by inorganic acids during the transport across the North Pacific Ocean. As a result, the inclusion of alkaline compounds in aqueous chemistry substantially limits the iron dissolution during the long-range transport to the North Pacific Ocean: only a small fraction of iron (<0.2% dissolves from hematite in the coarse-mode dust aerosols with 0.45% soluble iron initially. On the other hand, a significant fraction of iron (1–2% dissolves in the fine-mode dust aerosols due to the acid mobilization of the iron-containing minerals externally mixed with carbonate minerals. Consequently, the model quantitatively reproduces higher iron solubility in smaller particles as suggested by measurements over the Pacific Ocean. It implies that the buffering effect of alkaline content in dust aerosols might help to explain the inverse relationship between aerosol iron solubility and particle size. We also demonstrate that the iron solubility is sensitive to the chemical specification of iron-containing minerals in dust. Compared with the dust sources, soluble iron from combustion sources contributes to a relatively marginal effect for deposition of soluble iron over the North

  16. Dietary phosphate supplementation delays the onset of iron deficiency anemia and affects iron status in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Mari; Yamamoto, Hironori; Nakahashi, Otoki; Ikeda, Shoko; Abe, Kotaro; Masuda, Masashi; Ishiguro, Mariko; Iwano, Masayuki; Takeda, Eiji; Taketani, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) plays critical roles in bone metabolism and is an essential component of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG). It has been reported that animals fed a low-iron diet modulate Pi metabolism, whereas the effect of dietary Pi on iron metabolism, particularly in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), is not fully understood. In this study, we hypothesized the presence of a link between Pi and iron metabolism and tested the hypothesis by investigating the effects of dietary Pi on iron status and IDA. Wistar rats aged 4 weeks were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 experimental dietary groups: normal iron content (Con Fe)+0.5% Pi, low-iron (Low Fe)+0.5% Pi, Con Fe+1.5% Pi, and Low Fe+1.5% Pi. Rats fed the 1.5% Pi diet for 14 days, but not for 28 days, maintained their anemia state and plasma erythropoietin concentrations within the reference range, even under conditions of low iron. In addition, plasma concentrations of 2,3-DPG were significantly increased by the 1.5% Pi diets and were positively correlated with plasma Pi concentration (r=0.779; Piron-regulated genes, including divalent metal transporter 1, duodenal cytochrome B, and hepcidin. Furthermore, iron concentration in liver tissues was increased by the 1.5% Pi in Con Fe diet. These results suggest that dietary Pi supplementation delays the onset of IDA and increases plasma 2,3-DPG concentration, followed by modulation of the expression of iron-regulated genes.

  17. Ferric sodium edetate therapy in children with iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Moningkey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is frequently found in school-aged children. The main treatments for IDA are overcoming the causal factors and iron supplementation. Noncompliance in taking iron tablets and the possibility of iron absorbtion or transport difficulties, can reduce efficacy of daily oral iron supplementation. Because excess iron storage in the intestinal cells can lead to mucosal blockage, twice weekly oral iron therapy may be considered instead of daily dosage. Objective To compare the effects of daily vs. twice weekly ferric sodium edetate (NaFeEDTA on hemoglobin (Hb, hematocrit (Ht, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC levels on children with IDA. Methods We conducted an open-label, randomized, prospective study in 36 children with IDA aged 5-11 years. Subjects were divided into two groups. For a one-month period, group I received daily iron therapy (NaFeEDTA and group II received twice weekly iron therapy. Examinations of Hb, Ht, MCV, MCH, MCHC were performed before and after iron therapy. Results There were no significant differences in Hb, Ht, MCV, MCH or MCHC levels after therapy between the daily and twice weekly NaFeEDTA groups (P > 0.05. Conclusion Twice weekly NaFeEDTA therapy is as effective as daily NaFeEDTA administration in children with IDA. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:91-4.].

  18. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  19. The ubiquity of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth.

  20. Neisseria gonorrhoeae modulates iron-limiting innate immune defenses in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu M Zughaier

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strict human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection termed gonorrhea. The gonococcus can survive extracellularly and intracellularly, but in both environments the bacteria must acquire iron from host proteins for survival. However, upon infection the host uses a defensive response by limiting the bioavailability of iron by a number of mechanisms including the enhanced expression of hepcidin, the master iron-regulating hormone, which reduces iron uptake from the gut and retains iron in macrophages. The host also secretes the antibacterial protein NGAL, which sequesters bacterial siderophores and therefore inhibits bacterial growth. To learn whether intracellular gonococci can subvert this defensive response, we examined expression of host genes that encode proteins involved in modulating levels of intracellular iron. We found that N. gonorrhoeae can survive in association (tightly adherent and intracellular with monocytes and macrophages and upregulates a panel of its iron-responsive genes in this environment. We also found that gonococcal infection of human monocytes or murine macrophages resulted in the upregulation of hepcidin, NGAL, and NRAMP1 as well as downregulation of the expression of the gene encoding the short chain 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH2; BDH2 catalyzes the production of the mammalian siderophore 2,5-DHBA involved in chelating and detoxifying iron. Based on these findings, we propose that N. gonorrhoeae can subvert the iron-limiting innate immune defenses to facilitate iron acquisition and intracellular survival.

  1. Outer membrane proteins induced by iron deficiency in Anabaena sp.PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanling Dong; Xudong Xu

    2009-01-01

    Iron deficiency can induce cyanobacteria to synthesize siderophore receptor proteins on the outer membrane to enhance the uptake of iron. In this study, an outer membrane of high purity was prepared from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 based on aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning and discontinuous sucrose density ultra-centrifugation, and the induction of outer membrane proteins by iron deficiency was investigated using 2-D gel electrophoresis. At least five outer membrane proteins were newly synthesized or significantly up-regulated in cells transferred to iron-deficient conditions, which were all identified to be siderophore receptor proteins according to MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Bacterial luciferase reporter genes luxAB were employed to monitor the transcription of the encoding genes. The genes were induced by iron deficiency at the transcriptional level in different responsive modes. Luciferase activity expressed from an iron-regulated promoter may be used as a bioreporter for utilizable iron in natural water samples.

  2. Strong iron demand during hypoxia-induced erythropoiesis is associated with down-regulation of iron-related proteins and myoglobin in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robach, Paul; Cairo, Gaetano; Gelfi, Cecilia;

    2007-01-01

    Iron is essential for oxygen transport because it is incorporated in the heme of the oxygen-binding proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. An interaction between iron homeostasis and oxygen regulation is further suggested during hypoxia, in which hemoglobin and myoglobin syntheses have been reported...... to increase. This study gives new insights into the changes in iron content and iron-oxygen interactions during enhanced erythropoiesis by simultaneously analyzing blood and muscle samples in humans exposed to 7 to 9 days of high altitude hypoxia (HA). HA up-regulates iron acquisition by erythroid cells...... with increased ferroportin mRNA levels, suggesting enhanced iron export. Thus, in HA, the elevated iron requirement associated with enhanced erythropoiesis presumably elicits iron mobilization and myoglobin down-modulation, suggesting an altered muscle oxygen homeostasis....

  3. Dynamic fracture behavior of nodular cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferritic nodular cast iron has been found to be a much tougher material than previously believed based on Charpy impact test results. As a result this material is being considered as a substitute for Stainless Steel in nuclear waste transport containers. We have determined Klc and Kld values for nodular cast iron with varying values of silicon and percentage of pearlite in the matrix. Regular V-notch charpy bars and fatigue precracked charpy bars have been tested to determine the initiation and propagation energy and the effect of notch acuity on transition temperature. (author)

  4. PfsR is a key regulator of iron homeostasis in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cheng

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor in numerous cellular processes. The iron deficiency in the oceans affects the primary productivity of phytoplankton including cyanobacteria. In this study, we examined the function of PfsR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator, in iron homeostasis of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Compared with the wild type, the pfsR deletion mutant displayed stronger tolerance to iron limitation and accumulated significantly more chlorophyll a, carotenoid, and phycocyanin under iron-limiting conditions. The mutant also maintained more photosystem I and photosystem II complexes than the wild type after iron deprivation. In addition, the activities of photosystem I and photosystem II were much higher in pfsR deletion mutant than in wild-type cells under iron-limiting conditions. The transcripts of pfsR were enhanced by iron limitation and inactivation of the gene affected pronouncedly expression of fut genes (encoding a ferric iron transporter, feoB (encoding a ferrous iron transporter, bfr genes (encoding bacterioferritins, ho genes (encoding heme oxygenases, isiA (encoding a chlorophyll-binding protein, and furA (encoding a ferric uptake regulator. The iron quota in pfsR deletion mutant cells was higher than in wild-type cells both before and after exposure to iron limitation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that PfsR bound to its own promoter and thereby auto-regulated its own expression. These data suggest that PfsR is a critical regulator of iron homeostasis.

  5. The Organization of Controller Motifs Leading to Robust Plant Iron Homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Agafonov

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential element needed by all organisms for growth and development. Because iron becomes toxic at higher concentrations iron is under homeostatic control. Plants face also the problem that iron in the soil is tightly bound to oxygen and difficult to access. Plants have therefore developed special mechanisms for iron uptake and regulation. During the last years key components of plant iron regulation have been identified. How these components integrate and maintain robust iron homeostasis is presently not well understood. Here we use a computational approach to identify mechanisms for robust iron homeostasis in non-graminaceous plants. In comparison with experimental results certain control arrangements can be eliminated, among them that iron homeostasis is solely based on an iron-dependent degradation of the transporter IRT1. Recent IRT1 overexpression experiments suggested that IRT1-degradation is iron-independent. This suggestion appears to be misleading. We show that iron signaling pathways under IRT1 overexpression conditions become saturated, leading to a breakdown in iron regulation and to the observed iron-independent degradation of IRT1. A model, which complies with experimental data places the regulation of cytosolic iron at the transcript level of the transcription factor FIT. Including the experimental observation that FIT induces inhibition of IRT1 turnover we found a significant improvement in the system's response time, suggesting a functional role for the FIT-mediated inhibition of IRT1 degradation. By combining iron uptake with storage and remobilization mechanisms a model is obtained which in a concerted manner integrates iron uptake, storage and remobilization. In agreement with experiments the model does not store iron during its high-affinity uptake. As an iron biofortification approach we discuss the possibility how iron can be accumulated even during high-affinity uptake.

  6. Hunger for iron: the alternative siderophore iron scavenging systems in highly virulent Yersinia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eRakin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight siderophores are used by many living organisms to scavenge scarcely available ferric iron. Presence of at least a single siderophore-based iron acquisition system is usually acknowledged as a virulence-associated trait and a prerequisite to become an efficient and successful pathogen. Currently it is assumed that yersiniabactin (Ybt is the solely functional endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in highly virulent Yersinia (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica biotype 1B. Genes responsible for biosynthesis, transport and regulation of the yersiniabactin (ybt production are clustered on a mobile genetic element, the High Pathogenicity Island (HPI that is responsible for broad dissemination of the ybt genes in Enterobacteriaceae. However, the ybt gene cluster is absent from nearly half of Y. pseudotuberculosis O3 isolates and epidemic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 isolates responsible for the Far East Scarlet-like Fever. Several potential siderophore-mediated iron uptake gene clusters are documented in Yersinia genomes, however neither of them have been proven to be functional. It has been suggested that at least two siderophores alternative to Ybt may operate in the highly virulent Yersinia pestis / Y. pseudotuberculosis group, and are referred to as pseudochelin (Pch and yersiniachelin (Ych. Furthermore, most sporadic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 strains possess gene clusters encoding all three iron scavenging systems. Thus, the Ybt system appears not to be the sole endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in the highly virulent yersiniae and may be efficiently substituted and / or supplemented by alternative iron scavenging systems.

  7. Iron and Stony-iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, H.; McCoy, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids.Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar to that continuing on Earth - although on much smaller length- and timescales - with melting of the metal and silicates, differentiation into core, mantle, and crust, and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This fact has been recognized since the work of Chladni (1794), who argued that stony-iron meteorites must have originated in outer space and fallen during fireballs and that they provide our closest analogue to the material that comprises our own planet's core. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do we know and don't we know?Iron and stony-iron meteorites constitute ˜6% of meteorite falls (Grady, 2000). Despite their scarcity among falls, iron meteorites are our only samples of ˜75 of the ˜135 asteroids from which meteorites originate ( Keil et al., 1994; Scott, 1979; Meibom and Clark, 1999; see also Chapter 1.05), suggesting that both differentiated asteroids and the geologic processes that produced them were common.Despite the highly evolved nature of iron and stony-iron meteorites, their chemistry provides important

  8. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  9. State of the iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinisch, Walter; Staun, Michael; Bhandari, Sunil;

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) frequently occurs in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and negatively impacts their quality of life. Nevertheless, the condition appears to be both under-diagnosed and undertreated. Regular biochemical screening of patients with IBD for anemia...... by the gastroenterology community has to be advocated. Oral iron is a low cost treatment however its effectiveness is limited by low bioavailability and poor tolerability. Intravenous (IV) iron rapidly replenishes iron stores and has demonstrated its safe use in a number of studies in various therapeutic areas. A broad...... spectrum of new IV iron formulations is now becoming available offering improved tolerability and patient convenience by rapidly restoring the depleted iron status of patients with IBD. The following article aims to review the magnitude of the problem of IDA in IBD, suggest screening standards...

  10. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(I) Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, SG iron in short, refers to the cast iron in which graphite precipitates as spheroidal shape during solidification of liquid iron. The graphite in common commercial cast iron can only be changed from flake to spheroidal shape by spheroidising treatment. Since spheroidal graphite reduces the cutting effect of stress concentration, the metal matrix strength of SG iron can be applied around 70%-90%, thus the mechanical property of SG iron is significantly superior to other cast irons;even the tensile strength of SG iron is higher than that carbon steel.

  11. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(Ⅳ) 3.7 Segregation of SG iron The non-uniform distribution of solute elements during solidification results in the micro segregation of SG iron.As for the redistribution of elements in the phases of the solidification structure,there is no intrinsic difference between SG iron and grey iron[132].

  12. Iron regulation by hepcidin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ningning; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin is a key hormone that is involved in the control of iron homeostasis in the body. Physiologically, hepcidin is controlled by iron stores, inflammation, hypoxia, and erythropoiesis. The regulation of hepcidin expression by iron is a complex process that requires the coordination of multiple proteins, including hemojuvelin, bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), hereditary hemochromatosis protein, transferrin receptor 2, matriptase-2, neogenin, BMP receptors, and transferrin. Misregulati...

  13. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  14. Preferential Iron Trafficking Characterizes Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schonberg, David L; Miller, Tyler E; Wu, Qiulian;

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas display hierarchies with self-renewing cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). RNA sequencing and enhancer mapping revealed regulatory programs unique to CSCs causing upregulation of the iron transporter transferrin, the top differentially expressed gene compared with tissue-specific progeni......Glioblastomas display hierarchies with self-renewing cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). RNA sequencing and enhancer mapping revealed regulatory programs unique to CSCs causing upregulation of the iron transporter transferrin, the top differentially expressed gene compared with tissue......-specific progenitors. Direct interrogation of iron uptake demonstrated that CSCs potently extract iron from the microenvironment more effectively than other tumor cells. Systematic interrogation of iron flux determined that CSCs preferentially require transferrin receptor and ferritin, two core iron regulators......, to propagate and form tumors in vivo. Depleting ferritin disrupted CSC mitotic progression, through the STAT3-FoxM1 regulatory axis, revealing an iron-regulated CSC pathway. Iron is a unique, primordial metal fundamental for earliest life forms, on which CSCs have an epigenetically programmed, targetable...

  15. Review on iron and its importance for human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Abbaspour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that deficiency or over exposure to various elements has noticeable effects on human health. The effect of an element is determined by several characteristics, including absorption, metabolism, and degree of interaction with physiological processes. Iron is an essential element for almost all living organisms as it participates in a wide variety of metabolic processes, including oxygen transport, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA synthesis, and electron transport. However, as iron can form free radicals, its concentration in body tissues must be tightly regulated because in excessive amounts, it can lead to tissue damage. Disorders of iron metabolism are among the most common diseases of humans and encompass a broad spectrum of diseases with diverse clinical manifestations, ranging from anemia to iron overload, and possibly to neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss the latest progress in studies of iron metabolism and bioavailability, and our current understanding of human iron requirement and consequences and causes of iron deficiency. Finally, we discuss strategies for prevention of iron deficiency.

  16. Specific amplification of iron receptor genes in Xylella fastidiosa strains from different hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Teresa Hansen Pacheco

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial production of siderophores may involve specific genes related to nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthesis, which have not been fully identified in the genome of Xylella fastidiosa strain 9a5c. However, a search for siderophore-related genes in strain 9a5c indicated five membrane receptors, including siderophore, ferrichrome-iron and hemin receptors. All these biomolecules are thought to be associated with iron transport and utilization. Eighty isolates obtained from citrus orchards containing trees that developed citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC were screened for siderophore production. The results demonstrated that only 10 of the isolates did not produce siderophores. Additional strains obtained from coffee, almond, mulberry, elm, ragweed, periwinkle and grape also infected by X. fastidiosa were also shown by the chromeazurol bioassay to produce siderophores. In order to correlate siderophore production with the presence of siderophore-related genes, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR was developed using specific primers for the catechol-type ferric enterobactin receptor (pfeA and the hydroxamate-type ferrisiderophore receptor (fiuA genes of strain 9a5c. The PCR results confirmed our hypothesis by demonstrating that amplification products were detected in all strains except for those isolates that did not produce siderophores.

  17. Iron, Meat and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Geissler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is a summary of the publication “Iron and Health” by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN to the U.K. Government (2010, which reviews the dietary intake of iron and the impact of different dietary patterns on the nutritional and health status of the U.K. population. It concludes that several uncertainties make it difficult to determine dose-response relationships or to confidently characterize the risks associated with iron deficiency or excess. The publication makes several recommendations concerning iron intakes from food, including meat, and from supplements, as well as recommendations for further research.

  18. Iron overload and immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gra(c)a Porto; Maria De Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the characterization of genes involved in the control of iron homeostasis in humans and in mice has improved the definition of iron overload and of the cells affected by it. The cell involved in iron overload with the greatest effect on immunity is the macrophage.Intriguing evidence has emerged, however, in the last 12 years indicating that parenchymal iron overload is linked to genes classically associated with the immune system. This review offers an update of the genes and proteins relevant to iron metabolism expressed in cells of the innate immune system, and addresses the question of how this system is affected in clinical situations of iron overload. The relationship between iron and the major cells of adaptive immunity, the T lymphocytes,will also be reviewed. Most studies addressing this last question in humans were performed in the clinical model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis. Data will also be reviewed demonstrating how the disruption of molecules essentially involved in adaptive immune responses result in the spontaneous development of iron overload and how they act as modifiers of iron overload.

  19. Physics of iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, June 28 to July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, {beta}, with a {gamma}-{beta}-{epsilon} triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, {omega}, with an {epsilon}-{Theta}-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth`s heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there was notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  20. Recalling the Iron Girls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The phrase "iron girl" is symbolic of an era. Widely used in the 1960s and the early 1970s, it was a term that described women who, in the spirit of sexual equality, found in themselves a physical strength that surpassed their psychologi cal expectations. With their might and power, they proved to society that women could do everything that men could. The title of "iron girl" was their pride.The well-known writer Fan Xiaoqing, was one such iron girl. She says the "iron girls" were nothing less than a quest for perfection.

  1. Enhancement of anaerobic hydrogen production by iron and nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Dogan; Puhakka, Jaakko A. [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)

    2010-08-15

    The effects of iron and nickel on hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production were investigated in a glucose-fed anaerobic Continuous Flow Stirred Tank Reactor (ACSTR). Both iron and nickel improved the reactor performance and H{sub 2} production was enhanced by 71% with the sole iron or nickel supplementation. In all cases, H{sub 2} production yield was increased by lowering both ethanol and total metabolites production and increasing butyrate production. Furthermore, iron and nickel slightly increased biomass production while glucose degradation decreased with the supplementation of nickel. Dynamic changes in bacterial composition as analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-targeted denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed that hydrogen was produced mainly by Clostridium butyricum strains and that nickel addition decreased the microbial diversity. (author)

  2. Targeting iron assimilation to develop new antibacterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Timothy L.; Simeonov, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Since the first application of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections, the development and spread of resistance has been a persistent threat. An ever-evolving pipeline of next-generation therapeutics is required for modern medicine to remain one step ahead of pathogens. Areas covered in this review This review describes recent efforts to develop drugs that interrupt the assimilation of iron by bacteria, a process that is vital to cellular homeostasis and is not currently targeted by antibiotics used in the clinic. We cover the mechanisms through which bacteria acquire iron for their environment and detail efforts to intervene in these processes with small molecule inhibitors that target key steps in these pathways, with a special emphasis on recent advances published during the 2010–2012 period. Expert Opinion For decades, the routes used by bacteria to assimilate iron from host and environmental settings have been the subject of intense study. While numerous investigations have identified inhibitors of these pathways, many have stopped short of translating the in vitro results to in vivo proof of concept experiments. Extension of preliminary findings in this manner to validate the clinical potential of iron assimilation pathways for therapeutic development will significantly increase the impact of the field. PMID:22812521

  3. Bacterial metabolism in biofilm consortia: Consequences for potential ennoblement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekaran, P.; Dexter, S.C. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States). Graduate College of Marine Studies

    1994-12-31

    Platinum metal coupons were used in studying the mechanism of ennoblement in the presence of mature seawater biofilms. Presence of a bacterial consortia, rather than any single organism is determined to be necessary for ennoblement. Millimolar concentrations of iron and manganese were measured in biofilms formed over platinum. EDAX and ICP techniques were used for measuring the chemistry of particles in a biofilm. Utilization of various electron acceptors like oxygen, iron, manganese, etc. are thought to be important for ennoblement to take place over platinum. Heavy metal accumulation is hypothesized to favor the low pH mechanism of ennoblement due to heavy metal hydrolysis. Monoculture biofilms cannot support ennoblement on platinum.

  4. Benefits and harms of iron supplementation in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Due to high iron requirements, young children are at risk for iron deficiency anemia. Iron supplements are therefore often recommended, especially since iron deficiency anemia in children is associated with poor neurodevelopment. However, in contrast to most other nutrients, excess iron cannot be excreted by the human body and it has recently been suggested that excessive iron supplementation of young children may have adverse effects on growth, risk of infections, and even on cognitive development. Recent studies support that iron supplements are beneficial in iron-deficient children but there is a risk of adverse effects in those who are iron replete. In populations with a low prevalence of iron deficiency, general supplementation should therefore be avoided. Iron-fortified foods can still be generally recommended since they seem to be safer than medicinal iron supplements, but the level of iron fortification should be limited. General iron supplementation is recommended in areas with a high prevalence of iron deficiency, with the exception of malarious areas where a cautious supplementation approach needs to be adopted, based either on screening or a combination of iron supplements and infection control measures. More studies are urgently needed to better determine the risks and benefits of iron supplementation and iron-fortified foods given to iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

  5. Recent Advances in Iron Metabolism: Relevance for Health, Exercise, and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Paolo; Gammella, Elena; Rybinska, Ilona; Cairo, Gaetano; Recalcati, Stefania

    2015-08-01

    Iron is necessary for physiological processes essential for athletic performance, such as oxygen transport, energy production, and cell division. However, an excess of "free" iron is toxic because it produces reactive hydroxyl radicals that damage biological molecules, thus leading to cell and tissue injury. Therefore, iron homeostasis is strictly regulated; and in recent years, there have been important advancements in our knowledge of the underlying processes. Hepcidin is the central regulator of systemic iron homeostasis and exerts its function by controlling the presence of the iron exporter ferroportin on the cell membrane. Hepcidin binding induces ferroportin degradation, thus leading to cellular iron retention and decreased levels of circulating iron. As iron is required for hemoglobin synthesis, the tight link between erythropoiesis and iron metabolism is particularly relevant to sports physiology. The iron needed for hemoglobin synthesis is ensured by inhibiting hepcidin to increase ferroportin activity and iron availability and hence to make certain that efficient blood oxygen transport occurs for aerobic exercise. However, hepcidin expression is also affected by exercise-associated conditions, such as iron deficiency, anemia or hypoxia, and, particularly, inflammation, which can play a role in the pathogenesis of sports anemia. Here, we review recent advances showing the relevance of iron for physical exercise and athletic performance. Low body iron levels can cause anemia and thus limit the delivery of oxygen to exercising muscle, but tissue iron deficiency may also affect performance by, for example, hampering muscle oxidative metabolism. Accordingly, a hemoglobin-independent effect of iron on exercise capacity has been demonstrated in animal models and humans. Here, we review recent advances showing the relevance of iron for physical exercise and athletic performance. PMID:25494391

  6. Identification of high levels of phytochelatins, glutathione and cadmium in the phloem sap of Brassica napus. A role for thiol-peptides in the long-distance transport of cadmium and the effect of cadmium on iron translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Butko, Emerald; Springer, Franziska; Torpey, Justin W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Kehr, Julia; Schroeder, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides that function in heavy metal detoxification in plants and certain fungi. Recent research in Arabidopsis has shown that PCs undergo long-distance transport between roots and shoots. However, it remains unknown which tissues or vascular systems, xylem or phloem, mediate PC translocation and whether PC transport contributes to physiologically relevant long-distance transport of cadmium (Cd) between shoots and roots. To address these questions...

  7. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  8. Hepcidin in iron overload disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Papanikolaou, George; Tzilianos, Michalis; Christakis, John I.; Bogdanos, Dionisios; Tsimirika, Konstantina; MacFarlane, Julie; Goldberg, Y. Paul; Sakellaropoulos, Nikos; Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2005-01-01

    Hepcidin is the principal regulator of iron absorption in humans. The peptide inhibits cellular iron efflux by binding to the iron export channel ferroportin and inducing its internalization and degradation. Either hepcidin deficiency or alterations in its target, ferroportin, would be expected to result in dysregulated iron absorption, tissue maldistribution of iron, and iron overload. Indeed, hepcidin deficiency has been reported in hereditary hemochromatosis and attributed to mutations in ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Susan got counseling on how to improve her health and well-being. She began taking iron supplements and multivitamins to improve her iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such as focusing more on green leafy vegetables, red meats, nuts, dried fruits, and beans. Other ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  11. Identification and characterisation of an iron-responsive candidate probiotic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Bailey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron is an essential cofactor in almost all biological systems. The lactic acid bacteria (LAB, frequently employed as probiotics, are unusual in having little or no requirement for iron. Iron in the human body is sequestered by transferrins and lactoferrin, limiting bacterial growth. An increase in the availability of iron in the intestine by bleeding, surgery, or under stress leads to an increase in the growth and virulence of many pathogens. Under these high iron conditions, LAB are rapidly out-competed; for the levels of probiotic bacteria to be maintained under high iron conditions they must be able to respond by increasing growth rate to compete with the normal flora. Despite this, iron-responsive genera are poorly characterised as probiotics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that a panel of probiotics are not able to respond to increased iron availability, and identify an isolate of Streptococcus thermophilus that can increase growth rate in response to increased iron availability. The isolate of S. thermophilus selected was able to reduce epithelial cell death as well as NF-κB signalling and IL-8 production triggered by pathogens. It was capable of crossing an epithelial cell barrier in conjunction with E. coli and downregulating Th1 and Th17 responses in primary human intestinal leukocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that an inability to compete with potential pathogens under conditions of high iron availability such as stress and trauma may contribute to the lack of efficacy of many LAB-based probiotics in treating disease. Therefore, we offer an alternative paradigm which considers that probiotics should be able to be competitive during periods of intestinal bleeding, trauma or stress.

  12. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation...

  13. Metabolic Requirements of Escherichia coli in Intracellular Bacterial Communities during Urinary Tract Infection Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Matt S.; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria; Palermo, Joseph J.; Hibbing, Michael E.; Dodson, Karen W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary etiological agent of over 85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Mouse models of infection have shown that UPEC can invade bladder epithelial cells in a type 1 pilus-dependent mechanism, avoid a TLR4-mediated exocytic process, and escape into the host cell cytoplasm. The internalized UPEC can clonally replicate into biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) of thousands of bacteria while avoiding many host clearance mechanisms. Importantly, IBCs have been documented in urine from women and children suffering acute UTI. To understand this protected bacterial niche, we elucidated the transcriptional profile of bacteria within IBCs using microarrays. We delineated the upregulation within the IBC of genes involved in iron acquisition, metabolism, and transport. Interestingly, lacZ was highly upregulated, suggesting that bacteria were sensing and/or utilizing a galactoside for metabolism in the IBC. A ΔlacZ strain displayed significantly smaller IBCs than the wild-type strain and was attenuated during competitive infection with a wild-type strain. Similarly, a galK mutant resulted in smaller IBCs and attenuated infection. Further, analysis of the highly upregulated gene yeaR revealed that this gene contributes to oxidative stress resistance and type 1 pilus production. These results suggest that bacteria within the IBC are under oxidative stress and, consistent with previous reports, utilize nonglucose carbon metabolites. Better understanding of the bacterial mechanisms used for IBC development and establishment of infection may give insights into development of novel anti-virulence strategies. PMID:27073089

  14. Metabolic Requirements of Escherichia coli in Intracellular Bacterial Communities during Urinary Tract Infection Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt S. Conover

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is the primary etiological agent of over 85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs. Mouse models of infection have shown that UPEC can invade bladder epithelial cells in a type 1 pilus-dependent mechanism, avoid a TLR4-mediated exocytic process, and escape into the host cell cytoplasm. The internalized UPEC can clonally replicate into biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs of thousands of bacteria while avoiding many host clearance mechanisms. Importantly, IBCs have been documented in urine from women and children suffering acute UTI. To understand this protected bacterial niche, we elucidated the transcriptional profile of bacteria within IBCs using microarrays. We delineated the upregulation within the IBC of genes involved in iron acquisition, metabolism, and transport. Interestingly, lacZ was highly upregulated, suggesting that bacteria were sensing and/or utilizing a galactoside for metabolism in the IBC. A ΔlacZ strain displayed significantly smaller IBCs than the wild-type strain and was attenuated during competitive infection with a wild-type strain. Similarly, a galK mutant resulted in smaller IBCs and attenuated infection. Further, analysis of the highly upregulated gene yeaR revealed that this gene contributes to oxidative stress resistance and type 1 pilus production. These results suggest that bacteria within the IBC are under oxidative stress and, consistent with previous reports, utilize nonglucose carbon metabolites. Better understanding of the bacterial mechanisms used for IBC development and establishment of infection may give insights into development of novel anti-virulence strategies.

  15. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    White Cast Iron (Ⅰ) White cast iron or ‘white iron' refers to the type of cast iron in which all of the carbon exists as carbide;there is no graphite in the as-cast structure and the fractured surface shows a white colour.White cast iron can be divided in three classes:· Normal white cast iron — this iron contains only C,Si,Mn,P and S,with no other alloying elements.· Low-alloy white cast iron — the total mass fraction of alloying elements is less than 5%.

  16. Effect of animal proteins on the absorption of food iron in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björn-Rasmussen, E; Hallberg, L

    1979-01-01

    The way in which meat and fish act to promote the absorption of nonheme iron in food is not known. The present paper is a report of the results of a series of studies aimed at obtaining some insight into the mechanism of action of meat and other animal proteins on the absorption of food iron. Beef, fish, chicken and calf thymus all increased the iron absorption to about the same extent. Neither egg albumin, cysteine or a water extract of beef did, however, affect the absorption of food iron. Beef increased the absorption of a solution of inorganic iron given without food only when the iron salt was trivalent or when sodium phytate was added to the solution. It was concluded that meat acts by counteracting luminal factors that inhibit iron absorption. The most probable mechanism for this action is formation of a luminal carrier which transports the iron to the mucosal cell membrane.

  17. Hydrothermal Mobilization and Enrichment of Iron in the Iron Deposits of the Middle—Lower Yangtze Valley District

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾连兴; 阮惠础

    1993-01-01

    There are two main types of iron deposits in the Middle-Lower Yangtze Valley district.Both of them underwent post-magmatic hydrothermal processes during ore formation.Iron in the hydrothermal ore bodies was derived largely through mobilization from substantially consolidated diroitic intrusives.Wall-roch alteration zonation indicates that iron-mobilizing hydrothermal fluids evolved in a trend of decreasing alkalinity,which is suggested by regularly distributed wall-rock alterations formed by iron-mobilizing hydrothermal fluids and is in contradiction with the current chloride,chloride complex and bicarbonate models for iron mobilization.The close association of carbonatization with iron ores and the high concentrations of reduced gases such as CO,CH4 and H2 in fluid inclusions suggest that iron is most probably transported in the form of iron carbonyls during post-magmatic hydrothermal processes. In the light of the iron carbonyl mobilization model,explanations are made of the constraints on ores of some geologic factors such as melanocratic alteration,carbonatization,carbonate strata,structural fractures,cyptoexplosive pipes and embryo ores.

  18. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should...... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  19. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries. PMID:25320452

  20. Absorption of iron in the aged; investigation of mucosal-uptake, mucosal-transfer and retention of a physiological dose of inorganic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron (II) and iron (III) uptake by the mucosal cells, the retention in the body, and the mucosal-transport fraction were studied in 40 healthy people over 65 years old, in 30 young adults and in 20 patients with iron-deficiency. The study was performed with 59Fe as a tracer and 51Cr as an inert indicator. The radioactivity was measured with a whole body scanner 24 hours and 24 days after ingestion

  1. Mitochondria represent another locale for the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, Natascha A.; Garrick, Laura M.; Zhao, Lin; Garrick, Michael D.; Thévenod, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The divalent metal transporter (DMT1) is well known for its roles in duodenal iron absorption across the apical enterocyte membrane, in iron efflux from the endosome during transferrin-dependent cellular iron acquisition, as well as in uptake of non-transferrin bound iron in many cells. Recently, using multiple approaches, we have obtained evidence that the mitochondrial outer membrane is another subcellular locale of DMT1 expression. While iron is of vital importance for mitochondrial energy...

  2. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  3. Bacterial surface adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  4. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  5. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  6. Iron economy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaesener, Anne G.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.

    2013-01-01

    While research on iron nutrition in plants has largely focused on iron-uptake pathways, photosynthetic microbes such as the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provide excellent experimental systems for understanding iron metabolism at the subcellular level. Several paradigms in iron homeostasis have been established in this alga, including photosystem remodeling in the chloroplast and preferential retention of some pathways and key iron-dependent proteins in response to suboptimal iron supply. This review presents our current understanding of iron homeostasis in Chlamydomonas, with specific attention on characterized responses to changes in iron supply, like iron-deficiency. An overview of frequently used methods for the investigation of iron-responsive gene expression, physiology and metabolism is also provided, including preparation of media, the effect of cell size, cell density and strain choice on quantitative measurements and methods for the determination of metal content and assessing the effect of iron supply on photosynthetic performance. PMID:24032036

  7. From Iron Bowl to Iron Stomach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL; L.; O’NEAL

    2009-01-01

    A few decades ago, "Iron Bowl" referred to not having to go hungry in China if you were employed by the Agovernment. The government gave you a job that secured the filling of one’s rice bowl. This concept and practice did create loyalty, as the times were hard. China has moved far past those times to become the

  8. Bioleaching of marmatite in high concentration of iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱冠周; 吴伯增; 覃文庆; 蓝卓越

    2002-01-01

    Bioleaching of marmatite with a culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans in high concentration of iron was studied, the results show that the zinc leaching rate of the mixed culture is faster than that of the sole Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, the increasing iron concentration in leaching solution enhances the zinc leaching rate. The SEM analysis indicates that the chemical leaching residues is covered with porous solid layer of elemental sulfur, while elemental sulfur is not found in the bacterial leaching residues. The primary role of bacteria in bioleaching of sphalerite is to oxidize the chemical leaching products of ferrous ion and elemental sulfur, thus the indirect mechanism prevails in the bioleaching of marmatite.

  9. Duodenal Cytochrome b (DCYTB in Iron Metabolism: An Update on Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius J. R. Lane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron and ascorbate are vital cellular constituents in mammalian systems. The bulk-requirement for iron is during erythropoiesis leading to the generation of hemoglobin-containing erythrocytes. Additionally; both iron and ascorbate are required as co-factors in numerous metabolic reactions. Iron homeostasis is controlled at the level of uptake; rather than excretion. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that in addition to the known ability of dietary ascorbate to enhance non-heme iron absorption in the gut; ascorbate regulates iron homeostasis. The involvement of ascorbate in dietary iron absorption extends beyond the direct chemical reduction of non-heme iron by dietary ascorbate. Among other activities; intra-enterocyte ascorbate appears to be involved in the provision of electrons to a family of trans-membrane redox enzymes; namely those of the cytochrome b561 class. These hemoproteins oxidize a pool of ascorbate on one side of the membrane in order to reduce an electron acceptor (e.g., non-heme iron on the opposite side of the membrane. One member of this family; duodenal cytochrome b (DCYTB; may play an important role in ascorbate-dependent reduction of non-heme iron in the gut prior to uptake by ferrous-iron transporters. This review discusses the emerging relationship between cellular iron homeostasis; the emergent “IRP1-HIF2α axis”; DCYTB and ascorbate in relation to iron metabolism.

  10. Iron-induced changes in the proteome of Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neritza Campo Beltrán

    Full Text Available Iron plays a crucial role in metabolism as a key component of catalytic and redox cofactors, such as heme or iron-sulfur clusters in enzymes and electron-transporting or regulatory proteins. Limitation of iron availability by the host is also one of the mechanisms involved in immunity. Pathogens must regulate their protein expression according to the iron concentration in their environment and optimize their metabolic pathways in cases of limitation through the availability of respective cofactors. Trichomonas vaginalis, a sexually transmitted pathogen of humans, requires high iron levels for optimal growth. It is an anaerobe that possesses hydrogenosomes, mitochondrion-related organelles that harbor pathways of energy metabolism and iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We analyzed the proteomes of hydrogenosomes obtained from cells cultivated under iron-rich and iron-deficient conditions employing two-dimensional peptide separation combining IEF and nano-HPLC with quantitative MALDI-MS/MS. We identified 179 proteins, of which 58 were differentially expressed. Iron deficiency led to the upregulation of proteins involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly and the downregulation of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Interestingly, iron affected the expression of only some of multiple protein paralogues, whereas the expression of others was iron independent. This finding indicates a stringent regulation of differentially expressed multiple gene copies in response to changes in the availability of exogenous iron.

  11. Bacterial tactic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, J P

    1999-01-01

    Many, if not most, bacterial species swim. The synthesis and operation of the flagellum, the most complex organelle of a bacterium, takes a significant percentage of cellular energy, particularly in the nutrient limited environments in which many motile species are found. It is obvious that motility accords cells a survival advantage over non-motile mutants under normal, poorly mixed conditions and is an important determinant in the development of many associations between bacteria and other organisms, whether as pathogens or symbionts and in colonization of niches and the development of biofilms. This survival advantage is the result of sensory control of swimming behaviour. Although too small to sense a gradient along the length of the cell, and unable to swim great distances because of buffetting by Brownian motion and the curvature resulting from a rotating flagellum, bacteria can bias their random swimming direction towards a more favourable environment. The favourable environment will vary from species to species and there is now evidence that in many species this can change depending on the current physiological growth state of the cell. In general, bacteria sense changes in a range of nutrients and toxins, compounds altering electron transport, acceptors or donors into the electron transport chain, pH, temperature and even the magnetic field of the Earth. The sensory signals are balanced, and may be balanced with other sensory pathways such as quorum sensing, to identify the optimum current environment. The central sensory pathway in this process is common to most bacteria and most effectors. The environmental change is sensed by a sensory protein. In most species examined this is a transmembrane protein, sensing the external environment, but there is increasing evidence for additional cytoplasmic receptors in many species. All receptors, whether sensing sugars, amino acids or oxygen, share a cytoplasmic signalling domain that controls the activity of a

  12. Transport of trace metals in the Magela Creek system, Northern Territory. I. Concentrations and loads of iron, manganese, cadmium, copper, lead and zinc during flood periods in the 1978-1979 wet season

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order that realistic effluent standards may be established for the Ranger uranium operations at Jabiru, Northern Territory, it is necessary that there be a clear and detailed knowledge of the pre-mining levels of trace metals and their behaviour within the Magela Creek system. During the wet season, floodwaters were sampled for conductivity, suspended solids and the trace metals, iron, manganese, cadmium, copper, lead and zinc. All concentrations were found to be very low, as were the denudation rates for the trace metals and suspended materials

  13. Response of acid mobilization of iron-containing mineral dust to improvement of air quality projected in the future

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, A.; Xu, L.

    2013-01-01

    Acidification of dust aerosols may increase aerosol iron (Fe) solubility, which is linked to mineral properties. Combustion aerosols can also elevate aerosol iron solubility when aerosol loading is low. Here, we use an atmospheric chemical transport model to investigate the deposition of filterable iron and its response to changes in anthropogenic emissions of both combustion aerosols and precursor gases. By introducing three classes of iron-containing minerals into the detailed aeroso...

  14. Gastric Helicobacter infection induces iron deficiency in the INS-GAS mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie J Thomson

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence from clinical and population studies for a role of H. pylori infection in the aetiology of iron deficiency. Rodent models of Helicobacter infection are helpful for investigating any causal links and mechanisms of iron deficiency in the host. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gastric Helicobacter infection on iron deficiency and host iron metabolism/transport gene expression in hypergastrinemic INS-GAS mice. INS-GAS mice were infected with Helicobacter felis for 3, 6 and 9 months. At post mortem, blood was taken for assessment of iron status and gastric mucosa for pathology, immunohistology and analysis of gene expression. Chronic Helicobacter infection of INS- GAS mice resulted in decreased serum iron, transferrin saturation and hypoferritinemia and increased Total iron binding capacity (TIBC. Decreased serum iron concentrations were associated with a concomitant reduction in the number of parietal cells, strengthening the association between hypochlorhydria and gastric Helicobacter-induced iron deficiency. Infection with H. felis for nine months was associated with decreased gastric expression of iron metabolism regulators hepcidin, Bmp4 and Bmp6 but increased expression of Ferroportin 1, the iron efflux protein, iron absorption genes such as Divalent metal transporter 1, Transferrin receptor 1 and also Lcn2 a siderophore-binding protein. The INS-GAS mouse is therefore a useful model for studying Helicobacter-induced iron deficiency. Furthermore, the marked changes in expression of gastric iron transporters following Helicobacter infection may be relevant to the more rapid development of carcinogenesis in the Helicobacter infected INS-GAS model.

  15. A mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation of a sulfide ore concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, S.; Dahlstrom, D. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Oolman, T. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States))

    1994-03-05

    The effect of dilution rate and feed solids concentration on the bacterial leaching of a pyrite/arsenopyrite ore concentrate was studied. A mathematical model was developed for the process based on the steady-state data collected over the range of dilution rates (20 to 110 h) and feed solids concentrations (6 to 18% w/v) studied. A modified Monod model with inhibition by arsenic was used to model bacterial ferrous ion oxidation rates. The model assumes that (1) pyrite and arsenopyrite leaching occurs solely by the action of ferric iron produced from the bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron and (2) bacterial growth rates are proportional to ferrous ion oxidation rate. The equilibrium among the various ionic species present in the leach solution that are likely to have a significant effect on the bioleach process were included in the model.

  16. Factors limiting heterotrophic bacterial production in the southern Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Van Wambeke

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of potential factors limiting bacterial growth was investigated along vertical and longitudinal gradients across the South Eastern Pacific Gyre. The effects of glucose, nitrate, ammonium and phosphate additions on heterotrophic bacterial production (using leucine technique were studied in parallel in unfiltered seawater samples incubated under natural daily irradiance. Longitudinally, the enrichments realized on the subsurface showed three types of responses. From the Marquesas plateau (8° W to approx 125° W, bacteria were not bottom-up controlled, as confirmed by the huge potential of growth in non-enriched seawater (43±24 times in 24 h. Within the Gyre (125° W–95° W, nitrogen alone stimulated leucine incorporation rates by a factor of 5.6±3.6, but rapidly labile carbon (glucose became a second limiting factor (enhancement factor 49±32 when the two elements were added. Finally from the border of the gyre to the Chilean upwelling (95° W–73° W, labile carbon was the only factor stimulating heterotrophic bacterial production. Interaction between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterial communities and the direct versus indirect effect of iron and macronutrients on bacterial production were also investigated in four selected sites: two sites on the vicinity of the Marquesas plateau, the centre of the gyre and the Eastern border of the gyre. Both phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria were limited by availability of nitrogen within the gyre, but not by iron. While iron limited phytoplankton at Marquesas plateau and at the eastern border of the gyre, heterotrophic bacteria were only limited by availability of labile DOC in those environments.

  17. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Ph.D Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Note: This book consists of five sections: Chapter 1 Introduction, Chapter 2 Grey Iron, Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, Chapter 4 Vermicular Cast Iron, and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishes this book in several parts serially, starting from the first issue of 2009.

  18. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ This book consists of five sections:Chapter 1 Introduction,Chapter 2 Grey Iron,Chapter 3 Ductile Iron,Chapter 4Vermicular Cast Iron,and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishs this book in several parts serially,starting from the first issue of 2009.

  19. Coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert H.; Freund, Henry P.; Pershing, Dean E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1993-11-01

    A magnetic wiggler design has been developed for applications in free-electron lasers which is scalable to small periods with high field amplitude, high beam current acceptance, and excellent transverse focusing and beam propagation properties. The Coaxial Hybrid Iron (CHI) wiggler design consists of a coaxial arrangement of alternating ferromagnetic and non- ferromagnetic rings with the central portion of the coax shifted by one half period. The entire arrangement is immersed in a solenoidal field which results in a cylindrically symmetric periodic field. A key advantage of this wiggler configuration is its capacity to handle very high beam currents with excellent focusing and transport properties. FEL configuration using the CHI wiggler design have the potential for high power, high frequency coherent generation in relatively compact systems. Analytic and simulated characteristics of the CHI wiggler are presented.

  20. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.