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Sample records for bacterial intermediate filament

  1. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation. PMID:27039023

  2. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    controls the length of the structure by favoring lateral insertion of crescentin subunits over bipolar longitudinal extension when the structure ends reach the cell poles. The crescentin structure is stably anchored to the cell envelope, and this cellular organization requires MreB function, identifying a...... new function for MreB and providing a parallel to the role of actin in IF assembly and organization in metazoan cells. Additionally, analysis of an MreB localization mutant suggests that cell wall insertion during cell elongation normally occurs along two helices of opposite handedness, each...

  3. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  4. Intermediate filaments in small configuration spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöding, Bernd; Köster, Sarah

    2012-02-24

    Intermediate filaments play a key role in cell mechanics. Apart from their great importance from a biomedical point of view, they also act as a very suitable micrometer-sized model system for semiflexible polymers. We perform a statistical analysis of the thermal fluctuations of individual filaments confined in microchannels. The small channel width and the resulting deflections at the walls give rise to a reduction of the configuration space by about 2 orders of magnitude. This circumstance enables us to precisely measure the intrinsic persistence length of vimentin intermediate filaments and to show that they behave as ideal wormlike chains; we observe that small fluctuations in perpendicular planes decouple. Furthermore, the inclusion of results for confined actin filaments demonstrates that the Odijk confinement regime is valid over at least 1 order of magnitude in persistence length. PMID:22463576

  5. Assembly characteristics of plant keratin intermediate filaments in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵光伟; 杨澄; 佟向军; 翟中和

    1999-01-01

    After selective extraction and purification, plant keratin intermediate filaments were reassembled in vitro. Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs showed that acidic keratins and basic keratins can assemble into dimers and further into 10 nm filaments in vitro. In higher magnification images, it can be seen that fully assembled plant keratin intermediate filaments consist of several thinner filaments of 3 nm in diameter, which indicates the formation of protofilaments in the assembly processes. One of the explicit features of plant keratin intermediate filaments is a 24—25 nm periodic structural repeat alone the axis of beth the 10 nm filaments and protofilaments. The periodic repeat is one of the fundamental characteristic of all intermediate filaments, and demonstrates the half staggered arrangement of keratin molecules within the filaments.

  6. Molecular phylogeny of metazoan intermediate filament proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erber, A; Riemer, D; Bovenschulte, M; Weber, K

    1998-12-01

    We have cloned cytoplasmic intermediate filament (IF) proteins from a large number of invertebrate phyla using cDNA probes, the monoclonal antibody IFA, peptide sequence information, and various RT-PCR procedures. Novel IF protein sequences reported here include the urochordata and nine protostomic phyla, i.e., Annelida, Brachiopoda, Chaetognatha, Echiura, Nematomorpha, Nemertea, Platyhelminthes, Phoronida, and Sipuncula. Taken together with the wealth of data on IF proteins of vertebrates and the results on IF proteins of Cephalochordata, Mollusca, Annelida, and Nematoda, two IF prototypes emerge. The L-type, which includes 35 sequences from 11 protostomic phyla, shares with the nuclear lamins the long version of the coil 1b subdomain and, in most cases, a homology segment of some 120 residues in the carboxyterminal tail domain. The S-type, which includes all four subfamilies (types I to IV) of vertebrate IF proteins, lacks 42 residues in the coil 1b subdomain and the carboxyterminal lamin homology segment. Since IF proteins from all three phyla of the chordates have the 42-residue deletion, this deletion arose in a progenitor prior to the divergence of the chordates into the urochordate, cephalochordate, and vertebrate lineages, possibly already at the origin of the deuterostomic branch. Four phyla recently placed into the protostomia on grounds of their 18S rDNA sequences (Brachiopoda, Nemertea, Phoronida, and Platyhelminthes) show IF proteins of the L-type and fit by sequence identity criteria into the lophotrochozoic branch of the protostomia. PMID:9847417

  7. Functions of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in the eye lens

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Shuhua; Landsbury, Andrew; Dahm, Ralf; Liu, Yizhi; Zhang, Qingjiong; Quinlan, Roy A.

    2009-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are a key component of the cytoskeleton in virtually all vertebrate cells, including those of the lens of the eye. IFs help integrate individual cells into their respective tissues. This Review focuses on the lens-specific IF proteins beaded filament structural proteins 1 and 2 (BFSP1 and BFSP2) and their role in lens physiology and disease. Evidence generated in studies in both mice and humans suggests a critical role for these proteins and their filamentous poly...

  8. Model-based analysis of keratin intermediate filament assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytoskeleton of epithelial cells consists of three types of filament systems: microtubules, actin filaments and intermediate filaments (IFs). Here, we took a closer look at type I and type II IF proteins, i.e. keratins. They are hallmark constituents of epithelial cells and are responsible for the generation of stiffness, the cellular response to mechanical stimuli and the integrity of entire cell layers. Thereby, keratin networks constitute an important instrument for cells to adapt to their environment. In particular, we applied models to characterize the assembly of keratin K8 and K18 into elongated filaments as a means for network formation. For this purpose, we measured the length of in vitro assembled keratin K8/K18 filaments by transmission electron microscopy at different time points. We evaluated the experimental data of the longitudinal annealing reaction using two models from polymer chemistry: the Schulz–Zimm model and the condensation polymerization model. In both scenarios one has to make assumptions about the reaction process. We compare how well the models fit the measured data and thus determine which assumptions fit best. Based on mathematical modelling of experimental filament assembly data we define basic mechanistic properties of the elongation reaction process. (paper)

  9. Evidence for an intermediate in tau filament formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirita, Carmen N; Kuret, Jeff

    2004-02-17

    Alzheimer's disease is defined in part by the intraneuronal accumulation of filaments comprised of the microtubule-associated protein tau. In vitro, fibrillization of full-length, unphosphorylated recombinant tau can be induced under near-physiological conditions by treatment with various agents, including anionic surfactants. Here we examine the pathway through which anionic surfactants promote tau fibrillization using a combination of electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. Protein and surfactant first interacted in solution to form micelles, which then provided negatively charged surfaces that accumulated tau aggregates. Surface aggregation of tau protein was followed by the time-dependent appearance of a thioflavin S reactive intermediate that accumulated over a period of hours. The intermediate was unstable in the absence of anionic surfaces, suggesting it was not filamentous. Fibrillization proceeded after intermediate formation with classic nucleation-dependent kinetics, consisting of lag phase followed by the exponential increase in filament lengths, followed by an equilibrium phase reached in approximately 24 h. The pathway did not require protein insertion into the micelle hydrophobic core or conformational change arising from mixed micelle formation, because anionic microspheres constructed from impermeable polystyrene were capable of qualitatively reproducing all aspects of the fibrillization reaction. It is proposed that the progression from amorphous aggregation through intermediate formation and fibrillization may underlie the activity of other inducers such as hyperphosphorylation and may be operative in vivo. PMID:14769048

  10. Towards a molecular description of intermediate filament structure and assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) represent one of the prominent cytoskeletal elements of metazoan cells. Their constituent proteins are coded by a multigene family, whose members are expressed in complex patterns that are controlled by developmental programs of differentiation. Hence, IF proteins found in epidermis differ significantly from those in muscle or neuronal tissues. Due to their fibrous nature, which stems from a fairly conserved central α-helical coiled-coil rod domain, IF proteins have long resisted crystallization and thus determination of their atomic structure. Since they represent the primary structural elements that determine the shape of the nucleus and the cell more generally, a major challenge is to arrive at a more rational understanding of how their nanomechanical properties effect the stability and plasticity of cells and tissues. Here, we review recent structural results of the coiled-coil dimer, assembly intermediates and growing filaments that have been obtained by a hybrid methods approach involving a rigorous combination of X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering, cryo-electron tomography, computational analysis and molecular modeling

  11. Ascaris suum: molecular cloning of an intermediate filament

    OpenAIRE

    Bisoffi, Marco; Betschart, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that intermediate filament proteins are involved in force transduction from the muscle cells through the hypodermis to the cuticle of nematodes. An additional role of intermediate filaments as excretory/secretory components of parasitic nematodes is under discussion. We report on the molecular characterization of the cDNA clone AsIF of the intestinal nematode parasite Ascaris suum, encoding a member of the intermediate filament protein family by sequence comparison with i...

  12. Phospho-Specific Antibody Probes of Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hidemasa; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kasahara, Kousuke; Inagaki, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) form one of the major cytoskeletal systems in the cytoplasm or beneath the nuclear membrane. Accumulating data have suggested that IF protein phosphorylation dramatically changes IF structure/dynamics in cells. For the production of an antibody recognizing site-specific protein phosphorylation (a site- and phosphorylation state-specific antibody), we first employed a strategy to immunize animals with an in vitro-phosphorylated polypeptide or a phosphopeptide (corresponding to a phosphorylated residue and its surrounding sequence of amino acids), instead of a phosphorylated protein. Our established methodology not only improves the chance of obtaining a phospho-specific antibody but also has the advantage that one can predesign a targeted phosphorylation site. It is now applied to the production of an antibody recognizing other types of site-specific posttranslational modification, such as acetylation or methylation. The use of such an antibody in immunocytochemistry enables us to analyze spatiotemporal distribution of site-specific IF protein phosphorylation. The antibody is of great use to identify a protein kinase responsible for in vivo IF protein phosphorylation and to monitor intracellular kinase activities through IF protein phosphorylation. Here, we present an overview of our methodology and describe stepwise approaches for the antibody characterization. We also provide some examples of analyses for IF protein phosphorylation involved in mitosis and signal transduction. PMID:26795468

  13. Phosphorylation and disassembly of intermediate filaments in mitotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells enter mitosis, networks of intermediate filaments (IFs) are transformed into cytoplasmic aggregates of protofilaments. Coincident with this morphological change, the phosphate content of vimentin increases from 0.3 mol of Pi per mol of protein in interphase to 1.9 mol of Pi per mol of protein in mitosis. A similar increase in phosphate content is observed with desmin, from 0.5 mol of Pi per mol of protein to 1.5 mol of Pi per mol of protein. Fractionation of mitotic cell lysates by hydroxylapatite column chromatography reveals the presence of two IF protein kinase activities, designated as IF protein kinase I and IF protein kinase II. Comparison of two-dimensional 32P-labeled phosphopeptide maps of vimentin and desmin phosphorylated in vivo in mitosis, and in vitro using partially purified kinase fractions, reveals extensive similarity in the two sets of phosphorylation sites. Phosphorylation of in vitro polymerized IFs by IF protein kinase II induces complete disassembly as determined by negative-stain electron microscopy. The results support the idea that the disassembly of IFs in mitosis is regulated by the phosphorylation of its subunit proteins

  14. Phosphorylation and disassembly of intermediate filaments in mitotic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yinghao; Rosevear, E.; Goldman, R.D. (Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1989-03-01

    As baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells enter mitosis, networks of intermediate filaments (IFs) are transformed into cytoplasmic aggregates of protofilaments. Coincident with this morphological change, the phosphate content of vimentin increases from 0.3 mol of P{sub i} per mol of protein in interphase to 1.9 mol of P{sub i} per mol of protein in mitosis. A similar increase in phosphate content is observed with desmin, from 0.5 mol of P{sub i} per mol of protein to 1.5 mol of P{sub i} per mol of protein. Fractionation of mitotic cell lysates by hydroxylapatite column chromatography reveals the presence of two IF protein kinase activities, designated as IF protein kinase I and IF protein kinase II. Comparison of two-dimensional {sup 32}P-labeled phosphopeptide maps of vimentin and desmin phosphorylated in vivo in mitosis, and in vitro using partially purified kinase fractions, reveals extensive similarity in the two sets of phosphorylation sites. Phosphorylation of in vitro polymerized IFs by IF protein kinase II induces complete disassembly as determined by negative-stain electron microscopy. The results support the idea that the disassembly of IFs in mitosis is regulated by the phosphorylation of its subunit proteins.

  15. Molecular evolution of type VI intermediate filament proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Michel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanabin, transitin and nestin are type VI intermediate filament (IF proteins that are developmentally regulated in frogs, birds and mammals, respectively. Tanabin is expressed in the growth cones of embryonic vertebrate neurons, whereas transitin and nestin are found in myogenic and neurogenic cells. Another type VI IF protein, synemin, is expressed in undifferentiated and mature muscle cells of birds and mammals. In addition to an IF-typical α-helical core domain, type VI IF proteins are characterized by a long C-terminal tail often containing distinct repeated motifs. The molecular evolution of type VI IF proteins remains poorly studied. Results To examine the evolutionary history of type VI IF proteins, sequence comparisons, BLAST searches, synteny studies and phylogenic analyses were performed. This study provides new evidence that tanabin, transitin and nestin are indeed orthologous type VI IF proteins. It demonstrates that tanabin, transitin and nestin genes share intron positions and sequence identities, have a similar chromosomal context and display closely related positions in phylogenic analyses. Despite this homology, fast evolution rates of their C-terminal extremity have caused the appearance of repeated motifs with distinct biological activities. In particular, our in silico and in vitro analyses of their tail domain have shown that (avian transitin, but not (mammalian nestin, contains a repeat domain displaying nucleotide hydrolysis activity. Conclusion These analyses of the evolutionary history of the IF proteins fit with a model in which type VI IFs form a branch distinct from NF proteins and are composed of two major proteins: synemin and nestin orthologs. Rapid evolution of the C-terminal extremity of nestin orthologs could be responsible for their divergent functions.

  16. Structure of the Intermediate Filament-Binding Region of Desmoplakin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunook Kang

    Full Text Available Desmoplakin (DP is a cytoskeletal linker protein that connects the desmosomal cadherin/plakoglobin/plakophilin complex to intermediate filaments (IFs. The C-terminal region of DP (DPCT mediates IF binding, and contains three plakin repeat domains (PRDs, termed PRD-A, PRD-B and PRD-C. Previous crystal structures of PRDs B and C revealed that each is formed by 4.5 copies of a plakin repeat (PR and has a conserved positively charged groove on its surface. Although PRDs A and B are linked by just four amino acids, B and C are separated by a 154 residue flexible linker, which has hindered crystallographic analysis of the full DPCT. Here we present the crystal structure of a DPCT fragment spanning PRDs A and B, and elucidate the overall architecture of DPCT by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS analysis. The structure of PRD-A is similar to that of PRD-B, and the two domains are arranged in a quasi-linear arrangement, and separated by a 4 amino acid linker. Analysis of the B-C linker region using secondary structure prediction and the crystal structure of a homologous linker from the cytolinker periplakin suggests that the N-terminal ~100 amino acids of the linker form two PR-like motifs. SAXS analysis of DPCT indicates an elongated but non-linear shape with Rg = 51.5 Å and Dmax = 178 Å. These data provide the first structural insights into an IF binding protein containing multiple PRDs and provide a foundation for studying the molecular basis of DP-IF interactions.

  17. Bidirectional Interplay between Vimentin Intermediate Filaments and Contractile Actin Stress Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaming Jiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton and cytoplasmic intermediate filaments contribute to cell migration and morphogenesis, but the interplay between these two central cytoskeletal elements has remained elusive. Here, we find that specific actin stress fiber structures, transverse arcs, interact with vimentin intermediate filaments and promote their retrograde flow. Consequently, myosin-II-containing arcs are important for perinuclear localization of the vimentin network in cells. The vimentin network reciprocally restricts retrograde movement of arcs and hence controls the width of flat lamellum at the leading edge of the cell. Depletion of plectin recapitulates the vimentin organization phenotype of arc-deficient cells without affecting the integrity of vimentin filaments or stress fibers, demonstrating that this cytoskeletal cross-linker is required for productive interactions between vimentin and arcs. Collectively, our results reveal that plectin-mediated interplay between contractile actomyosin arcs and vimentin intermediate filaments controls the localization and dynamics of these two cytoskeletal systems and is consequently important for cell morphogenesis.

  18. Self-consistent field theory for the interactions between keratin intermediate filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keratins are important structural proteins found in skin, hair and nails. Keratin Intermediate Filaments are major components of corneocytes, nonviable horny cells of the Stratum Corneum, the outermost layer of skin. It is considered that interactions between unstructured domains of Keratin Intermediate Filaments are the key factor in maintaining the elasticity of the skin. We have developed a model for the interactions between keratin intermediate filaments based on self-consistent field theory. The intermediate filaments are represented by charged surfaces, and the disordered terminal domains of the keratins are represented by charged heteropolymers grafted to these surfaces. We estimate the system is close to a charge compensation point where the heteropolymer grafting density is matched to the surface charge density. Using a protein model with amino acid resolution for the terminal domains, we find that the terminal chains can mediate a weak attraction between the keratin surfaces. The origin of the attraction is a combination of bridging and electrostatics. The attraction disappears when the system moves away from the charge compensation point, or when excess small ions and/or NMF-representing free amino acids are added. These results are in concordance with experimental observations, and support the idea that the interaction between keratin filaments, and ultimately in part the elastic properties of the keratin-containing tissue, is controlled by a combination of the physico-chemical properties of the disordered terminal domains and the composition of the medium in the inter-filament region

  19. Computational and theoretical modeling of intermediate filament networks:Structure, mechanics and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Qin; Markus J. Buehler

    2012-01-01

    Intermediate filaments,in addition to microtubules and actin microfilaments,are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells.It was discovered during the recent decades that in most cells,intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected to large-deformation,and that they participate in signal transduction,and it was proposed that their nanomechanical properties are critical to perform those functions.However,it is still poorly understood how the nanoscopic structure,as well as the combination of chemical composition,molecular structure and interfacial properties of these protein molecules contribute to the biomechanical properties of filaments and filament networks. Here we review recent progress in computational and theoretical studies of the intermediate filaments network at various levels in the protein's structure. A multiple scale method is discussed,used to couple molecular modeling with atomistic detail to larger-scale material properties of the networked material. It is shown that a finer-trains-coarser methodology as discussed here provides a useful tool in understanding the biomechanical property and disease mechanism of intermediate filaments,coupling experiment and simulation. It further allows us to improve the understanding of associated disease mechanisms and lays the foundation for engineering the mechanical properties of biomaterials.

  20. Mechanical Probing of the Intermediate Filament-Rich Caenorhabditis Elegans Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnel, Oliver; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf; Bossinger, Olaf; Leube, Rudolf E

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that intermediate filaments have an important mechanical function. This function relies not only on intrinsic material properties but is also determined by dynamic interactions with other cytoskeletal filament systems, distinct cell adhesion sites, and cellular organelles which are fine-tuned by multiple signaling pathways. While aspects of these properties and processes can be studied in vitro, their full complexity can only be understood in a viable tissue context. Yet, suitable and easily accessible model systems for monitoring tissue mechanics at high precision are rare. We show that the dissected intestine of the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans fulfills this requirement. The 20 intestinal cells, which are arranged in an invariant fashion, are characterized by a dense subapical mesh of intermediate filaments that are attached to the C. elegans apical junction. We present procedures to visualize details of the characteristic intermediate filament-junctional complex arrangement in living animals. We then report on methods to prepare intestines with a fully intact intermediate filament cytoskeleton and detail procedures to assess their viability. A dual micropipette assay is described to measure mechanical properties of the dissected intestine while monitoring the spatial arrangement of the intermediate filament system. Advantages of this approach are (i) the high reproducibility of measurements because of the uniform architecture of the intestine and (ii) the high degree of accessibility allowing not only mechanical manipulation of an intact tissue but also control of culture medium composition and addition of drugs as well as visualization of cell structures. With this method, examination of worms carrying mutations in the intermediate filament system, its interacting partners and its regulators will become feasible. PMID:26795489

  1. In vitro assembly of homopolymer and copolymer filaments from intermediate filament subunits of muscle and fibroblastic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinert, P M; Idler, W W; Cabral, F; Gottesman, M M; Goldman, R D

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents evidence that the intermediate filament (IF) subunits of muscle cells (skeletin or desmin) and fibroblastic cells (decamin or vimentin) separately form homopolymer IF in vitro and, when mixed, prefer to form copolymer IF in vitro. Because they coexist in cells, they may also form copolymers in vivo. The IFs of baby hamster kidney fibroblasts (BHK-21) consist of a major subunit, decamin, and two minor subunits which, on the basis of two-dimensional gel and peptide mapping c...

  2. Intermediate filaments in monkey kidney TC7 cells: focal centers and interrelationship with other cytoskeletal systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Celis, J E; Small, J V; Larsen, P M; Fey, S J; De Mey, J.; Celis, A

    1984-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of intermediate-sized filament-enriched cytoskeletons of epithelial monkey kidney TC7 cells has shown that they are composed of at least two keratins (isoelectric focusing 36, Mr = 48,500; IEF 46, Mr = 43,500; HeLa protein catalogue number) and vimentin. Indirect immunofluorescence as well as immunoelectron microscopy using antibodies directed against specific polypeptides sometimes revealed a discontinuous staining of keratin-containing filaments. Indirect...

  3. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filaments under Extreme Conditions and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao

    Intermediate filaments are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected to large-deformation as well as participate in signal transduction. However, it is still poorly understood how the nanoscopic structure, as well as the biochemical properties of these protein molecules contribute to their biomechanical functions. In this research we investigate the material function of intermediate filaments under various extreme mechanical conditions as well as disease states. We use a full atomistic model and study its response to mechanical stresses. Learning from the mechanical response obtained from atomistic simulations, we build mesoscopic models following the finer-trains-coarser principles. By using this multiple-scale model, we present a detailed analysis of the mechanical properties and associated deformation mechanisms of intermediate filament network. We reveal the mechanism of a transition from alpha-helices to beta-sheets with subsequent intermolecular sliding under mechanical force, which has been inferred previously from experimental results. This nanoscale mechanism results in a characteristic nonlinear force-extension curve, which leads to a delocalization of mechanical energy and prevents catastrophic fracture. This explains how intermediate filament can withstand extreme mechanical deformation of > 1 00% strain despite the presence of structural defects. We combine computational and experimental techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, a premature aging disease. We find that the mutated lamin tail .domain is more compact and stable than the normal one. This altered structure and stability may enhance the association of intermediate filaments with the nuclear membrane, providing a molecular mechanism of the disease. We study the nuclear membrane association

  4. Planck intermediate results. VIII. Filaments between interacting clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bourdin, H; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Castex, G; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombo, L P L; Comis, B; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frommert, M; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Gilfanov, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hempel, A; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jagemann, T; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Luzzi, G; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Mei, S; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roman, M; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Welikala, N; White, S D M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    About half of the baryons of the Universe are expected to be in the form of filaments of hot and low density intergalactic medium. Most of these baryons remain undetected even by the most advanced X-ray observatories which are limited in sensitivity to the diffuse low density medium. The Planck satellite has provided hundreds of detections of the hot gas in clusters of galaxies via the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect and is an ideal instrument for studying extended low density media through the tSZ effect. In this paper we use the Planck data to search for signatures of a fraction of these missing baryons between pairs of galaxy clusters. Cluster pairs are good candidates for searching for the hotter and denser phase of the intergalactic medium (which is more easily observed through the SZ effect). Using an X-ray catalogue of clusters and the Planck data, we select physical pairs of clusters as candidates. Using the Planck data we construct a local map of the tSZ effect centered on each pair of galaxy...

  5. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks.

  6. Fluorescence and bioluminescence of bacterial luciferase intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intermediate in the luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescent oxidation of FMNH2, isolated and purified by chromatography at --200, was postulated to be an oxygenated reduced flavine-luciferase. Maintained and studied at --20 to --300, this material exhibits a relatively weak fluorescence emission peaking at about 505 nm when excited at 370 nm. It may comprise more than one species. Upon continued exposure to light at 370 nm, the intensity of this fluorescence increases, often by a factor of 5 or more, and its emission spectrum is blue shifted to a maximum at about 485 nm. Upon warming this fluorescence is lost and the fluorescence of flavine mononucleotide appears. If warming is carried out in the presence of a long chain aldehyde, bioluminescence occurs, with the appearance of a similar amount of flavine fluorescence. The bioluminescence yield is about the same with irradiated and nonirradiated samples. The bioluminescence emission spectrum corresponds exactly to the fluorescence emission spectrum of the intermediate formed by irradiation, implicating the latter as being structurally close to the emitting species in bioluminescence. (auth)

  7. Complete Structure of an Epithelial Keratin Dimer: Implications for Intermediate Filament Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Bray

    Full Text Available Keratins are cytoskeletal proteins that hierarchically arrange into filaments, starting with the dimer sub-unit. They are integral to the structural support of cells, in skin, hair and nails. In skin, keratin is thought to play a critical role in conferring the barrier properties and elasticity of skin. In general, the keratin dimer is broadly described by a tri-domain structure: a head, a central rod and a tail. As yet, no atomistic-scale picture of the entire dimer structure exists; this information is pivotal for establishing molecular-level connections between structure and function in intermediate filament proteins. The roles of the head and tail domains in facilitating keratin filament assembly and function remain as open questions. To address these, we report results of molecular dynamics simulations of the entire epithelial human K1/K10 keratin dimer. Our findings comprise: (1 the first three-dimensional structural models of the complete dimer unit, comprising of the head, rod and tail domains; (2 new insights into the chirality of the rod-domain twist gained from analysis of the full domain structure; (3 evidence for tri-subdomain partitioning in the head and tail domains; and, (4 identification of the residue characteristics that mediate non-covalent contact between the chains in the dimer. Our findings are immediately applicable to other epithelial keratins, such as K8/K18 and K5/K14, and to intermediate filament proteins in general.

  8. α-Internexin Is Present in the Pathological Inclusions of Neuronal Intermediate Filament Inclusion Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, Nigel J.; Zhukareva, Victoria; Uryu, Kunihiro; Zhang, Bin; Bigio, Eileen; Mackenzie, Ian R.A.; Gearing, Marla; Duyckaerts, Charles; Yokoo, Hideaki; Nakazato, Yoichi; Jaros, Evelyn; Perry, Robert H.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal intermediate filament (IF) inclusion disease (NIFID) is a novel neurological disease of early onset with a variable clinical phenotype including frontotemporal dementia, pyramidal, and extrapyramidal signs. Pathologically, in affected areas, there is neuronal loss, astrocytosis, and neuronal intracytoplasmic aggregates of abnormal neuronal IFs that contain neither tau nor α-synuclein. Thus, to characterize the neuronal IF protein profile of inclusions in NIFID, immunohistochemistry (...

  9. In vitro assembly properties of mutant and chimeric intermediate filament proteins: insight into the function of sequences in the rod and end domains of IF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors and mechanisms regulating assembly of intermediate filament (IF) proteins to produce filaments with their characteristic 10 nm diameter are not fully understood. All IF proteins contain a central rod domain flanked by variable head and tail domains. To elucidate the role that different domains of IF proteins play in filament assembly, we used negative staining and electron microscopy (EM) to study the in vitro assembly properties of purified bacterially expressed IF proteins, in which specific domains of the proteins were either mutated or swapped between a cytoplasmic (mouse neurofilament-light (NF-L) subunit) and nuclear intermediate filament protein (human lamin A). Our results indicate that filament formation is profoundly influenced by the composition of the assembly buffer. Wild type (wt) mouse NF-L formed 10 nm filaments in assembly buffer containing 175 mM NaCl, whereas a mutant deleted of 18 NH2-terminal amino acids failed to assemble under similar conditions. Instead, the mutant assembled efficiently in buffers containing CaCl2 ≥ 6 mM forming filaments that were 10 times longer than those formed by wt NF-L, although their diameter was significantly smaller (6-7 nm). These results suggest that the 18 NH2-terminal sequence of NF-L might serve two functions, to inhibit filament elongation and to promote lateral association of NF-L subunits. We also demonstrate that lengthening of the NF-L rod domain, by inserting a 42 aa sequence unique to nuclear IF proteins, does not compromise filament assembly in any noticeable way. Our results suggests that the known inability of nuclear lamin proteins to assemble into 10 nm filaments in vitro cannot derive solely from their longer rod domain. Finally, we demonstrate that the head domain of lamin A can substitute for that of NF-L in filament assembly, whereas substitution of both the head and tail domains of lamins for those of NF-L compromises assembly. Therefore, the effect of lamin A 'tail' domain alone

  10. Bacterial filamentation accelerates colonization of adhesive spots embedded in biopassive surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessile bacteria adhere to engineered surfaces and host tissues and pose a substantial clinical and economical risk when growing into biofilms. Most engineered and biological interfaces are of chemically heterogeneous nature and provide adhesive islands for bacterial attachment and growth. To mimic either defects in a surface coating of biomedical implants or heterogeneities within mucosal layers (Peyer's patches), we embedded micrometre-sized adhesive islands in a poly(ethylene glycol) biopassive background. We show experimentally and computationally that filamentation of Escherichia coli can significantly accelerate the bacterial surface colonization under physiological flow conditions. Filamentation can thus provide an advantage to a bacterial population to bridge non-adhesive distances exceeding 5 μm. Bacterial filamentation, caused by blocking of bacterial division, is common among bacterial species and can be triggered by environmental conditions or antibiotic treatment. While great awareness exists that the build-up of antibiotic resistance serves as intrinsic survival strategy, we show here that antibiotic treatment can actually promote surface colonization by triggering filamentation, which in turn prevents daughter cells from being washed away. Our combined microfabrication and computational approaches provide quantitative insights into mechanisms that enable biofouling of biopassive surfaces with embedded adhesive spots, even for spot distances that are multiples of the bacterial length. (paper)

  11. A Bipolar Spindle of Antiparallel ParM Filaments Drives Bacterial Plasmid Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gayathri, P; Fujii, T; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2012-01-01

    To ensure their stable inheritance by daughter cells during cell division, bacterial low copy-number plasmids make simple DNA segregating machines that use an elongating protein filament between sister plasmids. In the ParMRC system of Escherichia coli R1 plasmid, ParM, an actin-like protein, forms...... the spindle between ParRC complexes on sister plasmids. Using a combination of structural work and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we show that ParRC bound and could accelerate growth at only one end of polar ParM filaments, mechanistically resembling eukaryotic formins. The architecture...... of ParM filaments enabled two ParRC-bound filaments to associate in an antiparallel orientation, forming a bipolar spindle. The spindle elongated as a bundle of at least two antiparallel filaments, thereby pushing two plasmid clusters toward the poles....

  12. Simultaneous identification of multi-combustion-intermediates of alkanol-air flames by femtosecond filament excitation for combustion sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Helong; Chu, Wei; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Chin, See-Leang; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-06-01

    Laser filamentation produced by the propagation of intense laser pulses in flames is opening up new possibility in application to combustion diagnostics that can provide useful information on understanding combustion processes, enhancing combustion efficiency and reducing pollutant products. Here we present simultaneous identification of multiple combustion intermediates by femtosecond filament excitation for five alkanol-air flames fueled by methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, and n-pentanol. We experimentally demonstrate that the intensities of filament-induced photoemission signals from the combustion intermediates C, C2, CH, CN increase with the increasing number of carbons in the fuel molecules, and the signal ratios between the intermediates (CH/C, CH/C2, CN/C, CH/C2, CN/CH) are different for different alkanol combustion flames. Our observation provides a way for sensing multiple combustion components by femtosecond filament excitation in various combustion conditions that strongly depend on the fuel species.

  13. A COMPLEX OF INTERMEDIATE FILAMENT PROTEIN-DNA: A TARGET FOR AUTOANTIBODIES IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎锡德; S.Kuhn; P.Traub

    1995-01-01

    Autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus which cross-react with double stranded DNA and in-termediate filament proteins are frequently reported.However,little is Known about the origin and the target of these antibodies.In this paper,a polyspecific monoclonal antibody,XY12,produced by the im-munization of genetically non-autoimmune mice with a DNA-protein complex is detsiled.Its antigen bind-ing patterms are very similar to the autoantibodies.The data suggest that these autoantibodies may be trig-gered by a circulating nucleoprotein.

  14. Magnetic field strength in an intermediate-velocity ionized filament in the First Galactic Quadrant

    CERN Document Server

    Stil, Jeroen M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic field in an intermediate-velocity filament for which the H$\\alpha$ intensity in the WHAM survey correlates with excess Faraday rotation of extragalactic radio sources over the length of the filament from b ~ 20 degr. to b ~ 55 degr. The density-weighted mean magnetic field is 2.8 +/- 0.8 microgauss, derived from rotation measures and an empirical relation between H-alpha emission measure and dispersion measure from Berkhuijsen et al. (2006). In view of the uncertainties in the derived magnetic field strength, we propose an alternative use of the available data, rotation measure and emission measure, to derive a lower limit to the Alfven speed, weighted by electron density n_e^1.5. We find lower limits to the Alfven speed that are comparable to, or larger than the sound speed in a 10^4 K plasma, and conclude that the magnetic field is dynamically important. We discuss the role of intermediate-velocity gas as a locus of Faraday rotation in the interstellar medium, and propose this lo...

  15. Novel association of APC with intermediate filaments identified using a new versatile APC antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coffey Robert J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a key player in suppression of colon tumorigenesis, Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC has been widely studied to determine its cellular functions. However, inconsistencies of commercially available APC antibodies have limited the exploration of APC function. APC is implicated in spindle formation by direct interactions with tubulin and microtubule-binding protein EB1. APC also interacts with the actin cytoskeleton to regulate cell polarity. Until now, interaction of APC with the third cytoskeletal element, intermediate filaments, has remained unexamined. Results We generated an APC antibody (APC-M2 pAb raised against the 15 amino acid repeat region, and verified its reliability in applications including immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence in cultured cells and tissue. Utilizing this APC-M2 pAb, we immunoprecipitated endogenous APC and its binding proteins from colon epithelial cells expressing wild-type APC. Using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, we identified 42 proteins in complex with APC, including β-catenin and intermediate filament (IF proteins lamin B1 and keratin 81. Association of lamin B1 with APC in cultured cells and human colonic tissue was verified by co-immunoprecipitation and colocalization. APC also colocalized with keratins and remained associated with IF proteins throughout a sequential extraction procedure. Conclusion We introduce a versatile APC antibody that is useful for cell/tissue immunostaining, immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. We also present evidence for interactions between APC and IFs, independent of actin filaments and microtubules. Our results suggest that APC associates with all three major components of the cytoskeleton, thus expanding potential roles for APC in the regulation of cytoskeletal integrity.

  16. Filament depolymerization can explain chromosome pulling during bacterial mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Banigan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole, binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that disassembles it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple, physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is "self-diffusiophoretic": by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is most robust when ParB binds side-on to ParA filaments. In this case, robust translocation occurs over a wide parameter range and is controlled by a single dimensionless quantity: the product of the rate of ParA disassembly and a characteristic relaxation time of the chromosome. This time scale measures the time it takes for the chromosome to recover its average shape after it is has been pulled. Our results suggest explanations for observed phenomena such as segregation failure, filament-length-dependent translocation velocity, and chromosomal compaction.

  17. The effects of a low-intensity red laser on bacterial growth, filamentation and plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, C.; Santos, J. N.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of nonphotosynthesizing microorganisms to light could increase cell division in cultures, a phenomenon denominated as biostimulation. However, data concerning the importance of the genetic characteristics of cells on this effect are as yet scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity red laser on the growth, filamentation and plasmids in Escherichia coli cells proficient and deficient in DNA repair. E. coli cultures were exposed to a laser (658 nm, 10 mW, 1 and 8 J cm-2) to study bacterial growth and filamentation. Also, bacterial cultures hosting pBSK plasmids were exposed to the laser to study DNA topological forms from the electrophoretic profile in agarose gels. Data indicate the low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on the growth of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III deficient cells; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) led to no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids from exonuclease III deficient cells, but plasmids from wild type cells were altered. A low-intensity red laser at the low fluences used in phototherapy has no effect on growth, but induces filamentation and alters the topological forms of plasmid DNA in E. coli cultures depending on the DNA repair mechanisms.

  18. The effects of a low-intensity red laser on bacterial growth, filamentation and plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of nonphotosynthesizing microorganisms to light could increase cell division in cultures, a phenomenon denominated as biostimulation. However, data concerning the importance of the genetic characteristics of cells on this effect are as yet scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity red laser on the growth, filamentation and plasmids in Escherichia coli cells proficient and deficient in DNA repair. E. coli cultures were exposed to a laser (658 nm, 10 mW, 1 and 8 J cm−2) to study bacterial growth and filamentation. Also, bacterial cultures hosting pBSK plasmids were exposed to the laser to study DNA topological forms from the electrophoretic profile in agarose gels. Data indicate the low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on the growth of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III deficient cells; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) led to no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids from exonuclease III deficient cells, but plasmids from wild type cells were altered. A low-intensity red laser at the low fluences used in phototherapy has no effect on growth, but induces filamentation and alters the topological forms of plasmid DNA in E. coli cultures depending on the DNA repair mechanisms. (paper)

  19. Structure of a Filament-Like Actin Trimer Bound to the Bacterial Effector VopL

    OpenAIRE

    Zahm, Jacob A.; Padrick, Shae B.; Chen, Zhucheng; Pak, Chi W.; Yunus, Ali A.; Henry, Lisa; Tomchick, Diana R.; Chen, Zhe; Rosen, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens use secreted effector proteins to subvert host-cell defenses. VopL is an effector protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus that nucleates actin filaments. VopL consists of a VopL C-terminal Domain (VCD) and a tandem array of three WASP homology 2 (WH2) motifs. Here we report the crystal structure of the VCD dimer bound to actin. The VCD binds three actin monomers in a spatial arrangement close to that in the canonical actin filament. In this configuration each actin can readil...

  20. Flaw tolerance of nuclear intermediate filament lamina under extreme mechanical deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2011-04-26

    The nuclear lamina, composed of intermediate filaments, is a structural protein meshwork at the nuclear membrane that protects genetic material and regulates gene expression. Here we uncover the physical basis of the material design of nuclear lamina that enables it to withstand extreme mechanical deformation of >100% strain despite the presence of structural defects. Through a simple in silico model we demonstrate that this is due to nanoscale mechanisms including protein unfolding, alpha-to-beta transition, and sliding, resulting in a characteristic nonlinear force-extension curve. At the larger microscale this leads to an extreme delocalization of mechanical energy dissipation, preventing catastrophic crack propagation. Yet, when catastrophic failure occurs under extreme loading, individual protein filaments are sacrificed rather than the entire meshwork. This mechanism is theoretically explained by a characteristic change of the tangent stress-strain hardening exponent under increasing strain. Our results elucidate the large extensibility of the nuclear lamina within muscle or skin tissue and potentially many other protein materials that are exposed to extreme mechanical conditions, and provide a new paradigm toward the de novo design of protein materials by engineering the nonlinear stress-strain response to facilitate flaw-tolerant behavior. PMID:21384869

  1. Quantum mechanism of light transmission by the intermediate filaments in some specialized optically transparent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Vladimir; Zueva, Lidia; Golubeva, Tatiana; Korneeva, Elena; Khmelinskii, Igor; Inyushin, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Some very transparent cells in the optical tract of vertebrates, such as the lens fiber cells, possess certain types of specialized intermediate filaments (IFs) that have essential significance for their transparency. The exact mechanism describing why the IFs are so important for transparency is unknown. Recently, transparency was described also in the retinal Müller cells (MCs). We report that the main processes of the MCs contain bundles of long specialized IFs, each about 10 nm in diameter; most likely, these filaments are the channels providing light transmission to the photoreceptor cells in mammalian and avian retinas. We interpret the transmission of light in such channels using the notions of quantum confinement, describing energy transport in structures with electroconductive walls and diameter much smaller than the wavelength of the respective photons. Model calculations produce photon transmission efficiency in such channels exceeding 0.8, in optimized geometry. We infer that protein molecules make up the channels, proposing a qualitative mechanism of light transmission by such structures. The developed model may be used to describe light transmission by the IFs in any transparent cells. PMID:27570792

  2. Isomin: a novel cytoplasmic intermediate filament protein from an arthropod species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lupetti Pietro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of intermediate filaments (IFs is a hallmark feature of metazoan cells. IFs play a central role in cell organization and function, acting mainly as structural stress-absorbing elements. There is growing evidence to suggest that these cytoskeletal elements are also involved in the integration of signalling networks. According to their fundamental functions, IFs show a widespread phylogenetic expression, from simple diblastic animals up to mammals, and their constituent proteins share the same molecular organization in all species so far analysed. Arthropods represent a major exception in this scenario. Only lamins, the nuclear IF proteins, have so far been identified in the model organisms analysed; on this basis, it has been considered that arthropods do not express cytoplasmic IFs. Results Here, we report the first evidence for the expression of a cytoplasmic IF protein in an arthropod - the basal hexapod Isotomurus maculatus. This new protein, we named it isomin, is a component of the intestinal terminal web and shares with IFs typical biochemical properties, molecular features and reassembly capability. Sequence analysis indicates that isomin is mostly related to the Intermediate Filament protein C (IFC subfamily of Caenorhabditis elegans IF proteins, which are molecular constituents of the nematode intestinal terminal web. This finding is coherent with, and provides further support to, the most recent phylogenetic views of arthropod ancestry. Interestingly, the coil 1a domain of isomin appears to have been influenced by a substantial molecular drift and only the aminoterminal part of this domain, containing the so-called helix initiation motif, has been conserved. Conclusions Our results set a new basis for the analysis of IF protein evolution during arthropod phylogeny. In the light of this new information, the statement that the arthropod phylum lacks cytoplasmic IFs is no longer tenable. See commentary

  3. Multiple roles for keratin intermediate filaments in the regulation of epithelial barrier function and apico-basal polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Pedro J; Forteza, Radia; Mashukova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    As multicellular organisms evolved a family of cytoskeletal proteins, the keratins (types I and II) expressed in epithelial cells diversified in more than 20 genes in vertebrates. There is no question that keratin filaments confer mechanical stiffness to cells. However, such a number of genes can hardly be explained by evolutionary advantages in mechanical features. The use of transgenic mouse models has revealed unexpected functional relationships between keratin intermediate filaments and intracellular signaling. Accordingly, loss of keratins or mutations in keratins that cause or predispose to human diseases, result in increased sensitivity to apoptosis, regulation of innate immunity, permeabilization of tight junctions, and mistargeting of apical proteins in different epithelia. Precise mechanistic explanations for these phenomena are still lacking. However, immobilization of membrane or cytoplasmic proteins, including chaperones, on intermediate filaments ("scaffolding") appear as common molecular mechanisms and may explain the need for so many different keratin genes in vertebrates. PMID:27583190

  4. The intermediate filament network protein, vimentin, is required for parvoviral infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fay, Nikta; Panté, Nelly, E-mail: pante@zoology.ubc.ca

    2013-09-15

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) have recently been shown to serve novel roles during infection by many viruses. Here we have begun to study the role of IFs during the early steps of infection by the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM). We found that during early infection with MVM, after endosomal escape, the vimentin IF network was considerably altered, yielding collapsed immunofluorescence staining near the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, we found that vimentin plays an important role in the life cycle of MVM. The number of cells, which successfully replicated MVM, was reduced in infected cells in which the vimentin network was genetically or pharmacologically modified; viral endocytosis, however, remained unaltered. Perinuclear accumulation of MVM-containing vesicles was reduced in cells lacking vimentin. Our data suggests that vimentin is required for the MVM life cycle, presenting possibly a dual role: (1) following MVM escape from endosomes and (2) during endosomal trafficking of MVM. - Highlights: • MVM infection changes the distribution of the vimentin network to perinuclear regions. • Disrupting the vimentin network with acrylamide decreases MVM replication. • MVM replication is significantly reduced in vimentin-null cells. • Distribution of MVM-containing vesicles is affected in MVM infected vimentin-null cells.

  5. Neuronal intranuclear inclusions are ultrastructurally and immunologically distinct from cytoplasmic inclusions of neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mosaheb, Sabrina; Thorpe, Julian R.; Hashemzadeh-Bonehi, Lida; Bigio, Eileen H.; Gearing, Marla; Cairns, Nigel J.

    2005-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) containing aggregates of α-internexin and the neurofilament (NF) subunits, NF-H, NF-M, and NF-L, are the signature lesions of neuronal intermediate filament (IF) inclusion disease (NIFID). The disease has a clinically heterogeneous phenotype, including fronto-temporal dementia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs presenting at a young age. NCIs are variably ubiquitinated and about half of cases also have neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NIIs), w...

  6. Solid-state NMR studies of the dynamics and structure of mouse keratin intermediate filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular dynamics and structural organization of mouse epidermal keratin intermediate filaments (IF) have been studied via solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on IF labeled both in vivo and in vitro with isotopically enriched amino acids. As a probe of the organization of the peripheral glycine-rich end domains of the IF, carbon-13 NMR experiments have been performed on subfilamentous forms (prekeratin) and on IF reassembled in vitro that had been labeled with either [1-13C]glycine or [2-13C]glycine, as more than 90% of the glycines of the keratins are located in the end domains. Measurements of carbon relaxation times, nuclear Overhauser enhancements, and signal intensities show that the motions of the peptide backbone in the end domains are effectively isotropic. These results indicate that the end domains of IF are remarkably flexible and have little or no structural order. To probe the structural organization of the coiled-coil rod domains of the IF, separate samples of native keratin IF, raised in primary tissue culture, were labeled with L-[1-13C]leucine, L-[2H10]leucine, or L-[2,3,3-2H3]leucine, as greater than 90% of the leucyl residues of the keratin IF types studied are located in the coiled coils which form the central core of IF. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on IF labeled with deuteriated leucines indeed reveal a marked degree of peptide backbone rigidity within the coiled coils, confirming the initial conclusions of the carbon-13 data. These data, demonstrating relative peptide backbone rigidity yet side-chain flexibility, are interpreted to mean that the coiled coils of these keratin IF are not tightly packed together but rather form a somewhat looser structure which permits a significant degree of side-chain mobility

  7. Soluble CD44 interacts with intermediate filament protein vimentin on endothelial cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päll, Taavi; Pink, Anne; Kasak, Lagle; Turkina, Marina; Anderson, Wally; Valkna, Andres; Kogerman, Priit

    2011-01-01

    CD44 is a cell surface glycoprotein that functions as hyaluronan receptor. Mouse and human serum contain substantial amounts of soluble CD44, generated either by shedding or alternative splicing. During inflammation and in cancer patients serum levels of soluble CD44 are significantly increased. Experimentally, soluble CD44 overexpression blocks cancer cell adhesion to HA. We have previously found that recombinant CD44 hyaluronan binding domain (CD44HABD) and its non-HA-binding mutant inhibited tumor xenograft growth, angiogenesis, and endothelial cell proliferation. These data suggested an additional target other than HA for CD44HABD. By using non-HA-binding CD44HABD Arg41Ala, Arg78Ser, and Tyr79Ser-triple mutant (CD443MUT) we have identified intermediate filament protein vimentin as a novel interaction partner of CD44. We found that vimentin is expressed on the cell surface of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Endogenous CD44 and vimentin coprecipitate from HUVECs, and when overexpressed in vimentin-negative MCF-7 cells. By using deletion mutants, we found that CD44HABD and CD443MUT bind vimentin N-terminal head domain. CD443MUT binds vimentin in solution with a Kd in range of 12-37 nM, and immobilised vimentin with Kd of 74 nM. CD443MUT binds to HUVEC and recombinant vimentin displaces CD443MUT from its binding sites. CD44HABD and CD443MUT were internalized by wild-type endothelial cells, but not by lung endothelial cells isolated from vimentin knock-out mice. Together, these data suggest that vimentin provides a specific binding site for soluble CD44 on endothelial cells. PMID:22216242

  8. Regulation of protein phosphorylation of the intermediate-sized filament vimentin in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intermediate-sized filaments of vimentin-type (Mr = 57,000) have been identified biochemically and immunochemically as a major cytoskeleton component in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye. When human or rabbit ciliary processes, or cultured ciliary epithelial-derived cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing [32P]orthophosphate and any of the following agents: 1) beta-adrenergic agonists (isoproterenol or epinephrine), 2) direct activators of adenylate cyclase (cholera toxin or forskolin), 3) analogs of cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP), or 4) prostaglandin E1, the phosphorylation of vimentin was significantly enhanced. The maximal enhancement ranged, in vivo and in vitro, from about 3-fold in human to 5-fold in rabbit, with either 1 mM 8-Br-cAMP or 0.1 microM forskolin. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-vimentin, allowed the localization of vimentin filaments in cultured ciliary epithelial cells. Treatment of these cells in culture with the catecholamine hormone, isoproterenol (1 microM), resulted in a profound reorganization of vimentin filaments. This may be correlated with the enhanced levels of phosphorylated vimentin observed upon increasing cellular cyclic AMP

  9. The dermatan sulfate proteoglycan decorin modulates α2β1 integrin and the vimentin intermediate filament system during collagen synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Jungmann

    Full Text Available Decorin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan harboring a dermatan sulfate chain at its N-terminus, is involved in regulating matrix organization and cell signaling. Loss of the dermatan sulfate of decorin leads to an Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by delayed wound healing. Decorin-null (Dcn(-/- mice display a phenotype similar to that of EDS patients. The fibrillar collagen phenotype of Dcn(-/- mice could be rescued in vitro by decorin but not with decorin lacking the glycosaminoglycan chain. We utilized a 3D cell culture model to investigate the impact of the altered extracellular matrix on Dcn(-/- fibroblasts. Using 2D gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry, we identified vimentin as one of the proteins that was differentially upregulated by the presence of decorin. We discovered that a decorin-deficient matrix leads to abnormal nuclear morphology in the Dcn(-/- fibroblasts. This phenotype could be rescued by the decorin proteoglycan but less efficiently by the decorin protein core. Decorin treatment led to a significant reduction of the α2β1 integrin at day 6 in Dcn(-/- fibroblasts, whereas the protein core had no effect on β1. Interestingly, only the decorin core induced mRNA synthesis, phosphorylation and de novo synthesis of vimentin indicating that the proteoglycan decorin in the extracellular matrix stabilizes the vimentin intermediate filament system. We could support these results in vivo, because the dermis of wild-type mice have more vimentin and less β1 integrin compared to Dcn(-/-. Furthermore, the α2β1 null fibroblasts also showed a reduced amount of vimentin compared to wild-type. These data show for the first time that decorin has an impact on the biology of α2β1 integrin and the vimentin intermediate filament system. Moreover, our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the reported defects in wound healing associated with the Dcn(-/- phenotype.

  10. A “Mechanistic” Explanation of the Multiple Helical Forms Adopted by Bacterial Flagellar Filaments

    OpenAIRE

    Calladine, C. R.; Luisi, B F; Pratap, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    The corkscrew-like flagellar filaments emerging from the surface of bacteria such as Salmonella typhimurium propel the cells toward nutrient and away from repellents. This kind of motility depends upon the ability of the flagellar filaments to adopt a range of distinct helical forms. A filament is typically constructed from ~ 30,000 identical flagellin molecules, which self-assemble into a tubular structure containing 11 near-longitudinal protofilaments. A “mechanical” model, in which the fla...

  11. Self-Elongation with Sequential Folding of a Filament of Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryojiro; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Katori, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    Under hard-agar and nutrient-rich conditions, a cell of Bacillus subtilis grows as a single filament owing to the failure of cell separation after each growth and division cycle. The self-elongating filament of cells shows sequential folding processes, and multifold structures extend over an agar plate. We report that the growth process from the exponential phase to the stationary phase is well described by the time evolution of fractal dimensions of the filament configuration. We propose a method of characterizing filament configurations using a set of lengths of multifold parts of a filament. Systems of differential equations are introduced to describe the folding processes that create multifold structures in the early stage of the growth process. We show that the fitting of experimental data to the solutions of equations is excellent, and the parameters involved in our model systems are determined.

  12. Delayed Failure of Hi-Nicalon and Hi-Nicalon S Multi-filament Tows and Single Filaments at Intermediate Temperatures (500 degrees-800 degrees C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous results have shown that tows of SiC Nicalon fibers are sensitive to the phenomenon of delayed failure, at temperatures below 700 C. The present paper examines the static fatigue of Hi-Nicalon and Hi-Nicalon S when subjected to constant load, at temperatures between 500 and 800 C in air. Multi-filament tows and single filaments were tested. Experimental data show that the rupture times of tows depend on the applied stress according to the conventional power law tσn=A. In contrast, the stress-rupture time data obtained on single filaments exhibit significant scatter. A model based on slow crack growth in single filaments shows that the stress-rupture of fiber tows follows the conventional time power law. The dependence on temperature was introduced. The model allowed sound calculations of tow lifetimes and characteristics of the slow crack growth phenomenon to be extracted from the tow stress-rupture time data. (authors)

  13. Determination of atrazine and its biodegradation intermediates in bacterial enrichments obtained from Uruguayan water courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Da Cunha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine is an herbicide used to control annual weeds and perennial grasses. Due to the toxicity of atrazine and its metabolites, this herbicide is banned in the European Union. In Uruguay atrazine is the second most frequently imported herbicide. It has been detected in surface water courses, particularly those that provide water for potabilization plants.The main mechanism for atrazine removal in neutral pH environments is the bacterial degradation. The microorganisms can degrade atrazine giving intermediates that vary in persistence and toxicity, or mineralize it giving ammonia and carbondioxide. The separation and detection of atrazine intermediates of biological degradation is important to know the potential of bacterial consortia to be applied in bioremediation processes. In this paper we developed an isocratic method of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC by ion-pair reversed phase to separate atrazine and metabolites in a synthetic culture medium. This method was useful to detect intermediates of atrazine degradation produced by selected native bacterial consortia. In addition, the method was employed to assess if atrazine adsorbed on activated carbon could be degraded by an active degrading consortium.

  14. Immunoexpression of intermediate filaments and morphological changes in the liver and bile duct of rats infected with Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk, L; Laszczyńska, M; Masiuk, M; Grabowska, M; Skrzydlewska, E

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the immunoexpression of the intermediate filament proteins, cytokeratin and desmin, and the morphological changes in the liver of rats during experimental fasciolosis at 4, 7 and 10 weeks post-infection. Rats were infected with 30 Fasciola hepatica metacercariae. Paraffin sections of the liver were stained using H & E, PAS and azan stains. Immunohistochemical reactions were performed using antibodies against cytokeratin and desmin. The experimental F. hepatica infection led to fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver, and to inflammation of the common bile ducts. The expression of cytokeratin was increased in the epithelial cells of both the liver bile ductules at 4, 7 and 10 weeks post-infection and in the common bile ducts at 7 and 10 weeks post-infection compared to uninfected rats; expression in the common bile ducts was more intense. The myofibroblasts of the liver and smooth myocytes of the interlobular bile ducts and common bile ducts, showed a slight increase in desmin expression compared to the uninfected rats. The increased expression of cytokeratins in the hyperplastic rat common bile duct epithelium during the biliary phase of fasciolosis at 7 and 10 weeks post-infection may be explained by mechanical irritation by the parasite and an inflammatory reaction in the bile duct epithelium and in periductal fibrous tissue. PMID:25923046

  15. A study of the cell adhesions molecules, E-Cadherin and C-CAM, and the intermediate filaments, nestin, in craniofacial and tooth development

    OpenAIRE

    Terling, Catharina

    1998-01-01

    A STUDY OF THE CELL ADHESION MOLECULES, E-CADHERIN AND C-CAM AND THE INTERMEDIATE FILAMENT NESTIN IN CRANIOFACIAL AND TOOTH DEVELOPMENT. Catharina Terling The Department of Basic Oral Sciences, The Center of Oral Biology, Novum Research Park and The Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Medical Nobel Institute, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are involved in cell migration, morphogenesis, and cell differentiation within the embryo, and ...

  16. An Appraisal of Intermediate Filament Expression in Adult and Developing Pancreas: Vimentin Is Expressed in α Cells of Rat and Mouse Embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Di Bella, Alessandro; Regoli, Marì; Nicoletti, Claudio; Ermini, Leonardo; Fonzi, Luciano; Bertelli, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are frequently used in studies of developmental biology as markers of cell differentiation. To assess whether they can be useful to identify differentiating pancreatic endocrine cells, we examined the pattern of expression of nestin, cytokeratin 20, and vimentin on acetone-fixed cryosections of rat adult and developing pancreas. We also studied vimentin expression in mouse embryonic pancreas at E19. Cytokeratin 20 was found in all pancreatic epithelial cell lineages dur...

  17. Intermediate filaments of zebrafish retinal and optic nerve astrocytes and Müller glia: differential distribution of cytokeratin and GFAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosier Amanda L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optic nerve regeneration (ONR following injury is a model for central nervous system regeneration. In zebrafish, ONR is rapid - neurites cross the lesion and enter the optic tectum within 7 days; in mammals regeneration does not take place unless astrocytic reactivity is suppressed. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP is used as a marker for retinal and optic nerve astrocytes in both fish and mammals, even though it has long been known that astrocytes of optic nerves in many fish, including zebrafish, express cytokeratins and not GFAP. We used immunofluorescence to localize GFAP and cytokeratin in wild-type zebrafish and transgenic zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under control of a GFAP promoter to determine the pattern of expression of intermediate filaments in retina and optic nerve. Findings GFAP labeling and GFAP gene expression as indicated by GFP fluorescence was found only in the Müller glial cells of the retina. Within Müller cells, GFP fluorescence filled the entire cell while GFAP labelling was more restricted in distribution. No GFAP expression was observed in optic nerves. Cytokeratin labeling of astrocytes was observed throughout the optic nerve and less intensely in cells in the retinal inner plexiform layer. The retinal inner limiting membrane was strongly labeled by anti-cytokeratin. Conclusions Studies of astrocyte function during ONR in zebrafish cannot solely rely on GFAP as an astrocyte marker or indicator of reactivity. Future studies of ONR in zebrafish should include evaluation of changes in cytokeratin expression and localization in the optic nerve.

  18. Apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy of sparsely labeled tobacco mosaic viruses and the intermediate filament desmin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Harder

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Both fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM are highly versatile and extensively used in applications ranging from nanotechnology to life sciences. In fluorescence microscopy luminescent dyes serve as position markers. Moreover, they can be used as active reporters of their local vicinity. The dipolar coupling of the tip with the incident light and the fluorophore give rise to a local field and fluorescence enhancement. AFM topographic imaging allows for resolutions down to the atomic scale. It can be operated in vacuum, under ambient conditions and in liquids. This makes it ideal for the investigation of a wide range of different samples. Furthermore an illuminated AFM cantilever tip apex exposes strongly confined non-propagating electromagnetic fields that can serve as a coupling agent for single dye molecules. Thus, combining both techniques by means of apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (aSNOM enables concurrent high resolution topography and fluorescence imaging. Commonly, among the various (apertureless SNOM approaches metallic or metallized probes are used. Here, we report on our custom-built aSNOM setup, which uses commercially available monolithic silicon AFM cantilevers. The field enhancement confined to the tip apex facilitates an optical resolution down to 20 nm. Furthermore, the use of standard mass-produced AFM cantilevers spares elaborate probe production or modification processes. We investigated tobacco mosaic viruses and the intermediate filament protein desmin. Both are mixed complexes of building blocks, which are fluorescently labeled to a low degree. The simultaneous recording of topography and fluorescence data allows for the exact localization of distinct building blocks within the superordinate structures.

  19. Planck intermediate results XXXIII. Signature of the magnetic field geometry of interstellar filaments in dust polarization maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.;

    2016-01-01

    background in dust total and polarized emission. We use the spatial information to separate Stokes I, Q, and U of the filaments from those of their backgrounds, an essential step in measuring the intrinsic polarization fraction (p) and angle (ψpsi) of each emission component. We find that the polarization......-H from the backgrounds to the crest of the filaments. We show that the bulk of the drop in p within the filaments cannot be explained by random fluctuations of the orientation of the magnetic field because they are too small (σψ <10 °). We recognize the degeneracy between the dust alignment efficiency...

  20. Mechanism of Actin Filament Nucleation by the Bacterial Effector VopL

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Bingke; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Brautigam, Chad A.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus protein L (VopL) is an actin nucleation factor that induces stress fibers when injected by bacteria into eukaryotic host cells. VopL contains three N-terminal Wiskott-Aldrich Homology 2 (WH2) motifs and a unique VopL C-terminal domain (VCD). We describe crystallographic and biochemical analyses of filament nucleation by VopL. The WH2 element of VopL does not nucleate on its own, and requires the VCD for activity. The VCD forms a U-shaped dimer in the crystal, which is ...

  1. Estrous cycle-dependent changes of Fas expression in the bovine corpus luteum: influence of keratin 8/18 intermediate filaments and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Alice

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fas expression and Fas-induced apoptosis are mechanisms attributed to the selective destruction of cells of the corpus luteum (CL during luteal regression. In certain cell-types, sensitivity to these death-inducing mechanisms is due to the loss or cleavage of keratin-containing intermediate filaments. Specifically, keratin 8/18 (K8/K18 filaments are hypothesized to influence cell death in part by regulating Fas expression at the cell surface. Methods Here, Fas expression on bovine luteal cells was quantified by flow cytometry during the early (Day 5, postovulation and late stages (Days 16–18, postovulation of CL function, and the relationship between Fas expression, K8/K18 filament expression and cytokine-induced cell death in vitro was evaluated. Results Both total and cell surface expression of Fas on luteal cells was greater for early versus late stage bovine CL (89% vs. 44% of cells for total Fas; 65% vs.18% of cells for cell surface Fas; respectively, P0.05, n=4 CL/stage, despite evidence these conditions increased Fas expression on HepG2 cells (P0.05 or stage of CL (P>0.05, n= 4 CL/stage on this outcome. Conclusion In conclusion, we rejected our null hypothesis that the cell surface expression of Fas does not differ between luteal cells of early and late stage CL. The results also did not support the idea that K8/K18 filaments influence the expression of Fas on the surface of bovine luteal cells. Potential downstream effects of these filaments on death signaling, however, remain a possibility. Importantly, the elevated expression of Fas observed on cells of early stage bovine CL compared to late stage bovine CL raises a provocative question concerning the physiological role(s of Fas in the corpus luteum, particularly during early luteal development.

  2. Protein-chemical characterization of NF-H, the largest mammalian neurofilament component; intermediate filament-type sequences followed by a unique carboxy-terminal extension

    OpenAIRE

    Geisler, N; Fischer, S.; Vandekerckhove, J; Van Damme, J; Plessmann, U.; Weber, K.

    1985-01-01

    NF-H has the highest mol. wt. of the three mammalian neurofilament components (NF-L, NF-M, NF-H). In spite of its unusually large mol. wt., estimated to be 200 K by gel electrophoresis, NF-H contains sequences which identify it as an integral intermediate filament (IF) protein in its amino-terminal region. We have isolated and partially characterized a basic, non-α-helical segment located at the amino-terminal end with properties similar to headpieces of other non-epithelial IF proteins. The ...

  3. Identification of Fic-1 as an enzyme that inhibits bacterial DNA replication by AMPylating GyrB, promoting filament formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Canhua; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Zhang, Li-Qun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of bacterial cells is important for virulence, evasion of the host immune system, and coping with environmental stresses. The widely distributed Fic proteins (filamentation induced by cAMP) are annotated as proteins involved in cell division because of the presence of the HPFx[D/E]GN[G/K]R motif. We showed that the presence of Fic-1 from Pseudomonas fluorescens significantly reduced the yield of plasmid DNA when expressed in Escherichia coli or P. fluorescens. Fic-1 interacted with GyrB, a subunit of DNA gyrase, which is essential for bacterial DNA replication. Fic-1 catalyzed the AMPylation of GyrB at Tyr(109), a residue critical for binding ATP, and exhibited auto-AMPylation activity. Mutation of the Fic-1 auto-AMPylated site greatly reduced AMPylation activity toward itself and toward GyrB. Fic-1-dependent AMPylation of GyrB triggered the SOS response, indicative of DNA replication stress or DNA damage. Fic-1 also promoted the formation of elongated cells when the SOS response was blocked. We identified an α-inhibitor protein that we named anti-Fic-1 (AntF), encoded by a gene immediately upstream of Fic-1. AntF interacted with Fic-1, inhibited the AMPylation activity of Fic-1 for GyrB in vitro, and blocked Fic-1-mediated inhibition of DNA replication in bacteria, suggesting that Fic-1 and AntF comprise a toxin-antitoxin module. Our work establishes Fic-1 as an AMPylating enzyme that targets GyrB to inhibit DNA replication and may target other proteins to regulate bacterial morphology. PMID:26814232

  4. RecA-DNA filament topology: the overlooked alternative of an unconventional syn-syn duplex intermediate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The helical filaments of RecA protein mediate strand exchange for homologous recombination, but the paths of the interacting DNAs have yet to be determined. Although this interaction is commonly limited to three strands, it is reasoned here that the intrinsic symmetry relationships of quadruplex...... topology are superior in explaining a range of observations. In particular, this topology suggests the potential of post-exchange base pairing in the unorthodox configuration of syn-syn glycosidic bonds between the nucleotide bases and the pentose rings in the sugar-phosphate backbone, which would...

  5. Co-expression of neuronal intermediate filaments, peripherin and α-internexin in human well-differentiated endocrine neoplasms (carcinoid tumors) of the appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Mitsuaki; Kushima, Ryoji; Brevet, Marie; Chatelain, Denis; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2008-01-01

    The rectum and appendix are the two major sites of well-differentiated endocrine neoplasms (carcinoid tumors) in the lower gastrointestinal tract. Previously, we reported the consistent expression of peripherin in rectal well-differentiated endocrine neoplasms without metastases. However, its expression has not as yet been examined in appendiceal well-differentiated endocrine neoplasms. The aim of our present study was to clarify whether peripherin, a type III neuronal intermediate filament, and α-internexin, a type IV neuronal intermediate filament, are expressed in appendiceal well-differentiated endocrine neoplasms. Other endocrine markers were also examined and compared with the findings from the rectal well-differentiated endocrine neoplasms. The analyses were carried out by immunohistochemical methods using 12 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded appendiceal well-differentiated endocrine neoplasms. In all the neoplasms examined, diffuse immunoreactivity of peripherin was observed. In addition, immunoreactivity of α-internexin, which was frequently co-expressed with peripherin, was found in all appendiceal cases. Chromogranin A and neural cell adhesion molecule expression was found in all appendiceal tumors, and serotonin was also frequently expressed (83%, 10/12 cases). Incidences of the expression of these three markers were much higher in the appendiceal than in the rectal cases. Peripherin expression is a common feature of appendiceal and rectal well-differentiated endocrine neoplasms, but the manner of neural marker expression is different depending on the site of origin. It is uncertain whether the expression of peripherin and/or α-internexin is present in the well-differentiated endocrine neoplasms of other organs; further analysis is required to clarify this issue. PMID:21479396

  6. Functional expression of NF1 tumor suppressor protein: association with keratin intermediate filaments during the early development of human epidermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peltonen Sirkku

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NF1 refers to type 1 neurofibromatosis syndrome, which has been linked with mutations of the large NF1 gene. NF1 tumor suppressor protein, neurofibromin, has been shown to regulate ras: the NF1 protein contains a GTPase activating protein (GAP related domain which functions as p21rasGAP. Our studies have previously demonstrated that the NF1 protein forms a high affinity association with cytokeratin 14 during the formation of desmosomes and hemidesmosomes in cultured keratinocytes. Methods The expression of NF1 protein was studied in developing human epidermis using western transfer analysis, indirect immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and in situ hybridization. Results The expression of NF1 protein was noted to be highly elevated in the periderm at 8 weeks estimated gestational age (EGA and in the basal cells at 8–14 weeks EGA. During this period, NF1 protein was associated with cytokeratin filaments terminating to desmosomes and hemidesmosomes. NF1 protein did not display colocalization with α-tubulin or actin of the cytoskeleton, or with adherens junction proteins. Conclusions These results depict an early fetal period when the NF1 tumor suppressor is abundantly expressed in epidermis and associated with cytokeratin filaments. This period is characterized by the initiation of differentiation of the basal cells, maturation of the basement membrane zone as well as accentuated formation of selected cellular junctions. NF1 tumor suppressor may function in the regulation of epidermal histogenesis via controlling the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton during the assembly of desmosomes and hemidesmosomes.

  7. Microbial dynamics and properties of aerobic granules developed in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor with an intermediate filamentous bulking stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, H; Basuvaraj, M; Hall, M; Neufeld, J D; Liss, S N

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic granules offer enhanced biological nutrient removal and are compact and dense structures resulting in efficient settling properties. Granule instability, however, is still a challenge as understanding of the drivers of instability is poorly understood. In this study, transient instability of aerobic granules, associated with filamentous outgrowth, was observed in laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). The transient phase was followed by the formation of stable granules. Loosely bound, dispersed, and pinpoint seed flocs gradually turned into granular flocs within 60 days of SBR operation. In stage 1, the granular flocs were compact in structure and typically 0.2 mm in diameter, with excellent settling properties. Filaments appeared and dominated by stage 2, resulting in poor settleability. By stage 3, the SBRs were selected for larger granules and better settling structures, which included filaments that became enmeshed within the granule, eventually forming structures 2-5 mm in diameter. Corresponding changes in sludge volume index were observed that reflected changes in settleability. The protein-to-polysaccharide ratio in the extracted extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) from stage 1 and stage 3 granules was higher (2.8 and 5.7, respectively), as compared to stage 2 filamentous bulking (1.5). Confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging of the biomass samples, coupled with molecule-specific fluorescent staining, confirmed that protein was predominant in stage 1 and stage 3 granules. During stage 2 bulking, there was a decrease in live cells; dead cells predominated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint results indicated a shift in bacterial community composition during granulation, which was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In particular, Janthinobacterium (known denitrifier and producer of antimicrobial pigment) and Auxenochlorella protothecoides (mixotrophic green algae) were predominant during stage

  8. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity under alkaline conditions found in intermediate-level nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on the bituminous waste, a mixture of bitumen and insoluble salts, mainly of nitrate and sulphate carrying low and intermediate level radioactivity. The re-saturation of the disposal cells after closure will likely lead to the development of microbial activity. One of the most critical aspects limiting bacterial activity is the high alkalinity prevailing in the barrier concrete system and at the concrete-clay rock interface (pH = 11-13.5). The objective of this work is to evaluate the possible activity of nitrate reducing bacteria under these alkaline conditions, building on knowledge for alkaliphilic bacteria gained from similar conditions. Alkaliphilic bacteria develop optimally at pH values above 9, often between 10 and 12, in some cases above 12. They are likely to be predominant under alkaline conditions, but they will be replaced by neutrophilic bacteria as soon as local zones of near-neutral pH develop. In the case of a waste cell this could be at the interface to the clay rock or in the vicinity of organic matter releasing bituminous waste. Two sets of experiments have been carried out, bringing nitrate in contact with a solution containing organic matter (acetate) and a culture of alkaliphilic microbes, one focuses on the influence of nitrate concentrations, the other on the impact of changes in pH (10.0 and 12.4). The results indicate a low microbial activity at pH 12.4 whereas a significant nitrate reduction is obtained at pH 10.0. Furthermore, nitrite is the main product of nitrate reduction; traces of ammonium have also been measured. (authors)

  9. Cloning human herpes virus 6A genome into bacterial artificial chromosomes and study of DNA replication intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Borenstein, Ronen; Frenkel, Niza

    2009-01-01

    Cloning of large viral genomes into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) facilitates analyses of viral functions and molecular mutagenesis. Previous derivations of viral BACs involved laborious recombinations within infected cells. We describe a single-step production of viral BACs by direct cloning of unit length genomes, derived from circular or head-to-tail concatemeric DNA replication intermediates. The BAC cloning is independent of intracellular recombinations and DNA packaging constr...

  10. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    -vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial......Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  11. The Molecular Architecture for the Intermediate Filaments of Hard [alpha]-Keratin Based on the Superlattice Data Obtained from a Study ofMammals Using Synchrotron Fibre Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Veronica (ANU)

    2014-09-24

    High- and low-angle X-ray diffraction studies of hard {alpha}-keratin have been studied, and various models have been proposed over the last 70 years. Most of these studies have been confined to one or two forms of alpha keratin. This high- and low-angle synchrotron fibre diffraction study extends the study to cover all available data for all known forms of hard {alpha}-keratin including hairs, fingernails, hooves, horn, and quills from mammals, marsupials, and a monotreme, and it confirms that the model proposed is universally acceptable for all mammals. A complete Bragg analysis of the meridional diffraction patterns, including multiple-time exposures to verify any weak reflections, verified the existence of a superlattice consisting of two infinite lattices and three finite lattices. An analysis of the equatorial patterns establishes the radii of the oligomeric levels of dimers, tetramers, and intermediate filaments (IFs) together with the centre to centre distance for the IFs, thus confirming the proposed helices within helices molecular architecture for hard {alpha}-keratin. The results verify that the structure proposed by Feughelman and James meets the criteria for a valid {alpha}-keratin structure.

  12. Cloning of the non-neuronal intermediate filament protein of the gastropod Aplysia californica; identification of an amino acid residue essential for the IFA epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, D; Dodemont, H; Weber, K

    1991-12-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a full-length cDNA corresponding to the larger non-neuronal (nn) intermediate filament (IF) protein of the gastropod Aplysia californica. Comparison of the sequences of the nn-IF proteins from Aplysia californica and Helix aspersa shows a strong evolutionary drift. At a 72% sequence identity level, the IF proteins of Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata show a larger distance than vimentins from Xenopus and mammals. The sequence comparison of the two snail proteins provides an important step in understanding the epitope of the monoclonal antibody IFA mapped by previous studies to the consensus sequence at the carboxy-terminal end of the rod domain of IF proteins. We identify for the first time in a naturally occurring IF protein a single amino acid exchange which leads to the loss of the epitope. The consensus sequence YRKLLEGEE present in IFA-positive proteins such as the Helix IF protein is changed in the IFA-negative Aplysia protein only by the conservative substitution of the arginine (R) by a lysine (K). Thus, the IFA epitope is not a necessity of IF structure, and its presence or absence on different IF proteins reflects only small changes in an otherwise conserved consensus sequence. Consequently, lack of IFA reactivity does not exclude the presence of IF. This result predicts that IF are much more universally expressed in lower eukaryotes than currently expected from immunological results with the monoclonal antibody IFA. PMID:1724961

  13. Age features in protein’s composition modifications of the neurospecifical and glial intermediate filaments in different parts of the red’s brain depend on ionization radiation actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanenko L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we compare the main changes in protein composition of intermediate filaments due to ionization radiation actions on old and yang rats. The objects of our investigation were 120 rats (60 old and 60 yangs. They were divided on groups in depend on ionization radiation action duration – 1 day, 1,2 and 3 week, and the control group. The action of ionization radiation was modeled with the help of “РУМ-17” in the fate 0,00129 Kl/kg. Brains were divided on parts (cortex, cerebellum, gypocamp, homogenized, centrifugised. The quantity of glial and neuronal filaments (NF was defined by the rocket-lineal immunoelectrophoresis; immunoblotting with specific antibodies was used for qualitative changes defining. After ionization radiation action we observed no age features in protein composition of intermediate filaments. All changes were due to duration of the ionization radiation action. Main changes in neurofilaments were associated with decrease of 210 kDa subunit. Products of degradation (40 - 48 kDa of fibrillar glial filaments were observed on the 2 week of experiment. There were biphasic changes in glial fibrillar acidic protein in cerebellum and gypocamp of yang and old rats.

  14. Intracellular fibril formation, calcification, and enrichment of chaperones, cytoskeletal, and intermediate filament proteins in the adult hippocampus CA1 following neonatal exposure to the nonprotein amino acid BMAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Oskar; Berg, Anna-Lena; Hanrieder, Jörg; Arnerup, Gunnel; Lindström, Anna-Karin; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-03-01

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease, and recent studies indicate that BMAA can be misincorporated into proteins. BMAA is a developmental neurotoxicant that can induce long-term learning and memory deficits, as well as regionally restricted neuronal degeneration and mineralization in the hippocampal CA1. The aim of the study was to characterize long-term changes (2 weeks to 6 months) further in the brain of adult rats treated neonatally (postnatal days 9-10) with BMAA (460 mg/kg) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), transmission electron microscopy, and laser capture microdissection followed by LC-MS/MS for proteomic analysis. The histological examination demonstrated progressive neurodegenerative changes, astrogliosis, microglial activation, and calcification in the hippocampal CA1 3-6 months after exposure. The IHC showed an increased staining for α-synuclein and ubiquitin in the area. The ultrastructural examination revealed intracellular deposition of abundant bundles of closely packed parallel fibrils in neurons, axons, and astrocytes of the CA1. Proteomic analysis of the affected site demonstrated an enrichment of chaperones (e.g., clusterin, GRP-78), cytoskeletal and intermediate filament proteins, and proteins involved in the antioxidant defense system. Several of the most enriched proteins (plectin, glial fibrillar acidic protein, vimentin, Hsp 27, and ubiquitin) are known to form complex astrocytic inclusions, so-called Rosenthal fibers, in the neurodegenerative disorder Alexander disease. In addition, TDP-43 and the negative regulator of autophagy, GLIPR-2, were exclusively detected. The present study demonstrates that neonatal exposure to BMAA may offer a novel model for the study of hippocampal fibril formation in vivo. PMID:24798087

  15. The calcium-modulated proteins, S100A1 and S100B, as potential regulators of the dynamics of type III intermediate filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garbuglia

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ca2+-modulated, dimeric proteins of the EF-hand (helix-loop-helix type, S100A1 and S100B, that have been shown to inhibit microtubule (MT protein assembly and to promote MT disassembly, interact with the type III intermediate filament (IF subunits, desmin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, with a stoichiometry of 2 mol of IF subunit/mol of S100A1 or S100B dimer and an affinity of 0.5-1.0 µM in the presence of a few micromolar concentrations of Ca2+. Binding of S100A1 and S100B results in inhibition of desmin and GFAP assemblies into IFs and stimulation of the disassembly of preformed desmin and GFAP IFs. S100A1 and S100B interact with a stretch of residues in the N-terminal (head domain of desmin and GFAP, thereby blocking the head-to-tail process of IF elongation. The C-terminal extension of S100A1 (and, likely, S100B represents a critical part of the site that recognizes desmin and GFAP. S100B is localized to IFs within cells, suggesting that it might have a role in remodeling IFs upon elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration by avoiding excess IF assembly and/or promoting IF disassembly in vivo. S100A1, that is not localized to IFs, might also play a role in the regulation of IF dynamics by binding to and sequestering unassembled IF subunits. Together, these observations suggest that S100A1 and S100B may be regarded as Ca2+-dependent regulators of the state of assembly of two important elements of the cytoskeleton, IFs and MTs, and, potentially, of MT- and IF-based activities.

  16. The bacterial transposon Tn7 causes premature polyadenylation of mRNA in eukaryotic organisms: TAGKO mutagenesis in filamentous fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Clive; Adachi, Kiichi; Shuster, Jeffrey R.; Hamer, John E.; Hamer, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    TAGKO is a Tn7-based transposition system for genome wide mutagenesis in filamentous fungi. The effects of transposon insertion on the expression of TAGKO alleles were examined in Magnaporthe grisea and Mycosphaerella graminicola. Northern analysis showed that stable, truncated transcripts were expressed in the TAGKO mutants. Mapping of the 3′-ends of TAGKO cDNAs revealed that they all contain Tn7 end sequences, regardless of the transposon orientation. Polyadenylation signals characteristic ...

  17. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.;

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that coll...... cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology......The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that...

  18. Replication fork assembly at recombination intermediates is required for bacterial growth

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Joing; Xu, Liewei; Sandler, Steven J.; Marians, Kenneth J.

    1999-01-01

    PriA, a 3′ → 5′ DNA helicase, directs assembly of a primosome on some bacteriophage and plasmid DNAs. Primosomes are multienzyme replication machines that contribute both the DNA-unwinding and Okazaki fragment-priming functions at the replication fork. The role of PriA in chromosomal replication is unclear. The phenotypes of priA null mutations suggest that the protein participates in replication restart at recombination intermediates. We show here that PriA promotes replication fork assembly...

  19. Prediction of isotope effects for anticipated intermediate structures in the course of bacterial denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibrational-analysis methods have been used to estimate the equilibrium 14N/15N isotope effects to be expected for conversion of nitrite anion to thirteen possible intermediate-state and product-state structures [HONO, NO+, NO, NO-, FeNO, ON*NO2, O*NNO2, O2NNO2, ONO*N, O*NON, ONNO, *NNO, N*NO] in the reduction of nitrite ion to nitrous oxide denitrifying bacteria. The results, taken in combination with previous experimental isotope-effect and tracer studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri and related systems, are consistent with a suggestion that a second nitrite anion enters the enzyme-catalytic cycle at the stage of a nitrosyl-ion intermediate but re-emerges after entry of the reducing electrons; the product nitrous oxide is then formed by disproportionation of enzymically generated hyponitrous acid. The calculations are consistent with contributions, under different experimental conditions, of several different transition states to limiting the rate of the enzymic reaction. These transition states (and the corresponding experimental conditions) are the transition states for N-O fission in the generation of a mononitrogen electrophilic species from nitrite anion (high reductant, high nitrite concentrations), for attack of nitrite on this electrophile (high reductant, low nitrite concentrations) and for electron transfer to a dinitrogen-trioxide-like species (low reductant concentration). (orig.)

  20. Divergent evolution peaks under intermediate population bottlenecks during bacterial experimental evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogwill, Tom; Phillips, Robyn L; Gifford, Danna R; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-07-27

    There is growing evidence that parallel molecular evolution is common, but its causes remain poorly understood. Demographic parameters such as population bottlenecks are predicted to be major determinants of parallelism. Here, we test the hypothesis that bottleneck intensity shapes parallel evolution by elucidating the genomic basis of adaptation to antibiotic-supplemented media in hundreds of populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. As expected, bottlenecking decreased the rate of phenotypic and molecular adaptation. Surprisingly, bottlenecking had no impact on the likelihood of parallel adaptive molecular evolution at a genome-wide scale. However, bottlenecking had a profound impact on the genes involved in antibiotic resistance. Specifically, under either intense or weak bottlenecking, resistance predominantly evolved by strongly beneficial mutations which provide high levels of antibiotic resistance. In contrast with intermediate bottlenecking regimes, resistance evolved by a greater diversity of genetic mechanisms, significantly reducing the observed levels of parallel genetic evolution. Our results demonstrate that population bottlenecking can be a major predictor of parallel evolution, but precisely how may be more complex than many simple theoretical predictions. PMID:27466449

  1. A bacterial artificial chromosome library for Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate snail host of Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen M Adema

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available To provide a novel resource for analysis of the genome of Biomphalaria glabrata, members of the international Biomphalaria glabrata Genome Initiative (biology.unm.edu/biomphalaria-genome.html, working with the Arizona Genomics Institute (AGI and supported by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI, produced a high quality bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library. The BB02 strain B. glabrata, a field isolate (Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil that is susceptible to several strains of Schistosoma mansoni, was selfed for two generations to reduce haplotype diversity in the offspring. High molecular weight DNA was isolated from ovotestes of 40 snails, partially digested with HindIII, and ligated into pAGIBAC1 vector. The resulting B. glabrata BAC library (BG_BBa consists of 61824 clones (136.3 kb average insert size and provides 9.05 × coverage of the 931 Mb genome. Probing with single/low copy number genes from B. glabrata and fingerprinting of selected BAC clones indicated that the BAC library sufficiently represents the gene complement. BAC end sequence data (514 reads, 299860 nt indicated that the genome of B. glabrata contains ~ 63% AT, and disclosed several novel genes, transposable elements, and groups of high frequency sequence elements. This BG_BBa BAC library, available from AGI at cost to the research community, gains in relevance because BB02 strain B. glabrata is targeted whole genome sequencing by NHGRI.

  2. Solid friction between soft filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Andrew; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the prop...

  3. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  4. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  5. Crossing Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Solar filaments show the position of large scale polarity inversion lines and are used for the reconstruction of large-scale solar magnetic field structure on the basis of H{\\alpha} synoptic charts for the periods when magnetographic measurements were not available. Sometimes crossing filaments are seen in H{\\alpha} filtergrams. We analyze daily H{\\alpha} filtergrams from the archive of Big Bear Solar Observatory for the period of 1999-2003 to find crossing and interacting filaments. A number of examples are presented and filament patterns are compared with photospheric magnetic field distributions. We have found that all crossing filaments reveal quadrupolar magnetic configurations of the photospheric field and presume the presence of null points in the corona.

  6. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  7. Helical filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin [Townes Laser Institute, CREOL—The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Johnson, Eric [Micro-Photonics Laboratory – Center for Optical Material Science, Clemson, Anderson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  8. Bacterial processes in the intermediate and deep layers of the Ionian Sea in winter 1999: Vertical profiles and their relationship to the different water masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, R.; Monticelli, L. S.; Seritti, A.; Santinelli, C.; Azzaro, M.; Boldrin, A.; La Ferla, R.; Ribera D'Alcalã, M.

    2003-09-01

    Dissolved and particulate organic carbon, bacterial biomass, microbial enzymatic activities (EEA: leucine aminopeptidase, β-glucosidase, and alkaline phosphatase), bacterial production, respiration rates, and bacterial growth efficiency were determined in 10 stations of the Ionian Sea (winter 1998-1999) with the aim of characterizing the recycling of biogenic carbon and phosphorus in the different water masses, previously identified on the basis of their hydrographical properties. All microbial activities decreased markedly with depth, with a sharp increase in the benthic boundary layer, where potential remineralization rates of phosphorus up to 1.03 μg P·dm-3d-1 and bacterial carbon production of 0.078 μg C·dm-3 d-1 were recorded. Those rates were close to the surface ones; the bacterial growth efficiency was also around 20%, similar to the surface value, sustaining the microbial food chain at the bottom. The daily hydrolysis of the organic carbon pool estimated by EEA varied from 0.67% (Ionian Surface Water) to 0.02% (Deep Water). Alkaline phosphatase activity was generally low in the intermediate and deep layers, in relation to the higher inorganic P content. The last facts support the hypothesis that deep waters of Ionian Sea, and in general of the entire Mediterranean basin, because of their young age, carry a larger amount of labile dissolved organic carbon, which reduces the need for a high recycling activity by bacterial community. As a matter of fact, a relatively higher activity per cell in carbon production rates was found in the deep layer where a large volume of the very recently formed Cretan Sea Outflow Water was present.

  9. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measur...

  10. The intermediate filament protein vimentin binds specifically to a recombinant integrin α2/β1 cytoplasmic tail complex and co-localizes with native α2/β1 in endothelial cell focal adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrin receptors are crucial players in cell adhesion and migration. Identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with their short α and β cytoplasmic tails will help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which integrins mediate bi-directional signaling across the plasma membrane. Integrin α2β1 is a major collagen receptor but to date, only few proteins have been shown to interact with the α2 cytoplasmic tail or with the α2β1 complex. In order to identify novel binding partners of a α2β1cytoplasmic domain complex, we have generated recombinant GST-fusion proteins, incorporating the leucine zipper heterodimerization cassettes of Jun and Fos. To ascertain proper functionality of the recombinant proteins, interaction with natural binding partners was tested. GST-α2 and GST-Jun α2 bound His-tagged calreticulin while GST-β1 and GST-Fos β1 proteins bound talin. In screening assays for novel binding partners, the immobilized GST-Jun α2/GST-Fos β1 heterodimeric complex, but not the single subunits, interacted specifically with endothelial cell-derived vimentin. Vimentin, an abundant intermediate filament protein, has previously been shown to co-localize with αvβ3-positive focal contacts. Here, we provide evidence that this interaction also occurs with α2β1-enriched focal adhesions and we further show that this association is lost after prolonged adhesion of endothelial cells to collagen

  11. Filamentous cyanobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komárek, Jiří; Komárková, J.; Kling, H.

    San Diego: Academic Press pro Elsevier Science, 2003 - (Wehr, J.; Sheath, R.), s. 117-196 ISBN 0-12-741550-5 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Keywords : filamentous cyanobacteria * freshwater algae * North America Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  12. Triggering filamentation using turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Eeltink, D; Marchiando, N; Hermelin, S; Gateau, J; Brunetti, M; Wolf, J P; Kasparian, J

    2016-01-01

    We study the triggering of single filaments due to turbulence in the beam path for a laser of power below the filamenting threshold. Turbulence can act as a switch between the beam not filamenting and producing single filaments. This 'positive' effect of turbulence on the filament probability, combined with our observation of off-axis filaments suggests the underlying mechanism is modulation instability caused by transverse perturbations. We hereby experimentally explore the interaction of modulation instability and turbulence, commonly associated with multiple-filaments, in the single-filament regime.

  13. Solar Filaments as Tracers of Subsurface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. M. Rust

    2000-09-01

    Solar filaments are discussed in terms of two contrasting paradigms. The standard paradigm is that filaments are formed by condensation of coronal plasma into magnetic fields that are twisted or dimpled as a consequence of motions of the fields' sources in the photo-sphere. According to a new paradigm, filaments form in rising, twisted flux ropes and are a necessary intermediate stage in the transfer to interplanetary space of dynamo-generated magnetic flux. It is argued that the accumulation of magnetic helicity in filaments and their coronal surroundings leads to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections. These ejections relieve the Sun of the flux generated by the dynamo and make way for the flux of the next cycle.

  14. Experimental study of a three dimensional cylinder-filament system

    CERN Document Server

    Brosse, Nicolas; Lundell, Fredrik; Bagheri, Shervin

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study reports on the behavior of a filament attached to the rear of a three- dimensional cylinder. The axis of the cylinder is placed normal to a uniform incoming flow and the filament is free to move in the cylinder wake. The mean position of the filament is studied as a function of the filament length L. It is found that for long (L/D > 6.5, where D is the cylinder diameter) and short (L/D < 2) filaments the mean position of the filament tends to align with the incoming flow, whereas for intermediate filament lengths (2 < L/D < 6.5) the filament lies down on the cylinder and tends to align with the cylinder axis. The underlying mechanism of the bifurcations are discussed and related to buckling and inverted-pendulum-like instabilities.

  15. Filamentous Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers-Fletcher, Margaret V; Kendall, Brian A; Griffin, Allen T; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2016-06-01

    Filamentous mycoses are often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment are essential for good clinical outcomes in immunocompromised patients. The host immune response plays an essential role in determining the course of exposure to potential fungal pathogens. Depending on the effectiveness of immune response and the burden of organism exposure, fungi can either be cleared or infection can occur and progress to a potentially fatal invasive disease. Nonspecific cellular immunity (i.e., neutrophils, natural killer [NK] cells, and macrophages) combined with T-cell responses are the main immunologic mechanisms of protection. The most common potential mold pathogens include certain hyaline hyphomycetes, endemic fungi, the Mucorales, and some dematiaceous fungi. Laboratory diagnostics aimed at detecting and differentiating these organisms are crucial to helping clinicians make informed decisions about treatment. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the medically important fungal pathogens, as well as to discuss the patient characteristics, antifungal-therapy considerations, and laboratory tests used in current clinical practice for the immunocompromised host. PMID:27337469

  16. Endocytosis in filamentous fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Kalkman, Edward R I C

    2007-01-01

    Endocytosis is little understood in filamentous fungi. For some time it has been controversial as to whether endocytosis occurs in filamentous fungi. A comparative genomics analysis between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 10 genomes of filamentous fungal species showed that filamentous fungi possess complex endocytic machineries. The use of the endocytic marker dye FM4-64, and various vesicle trafficking inhibitors revealed many similarities between endocytosis in the filamentous ...

  17. Filamentous Fungi Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anders; Stocks, Stuart; Woodley, John;

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi (including microorganisms such as Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae) represent an enormously important platform for industrial fermentation. Two particularly valuable features are the high yield coefficients and the ability to secrete products. However, the filamentous...

  18. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments - Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Filaments are formed in magnetic loops that hold relatively cool, dense gas suspended above the surface of the Sun (David Hathaway/NASA)

  19. Filamentous influenza viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Dadonaite, Bernadeta; Vijyakrishnan, Swetha; Fodor, Ervin; Bhella, David; Hutchinson, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical isolates of influenza virus produce pleomorphic virus particles, including extremely long filamentous virions. In contrast, strains of influenza that have adapted to laboratory growth typically produce only spherical virions. As a result, the filamentous phenotype has been overlooked in most influenza virus research. Recent advances in imaging and improved animal models have highlighted the distinct structure and functional relevance of filamentous virions. In this review we summaris...

  20. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts grown in

  1. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a ‘cartoon’ part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the ‘cartoon’ image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts

  2. Covert connection of filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, Boris

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the relationship between two near filaments, which do not show any connection in H-alpha images but reveal close magnetic connectivity during filament activations in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) observations. A twisted flux rope, which connects a half of one filament with another filament, becomes visible during several activations but seems to exist all the time of the filaments presence on the disc. Solar Dynamic Observatory} (SDO) and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) observed the region with the filaments from two points of view separated by the angle of about 120 deg. On 2012 July 27, SDO observed the filament activation on disc, while for the STEREO B position the filaments were visible at the limb. Nearly identical interaction episode was observed on 2012 August 04 by STEREO A on disc and by SDO at the limb. This good opportunity allows us to disentangle the 3-D shape of the connecting flux rope and in particular to determine with high reliability the helicity sign of the flux ro...

  3. Tungsten filament fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-05-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent light bulb is being replaced by compact fluorescent and LED lamps.

  4. Filamentous bacteria inhabiting the sheaths of marine Thioploca spp. on the Chilean continental shelf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teske, Andreas; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Gallardo, Victor A.

    2009-01-01

    A new component of the benthic Thioploca mat microbial ecosystem on the Chilean continental shelf was detected by epifluorescence microscopy: filamentous, bacterial endobionts of 4-5-μm filament diameter and length sometimes exceeding 1 mm. These filaments were identified as growing within...

  5. Experimental study of a three-dimensional cylinder-filament system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosse, Nicolas; Finmo, Carl; Lundell, Fredrik; Bagheri, Shervin

    2015-06-01

    This experimental study reports on the behavior of a filament attached to the rear of a three-dimensional cylinder. The axis of the cylinder is placed normal to a uniform incoming flow, and the filament is free to move in the cylinder wake. The mean position of the filament is studied as a function of the filament length L. It is found that for long ( L/ D 6.5, where D is the cylinder diameter) and short ( L/ D 2) filaments, the mean position of the filament tends to align with the incoming flow, whereas for intermediate filament lengths (2 L/ D 6.5), the filament lies down on the cylinder and tends to align with the cylinder axis. The underlying mechanism of the bifurcations is discussed and related to buckling and inverted-pendulum-like instabilities.

  6. Blistering of viscoelastic filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Sattler, R; Wagner, C

    2007-01-01

    When a dilute polymer solution experiences capillary thinning, it forms an almost uniformly cylindrical thread, which we study experimentally. In the last stages of thinning, when polymers have become fully stretched, the filament becomes prone to instabilities, of which we describe two: A novel "breathing" instability, originating from the edge of the filament, and a sinusoidal instability in the interior, which ultimately gives rise to a "blistering" pattern of beads on the filament. We describe the linear instability with a spatial resolution of 80 nm in the disturbance amplitude. For sufficiently high polymer concentrations, the filament eventually separates out into a "solid" phase of entangled polymers, connected by fluid beads. A solid polymer fiber of about 100 nanometer thickness remains, which is essentially permanent.

  7. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, See Leang

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond Laser Filamentation gives a comprehensive review of the physics of propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in optical media (principally air) and the applications and challenges of this new technique. This book presents the modern understanding of the physics of femtosecond laser pulse propagation, including unusual new effects such as the self-transformation of the pulse into a white light laser pulse, intensity clamping, the physics of multiple filamentation and competition, and how filaments’ ability to melt glass leads to wave guide writing. The potential applications of laser filamentation in atmospheric sensing and the generation of other electromagnetic pulses from the UV to the radio frequency are treated, together with possible future challenges in the excitation of super-excited states of molecules. Exciting new phenomena such as filament induced ultrafast birefringence and the excitation of molecular rotational wave packets and their multiple revivals in air (gases) will also ...

  8. Quadrantids filaments modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Rosaev, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Numeric integration of orbits of particles along mean orbit of Quadrantid meteor stream is done at time span 20000 years. Orbits are subdivided on several classes by their evolution type. A very complex dynamical behavior is detected. About 20% of modeled particles escape stream: this fact point on that stream cannot be long-live and have a source within 5000 years. After that, Quadrantid filaments dynamics are studied. By comparison of different authors data, 7 independent filaments are sele...

  9. Nonparametric Filament Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Genovese, Christopher R; verdinelli, Isabella; Wasserman, Larry

    2010-01-01

    We develop nonparametric methods for estimating filamentary structure from planar point process data and find the minimax lower bound for this problem. We show that, under weak conditions, the filaments have a simple geometric representation as the medial axis of the data distribution's support. Our methods convert an estimator of the support's boundary into an estimator of the filaments. We find the rates of convergence of our estimators and show that when using an optimal boundary estimator, they achieve the minimax rate. Our work can be regarded as providing a solution to the manifold learning problem as well as being a new approach to principal curve estimation.

  10. Aerogel-supported filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  11. Substitution of glutamine for lysine at the pyridoxal phosphate binding site of bacterial D-amino acid transaminase. Effects of exogenous amines on the slow formation of intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaki, S; Ueno, H; Martinez del Pozo, A; Pospischil, M A; Manning, J M; Ringe, D; Stoddard, B; Tanizawa, K; Yoshimura, T; Soda, K

    1990-12-25

    In bacterial D-amino acid transaminase, Lys-145, which binds the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate in Schiff base linkage, was changed to Gln-145 by site-directed mutagenesis (K145Q). The mutant enzyme had 0.015% the activity of the wild-type enzyme and was capable of forming a Schiff base with D-alanine; this external aldimine was formed over a period of minutes depending upon the D-alanine concentration. The transformation of the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate form of the enzyme to the pyridoxamine-5'-phosphate form (i.e. the half-reaction of transamination) occurred over a period of hours with this mutant enzyme. Thus, information on these two steps in the reaction and on the factors that influence them can readily be obtained with this mutant enzyme. In contrast, these reactions with the wild-type enzyme occur at much faster rates and are not easily studied separately. The mutant enzyme shows distinct preference for D- over L-alanine as substrates but it does so about 50-fold less effectively than the wild-type enzyme. Thus, Lys-145 probably acts in concert with the coenzyme and other functional side chain(s) to lead to efficient and stereochemically precise transamination in the wild-type enzyme. The addition of exogenous amines, ethanolamine or methyl amine, increased the rate of external aldimine formation with D-alanine and the mutant enzyme but the subsequent transformation to the pyridoxamine-5'-phosphate form of the enzyme was unaffected by exogenous amines. The wild-type enzyme displayed a large negative trough in the circular dichroic spectrum at 420 nm, which was practically absent in the mutant enzyme. However, addition of D-alanine to the mutant enzyme generated this negative Cotton effect (due to formation of the external aldimine with D-alanine). This circular dichroism band gradually collapsed in parallel with the transformation to the pyridoxamine-5'-phosphate enzyme. Further studies on this mutant enzyme, which displays the characteristics of the wild

  12. Lens tilting effect on filamentation and filament-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Y.; Sun, Q.; Daigle, J.-F.; Azarm, A.; Bernhardt, J.; Chin, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    In filament-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, we experimentally found that if the lens used for the creation and localization of filament is tilted, the signal to noise ratio of spectral measurement increases. Further study shows that with lens tilting, astigmatism occurs and the filament is split into shorter parts. In turn the shortening of filament reduces the generation of white light which is the major 'noise' source of the spectra.

  13. Positrusion Filament Recycling System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes a novel process to produce 3d printer feedstock filament out of scrap ABS on the ISS. Currently the plastic filament materials that most 3d printers...

  14. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prominences and filaments are two manifestations of the same phenomenon. Both prominences and filaments are features formed above the chromosphere by cool dense...

  15. Cryopreservation of Filamentous Fungi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, Ladislav

    New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc, 2013 - (Colvert, A.; Coty, H.), s. 1-66 ISBN 978-1-62618-474-9 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/12/0709 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : cryopreservation * filamentous fungi Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  16. Mechanosensing through focal adhesion-anchored intermediate filaments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregor, Martin; Osmanagic-Myers, S.; Burgstaller, G.; Wolfram, M.; Fischer, I.; Walko, G.; Resch, G.P.; Jorgl, A.; Herrmann, H.; Wiche, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2014), s. 715-729. ISSN 0892-6638 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : vimentin * plectin * integrin * activation * cellmotility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.043, year: 2014

  17. Biomechanics of bacterial walls: studies of bacterial thread made from Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Thwaites, J J; Mendelson, N H

    1985-01-01

    Bacterial threads of up to 1 m in length have been produced from filaments of separation-suppressed mutants of Bacillus subtilis. Individual threads may contain 20,000 cellular filaments in parallel alignment. The tensile properties of bacterial threads have been examined by using conventional textile engineering techniques. The kinetics of elongation at constant load are indicative of a viscoelastic material. Both Young's modulus and breaking stress are highly dependent upon relative humidit...

  18. Filament heater current modulation for increased filament lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface conversion H-minus ion source employs two 60 mil tungsten filaments which are approximately 17 centimeters in length. These filaments are heated to approximately 2,800 degrees centigrade by 95--100 amperes of DC heater current. The arc is struck at a 120 hertz rate, for 800 microseconds and is generally run at 30 amperes peak current. Although sputtering is considered a contributing factor in the demise of the filament, evaporation is of greater concern. If the peak arc current can be maintained with less average heater current, the filament evaporation rate for this arc current will diminish. In the vacuum of an ion source, the authors expect the filaments to retain much of their heat throughout a 1 millisecond (12% duty) loss of heater current. A circuit to eliminate 100 ampere heater currents from filaments during the arc pulse was developed. The magnetic field due to the 100 ampere current tends to hold electrons to the filament, decreasing the arc current. By eliminating this magnetic field, the arc should be more efficient, allowing the filaments to run at a lower average heater current. This should extend the filament lifetime. The circuit development and preliminary filament results are discussed

  19. Financial Intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Gorton; Andrew Winton

    2002-01-01

    The savings/investment process in capitalist economies is organized around financial intermediation, making them a central institution of economic growth. Financial intermediaries are firms that borrow from consumer/savers and lend to companies that need resources for investment. In contrast, in capital markets investors contract directly with firms, creating marketable securities. The prices of these securities are observable, while financial intermediaries are opaque. Why do financial inter...

  20. Intermediated Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Antras, Pol; Costinot, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops a simple model of international trade with intermediation. We consider an economy with two islands and two types of agents, farmers and traders. Farmers can produce two goods, but in order to sell these goods in centralized (Walrasian) markets, they need to be matched with a trader, and this entails costly search. In the absence of search frictions, our model reduces to a standard Ricardian model of trade. We use this simple model to contrast the implications of changes in...

  1. Energy saving achieved by limited filamentous bulking sludge under low dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-Hua; Peng, Yong-Zhen; Peng, Cheng-Yao; Wang, Shu-Ying; Chen, Ying; Huang, Hui-Jun; Sun, Zhi-Rong

    2010-02-01

    Limited filamentous bulking caused by low dissolved oxygen (DO) was proposed to establish a low energy consumption wastewater treatment system. This method for energy saving was derived from two full-scale field observations, which showed pollutants removal would be enhanced and energy consumption could be reduced by at least 10% using limited filamentous bulking. Furthermore, preliminary investigation including the abundance evaluation and the identification of filamentous bacteria demonstrated that the limited filamentous bulking could be repeated steadily in a lab-scale anoxic-oxic reactor fed with domestic wastewater. The sludge loss did not occur in the secondary clarifier, while COD and total nitrogen removal efficiencies were improved by controlling DO for optimal filamentous bacterial population. Suspended solids in effluent were negligible and turbidity was lower than 2 NTU, which were distinctly lower than those under no bulking. Theoretical and experimental results indicated the aeration consumption could be saved by the application of limited filamentous bulking. PMID:19837583

  2. CVD-produced boron filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawner, F. E.; Debolt, H. E.; Suplinskas, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for producing boron filaments with an average tensile strength of 6.89 GPa has been developed which involves longitudinal splitting of the filament and core (substrate) removal by etching. Splitting is accomplished by a pinch wheel device which continuously splits filaments in lengths of 3.0 m by applying a force to the side of the filament to create a crack which is then propagated along the axis by a gentle sliding action. To facilitate the splitting, a single 10 mil tungsten substrate is used instead of the usual 0.5 mil substrate. A solution of hot 30% hydrogen peroxide is used to remove the core without attacking the boron. An alternative technique is to alter the residual stress by heavily etching the filament. Average strengths in the 4.83-5.52 GPa range have been obtained by etching an 8 mil filament to 4 mil.

  3. Filament Identification through Mathematical Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Eric W

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for detecting filamentary structure FilFinder. The algorithm uses the techniques of mathematical morphology for filament identification, presenting a complementary approach to current algorithms which use matched filtering or critical manifolds. Unlike other methods, FilFinder identifies filaments over a wide dynamic range in brightness. We apply the new algorithm to far infrared imaging data of dust emission released by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey team. Our preliminary analysis characterizes both filaments and fainter striations. We find a typical filament width of 0.09 pc across the sample, but the brightness varies from cloud to cloud. Several regions show a bimodal filament brightness distribution, with the bright mode (filaments) being an order of magnitude brighter than the faint mode (striations). Using the Rolling Hough Transform, we characterize the orientations of the striations in the data, finding preferred directions that agree with magnetic field direction where dat...

  4. Intermediate Images

    OpenAIRE

    Paech Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Starting from a definition of the word ‘picture’ as a real-world object that shows other objects on its surface as a representation of its image, I propose that the intermediality of pictures of all kinds is only possible through their images, after they have been separated from their material basis or foundation (for example, a painting in its physical reality can never be directly connected with a movie). In all technical reproductions of images, such as printing processes, an image is take...

  5. Soliton on thin vortex filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showing that one of the equations found by Wadati, Konno and Ichikawa is equivalent to the equation of motion of a thin vortex filament, we investigate solitons on the vortex filament. N vortex soliton solution is given in terms of the inverse scattering method. We examine two soliton collision processes on the filament. Our analysis provides the theoretical foundation of two soliton collision processes observed numerically by Aref and Flinchem. (author)

  6. Solar Filament Extraction and Characterizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Shih, F. Y.; Jing, J.; Wang, H.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to extract and characterize solar filaments from H-alpha full-disk images produced by Big Bear Solar Observatory. A cascading Hough Transform method is designed to identify solar disk center location and radius. Solar disks are segmented from the background, and unbalanced illumination on the surface of solar disks is removed using polynomial surface fitting. And then a localized adaptive thresholding is employed to extract solar filament candidates. After the removal of small solar filament candidates, the remaining larger candidates are used as the seeds of region growing. The procedure of region growing not only connects broken filaments but also generate complete shape for each filament. Mathematical morphology thinning is adopted to produce the skeleton of each filament, and graph theory is used to prune branches and barbs to get the main skeleton. The length and the location of the main skeleton is characterized. The proposed method can help scientists and researches study the evolution of solar filament, for instance, to detect solar filament eruption. The presented method has already been used by Space Weather Research Lab of New Jersey Institute of Technology (http://swrl.njit.edu) to generate the solar filament online catalog using H-alpha full-disk images of Global H-alpha Network (http://swrl.njit.edu/ghn_web/).

  7. Intermediate Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paech Joachim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from a definition of the word ‘picture’ as a real-world object that shows other objects on its surface as a representation of its image, I propose that the intermediality of pictures of all kinds is only possible through their images, after they have been separated from their material basis or foundation (for example, a painting in its physical reality can never be directly connected with a movie. In all technical reproductions of images, such as printing processes, an image is taken from a negative matrix in order to realize multiple prints of the same representation. The most effective model of this procedure is photography: photographic images can easily be connected with their media forms to produce other, more complex forms, such as magazines, printed books, or films. Intermediate images in the form of matrices - sometimes transparent (e.g. in the light beam of a film projection, sometimes opaque - are required to transform one pictorial media form into another. Finally, for the digital matrix-image, there is no longer any difference between the matrix and the image: the matrix has become its own image, which can be linked to all other media forms.

  8. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  9. Intermediate uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate uveitis (IU is described as inflammation in the anterior vitreous, ciliary body and the peripheral retina. In the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN working group′s international workshop for reporting clinical data the consensus reached was that the term IU should be used for that subset of uveitis where the vitreous is the major site of the inflammation and if there is an associated infection (for example, Lyme disease or systemic disease (for example, sarcoidosis. The diagnostic term pars planitis should be used only for that subset of IU where there is snow bank or snowball formation occurring in the absence of an associated infection or systemic disease (that is, "idiopathic". This article discusses the clinical features, etiology, pathogenesis, investigations and treatment of IU.

  10. The keratin intermediate filament—like system in maize protoplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SuFei; GuWei; 等

    1990-01-01

    The application of Penman's method of cell fractionation to plant protoplasts leads to our finding of keratin intermediate filament(IF)-like system in maize protoplasts,which was identified by using immunogold labelling with monoclonal antibody of cytokeratin from animal cells.Many gold particles were found to be bound on filaments,linked by 3 nm filaments.After further digestion and extraction with DNase I and ammonium sulphate.IF-like framework-lamina-nuclear matrix system was shown under electron microscope.That IF system exists in plant protoplasts just like in animal cells,and their main component is keratin-like protein.

  11. Resonantly enhanced filamentation in gases

    CERN Document Server

    Doussot, J; Billard, F; Béjot, P; Faucher, O

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, a low-loss Kerr-driven optical filament in Krypton gas is experimentally reported in the ultraviolet. The experimental findings are supported by ab initio quantum calculations describing the atomic optical response. Higher-order Kerr effect induced by three-photon resonant transitions is identified as the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the intensity stabilization during the filamentation process, while ionization plays only a minor role. This result goes beyond the commonly-admitted paradigm of filamentation, in which ionization is a necessary condition of the filament intensity clamping. At resonance, it is also experimentally demonstrated that the filament length is greatly extended because of a strong decrease of the optical losses.

  12. The link between CMEs, filaments and filament channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Martin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a broad concept for the build-up to eruptive solar events which needs to be tested in future observational and theoretical research. In this concept an eruptive solar event consists of a coronal mass ejection, a filament eruption, a cavity around the filament, and a flare. In our picture, the initial energy source must be external to this eruptive system but also feed into it. Among all eruptive events the common denominator is a filament channel with canceling magnetic fields along a primary polarity reversal boundary. We find that magnetic reconnection at or close to the photosphere is the only interpretation of canceling fields to date that is consistent with observations of filament channels. This reconnection serves to transfer magnetic flux from the photosphere into the chromosphere and corona along polarity reversal boundaries and concurrently initiates the building of a filament channel. Magnetic flux, in excess of that needed to sustain the filament channel, goes into building a filament magnetic field that is always aligned with the polarity reversal boundary and the channel magnetic field. The filament magnetic field remains separated from overarching coronal magnetic fields by the magnetic field of the cavity. The magnetic flux being transported upward from the photosphere/chromosphere carries streams of plasma into the corona along the filament magnetic field. However, the flowing and counterstreaming filament mass also slowly drains out of the field and thereby leaves behind new strands of cavity magnetic field with little or no associated mass. When the build-up of magnetic pressure in the filament and cavity magnetic fields exceeds that of the overlying coronal loops, the coronal loops, the filament and the cavity together begin an observable slow rise which can last a few hours to many days before rapid onset and ejection with a solar flare. We suggest that this process can be accelerated by any number of external

  13. Targeting Antibacterial Agents by Using Drug-Carrying Filamentous Bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoby, Iftach; Shamis, Marina; Bar, Hagit; Shabat, Doron; Benhar, Itai

    2006-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been used for more than a century for (unconventional) therapy of bacterial infections, for half a century as tools in genetic research, for 2 decades as tools for discovery of specific target-binding proteins, and for nearly a decade as tools for vaccination or as gene delivery vehicles. Here we present a novel application of filamentous bacteriophages (phages) as targeted drug carriers for the eradication of (pathogenic) bacteria. The phages are genetically modified to d...

  14. Activity Cycle of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. J. Li; Q. X. Li; P. X. Gao; J. Mu; H. D. Chen; T. W. Su

    2007-06-01

    Long-term variation in the distribution of the solar filaments observed at the Observatorie de Paris, Section de Meudon from March 1919 to December 1989 is presented to compare with sunspot cycle and to study the periodicity in the filament activity, namely the periods of the coronal activity with the Morlet wavelet used. It is inferred that the activity cycle of solar filaments should have the same cycle length as sunspot cycle, but the cycle behavior of solar filaments is globally similar in profile with, but different in detail from, that of sunspot cycles. The amplitude of solar magnetic activity should not keep in phase with the complexity of solar magnetic activity. The possible periods in the filament activity are about 10.44 and 19.20 years. The wavelet local power spectrum of the period 10.44 years is statistically significant during the whole consideration time. The wavelet local power spectrum of the period 19.20 years is under the 95% confidence spectrum during the whole consideration time, but over the mean red-noise spectrum of = 0.72 before approximate Carrington rotation number 1500, and after that the filament activity does not statistically show the period. Wavelet reconstruction indicates that the early data of the filament archive (in and before cycle 16) are more noiseful than the later (in and after cycle 17).

  15. Laser Filament Induced Water Condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Kasparian J.; Webe K.; Vogel A; Petit Y.; Lüder J.; Hao Z.Q.; Rohwetter P.; Petrarca M.; Stelmaszczyk K.; Henin S.; Wöste L.; Wolf J.-P.

    2013-01-01

    At relative humidities above 70%, femtosecond laser filaments generate aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere. The water vapour condensation and droplet stabilization are assured by soluble species produced in the laser plasma.

  16. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte; Kruse, Torben; Nordström, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  17. Microcyle Conidiation in Filamentous Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Boknam; Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Jungkwan

    2014-01-01

    The typical life cycle of filamentous fungi commonly involves asexual sporulation after vegetative growth in response to environmental factors. The production of asexual spores is critical in the life cycle of most filamentous fungi. Normally, conidia are produced from vegetative hyphae (termed mycelia). However, fungal species subjected to stress conditions exhibit an extremely simplified asexual life cycle, in which the conidia that germinate directly generate further conidia, without formi...

  18. Impact of matric potential and pore size distribution on growth dynamics of filamentous and non-filamentous soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alexandra B; Vos, Michiel; de Boer, Wietse; Kowalchuk, George A

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to what extent, filamentous bacteria may also display similar advantages over non-filamentous bacteria in soils with low hydraulic connectivity. In addition to allowing for microbial interactions and competition across connected micro-sites, water films also facilitate the motility of non-filamentous bacteria. To examine these issues, we constructed and characterized a series of quartz sand microcosms differing in matric potential and pore size distribution and, consequently, in connection of micro-habitats via water films. Our sand microcosms were used to examine the individual and competitive responses of a filamentous bacterium (Streptomyces atratus) and a motile rod-shaped bacterium (Bacillus weihenstephanensis) to differences in pore sizes and matric potential. The Bacillus strain had an initial advantage in all sand microcosms, which could be attributed to its faster growth rate. At later stages of the incubation, Streptomyces became dominant in microcosms with low connectivity (coarse pores and dry conditions). These data, combined with information on bacterial motility (expansion potential) across a range of pore-size and moisture conditions, suggest that, like their much larger fungal counterparts, filamentous bacteria also use this growth form to facilitate growth and expansion under conditions of low hydraulic conductivity. The sand microcosm system developed and used in this study allowed for precise manipulation of hydraulic properties and pore size distribution, thereby providing a useful approach for future examinations of how these properties influence the composition, diversity and function of soil-borne microbial communities. PMID:24391805

  19. Impact of matric potential and pore size distribution on growth dynamics of filamentous and non-filamentous soil bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra B Wolf

    Full Text Available The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to what extent, filamentous bacteria may also display similar advantages over non-filamentous bacteria in soils with low hydraulic connectivity. In addition to allowing for microbial interactions and competition across connected micro-sites, water films also facilitate the motility of non-filamentous bacteria. To examine these issues, we constructed and characterized a series of quartz sand microcosms differing in matric potential and pore size distribution and, consequently, in connection of micro-habitats via water films. Our sand microcosms were used to examine the individual and competitive responses of a filamentous bacterium (Streptomyces atratus and a motile rod-shaped bacterium (Bacillus weihenstephanensis to differences in pore sizes and matric potential. The Bacillus strain had an initial advantage in all sand microcosms, which could be attributed to its faster growth rate. At later stages of the incubation, Streptomyces became dominant in microcosms with low connectivity (coarse pores and dry conditions. These data, combined with information on bacterial motility (expansion potential across a range of pore-size and moisture conditions, suggest that, like their much larger fungal counterparts, filamentous bacteria also use this growth form to facilitate growth and expansion under conditions of low hydraulic conductivity. The sand microcosm system developed and used in this study allowed for precise manipulation of hydraulic properties and pore size distribution, thereby providing a useful approach for future examinations of how these properties influence the composition, diversity and function of soil-borne microbial communities.

  20. Comparative Biomechanics of Thick Filaments and Thin Filaments with Functional Consequences for Muscle Contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Mark S; Tanner, Bertrand C. W.; Lori R. Nyland; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2010-01-01

    The scaffold of striated muscle is predominantly comprised of myosin and actin polymers known as thick filaments and thin filaments, respectively. The roles these filaments play in muscle contraction are well known, but the extent to which variations in filament mechanical properties influence muscle function is not fully understood. Here we review information on the material properties of thick filaments, thin filaments, and their primary constituents; we also discuss ways in which mechanica...

  1. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  2. Droplets engulfing on a filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Yu, Meng; Zhou, Zhengping; Bedarkar, Amol; Zhao, Youhao

    2014-03-01

    Two immiscible droplets wetting on a filament may assume engulfing, partial-engulfing, or non-engulfing morphology that depends on the wetting behavior and geometries of the resulting droplet-on-filament system. This paper studies the wetting behavior of two immiscible droplets contacting and sitting symmetrically on a straight filament. A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for determining the wetting morphology of the droplet-on-filament system. In the limiting case of engulfing or non-engulfing, the morphology of the droplet-on-filament system is determined in explicit form. In the case of partial-engulfing, surface finite element method is further employed for determining the wetting morphology, surface energy, and internal pressures of droplets of the system. Numerical scaling study is performed to explore their dependencies upon the wetting properties and geometries of the system. The study can be applicable for analysis and design of textiles with tailorable wetting properties and development of novel multifunctional fibrous materials for environmental protection such as oil-spill sorption, etc.

  3. Temperature Controlled Filamentation in Argon Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Shi-Ying; KONG Wei-Peng; SONG Zhen-Ming; QIN Yu; LI Ru-Xin; WANG Qing-Yue; ZHANG Zhi-Gang

    2008-01-01

    Temperature controlled filamentation is experimentally demonstrated in a temperature gradient gas-filled tube.The proper position of the tube is heated by a furnace and two ends of the tube are cooled by air. The experimental results show that multiple filaments are shrunken into a single fila.ment or no filament only by increasing the temperature at the beginning of the filament. This technique offers another degree of freedom of controlling the filamentation and opens a new way for intense monocycle pulse generation through gradient temperature in a noble gas.

  4. Filament depolymerization can pull a chromosome during bacterial mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banigan, Edward; Gelbart, Michael; Gitai, Zemer; Liu, Andrea; Wingreen, Ned

    2011-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole and binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, thus pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that is disassembling it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple and physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is ``self-diffusiophoretic'': by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the concentration of ParA is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is controlled by the product of an effective relaxation time for the chromosome and the rate of ParA disassembly. Our results provide a physical explanation of the mechanism of depolymerization-driven translocation and suggest physical explanations for recent experimental observations.

  5. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references

  6. Shape Preserving Filament Enhancement Filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.; Westenberg, Michel A.

    2001-01-01

    Morphological connected set filters for extraction of filamentous details from medical images are developed. The advantages of these filters are that they are shape preserving and do not amplify noise. Two approaches are compared: (i) multi-scale filtering (ii) single-step shape filtering using conn

  7. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.;

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...... propagation structures in lasers and amplifiers which suppress lateral reflections....

  8. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The capillary thinning of filaments of a Newtonian polybutene fluid and a viscoelastic polyisobutylene solution are analyzed experimentally and by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially, a liquid sample is placed between two cylindrical plates. Then, th...

  9. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    The capillary thinning of a polymeric filament is analysed experimentally as well as by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially a liquid sample is kept between two cylindrical plates. Then the bottom plate is lowered under gravity to yield a given strain...

  10. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; Mullane, Mark; Houlihan, John; O'Neill, Eamonn; Moloney, Jerome V.; Indik, Robert A.

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...... propagation structures in lasers and amplifiers which suppress lateral reflections....

  11. Effect of orientation on the morphology and mechanical properties of PLA/starch composite filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    PLA/starch fibers were produced by twin screw extrusion of PLA with granular or gelatinized starch/glycerol followed by drawing through a set of winders with an intermediate oven. At 30% starch, fibers drawn 2-5x were highly flexible (elongation 20-100%) while undrawn filaments were brittle (elonga...

  12. Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavel Ambrož; Alfred Schroll

    2000-09-01

    Precise measurements of heliographic position of solar filaments were used for determination of the proper motion of solar filaments on the time-scale of days. The filaments have a tendency to make a shaking or waving of the external structure and to make a general movement of whole filament body, coinciding with the transport of the magnetic flux in the photosphere. The velocity scatter of individual measured points is about one order higher than the accuracy of measurements.

  13. Current-vortex filaments in magnetized plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmans, J.; Kuvshinov, B. N.; Lakhin, V. P.; Schep, T. J.; Westerhof, E.

    1999-01-01

    Current-vortex filament solutions to the two-fluid plasma equations that describe drift-Alfven waves are presented. Such filament systems are Hamiltonian. Integrable three and four filament systems are discussed in some detail. A wide variety of orbit topologies exists in the plasma case. Special at

  14. Interaction of light filaments in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Ting-Ting; Lu Xin; Hao Zuo-Qiang; Me Yuan-yuan; Zhang Jie

    2009-01-01

    This paper analytically investigates the interaction of light filaments generated by a femtosecond laser beam in air. It obtains the Hamiltonian of a total laser field and interaction force between two filaments with different phase shifts and crcssing angles. The property of the interaction force, which leads the attraction or repulsion of filaments, is basically dependent on the phase shift between filaments. The crossing angle between two filaments can only determine the magnitude of the interaction force, but does not change the property of the force.

  15. Measurement of Behavioral Evolution in Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Robert

    2013-03-01

    A curious aspect of bacterial behavior under stress is the induction of filamentation: the anomalous growth of certain bacteria in which cells continue to elongate but do not divide into progeny. We show that E.coli under the influence of the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin have robust filamentous growth, which provides individual bacteria a mesoscopic niche for evolution until resistant progeny can bud off and propagate. Hence, filamentation is a form of genomic amplification where even a single, isolated bacteria can have access to multiple genomes. We propose a model that predicts that the first arrival time of the normal sized progeny should follow a Gompertz distribution with the mean first arrival time proportional to the elongation rate of filament. These predictions agree with our experimental measurements. Finally, we suggest bacterial filament growth and budding has many similarities to tumor growth and metastasis and can serve as a simpler model to study those complicated processes. Sponsored by the NCI/NIH Physical Sciences Oncology Centers

  16. Direct observation of current in type-I edge-localized-mode filaments on the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianello, N.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.;

    2011-01-01

    Magnetically confined plasmas in the high confinement regime are regularly subjected to relaxation oscillations, termed edge localized modes (ELMs), leading to large transport events. Present ELM theories rely on a combined effect of edge current and the edge pressure gradients which result...... in intermediate mode number (n≅10-15) structures (filaments) localized in the perpendicular plane and extended along the field lines. By detailed localized measurements of the magnetic field perturbation associated to type-I ELM filaments, it is shown that these filaments carry a substantial current. © 2011...

  17. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  18. Dynamics of 3D isolated thermal filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Walkden, N R; Militello, F; Omotani, J T

    2016-01-01

    Simulations have been carried out to establish how electron thermal physics, introduced in the form of a dynamic electron temperature, affects isolated filament motion and dynamics in 3D. It is found that thermal effects impact filament motion in two major ways when the filament has a significant temperature perturbation compared to its density perturbation: They lead to a strong increase in filament propagation in the bi-normal direction and a significant decrease in net radial propagation. Both effects arise from the temperature dependence of the sheath current which leads to a non-uniform floating potential, with the latter effect supplemented by faster pressure loss. The reduction in radial velocity can only occur when the filament cross-section loses angular symmetry. The behaviour is observed across different filament sizes and suggests that filaments with much larger temperature perturbations than density perturbations are more strongly confined to the near SOL region.

  19. Filamentation as primitive growth mode?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Osmotic pressure influences cellular shape. In a growing cell, chemical reactions and dilution induce changes in osmolarity, which in turn influence the cellular shape. Using a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, we find that when the membrane is so flexible that its shape adjusts itself quasi-instantaneously to balance the osmotic pressure, the protocell either grows filamentous or fails to grow. This behavior is consistent with a mathematical proof. This suggests that filamentation may be a primitive growth mode resulting from the simple physical property of balanced osmotic pressure. We also find that growth is favored if some chemical species are only present inside the protocell, but not in the outside growth medium. Such an insulation requires specific chemical schemes. Modern evolved cells such as E. coli meet these requirements through active transport mechanisms such as the phosphotransferase system.

  20. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Bergé, L; Skupin, S; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of intense picosecond laser pulses in air in the presence of strong nonlinear self-action effects and air ionization is investigated experimentally and numerically. The model used for numerical analysis is based on the nonlinear propagator for the optical field coupled with the rate equations for the production of various ionic species and plasma temperature. Our results show that the phenomenon of plasma-driven intensity clamping, which is paramount in femtosecond laser filamentation, holds for picosecond pulses. Furthermore, the temporal pulse distortions are limited and the pulse fluence is also clamped. The resulting unique feature of the picosecond filamentation regime is the production of a broad, fully ionized air channel, continuous both longitudinally and transversely, which may be instrumental for numerous applications.

  1. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB

    OpenAIRE

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D.; Garner, Ethan C.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is critical for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of li...

  2. Physical properties of interstellar filaments

    OpenAIRE

    Fischera, Joerg; Martin, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the physical parameters of interstellar filaments that we describe by an idealized model of isothermal self-gravitating infinite cylinder in pressure equilibrium with the ambient medium. Their gravitational state is characterized by the ratio f_cyl of their mass line density to the maximum possible value for a cylinder in a vacuum. Equilibrium solutions exist only for f_cyl < 1. This ratio is used in providing analytical expressions for the central density, the radius, the profile ...

  3. Lighting the universe with filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Theuns, Tom

    2007-09-14

    The first stars in the universe form when chemically pristine gas heats as it falls into dark-matter potential wells, cools radiatively because of the formation of molecular hydrogen, and becomes self-gravitating. Using supercomputer simulations, we demonstrated that the stars' properties depend critically on the currently unknown nature of the dark matter. If the dark-matter particles have intrinsic velocities that wipe out small-scale structure, then the first stars form in filaments with lengths on the order of the free-streaming scale, which can be approximately 10(20) meters (approximately 3 kiloparsecs, corresponding to a baryonic mass of approximately 10(7) solar masses) for realistic "warm dark matter" candidates. Fragmentation of the filaments forms stars with a range of masses, which may explain the observed peculiar element abundance pattern of extremely metal-poor stars, whereas coalescence of fragments and stars during the filament's ultimate collapse may seed the supermassive black holes that lurk in the centers of most massive galaxies. PMID:17872439

  4. Choice of computational method for swimming and pumping with nonslender helical filaments at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, J. D.; Jabbarzadeh, M.; Fu, H. C.

    2016-02-01

    The flows induced by biological and artificial helical filaments are important to many possible applications including microscale swimming and pumping. Microscale helices can span a wide range of geometries, from thin bacterial flagella to thick helical bacterial cell bodies. While the proper choice of numerical method is critical for obtaining accurate results, there is little guidance about which method is optimal for a specified filament geometry. Here, using two physical scenarios — a swimmer with a head and a pump — we establish guidelines for the choice of numerical method based on helical radius, pitch, and filament thickness. For a range of helical geometries that encompass most natural and artificial helices, we create benchmark results using a surface distribution of regularized Stokeslets and then evaluate the accuracy of resistive force theory, slender body theory, and a centerline distribution of regularized Stokeslets. For the centerline distribution of regularized Stokeslets or slender body theory, we tabulate appropriate blob size and Stokeslet spacing or segment length, respectively, for each geometry studied. Finally, taking the computational cost of each method into account, we present the optimal choice of numerical method for each filament geometry as a guideline for future investigations involving filament-induced flows.

  5. Novel actin-like filament structure from Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C

    2012-06-15

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines. PMID:22514279

  6. A penny-shaped crack in a filament reinforced matrix. 1: The filament model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The electrostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack was studied. The elastic filament model was developed for application to evaluation studies of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. The requirements expected of the model are a sufficiently accurate representation of the filament and applicability to the interaction problems involving a cracked elastic continuum with multi-filament reinforcements. The technique for developing the model and numerical examples of it are shown.

  7. Hydrogen Two-Photon Continuum Emission from the Horseshoe Filament in NGC 1275

    CERN Document Server

    Johnstone, R M; Fabian, A C; Ferland, G J; Lykins, M; Porter, R L; van Hoof, P A M; Williams, R J R

    2012-01-01

    Far ultraviolet emission has been detected from a knot of Halpha emission in the Horseshoe filament, far out in the NGC 1275 nebula. The flux detected relative to the brightness of the Halpha line in the same spatial region is very close to that expected from Hydrogen two-photon continuum emission in the particle heating model of Ferland et al. (2009) if reddening internal to the filaments is taken into account. We find no need to invoke other sources of far ultraviolet emission such as hot stars or emission lines from CIV in intermediate temperature gas to explain these data.

  8. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Liang Xu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation.

  9. How bio-filaments twist membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierling, Julien; Johner, Albert; Kulić, Igor M; Mohrbach, Hervé; Müller, Martin Michael

    2016-06-29

    We study the deformations of a fluid membrane imposed by adhering stiff bio-filaments due to the torques they apply. In the limit of small deformations, we derive a general expression for the energy and the deformation field of the membrane. This expression is specialised to different important cases including closed and helical bio-filaments. In particular, we analyse interface-mediated interactions and membrane wrapping when the filaments apply a local torque distribution on a tubular membrane. PMID:27291854

  10. Recent observations of the formation of filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two examples of the formation of small filaments in H alpha are described and illustrated. In both cases, the formation is seen to be the spontaneous appearance of strands of absorbing mass that evolve from no previous structure. The initial development of the filaments appears to consist of the accumulation of these absorptive strands along approximately parallel paths in a channel between large-scale, opposite polarity magnetic fields on either side of the filaments. The strands exhibit continuous changes in shape and degree of absorption which can be due to successive condensations resulting in new strands, mass motions within the strands, and outflow of the mass from the strands. For at least several hours before the formation of both filaments, small-scale fragments of opposite polarity, line-of-sight magnetic flux adjacent to or immediately below the filaments, and at the ends of the filaments, were cancelling. This type of magnetic flux disappearance continued during the development of the filaments and is commonly observed in association with established filaments. Cancellation is interpreted as an important evolutionary change in the magnetic field that can lead to configurations suitable for the formation of filaments

  11. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  12. Methods for modeling cytoskeletal and DNA filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review summarizes the models that researchers use to represent the conformations and dynamics of cytoskeletal and DNA filaments. It focuses on models that address individual filaments in continuous space. Conformation models include the freely jointed, Gaussian, angle-biased chain (ABC), and wormlike chain (WLC) models, of which the first three bend at discrete joints and the last bends continuously. Predictions from the WLC model generally agree well with experiment. Dynamics models include the Rouse, Zimm, stiff rod, dynamic WLC, and reptation models, of which the first four apply to isolated filaments and the last to entangled filaments. Experiments show that the dynamic WLC and reptation models are most accurate. They also show that biological filaments typically experience strong hydrodynamic coupling and/or constrained motion. Computer simulation methods that address filament dynamics typically compute filament segment velocities from local forces using the Langevin equation and then integrate these velocities with explicit or implicit methods; the former are more versatile and the latter are more efficient. Much remains to be discovered in biological filament modeling. In particular, filament dynamics in living cells are not well understood, and current computational methods are too slow and not sufficiently versatile. Although primarily a review, this paper also presents new statistical calculations for the ABC and WLC models. Additionally, it corrects several discrepancies in the literature about bending and torsional persistence length definitions, and their relations to flexural and torsional rigidities. (topical review)

  13. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  14. Filamentation with nonlinear Bessel vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukna, V; Milián, C; Xie, C; Itina, T; Dudley, J; Courvoisier, F; Couairon, A

    2014-10-20

    We present a new type of ring-shaped filaments featured by stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions to the laser beam propagation equation. Two different regimes are identified by direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear propagation of axicon focused Gaussian beams carrying helicity in a Kerr medium with multiphoton absorption: the stable nonlinear propagation regime corresponds to a slow beam reshaping into one of the stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions, called nonlinear Bessel vortices. The region of existence of nonlinear Bessel vortices is found semi-analytically. The influence of the Kerr nonlinearity and nonlinear losses on the beam shape is presented. Direct numerical simulations highlight the role of attractors played by nonlinear Bessel vortices in the stable propagation regime. Large input powers or small cone angles lead to the unstable propagation regime where nonlinear Bessel vortices break up into an helical multiple filament pattern or a more irregular structure. Nonlinear Bessel vortices are shown to be sufficiently intense to generate a ring-shaped filamentary ionized channel in the medium which is foreseen as opening the way to novel applications in laser material processing of transparent dielectrics. PMID:25401574

  15. Microcyle conidiation in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Boknam; Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Jungkwan

    2014-03-01

    The typical life cycle of filamentous fungi commonly involves asexual sporulation after vegetative growth in response to environmental factors. The production of asexual spores is critical in the life cycle of most filamentous fungi. Normally, conidia are produced from vegetative hyphae (termed mycelia). However, fungal species subjected to stress conditions exhibit an extremely simplified asexual life cycle, in which the conidia that germinate directly generate further conidia, without forming mycelia. This phenomenon has been termed as microcycle conidiation, and to date has been reported in more than 100 fungal species. In this review, first, we present the morphological properties of fungi during microcycle conidiation, and divide microcycle conidiation into four simple categories, even though fungal species exhibit a wide variety of morphological differences during microcycle conidiogenesis. Second, we describe the factors that influence microcycle conidiation in various fungal species, and present recent genetic studies that have identified the genes responsible for this process. Finally, we discuss the biological meaning and application of microcycle conidiation. PMID:24808726

  16. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  17. A First Approach to Filament Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P. E. S.; de Abreu, F. Vistulo; Simoes, R.; Dias, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive…

  18. Process for making silver metal filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1998-04-01

    This invention relates to a process for making filaments of metal compounds and more particularly to a process for making silver metal filaments. The United States Government has rights to this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC05-8421400 with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. awarded by the US Department of Energy.

  19. Bacterial streamers in curved microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Biofilms, generally identified as microbial communities embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, are involved in a wide variety of health-related problems ranging from implant-associated infections to disease transmissions and dental plaque. The usual picture of these bacterial films is that they grow and develop on surfaces. However, suspended biofilm structures, or streamers, have been found in natural environments (e.g., rivers, acid mines, hydrothermal hot springs) and are always suggested to stem from a turbulent flow. We report the formation of bacterial streamers in curved microfluidic channels. By using confocal laser microscopy we are able to directly image and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of these filamentous structures. Such streamers, which always connect the inner corners of opposite sides of the channel, are always located in the middle plane. Numerical simulations of the flow provide evidences for an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism behind the formation of the streamers.

  20. FtsZ Cytoskeletal Filaments as a Template for Metallic Nanowire Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, Nili; Fichman, Galit; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies can serve as templates for the fabrication of inorganic nanowires due to their morphological reproducibility and innate proclivity to form well-ordered structures. Amongst the variety of naturally occurring nano-scale assemblies, cytoskeletal fibers from diverse biological sources represent a unique family of scaffolds for biomimetics as they efficiently self-assemble in vitro in a controllable manner to form stable filaments. Here, we harness the bacterial FtsZ filament system as a scaffold for protein-based metal nanowires, and further demonstrate the control of wire alignment with the use of an external magnetic field. Due to the ease at which the bacterial FtsZ is overexpressed and purified, as well as the extensive studies of its ultrastructural properties and physiological significance, FtsZ filaments are an ideal substrate for large-scale production and chemical manipulation. Using a biologically compatible electroless metal deposition technique initiated by adsorption of platinum as a surface catalyst, we demonstrate the coating of assembled FtsZ filaments with iron, nickel, gold, and copper to fabricate continuous nanowires with diameters ranging from 10-50 nm. Organic-inorganic hybrid wires were analyzed using high-resolution field-emission-gun transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and confirmed by energy-dispersive elemental analysis. We also achieved alignment of ferrofluid-coated FtsZ filaments using an external magnetic field. Overall, we provide evidence for the robustness of the FtsZ filament system as a molecular scaffold, and offer an efficient, biocompatible procedure for facile bottom-up assembly of metallic wires on biological templates. We believe that bottom-up fabrication methods as reported herein significantly contribute to the expanding toolkit available for the incorporation of biological materials in nano-scale devices for electronic and electromechanical applications. PMID:26328401

  1. Quantifying protein diffusion and capture on filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The functional relevance of regulating proteins is often limited to specific binding sites such as the ends of microtubules or actin-filaments. A localization of proteins on these functional sites is of great importance. We present a quantitative theory for a diffusion and capture process, where proteins diffuse on a filament and stop diffusing when reaching the filament's end. It is found that end-association after one-dimensional diffusion is the main source for tip-localization of such proteins. As a consequence, diffusion and capture is highly efficient in enhancing the reaction velocity of enzymatic reactions, where proteins and filament ends are to each other as enzyme and substrate. We show that the reaction velocity can effectively be described within a Michaelis-Menten framework. Together one-dimensional diffusion and capture beats the (three-dimensional) Smoluchowski diffusion limit for the rate of protein association to filament ends.

  2. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  3. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    , this thesis deals with some of the aspects of hyphal growth, which is an important virulence factor for pathogenic fungi infecting both humans and plants. Hyphal establishment through continuous polar growth is a complex process, requiring the careful coordination of a large subset of proteins involved......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...... of molecular tools for E. cymbalariae to enable a faster and more efficient approach for genetic comparisons between Eremothecium genus fungi....

  4. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  5. Natural colorants from filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Fábio Aurélio Esteves; Zaccarim, Bruna Regina; de Lencastre Novaes, Letícia Celia; Jozala, Angela Faustino; Santos, Carolina Alves Dos; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho

    2016-03-01

    In the last years, there is a trend towards the replacement of synthetic colorants by natural ones, mainly due to the increase of consumer demand for natural products. The natural colorants are used to enhance the appearance of pharmaceutical products, food, and different materials, making them preferable or attractive. This review intends to provide and describe a comprehensive overview of the history of colorants, from prehistory to modern time, of their market and their applications, as well as of the most important aspects of the fermentation process to obtain natural colorants. Focus is given to colorants produced by filamentous fungal species, aiming to demonstrate the importance of these microorganisms and biocompounds, highlighting the production performance to get high yields and the aspects of conclusion that should be taken into consideration in future studies about natural colorants. PMID:26780357

  6. Optimal computational methods for swimming and pumping with helical filaments at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, James; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; Fu, Henry

    2015-11-01

    The flows induced by biological and artificial helical filaments are important to many possible applications including microscale swimming and pumping. Microscale helices can span a wide range of geometries, from thin bacterial flagella to thick helical bacterial cell bodies. While the proper choice of numerical method is critical for obtaining accurate results, there is little guidance about which method is optimal for a specified filament geometry. Using two physical scenarios - a swimmer with a head, and a pump - I establish guidelines for the choice of numerical method based on helical geometry. For a range of helical geometries that encompass most natural and artificial helices, I create benchmark results using a surface distribution of regularized Stokeslets, then evaluate the accuracy of resistive force theory, slender body theory, and a centerline distribution of regularized Stokeslets. Taking the computational cost of each method into account, I present the optimal choice of numerical method for each filament geometry as a guideline for future investigations involving filament-induced flows.

  7. Exploring the Secretomes of Microbes and Microbial Communities Using Filamentous Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagic, Dragana; Ciric, Milica; Wen, Wesley X.; Ng, Filomena; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    Microbial surface and secreted proteins (the secretome) contain a large number of proteins that interact with other microbes, host and/or environment. These proteins are exported by the coordinated activities of the protein secretion machinery present in the cell. A group of bacteriophage, called filamentous phage, have the ability to hijack bacterial protein secretion machinery in order to amplify and assemble via a secretion-like process. This ability has been harnessed in the use of filamentous phage of Escherichia coli in biotechnology applications, including screening large libraries of variants for binding to “bait” of interest, from tissues in vivo to pure proteins or even inorganic substrates. In this review we discuss the roles of secretome proteins in pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria and corresponding secretion pathways. We describe the basics of phage display technology and its variants applied to discovery of bacterial proteins that are implicated in colonization of host tissues and pathogenesis, as well as vaccine candidates through filamentous phage display library screening. Secretome selection aided by next-generation sequence analysis was successfully applied for selective display of the secretome at a microbial community scale, the latter revealing the richness of secretome functions of interest and surprising versatility in filamentous phage display of secretome proteins from large number of Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria and archaea. PMID:27092113

  8. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli forms filaments as an initial response to cefotaxime treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Thea S. B.; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander; Olsen, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: beta-lactams target the peptidoglycan layer in the bacterial cell wall and most beta-lactam antibiotics cause filamentation in susceptible Gram-negative bacteria at low concentrations. The objective was to determine the initial morphological response of cephalosporin resistant CTX-M-1...

  9. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  10. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  11. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  12. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of two filaments that showed a quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) were made to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17 - 20 (SOL2013-08-17) and September 29 (SOL2013-09-29). The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4×1021 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest a similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed three days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2×1020 Mx, about one order of magnitude lower than that of the first event. Two patches of parasitic polarity in the vicinity of the barb merged, then cancelled with nearby network fields. About 20 hours after the onset of the emergence, the filament erupted. Our findings imply that the location of emerging flux within the filament channel is probably crucial to filament evolution. If the flux emergence appears nearby the barbs, it is highly likely that the emerging flux and the filament magnetic fields will cancel, which may lead to the eruption of the filament. The comparison of the two events shows that the emergence of a small AR may still not be enough to disrupt the stability of a filament system, and the actual eruption only occurs after the flux cancellation sets in.

  13. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhle, Ülkü; Kükner, Şahap

    2003-01-01

    Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva, generally characterized by irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing and discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis may be distinguished from other types of conjunctivitis by the presence of yellow–white mucopurulent discharge. It is the most common form of ocular infection all around the world. Staphylococcus species are the most common bacterial pathogenes, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus i...

  14. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Liu, J. H. [Department of Physics, Shijiazhuang University, Shijiazhuang 050035 (China); Xu, C. L. [Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China)

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  15. Automatic Detect and Trace of Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Chen, P. F.; Tang, Yu-hua; Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang

    We developed a series of methods to automatically detect and trace solar filaments in solar Hα images. The programs are able to not only recognize filaments and determine their properties, such as the position, the area and other relevant parameters, but also to trace the daily evolution of the filaments. For solar full disk Hα images, the method consists of three parts: first, preprocessing is applied to correct the original images; second, the Canny edge-detection method is used to detect the filaments; third, filament properties are recognized through the morphological operators. For each Hα filament and its barb features, we introduced the unweighted undirected graph concept and adopted Dijkstra shortest-path algorithm to recognize the filament spine; then, using polarity inversion line shift method for measuring the polarities in both sides of the filament to determine the filament axis chirality; finally, employing connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculating the angle between each barb and spine to indicate the barb chirality. Our algorithms are applied to the observations from varied observatories, including the Optical & Near Infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET) in Nanjing University, Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) and Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The programs are demonstrated to be effective and efficient. We used our method to automatically process and analyze 3470 images obtained by MLSO from January 1998 to December 2009, and a butterfly diagram of filaments is obtained. It shows that the latitudinal migration of solar filaments has three trends in the Solar Cycle 23: The drift velocity was fast from 1998 to the solar maximum; after the solar maximum, it became relatively slow and after 2006, the migration became divergent, signifying the solar minimum. About 60% filaments with the latitudes larger than 50 degree migrate towards the Polar Regions with relatively high velocities, and the latitudinal migrating

  16. Regulated docking of nuclear membrane vesicles to vimentin filaments during mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    During mitosis, several types of intermediate-sized filaments (IFs) undergo an extensive remodelling in response to phosphorylation by cdc 2 and other protein kinases. However, unlike the nuclear lamins, the cytoplasmic IFs do not seem to follow a fixed disassembly stereotype and often retain their physical continuity without depolymerizing into soluble subunits. To investigate potential interactions between mitotically modified IFs and other cellular structures, we have examined prometaphase...

  17. Ultrastrucmturaiml munogold labelling of vimentin filaments on postembedding ultrathin sections of arachnoid villi and meningiomas

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashima, Tetsumori; Tachibana, Osamu; Nitta, Hisashi; Yamaguchi, Narihito; Yamashita, Junkoh

    1989-01-01

    An immunoelectron microscopic technique for the labelling of vimentin intermediate filaments on postembedding ultrathin sections is reported. Arachnoid villi obtained at autopsy and meningiomas at surgery were fixed in 1% paraformaldehyde for 30 minutes, embedded without postfixation in Epon-Araldite mixture and polymerized at 37OC for 3 weeks. Ultrathin sections were etched in 2% KOH for 3 minutes and incubated with anti-vimentin monoclonal antibodies whic...

  18. Exploring the Secretomes of Microbes and Microbial Communities Using Filamentous Phage Display

    OpenAIRE

    Gagic, Dragana; Ciric, Milica; Wen, Wesley X.; Ng, Filomena; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    Microbial surface and secreted proteins (the secretome) contain a large number of proteins that interact with other microbes, host and/or environment. These proteins are exported by the coordinated activities of the protein secretion machinery present in the cell. A group of bacteriophage, called filamentous phage, have the ability to hijack bacterial protein secretion machinery in order to amplify and assemble via a secretion-like process. This ability has been harnessed in the use of filame...

  19. Molecular Characterization of Epiphytic Bacterial Communities on Charophycean Green Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Madeline M.; Wilcox, Lee W.; Linda E Graham

    1998-01-01

    Epiphytic bacterial communities within the sheath material of three filamentous green algae, Desmidium grevillii, Hyalotheca dissiliens, and Spondylosium pulchrum (class Charophyceae, order Zygnematales), collected from a Sphagnum bog were characterized by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA. A total of 20 partial sequences and nine different sequence types were obtained, and one sequence type was recovered from the bacterial communities on all three algae. By phyl...

  20. Structural characterization of mRNA-tRNA translocation intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Liao, Hstau Y.; Schreiner, Eduard; Fu, Jie; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F.; Schulten, Klaus; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Cryo-EM analysis of a wild-type Escherichia coli pretranslocational sample has revealed the presence of previously unseen intermediate substates of the bacterial ribosome during the first phase of translocation, characterized by intermediate intersubunit rotations, L1 stalk positions, and tRNA configurations. Furthermore, we describe the domain rearrangements in quantitative terms, which has allowed us to characterize the processivity and coordination of the conformational reorganization of t...

  1. Intermediation under Trade Restrictions.

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, G Michael

    1989-01-01

    Intermediation is the activity of buying and selling simultaneously in one market. In this paper, intermediation in the market for an arbitrary good is derived from trade restrictions in a general equilibrium exchange model. The trade restrictions are given by a trade feasibility relation defined on the set of households, and they necessitate dropping the one price assumption of standard general equilibrium theory. It is shown that, in this setting, equilibria need not exist in spite of well-...

  2. Intermediate algebra a textworkbook

    CERN Document Server

    McKeague, Charles P

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra: A Text/Workbook, Second Edition focuses on the principles, operations, and approaches involved in intermediate algebra. The publication first takes a look at basic properties and definitions, first-degree equations and inequalities, and exponents and polynomials. Discussions focus on properties of exponents, polynomials, sums, and differences, multiplication of polynomials, inequalities involving absolute value, word problems, first-degree inequalities, real numbers, opposites, reciprocals, and absolute value, and addition and subtraction of real numbers. The text then ex

  3. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  4. Optical Filaments and Gas Dynamics in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeak, Jeremy

    Until now, the propagation dynamics of intense ultrashort laser pulses leading to optical filamentation in air has only been investigated in the frame of a dynamic balance between linear diffraction, Kerr self-focusing and plasma defocusing. This has led to the development of different theories surrounding the generation and persistence of optical filaments propagating over many Rayleigh lengths in air. These theories include wave-guiding model, moving focus model, dynamic spatial replenishment model and conical wave model. However, these models fail to capture the gas dynamics that arise from optical filaments interacting with air. In this work, we demonstrate that initial conditions are critical to the formation of optical filaments through the use of an aerodynamic window. Filament characteristics in air, such as spectral broadening, electrical conductivity and fluorescence, are measured and presented. Using these as diagnostic tools, we also show that the optical filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses can be enhanced at high repetition rates because of the thermal response of air, resulting from the interaction of each laser pulse with the modified atmospheric density distribution left behind by the preceding pulse. This is explained by the sudden deposition of energy by a filament in the air which generates a cylindrical shock wave, leaving behind a column of rarefied air. This low-density region persists for an extended period and can materially affect the propagation dynamics of an ensuing pulse that follows before the low-density region has relaxed sufficiently to ambient conditions. By further increasing the repetition rate, the onset of ionization is shifted downstream and the spectral continuum displays a stronger broadening on both sides of the original pulse spectrum. This gas dynamic interaction regime of filamentation can be utilized to enhance the length and spectral width of filaments for remote sensing and long range laser-induced high voltage

  5. Automatic filament warm-up controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccluskey, J.; Daeges, J.

    1979-01-01

    As part of the unattended operations objective of the Deep Space Network deep space stations, this filament controller serves as a step between manual operation of the station and complete computer control. Formerly, the operator was required to devote five to fifteen minutes of his time just to properly warm up the filaments on the klystrons of the high power transmitters. The filament controller reduces the operator's duty to a one-step command and is future-compatible with various forms of computer control.

  6. System Applies Polymer Powder To Filament Tow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Snoha, John J.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    Polymer powder applied uniformly and in continuous manner. Powder-coating system applies dry polymer powder to continuous fiber tow. Unique filament-spreading technique, combined with precise control of tension on fibers in system, ensures uniform application of polymer powder to web of spread filaments. Fiber tows impregnated with dry polymer powders ("towpregs") produced for preform-weaving and composite-material-molding applications. System and process valuable to prepreg industry, for production of flexible filament-windable tows and high-temperature polymer prepregs.

  7. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  8. Can We Determine the Filament Chirality by the Filament Footpoint Location or the Barb-bearing?

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Q; Fang, C; Chen, P F; Cao, W

    2015-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the unweighted undirected graph concept and adopt the Dijkstra shortest-path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with H-alpha filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) H-alpha archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have ...

  9. Filament overwrapped motor case technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Joel P.

    1993-11-01

    Atlantic Research Corporation (ARC) joined with the French Societe Europeenne de Propulsion (SEP) to develop and deliver to the U.S. Navy a small quantity of composite filament wound rocket motors to demonstrate a manufacturing technique that was being applied at the two companies. It was perceived that the manufacturing technique could produce motors that would be light in weight, inexpensive to produce, and that had a good chance of meeting insensitive munitions (IM) requirements that were being formulated by the Navy in the early 1980s. Under subcontract to ARC, SEP designed, tested, and delivered 2.75-inch rocket motors to the U.S. Navy for IM tests that were conducted in 1989 at China Lake, California. The program was one of the first to be founded by Nunn Amendment money. The Government-to-Government program was sponsored by the Naval Air Systems Command and was monitored by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head (NSWC-IH), Maryland. The motor propellant that was employed was a new, extruded composite formulation that was under development at the Naval Surface Warfare Center. The following paper describes the highlights of the program and gives the results of structural and ballistic static tests and insensitive munitions tests that were conducted on demonstration motors.

  10. Pressure effects on the femtosecond laser filamentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiexing; Ma, Cunliang; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the pressure effects on the propagation of the laser pulse with wavelength of 800 nm by numerical simulations. We consider the effects on the on-axis intensity, the beam radius and the energy of the filament, as well as the on-axis density of plasma. Numerical results show that when the pressures increase, the length, radius and energy of the light filament become shorter, narrower and lower, respectively. Moreover, we find that the length and the radius of filament are approximately inversely proportional to the pressure and the square root of pressure, respectively, and the pulse with shorter duration is easier to be affected by the pressure. We also obtain the conclusion that the plasma is not necessary to generate the filament in gases in various pressures, as stated by Béjot et al. [1] for the case of standard atmosphere pressure.

  11. Analysis of intermediate wettability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skauge, A.; Vik, B.; Spildo, K.; Ottesen, B. [Bergen Univ., Centre for Integrated Petroleum Research, Bergen (Norway)

    2003-09-01

    The fluid flow of porous media petroleum reservoirs is affected by wettability. In general, North Sea sandstone reservoirs fall into the large group of intermediate wet state reservoirs having end point saturation, capillary pressure, and relative permeability properties. This study examined intermediate the wet state by dividing the wet group into three sub-classes defined as fractionally-wet (FW), mixed-wet large (MWL), and mixed-wet small (MWS). Wettability indices were used to group reservoir data into reservoirs with FW, MWL and MWS behaviour. The analysis of wettability data from several North Sea fields showed that 13 reservoirs have sufficient wettability data to determine the state of intermediate wettability. Five of the reservoirs were classified as MWL, 4 as FW and 4 as MWS. Fractional-wet rock was found to have a more robust wettability and cleaned cores maintained a non-water state, suggesting that wetting sites can be coupled to mineralogy in addition to adsorption/deposition of oil components that change the surface properties of the rock. MWS was found to maintain wettability after cleaning, but MWL cores became water wet after solvent cleaning. This study indicates that the type of intermediate wettability has an impact on the data structure required to develop reservoir models. Wettability was found to influence the share of relative permeability curves and the capillary pressure relations in a variety of intermediate wettability classifications. 23 figs.

  12. Can we determine the filament chirality by the filament footpoint location or the barb-bearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang; Fang, Cheng; Chen, Peng-Fei; Cao, Wen-Da

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the concept of an unweighted undirected graph and adopt the Dijkstra shortest path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with Hα filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) Hα archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have left-bearing (right-bearing) barbs and positive (negative) magnetic helicity, respectively. The tested results demonstrate that our method is efficient and effective in detecting the bearing of filament barbs. It is demonstrated that the conventionally believed one-to-one correspondence between filament chirality and barb bearing is not valid. The correct detection of the filament axis chirality should be done by combining both imaging morphology and magnetic field observations.

  13. Hoop tensile properties of filament wound pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Zhezhova, Silvana; Naseva, Simona

    2015-01-01

    In this study hoop tensile properties of continuous fiber reinforced composites pipes are investigated. The test pipes were manufactured of glass fiber and epoxy resin by filament winding method with three different winding angle configurations (10°, 45° and 90°). Three specimens from each model of filament wound pipes with help of split-disk tests were tested and the hoop tensile strengths and modulus of elasticity were determined. From received results it is concluded that, mechanical prope...

  14. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    OpenAIRE

    Saathoff, H.; Henin, S.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Petrarca, M.; Delagrange, R.; Hao, Z.; Lüder, J.; Möhler, O.; Y. Petit; Rohwetter, P.; Schnaiter, M.; Kasparian, J.; Leisner, T.; J.-P. Wolf; Wöste, L.

    2012-01-01

    Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon-oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with partic...

  15. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    OpenAIRE

    Saathoff, H.; Henin, S.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Petrarca, M.; Delagrange, R.; Hao, Z.; Lüder, J.; Möhler, O.; Y. Petit; Rohwetter, P.; Schnaiter, M.; Kasparian, J.; Leisner, T.; J.-P. Wolf; Wöste, L.

    2013-01-01

    Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA, we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon–oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with parti...

  16. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    OpenAIRE

    Saathoff, H.; Henin, S.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Petrarca, M.; Delagrange, R.; Hao, Z.; Lüder, J.; Möhler, O.; Y. Petit; Rohwetter, P.; Schnaiter, M.; Kasparian, J.; Leisner, T.; Wolf, J.-P.; Wöste, L.

    2013-01-01

    Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA, we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon–oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to...

  17. Theory of swimming filaments in viscoelastic media

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Henry C.; Powers, Thomas R.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the swimming of sperm in the non-Newtonian fluids of the female mammalian reproductive tract, we examine the swimming of filaments in the nonlinear viscoelastic Upper Convected Maxwell model. We obtain the swimming velocity and hydrodynamic force exerted on an infinitely long cylinder with prescribed beating pattern. We use these results to examine the swimming of a simplified sliding-filament model for a sperm flagellum. Viscoelasticity tends to decrease swimming speed, and chan...

  18. Filaments in the Lupus molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Benedettini, M; Pezzuto, S; Elia, D; André, P; Könyves, V; Schneider, N; Tremblin, P; Arzoumanian, D; di Giorgio, A M; Di Francesco, J; Hill, T; Molinari, S; Motte, F; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Palmeirim, P; Rivera-Ingraham, A; Roy, A; Rygl, K L J; Spinoglio, L; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G J

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of $\\sim$1.5$\\times$10$^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.

  19. Filaments in the Lupus molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Pezzuto, S.; Elia, D.; André, P.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Tremblin, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Hill, T.; Molinari, S.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Palmeirim, P.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of ˜1.5 × 1021 cm-2 and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.

  20. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, William J

    2013-01-01

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, $Z \\approx 0.1 Z_\\odot $ filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, $Z=10^{-3} Z_\\odot$ filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which lead...

  1. Filaments in Simulations of Molecular Cloud Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, Gilberto C

    2013-01-01

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse is hierarchical in nature, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in cloud, and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features, through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump, but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalli...

  2. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  3. Bacterial Microcompartments

    OpenAIRE

    Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterialmicrocompartments (BMCs) are organelles composed entirely of protein. They promote specific metabolic processes by encapsulating and colocalizing enzymes with their substrates and cofactors, by protecting vulnerable enzymes in a defined microenvironment, and by sequestering toxic or volatile intermediates. Prototypes of the BMCsare the carboxysomes of autotrophic bacteria. However, structures of similar polyhedral shape are being discovered in an ever-increasing number of heterotroph...

  4. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  5. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  6. Multiple filamentation Ti:Sapphire-laser pulses in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apeksimov, D. V.; Bukin, O. A.; Golik, S. S.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Kabanov, A. M.; Kuchinskaya, O. I.; Mayor, A. Yu.; Matvienko, G. G.; Petrov, A. V.; Sokolova, E. B.

    2015-11-01

    The results of experimental studies of the spatial characteristics of multiple filamentation terawatt femtosecond Ti:Salaser in water are presented. With an increase in initial power laser pulses increases the number of filaments, the length of the field is increased filamentation and reducing the length of the filaments have been shown. The distribution of the filaments in the longitudinal direction of the field of multiple filamentation has a maximum cross-sectional filament is shifted from the center to the periphery of the beam at the end region of filamentation. The minimum diameter of the beam on the track corresponds to the position of the maximum number of filaments. After the point of maximum impulse essentially loses energy in the initial direction of propagation. Upon reaching the pulse power 2 104 Pcr of multiple filamentation area is formed of a hollow cone, the apex directed to the radiation source.

  7. Mobile communication and intermediality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    The article argues the importance of intermediality as a concept for research in mobile communication and media. The constant availability of several, partially overlapping channels for communication (texting, calls, email, Facebook, etc.) requires that we adopt an integrated view of the various...... communicative affordances of mobile devices in order to understand how people choose between them for different purposes. It is argued that mobile communication makes intermediality especially central, as the choice of medium is detached from the location of stationary media and begins to follow the user across...

  8. Potential fields of merging and splitting filaments in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yuan-Yuan; Lu Xin; Xi Ting-Ting; Hao Zuo-Qiang; Gong Qi-Huang; Zhang Jie

    2007-01-01

    Two interacting light filaments with different initial phases propagating in air are investigated numerically by using a ray tracing method. The evolution of the rays of a filament is governed by a potential field. During propagation, the two potential wells of the two filaments can merge into one or repel each other, depending on the initial phase difference between the two filaments. The study provides a simple description of the interacting filaments.

  9. Caspase cleavage of GFAP produces an assembly-compromised proteolytic fragment that promotes filament aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei‑Hsuan Chen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available IF (intermediate filament proteins can be cleaved by caspases to generate proapoptotic fragments as shown for desmin. These fragments can also cause filament aggregation. The hypothesis is that disease-causing mutations in IF proteins and their subsequent characteristic histopathological aggregates could involve caspases. GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, a closely related IF protein expressed mainly in astrocytes, is also a putative caspase substrate. Mutations in GFAP cause AxD (Alexander disease. The overexpression of wild-type or mutant GFAP promotes cytoplasmic aggregate formation, with caspase activation and GFAP proteolysis. In this study, we report that GFAP is cleaved specifically by caspase 6 at VELD225 in its L12 linker domain in vitro. Caspase cleavage of GFAP at Asp225 produces two major cleavage products. While the C-GFAP (C-terminal GFAP is unable to assemble into filaments, the N-GFAP (N-terminal GFAP forms filamentous structures that are variable in width and prone to aggregation. The effect of N-GFAP is dominant, thus affecting normal filament assembly in a way that promotes filament aggregation. Transient transfection of N-GFAP into a human astrocytoma cell line induces the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates, which also disrupt the endogenous GFAP networks. In addition, we generated a neo-epitope antibody that recognizes caspase-cleaved but not the intact GFAP. Using this antibody, we demonstrate the presence of the caspase-generated GFAP fragment in transfected cells expressing a disease-causing mutant GFAP and in two mouse models of AxD. These findings suggest that caspase-mediated GFAP proteolysis may be a common event in the context of both the GFAP mutation and excess.

  10. Hispanic American Heritage, Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Mike

    This resource book features the cultural heritage of Hispanics living within the United States and includes ideas, materials, and activities to be used with students in the intermediate grades and middle school. This book explores the definition of the term "Hispanic Americans" and suggests a multilayered population with a variety of cultural…

  11. Water oxidation: Intermediate identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Alexander J.

    2016-08-01

    The slow kinetics of light-driven water oxidation on haematite is an important factor limiting the material's efficiency. Now, an intermediate of the water-splitting reaction has been identified offering hope that the full mechanism will soon be resolved.

  12. GLOSSARY TO INTERMEDIATE HINDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Indian Language and Area Center.

    INCLUDED IN THIS GLOSSARY ARE THE VOCABULARY ITEMS FOR THE READINGS IN "INTERMEDIATE HINDI." THE ITEMS ARE ARRANGED BY SELECTION IN SERIAL ORDER. EACH ENTRY INCLUDES NAGARI (DEVANAGARI) SCRIPT SPELLING, A NOTATION OF THE FORM CLASS, AND A SHORT ENGLISH GLOSS. THESE TWO VOLUMES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE AS A SET FOR $7.00 FROM THE COLLEGE PRINTING…

  13. Bacterial floc mediated rapid streamer formation in creeping flows

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Ghosh, Ranajay; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas; Liu, Yang; Kumar, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    One of the central puzzles concerning the interaction of low Reynolds number (Re<<1) fluid transport with bacterial biomass is the formation of filamentous structures called streamers. In this manuscript, we report our discovery of a new kind of low Re bacterial streamers, which appear from pre-formed bacterial flocs. In sharp contrast to the biofilm-mediated streamers, these streamers form over extremely small timescales (less than a second). Our experiments, carried out in a microchannel with micropillars rely on fluorescence microscopy techniques to illustrate that floc-mediated streamers form when a freely-moving floc adheres to the micropillar wall and gets rapidly sheared by the background flow. We also show that at their inception the deformation of the flocs is dominated by recoverable large strains indicating significant elasticity. These strains subsequently increase tremendously to produce filamentous streamers. Interestingly, we find that these fully formed streamers are not static structure...

  14. Bacterial floc mediated rapid streamer formation in creeping flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Nikakhtari, Zahra; Ghosh, Ranajay; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas; Kumar, Aloke

    2015-11-01

    One of the contentious problems regarding the interaction of low Reynolds number (Re bacterial biomass is the formation of filamentous structures called streamers. Recently, we discovered that streamers can be formed from flow-induced deformation of the pre-formed bacterial flocs over extremely small timescales (less than a second). However, these streamers are different than the ones that mediated by biofilms. To optically probe the inception process of these streamers formation, bacterial flocs were embedded with 200 nm red fluorescent polystyrene beads that served as tracers. We also showed that at their inception the deformation of the flocs is dominated by large recoverable strains indicating significant elasticity. These strains subsequently increase tremendously to produce filamentous streamers. At time scales larger than streamers formation time scale, viscous response was observed from streamers. Finally, rapid clogging of microfluidic devices occurred after these streamers formed.

  15. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ting; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-01-01

    We make a comparative analysis for two filaments that showed quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) are carried out to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17-20 and September 29. The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4*10^21 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed within 3 days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2*10^20 Mx, about one ...

  16. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  17. Theory of a filament initiated nitrogen laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashov, Daniil; Ališauskas, Skirmantas; Pugžlys, Audrius; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Baltuška, Andrius

    2015-05-01

    We present the theoretical model for a single-pass, discharge-type standoff nitrogen laser initiated by a femtosecond filament in nitrogen gas. The model is based on the numerical solution of the kinetic equation for the electron energy distribution function self-consistently with balance equations for nitrogen species and laser equations. We identify the kinetic mechanisms responsible for a buildup of population inversion in the filament afterglow plasma and determine the dependence of population inversion density and the parameters of nitrogen lasing at a 337 nm wavelength corresponding to the transition between the C3Πu (v = 0) excited and the X1Σg (v = 0) ground electronic states in a nitrogen molecule on the polarization and wavelength of the driver laser pulse used to produce the filament. We show that population inversion is achieved on an ultrafast time scale of ≈10 ps and decays within the time: <100 ps. We derive the low-signal gain 2.2 cm-1 for lasing from a circularly polarized 0.8 μm near-IR filament and 0.16 cm-1 for a linearly polarized 4 μm mid-IR filament. The results of the numerical simulations demonstrate good quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements.

  18. Nonlinear elasticity of semiflexible filament networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanlong; Terentjev, Eugene M

    2016-08-10

    We develop a continuum theory for equilibrium elasticity of a network of crosslinked semiflexible filaments, spanning the full range between flexible entropy-driven chains to stiff athermal rods. We choose the 3-chain constitutive model of network elasticity over several plausible candidates, and derive analytical expressions for the elastic energy at arbitrary strain, with the corresponding stress-strain relationship. The theory fits well to a wide range of experimental data on simple shear in different filament networks, quantitatively matching the differential shear modulus variation with stress, with only two adjustable parameters (which represent the filament stiffness and the pre-tension in the network, respectively). The general theory accurately describes the crossover between the positive and negative Poynting effect (normal stress on imposed shear) on increasing the stiffness of filaments forming the network. We discuss the network stability (the point of marginal rigidity) and the phenomenon of tensegrity, showing that filament pre-tension on crosslinking into the network determines the magnitude of linear modulus G0. PMID:27444846

  19. The hydrodynamic stability of gaseous cosmic filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Birnboim, Yuval; Zinger, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Virial shocks at edges of cosmic-web structures are a clear prediction of standard structure formation theories. We derive a criterion for the stability of the post-shock gas and of the virial shock itself in spherical, filamentary and planar infall geometries. When gas cooling is important, we find that shocks become unstable, and gas flows uninterrupted towards the center of the respective halo, filament or sheet. For filaments, we impose this criterion on self-similar infall solutions. We find that instability is expected for filament masses between $10^{11}-10^{13}M_\\odot Mpc^{-1}.$ Using a simplified toy model, we then show that these filaments will likely feed halos with $10^{10}M_{\\odot}\\lesssim M_{halo}\\lesssim 10^{13}M_{\\odot}$ at redshift $z=3$, as well as $10^{12}M_{\\odot}\\lesssim M_{halo}\\lesssim 10^{15}M_{\\odot}$ at $z=0$. The instability will affect the survivability of the filaments as they penetrate gaseous halos in a non-trivial way. Additionally, smaller halos accreting onto non-stable filam...

  20. Structure of a filament of stacked octamers of human DMC1 recombinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Octameric rings of DMC1 stacked into filaments in the crystal. Similar DMC1–DNA filaments have been observed previously using electron microscopy. Eukaryal DMC1 proteins play a central role in homologous recombination in meiosis by assembling at the sites of programmed DNA double-strand breaks and carrying out a search for allelic DNA sequences located on homologous chromatids. They are close homologs of eukaryal Rad51 and archaeal RadA proteins and are remote homologs of bacterial RecA proteins. These recombinases (also called DNA strand-exchange proteins) promote a pivotal strand-exchange reaction between homologous single-stranded and double-stranded DNA substrates. An octameric form of a truncated human DMC1 devoid of its small N-terminal domain (residues 1–83) has been crystallized. The structure of the truncated DMC1 octamer is similar to that of the previously reported full-length DMC1 octamer, which has disordered N-terminal domains. In each protomer, only the ATP cap regions (Asp317–Glu323) show a noticeable conformational difference. The truncated DMC1 octamers further stack with alternate polarity into a filament. Similar filamentous assemblies of DMC1 have been observed to form on DNA by electron microscopy

  1. Galaxy alignment as a probe of large-scale filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yu; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    The orientations of the red galaxies in a filament are aligned with the orientation of the filament. We thus develop a location-alignment-method (LAM) of detecting filaments around clusters of galaxies, which uses both the alignments of red galaxies and their distributions in two-dimensional images. For the first time, the orientations of red galaxies are used as probes of filaments. We apply LAM to the environment of Coma cluster, and find four filaments (two filaments are located in sheets) in two selected regions, which are compared with the filaments detected with the method of Falco et al.. We find that LAM can effectively detect the filaments around a cluster, even with 3σ confidence level, and clearly reveal the number and overall orientations of the detected filaments. LAM is independent of the redshifts of galaxies, and thus can be applied at relatively high redshifts and to the samples of red galaxies without the information of redshifts.

  2. Terahertz waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Hai-Wei; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Otani, Chiko, E-mail: otani@riken.jp [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Sendai, Miyagi 980-0845 (Japan); Midorikawa, Katsumi [Attosecond Science Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-11-23

    Terahertz (THz) waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments with a crossing angle of 25° are investigated. The irradiated THz waves from the crossing filaments show a small THz pulse after the main THz pulse, which was not observed in those from single-filament scheme. Since the position of the small THz pulse changes with the time-delay of two filaments, this phenomenon can be explained by a model in which the small THz pulse is from the second filament. The denser plasma in the overlap region of the filaments changes the movement of space charges in the plasma, thereby changing the angular distribution of THz radiation. As a result, this schematic induces some THz wave from the second filament to propagate along the path of the THz wave from the first filament. Thus, this schematic alters the direction of the THz radiation from the filamentation, which can be used in THz wave remote sensing.

  3. Free-Space Nonlinear Beam Combining Towards Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Rostami, Shermineh; Kepler, Daniel; Baudelet, Matthieu; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Richardson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Multi-filamentation opens new degrees of freedom for manipulating electromagnetic waves in air. However, without control, multiple filament interactions, including attraction, repulsion or fusion often result in formation of complex disordered filament distributions. Moreover, high power beams conventionally used in multi-filament formation experiments often cause significant surface damage. The growing number of applications for laser filaments requires fine control of their formation and propagation. We demonstrate, experimentally and theoretically, that the attraction and fusion of ultrashort beams with initial powers below the critical value enable the eventual formation of a filament downstream. Filament formation is delayed to a predetermined distance in space, avoiding optical damage to external beam optics while still enabling robust filaments with controllable properties as if formed from a single high power beam. This paradigm introduces new opportunities for filament engineering eliminating the nee...

  4. Unwinding motion of a twisted active-region filament

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, X L; Liu, J H; Kong, D F; Xu, C L

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the structures of active-region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active-region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on June 22, 2010. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament is consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5$\\pi$ obtained by using time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active-region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magn...

  5. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C; Ankowski, A M; Asaadi, J A; Ashenfelter, J; Axani, S N; Babu, K; Backhouse, C; Band, H R; Barbeau, P S; Barros, N; Bernstein, A; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blucher, E; Bouffard, J; Bowden, N; Brice, S; Bryan, C; Camilleri, L; Cao, J; Carlson, J; Carr, R E; Chatterjee, A; Chen, M; Chen, S; Chiu, M; Church, E D; Collar, J I; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Convery, M R; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; Davoudiasl, H; De Gouvea, A; Dean, D J; Deichert, G; Descamps, F; DeYoung, T; Diwan, M V; Djurcic, Z; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Donnelly, B; Dwyer, D A; Dytman, S; Efremenko, Y; Everett, L L; Fava, A; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fleming, B; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B K; Gaisser, T K; Galeazzi, M; Galehouse, D C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garvey, G T; Gautam, S; Gilje, K E; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Goodman, M C; Gordon, H; Gramellini, E; Green, M P; Guglielmi, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hackenburg, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hans, S; Harris, D; Heeger, K M; Herman, M; Hill, R; Holin, A; Huber, P; Jaffe, D E; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Kettell, S H; Kirby, B J; Klein, J R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kriske, R M; Lane, C E; Langford, T J; Lankford, A; Lau, K; Learned, J G; Ling, J; Link, J M; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lokajicek, M; Louis, W C; Luk, K; Lykken, J; Marciano, W J; Maricic, J; Markoff, D M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mauger, C; Mavrokoridis, K; McCluskey, E; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Mills, G; Mocioiu, I; Monreal, B; Mooney, M R; Morfin, J G; Mumm, P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Nelson, J K; Nessi, M; Norcini, D; Nova, F; Nygren, D R; Gann, G D Orebi; Palamara, O; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Paul, P; Pocar, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Ranucci, G; Ray, H; Reyna, D; Rich, G C; Rodrigues, P; Romero, E Romero; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Rybolt, B; Sanchez, M C; Santucci, G; Schmitz, D; Scholberg, K; Seckel, D; Shaevitz, M; Shrock, R; Smy, M B; Soderberg, M; Sonzogni, A; Sousa, A B; Spitz, J; John, J M St; Stewart, J; Strait, J B; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szelc, A M; Tayloe, R; Thomson, M A; Toups, M; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Van de Water, R G; Vogelaar, R B; Weber, M; Weng, W; Wetstein, M; White, C; White, B R; Whitehead, L; Whittington, D W; Wilking, M J; Wilson, R J; Wilson, P; Winklehner, D; Winn, D R; Worcester, E; Yang, L; Yeh, M; Yokley, Z W; Yoo, J; Yu, B; Yu, J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  6. Intermediate energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subgroup 13 (SG13) on Intermediate Energy Nuclear data was formed by NEA Nuclear Science Committee to solve common problems of these types of data for nuclear applications. An overview is presented in this final report of the present activities of SG13, including data needs, high-priority nuclear data request list (nuclides), compilation of experimental data, specialists meetings and benchmarks, data formats and data libraries. Some important accomplishments are summarized, and recommendations are presented. (R.P.)

  7. Volatility and Financial Intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua Aizenman; Andrew Powell

    1997-01-01

    Following the Tequila period, its after-effects in Latin America and recent events in South East Asia, the effect of volatility on emerging market economies has become an important topic of research with the domestic financial intermediation process being advanced as one of the most important transmission mechanisms. At the same time there has been continued interest in issues related to imperfect information and rationing in credit markets. In this paper, we consider an economy where risk ne...

  8. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; Houlihan, John; Mullane, Mark; O'Neill, Eamonn

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture....... Large apertures result in high order transverse modes, filamentation and spatio-temporal instabilities, all of which degrade spatial coherence and therefore brightness. We shall describe a combined assault on three fronts: (1) minimise aperture size required for a given power by maximising the facet...... damage threshold, (2) for a given aperture, minimise self-focusing and filamentation by minimising the effective nonlinear coefficient (the alpha parameter), and (3) for a given aperture and nonlinear coefficient, develop optical cavities and propagation structures to suppress filamentation and high...

  9. Heterologous expression of cellobiohydrolases in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Peter S.; Ahring, Birgitte K.;

    2015-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases are among the most important enzymes functioning in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose, significantly contributing to the efficient biorefining of recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels and bio-based products. Filamentous fungi are recognized as both well...... into valuable products. However, due to low cellobiohydrolase activities, certain fungi might be deficient with regard to enzymes of value for cellulose conversion, and improving cellobiohydrolase expression in filamentous fungi has proven to be challenging. In this review, we examine the effects of altering...... promoters, signal peptides, culture conditions and host post-translational modifications. For heterologous cellobiohydrolase production in filamentous fungi to become an industrially feasible process, the construction of site-integrating plasmids, development of protease-deficient strains and glycosylation...

  10. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.;

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture....... Large apertures result in high order transverse modes, filamentation and spatio-temporal instabilities, all of which degrade spatial coherence and therefore brightness. We shall describe a combined assault on three fronts: (1) minimise aperture size required for a given power by maximising the facet...... damage threshold, (2) for a given aperture, minimise self-focusing and filamentation by minimising the effective nonlinear coefficient (the alpha parameter), and (3) for a given aperture and nonlinear coefficient, develop optical cavities and propagation structures to suppress filamentation and high...

  11. Reduced filamentation in high power semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in fields ranging from material processing to medicine. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that high optical power densities cause damage to the laser facet and thus require large apertures. This, in turn, results in spatio......-temporal instabilities such as filamentation which degrades spatial coherence and brightness. We first evaluate performance of existing designs with a “top-hat” shaped transverse current density profile. The unstable nature of highly excited semiconductor material results in a run-away process where small modulations in...... the optical field causes spatial hole-burning and thus filamentation. To reduce filamentation we propose a new, relatively simple design based on inhomogeneous pumping in which the injected current has a gradual transverse profile. We confirm the improved laser performance theoretically and...

  12. SOLAR MAGNETIZED 'TORNADOES': RELATION TO FILAMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar magnetized 'tornadoes', a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar 'tornadoes' (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

  13. Oscillating Filaments: I - Oscillation and Geometrical Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Burkert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid based AMR-code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, e.g. with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process `geometrical fragmentation'. In our realization the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristical scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. ...

  14. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime

  15. Geometrically frustrated filament assemblies: Unravelling the connection between bundle shape and inter-filament order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grason, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    From steel cables and textile fibers to filamentous protein bundles in cells and tissues, densely-packed assemblies of filaments are vital structural elements of the worlds around us and inside of us. Despite the ubiquity and utility of dense-filament assemblies in such diverse materials (across 7 orders of magnitude in size!) surprisingly little is known about the fundamental rules that govern their structure. This talk will discuss recent progress in our understanding of the non-linear relationship between the geometry of a rope-like assembly and the structure and energetics of inter-filament packing. In particular, we focus on mathematical models of the geometric frustration between twist - as in macroscopic cables or chiral biofilament bundles - and the preference for isometric, or ``constant spacing,'' packing of filaments in the cross section. Any measure of twist makes it geometrically impossible to evenly space filaments in bundles, begging the question what is the optimal packing of a twisted bundle? We show that geometry of interfilament contact can be mapped formally onto a problem of packing on a 2D non-Euclidean surfaces, whose intrinsically-curved geometry points to the necessity of a complex spectrum defects in the ground-state packing. We confirm the existence of defects and their sensitivity to bundle twist and radius through simulations of energy-minimizing assemblies of cohesive filaments.

  16. On the nature of star-forming filaments: I. Filament morphologies

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Rowan J; Klessen, Ralf S

    2014-01-01

    We use a suite of high resolution molecular cloud simulations carried out with the moving mesh code Arepo to explore the nature of star-forming filaments. The simulated filaments are identified and categorised from column density maps in the same manner as for recent Herschel observations. When fit with a Plummer-like profile the filaments are in excellent agreement with observations, and have shallow power-law profiles of p~2.2 without the need for magnetic support. The derived filament widths depend on the data range that is fitted. When data within 1 pc of the filament centre is fitted with a Gaussian function, the average FWHM is ~0.3 pc, in agreement with predictions for accreting filaments. However, if the fit is constructed using only data within 0.35 pc of the centre, in order to better match the procedure used to derive filament widths from Herschel observations, the resulting FWHM is only ~0.2 pc. This value is larger than that measured in IC 5146 and Taurus, but is similar to that found in the Plan...

  17. The exo-metabolome in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Ulf; Andersen, Birgitte; Frisvad, Jens Christian;

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are a diverse group of eukaryotic microorganisms that have a significant impact on human life as spoilers of food and feed by degradation and toxin production. They are also most useful as a source of bulk and fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. This chapter focuses on the exo......-metabolome in filamentous fungi, which comprises more than 30,000 known secondary metabolites. Profiles of this diverse range of secondary metabolites have, for more than 25 years, been central in development of fungal systematics, taxonomy, and ecology, today integrated in a multidisciplinary and polyphasic approach...

  18. Terahertz radiation from a laser plasma filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H-C; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J; Ruhl, H; Sheng, Z-M

    2011-03-01

    By the use of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we clarify the terahertz (THz) radiation mechanism from a plasma filament formed by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The nonuniform plasma density of the filament leads to a net radiating current for THz radiation. This current is mainly located within the pulse and the first cycle of the wakefield. As the laser pulse propagates, a single-cycle and radially polarized THz pulse is constructively built up forward. The single-cycle shape is mainly due to radiation damping effect. PMID:21517604

  19. Collision of almost parallel vortex filaments

    OpenAIRE

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of collisions in the evolution of vortex filaments through a system introduced by Klein, Majda and Damodaran [KMD95] and Zakharov [Z88, Z99]. We first establish rigorously the existence of a pair of almost parallel vortex filaments, with opposite circulation, colliding at some point in finite time. The collision mechanism is based on the one of the self-similar solutions of the model, described in [BFM14]. In the second part of this paper we extend this construct...

  20. Nuclear flow in a filamentous fungus

    CERN Document Server

    Hickey, Patrick C; Read, Nick; Glass, N Louise; Roper, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The syncytial cells of a filamentous fungus consist of a mass of growing, tube-like hyphae. Each extending tip is fed by a continuous flow of nuclei from the colony interior, pushed by a gradient in turgor pressure. The myco-fluidic flows of nuclei are complex and multidirectional, like traffic in a city. We map out the flows in a strain of the model filamentous fungus {\\it N. crassa} that has been transformed so that nuclei express either hH1-dsRed (a red fluorescent nuclear protein) or hH1-GFP (a green-fluorescent protein) and report our results in a fluid dynamics video.

  1. Defects in crystalline packings of twisted filament bundles. II. Dislocations and grain boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadi, Amir; Grason, Gregory M

    2012-03-01

    Twisted and ropelike assemblies of filamentous molecules are common and vital structural elements in cells and tissues of living organisms. We study the intrinsic frustration occurring in these materials between the two-dimensional organization of filaments in cross section and out-of-plane interfilament twist in bundles. Using nonlinear continuum elasticity theory of columnar materials, we study the favorable coupling of twist-induced stresses to the presence of edge dislocations in the lattice packing of bundles, which leads to a restructuring of the ground-state order of these materials at intermediate twist. The stability of dislocations increases as both the degree of twist and lateral bundle size grow. We show that in ground states of large bundles, multiple dislocations pile up into linear arrays, radial grain boundaries, whose number and length grows with bundle twist, giving rise to a rich class of "polycrystalline" packings. PMID:22587105

  2. Altered expression of epithelial cell surface glycoconjugates and intermediate filaments at the margins of mucosal wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Grøn, B; Mandel, U;

    1998-01-01

    Alterations in cell to cell adhesion are necessary to enable the type of cell movements that are associated with epithelial wound healing and malignant invasion. Several studies of transformed cells have related epithelial cell movement to changes in the cell surface expression of the carbohydrate...... structures represented by the ABO blood group antigens and, in particular, by Lewis antigens and their biosynthetic precursors. To study further the relationship between cell surface carbohydrates and keratinocyte cell movement, experimental wounds were created in human oral mucosa and examined by...... immunohistochemical methods for their expression of selected cytokeratins (K5, K16, K19), basement membrane components (laminin alpha5 and gamma2-chains, BP180, collagen IV and collagen VII), and blood group antigen precursor structures Le(x), sialosyl-Le(x), Le(y), H antigen, N-acetyllactosamine, and sialosyl...

  3. FSHD myoblasts fail to downregulate intermediate filament protein vimentin during myogenic differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipinski M.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal dominant hereditary neuromuscular disorder. The clinical features of FSHD include weakness of the facial and shoulder girdle muscles followed by wasting of skeletal muscles of the pelvic girdle and lower extremities. Although FSHD myoblasts grown in vitro can be induced to differentiate into myotubes by serum starvation, the resulting FSHD myotubes have been shown previously to be morphologically abnormal. Aim. In order to find the cause of morphological anomalies of FSHD myotubes we compared in vitro myogenic differentiation of normal and FSHD myoblasts at the protein level. Methods. We induced myogenic differentiation of normal and FSHD myoblasts by serum starvation. We then compared protein extracts from proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes using SDS-PAGE followed by mass spectrometry identification of differentially expressed proteins. Results. We demonstrated that the expression of vimentin was elevated at the protein and mRNA levels in FSHD myotubes as compared to normal myotubes. Conclusions. We demonstrate for the first time that in contrast to normal myoblasts, FSHD myoblasts fail to downregulate vimentin after induction of in vitro myogenic differentiation. We suggest that vimentin could be an easily detectable marker of FSHD myotubes

  4. Caveolae in fibroblast-like synoviocytes: static structures associated with vimentin-based intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper; Tamas, Raluca; Riemann, Anne; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte; Hansen, Gert; Michael Danielsen, E

    2008-01-01

    The fibroblast-like synoviocyte is a CD13-positive cell-type containing numerous caveolae, both single and interconnected clusters. In unstimulated cells, all single caveolae at the cell surface and the majority of those localized deeper into the cytoplasm were freely accessible from the medium, as...... judged from electron microscopy of synoviocytes exposed to the membrane impermeable marker Ruthenium Red. Caveolar internalization could be induced by a CD13 antibody or by cholera toxin B subunit (CTB). Thus, in experiments using sequential labeling with Alexa 488- and 594-conjugated CTB, about 50% of...... involved in cell-cell interactions, such as CD13, can be sequestered by binding to RECK in a regulatory manner....

  5. Rupture and recoil of bent-core liquid crystal filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salili, S M; Ostapenko, T; Kress, O; Bailey, C; Weissflog, W; Harth, K; Eremin, A; Stannarius, R; Jákli, A

    2016-05-25

    The recoil process of free-standing liquid crystal filaments is investigated experimentally and theoretically. We focus on two aspects, the contraction speed of the filament and a spontaneously formed undulation instability. At the moment of rupture, the filaments buckle similarly to the classical Euler buckling of elastic rods. The tip velocity decays with decreasing filament length. The wavelength of buckling affinely decreases with the retracting filament tip. The energy gain related to the decrease of the total length and surface area of the filaments is mainly dissipated by layer rearrangements during thickening of the fibre. A flow back into the meniscus is relevant only in the final stage of the recoil process. We introduce a model for the quantitative description of the filament retraction speed. The dynamics of this recoil behaviour may find relevance as a model for biology-related filaments. PMID:27140824

  6. Interaction of Two Filament Channels of Different Chiralities

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Schmieder, Brigitte; Magara, Tetsuya; Moon, Young-Jae; Uddin, Wahab

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of interactions between the two filament channels of different chiralities and associated dynamics that occurred during 2014 April 18 -- 20. While two flux ropes of different helicity with parallel axial magnetic fields can only undergo a bounce interaction when they are brought together, the observations at the first glance show that the heated plasma is moving from one filament channel to the other. The SDO/AIA 171 A observations and the PFSS magnetic field extrapolation reveal the presence of fan-spine magnetic configuration over the filament channels with a null point located above them. Three different events of filament activations, partial eruptions, and associated filament channel interactions have been observed. The activation initiated in one filament channel seems to propagate along the neighbour filament channel. We believe that the activation and partial eruption of the filaments bring the field lines of flux ropes containing them closer to the null point and trigger the m...

  7. Multiple Filamentation of Laser Pulses in a Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apeksimov, D. V.; Bukin, O. A.; Golik, S. S.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Iglakova, A. N.; Kabanov, A. M.; Kuchinskaya, O. I.; Matvienko, G. G.; Oshlakov, V. K.; Petrov, A. V.; Sokolova, E. B.

    2016-03-01

    Results are presented of experiments on investigation of the spatial characteristics of multi-filamentation region of giga- and terawatt pulses of a Ti:sapphire laser in a glass. Dependences are obtained of the coordinate of the beginning of filamentation region, number of filaments, their distribution along the laser beam axis, and length of filaments on the pulse power. It is shown that with increasing radiation power, the number of filaments in the multi-filamentation region decreases, whereas the filament diameter has a quasiconstant value for all powers realized in the experiments. It is shown that as a certain power of the laser pulse with Gauss energy density distribution is reached, the filamentation region acquires the shape of a hollow cone with apex directed toward the radiation source.

  8. Dynamics of filament formation in a Kerr medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the large-scale beam breakup and filamentation of femtosecond pulses in a Kerr medium. We have experimentally monitored the formation of stable light filaments, conical emission, and interactions between filaments. Three major stages lead to the formation of stable light filaments: First the beam breaks up into a pattern of connected lines (constellation), then filaments form on the constellations, and finally the filaments release a fraction of their energy through conical emission. We observed a phase transition to a faster filamentation rate at the onset of conical emission. We attribute this to the interaction of conical emissions with the constellation which creates additional filaments. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental results

  9. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie;

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  10. Multiple breathers on a vortex filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, H.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we investigate the correspondence between the Da Rios-Betchov equation, which appears in the three-dimensional motion of a vortex filament, and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Using this correspondence we map a set of solutions corresponding to breathers in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation to waves propagating along a vortex filament. The work presented generalizes the recently derived family of vortex configurations associated with these breather solutions to a wider class of configurations that are associated with combination homoclinic/heteroclinic orbits of the 1D self-focussing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We show that by considering these solutions of the governing nonlinear Schrödinger equation, highly nontrivial vortex filament configurations can be obtained that are associated with a pair of breather excitations. These configurations can lead to loop-like excitations emerging from an otherwise weakly perturbed helical vortex. The results presented further demonstrate the rich class of solutions that are supported by the Da Rios-Betchov equation that is recovered within the local induction approximation for the motion of a vortex filament.

  11. The Apis mellifera filamentous virus genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    A complete reference genome of the Apis mellifera Filamentous virus (AmFV) was determined using Illumina Hiseq sequencing. The AmFV genome is a double strand DNA molecule of approximately 498’500 nucleotides with a GC content of 50.8%. It encompasses 251 non overlapping open reading frames (ORFs), e...

  12. On viscoelastic instability in polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    The 3D Lagrangian Integral Method is used to simulate the effects of surface tension on the viscoelastic end-plate instability, occuring in the rapid extension of some polymeric filaments between parallel plates. It is shovn that the surface tension delays the onset of the instability. Furthermore...

  13. Filament stretching rheometer: inertia compensation revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2003-01-01

    The necessary inertia compensation used in the force balance for the filament stretching rheometer is derived for an arbitrary frame of reference. This enables the force balance to be used to extract correctly the extensional viscosity from measurements of the tensile force at either end of the...

  14. Modelling the morphology of filamentous microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1996-01-01

    The rapid development in image analysis techniques has made it possible to study the growth kinetics of filamentous microorganisms in more detail than previously, However, owing to the many different processes that influence the morphology it is important to apply mathematical models to extract...

  15. Electric field generation by the electron beam filamentation instability: Filament size effects

    CERN Document Server

    Dieckmann, M E

    2009-01-01

    The filamentation instability (FI) of counter-propagating beams of electrons is modelled with a particle-in-cell simulation in one spatial dimension and with a high statistical plasma representation. The simulation direction is orthogonal to the beam velocity vector. Both electron beams have initially equal densities, temperatures and moduli of their nonrelativistic mean velocities. The FI is electromagnetic in this case. A previous study of a small filament demonstrated, that the magnetic pressure gradient force (MPGF) results in a nonlinearly driven electrostatic field. The probably small contribution of the thermal pressure gradient to the force balance implied, that the electrostatic field performed undamped oscillations around a background electric field. Here we consider larger filaments, which reach a stronger electrostatic potential when they saturate. The electron heating is enhanced and electrostatic electron phase space holes form. The competition of several smaller filaments, which grow simultaneo...

  16. Structure and paramyosin content of tarantula thick filaments

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Muscle fibers of the tarantula femur exhibit structural and biochemical characteristics similar to those of other long-sarcomere invertebrate muscles, having long A-bands and long thick filaments. 9-12 thin filaments surround each thick filament. Tarantula muscle has a paramyosin:myosin heavy chain molecular ratio of 0.31 +/- 0.079 SD. We studied the myosin cross-bridge arrangement on the surface of tarantula thick filaments on isolated, negatively stained, and unidirectionally metal-shadowed...

  17. On the filament motion in magnetic field of active regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of filament motion in magnetic field of active regions is fulfiled. Filament movement can possibly be presented as a drift in the crossed fields, but there exist fast movements that cannot be described as a drift. For very fast motion, with acceleration greater than that of free fall, it is sometimes necessary to assume, that the motion is carried out due to the filament's own electric current. A model, describing filament motion data, given by Mouradian M. is presented

  18. Bacterial Microcompartments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Cannon, Gordon C.

    2010-06-05

    Bacterialmicrocompartments (BMCs) are organelles composed entirely of protein. They promote specific metabolic processes by encapsulatingand colocalizing enzymes with their substrates and cofactors, by protecting vulnerable enzymes in a defined microenvironment, and bysequestering toxic or volatile intermediates. Prototypes of the BMCsare the carboxysomes of autotrophic bacteria. However, structures of similarpolyhedral shape are being discovered in an ever-increasing number of heterotrophic bacteria, where they participate in the utilization ofspecialty carbon and energy sources.Comparative genomics reveals that the potential for this type of compartmentalization is widespread acrossbacterial phyla and suggests that genetic modules encoding BMCs are frequently laterally transferred among bacteria. The diverse functionsof these BMCs suggest that they contribute to metabolic innovation in bacteria in a broad range of environments.

  19. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  20. A penny-shaped crack in a filament-reinforced matrix. I - The filament model. II - The crack problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The study deals with the elastostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which is reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack. An elastic filament model is first developed, followed by consideration of the application of the model to the penny-shaped crack problem in which the filaments of finite length are asymmetrically distributed around the crack. Since the primary interest is in the application of the results to studies relating to the fracture of fiber or filament-reinforced composites and reinforced concrete, the main emphasis of the study is on the evaluation of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. Using the filament model developed, the elastostatic interaction problem between a penny-shaped crack and a slender inclusion or filament in an elastic matrix is formulated.

  1. Filamentary structures in dense plasma focus: Current filaments or vortex filaments?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, CCHEN, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4, Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Castillo, Fermin [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, México (Mexico); Veloso, Felipe [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 7820436 Santiago (Chile); Auluck, S. K. H. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-07-15

    Recent observations of an azimuthally distributed array of sub-millimeter size sources of fusion protons and correlation between extreme ultraviolet (XUV) images of filaments with neutron yield in PF-1000 plasma focus have re-kindled interest in their significance. These filaments have been described variously in literature as current filaments and vortex filaments, with very little experimental evidence in support of either nomenclature. This paper provides, for the first time, experimental observations of filaments on a table-top plasma focus device using three techniques: framing photography of visible self-luminosity from the plasma, schlieren photography, and interferometry. Quantitative evaluation of density profile of filaments from interferometry reveals that their radius closely agrees with the collision-less ion skin depth. This is a signature of relaxed state of a Hall fluid, which has significant mass flow with equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy, supporting the “vortex filament” description. This interpretation is consistent with empirical evidence of an efficient energy concentration mechanism inferred from nuclear reaction yields.

  2. Production, characterization, and modeling of mineral filled polypropylene filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Brian Robert

    1999-11-01

    This research produced mineral filled polypropylene filaments using a variety of fillers, characterized these filaments, and attempted to model their mechanical properties with current composite models. Also, these filaments were compared with bone to determine if they are suitable for modeling the mechanical properties of bone. Fillers used consist of wollastonite, talc, calcium carbonate, titanium dioxide, and hydroxyapatite. Fillers and polypropylene chips were combined and extruded into rods with the use of a mixer. The rods were chipped up and then formed into filaments through melt extrusion utilizing a piston extruder. Filaments with volume fractions of filler of 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20 were produced. Additionally, some methods of trying to improve the properties of these filaments were attempted, but did not result in any significant property improvements. The fillers and filaments were visually characterized with a scanning electron microscope. Cross-sections, filament outer surfaces, fracture surfaces, and longitudinal cut open surfaces were viewed in this manner. Those filaments with anisotropic filler had some oriented filler particles, while all filaments suffered from poor adhesion between the polypropylene and the filler as well as agglomerations of filler particles. Twenty specimens of each filament were tensile tested and the average tenacity, strain, and modulus were calculated. Filaments containing talc, talc and wollastonite, titanium dioxide, or hydroxyapatite suffered from a drastic transition from ductile to brittle with the addition of 0.05 volume fraction of filler. This is evidenced by the sharp decrease in strain at this volume fraction of filler when compared to the strain of the unfilled polypropylene filament. Additionally, these same filaments suffered a sharp decrease in tenacity at the same volume fraction. These instant decreases are attributed to the agglomerations of filler in the filament. Generally, the modulus of the

  3. First genomic insights into members of a candidate bacterial phylum responsible for wastewater bulking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Sekiguchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous cells belonging to the candidate bacterial phylum KSB3 were previously identified as the causative agent of fatal filament overgrowth (bulking in a high-rate industrial anaerobic wastewater treatment bioreactor. Here, we obtained near complete genomes from two KSB3 populations in the bioreactor, including the dominant bulking filament, using differential coverage binning of metagenomic data. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with 16S rRNA-targeted probes specific for the two populations confirmed that both are filamentous organisms. Genome-based metabolic reconstruction and microscopic observation of the KSB3 filaments in the presence of sugar gradients indicate that both filament types are Gram-negative, strictly anaerobic fermenters capable of non-flagellar based gliding motility, and have a strikingly large number of sensory and response regulator genes. We propose that the KSB3 filaments are highly sensitive to their surroundings and that cellular processes, including those causing bulking, are controlled by external stimuli. The obtained genomes lay the foundation for a more detailed understanding of environmental cues used by KSB3 filaments, which may lead to more robust treatment options to prevent bulking.

  4. Detection of intracellular bacterial communities in human urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Rosen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs. These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18% urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41% urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29% of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001. Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22% had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45% had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The

  5. DNA repair in bacterial cultures and plasmid DNA exposed to infrared laser for treatment of pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biostimulation of tissues by low intensity lasers has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases, but their effects on DNA are controversial. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of low intensity infrared laser exposure on survival and bacterial filamentation in Escherichia coli cultures, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. In E. coli cultures and plasmids exposed to an infrared laser at fluences used to treat pain, bacterial survival and filamentation and DNA lesions in plasmids were evaluated by electrophoretic profile. Data indicate that the infrared laser (i) increases survival of E. coli wild type in 24 h of stationary growth phase, (ii) induces bacterial filamentation, (iii) does not alter topological forms of plasmids and (iv) does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. A low intensity infrared laser at the therapeutic fluences used to treat pain can alter survival of E. coli wild type, induce filamentation in bacterial cells, depending on physiologic conditions and DNA repair, and induce DNA lesions other than single or double DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites, which are not targeted by exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. (letter)

  6. DNA repair in bacterial cultures and plasmid DNA exposed to infrared laser for treatment of pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Marciano, R. S.; Guimarães, O. R.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    Biostimulation of tissues by low intensity lasers has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases, but their effects on DNA are controversial. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of low intensity infrared laser exposure on survival and bacterial filamentation in Escherichia coli cultures, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. In E. coli cultures and plasmids exposed to an infrared laser at fluences used to treat pain, bacterial survival and filamentation and DNA lesions in plasmids were evaluated by electrophoretic profile. Data indicate that the infrared laser (i) increases survival of E. coli wild type in 24 h of stationary growth phase, (ii) induces bacterial filamentation, (iii) does not alter topological forms of plasmids and (iv) does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. A low intensity infrared laser at the therapeutic fluences used to treat pain can alter survival of E. coli wild type, induce filamentation in bacterial cells, depending on physiologic conditions and DNA repair, and induce DNA lesions other than single or double DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites, which are not targeted by exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

  7. High-Resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingna; Li, Shangwei; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the sympathetic eruptions of two solar filaments side by side as observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) on 2015 October 15. These two filaments start from the complex active region NOAA 12434 (north) and end in a large quiescent region (south). The corresponding SDO/HMI magnetic field observations suggest that the two small filaments are located above two different polarity inversion lines in the northern part. The SDO/AIA observations of the eruption show that these two filaments appear to merge into one in the southern quiescent region. The north-eastern filament starts eruption firstly, which is followed by the north-western filament eruption about 20 minutes later. Clear untwisting motions (i.e., signature of flux ropes) are observed in both filaments during the eruption. After the lifts off of the north-western filament, mini filaments are observed to emerge from the surface and rise up multiple times. The high-resolution observations reveal the fact that the filament is composed of multiple sections and multiple layers. The filament in the lower layer can merge into the upper layer, which leads to the increase of non-potentiality of the upper layer. Magnetic field models using the flux rope insertion method are also constructed in order to understand the complex magnetic configuration as well as the initiation and dynamics of the eruptions.

  8. In situ ellipsometric study of surface immobilization of flagellar filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein filaments composed of thousands of subunits are promising candidates as sensing elements in biosensors. In this work in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry is applied to monitor the surface immobilization of flagellar filaments. This study is the first step towards the development of layers of filamentous receptors for sensor applications. Surface activation is performed using silanization and a subsequent glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Structure of the flagellar filament layers immobilized on activated and non-activated Si wafer substrates is determined using a two-layer effective medium model that accounted for the vertical density distribution of flagellar filaments with lengths of 300-1500 nm bound to the surface. The formation of the first interface layer can be explained by the multipoint covalent attachment of the filaments, while the second layer is mainly composed of tail pinned filaments floating upwards with the free parts. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy, covalent immobilization resulted in an increased surface density compared to absorption.

  9. Magnetic reconnection between a solar filament and nearby coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Leping; Peter, Hardi; Priest, Eric; Chen, Huadong; Guo, Lijia; Chen, Feng; Mackay, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection, the rearrangement of magnetic field topology, is a fundamental physical process in magnetized plasma systems all over the universe1,2. Its process is difficult to be directly observed. Coronal structures, such as coronal loops and filament spines, often sketch the magnetic field geometry and its changes in the solar corona3. Here we show a highly suggestive observation of magnetic reconnection between an erupting solar filament and its nearby coronal loops, resulting in changes in connection of the filament. X-type structures form when the erupting filament encounters the loops. The filament becomes straight, and bright current sheets form at the interfaces with the loops. Many plasmoids appear in these current sheets and propagate bi-directionally. The filament disconnects from the current sheets, which gradually disperse and disappear, reconnects to the loops, and becomes redirected to the loop footpoints. This evolution of the filament and the loops suggests successive magnetic recon...

  10. Galaxy spin alignment in filaments and sheets: observational evidence

    CERN Document Server

    Tempel, Elmo

    2013-01-01

    Galaxies properties are known to be affected by their environment. One important question is how their angular momentum reflects the surrounding cosmic web. We use the SDSS to investigate the spin axes of spiral and elliptical galaxies relative to their surrounding filament/sheet orientations. To detect filaments a marked point process with interactions (the "Bisous model") is used. Sheets are found by detecting "flattened" filaments. The minor axes of ellipticals are found to be preferentially perpendicular to hosting filaments. A weak correlation is found with sheets. These findings are consistent with the notion that elliptical galaxies formed via mergers which predominantly occurred along the filaments. The spin axis of spiral galaxies is found to align with the host filament, with no correlation between spiral spin and sheet normal. When examined as a function of distance from the filament axis, a much stronger correlation is found in outer parts, suggesting that the alignment is driven by the laminar in...

  11. Topological Aspect of Knotted Vortex Filaments in Excitable Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Ji-Rong; ZHU Tao; DUAN Yi-Shi

    2008-01-01

    Scroll waves exist ubiquitously in three-dimensional excitable media.The rotation centre can be regarded as a topological object called the vortex filament.In three-dimensional space,the vortex filaments usually form closed loops,and can be even linked and knotted.We give a rigorous topological description of knotted vortex filaments.By using the Φ-mapping topological current theory,we rewrite the topological current form of the charge density of vortex filaments,and using this topological current we reveal that the Hopf invariant of vortex filaments is just the sum of the linking and self-linking numbers of the knotted vortex filaments.We think that the precise expression of the Hopf invariant may imply a new topological constraint on knotted vortex filaments.

  12. Structure and dynamics of penumbral filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Cobo, B Ruiz

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution observations of sunspots have revealed the existence of dark cores inside the bright filaments of the penumbra. Here we present the stationary solution of the heat transfer equation in a stratified penumbra consisting of nearly horizontal magnetic flux tubes embedded in a stronger and more vertical field. The tubes and the external medium are in horizontal mechanical equilibrium. This model produces bright filaments with dark cores as a consequence of the higher density of the plasma inside the flux tube, which shifts the surface of optical depth unity toward higher (cooler) layers. Our results suggest that the surplus brightness of the penumbra is a natural consequence of the Evershed flow, and that magnetic flux tubes about 250 km in diameter can explain the morphology of sunspot penumbra.

  13. Filament velocity scaling in SOL plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the edge region of magnetically confined plasmas one observes intermittent transport of plasma by filaments elongated along the magnetic field lines. These filaments carry excess plasma particles and heat and are referred to as blobs. Blobs are created behind the LCFS and move radially outwards through the SOL, contributing significantly to particle and heat loss as well as wall erosion. Recent experimental progress shows a broad range of blob velocities with regimes where the blobs accelerate and regimes where it presents a constant velocity in the range of the acoustic velocity. This work presents the blob velocity scaling for a electrostatic interchange model. Numerical simulations show the blob velocity scaling depending on sheath parallel currents. We identify regimes blob acceleration behaviour and a velocity scaling depending on the size of the structure.

  14. Influence of multiple ionization in laser filamentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser filaments in gases result from the nonlinear balance between optical Kerr self-focusing and plasma generation in the single ionization limit, i.e., the pulse intensity is supposed to remain moderate enough (∼1014 W cm−2) to apply photo-ionization theories valid for an averaged ion charge less than unity. However, no theory has attempted so far to consider how an ionization model allowing a priori multiple-charged states could impact the standard filamentation scenario. Here, we discuss a multiple photo-ionization scheme that relies on probabilities assuming successive single-electron ionizations. We numerically show that a multiple ionization scheme can increase the clamping intensity, the peak electron density and supercontinuum generation in gases with high binding energy, e.g., helium. (paper)

  15. Solar Magnetized "Tornadoes": Relation to Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Gan, Weiqun

    2012-01-01

    Solar magnetized "tornadoes", a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but root in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar "tornadoes" {Two papers which focused on different aspect of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters (Li et al. 2012) and Nature (Wedemeyer-B\\"ohm et al. 2012), respectively, during the revision of this Letter.}. A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and relate to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanati...

  16. Structure and kinematics of the Bootes filament

    CERN Document Server

    Nasonova, Olga G; Karachentseva, Valentina E

    2014-01-01

    Bootes filament of galaxies is a dispersed chain of groups residing on sky between the Local Void and the Virgo cluster. We consider a sample of 361 galaxies inside the sky area of $RA = 13.0^h ... 18.5^h$ and $Dec = -5^\\circ ... +10^\\circ$ with radial velocities $V_{LG} 17^h$. According to the galaxy grouping criterion, this complex contains the members of 13 groups, 11 pairs and 140 field galaxies. The most prominent group is dominated by NGC5846. The Bootes filament contains the total stellar mass of $2.7\\times10^{12} M_\\odot$ and the total virial mass of $9.07\\times10^{13} M_\\odot$, having the average density of dark matter to be $\\Omega_m = 0.09$, i.e. a factor three lower than the global cosmic value.

  17. Merging and energy exchange between optical filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, D. A., E-mail: dgeorgieva@tu-sofia.bg [Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Sofia, 8 Kliment Ohridski Blvd., 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Kovachev, L. M. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradcko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-10-28

    We investigate nonlinear interaction between collinear femtosecond laser pulses with power slightly above the critical for self-focusing P{sub cr} trough the processes of cross-phase modulation (CPM) and degenerate four-photon parametric mixing (FPPM). When there is no initial phase difference between the pulses we observe attraction between pulses due to CPM. The final result is merging between the pulses in a single filament with higher power. By method of moments it is found that the attraction depends on the distance between the pulses and has potential character. In the second case we study energy exchange between filaments. This process is described through FPPM scheme and requests initial phase difference between the waves.

  18. Laser filamentation mathematical methods and models

    CERN Document Server

    Lorin, Emmanuel; Moloney, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on the nonlinear theoretical and mathematical problems associated with ultrafast intense laser pulse propagation in gases and in particular, in air. With the aim of understanding the physics of filamentation in gases, solids, the atmosphere, and even biological tissue, specialists in nonlinear optics and filamentation from both physics and mathematics attempt to rigorously derive and analyze relevant non-perturbative models. Modern laser technology allows the generation of ultrafast (few cycle) laser pulses, with intensities exceeding the internal electric field in atoms and molecules (E=5x109 V/cm or intensity I = 3.5 x 1016 Watts/cm2 ). The interaction of such pulses with atoms and molecules leads to new, highly nonlinear nonperturbative regimes, where new physical phenomena, such as High Harmonic Generation (HHG), occur, and from which the shortest (attosecond - the natural time scale of the electron) pulses have been created. One of the major experimental discoveries in this nonlinear...

  19. The Eastern Filament of W50

    CERN Document Server

    Abolmasov, P; Burenkov, N A

    2010-01-01

    We present new spectral (FPI and long-slit) data on the Eastern optical filament of the well known radionebula W50 associated with SS433. We find that on sub-parsec scales different emission lines are emitted by different regions with evidently different physical conditions. Kinematical properties of the ionized gas show evidence for moderately high (V ~ 100 km/s) supersonic motions. [OIII]5007 emission is found to be multi-component and differs from lower-excitation [SII]6717 line both in spatial and kinematical properties. Indirect evidence for very low characteristic densities of the gas (n ~ 0.1cm^{-3}) is found. We propose radiative (possibly incomplete) shock waves in low-density, moderately high metallicity gas as the most probable candidate for the power source of the optical filament. Apparent nitrogen over-abundance is better understood if the location of W50 in the Galaxy is taken into account.

  20. Diesel Pollution Biodegradation: Synergetic Effect of Mycobacterium and Filamentous Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU-QING LI; HONG-FANG LIU; ZHEN-LE TIAN; LI-HUA ZHU; YIN-GHUI WU; HE-QING TANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To biodegrade the diesel pollution in aqueous solution inoculated with Mycobacterium and filamentous fungi.Methods Bacteria sampled from petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated sites in Karamay Oilfield were isolated and identified as Mycobacterium hyalinum (MH) and cladosporium. Spectrophotometry and gas chromatography (GC) were used to analyze of the residual concentrations of diesel oil and its biodegradation products. Results From the GC data, the values of apparent biodegradation ratio of the bacterial strain MH to diesel oil were close to those obtained in the control experiments. Moreover, the number of MH did not increase with degradation time. However, by using n-octadecane instead of diesel oil, the real biotic degradation ratio increased to 20.9% over 5 days of degradation. Cladosporium strongly biodegraded diesel oil with a real degradation ratio of up to 34% after 5 days treatment. When the two strains were used simultaneously, a significant synergistic effect between them resulted in almost cornplete degradation of diesel off, achieving a total diesel removal of 99% over 5 days of treatment, in which one part of about 80% and another part of about 19% were attributed to biotic and abiotic processes, respectively. Conclusion The observed synergistic effect was closely related to the aromatics-degrading ability of Cladosporium, which favored the growth of MH and promoted the bioavailability of diesel oil.

  1. Cold Milky Way HI Gas in Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.; Haud, U.; Winkel, B.; Ben Bekhti, N.; Flöer, L.; Lenz, D.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate data from the Galactic Effelsberg-Bonn H i Survey, supplemented with data from the third release of the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS III) observed at Parkes. We explore the all-sky distribution of the local Galactic H i gas with | {v}{{LSR}}| \\lt 25 km s‑1 on angular scales of 11‧–16‧. Unsharp masking is applied to extract small-scale features. We find cold filaments that are aligned with polarized dust emission and conclude that the cold neutral medium (CNM) is mostly organized in sheets that are, because of projection effects, observed as filaments. These filaments are associated with dust ridges, aligned with the magnetic field measured on the structures by Planck at 353 GHz. The CNM above latitudes | b| \\gt 20^\\circ is described by a log-normal distribution, with a median Doppler temperature TD = 223 K, derived from observed line widths that include turbulent contributions. The median neutral hydrogen (H i) column density is NH i ≃ 1019.1 cm‑2. These CNM structures are embedded within a warm neutral medium with NH i ≃ 1020 cm‑2. Assuming an average distance of 100 pc, we derive for the CNM sheets a thickness of ≲0.3 pc. Adopting a magnetic field strength of Btot = (6.0 ± 1.8) μG, proposed by Heiles & Troland, and assuming that the CNM filaments are confined by magnetic pressure, we estimate a thickness of 0.09 pc. Correspondingly, the median volume density is in the range 14 ≲ n ≲ 47 cm‑3. The authors thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for support under grant numbers KE757/11-1, KE757/7-3, KE757/7-2, KE757/7-1, and BE4823/1-1.

  2. Stimulation of Actin Polymerization by Filament Severing

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, A E

    2005-01-01

    The extent and dynamics of actin polymerization in solution are calculated as functions of the filament severing rate, using a simple model of in vitro polymerization. The model is solved by both analytic theory and stochastic-growth simulation. The results show that severing essentially always enhances actin polymerization by freeing up barbed ends, if barbed-end cappers are present. Severing has much weaker effects if only pointed-end cappers are present. In the early stages of polymerizati...

  3. Evolution of genetic systems in filamentous Ascomycetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Nauta, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    A great variety of genetic systems exist in filamentous ascomycetes. The transmission of genetic material does not only occur by (sexual or asexual) reproduction, but it can also follow vegetative fusion of different strains. In this thesis the evolution of this variability is studied, using theoretical population genetic models.First the evolution of different reproductive systems is studied. It is found that homothallism (allowing selfing) most probably evolved from heterothallism. (with tw...

  4. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Resul...... for LDPE up to 7 Hencky strain units show a maximum in the transient elongational viscosity followed by a steady stress. Also results for monodisperse PS fractions will be shown and discussed....

  5. A first approach to filament dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, P E S; De Abreu, F Vistulo; Dias, R G [Department of Physics, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Simoes, R, E-mail: fva@ua.p [I3N-Institute for Nanostructures, Nanomodelling and Nanofabrication (Portugal)

    2010-11-15

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive equations governing the dynamics of an elastic lament suitable for a computer simulation implementation. The derivation starts from the relation between forces and potential energy in conservative systems in order to derive the equation of motion of any bead in the filament. Only two-dimensional movements are considered, but extensions to three dimensions can follow similar lines. Suggestions for computer implementations are provided in Matlab as well as an example of application related to the generation of musical sounds. This example allows a critical analysis of the numerical results obtained using a cross-disciplinary perspective. Since derivations start from basic physics equations, use simple calculus and computational implementations are straightforward, this paper proposes a different approach to introduce simple molecular dynamics simulations or animations of real systems in undergraduate elasticity or computer modelling courses.

  6. A first approach to filament dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive equations governing the dynamics of an elastic lament suitable for a computer simulation implementation. The derivation starts from the relation between forces and potential energy in conservative systems in order to derive the equation of motion of any bead in the filament. Only two-dimensional movements are considered, but extensions to three dimensions can follow similar lines. Suggestions for computer implementations are provided in Matlab as well as an example of application related to the generation of musical sounds. This example allows a critical analysis of the numerical results obtained using a cross-disciplinary perspective. Since derivations start from basic physics equations, use simple calculus and computational implementations are straightforward, this paper proposes a different approach to introduce simple molecular dynamics simulations or animations of real systems in undergraduate elasticity or computer modelling courses.

  7. Modelling the chemistry of star forming filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Seifried, D

    2015-01-01

    We present simulations of star forming filaments incorporating - to our knowledge - the largest chemical network used to date on-the-fly in a 3D-MHD simulation. The network contains 37 chemical species and about 300 selected reaction rates. For this we use the newly developed package KROME (Grassi et al. 2014). We combine the KROME package with an algorithm which allows us to calculate the column density and attenuation of the interstellar radiation field necessary to properly model heating and ionisation rates. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using such a complex chemical network in 3D-MHD simulations on modern supercomputers. We perform simulations with different strengths of the interstellar radiation field and the cosmic ray ionisation rate. We find that towards the centre of the filaments there is gradual conversion of hydrogen from H^+ over H to H_2 as well as of C^+ over C to CO. Moreover, we find a decrease of the dust temperature towards the centre of the filaments in agreement with recent...

  8. The tidal filament of NGC 4660

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, S N; Marquez-Lugo, R A; Zepeda-Garcia, D; Franco-Hernandez, R; Nigoche-Netro, A; Ramos-Larios, G; Navarro, S G; Corral, L J

    2016-01-01

    NGC 4660, in the Virgo cluster, is a well-studied elliptical galaxy which has a strong disk component (D/T about 0.2-0.3). The central regions including the disk component have stellar populations with ages about 12-13 Gyr from SAURON studies. However we report the discovery of a long narrow tidal filament associated with the galaxy in deep co-added Schmidt plate images and deep CCD frames, implying that the galaxy has undergone a tidal interaction and merger within the last few Gyr. The relative narrowness of the filament implies a wet merger with at least one spiral galaxy involved, but the current state of the system has little evidence for this. However a 2-component photometric fit using GALFIT shows much bluer B-V colours for the disk component than for the elliptical component, which may represent a residual trace of enhanced star formation in the disk caused by the interaction 1-2 Gyr ago. There are brighter concentrations within the filament which resemble Tidal Dwarf Galaxies, although they are at l...

  9. Financial Intermediation and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Dima, Bogdan; Petru-Eugen OPRIȘ

    2013-01-01

    The paper evaluates the relationship between financial intermediation and the economic growth in the developing economic systems. First, using dataset from 28 countries,between 2001 and 2010 we define a financial intermediation indicator applying EFA method. We use several dimensions of the financial intermediation: Domestic credit provided by banking sector (% of GDP); Domestic credit to private sector (% of GDP); Broad money (% of GDP); Market capitalization of listed companies (% of GDP). ...

  10. Financial Intermediation and Macroeconomic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Woodford

    2010-01-01

    Understanding phenomena such as the recent financial crisis, and possible policy responses, requires the use of a macroeconomic framework in which financial intermediation matters for the allocation of resources. Neither standard macroeconomic models that abstract from financial intermediation nor traditional models of the "bank lending channel" are adequate as a basis for understanding the recent crisis. Instead we need models in which intermediation plays a crucial role, but in which interm...

  11. Ca2+ improves organization of single-stranded DNA bases in human Rad51 filament, explaining stimulatory effect on gene recombination.

    KAUST Repository

    Fornander, Louise H

    2012-02-22

    Human RAD51 protein (HsRad51) catalyses the DNA strand exchange reaction for homologous recombination. To clarify the molecular mechanism of the reaction in vitro being more effective in the presence of Ca(2+) than of Mg(2+), we have investigated the effect of these ions on the structure of HsRad51 filament complexes with single- and double-stranded DNA, the reaction intermediates. Flow linear dichroism spectroscopy shows that the two ionic conditions induce significantly different structures in the HsRad51/single-stranded DNA complex, while the HsRad51/double-stranded DNA complex does not demonstrate this ionic dependence. In the HsRad51/single-stranded DNA filament, the primary intermediate of the strand exchange reaction, ATP/Ca(2+) induces an ordered conformation of DNA, with preferentially perpendicular orientation of nucleobases relative to the filament axis, while the presence of ATP/Mg(2+), ADP/Mg(2+) or ADP/Ca(2+) does not. A high strand exchange activity is observed for the filament formed with ATP/Ca(2+), whereas the other filaments exhibit lower activity. Molecular modelling suggests that the structural variation is caused by the divalent cation interfering with the L2 loop close to the DNA-binding site. It is proposed that the larger Ca(2+) stabilizes the loop conformation and thereby the protein-DNA interaction. A tight binding of DNA, with bases perpendicularly oriented, could facilitate strand exchange.

  12. Protein-Nanocrystal Conjugates Support a Single Filament Polymerization Model in R1 Plasmid Segregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charina L.; Claridge, Shelley A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-07-15

    To ensure inheritance by daughter cells, many low-copy number bacterial plasmids, including the R1 drug-resistance plasmid, encode their own DNA segregation systems. The par operon of plasmid R1 directs construction of a simple spindle structure that converts free energy of polymerization of an actin-like protein, ParM, into work required to move sister plasmids to opposite poles of rod-shaped cells. The structures of individual components have been solved, but little is known about the ultrastructure of the R1 spindle. To determine the number of ParM filaments in a minimal R1 spindle, we used DNA-gold nanocrystal conjugates as mimics of the R1 plasmid. Wefound that each end of a single polar ParM filament binds to a single ParR/parC-gold complex, consistent with the idea that ParM filaments bind in the hollow core of the ParR/parC ring complex. Our results further suggest that multifilament spindles observed in vivo are associated with clusters of plasmidssegregating as a unit.

  13. Filaments in curved streamlines: rapid formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Drescher, Knut; Pak, On Shun; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-06-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated conglomerates of bacteria that are highly resistant to antibiotics. These bacterial communities can cause chronic infections in humans by colonizing, for example, medical implants, heart valves, or lungs. Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious human pathogen, causes some of the most common biofilm-related infections. Despite the clinical importance of S. aureus biofilms, it remains mostly unknown how physical effects, in particular flow, and surface structure influence biofilm dynamics. Here we use model microfluidic systems to investigate how environmental factors, such as surface geometry, surface chemistry, and fluid flow affect biofilm development of S. aureus. We discovered that S. aureus rapidly forms flow-induced, filamentous biofilm streamers, and furthermore if surfaces are coated with human blood plasma, streamers appear within minutes and clog the channels more rapidly than if the channels are uncoated. To understand how biofilm streamer filaments reorient in flows with curved streamlines to bridge the distances between corners, we developed a mathematical model based on resistive force theory of slender filaments. Understanding physical aspects of biofilm formation of S. aureus may lead to new approaches for interrupting biofilm formation of this pathogen.

  14. Filaments in curved streamlines: rapid formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm streamers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofilms are surface-associated conglomerates of bacteria that are highly resistant to antibiotics. These bacterial communities can cause chronic infections in humans by colonizing, for example, medical implants, heart valves, or lungs. Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious human pathogen, causes some of the most common biofilm-related infections. Despite the clinical importance of S. aureus biofilms, it remains mostly unknown how physical effects, in particular flow, and surface structure influence biofilm dynamics. Here we use model microfluidic systems to investigate how environmental factors, such as surface geometry, surface chemistry, and fluid flow affect biofilm development of S. aureus. We discovered that S. aureus rapidly forms flow-induced, filamentous biofilm streamers, and furthermore if surfaces are coated with human blood plasma, streamers appear within minutes and clog the channels more rapidly than if the channels are uncoated. To understand how biofilm streamer filaments reorient in flows with curved streamlines to bridge the distances between corners, we developed a mathematical model based on resistive force theory of slender filaments. Understanding physical aspects of biofilm formation of S. aureus may lead to new approaches for interrupting biofilm formation of this pathogen. (paper)

  15. Cloning and Characterization of Filamentous Fungal S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase from Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yao; Zhou, Shengmin; Yu, Haijun; Li, Jingyi; Xia, Yang; Li, Baoyi; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Ping

    2016-05-28

    S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) metabolizes S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and has been shown to play important roles in regulating cellular signaling and formulating host defense by modulating intracellular nitric oxide levels. The enzyme has been found in bacterial, yeast, mushroom, plant, and mammalian cells. However, to date, there is still no evidence of its occurrence in filamentous fungi. In this study, we cloned and investigated a GSNOR-like enzyme from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. The enzyme occurred in native form as a homodimer and exhibited low thermal stability. GSNO was an ideal substrate for the enzyme. The apparent Km and kcat values were 0.55 mM and 34,100 min(-1), respectively. Substrate binding sites and catalytic center amino acid residues based on those from known GSNORs were conserved in this enzyme, and the corresponding roles were verified using site-directed mutagenesis. Therefore, we demonstrated the presence of GSNOR in a filamentous fungus for the first time. PMID:26869606

  16. Type 1 pilus-mediated bacterial invasion of bladder epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Juan J.; Mulvey, Matthew A.; Schilling, Joel D.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2000-01-01

    Most strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) encode filamentous adhesive organelles called type 1 pili. We have determined that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, mediates not only bacterial adherence, but also invasion of human bladder epithelial cells. In contrast, adherence mediated by another pilus adhesin, PapG, did not initiate bacterial internalization. FimH-mediated invasion required localized host actin reorganization, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activation and host...

  17. Are grazer-induced adaptations of bacterial abundance and morphology time-dipendent?

    OpenAIRE

    Corno, Gianluca

    2006-01-01

    Predation by protists is a well known force that shapes bacterial communities and can lead to filamentous forms and aggregations of large cell clusters. These classic resistance strategies were observed as a direct consequence of predation by heteroand mixotrophic flagellates (the main group of bacteria predators in water) on natural assemblages of bacteria and on single plastic strains. Recently it was shown that a long time exposure (about 30 days) of a bacterial strain, characterized by hi...

  18. Are grazer-induced adaptations of bacterial abundance and morphology timedependent?

    OpenAIRE

    Corno, Gianluca

    2006-01-01

    Predation by protists is a well known force that shapes bacterial communities and can lead to filamentous forms and aggregations of large cell clusters. These classic resistance strategies were observed as a direct consequence of predation by heteroand mixotrophic flagellates (the main group of bacteria predators in water) on natural assemblages of bacteria and on single plastic strains. Recently it was shown that a long time exposure (about 30 days) of a bacterial strain, characterized by hi...

  19. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

  20. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. PMID:26240174

  1. Optimal Auditing Under Intermediated Contracting

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Gick

    2004-01-01

    This paper builds on Faure-Grimaud and Martimort’s [Economics Letters 71 (2001) 75-82] analysis of intermediated contracting. I argue that intermediated contracting permits one form of auditing, in which the sub-contract offered to the firm is examined, contingent on the intermediary’s report. Auditing reduces the intermediary’s rent and increases allocative efficiency.

  2. Recent results on intermediate polars

    OpenAIRE

    Hellier, Coel

    1999-01-01

    I review recent activity in the field of intermediate polars, concentrating on: the mode of accretion (disc-fed, disc-overflow or discless); accretion curtains (the transition region and the accretion footprint); X-ray pulse profiles (occultation and absorption effects); accretion columns (mass determinations, line-broadening, the soft X-ray component), and outbursts in intermediate polars.

  3. Masonry. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Moses

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 13 terminal objectives for an intermediate masonry course. These materials, developed for a two-semester (3 hours daily) course, are designed to provide the student with the skills and knowledge necessary for entry level employment in the field…

  4. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  5. Intermediate neutron spectrum problems and the intermediate neutron spectrum experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criticality benchmark data for intermediate energy spectrum systems does not exist. These systems are dominated by scattering and fission events induced by neutrons with energies between 1 eV and 1 MeV. Nuclear data uncertainties have been reported for such systems which can not be resolved without benchmark critical experiments. Intermediate energy spectrum systems have been proposed for the geological disposition of surplus fissile materials. Without the proper benchmarking of the nuclear data in the intermediate energy spectrum, adequate criticality safety margins can not be guaranteed. The Zeus critical experiment now under construction will provide this necessary benchmark data

  6. Heterocyst placement strategies to maximize growth of cyanobacterial filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Aidan I

    2012-01-01

    Under conditions of limited fixed-nitrogen, some filamentous cyanobacteria develop a regular pattern of heterocyst cells that fix nitrogen for the remaining vegetative cells. We examine three different heterocyst placement strategies by quantitatively modelling filament growth while varying both external fixed-nitrogen and leakage from the filament. We find that there is an optimum heterocyst frequency which maximizes the growth rate of the filament; the optimum frequency decreases as the external fixed-nitrogen concentration increases but increases as the leakage increases. In the presence of leakage, filaments implementing a local heterocyst placement strategy grow significantly faster than filaments implementing random heterocyst placement strategies. With no extracellular fixed-nitrogen, consistent with recent experimental studies of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the modelled heterocyst spacing distribution using our local heterocyst placement strategy is qualitatively similar to experimentally observed patterns...

  7. A Synchrotron-Based Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting Analysis of Amyloid Fibrils and Prefibrillar Intermediates with Residue-Specific Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, Alexandra L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kiselar, Janna [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ilchenko, Serguei [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Komatsu, Hiroaki [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chance, Mark R. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Axelsen, Paul H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-11-09

    The structural models of the fibrils formed by the 40-residue amyloid-β (Aβ40) peptide in Alzheimer’s disease typically consist of linear polypeptide segments, oriented approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the fibril, and joined together as parallel in-register β-sheets to form filaments. However, various models differ in the number of filaments that run the length of a fibril, and in the topological arrangement of these filaments. In addition to questions about the structure of Aβ40 monomers in fibrils, there are important unanswered questions about their structure in prefibrillar intermediates, which are of interest because they may represent the most neurotoxic form of Aβ40. To assess different models of fibril structure and to gain insight into the structure of prefibrillar intermediates, the relative solvent accessibility of amino acid residue side chains in fibrillar and prefibrillar Aβ40 preparations was characterized in solution by hydroxyl radical footprinting and structural mass spectrometry. A key to the application of this technology was the development of hydroxyl radical reactivity measures for individual side chains of Aβ40. When we combined mass-per-length measurements performed by dark-field electron microscopy, we determined that the results of our study were consistent with the core filament structure represented by two- and three-filament solid state nuclear magnetic resonance-based models of the Aβ40 fibril (such as 2LMN, 2LMO, 2LMP, and 2LMQ), with minor refinements, but they are inconsistent with the more recently proposed 2M4J model. Our results also demonstrate that individual Aβ40 fibrils exhibit structural heterogeneity or polymorphism, where regions of two-filament structure alternate with regions of three-filament structure. The footprinting approach utilized in this study will be valuable for characterizing various fibrillar and nonfibrillar forms of the Aβ peptide.

  8. Dead-end intermediates in the enterobacterial common antigen pathway induce morphological defects in Escherichia coli by competing for undecaprenyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Matthew A; Kannan, Suresh; Laubacher, Mary E; Young, Kevin D

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial morphology is determined primarily by the architecture of the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall, a mesh-like layer that encases the cell. To identify novel mechanisms that create or maintain cell shape in Escherichia coli, we used flow cytometry to screen a transposon insertion library and identified a wecE mutant that altered cell shape, causing cells to filament and swell. WecE is a sugar aminotransferase involved in the biosynthesis of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA), a non-essential outer membrane glycolipid of the Enterobacteriaceae. Loss of wecE interrupts biosynthesis of ECA and causes the accumulation of the undecaprenyl pyrophosphate-linked intermediate ECA-lipid II. The wecE shape defects were reversed by: (i) preventing initiation of ECA biosynthesis, (ii) increasing the synthesis of the lipid carrier undecaprenyl phosphate (Und-P), (iii) diverting Und-P to PG synthesis or (iv) promoting Und-P recycling. The results argue that the buildup of ECA-lipid II sequesters part of the pool of Und-P, which, in turn, adversely affects PG synthesis. The data strongly suggest there is competition for a common pool of Und-P, whose proper distribution to alternate metabolic pathways is required to maintain normal cell shape in E. coli. PMID:26593043

  9. Mechanism of Actin Filament Bundling by Fascin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Yang, Changsong; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto (UPENN); (UPENN-MED)

    2013-03-07

    Fascin is the main actin filament bundling protein in filopodia. Because of the important role filopodia play in cell migration, fascin is emerging as a major target for cancer drug discovery. However, an understanding of the mechanism of bundle formation by fascin is critically lacking. Fascin consists of four {beta}-trefoil domains. Here, we show that fascin contains two major actin-binding sites, coinciding with regions of high sequence conservation in {beta}-trefoil domains 1 and 3. The site in {beta}-trefoil-1 is located near the binding site of the fascin inhibitor macroketone and comprises residue Ser-39, whose phosphorylation by protein kinase C down-regulates actin bundling and formation of filopodia. The site in {beta}-trefoil-3 is related by pseudo-2-fold symmetry to that in {beta}-trefoil-1. The two sites are {approx}5 nm apart, resulting in a distance between actin filaments in the bundle of {approx}8.1 nm. Residue mutations in both sites disrupt bundle formation in vitro as assessed by co-sedimentation with actin and electron microscopy and severely impair formation of filopodia in cells as determined by rescue experiments in fascin-depleted cells. Mutations of other areas of the fascin surface also affect actin bundling and formation of filopodia albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that, in addition to the two major actin-binding sites, fascin makes secondary contacts with other filaments in the bundle. In a high resolution crystal structure of fascin, molecules of glycerol and polyethylene glycol are bound in pockets located within the two major actin-binding sites. These molecules could guide the rational design of new anticancer fascin inhibitors.

  10. Case study of a complex active-region filament eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. L.; Qu, Z. Q.; Kong, D. F.; Deng, L. H.; Xue, Z. K.

    2013-09-01

    Context. We investigated a solar active-region filament eruption associated with a C6.6 class flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME) in NOAA active region 08858 on 2000 February 9. Aims: We aim to better understand the relationship between filament eruptions and the associated flares and CMEs. Methods: Using BBSO, SOHO/EIT, and TRACE observational data, we analyzed the process of the active-region filament eruption in the chromosphere and the corona. Using the SOHO/MDI magnetograms, we investigated the change of the magnetic fields in the photosphere. Using the GOES soft X-ray flux and the SOHO/LASCO images, we identified the flare and CME, which were associated with this active-region filament eruption. Results: The brightenings in the chromosphere are a precursor of the filament expansion. The eruption itself can be divided into four phases: In the initial phase, the intertwined bright and dark strands of the filament expand. Then, the bright strands are divided into three parts with different expansion velocity. Next, the erupting filament-carrying flux rope expands rapidly and combines with the lower part of the expanding bright strands. Finally, the filament erupts accompanied by other dark strands overlying the filament.The overlying magnetic loops and the expansion of the filament strands can change the direction of the eruption. Conclusions: The time delay between the velocity peaks of the filament and that of the two parts of the bright strands clearly demonstrates that the breakup of the bright loops tying on the filament into individual strands is important for its eruption. The eruption is a collection of multiple processes that are physically coupled rather than a single process.

  11. Structural changes accompanying phosphorylation of tarantula muscle myosin filaments

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to study the structural changes that occur in the myosin filaments of tarantula striated muscle when they are phosphorylated. Myosin filaments in muscle homogenates maintained in relaxing conditions (ATP, EGTA) are found to have nonphosphorylated regulatory light chains as shown by urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis and [32P]phosphate autoradiography. Negative staining reveals an ordered, helical arrangement of crossbridges in these filaments, in which the hea...

  12. Filament free electron gun and ISU generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron Beam Curing consists of the use of accelerated electrons for the creation of chemical reactions such as polymerisation cross linking or grafting. Electron guns use thermal emission to produce electrons before accelerating them towards the products to be cured. In the range of energy from 150 kV to 300 kV, A.I.D. has developed a new machine that is more adapted to industrial uses. A filament free system that is more reliable, tougher and easier to maintain than conventional systems, is described. The ISU (Induction Spire Unique) high voltage generator is also described briefly. (U.K.)

  13. The elastic modulus of isolated polytetrafluoroethylene filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Drawe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report vibrational Raman spectra of small extended perfluoro-n-alkanes (CnF2n+2 with n = 6, 8–10, 12–14 isolated in supersonic jet expansions and use wavenumbers of longitudinal acoustic vibrations to extrapolate the elastic modulus of cold, isolated polytetrafluoroethylene filaments. The derived value E = 209(10 GPa defines an upper limit for the elastic modulus of the perfectly crystalline, noninteracting polymer at low temperatures and serves as a benchmark for quantum chemical predictions.

  14. The interaction energy of charged filaments in an electrolyte: Results for all filament spacings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D A

    2011-05-01

    Electrically charged long-chain macromolecules in an electrolyte can form an ordered lattice whose spacing is greater than their diameter. If entropic effects are neglected, these nematic structures can be predicted from a balance of Coulomb repulsion and van-der-Waals attraction forces. To enhance the utility of such theories, this paper extends existing results for the interaction between charged filaments, and gives approximate formulae for the screened Coulomb and van-der-Waals potentials over the whole range of their centre-to-centre spacing d. The repulsive Coulomb potential is proportional to exp(-λd)/λd for all spacings when the Debye screening length 1/λ is smaller than the sum of the filament radii. The attractive van-der-Waals potential is asymptotic to d⁻⁵ at large d. For smaller spacings, the potential is calculated by numerical integration and compared with published formulae: the series expansion of Brenner and McQuarrie converges too slowly, whereas the interpolation formula of Moisescu provides reasonable accuracy over the whole range of d. Combining these potentials shows that there is a finite range of charge densities for which a nematic crystal lattice is stable, but this conclusion ignores entropic effects associated with motile filaments. The role of electrostatic forces in aligning filaments and stabilizing a nematic liquid-crystal phase is discussed, in conjunction with other mechanisms such as motor proteins, crosslinkers or scaffolding structures. PMID:21295590

  15. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  16. Detection of Stacked Filament Lensing Between SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Clampitt, Joseph; Takada, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    We search for the lensing signal of massive filaments between 220,000 pairs of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use a nulling technique to remove the contribution of the LRG halos, resulting in a $10 \\sigma$ detection of the filament lensing signal. We compare the measurements with halo model predictions based on a calculation of 3-point halo-halo-mass correlations. Comparing the "thick" halo model filament to a "thin" string of halos, thick filaments larger than a Mpc in width are clearly preferred by the data.

  17. Defects on semiflexible filaments: Kinks and twist kinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Kyung; Johner, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Due to local interactions with ligands or to global constraints, semiflexible filaments can exhibit localized defects. We focus on filaments laying flat on a surface. The two lowest order singularities are addressed: discontinuities of the orientation, which are called kink, and discontinuities of the curvature. The latter are called twist kinks in flattened helical filaments where they can form spontaneously. We calculate the partition functions for a given defect fugacity and discuss some often measured quantities like the correlation of the orientation along the filament.

  18. Galaxy alignment as a probe of large-scale filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Rong, Yu; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The orientations of the red galaxies in a filament are aligned with the orientation of the filament. We thus develop a location-alignment-method (LAM) of detecting filaments around clusters of galaxies, which uses both the alignments of red galaxies and their distributions in two-dimensional images. For the first time, the orientations of red galaxies are used as probes of filaments. We apply LAM to the environment of Coma cluster, and find four filaments (two filaments are located in sheets) in two selected regions, which are compared with the filaments detected with the method of \\cite{Falco14}. We find that LAM can effectively detect the filaments around a cluster, even with $3\\sigma$ confidence level, and clearly reveal the number and overall orientations of the detected filaments. LAM is independent of the redshifts of galaxies, and thus can be applied at relatively high redshifts and to the samples of red galaxies without the information of redshifts. We also find that the images of background galaxies ...

  19. Lanthanum hexaboride tapered filament in a plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A directly heated lanthanum hexaboride tapered filament has been tested in a plasma generator. A uniform temperature distribution at 1820 K has been achieved. The heating and cooling power calculated from measured quantities are balanced. A maximum arc current of 80 A was obtained, limited only by the power supply and plasma generator. The corresponding hydrogen ion current density was 0.6 A/cm2 when the arc voltage was 80 V and the filament heater current was about 5 A. The filament was capable of emitting 100 A of current at an operating temperature of 1900 K. The estimated lifetime for this filament is 900 h

  20. Impact of Matric Potential and Pore Size Distribution on Growth Dynamics of Filamentous and Non-Filamentous Soil Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra B Wolf; Michiel Vos; Wietse de Boer; Kowalchuk, George A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to what extent, filamentous bacteria may also display similar advantages over non-filamentous bacteria in soils with low hydraulic connectivity. In addition to allowing for microbial interactions and c...

  1. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saathoff, H.; Henin, S.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Petrarca, M.; Delagrange, R.; Hao, Z.; Lüder, J.; Möhler, O.; Petit, Y.; Rohwetter, P.; Schnaiter, M.; Kasparian, J.; Leisner, T.; Wolf, J.-P.; Wöste, L.

    2013-05-01

    Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA, we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon-oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with particle production rates ranging from 1 × 107 to 5 × 109 cm-3 plasma s-1 for the given experimental conditions. In all cases the particle formation rates increased exponentially with the water content of the gas mixture. Furthermore, the presence of a few ppb of trace gases like SO2 and α-pinene clearly enhanced the particle yield by number, the latter also by mass. Our findings suggest that new particle formation is efficiently supported by oxidized species like acids generated by the photoionization of both major and minor components of the air, including N2, NH3, SO2 and organics.

  2. The Golgi apparatus: insights from filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazopoulou, Areti

    2016-01-01

    Cargo passage through the Golgi, albeit an undoubtedly essential cellular function, is a mechanistically unresolved and much debated process. Although the main molecular players are conserved, diversification of the Golgi among different eukaryotic lineages is providing us with tools to resolve standing controversies. During the past decade the Golgi apparatus of model filamentous fungi, mainly Aspergillus nidulans, has been intensively studied. Here an overview of the most important findings in the field is provided. Golgi architecture and dynamics, as well as the novel cell biology tools that were developed in filamentous fungi in these studies, are addressed. An emphasis is placed on the central role the Golgi has as a crossroads in the endocytic and secretory-traffic pathways in hyphae. Finally the major advances that the A. nidulans Golgi biology has yielded so far regarding our understanding of key Golgi regulators, such as the Rab GTPases RabC(Rab6) and RabE(Rab11), the oligomeric transport protein particle, TRAPPII, and the Golgi guanine nucleotide exchange factors of Arf1, GeaA(GBF1/Gea1) and HypB(BIG/Sec7), are highlighted. PMID:26932185

  3. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Saathoff

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon-oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with particle production rates ranging from 1 × 107 to 5 × 109 cm−3 plasma s−1. In all cases the particle formation rates increased exponentially with the water content of the gas mixture. Furthermore, the presence of a few ppb of trace gases like SO2 and α-pinene clearly enhanced the particle yield by number, the latter also by mass. Our findings suggest that new particle formation is efficiently supported by acids generated by the photo-ionization of both major and minor components of the air, including N2, NH3, SO2 and organics.

  4. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Saathoff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA, we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon–oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with particle production rates ranging from 1 × 107 to 5 × 109 cm−3 plasma s−1 for the given experimental conditions. In all cases the particle formation rates increased exponentially with the water content of the gas mixture. Furthermore, the presence of a few ppb of trace gases like SO2 and α-pinene clearly enhanced the particle yield by number, the latter also by mass. Our findings suggest that new particle formation is efficiently supported by oxidized species like acids generated by the photoionization of both major and minor components of the air, including N2, NH3, SO2 and organics.

  5. Formation of a solar Hα filament from orphan penumbrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, D.; Lagg, A.; van Noort, M.; Solanki, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: The formation and evolution of an Hα filament in active region (AR) 10953 is described. Methods: Observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite starting from UT 18:09 on 27th April 2007 until UT 06:08 on 1st May 2007 were analysed. 20 scans of the 6302 Å Fe I line pair recorded by SOT/SP were inverted using the spatially coupled version of the SPINOR code. The inversions were analysed together with co-spatial SOT/BFI G-band and Ca II H and SOT/NFI Hα observations. Results: Following the disappearance of an initial Hα filament aligned along the polarity inversion line (PIL) of the AR, a new Hα filament formed in its place some 20 h later, which remained stable for, at least, another 1.5 days. The creation of the new Hα filament was driven by the ascent of horizontal magnetic fields from the photosphere into the chromosphere at three separate locations along the PIL. The magnetic fields at two of these locations were situated directly underneath the initial Hα filament and formed orphan penumbrae already aligned along the Hα filament channel. The 700 G orphan penumbrae were stable and trapped in the photosphere until the disappearance of the overlying initial Hα filament, after which they started to ascend into the chromosphere at 10 ± 5 m/s. Each ascent was associated with a simultaneous magnetic flux reduction of up to 50% in the photosphere. The ascended orphan penumbrae formed dark seed structures in Hα in parallel with the PIL, which elongated and merged to form an Hα filament. The filament channel featured horizontal magnetic fields of on average 260 G at log (τ) = -2 suspended above the nearly field-free lower photosphere. The fields took on an overall inverse configuration at log (τ) = -2 suggesting a flux rope topology for the new Hα filament. The destruction of the initial Hα filament was likely caused by the flux emergence at the third location along the PIL. Conclusions: We present a new

  6. Interactions between Lactobacillus crispatus and bacterial vaginosis (BV)-Associated bacterial species in initial attachment and biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Kay Jefferson; Nuno Cerca; António Machado

    2013-01-01

    Certain anaerobic bacterial species tend to predominate the vaginal flora during bacterial vaginosis (BV), with Gardnerella vaginalis being the most common. However, the exact role of G. vaginalis in BV has not yet been determined. The main goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that G. vaginalis is an early colonizer, paving the way for intermediate (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum) and late colonizers (e.g., Prevotella bivia). Theoretically, in order to function as an early colonizer, ...

  7. Intermediation Costs and Financial Fragility

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Cafer; Salman, Ferhan

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies implications of intermediation costs in credit markets. The presence of intermediation costs increases the amount of risky projects therefore results in financial fragility. Moreover, for an open economy that has a perfectly liberal capital account, prudent firms finance their projects from foreign markets therefore shrinking the domestic credit markets. The theoretical predictions of our model gains support by Turkish data for the 1991 – 2004 period. Data suggests that an ...

  8. Intermediate uveitis and Lyme borreliosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Breeveld, J; Rothova, A.; Kuiper, H

    1992-01-01

    A case of chronic intermediate uveitis and associated classic snowbanking (pars planitis) with severe cystoid macular oedema probably due to Lyme borreliosis is reported. Despite a disease duration of 10 years the patient's ocular symptoms and visual acuity responded promptly to intravenous ceftriaxone treatment. This case demonstrates that periodic reevaluation of patients with intermediate uveitis is necessary to obtain a specific diagnosis which may include Lyme borreliosis.

  9. Wealth, Financial Intermediation and Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Gaytan, Alejandro; Ranci??re, Romain

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents empirical support for the existence of wealth effects in the contribution of financial intermediation to economic growth, and offers a theoretical explanation for these effects. Using GMM dynamic panel data techniques applied to study the growth-promoting effects of financial intermediation, we show that the exogenous contribution of financial development on economic growth has different effects for different levels of income per capita. We find that this contribution is g...

  10. Intermediate Filing in Household Taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Henry Edward

    1998-01-01

    This article explores an alternative filing system between joint and individual filing, here termed "intermediate filing." Under such a system, instead of allowing couples to "split" their income as joint filers or forcing them to file as individuals, intermediate filing presents couples with a choice of individual filing as a default or fractional splitting. The ratio of the split would govern both tax treatment and property division (broadly defined) on divorce. The article shows that such ...

  11. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of nail infection is often caused by a bacterial infection but may also be caused by herpes, a ... to a type of yeast called Candida , or bacterial infection, and this may lead to abnormal nail growth. ...

  12. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  13. Bacterial signaling and motility: Sure bets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2008-01-01

    The IX International Conference on Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction (BLAST IX) was held from 14 to 19 January 2007 in Laughlin, NV, a town in the Mojave Desert on the Nevada-Arizona border near old Route 66 and along the banks of the Colorado River. This area is a home to rattlesnakes, sagebrush, abandoned gold mines, and compulsive gamblers. What better venue could scientists possibly dream of for a professional meeting? So there they were, about 190 scientists gathered in the Aquarius Casino Resort, the largest hotel and casino in Laughlin, discussing the latest advances in the field. Aside from a brief excursion to an abandoned gold mine and a dinner cruise on the Colorado River, the scientists focused on nothing but their data and hypotheses, in spirited arguments and rebuttals, and outlined their visions and future plans in a friendly and open environment. The BLAST IX program was dense, with nearly 50 talks and over 90 posters. For that reason, this meeting report will not attempt to be comprehensive; instead it will first provide general background information on the central topics of the meeting and then highlight only a few talks that were of special interest to us and hopefully to the wider scientific community. We will also attempt to articulate some of the future directions or perspectives to the best of our abilities. The best known and understood bacterial motility mechanism is swimming powered by flagella. The rotation of bacterial flagella drives this form of bacterial movement in an aqueous environment. A bacterial flagellum consists of a helical filament attached to the cell body through a complex structure known as the hook-basal body, which drives flagellar rotation. The essential components of the basal body are the MotA-MotB motor-stator proteins bound to the cytoplasmic membrane. These stator proteins interact with proteins that comprise the supramembrane and cytoplasmic rings, which are components of the motor imbedded in the

  14. Motion of a Vortex Filament in the Half Space

    CERN Document Server

    Aiki, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    A model equation for the motion of a vortex filament immersed in three dimensional, incompressible and inviscid fluid is investigated as a humble attempt to model the motion of a tornado. We solve an initial-boundary value problem in the half space where we impose a boundary condition in which the vortex filament is allowed to move on the boundary.

  15. Detection of stacked filament lensing between SDSS luminous red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampitt, Joseph; Miyatake, Hironao; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Takada, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    We search for the lensing signal of massive filaments between 135 000 pairs of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We develop a new estimator that cleanly removes the much larger shear signal of the neighbouring LRG haloes, relying only on the assumption of spherical symmetry. We consider two models: a `thick'-filament model constructed from ray-tracing simulations for Λ cold dark matter model, and a `thin'-filament model which models the filament by a string of haloes along the line connecting the two LRGs. We show that the filament lensing signal is in nice agreement with the thick simulation filament, while strongly disfavouring the thin model. The magnitude of the lensing shear due to the filament is below 10-4. Employing the likelihood ratio test, we find a 4.5σ significance for the detection of the filament lensing signal, corresponding to a null hypothesis fluctuation probability of 3 × 10-6. We also carried out several null tests to verify that the residual shear signal from neighbouring LRGs and other shear systematics are minimized.

  16. Fully filamentized HTS coated conductor via striation and selective electroplating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Fully-filamentized coated conductor with 13-fold reduction in ac losses. ► Selective electroplating for filamentization of thick copper stabilizer. ► A twofold decrease in ac loss by filamentization of copper stabilizer. ► Absence of appreciable coupling loss contribution from electroplating. -- Abstract: A simple, cost-effective method involving top-down mechanical scribing, oxidation and bottom-up electroplating has been successfully developed to fabricate fully filamentized HTS coated conductors. The copper stabilizer layer is selectively electroplated on the superconducting filaments while the striations remain copper-free due to the formation of a resistive oxide layer in between filaments by oxidation of the striated grooves at elevated temperature in oxygen atmosphere. Magnetization AC loss measurements, performed in a frequency range of 45–500 Hz at 77 K, confirmed the expected N-fold reduction in AC loss of the filamentized tapes with no significant degradation in critical current beyond that due to the material removal from the striations (N – number of filaments). A considerable reduction in coupling AC loss was observed after high temperature annealing/oxidation of the striated tapes. Furthermore, a significant reduction in eddy current loss was achieved with selective copper electroplating, as evidenced by analyzing the field and frequency dependence of magnetization AC loss, as well as by comparing the AC loss performance of striated samples to that of non-striated samples after electroplating of copper stabilizer

  17. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, M. D.

    2013-06-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells.

  18. An Observational Detection of the Bridge Effect of Void Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-12-01

    The bridge effect of void filaments is a phrase coined by Park & Lee to explain the correlations found in a numerical experiment between the luminosity of the void galaxies and the degree of straightness of their host filaments. Their numerical finding implies that a straight void filament provides a narrow channel for the efficient transportation of gas and matter particles from the surroundings into void galaxies. Analyzing the Sloan void catalog constructed by Pan et al., we identify the filamentary structures in void regions and determine the specific size of each void filament as a measure of its straightness. To avoid possible spurious signals caused by Malmquist bias, we consider only those void filaments whose redshifts are in the range 0≤slant z≤slant 0.02 and find a clear tendency that the void galaxies located in the straighter filaments are on average more luminous, which is in qualitative agreement with the numerical prediction. It is also shown that the strength of correlation increases with the number of member galaxies in the void filaments, which can be understood physically on the grounds that the more stretched filaments can connect the dense surroundings even to galaxies located deep in the central parts of the voids. This observational evidence may provide a key clue to the puzzling issue of why the void galaxies have higher specific star formation rates and bluer colors than their wall counterparts.

  19. Regulation of filamentation in the human fungal pathogen Candida tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuyu; Tao, Li; Guan, Guobo; Yue, Huizhen; Liang, Weihong; Cao, Chengjun; Dai, Yu; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-02-01

    The yeast-filament transition is essential for the virulence of a variety of fungi that are pathogenic to humans. N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is a potent inducer of filamentation in Candida albicans and thermally dimorphic fungi such as Histoplasma capsulatum and Blastomyces dermatitidis. However, GlcNAc suppresses rather than promotes filamentation in Candida tropicalis, a fungal species that is closely related to C. albicans. Despite the intensive study in C. albicans, the regulatory mechanism of filamentation is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that the cAMP signaling pathway plays a central role in the regulation of filamentation in C. tropicalis. By screening an overexpression library of 156 transcription factors, we have identified approximately 40 regulators of filamentous growth. Although most of the regulators (e.g., Tec1, Gat2, Nrg1, Sfl1, Sfl2 and Ash1) demonstrate a conserved role in the regulation of filamentation, similar to their homologues in C. albicans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a number of transcription factors (e.g., Wor1, Bcr1, Stp4, Efh1, Csr1 and Zcf17) play a specific role in C. tropicalis. Our findings indicate that multiple interconnected signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of filamentation in C. tropicalis. These mechanisms have conserved and divergent features among different Candida species. PMID:26466925

  20. Design and Optimization of Filament Wound Composite Pressure Vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zu, L.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important issues for the design of filament-wound pressure vessels reflects on the determination of the most efficient meridian profiles and related fiber architectures, leading to optimal structural performance. To better understand the design and optimization of filament-wound pres

  1. A catalytic oligomeric motor that walks along a filament track

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most biological motors in the cell execute chemically powered conformational changes as they walk on biopolymer filaments in order to carry out directed transport functions. Synthetic motors that operate in a similar manner are being studied since they have the potential to perform similar tasks in a variety of applications. In this paper, a synthetic nanomotor that moves along a filament track, without invoking motor conformational changes, is constructed and its properties are studied in detail. The motor is an oligomer comprising three linked beads with specific binding properties. The filament track is a stiff polymer chain, also described by a linear chain of linked coarse-grained molecular groups modeled as beads. Reactions on the filament that are catalyzed by a motor bead and use fuel in the environment, in conjunction within the binding affinities of the motor beads to the filament beads, lead to directed motion. The system operates out of equilibrium due to the state of the filament and supply of fuel. The motor, filament, and surrounding medium are all described at microscopic level that permits a full analysis of the motor motion. A stochastic model that captures the main trends seen in the simulations is also presented. The results of this study point to some of the key features that could be used to construct nanomotors that undergo biased walks powered by chemical reactions on filaments

  2. A catalytic oligomeric motor that walks along a filament track

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Mu-Jie, E-mail: mjhuang@chem.utoronto.ca; Kapral, Raymond, E-mail: rkapral@chem.utoronto.ca [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2015-06-28

    Most biological motors in the cell execute chemically powered conformational changes as they walk on biopolymer filaments in order to carry out directed transport functions. Synthetic motors that operate in a similar manner are being studied since they have the potential to perform similar tasks in a variety of applications. In this paper, a synthetic nanomotor that moves along a filament track, without invoking motor conformational changes, is constructed and its properties are studied in detail. The motor is an oligomer comprising three linked beads with specific binding properties. The filament track is a stiff polymer chain, also described by a linear chain of linked coarse-grained molecular groups modeled as beads. Reactions on the filament that are catalyzed by a motor bead and use fuel in the environment, in conjunction within the binding affinities of the motor beads to the filament beads, lead to directed motion. The system operates out of equilibrium due to the state of the filament and supply of fuel. The motor, filament, and surrounding medium are all described at microscopic level that permits a full analysis of the motor motion. A stochastic model that captures the main trends seen in the simulations is also presented. The results of this study point to some of the key features that could be used to construct nanomotors that undergo biased walks powered by chemical reactions on filaments.

  3. Supramolecular Filaments Containing a Fixed 41% Paclitaxel Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Ran; Cheetham, Andrew G.; Zhang, Pengcheng; Lin, Yi-An; Cui, Honggang

    2013-01-01

    We report here the self-assembly of a rationally designed paclitaxel drug amphiphile into well-defined supramolecular filaments that possess a fixed 41% paclitaxel loading. These filaments can exert effective cytotoxicity against a number of cell lines comparable to that of free paclitaxel.

  4. A catalytic oligomeric motor that walks along a filament track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-06-01

    Most biological motors in the cell execute chemically powered conformational changes as they walk on biopolymer filaments in order to carry out directed transport functions. Synthetic motors that operate in a similar manner are being studied since they have the potential to perform similar tasks in a variety of applications. In this paper, a synthetic nanomotor that moves along a filament track, without invoking motor conformational changes, is constructed and its properties are studied in detail. The motor is an oligomer comprising three linked beads with specific binding properties. The filament track is a stiff polymer chain, also described by a linear chain of linked coarse-grained molecular groups modeled as beads. Reactions on the filament that are catalyzed by a motor bead and use fuel in the environment, in conjunction within the binding affinities of the motor beads to the filament beads, lead to directed motion. The system operates out of equilibrium due to the state of the filament and supply of fuel. The motor, filament, and surrounding medium are all described at microscopic level that permits a full analysis of the motor motion. A stochastic model that captures the main trends seen in the simulations is also presented. The results of this study point to some of the key features that could be used to construct nanomotors that undergo biased walks powered by chemical reactions on filaments.

  5. Failure and nonfailure of fluid filaments in extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Kolte, Mette Irene; Renardy, Michael

    fluid filaments do not exhibit ductile failure without surface tension; (2) some viscoelastic fluids form stable filaments while other fluids exhibit ductile failure as a result of an elastic instability; (3) for large Deborah numbers, the Considere condition may be used to predict the Hencky strain of...

  6. A Filament-Associated Halo Coronal Mass Ejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There are only a few observations published so far that show the initiation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and illustrate the magnetic changes in the surface origin of a CME. Any attempt to connect a CME with its local solar activities is meaningful. In this paper we present a clear instance of a halo CME initiation. A careful analysis of magnetograms shows that the only obvious magnetic changes in the surface region of the CME is a magnetic flux cancellation underneath a quiescent filament. The early disturbance was seen as the slow upward motion in segments of the quiescent filament. Four hours later, the filament was accelerated to about 50 km s-1 and erupted. While a small part of the material in the filament was ejected into the upper corona, most of the mass was transported to a nearby region. About forty minutes later, the transported mass was also ejected partially to the upper corona. The eruption of the filament triggered a two-ribbon flare, with post-flare loops connecting the flare ribbons. A halo CME, which is inferred to be associated with the eruptive filament, was observed from LASCO/C2 and C3. The halo CME contained two CME events, each event corresponded to a partial mass ejection of the filament. We suggest that the magnetic reconnection at the lower atmosphere is responsible for the filament eruption and the halo CME.

  7. THE APPARATUS FOR ALIGNMENT OF THE PHOTOMETRIC LAMP FILAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dlugunovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During photometric measurements involving the use of photometric lamps it is necessary that the filament of lamp takes a strictly predetermined position with respect to the photodetector and the optical axis of the photometric setup. The errors in positioning of alignment filament with respect to the optical axis of the measuring system lead to increase the uncertainty of measurement of the photometric characteristics of the light sources. A typical method for alignment of filament of photometric lamps is based on the use a diopter tubes (telescopes. Using this method, the mounting of filament to the required position is carried out by successive approximations, which requires special concentration and a lot of time. The aim of this work is to develop an apparatus for alignment which allows simultaneous alignment of the filament of lamps in two mutually perpendicular planes. The method and apparatus for alignment of the photometric lamp filament during measurements of the photometric characteristics of light sources based on two digital video cameras is described in this paper. The apparatus allows to simultaneously displaying the image of lamps filament on the computer screen in two mutually perpendicular planes. The apparatus eliminates a large number of functional units requiring elementwise alignment and reduces the time required to carry out the alignment. The apparatus also provides the imaging of lamps filament with opaque coated on the bulb. The apparatus is used at the National standard of light intensity and illuminance units of the Republic of Belarus. 

  8. Intermediate ions in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammet, Hannes; Komsaare, Kaupo; Hõrrak, Urmas

    2014-01-01

    Intermediate air ions are charged nanometer-sized aerosol particles with an electric mobility of about 0.03-0.5 cm2 V- 1 s- 1 and a diameter of about 1.5-7.5 nm. Intensive studies of new particle formation provided good knowledge about intermediate ions during burst events of atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Information about intermediate ions during quiet periods between the bursts remained poor. The new mobility analyzer SIGMA can detect air ions at concentrations of mobility fractions of about 1 cm- 3 and enables studying intermediate ions during quiet periods. It became evident that intermediate ions always exist in atmospheric air and should be considered an indicator and a mediator of aerosol nucleation. The annual average concentration of intermediate ions of one polarity in Tartu, Estonia, was about 40 cm- 3 while 5% of the measurements showed a concentration of less than 10 cm- 3. The fraction concentrations in logarithmic 1/8-decade mobility bins between 0.1 and 0.4 cm2 V- 1 s- 1 often dropped below 1 cm- 3. The bursts of intermediate ions at stations separated by around 100 km appeared to be correlated. The lifespan of intermediate ions in the atmosphere is a few minutes, and they cannot be carried by wind over long distances. Thus the observed long-range correlation of intermediate ions is explained by simultaneous changes in air composition in widely spaced stations. A certain amount of intermediate ion bursts, predominantly of negative polarity, are produced by the balloelectric effect at the splashing of water drops during rain. These bursts are usually excluded when speaking about new particle formation because the balloelectric particles are assumed not to grow to the size of the Aitken mode. The mobility distribution of balloelectric ions is uniform in shape in all measurements. The maximum is located at a mobility of about 0.2 cm2 V- 1 s- 1, which corresponds to the diameter of particles of about 2.5 nm.

  9. Propagation of radio frequency waves through density filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos

    2015-12-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. In this paper we develop an analytical formalism for the scattering of radio frequency waves by filaments which are cylindrical with their major axis aligned along the toroidal magnetic field lines. Since the magnitude of the ratio of the density inside the filaments to the background density is generally of order 1, the geometric optics approximation cannot be used to describe the scattering. A full-wave model is formulated which assumes that the plasma is cold and that the plasma in the cylindrical filament has uniform density. The background plasma, in which the filament is present, is also assumed to be cold and uniform. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any plasma wave.

  10. Conformations, hydrodynamic interactions, and instabilities of sedimenting semiflexible filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Saggiorato, G; Winkler, R G; Gompper, G

    2015-01-01

    The conformations and dynamics of semiflexible filaments subject to a homogeneous external (gravitational) field, e.g., in a centrifuge, are studied numerically and analytically. The competition between hydrodynamic drag and bending elasticity generates new shapes and dynamical features. We show that the shape of a semiflexible filament undergoes instabilities as the external field increases. We identify two transitions that correspond to the excitation of higher bending modes. In particular, for strong fields the filament stabilizes in a non-planar shape, resulting in a sideways drift or in helical trajectories. For two interacting filaments, we find the same transitions, with the important consequence that the new non-planar shapes have an effective hydrodynamic repulsion, in contrast to the planar shapes which attract themselves even when their osculating planes are rotated with respect to each other. For the case of planar filaments, we show analytically and numerically that the relative velocity is not n...

  11. Beam wandering of femtosecond laser filament in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Zeng, Tao; Lin, Lie; Liu, Weiwei

    2015-10-01

    The spatial wandering of a femtosecond laser filament caused by the filament heating effect in air has been studied. An empirical formula has also been derived from the classical Karman turbulence model, which determines quantitatively the displacement of the beam center as a function of the propagation distance and the effective turbulence structure constant. After fitting the experimental data with this formula, the effective turbulence structure constant has been estimated for a single filament generated in laboratory environment. With this result, one may be able to estimate quantitatively the displacement of a filament over long distance propagation and interpret the practical performance of the experiments assisted by femtosecond laser filamentation, such as remote air lasing, pulse compression, high order harmonic generation (HHG), etc. PMID:26480079

  12. Propagation of radio frequency waves through density filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, Abhay K., E-mail: abhay@psfc.mit.edu [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139. USA (United States); Hizanidis, Kyriakos [National Technical University of Athens, Association EURATOM (Greece)

    2015-12-10

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. In this paper we develop an analytical formalism for the scattering of radio frequency waves by filaments which are cylindrical with their major axis aligned along the toroidal magnetic field lines. Since the magnitude of the ratio of the density inside the filaments to the background density is generally of order 1, the geometric optics approximation cannot be used to describe the scattering. A full-wave model is formulated which assumes that the plasma is cold and that the plasma in the cylindrical filament has uniform density. The background plasma, in which the filament is present, is also assumed to be cold and uniform. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any plasma wave.

  13. Propagation of radio frequency waves through density filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. In this paper we develop an analytical formalism for the scattering of radio frequency waves by filaments which are cylindrical with their major axis aligned along the toroidal magnetic field lines. Since the magnitude of the ratio of the density inside the filaments to the background density is generally of order 1, the geometric optics approximation cannot be used to describe the scattering. A full-wave model is formulated which assumes that the plasma is cold and that the plasma in the cylindrical filament has uniform density. The background plasma, in which the filament is present, is also assumed to be cold and uniform. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any plasma wave

  14. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Hui-Shun

    2013-01-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kines...

  15. Radial interchange motions of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Fundamenski, W.

    2006-01-01

    Radial convection of isolated filamentary structures due to interchange motions in magnetized plasmas is investigated. Following a basic discussion of vorticity generation, ballooning, and the role of sheaths, a two-field interchange model is studied by means of numerical simulations on a...... biperiodic domain perpendicular to the magnetic field. It is demonstrated that a blob-like plasma structure develops dipolar vorticity and electrostatic potential fields, resulting in rapid radial acceleration and formation of a steep front and a trailing wake. While the dynamical evolution strongly depends...... on the amount of collisional diffusion and viscosity, the structure travels a radial distance many times its initial size in all parameter regimes in the absence of sheath dissipation. In the ideal limit, there is an inertial scaling for the maximum radial velocity of isolated filaments. This...

  16. Current filaments in turbulent magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martines, E; Vianello, N; Spolaore, M; Zuin, M; Agostini, M; Antoni, V; Cavazzana, R; Scarin, P; Serianni, G; Spada, E [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Padova (Italy); Sundkvist, D [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ionita, C; Mehlmann, F; Schrittwieser, R [Association EURATOM/OeAW, Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck (Austria); Maraschek, M; Mueller, H W; Rohde, V [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Naulin, V; Rasmussen, J J, E-mail: emilio.martines@igi.cnr.i [Association EURATOM/RISOe-Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2009-12-15

    Direct measurements of current density perturbations associated with non-linear phenomena in magnetized plasmas can be carried out using in situ magnetic measurements. In this paper we report such measurements for three different kinds of phenomena. Current density fluctuations in the edge density gradient region of a fusion plasma confined in reversed field pinch configuration and in a density gradient region in the Earth magnetosphere are measured and compared, showing that in both environments they can be attributed to drift-Alfven vortices. Current structures associated with reconnection events measured in a reversed field pinch plasma and in the magnetosheath are detected and compared. Evidence of current filaments occurring during ELMs in an H-mode tokamak plasma is displayed.

  17. Current filaments in turbulent magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martines, E.; Vianello, N.; Sundkvist, D.;

    2009-01-01

    gradient region of a fusion plasma confined in reversed field pinch configuration and in a density gradient region in the Earth magnetosphere are measured and compared, showing that in both environments they can be attributed to drift-Alfvén vortices. Current structures associated with reconnection events......Direct measurements of current density perturbations associated with non-linear phenomena in magnetized plasmas can be carried out using in situ magnetic measurements. In this paper we report such measurements for three different kinds of phenomena. Current density fluctuations in the edge density...... measured in a reversed field pinch plasma and in the magnetosheath are detected and compared. Evidence of current filaments occurring during ELMs in an H-mode tokamak plasma is displayed....

  18. Filament wound data base development, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, R. Scott; Braddock, William F.

    1985-01-01

    The objective was to update the present Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) baseline reentry aerodynamic data base and to develop a new reentry data base for the filament wound case SRB along with individual protuberance increments. Lockheed's procedures for performing these tasks are discussed. Free fall of the SRBs after separation from the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle is completely uncontrolled. However, the SRBs must decelerate to a velocity and attitude that is suitable for parachute deployment. To determine the SRB reentry trajectory parameters, including the rate of deceleration and attitude history during free-fall, engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center are using a six-degree-of-freedom computer program to predict dynamic behavior. Static stability aerodynamic coefficients are part of the information required for input into this computer program. Lockheed analyzed the existing reentry aerodynamic data tape (Data Tape 5) for the current steel case SRB. This analysis resulted in the development of Data Tape 7.

  19. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 μm continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 × 2.'0 (0.88 × 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H2 mass between 0.3-5.7 M ☉ and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (nH2≥106 cm–3), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of ≈17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud (≈35 pc), large-scale clumps (≈1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps (≈0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  20. RADIATION SPECTRAL SYNTHESIS OF RELATIVISTIC FILAMENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation from many astrophysical sources, e.g., gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei, is believed to arise from relativistically shocked collisionless plasmas. Such sources often exhibit highly transient spectra evolving rapidly compared with source lifetimes. Radiation emitted from these sources is typically associated with nonlinear plasma physics, complex field topologies, and non-thermal particle distributions. In such circumstances, a standard synchrotron paradigm may fail to produce accurate conclusions regarding the underlying physics. Simulating spectral emission and spectral evolution numerically in various relativistic shock scenarios is then the only viable method to determine the detailed physical origin of the emitted spectra. In this Letter, we present synthetic radiation spectra representing the early stage development of the filamentation (streaming) instability of an initially unmagnetized plasma, which is relevant for both collisionless shock formation and reconnection dynamics in relativistic astrophysical outflows as well as for laboratory astrophysics experiments. Results were obtained using a highly efficient in situ diagnostics method, based on detailed particle-in-cell modeling of collisionless plasmas. The synthetic spectra obtained here are compared with those predicted by a semi-analytical model for jitter radiation from the filamentation instability, the latter including self-consistent generated field topologies and particle distributions obtained from the simulations reported upon here. Spectra exhibit dependence on the presence-or the absence-of an inert plasma constituent, when comparing baryonic plasmas (i.e., containing protons) with pair plasmas. The results also illustrate that considerable care should be taken when using lower-dimensional models to obtain information about the astrophysical phenomena generating observed spectra.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Chloroflexus sp. Strain isl-2, a Thermophilic Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Isolated from the Strokkur Geyser, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisin, Vasil A.; Ivanov, Timophey M.; Kuznetsov, Boris B.; Gorlenko, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus sp. strain isl-2, which was isolated from the Strokkur geyser, Iceland, and contains 5,222,563 bp with a G+C content of 59.65%. The annotated genome sequence offers the genetic basis for understanding the strain’s ecological role as a phototrophic bacterium within the bacterial community. PMID:27445390

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Chloroflexus sp. Strain isl-2, a Thermophilic Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Isolated from the Strokkur Geyser, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisin, Vasil A; Ivanov, Timophey M; Kuznetsov, Boris B; Gorlenko, Vladimir M; Grouzdev, Denis S

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus sp. strain isl-2, which was isolated from the Strokkur geyser, Iceland, and contains 5,222,563 bp with a G+C content of 59.65%. The annotated genome sequence offers the genetic basis for understanding the strain's ecological role as a phototrophic bacterium within the bacterial community. PMID:27445390

  3. Bacteria Composition of Aerobic Granular Sludge Under Filamentous Bulking and Control Method of Filamentous Bulking%丝状膨胀好氧颗粒污泥细菌组成及丝状膨胀的控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪树兰; 李建婷; 秦振平; 刘志培; 崔丹红

    2011-01-01

    采用构建16S rDNA克隆文库方法对发生丝状膨胀的好氧颗粒污泥的细菌种群进行研究.结果表明,丝状膨胀的好氧颗粒污泥共包含六大类群,分别是β-proteobacteria(36.23%)、Sphingobacteria(20.29%)、δ-Pro-teobacteria(13.04%)、Flavobacteria(10.14%)、γ-Proteobacteria(1.45%)和Actinobacteria(1.45%),通过序列比对可知好氧颗粒污泥中存在Sphaerotilus natans等丝状菌,但根据所占比例确定其不是导致好氧颗粒污泥丝状膨胀的细菌.对膨胀颗粒污泥外边缘的丝状微生物进一步鉴定,发现它属于丝状真菌.试验验证了进水pH随运行时间降低是导致葡萄糖配水培养好氧颗粒污泥发生丝状膨胀的主要原因.采用缩短运行周期、运行过程中投加NaHCO3和减少曝气量的方法均可预防好氧颗粒污泥的丝状膨胀,但投加碱度是最直接有效的方法,且在发生丝状膨胀初期还可通过该方法控制膨胀.%The bacterial composition of the aerobic granular sludge under filamentous bulking was studied by construction of 16S rDNA clone library.The results indicated that the bacterial community in aerobic granular sludge included 6 major groups: β-proteobacteria,Sphingobacteria,δ-Proteobacteria,Flavobacteria,γ-proteobacteria and Actinobacteria,and their portions were 36.23%,20.29%,13.04%,10.12%,1.45% and 1.45%,respectively.Sequence analysis also indicated that filamentous bacterial such as Sphaerotilus natans existed in aerobic granular sludge,but it was not the main cause of filamentous bulking based on the occurrence frequency of clones in 16S rDNA clone library.Filamentous microorganism from outer edge of aerobic granular sludge was picked out for further identification and was identified to belong to filamentous fungi.Experiment proves that pH decreasing with running time is the main cause for filamentous bulking.Shorten running time of the cycle,adding NaHCO3 to reactor and decreasing aeration

  4. Nuclear Reactions at Intermediate Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Shyam, Radhey

    2015-01-01

    In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ is large enough ($\\sim$ 0.3 - 0.5) to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss applications of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  5. Fusion of bacterial spheroplasts by electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthe, H J; Adler, J

    1985-09-25

    Spheroplasts of Escherichia coli or Salmonella typhimurium were found to fuse in an electric field. We employed the fusion method developed by Zimmermann and Scheurich (1981): Close membrane contact between cells is established by dielectrophoresis (formation of chains of cells by an a.c. field), then membrane fusion is induced by the application of short pulses of direct current. Under optimum conditions the fusion yield was routinely 90%. Fusable spheroplasts were obtained by first growing filamentous bacteria in the presence of cephalexin, then converting these to spheroplasts by the use of lysozyme. The fusion products were viable and regenerated to the regular bacterial form. Fusion of genetically different spheroplasts resulted in strains of bacteria possessing a combination of genetic markers. Fusion could not be achieved with spheroplasts obtained by growing the cells in the presence of penicillin or by using lysozyme on bacteria of usual size. PMID:3899175

  6. Automated detection, characterization, and tracking of filaments from SDO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchlin, Eric; Vial, Jean-Claude; Mercier, Claude

    2016-07-01

    Thanks to the cadence and continuity of AIA and HMI observations, SDO offers unique data for detecting, characterizing, and tracking solar filaments, until their eruptions, which are often associated with coronal mass ejections. Because of the requirement of short latency when aiming at space weather applications, and because of the important data volume, only an automated detection can be worked out. We present the code "FILaments, Eruptions, and Activations detected from Space" (FILEAS) that we have developed for the automated detection and tracking of filaments. Detections are based on the analysis of AIA 30.4 nm He II images and on the magnetic polarity inversion lines derived from HMI. Following the tracking of filaments as they rotate with the Sun, filament characteristics are computed and a database of filaments parameters is built. We present the algorithms and performances of the code, and we compare its results with the filaments detected in Hα and already present in the Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase. We finally discuss the possibility of using such a code to detect eruptions in real time.

  7. Microwave structure of quiescent solar filaments at high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution very low altitude maps of a quiescent filament at three frequencies are presented. The spatial resolution (approx. 15'' at 1.45 GHz, approx. 6'' at 4.9 GHz, and approx. 2'' at 15 GHz) is several times better than previously attained. At each frequency, the filament appears as a depression in the quiet Sun background. The depression is measurably wider and longer in extent than the corresponding H alpha filament at 1.45 GHz and 4.9 GHz, indicating that the depression is due in large part to a deficit in coronal density associated with the filament channel. In contrast, the shape of the radio depression at 15 CHz closely matches that of the H alpha filament. In addition, the 15 GHz map shows enhanced emission along both sides of the radio depression. A similar enhancement is seen in an observation of a second filament 4 days later, which suggests that the enhancement is a general feature of filaments. Possible causes of the enhanced emission are explored

  8. An observational detection of the bridge effect of void filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Shim, Junsup; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The bridge effect of void filaments is a phrase coined by Park & Lee (2009b) to explain the correlations found in a numerical experiment between the luminosity of the void galaxies and the degree of the straightness of their host filaments. Their numerical finding implies that a straight void filament provides a narrow channel for the efficient transportation of gas and matter particles from the surroundings into the void galaxies. To observationally confirm the presence of the bridge effect of void filaments, we identify the filamentary structures from the Sloan void catalog and determine the specific size of each void filament as a measure of its straightness. Using both classical and Bayesian statistics, we indeed detect a strong tendency that the void galaxies located in the more straight filaments are on average more luminous, which is in agreement with the numerical prediction. It is also shown that the strength of correlation increases with the spatial extent of the void filaments, which can be phy...

  9. Investigating the Global Collapse of Filaments Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Seamus D

    2015-01-01

    We use Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulations of cold, uniform density, self-gravitating filaments, to investigate their longitudinal collapse timescales; these timescales are important because they determine the time available for a filament to fragment into cores. A filament is initially characterised by its line-mass, $\\mu$, its radius, $R$ (or equivalently its density $\\rho\\!=\\!\\mu/\\pi R^2$), and its aspect ratio, $A\\;\\,(\\equiv Z/R$, where $Z$ is its half-length). The gas is only allowed to contract longitudinally, i.e. parallel to the symmetry axis of the filament (the $z$-axis). Pon et al. (2012) have considered the global dynamics of such filaments analytically. They conclude that short filaments ($A\\! \\!5$) undergo end-dominated collapse, i.e. two dense clumps form at the ends of the filament and converge on the centre sweeping up mass as they go, on a time-scale $t_{_{\\rm END}} \\sim 0.98\\,A^{1/2}\\,(G\\rho)^{-1/2}$. Our simulations do not corroborate these predictions. First, for all $A\\! > \\!2$, ...

  10. Footpoint detection and mass-motion in chromospheric filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Aparna; Hardersen, P. S.; Martin, S. F.

    2013-07-01

    A quiescent region on the Sun containing three filaments is used to study the properties of mass motion. This study determines if the footpoints or end-points of the filaments are the locations from where mass gets injected into the filaments. Several hypotheses have been put forth in the past to determine how a filament acquires mass. Trapping of coronal mass in the filament channel due to condensation (Martin, 1996) and injection of mass into the filaments during magnetic reconnection (Priest, et al., 1995) are some of the speculations. This study looks for indications for injection of mass via chromospheric footpoints. The data consists of blue (Hα-0.5 Å) and red (Hα+0.5 Å) wing high resolution Hα images of the W29N37 region of the Sun taken on Oct 30, 2010, from 1200 - 1600 UT. The Dutch Open Telescope was used to obtain the data. The images are aligned and animated to see Doppler motion in the fibrils. Smaller fibrils merge to form longer ones; barbs appear and disappear in one of the long filaments and is seen moving along the length of the filament. A region with no typical filament-like absorption feature is observed to be continuously receiving mass. Fibrils appear to be converging from opposite sides along what appears to be a neutral line; mass motion is seen in these fibrils as well. An eruption occurs in a region of fibrils lumped together at the end of the first hour (1300 UT) followed by plage brightening at 1430 UT near one of the filament regions. Helioviewer (Panasenco, et al., 2011) is used for aligning the images; GIMP is used for precision alignment and animation. Each frame in the sequence is studied carefully to note changes in the filament regions. The footpoints of the filaments are determined by the changes observed in the position of the filament ‘legs’ in each frame. Variations in the magnetic polarity corresponding to changes observed in the chromosphere are analyzed using HMI magnetograms. Bright and dark points on the

  11. Simulation of Filament Heater for Uniform Emission from Dispenser Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narendra Kr.; Bhattacharya, Ranojoy; Khatun, Hasina; Singh, Udaybir; Sinha, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the design study of toroid shape filament heater for dispenser cathode.The filament heater will be used in cathode assembly of 200 kW 42 GHz gyrotron. A 3 D model of cathode assembly is designed using electromagnetic and thermal simulation software, ANSYS. The simulations are performed for optimizing the input filament heater power with respect to cathode surface temperature. The parametric study shows that the input power and cathode surface temperature depends strongly on the potting material, diameter of filament, number of turns, position and height of the filament heater with respect to cathode pellet. The design analyses are also carried out for two different filament heater materials i.e. tungsten and molybdenum. Further, the thermal, structural and transient analyses are also carried out to study the mechanical strength of the filament heater. It is concluded that the input heater power should be greater than 200 W to achieve cathode surface temperature greater than 1,000°C.

  12. MUSE discovers perpendicular arcs in Cen A inner filament

    CERN Document Server

    Hamer, Stephen; Combes, Francoise; Salomé, Quentin

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of AGN interaction with the intergalactic medium is observed in some galaxies and many cool core clusters. Radio-jets are suspected to dig large cavities into the surrounding gas. In most cases, very large optical filaments (several kpc) are also seen all around the central galaxy. The origin of these filaments is still not understood. Star forming regions are sometimes observed inside the filaments and are interpreted as evidence of positive feedback (AGN-triggered star formation). Cen A is a very nearby galaxy with huge optical filaments aligned with AGN radio-jet direction. Here, we search for line ratio variations along the filaments, kinematic evidence of shock-broadend line widths and large scale dynamical structures. We observe a 1'x1' region around the inner filament of Cen A with MUSE on the VLT during the Science Verification period. The brightest lines are the Halpha, [NII], [OIII] and [SII]. MUSE shows that the filaments are made of clumpy structures inside a more diffuse medium aligned w...

  13. Evolving new protein-protein interaction specificity through promiscuous intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher D; Herrou, Julien; Phung, Tuyen N; Perchuk, Barrett S; Crosson, Sean; Laub, Michael T

    2015-10-22

    Interacting proteins typically coevolve, and the identification of coevolving amino acids can pinpoint residues required for interaction specificity. This approach often assumes that an interface-disrupting mutation in one protein drives selection of a compensatory mutation in its partner during evolution. However, this model requires a non-functional intermediate state prior to the compensatory change. Alternatively, a mutation in one protein could first broaden its specificity, allowing changes in its partner, followed by a specificity-restricting mutation. Using bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems, we demonstrate the plausibility of this second, promiscuity-based model. By screening large libraries of interface mutants, we show that toxins and antitoxins with high specificity are frequently connected in sequence space to more promiscuous variants that can serve as intermediates during a reprogramming of interaction specificity. We propose that the abundance of promiscuous variants promotes the expansion and diversification of toxin-antitoxin systems and other paralogous protein families during evolution. PMID:26478181

  14. Structural characterization of mRNA-tRNA translocation intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Liao, Hstau Y; Schreiner, Eduard; Fu, Jie; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F; Schulten, Klaus; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2012-04-17

    Cryo-EM analysis of a wild-type Escherichia coli pretranslocational sample has revealed the presence of previously unseen intermediate substates of the bacterial ribosome during the first phase of translocation, characterized by intermediate intersubunit rotations, L1 stalk positions, and tRNA configurations. Furthermore, we describe the domain rearrangements in quantitative terms, which has allowed us to characterize the processivity and coordination of the conformational reorganization of the ribosome, along with the associated changes in tRNA ribosome-binding configuration. The results are consistent with the view of the ribosome as a molecular machine employing Brownian motion to reach a functionally productive state via a series of substates with incremental changes in conformation. PMID:22467828

  15. Gradient catastrophe and flutter in vortex filament dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Konopelchenko, B G

    2011-01-01

    Gradient catastrophe and flutter instability in the motion of vortex filament within the localized induction approximation are analyzed. It is shown that the origin if this phenomenon is in the gradient catastrophe for the dispersionless Da Rios system which describes motion of filament with slow varying curvature and torsion. Geometrically this catastrophe manifests as a rapid oscillation of a filament curve in a point that resembles the flutter of airfoils. Analytically it is the elliptic umbilic singularity in the terminology of the catastrophe theory. It is demonstrated that its double scaling regularization is governed by the Painlev\\'e-I equation.

  16. Gradient catastrophe and flutter in vortex filament dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradient catastrophe and flutter instability in the motion of a vortex filament within the localized induction approximation are analyzed. It is shown that the origin of this phenomenon is in the gradient catastrophe for the dispersionless Da Rios system which describes the motion of a filament with slow varying curvature and torsion. Geometrically, this catastrophe manifests as a rapid oscillation of a filament curve in a point that resembles the flutter of airfoils. Analytically, it is the elliptic umbilic singularity in the terminology of the catastrophe theory. It is demonstrated that its double scaling regularization is governed by the Painleve-I equation. (fast track communication)

  17. Gradient catastrophe and flutter in vortex filament dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopelchenko, B G [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Ortenzi, G, E-mail: giovanni.ortenzi@unimib.it [Dipartimento di Matematica Pura ed Applicazioni, Universita di Milano Bicocca, 20125 Milano (Italy)

    2011-10-28

    Gradient catastrophe and flutter instability in the motion of a vortex filament within the localized induction approximation are analyzed. It is shown that the origin of this phenomenon is in the gradient catastrophe for the dispersionless Da Rios system which describes the motion of a filament with slow varying curvature and torsion. Geometrically, this catastrophe manifests as a rapid oscillation of a filament curve in a point that resembles the flutter of airfoils. Analytically, it is the elliptic umbilic singularity in the terminology of the catastrophe theory. It is demonstrated that its double scaling regularization is governed by the Painleve-I equation. (fast track communication)

  18. Failure and nonfailure of fluid filaments in extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Kolte, Mette Irene; Renardy, Michael

    The phenomenon of ductile failure of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid filaments without surface tension is studied by a 2D finite element method and by ID non-linear analysis. The viscoelastic fluids are described by single integral constitutive equations. The main conclusions are: (1) Newtonian...... fluid filaments do not exhibit ductile failure without surface tension; (2) some viscoelastic fluids form stable filaments while other fluids exhibit ductile failure as a result of an elastic instability; (3) for large Deborah numbers, the Considere condition may be used to predict the Hencky strain of...... the elastic instability....

  19. Septin Filament Formation is Essential in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    McMurray, Michael A.; Bertin, Aurelie; Garcia, Galo; Lam, Lisa; Nogales, Eva; Thorner, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Septins are GTP-binding proteins that form ordered, rod-like multimeric complexes and polymerize into filaments, but how such supramolecular structure is related to septin function was unclear. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four septins form an apolar hetero-octamer (Cdc11–Cdc12–Cdc3–Cdc10–Cdc10–Cdc3–Cdc12–Cdc11) that associates end-to-end to form filaments. We show that septin filament assembly displays previously unanticipated plasticity. Cells lacking Cdc10 or Cdc11 are able to divide becau...

  20. Intermediality and the Child Performer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    This report details examples of praxis in the creation and presentation of "Joy Fear and Poetry": an intermedial theatre performance in which children aged 7-12 years generated aesthetic gestures using a range of new media forms. The impetus for the work's development was a desire to make an intervention into habituated patterns of…

  1. Material Voices: Intermediality and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimingham, Melissa; Shaughnessy, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Autism continues to be regarded enigmatically; a community that is difficult to access due to perceived disruptions of interpersonal connectedness. Through detailed observations of two children participating in the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project "Imagining Autism: Drama, Performance and Intermediality as Interventions for…

  2. Intermediate business programming with C++

    CERN Document Server

    Voils, Don

    2005-01-01

    Intermediate Business Programming with C++ 2005 offers a comprehensive approach to the topic with emphasis on the creation of object oriented programs for business and the use of data structures, this book deals with the writing of business programs using C++ from Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2005.

  3. Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, Jon K.; Lasure, Linda L.

    2004-05-03

    Many of the commercial production processes for organic acids are excellent examples of fungal biotechnology. However, unlike penicillin, the organic acids have had a less visible impact on human well-being. Indeed, organic acid fermentations are often not even identified as fungal bioprocesses, having been overshadowed by the successful deployment of the β-lactam processes. Yet, in terms of productivity, fungal organic acid processes may be the best examples of all. For example, commercial processes using Aspergillus niger in aerated stirred-tank-reactors can convert glucose to citric acid with greater than 80% efficiency and at final concentrations in hundreds of grams per liter. Surprisingly, this phenomenal productivity has been the object of relatively few research programs. Perhaps a greater understanding of this extraordinary capacity of filamentous fungi to produce organic acids in high concentrations will allow greater exploitation of these organisms via application of new knowledge in this era of genomics-based biotechnology. In this chapter, we will explore the biochemistry and modern genetic aspects of the current and potential commercial processes for making organic acids. The organisms involved, with a few exceptions, are filamentous fungi, and this review is limited to that group. Although yeasts including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, species of Rhodotorula, Pichia, and Hansenula are important organisms in fungal biotechnology, they have not been significant for commercial organic acid production, with one exception. The yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, and related yeast species, may be in use commercially to produce citric acid (Lopez-Garcia, 2002). Furthermore, in the near future engineered yeasts may provide new commercial processes to make lactic acid (Porro, Bianchi, Ranzi, Frontali, Vai, Winkler, & Alberghina, 2002). This chapter is divided into two parts. The first contains a review of the commercial aspects of current and potential large

  4. Structure, Dynamics, and Assembly of Filamentous Bacteriophages by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opella, Stanley J.; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Park, Sang Ho

    2008-05-01

    Filamentous bacteriophages serve as model systems for the development and implementation of spectroscopic methods suitable for biological supramolecular assemblies. Not only are their coat proteins small and readily prepared in the laboratory, but they also have two primary roles as membrane proteins and as the principal structural element of the virus particles. As a bacterial system, they are readily labeled with stable isotopes, and this has opened possibilities for the many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies described in this review. In particular, solid-state NMR of aligned samples has been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of both the membrane-bound forms of coat proteins in phospholipid bilayers and structural forms in virus particles, which has led to an analysis of the assembly mechanism for virus particles as they are extruded through the cell membrane.

  5. A Comparison Study of a Solar Active-Region Eruptive Filament and a Neighboring Non-Eruptive Filament

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Solar active region (AR) 11283 is a very magnetically complex region and it has produced many eruptions. However, there exists a non-eruptive filament in the plage region just next to an eruptive one in the AR, which gives us an opportunity to perform a comparison analysis of these two filaments. The coronal magnetic field extrapolated using a CESE-MHD-NLFFF code (Jiang & Feng 2013) reveals that two magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) exist in the same extrapolation box supporting these two filaments, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic field shows that the eruptive MFR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) co-spatial very well with a pre-eruptive EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for coronal sigmoids. The magnetic dips of the non-eruptive MFRs match H{\\alpha} observation of the non-eruptive filament strikingly well, which strongly supports the MFR-dip model for filaments. Compared with the non-eruptive MFR/filament (with a length of about 200 Mm), the eruptive MFR/filament is much ...

  6. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  7. Equilibrium theory for braided elastic filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Gert

    Motivated by supercoiling of DNA and other filamentous structures, we formulate a theory for equilibria of 2-braids, i.e., structures formed by two elastic rods winding around each other in continuous contact and subject to a local interstrand interaction. Unlike in previous work no assumption is made on the shape of the contact curve. Rather, this shape is found as part of the solution. The theory is developed in terms of a moving frame of directors attached to one of the strands with one of the directors pointing to the position of the other strand. The constant-distance constraint is automatically satisfied by the introduction of what we call braid strains. The price we pay is that the potential energy involves arclength derivatives of these strains, thus giving rise to a second-order variational problem. The Euler-Lagrange equations for this problem give balance equations for the overall braid force and moment referred to the moving frame as well as differential equations that can be interpreted as effective constitutive relations encoding the effect that the second strand has on the first as the braid deforms under the action of end loads. Simple analytical cases are discussed first and used as starting solutions in parameter continuation studies to compute classes of both open and closed (linked or knotted) braid solutions.

  8. The Apis mellifera Filamentous Virus Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gauthier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A complete reference genome of the Apis mellifera Filamentous virus (AmFV was determined using Illumina Hiseq sequencing. The AmFV genome is a double stranded DNA molecule of approximately 498,500 nucleotides with a GC content of 50.8%. It encompasses 247 non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs, equally distributed on both strands, which cover 65% of the genome. While most of the ORFs lacked threshold sequence alignments to reference protein databases, twenty-eight were found to display significant homologies with proteins present in other large double stranded DNA viruses. Remarkably, 13 ORFs had strong similarity with typical baculovirus domains such as PIFs (per os infectivity factor genes: pif-1, pif-2, pif-3 and p74 and BRO (Baculovirus Repeated Open Reading Frame. The putative AmFV DNA polymerase is of type B, but is only distantly related to those of the baculoviruses. The ORFs encoding proteins involved in nucleotide metabolism had the highest percent identity to viral proteins in GenBank. Other notable features include the presence of several collagen-like, chitin-binding, kinesin and pacifastin domains. Due to the large size of the AmFV genome and the inconsistent affiliation with other large double stranded DNA virus families infecting invertebrates, AmFV may belong to a new virus family.

  9. Cold Milky Way Hi gas in filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Kalberla, P M W; Haud, U; Winkel, B; Bekhti, N Ben; Floeer, L; Lenz, D

    2016-01-01

    We investigate data from the Galactic Effelsberg--Bonn HI Survey (EBHIS), supplemented with data from the third release of the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS III) observed at Parkes. We explore the all sky distribution of the local Galactic HI gas with $|v_{\\rm LSR}| 20^\\circ$ is described by a log-normal distribution, with a median Doppler temperature $T_{\\rm D} = 223$ K, derived from observed line widths that include turbulent contributions. The median neutral hydrogen (HI) column density is $N_{\\rm HI} \\simeq 10^{19.1}\\,{\\rm cm^{-2}}$. These CNM structures are embedded within a warm neutral medium (WNM) with $N_{\\rm HI} \\simeq 10^{20} {\\rm cm^{-2}}$. Assuming an average distance of 100 pc, we derive for the CNM sheets a thickness of $< 0.3$ pc. Adopting a magnetic field strength of $B_{\\rm tot} = (6.0 \\pm 1.8)\\mu$G, proposed by Heiles & Troland 2005, and assuming that the CNM filaments are confined by magnetic pressure, we estimate a thickness of 0.09 pc. Correspondingly the median volume density is ...

  10. Broken Detailed Balance of Filament Dynamics in Active Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladrow, J.; Fakhri, N.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Schmidt, C. F.; Broedersz, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Myosin motor proteins drive vigorous steady-state fluctuations in the actin cytoskeleton of cells. Endogenous embedded semiflexible filaments such as microtubules, or added filaments such as single-walled carbon nanotubes are used as novel tools to noninvasively track equilibrium and nonequilibrium fluctuations in such biopolymer networks. Here, we analytically calculate shape fluctuations of semiflexible probe filaments in a viscoelastic environment, driven out of equilibrium by motor activity. Transverse bending fluctuations of the probe filaments can be decomposed into dynamic normal modes. We find that these modes no longer evolve independently under nonequilibrium driving. This effective mode coupling results in nonzero circulatory currents in a conformational phase space, reflecting a violation of detailed balance. We present predictions for the characteristic frequencies associated with these currents and investigate how the temporal signatures of motor activity determine mode correlations, which we find to be consistent with recent experiments on microtubules embedded in cytoskeletal networks.

  11. Calibration and temperature profile of a tungsten filament lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament lamp (lamp used in automotive lighting) and then tested on a standard tungsten ribbon lamp. The calibration procedure developed was checked by determining the calibration point of the tungsten ribbon lamp with an accuracy of 2%. In addition, for low current intensity, it was observed that the temperature of the filament was not uniform; an explanation is proposed by considering a simple heat transfer model.

  12. Calibration and temperature profile of a tungsten filament lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Izarra, Charles [Groupe de Recherche sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, UMR6606 Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, Site de Bourges, rue Gaston Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France); Gitton, Jean-Michel, E-mail: Charles.De_Izarra@univ-orleans.f [College Littre, 10 rue Littre, Bourges (France)

    2010-07-15

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament lamp (lamp used in automotive lighting) and then tested on a standard tungsten ribbon lamp. The calibration procedure developed was checked by determining the calibration point of the tungsten ribbon lamp with an accuracy of 2%. In addition, for low current intensity, it was observed that the temperature of the filament was not uniform; an explanation is proposed by considering a simple heat transfer model.

  13. Laser control of filament-induced shock wave in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potemkin, F. V.; Mareev, E. I.; Podshivalov, A. A.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2014-09-01

    We discovered that tight focusing of Cr:forsterite femtosecond laser radiation in water provides the unique opportunity of long filament generation. The filament becomes a source of numerous spherical shock waves whose radius tends to saturate with the increase of energy. These overlapping waves create a contrast cylindrical shock wave. The laser-induced shock wave parameters such as shape, amplitude and speed can be effectively controlled by varying energy and focusing geometry of the femtosecond pulse. Aberrations added to the optical scheme lead to multiple dotted plasma sources for shock wave formation, spaced along the optical axis. Increasing the laser energy launches filaments at each dot that enhance the length of the entire filament and as a result, the shock impact on the material.

  14. Linear filaments of the radio arc near the Galactic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution radio continuum VLA images of a segment of the Galactic center arc centered at G0.16-0.15 at wavelengths of both 6 and 20 cm are presented. In this segment, the highest multiplicity of filaments, the largest degree of linear polarization, and a maximum rotation measure of -5500 rad/sq m between wavelengths 6.166 and 6.363 cm are found. The large helical segments which surround the filamentary system are also shown and discussed. Based on a number of intriguing characteristics of the filamentary system, including the helical component and possible twisting of some of the filaments, a picture is considered in which the geometry of the magnetic structure is that of a cylindrically symmetric, force-free field anchored to the halo of the Galaxy. An analogy with solar flare filaments is used to discuss some aspects of the Galactic center filaments. 25 references

  15. Linear filaments of the radio arc near the Galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Morris, M.

    1987-11-01

    High-resolution radio continuum VLA images of a segment of the Galactic center arc centered at G0.16-0.15 at wavelengths of both 6 and 20 cm are presented. In this segment, the highest multiplicity of filaments, the largest degree of linear polarization, and a maximum rotation measure of -5500 rad/sq m between wavelengths 6.166 and 6.363 cm are found. The large helical segments which surround the filamentary system are also shown and discussed. Based on a number of intriguing characteristics of the filamentary system, including the helical component and possible twisting of some of the filaments, a picture is considered in which the geometry of the magnetic structure is that of a cylindrically symmetric, force-free field anchored to the halo of the Galaxy. An analogy with solar flare filaments is used to discuss some aspects of the Galactic center filaments. 25 references.

  16. FILAMENTATION INSTABILITY OF LASER BEAMS IN NONLOCAL NONLINEAR MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文双春; 范滇元

    2001-01-01

    The filamentation instability of laser beams propagating in nonlocal nonlinear media is investigated. It is shown that the filamentation instability can occur in weakly nonlocal self-focusing media for any degree of nonlocality, and in defocusing media for the input light intensity exceeding a threshold related to the degree of nonlocality. A linear stability analysis is used to predict the initial growth rate of the instability. It is found that the nonlocality tends to suppress filamentation instability in self-focusing media and to stimulate filamentation instability in self-defocusing media. Numerical simulations confirm the results of the linear stability analysis and disclose a recurrence phenomenon in nonlocal self-focusing media analogous to the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem.

  17. Persistence of strain in motor-filament assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, L

    2015-01-01

    Crosslinked semi-flexible and flexible filaments that are actively deformed by molecular motors occur in various natural settings, such as the ordered eukaryotic flagellum, and the disordered cytoskeleton. The deformation of these composite systems is driven by active motor forces and resisted by passive filament elasticity, and structural constraints due to permanent cross-links. Using a mean field theory for a one-dimensional ordered system, we show that the combination of motor activity and finite filament extensibility yields a characteristic persistence length scale over which active strain decays. This decay length is set by the ability of motors to respond to combination of the weak extensional elasticity, passive shear resistance and the viscoelastic properties of the motor assembly, and generalizes the notion of persistence in purely thermal filaments to active systems.

  18. Filament propagation length of femtosecond pulses with different transverse modes

    CERN Document Server

    Kaya, N; Kaya, G; Strohaber, J; Kolomenskii, A A; Schuessler, H A

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally studied intense femtosecond pulse filamentation and propagation in water for Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian, and Bessel-Gaussian incident beams. These different transverse modes for incident laser pulses were created from an initial Gaussian beam by using a computer generated hologram technique. We found that the length of the filament induced by the Bessel-Gaussian incident beam was longer than that for the other transverse modes under the conditions of the same peak intensity, pulse duration, and the size of the central part of the beam. To better understand the Bessel-Gaussian beam propagation, we performed a more detailed study of the filament length as a function of the number of radial modal lobes. The length increased with the number of lobes, implying that the radial modal lobes serve as an energy reservoir for the filament formed by the central intensity peak.

  19. Thioploca spp: filamentous sulfur bacteria with nitrate vacuoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Gallardo, VA

    1999-01-01

    Thioploca spp. are multicellular, filamentous, colorless sulfur bacteria inhabiting freshwater and marine sediments. They have elemental sulfur inclusions similar to the phylogenetically closely related Beggiatoa, but in contrast to these they live in bundles surrounded by a common sheath. Vast...

  20. Dynamics of wave fronts and filaments in anisotropic cardiac tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Dierckx, Hans J F M

    2015-01-01

    The heartbeat is mediated between cardiac cells by waves of electrical depolarisation. During cardiac arrhythmias, electrical activity was found to be organised in scroll waves which rotate around a dynamical filament curve. In this thesis, a curved-space approach is used to mathematically capture anisotropy of wave propagation. We derive for the first time the covariant laws of motion for traveling wave fronts and scroll wave filaments in anisotropic excitable media such as cardiac tissue. We show that locally varying anisotropy yields non-zero Riemann tensor components, which may alter the stability of scroll wave filaments. The instability of scroll wave filaments has been linked to transition from ventricular tachycardia to fibrillation.

  1. Measurement of Reversed Extension Flow using the Filament Stretch Rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Nielsen, Jens Kromann;

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of material functions with reversed extension flow is demonstrated using the Filament Stretching Rheometer (FSR). This includes startup of uniaxial elongational flow (potentially until steady state) followed by biaxial squeezing, and large amplitude oscillatory elongation (LAOE...

  2. Filament proteins in central, cranial, and peripheral mammalian nerves

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    Several classes of 10-nm filaments have been reported in mammalian cells and they can be distinguished by the size of their protein subunit. We have studied the distribution of these filaments in nerves from calves and other mammals. From the display on polyacrylamide electrophoretic gels of proteins in extracts from fibroblast and central, cranial and peripheral nerves, we cut the appropriate stained bands and prepared iodinated peptide maps. The similarities between the respective maps prov...

  3. KAO and AAT observations of the Galactic Center filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Edwin F.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Simpson, Janet P.; Rubin, Robert H.; Haas, Michael R.; Morris, M.; Cotera, A. S.; Allen, David A.; Burton, Michael G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) and the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) to investigate the nature of the filamentary radio emission from the Galactic center region. KAO observations of the FIR line and continuum emission from the radio peak G0.095+0.012 and the E2 thermal radio filament northeast of the Galactic center can be produced by numerous nearby stars with T(sub eff) approx. 35,000 K; these can account for both the FIR luminosity and the excitation of the gas. Much of the FIR continuum and most of the strong (Si II) (34.8 micron) line emission are probably produced in the ionized gas of the filament. The FIR (O III) 52 and 88 micron lines imply an electron density of a few hundred; when compared with the radio emission measure, this implies the filament is roughly tubular or somewhat flattened in the plane of the sky. The (O III) and (S III) lines show higher excitation associated with the filament, and suggest that exciting stars may be located within the filaments and/or southeast of the E2 filament. AAT observations in the near infrared (NIR) in fact reveal a nearby cluster of hot stars southeast of the E2 filament. Additional hot stars, not identifiable from their NIR spectra, are likely to be present. These stars and those in the cluster can plausibly produce the observed radio and FIR emission in the region. The morphology of the filament is not explained by existing information however.

  4. Production of antimicrobials and antioxidants from filamentous fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Helen A.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi have proven throughout history to be a vast source of potential therapeutic activities. They are recognised as nutritious, highly palatable functional foods and are now widely accepted as an untapped source of potentially powerful natural products of pharmacological significance. In the present study, ten species of filamentous fungi were explored on the basis of their curative potential. Submerged liquid fermentation (SLF) was employed and proved to be a promising method...

  5. Technique for plasma filament stabilization in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention is related to the field of automatic control of thermonuclear device processes and can be used in control systems of plasma filament stabilization by large radius in tokamak type thermolnuclear devices. The economic effect of the suggested technique is caused by improvement of stabilization of optimum (from the viewpoint of the decrease of plasma energy losses) plasma filament position in the tokamak-reactor which results in the decrease of power of additional plasma heating systems

  6. Star formation efficiency in the outer filaments of Centaurus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomé, Q.; Salomé, P.; Combes, F.; Hamer, S.; Heywood, I.

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the northern filaments of Centaurus A (at a distance of ˜ 20 kpc from the galaxy center) based on FUV (GALEX), FIR (Herschel) and CO (SEST and ALMA) emission. We also searched for HCN and HCO^+ (ATCA) and observed optical emission lines (VLT/MUSE) in different places of the filament. An upper limit of the dense gas of L'_{HCN}inhibits star formation.

  7. A filament of dark matter between two clusters of galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Jörg P.; Werner, Norbert; Clowe, Douglas; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kitching, Tom; Miller, Lance,; Simionescu, Aurora

    2012-01-01

    It is a firm prediction of the concordance Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmological model that galaxy clusters live at the intersection of large-scale structure filaments. The thread-like structure of this "cosmic web" has been traced by galaxy redshift surveys for decades. More recently the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) residing in low redshift filaments has been observed in emission and absorption. However, a reliable direct detection of the underlying Dark Matter skeleton, which should c...

  8. Scrape Off Layer profiles interpreted with filament dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Militello, F

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to link the density profiles in the Scrape Off Layer (SOL) with the fluctuations (filaments) that generate them. The framework is based on the dynamics of independent filaments and their statistical behaviour and can be used to rigorously understand the mechanisms that lead to flattening and broadening of the SOL profiles as well as the radial increase of the relative fluctuation amplitude.

  9. Filament power regulator for thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device has been developed that will control the filament temperature in a thermal ionization mass spectrometer. The arrangement is superior to past methods to control this critical parameter. The operating principle lies in the feature of filament power control as contrasted with the formerly used voltage or current controls. Reproducibility and stability of ion beams showed great improvement. The mass spectrometer was developed to analyze for parts-per-billion concentrations of uranium in water samples

  10. The filament forming reactions of vimentin tetramers studied in a serial-inlet microflow device by small angle x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Oliva; Brennich, Martha E; Burghammer, Manfred; Herrmann, Harald; Köster, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    The structural organization of metazoan cells and their shape are established through the coordinated interaction of a composite network consisting of three individual filament systems, collectively termed the cytoskeleton. Specifically, microtubules and actin filaments, which assemble from monomeric globular proteins, provide polar structures that serve motor proteins as tracks. In contrast, intermediate filaments (IFs) assemble from highly charged, extended coiled coils in a hierarchical assembly mechanism of lateral and longitudinal interaction steps into non-polar structures. IF proteins are expressed in a distinctly tissue-specific way and thereby serve to generate the precise plasticity of the respective cells and tissues. Accordingly, in the cell, numerous parameters such as pH and salt concentration are adjusted such that the generation of functional networks is ensured. Here, we transfer the problem for the mesenchymal IF protein vimentin to an in vitro setting and combine small angle x-ray scattering with microfluidics and finite element method simulations. Our approach is adapted to resolve the early assembly steps, which take place in the sub-second to second range. In particular, we reveal the influence of ion species and concentrations on the assembly. By tuning the flow rates and thus concentration profiles, we find a minimal critical salt concentration for the initiation of the assembly. Furthermore, our analysis of the surface sensitive Porod regime in the x-ray data reveals that the formation of first assembly intermediates, so-called unit length filaments, is not a one-step reaction but consists of distinct consecutive lateral association steps followed by radial compaction as well as smoothening of the surface of the full-width filament. PMID:27042250

  11. Large scale filaments associated with Milky Way spiral arms

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ke; Ginsburg, Adam; Walmsley, C Malcolm; Molinari, Sergio; Schisano, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of filamentary structure at various scales through out the Galaxy has triggered a renewed interest in their formation, evolution, and role in star formation. The largest filaments can reach up to Galactic scale as part of the spiral arm structure. However, such large scale filaments are hard to identify systematically due to limitations in identifying methodology (i.e., as extinction features). We present a new approach to directly search for the largest, coldest, and densest filaments in the Galaxy, making use of sensitive Herschel Hi-GAL data complemented by spectral line cubes. We present a sample of the 9 most prominent Herschel filaments, including 6 identified from a pilot search field plus 3 from outside the field. These filaments measure 37-99 pc long and 0.6-3.0 pc wide with masses (0.5-8.3)$\\times10^4 \\, M_\\odot$, and beam-averaged ($28"$, or 0.4-0.7 pc) peak H$_2$ column densities of (1.7-9.3)$\\times 10^{22} \\, \\rm{cm^{-2}}$. The bulk of the filaments are relatively cold (17-21 K), whi...

  12. Properties of Cosmological Filaments extracted from Eulerian Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gheller, Claudio; Favre, Jean; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Using a new parallel algorithm implemented within the VisIt framework, we analysed large cosmological grid simulations to study the properties of baryons in filaments. The procedure allows us to build large catalogues with up to $\\sim 3 \\cdot 10^4$ filaments per simulated volume and to investigate the properties of cosmic filaments for very large volumes at high resolution (up to $300^3 ~\\rm Mpc^3$ simulated with $2048^3$ cells). We determined scaling relations for the mass, volume, length and temperature of filaments and compared them to those of galaxy clusters. The longest filaments have a total length of about $200 ~\\rm Mpc$ with a mass of several $10^{15} M_{\\odot}$. We also investigated the effects of different gas physics. Radiative cooling significantly modifies the thermal properties of the warm-hot-intergalactic medium of filaments, mainly by lowering their mean temperature via line cooling. On the other hand, powerful feedback from active galactic nuclei in surrounding halos can heat up the gas in ...

  13. Filament Fragmentation in High-Mass Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Beuther, H; Johnston, K; Henning, Th; Hacar, A; Kainulainen, J T

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We resolve the length-scales for filament formation and fragmentation (res. <=0.1pc), in particular the Jeans length and cylinder fragmentation scale. Methods: We observed the prototypical high-mass star-forming filament IRDC18223 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) in the 3.2mm continuum and N2H+(1-0) line emission in a ten field mosaic at a spatial resolution of ~4'' (~14000AU). Results: The dust continuum emission resolves the filament into a chain of at least 12 relatively regularly spaced cores. The mean separation between cores is ~0.40(+-0.18)pc. While this is approximately consistent with the fragmentation of an infinite, isothermal, gravitationally bound gas cylinder, a high mass-to-length ratio of M/l~1000M_sun/pc requires additional turbulent and/or magnetic support against radial collapse of the filament. The N2H+(1-0) data reveal a velocity gradient perpendicular to the main filament. Although rotation of the filament cannot be excluded, the data are also consistent with the m...

  14. Appearance of Dusty Filaments at Different Viewing Angles

    CERN Document Server

    Chira, R -A; Henning, Th; Kainulainen, J

    2016-01-01

    Context: In the last years, there have been many studies on the omnipresence and structures of filaments in star-forming regions, as well as their role in the process of star formation. Those filaments are normally identified as elongated fibres across the plane of the sky. But how would we detect filaments that are inclined? Aims: We aim to learn more about whether, and how, total column density or dust temperature change with respect to the line of sight. Such variations would enable observers to use dust observations to identify and study filaments at any inclination and gain more insight on the distribution and orientations of filaments within the Galactic plane. Methods: As a first step, we perform numerical calculations on simple cylindrical models to evaluate the influence of filament geometry on the average flux density. After that, we apply our three-dimensional Monte Carlo dust radiative transfer code on two models of star-forming regions and derive maps of effective total column density and dust te...

  15. Numerical Simulations of a Shock-Filament Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Pittard, J M

    2015-01-01

    We present 3D hydrodynamic adiabatic simulations of a shock interacting with a dense, elongated cloud. We compare how the nature of the interaction changes with the filament's length and its orientation to the shock, and with the shock Mach number and the density contrast of the filament. We then examine the differences with respect to 3D spherical-cloud calculations. We find significant differences in the morphology of the interaction when M=10 and chi=100: in many cases 3 parallel rolls are formed, and spread further apart with time, and periodic vortex shedding can occur off the ends of oblique filaments. Sideways-on filaments are accelerated more quickly, and initially lose mass more quickly than spherical clouds due to their greater surface area to volume ratio. However, at late stages they lose mass more slowly, due to the reduced relative speed between the filament and the postshock flow. The acceleration and mixing timescales can vary by a factor of 2 as the filament orientation changes. Oblique filam...

  16. Heterocyst placement strategies to maximize the growth of cyanobacterial filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under conditions of limited fixed-nitrogen, some filamentous cyanobacteria develop a regular pattern of heterocyst cells that fix nitrogen for the remaining vegetative cells. We examine three different heterocyst placement strategies by quantitatively modelling filament growth while varying both external fixed-nitrogen and leakage from the filament. We find that there is an optimum heterocyst frequency which maximizes the growth rate of the filament; the optimum frequency decreases as the external fixed-nitrogen concentration increases but increases as the leakage increases. In the presence of leakage, filaments implementing a local heterocyst placement strategy grow significantly faster than filaments implementing random heterocyst placement strategies. With no extracellular fixed-nitrogen, consistent with recent experimental studies of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the modelled heterocyst spacing distribution using our local heterocyst placement strategy is qualitatively similar to experimentally observed patterns. As external fixed-nitrogen is increased, the spacing distribution for our local placement strategy retains the same shape, while the average spacing between heterocysts continuously increases. (paper)

  17. Sympathetic Solar Filament Eruptions on 2015 March 15

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Rui; Zimovets, Ivan; Hu, Huidong; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 March 15 coronal mass ejection as one of the two that together drove the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far was associated with sympathetic filament eruptions. We investigate the relations between the different filaments involved in the eruption. A surge-like small-scale filament motion is confirmed as the trigger that initiated the erupting filament with multi-wavelength observations and using a forced magnetic field extrapolation method. When the erupting filament moved to an open magnetic field region, it experienced an obvious acceleration process and was accompanied by a C-class flare and the rise of another larger filament that eventually failed to erupt. We measure the decay index of the background magnetic field, which presents a critical height of 118 Mm. Combining with a potential field source surface extrapolation method, we analyze the distributions of the large-scale magnetic field, which indicates that the open magnetic field region may provide a favorable condition for ...

  18. Mid-infrared laser filaments in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Mitrofanov, A V; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Pugžlys, A; Stepanov, E A; Andriukaitis, G; Flöry, T; Ališauskas, S; Fedotov, A B; Baltuška, A; Zheltikov, A M

    2014-01-01

    Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere offers unique opportunities for long-range transmission of high-power laser radiation and standoff detection. With the critical power of self-focusing scaling as the laser wavelength squared, the quest for longer-wavelength drivers, which would radically increase the peak power and, hence, the laser energy in a single filament, has been ongoing over two decades, during which time the available laser sources limited filamentation experiments in the atmosphere to the near-infrared and visible ranges. Here, we demonstrate filamentation of ultrashort mid-infrared pulses in the atmosphere for the first time. We show that, with the spectrum of a femtosecond laser driver centered at 3.9 um, right at the edge of the atmospheric transmission window, radiation energies above 20 mJ and peak powers in excess of 200 GW can be transmitted through the atmosphere in a single filament. Our studies reveal unique properties of mid-infrared filaments, where the generatio...

  19. Ligand-dependent inhibition and reversal of tau filament formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirita, Carmen; Necula, Mihaela; Kuret, Jeff

    2004-03-16

    Alzheimer's disease is defined in part by the intraneuronal accumulation of filaments comprised of the microtubule associated protein tau. Because animal model studies suggest that a toxic gain of function accompanies tau aggregation in neurons, selective pharmacological inhibitors of the process may have utility in slowing neurodegeneration. Here, the properties of a candidate small molecule inhibitor of tau fibrillization, 3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-[2-[[3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-5-methoxy-2-benzothiazolylidene]methyl]-1-butenyl]-5-methoxybenzothiazolium (N744), were characterized in vitro using transmission electron microscopy. N744 inhibited arachidonic acid-induced aggregation of full-length, four-repeat tau protein at substoichiometric concentrations relative to total tau and with an IC(50) of approximately 300 nM. Inhibition was accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in the number concentration of filaments, suggesting that N744 interfered with tau filament nucleation. Stoichiometric concentrations of N744 also promoted tau disaggregation when added to mature synthetic filaments. Disaggregation followed first-order kinetics and was accompanied by a steady decrease in filament number, suggesting that N744 promoted endwise loss of tau molecules with limited filament breakage. N744 at substoichiometric concentrations did not inhibit Abeta and alpha-synuclein aggregation, indicating it was tau selective under these conditions. Because of its activity in vitro, N744 may offer a pharmacological approach to the role of tau fibrillization in neurodegeneration. PMID:15005623

  20. Formation of a solar Ha filament from orphan penumbrae

    CERN Document Server

    Buehler, D; van Noort, M; Solanki, S K

    2016-01-01

    The formation of an Ha filament in active region (AR) 10953 is described. Observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite starting on 27th April 2007 until 1st May 2007 were analysed. 20 scans of the 6302A Fe I line pair recorded by SOT/SP were inverted using the SPINOR code. The inversions were analysed together with SOT/BFI G-band and Ca II H and SOT/NFI Ha observations. Following the disappearance of an initial Ha filament aligned along the polarity inversion line (PIL) of the AR, a new Ha filament formed in its place some 20 hours later, which remained stable for at least 1.5 days. The creation of the new Ha filament was driven by the ascent of horizontal magnetic fields from the photosphere into the chromosphere at three separate locations along the PIL. The magnetic fields at two of these locations were situated directly underneath the initial Ha filament and formed orphan penumbrae already aligned along the Ha filament channel. The 700 G orphan penumbrae were stable and ...

  1. The interaction of a magnetohydrodynamical shock with a filament

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, K J A

    2016-01-01

    We present 3D magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the adiabatic interaction of a shock with a dense, filamentary cloud. We investigate the effects of various filament lengths and orientations on the interaction using different orientations of the magnetic field, and vary the Mach number of the shock, the density contrast of the filament, and the plasma beta, in order to determine their effect on the evolution and lifetime of the filament. We find that in a parallel magnetic field filaments have longer lifetimes if they are orientated more 'broadside' to the shock front, and that an increase in the density contrast hastens the destruction of the cloud, in terms of the modified cloud-crushing time-scale, tcs. The combination of a mild shock and a perpendicular or oblique field provides the best condition for extending the life of the filament, with some filaments able to survive almost indefinitely since they are cocooned by the magnetic field. A high value for the density contrast does not initiate la...

  2. A bacterial pathogen infecting gametophytes of Saccharina japonica (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yanting; LI Wei

    2013-01-01

    A newly identified bacterial disease of kelp (Saccharinajaponica) gametophytes was found in clone cultures.It is characterized by swollen gametophyte cells in the early period of infection followed by filamentous fading.An alginolytic marine bacterium referred to as A-1 was isolated from the diseased gametophytes.On the basis of 16S rDNA sequencing and morphological,physiological and biochemical characteristics,the bacterium was identified as a strain of the genus Alteromonas.By testing Koch's postulates,Alteromonas sp.A-1 was further confirmed as the pathogen.The infection process was also investigated using both scanning electron and light microscopy.

  3. Production of extremophilic bacterial cellulase enzymes in aspergillus niger.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, John Michael

    2013-09-01

    Enzymes can be used to catalyze a myriad of chemical reactions and are a cornerstone in the biotechnology industry. Enzymes have a wide range of uses, ranging from medicine with the production of pharmaceuticals to energy were they are applied to biofuel production. However, it is difficult to produce large quantities of enzymes, especially if they are non-native to the production host. Fortunately, filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, are broadly used in industry and show great potential for use a heterologous enzyme production hosts. Here, we present work outlining an effort to engineer A. niger to produce thermophilic bacterial cellulases relevant to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  4. Larval helminths in intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Poulin, R

    2005-01-01

    transmission to their bird definitive host by predation. In experimental infections, we found an intensity-dependent establishment success, with a decrease in the success rate of cercariae developing into infective metacercariae with an increasing dose of cercariae applied to each amphipod. In natural......Density-dependent effects on parasite fitness have been documented from adult helminths in their definitive hosts. There have, however, been no studies on the cost of sharing an intermediate host with other parasites in terms of reduced adult parasite fecundity. Even if larval parasites suffer a...... reduction in size, caused by crowding, virtually nothing is known about longer-lasting effects after transmission to the definitive host. This study is the first to use in vitro cultivation with feeding of adult trematodes to investigate how numbers of parasites in the intermediate host affect the size and...

  5. Molecular Studies of Filamentous and Biofilm-Forming Hyperthermophilic Communities in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Bradley, A. S.; Dibbell, A. K.; Fredricks, H. F.; Hinrichs, K.; Jahnke, L. L.; Shock, E.; Amend, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    The Aquificales, the most deeply-branching order of Bacteria in the phylogenetic tree of life, comprises eight recognized thermophilic genera, including Aquifex, Hydrogenobacter, and Thermocrinis. The common metabolism for these Bacteria, when grown in culture, is the oxidation of hydrogen with molecular oxygen (Knallgas reaction). Aquificales have been identified by molecular techniques (16S rRNA gene surveys, fluorescent in situ hybridization) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), sea vent chimneys and fluids, and many other terrestrial and marine locations. In situ, Aquificales can reside as biofilms on vent sinters but they also commonly form filamentous communities, otherwise known as pink streamers, which attach to solid substrates. Initial 16S rRNA gene surveys conducted on streamer communities from Octopus Spring YNP indicated that these were low diversity ecosystems dominated by a few phylotypes including Thermocrinis sp., Thermotoga sp. and one other bacterial clade (Reysenbach et al 1994). Archaea were notable for their absence. In one of the first geobiological studies of pink streamers and vent biofilms in Yellowstone National Park, Jahnke and coworkers (2001) used classical lipidological techniques to compare Aquificales cultures with environmental samples to show that YNP pink filaments were more phylogenetically diverse and physiologically more complex than the early genomic studies indicated. The presence of archaeol, the range and structures of other lipids and a wide dispersion in the carbon isotopic signatures of biomass and individual lipids (-15 to -27%) showed that Archaea were present in pink filament communities and that there was, at least, one additional bacterial group besides the dominant Aquificales component. New molecular studies that comprise analyses of 16S rRNA genes and total lipid extracts by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry and chemical degradation with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry now show that Crenarchaea

  6. Shuffling bacterial metabolomes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomason, Brendan; Read, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has a far more significant role than gene duplication in bacterial evolution. This has recently been illustrated by work demonstrating the importance of HGT in the emergence of bacterial metabolic networks, with horizontally acquired genes being placed in peripheral pathways at the outer branches of the networks.

  7. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... become valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  8. Financial Intermediation with Risk Aversion

    OpenAIRE

    Hellwig, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The paper extends Diamond's (1984) analysis of financial intermediation to allow for risk aversion of the intermediary. It shows that, as in the case of risk neutrality, the agency costs of external funds provided to an intermediary are relatively small if the intermediary is financing many entrepreneurs with stochastically independent returns. Even though the intermediary is adding rather than subdividing risks, the underlying large-numbers argument is not invalidated by the presence of risk...

  9. Theory of electron current filamentation instability and ion density filamentation in the early development of a DPF discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional simulations of the initial stages of plasma formation in a dense plasma focus show the formation, in a few tens of nanoseconds, of a dense layer of plasma (ne∼1018 cm-3,Te∼3 eV) in a thin layer surrounding the insulator-covered central anode of the focus device, and carrying axially-directed current at rather high current density.Earlier work on the filamentation of dense cathode plasma in high-power diodes seems to indicate that the anode plasma current layer in a dense plasma focus (DPF) device could be subject to the same instability, creating a growth of axially-directed filaments in the current density. The growth rate for resistive-thermal-driven filamentation, e.g. at 30 torr and ∼3 eV electron temperature, exceeds the that due to non-thermal current (JxB) driving, and is determined by electron dynamics, so its evolution is quicker than the response-time of the ions.Nonetheless, with such a growing current-density perturbation as a seed and its increasing rippling of the azimuthal magnetic field as a driver, the ions will eventually take part in the azimuthal bunching, forming filaments in the ion density as well. The resistive-thermal-driven filamentation fields thus serve to ''hurry-up'' the development of ion density filamentation, as shown approximately in the work presented here. This theory predicts, for light ions, a relatively early (≤250 ns) development of visible filaments along the anode, perhaps even before the main rundown phase of the focus plasma motion, and these filaments may persist during the 'liftoff' phase of the current layer to form the rundown phase of the plasma front. This work is supported by Larwenceville Plasma Physics.

  10. Frealix: Model-based refinement of helical filament structures from electron micrographs

    OpenAIRE

    Rohou, Alexis; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    The structures of many helical protein filaments can be derived from electron micrographs of their suspensions in thin films of vitrified aqueous solutions. The most successful and generally-applicable approach treats short segments of these filaments as independent “single particles”, yielding near-atomic resolution for rigid and well-ordered filaments. The single-particle approach can also accommodate filament deformations, yielding sub-nanometer resolution for more flexible filaments. Howe...

  11. Properties and processing by extrusion of electrically conductive multilayer filaments comprising polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    R. S. Martins; Gonçalves, Renato Ferreira; Azevedo, Tiago; Nóbrega, J. M.; Carvalho, Helder; Lanceros-Méndez, S.; Rocha, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the production and characterization of three-layer piezoelectric filaments using two different electrically conductive polymers. The filaments were produced in a filament extrusion line, equipped with a coextrusion die that enabled a coaxial arrangement for a three-layer filament. For the inner and outer layers two different electrically conductive compounds were used, and the middle layer was made of the electroactive polymer PVDF. The produced filament can be used as a p...

  12. Giant quiescent solar filament observed with high-resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: An extremely large filament was studied in various layers of the solar atmosphere. The inferred physical parameters and the morphological aspects are compared with smaller quiescent filaments. Methods: A giant quiet-Sun filament was observed with the high-resolution Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain, on 2011 November 15. A mosaic of spectra (ten maps of 100″ × 182″) was recorded simultaneously in the chromospheric absorption lines Hα and Na i D2. Physical parameters of the filament plasma were derived using cloud model (CM) inversions and line core fits. The spectra were complemented with full-disk filtergrams (He i λ10830 Å, Hα, and Ca ii K) of the Chromospheric Telescope (ChroTel) and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Results: The filament had extremely large linear dimensions (~817 arcsec), which corresponds to about 658 Mm along a great circle on the solar surface. A total amount of 175119 Hα contrast profiles were inverted using the CM approach. The inferred mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity, Doppler width, and source function were similar to previous works of smaller quiescent filaments. However, the derived optical thickness was higher. LOS velocity trends inferred from the Hα line core fits were in accord but weaker than those obtained with CM inversions. Signatures of counter-streaming flows were detected in the filament. The largest brightening conglomerates in the line core of Na i D2 coincided well with small-scale magnetic fields as seen by HMI. Mixed magnetic polarities were detected close to the ends of barbs. The computation of photospheric horizontal flows based on HMI magnetograms revealed flow kernels with a size of 5-8 Mm and velocities of 0.30-0.45 km s-1 at the ends of the filament. Conclusions: The physical properties of extremely large filaments are similar to their smaller counterparts, except for the optical thickness, which in

  13. Supergranular-scale magnetic flux emergence beneath an unstable filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Guerrero, A.; Saiz, E.; Cerrato, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: Here we report evidence of a large solar filament eruption on 2013, September 29. This smooth eruption, which passed without any previous flare, formed after a two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection towards Earth. The coronal mass ejection generated a moderate geomagnetic storm on 2013, October 2 with very serious localized effects. The whole event passed unnoticed to flare-warning systems. Methods: We have conducted multi-wavelength analyses of the Solar Dynamics Observatory through Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data. The AIA data on 304, 193, 211, and 94 Å sample the transition region and the corona, respectively, while HMI provides photospheric magnetograms, continuum, and linear polarization data, in addition to the fully inverted data provided by HMI. Results: This flux emergence happened very close to a filament barb that was very active in mass motion, as seen in 304 Å images. The observed flux emergence exhibited hectogauss values. The flux emergence extent appeared just beneath the filament, and the filament rose during the following hours. The emergence acquired a size of 33'' in ~12 h, about ~0.16 km s-1. The rate of signed magnetic flux is around 2 × 1017 Mx min-1 for each polarity. We have also studied the eruption speed, size, and dynamics. The mean velocity of the rising filament during the ~40 min previous to the flare is 115 ± 5 km s-1, and the subsequent acceleration in this period is 0.049 ± 0.001 km s-2. Conclusions: We have observed a supergranular-sized emergence close to a large filament in the boundary of the active region NOAA11850. Filament dynamics and magnetogram results suggest that the magnetic flux emergence takes place in the photospheric level below the filament. Reconnection occurs underneath the filament between the dipped lines that support the filament and the supergranular emergence. The very smooth ascent is probably caused by this emergence and torus instability

  14. Septins regulate bacterial entry into host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Mostowy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Septins are conserved GTPases that form filaments and are required in many organisms for several processes including cytokinesis. We previously identified SEPT9 associated with phagosomes containing latex beads coated with the Listeria surface protein InlB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigated septin function during entry of invasive bacteria in non-phagocytic mammalian cells. We found that SEPT9, and its interacting partners SEPT2 and SEPT11, are recruited as collars next to actin at the site of entry of Listeria and Shigella. SEPT2-depletion by siRNA decreased bacterial invasion, suggesting that septins have roles during particle entry. Incubating cells with InlB-coated beads confirmed an essential role for SEPT2. Moreover, SEPT2-depletion impaired InlB-mediated stimulation of Met-dependent signaling as shown by FRET. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together these findings highlight novel roles for SEPT2, and distinguish the roles of septin and actin in bacterial entry.

  15. The filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii as a competitive industrial inosine producer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Buey, Rubén M; Revuelta, José Luis

    2016-09-01

    Inosine is a nucleoside with growing biotechnological interest due to its recently attributed beneficial health effects and as a convenient precursor of the umami flavor. At present, most of the industrial inosine production relies on bacterial fermentations. In this work, we have metabolically engineered the filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii to obtain strains able to excrete high amounts of inosine to the culture medium. We report that the disruption of only two key genes of the purine biosynthetic pathway efficiently redirect the metabolic flux, increasing 200-fold the excretion of inosine with respect to the wild type, up to 2.2 g/L. These results allow us to propose A. gossypii as a convenient candidate for large-scale nucleoside production, especially in view of the several advantages that Ashbya has with respect to the bacterial systems used at present for the industrial production of this food additive. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2060-2063. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26927228

  16. THE FUNCTIONS OF FINANCIAL INTERMEDIATION - A SURVEY

    OpenAIRE

    Andries Marius Alin

    2009-01-01

    Traditional theories of intermediation are based on transaction costs and asymmetric information. In recent decades although transaction costs and asymmetric information have declined, intermediation has increased. New markets for financial futures and options are mainly markets for intermediaries rather than individuals or firms. In this paper we survey the last theoretical and empirical research on financial intermediation and functions of financial intermediation. We discuss the functions ...

  17. How Should Financial Intermediation Services be Taxed?

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Ben

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the optimal taxation of two types of financial intermediation services (savings intermediation, and payment services) in a dynamic general equilibrium setting, when the government can also use consumption and income taxes. When payment services are used in strict proportion to final consumption, and the cost of intermediation services is the same across firms, the optimal taxes on financial intermediation are generally indeterminate. But, when firms differ in the cost of ...

  18. ESL intermediate/advanced writing

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz Page, Mary Ellen; Jaskiewicz, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Master ESL (English as a Second Language) Writing with the study guide designed for non-native speakers of English. Skill-building lessons relevant to today's topics help ESL students write complete sentences, paragraphs, and even multi-paragraph essays. It's perfect for classroom use or self-guided writing preparation.DETAILS- Intermediate drills for improving skills with parallel structure, mood, correct shifting errors & dangling participles- Advanced essay drills focusing on narrative, descriptive, process, reaction, comparison and contrast- Superb preparation for students taking the TOEFL

  19. Fate of aerobic bacterial granules with fungal contamination under different organic loading conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Li, AJ; Zhang, T.; LI, XY

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic sludge granulation is an attractive new technology for biological wastewater treatment. However, the instability of aerobic granules caused by fungal growth is still one of the main problems encountered in granular bioreactors. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the fate and transformation of aerobic granules under different organic loading conditions. Bacterial granules (2-3 mm) in a poor condition with fungi-like black filamentous growth were seeded ...

  20. Rotor Vortex Filaments: Living on the Slipstream's Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of rotor wake evolution in hover and axial flow by deriving an analytical solution for the time dependent behavior of vortex filament circulation and core size. This solution is applicable only for vortex filaments in the rotor far-wake. A primarily inviscid vortex/shear layer interaction (where the slipstream boundary is modeled as a shear layer) has been identified in this analytical treatment. This vortex/shear layer interaction results in decreasing, vortex filament circulation and core size with time. The inviscid vortex/shear layer interaction is shown, in a first-order treatment, to be of greater magnitude than viscous diffusion effects. The rate of contraction, and ultimate collapse, of the vortex filament core is found to be directly proportional to the rotor inflow velocity. This new insight into vortex filament decay promises to help reconcile several disparate observations made in the literature and will, hopefully, promote new advances in theoretical modeling of rotor wakes.

  1. Large amplitude oscillatory motion along a solar filament

    CERN Document Server

    Vrsnak, B; Thalmann, J K; Zic, T

    2007-01-01

    Large amplitude oscillations of solar filaments is a phenomenon known for more than half a century. Recently, a new mode of oscillations, characterized by periodical plasma motions along the filament axis, was discovered. We analyze such an event, recorded on 23 January 2002 in Big Bear Solar Observatory H$\\alpha$ filtergrams, in order to infer the triggering mechanism and the nature of the restoring force. Motion along the filament axis of a distinct buldge-like feature was traced, to quantify the kinematics of the oscillatory motion. The data were fitted by a damped sine function, to estimate the basic parameters of the oscillations. In order to identify the triggering mechanism, morphological changes in the vicinity of the filament were analyzed. The observed oscillations of the plasma along the filament was characterized by an initial displacement of 24 Mm, initial velocity amplitude of 51 km/s, period of 50 min, and damping time of 115 min. We interpret the trigger in terms of poloidal magnetic flux inje...

  2. Numerical Study of Pinching Liquid Filament Using VOF Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪若瑜

    2003-01-01

    Study on pinching liquid filament in literature was reviewed. The breakup of liquid filaments under surface tension is governed by incompressible, two-dimensional (2-D), Navier-Stokes Equations. Surface tension was expressed via a CSF (continuous surface force) model that ensures robustness and accuracy. A new surface reconstruction scheme, alternative phase integration (API) scheme was proposed to solve the kinematic equation,and was compared with other three referential schemes. A general-purpose computer program has been developed for simulating transient, 2-D, incompressible fluid flows with free surface of complex topology. The transient behavior of breaking Newtonian liquid filaments under surface tension was simulated successfully using the developed program.The initial wave growth predicted using API-VOF (volume of fluid) scheme was in good agreement with Rayleigh''s linear theory and one-dimensional (l-D) long-wave theory. Both long wave theory and two-dimensional (2-D) API-VOF model on fine meshes show that as time goes on, these waves pinch off large droplets separated by smaller satellite ones that decrease in size with decreasing wavelength. Self-similar structure during the breakup was found using 1-D and 2-D models, and three breakups were predicted for a typical case. The criterion of filament breaking predicted by the 2-D model is that the wavelength is longer than the circumference of a filament. The predicted sizes of main and satellite droplets were compared with published experimental measurements.

  3. Observations of CO in the eastern filaments of NGC 1275

    CERN Document Server

    Salomé, P; Combes, F; Pety, J; Downes, D; Edge, A C; Fabian, A C

    2008-01-01

    We recently found extended CO(2-1) emission from cold molecular gas embedded in the network of Halpha filaments surrounding the galaxy NGC 1275 (Salome et al. 2006). We now present CO(2-1) interferometer maps of the eastern filaments, at high spatial and spectral resolutions. The cold molecular gas is detected by the Plateau de Bure Interferometer along the eastern filaments over an extent of 15'', or with a projected length of 5kpc. In our 2.5'' beam, the main CO filament is mostly unresolved along its minor axis. The multiple peaks along the CO filaments and the low values of the observed CO brightness temperatures imply further unresolved structures that may be giant molecular clouds. These clouds have very narrow line-width emission lines (~30 km/s). The CO emission is optically thick. It very likely traces cold clouds bound under their own self-gravity that may be falling back in the gravitational potential well of the galaxy. Such a picture would agree with current models of ``positive feedback'' in whi...

  4. Characterizing interstellar filaments with Herschel in IC5146

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, D; Didelon, P; Konyves, V; Schneider, N; Men'shchikov, A; Sousbie, T; Zavagno, A; Bontemps, S; Di Francesco, J; Griffin, M; Hennemann, M; Hill1, T; Kirk, J; Martin, P; Minier, V; Molinari, S; Motte, F; Peretto, N; Pezzuto, S; Spinoglio, L; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G; Wilson, C D

    2011-01-01

    We provide a first look at the results of the Herschel Gould Belt survey toward the IC5146 molecular cloud and present a preliminary analysis of the filamentary structure in this region. The column density map, derived from our 70-500 micron Herschel data, reveals a complex network of filaments, and confirms that these filaments are the main birth sites of prestellar cores. We analyze the column density profiles of 27 filaments and show that the underlying radial density profiles fall off as r^{-1.5} to r^{-2.5} at large radii. Our main result is that the filaments seem to be characterized by a narrow distribution of widths having a median value of 0.10 +- 0.03 pc, which is in stark contrast to a much broader distribution of central Jeans lengths. This characteristic width of ~0.1 pc corresponds to within a factor of ~2 to the sonic scale below which interstellar turbulence becomes subsonic in diffuse gas, supporting the argument that the filaments may form as a result of the dissipation of large-scale turbul...

  5. TRANSIENT BRIGHTENINGS ASSOCIATED WITH FLUX CANCELLATION ALONG A FILAMENT CHANNEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.-M. [Code 7682, Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Muglach, K., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: karin.muglach@nasa.gov [Code 674, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Filament channels coincide with large-scale polarity inversion lines of the photospheric magnetic field, where flux cancellation continually takes place. High-cadence Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) images recorded in He II 30.4 nm and Fe IX 17.1 nm during 2010 August 22 reveal numerous transient brightenings occurring along the edge of a filament channel within a decaying active region, where SDO line-of-sight magnetograms show strong opposite-polarity flux in close contact. The brightenings are elongated along the direction of the filament channel, with linear extents of several arcseconds, and typically last a few minutes; they sometimes have the form of multiple two-sided ejections with speeds on the order of 100 km s{sup -1}. Remarkably, some of the brightenings rapidly develop into larger scale events, forming sheetlike structures that are eventually torn apart by the diverging flows in the filament channel and ejected in opposite directions. We interpret the brightenings as resulting from reconnections among filament-channel field lines having one footpoint located in the region of canceling flux. In some cases, the flow patterns that develop in the channel may bring successive horizontal loops together and cause a cascade to larger scales.

  6. Cold filaments in galaxy clusters: effects of heat conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, C; Nipoti, Carlo; Binney, James

    2004-01-01

    We determine the critical size l_crit of a filament of cold (T~10^4 K) gas that is in radiative equilibrium with X-ray emitting gas at temperatures T_out~10^6 - 10^8 K. Filaments smaller than l_crit will be rapidly evaporated, while longer ones will induce the condensation of the ambient medium. At fixed pressure P, l_crit increases as T_out^(11/4), while at fixed T_out it scales as 1/P. It scales as f^(1/2), where f is the factor by which the magnetic field depresses the thermal conductivity below Spitzer's benchmark value. For plausible values of f, l_crit is similar to the lengths of observed filaments. In a cluster such as Perseus, the value of l_crit increases by over an order of magnitude between the centre and a radius of 100 kpc. If the spectrum of seed filament lengths l is strongly falling with l, as is natural, then these results explain why filaments are only seen within a few kiloparsecs of the centres of clusters, and are not seen in clusters that have no cooling flow. We calculate the different...

  7. The influence of intermediate roll characteristics on the residual crack density and critical current density in multifilamentary (Bi, Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the influence of the intermediate rolling deformation on the residual crack network and critical current density in multifilamentary (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (2223) tapes. Although an intermediate rolling step between heat treatment is generally beneficial in raising the critical current density, it also has the negative effect of causing cracking. Cracking was evaluated both by magneto optical imaging and by ultrasonic fracture of extracted filaments. We found that the characteristic fragment size was sensitive to both roll diameter and reduction percentage, decreasing from ∼210 μm for a 10% reduction to ∼115 μm for a ∼20% reduction with 152 mm diameter rolls. At a constant 10% reduction, the fragment size decreased from ∼ 210 μm to ∼140 μm when changing from 152 mm to 38 mm diameter rolls. We conclude that intermediate deformation is positive in so far as it decreases the filament porosity, but that it cannot reduce this too much without introducing more cracking than can be healed in subsequent heat treatment. The critical current density thus maximizes at an intermediate deformation that counterbalances these two oppositely directed influences on the filament connectivity. (author)

  8. Tilt Angles of Solar Filaments over the Period 1919-2014

    CERN Document Server

    Tlatov, A G; Vasil'yeva, V V

    2016-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of solar filaments were analyzed using data from the Meudon Observatory for the period 1919-2003 and the Kislovodsk Mountain Astronomical Station for the period 1979-2014. We scanned $H_\\alpha$ solar synoptic charts on which the filaments were isolated and digitized. The data on each filament comprise its location, length, area, and other geometrical characteristics. The temporal distributions of the number and total length of the filaments have been obtained. We also found latitudinal migration of filament locations with the solar cycle, and analyzed the longitudinal distribution and asymmetry of filaments in the northern and southern hemispheres, and other properties of their distribution. The tilt angles of filaments with respect the solar equator ($\\tau$) were analyzed. On average, the eastern tips of filaments are closer to the poles than the western ones ($\\tau \\sim 10^\\circ$). On the other hand, the filaments in the polar regions ($\\theta>50^\\circ$, where $\\theta$...

  9. Triggers of full-length tau aggregation: a role for partially folded intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirita, Carmen N; Congdon, Erin E; Yin, Haishan; Kuret, Jeff

    2005-04-19

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized in part by the accumulation of full-length tau proteins into intracellular filamentous inclusions. To clarify the events that trigger lesion formation, the aggregation of recombinant full-length four-repeat tau (htau40) was examined in vitro under near-physiological conditions using transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy methods. In the absence of exogenous inducers, tau protein behaved as an assembly-incompetent monomer with little tertiary structure. The addition of anionic inducers led to fibrillization with nucleation-dependent kinetics. On the basis of circular dichroism spectroscopy and reactivity with thioflavin S and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid fluorescent probes, the inducer stabilized a monomeric species with the folding characteristics of a premolten globule state. Planar aromatic dyes capable of binding the intermediate state with high affinity were also capable of triggering fibrillization in the absence of other inducers. Dye-mediated aggregation was characterized by concentration-dependent decreases in lag time, indicating increased nucleation rates, and submicromolar critical concentrations, indicating a final equilibrium that favored the filamentous state. The data suggest that the rate-limiting barrier for filament formation from full-length tau is conformational and that the aggregation reaction is triggered by environmental conditions that stabilize assembly-competent conformations. PMID:15823045

  10. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  11. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  12. Calibrating bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ochman, Howard; Elwyn, Susannah; Moran, Nancy A

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to calibrate bacterial evolution have relied on the assumption that rates of molecular sequence divergence in bacteria are similar to those of higher eukaryotes, or to those of the few bacterial taxa for which ancestors can be reliably dated from ecological or geological evidence. Despite similarities in the substitution rates estimated for some lineages, comparisons of the relative rates of evolution at different classes of nucleotide sites indicate no basis for their universal appl...

  13. Intermediate view synthesis from stereoscopic images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Chaohui; An Ping; Zhang Zhaoyang

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for synthesizing intermediate views from a pair of stereoscopic images. In order to synthesize high-quality intermediate views, the block matching method together with a simplified multi-window technique and dynamic programming is used in the process of disparity estimation. Then occlusion detection is performed to locate occluded regions and their disparities are compensated. After the projecton of the left-to-right and right-to-left disparities onto the intermediate image, intermediate view is synthesized considering occluded regions. Experimental results show that our synthesis method can obtain intermediate views with higher quality.

  14. Intermediate filament proteins and actin isoforms as markers for soft tissue tumor differentiation and origin. II. Rhabdomyosarcomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Skalli, O.; Gabbiani, G; Babaï, F.; Seemayer, T. A.; Pizzolato, G.; Schürch, W.

    1988-01-01

    A series of 15 rhabdomyosarcomas was examined by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) and indirect immunofluorescence, the latter using monoclonal or affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to desmin, vimentin, alpha-smooth muscle and alpha-sarcomeric (alpha-sr) actins. By light microscopy, the authors diagnosed 1 botrioid, 1 alveolar, and 7 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas, 4 pleomorphic spindle cell sarcomas, and 2 spindle cell sarcomas,...

  15. Intermediate filament proteins and actin isoforms as markers for soft tissue tumor differentiation and origin. I. Smooth muscle tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Schürch, W.; Skalli, O.; Seemayer, T. A.; Gabbiani, G.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 3 benign and 10 malignant smooth muscle (SM) neoplasms and of 2 malignant fibrous histiocytomas was examined by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) and indirect immunofluorescence, using polyclonal monospecific or monoclonal antibodies to desmin, vimentin, cytokeratin, alpha-SM and alpha-sarcomeric (alpha-SR) actins. Benign neoplasms displayed typical light-microscopic features of SM, whereas leiomyosarcomas demonstrated ...

  16. In vivo characteristics of targeted drug-carrying filamentous bacteriophage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaks Lilach

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines are a new class of nanomedicines that combines biological and chemical components into a modular nanometric drug delivery system. The core of the system is a filamentous phage particle that is produced in the bacterial host Escherichia coli. Target specificity is provided by a targeting moiety, usually an antibody that is displayed on the tip of the phage particle. A large drug payload is chemically conjugated to the protein coat of the phage via a chemically or genetically engineered linker that provides for controlled release of the drug after the particle homed to the target cell. Recently we have shown that targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines can be used to eradicate pathogenic bacteria and cultured tumor cells with great potentiation over the activity of the free untargeted drug. We have also shown that poorly water soluble drugs can be efficiently conjugated to the phage coat by applying hydrophilic aminoglycosides as branched solubility-enhancing linkers. Results With an intention to move to animal experimentation of efficacy, we tested anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines for toxicity and immunogenicity and blood pharmacokinetics upon injection into mice. Here we show that anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines that carry the antibiotic chloramphenicol conjugated via an aminoglycoside linker are non-toxic to mice and are greatly reduced in immunogenicity in comparison to native phage particles or particles to which the drug is conjugated directly and are cleared from the blood more slowly in comparison to native phage particles. Conclusion Our results suggest that aminoglycosides may serve as branched solubility enhancing linkers for drug conjugation that also provide for a better safety profile of the targeted nanomedicine.

  17. Actin filaments growing against a barrier with fluctuating shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Raj Kumar; Chatterjee, Sakuntala

    2016-06-01

    We study force generation by a set of parallel actin filaments growing against a nonrigid obstacle, in the presence of an external load. The filaments polymerize by either moving the whole obstacle, with a large energy cost, or by causing local distortion in its shape which costs much less energy. The nonrigid obstacle also has local thermal fluctuations due to which its shape can change with time and we describe this using fluctuations in the height profile of a one-dimensional interface with Kardar-Parisi-Zhang dynamics. We find the shape fluctuations of the barrier strongly affect the force generation mechanism. The qualitative nature of the force-velocity curve is crucially determined by the relative time scale of filament and barrier dynamics. The height profile of the barrier also shows interesting variation with the external load. Our analytical calculations within mean-field theory show reasonable agreement with our simulation results.

  18. Actin filaments growing against a barrier with fluctuating shape

    CERN Document Server

    Sadhu, Raj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We study force generation by a set of parallel actin filaments growing against a non-rigid obstacle, in presence of an external load. The filaments polymerize by either moving the whole obstacle, with a large energy cost, or by causing local distortion in its shape which costs much less energy. The non-rigid obstacle also has local thermal fluctuations due to which its shape can change with time and we describe this using fluctuations in the height profile of a one dimensional interface with Kardar-Parisi-Zhang dynamics. We find the shape fluctuations of the barrier strongly affects the force generation mechanism. The qualitative nature of the force-velocity curve is crucially determined by the relative time-scale of filament and barrier dynamics. The height profile of the barrier also shows interesting variation with the external load. Our analytical calculation within mean-field theory shows reasonable agreement with our simulation results.

  19. Structural Basis of Actin Filament Nucleation by Tandem W Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorui Chen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous nucleation of actin is very inefficient in cells. To overcome this barrier, cells have evolved a set of actin filament nucleators to promote rapid nucleation and polymerization in response to specific stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of actin nucleation remains poorly understood. This is hindered largely by the fact that actin nucleus, once formed, rapidly polymerizes into filament, thus making it impossible to capture stable multisubunit actin nucleus. Here, we report an effective double-mutant strategy to stabilize actin nucleus by preventing further polymerization. Employing this strategy, we solved the crystal structure of AMPPNP-actin in complex with the first two tandem W domains of Cordon-bleu (Cobl, a potent actin filament nucleator. Further sequence comparison and functional studies suggest that the nucleation mechanism of Cobl is probably shared by the p53 cofactor JMY, but not Spire. Moreover, the double-mutant strategy opens the way for atomic mechanistic study of actin nucleation and polymerization.

  20. High-resolution spectroscopy of a giant solar filament

    CERN Document Server

    Kuckein, C; Verma, M

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of a giant solar quiescent filament were taken with the Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT; Tenerife, Spain). A mosaic of various spectroheliograms (H\\alpha, H\\alpha\\ +/- 0.5\\AA\\ and Na D2) were chosen to examine the filament at different heights in the solar atmosphere. In addition, full-disk images (He I 10830\\AA\\ and Ca II K) of the Chromspheric Telescope and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager were used to complement the spectra. Preliminary results are shown of this filament, which had extremely large linear dimensions (~ 740'') and was observed in November 2011 while it traversed the northern solar hemisphere.

  1. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.

  2. High-resolution spectroscopy of a giant solar filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckein, Christoph; Denker, Carsten; Verma, Meetu

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of a giant solar quiescent filament were taken with the Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT; Tenerife, Spain). A mosaic of various spectroheliograms (Hα, Hα+/-0.5 Å and Na D2) were chosen to examine the filament at different heights in the solar atmosphere. In addition, full-disk images (He i 10830 Å and Ca ii K) of the Chromspheric Telescope and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager were used to complement the spectra. Preliminary results are shown of this filament, which had extremely large linear dimensions (~740'') and was observed in November 2011 while it traversed the northern solar hemisphere.

  3. SOLAR MAGNETIZED 'TORNADOES': RELATION TO FILAMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela [IGAM-Kanzelhoehe Observatory, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Wang Tongjiang [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Gan Weiqun, E-mail: yang.su@uni-graz.at [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-09-10

    Solar magnetized 'tornadoes', a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar 'tornadoes' (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

  4. Undulatory locomotion of finite filaments: lessons from C. elegans

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, R; Sznitman, J; Leshansky, A

    2013-01-01

    Undulatory swimming is a widespread propulsion strategy adopted by many small-scale organisms including various single-cell eukaryotes and nematodes. In this work, we report a comprehensive study of undulatory locomotion of a finite filament using (i) approximate resistive force theory (RFT) assuming a local nature of hydrodynamic interaction between the filament and the surrounding viscous liquid, and (ii) particle-based numerical computations taking into account the intra-filament hydrodynamic interaction. Using the ubiquitous model of a propagating sinusoidal waveform, we identify the limit of applicability of the RFT and determine the optimal propulsion gait in terms of (i) swimming distance per period of undulation and (ii) hydrodynamic propulsion efficiency. The occurrence of the optimal swimming gait maximizing hydrodynamic efficiency at finite wavelength in particle-based computations diverges from the prediction of the RFT. To compare the model swimmer powered by sine wave undulations to biological u...

  5. Formation of cracks on photodegraded nylon 6 filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cracks were found on the surface of drawn nylon 6 filaments irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light from a mercury lamp under various humidities at room temperature. The cracks were formed perpendicular to the fiber axis and were of varying sizes. No cracks were observed on undrawn filaments or drawn filaments exposed to UV light in a dry atmosphere. Considerable shrinkage was found in drawn samples by thermomechanical analysis indicating the presence of residual stress in the material. The cracking is explained in terms of the residual stress and plasticization by moisture. The presence of water appears to play an important role in the formation of cracks on nylon fibers which have been subjected either to UV light or to ν-ray irradiation

  6. Persistence of activity in noisy motor-filament assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Chelakkot, Raghunath; Mahadevan, L

    2015-01-01

    Long, elastic filaments cross-linked and deformed by active molecular motors occur in various natural settings. The overall macroscopic mechanical response of such a composite network depends on the coupling between the active and the passive properties of the underlying constituents and nonlocal interactions between different parts of the composite. In a simple one dimensional system, using a mean field model, it has been shown that the combination of motor activity and finite filament extensibility yields a persistence length scale over which strain decays. Here we study a similar system, in the complementary limit of strong noise and moderate extensibility, using Brownian multi-particle collision dynamics-based numerical simulations that includes the coupling between motor kinetics and local filament extensibility. While the numerical model shows deviations from the mean field predictions due to the presence of strong active noise caused by the variations in individual motor activity, several qualitative f...

  7. Supergranular-scale magnetic flux emergence beneath an unstable filament

    CERN Document Server

    Palacios, J; Guerrero, A; Saiz, E; Cerrato, Y

    2015-01-01

    Here we report evidence of a large solar filament eruption on 2013, September 29. This smooth eruption, which passed without any previous flare, formed after a two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection towards Earth. The coronal mass ejection generated a moderate geomagnetic storm on 2013, October 2 with very serious localized effects. The whole event passed unnoticed to flare-warning systems. We have conducted multi-wavelength analyses of the Solar Dynamics Observatory through Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data. The AIA data on 304, 193, 211, and 94 \\AA sample the transition region and the corona, respectively, while HMI provides photospheric magnetograms, continuum, and linear polarization data, in addition to the fully inverted data provided by HMI. [...] We have observed a supergranular-sized emergence close to a large filament in the boundary of the active region NOAA11850. Filament dynamics and magnetogram results suggest that the magnetic flux emergenc...

  8. Filament Discharge Phenomena in Fingerprint Acquisition by Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG Ming; XU Weijun; LIU Qiang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dielectric barrier discharge fingerprint acquisition technique is introduced. The filament discharge phenomena were observed in the process of fingerprint acquisition. The filament discharge reduced the quality of fingerprint images. Obviously, it was necessary to eliminate streamer discharges in order to get good fingerprint images. The streamer discharge was considered to be the cause of the filament discharge in the experiment. The relationship between the critical electric field and the discharge gap was calculated with the Raether's model of streamer discharge. The calculated results and our experiment proved that it would be difficult for the streamer discharge to occur when the discharge gap was narrow. With a narrow discharge gap, the discharge was homogeneous, and the fingerprint images were clear and large in area. The images obtained in the experiment are very suitable for fingerprint identification as they contain more information.

  9. How filaments are woven into the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R; Pogosyan, D; Bond, J Richard; Kofman, Lev; Pogosyan, Dmitri

    1995-01-01

    Observations indicate galaxies are distributed in a filament-dominated web-like structure. Numerical experiments at high and low redshift of viable structure formation theories also show filament-dominance. We present a simple quantitative explanation of why this is so, showing that the final-state web is actually present in embryonic form in the overdensity pattern of the initial fluctuations, with nonlinear dynamics just sharpening the image. The web is largely defined by the position and primordial tidal fields of rare events in the medium, with the strongest filaments between nearby clusters whose tidal tensors are nearly aligned. Applications of the cosmic web theory to observations include probing cluster-cluster bridges by weak gravitational lensing, X-rays, and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and probing high redshift galaxy-galaxy bridges by low column density Lyman alpha absorption lines.

  10. Space- and time-resolved observation of single filaments propagation in an underdense plasma and of beam coupling between neighbouring filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, J.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Marquès, J.-R.; Antici, P.; Bourgeois, N.; Grech, M.; Lin, T.; Romagnani, L.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Weber, S.; Kodama, R.; Audebert, P.

    2007-12-01

    We have performed a systematic study of beam propagation (400 ps, I = 1010-1014 W cm-2) in underdense plasmas (ne = 1019-1020 cm-3) at a level of reduced complexity compared with the smoothed beams currently used in inertial confinement fusion studies, using one or two well-controlled filaments. These experiments have been performed on the LULI 100 TW laser facility. The use of well-controlled, diffraction-limited single filaments is possibly due to the use of adaptative optics. We have used either a single filament or two filaments having variable distance, delay, intensity ratio and polarization. The single filament configuration allows to study basic beam propagation and reveals occurrence of filamentation at low intensity levels. The use of two filaments demonstrates the occurrence of beam coupling and merging, and the importance of cross-talk effects supported by the plasma.

  11. The Origin of Ionized Filaments Within the Orion-Eridanus Superbubble

    CERN Document Server

    Pon, Andy; Bally, John; Heiles, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The Orion-Eridanus superbubble, formed by the nearby Orion high mass star-forming region, contains multiple bright H$\\alpha$ filaments on the Eridanus side of the superbubble. We examine the implications of the H$\\alpha$ brightnesses and sizes of these filaments, the Eridanus filaments. We find that either the filaments must be highly elongated along the line of sight or they cannot be equilibrium structures illuminated solely by the Orion star-forming region. The Eridanus filaments may, instead, have formed when the Orion-Eridanus superbubble encountered and compressed a pre-existing, ionized gas cloud, such that the filaments are now out of equilibrium and slowly recombining.

  12. Galactic Cold Cores VII: Filament Formation and Evolution - Methods & Observational Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera-Ingraham, A; Juvela, M; Montillaud, J; Men'shchikov, A; Malinen, J; Pelkonen, V -M; Marston, A; Martin, P G; Pagani, L; Paladini, R; Paradis, D; Ysard, N; Ward-Thompson, D; Bernard, J -P; Marshall, D J; Montier, L; Tóth, V

    2016-01-01

    The association of filaments with protostellar objects has made these structures a priority target in star formation studies. The datasets of the Herschel Galactic Cold Cores Key Programme allow for a statistical study of filaments with a wide range of intrinsic and environmental characteristics. Characterisation of this sample can be used to identify key physical parameters and quantify the role of environment in the formation of supercritical filaments. Filaments were extracted from fields at DMcrit/2 may become supercritical and form stars. This translates into a need for filaments to become at least moderately self-gravitating in order to undergo localised star formation or become star-forming filaments.

  13. Transportation of nanoscale cargoes by myosin propelled actin filaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Persson

    Full Text Available Myosin II propelled actin filaments move ten times faster than kinesin driven microtubules and are thus attractive candidates as cargo-transporting shuttles in motor driven lab-on-a-chip devices. In addition, actomyosin-based transportation of nanoparticles is useful in various fundamental studies. However, it is poorly understood how actomyosin function is affected by different number of nanoscale cargoes, by cargo size, and by the mode of cargo-attachment to the actin filament. This is studied here using biotin/fluorophores, streptavidin, streptavidin-coated quantum dots, and liposomes as model cargoes attached to monomers along the actin filaments ("side-attached" or to the trailing filament end via the plus end capping protein CapZ. Long-distance transportation (>100 µm could be seen for all cargoes independently of attachment mode but the fraction of motile filaments decreased with increasing number of side-attached cargoes, a reduction that occurred within a range of 10-50 streptavidin molecules, 1-10 quantum dots or with just 1 liposome. However, as observed by monitoring these motile filaments with the attached cargo, the velocity was little affected. This also applied for end-attached cargoes where the attachment was mediated by CapZ. The results with side-attached cargoes argue against certain models for chemomechanical energy transduction in actomyosin and give important insights of relevance for effective exploitation of actomyosin-based cargo-transportation in molecular diagnostics and other nanotechnological applications. The attachment of quantum dots via CapZ, without appreciable modulation of actomyosin function, is useful in fundamental studies as exemplified here by tracking with nanometer accuracy.

  14. The versatility of hot-filament activated chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of activated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polycrystalline diamond films, hot-filament activation (HF-CVD) is widely used for applications where large deposition areas are needed or three-dimensional substrates have to be coated. We have developed processes for the deposition of conductive, boron-doped diamond films as well as for tribological crystalline diamond coatings on deposition areas up to 50 cm x 100 cm. Such multi-filament processes are used to produce diamond electrodes for advanced electrochemical processes or large batches of diamond-coated tools and parts, respectively. These processes demonstrate the high degree of uniformity and reproducibility of hot-filament CVD. The usability of hot-filament CVD for diamond deposition on three-dimensional substrates is well known for CVD diamond shaft tools. We also develop interior diamond coatings for drawing dies, nozzles, and thread guides. Hot-filament CVD also enables the deposition of diamond film modifications with tailored properties. In order to adjust the surface topography to specific applications, we apply processes for smooth, fine-grained or textured diamond films for cutting tools and tribological applications. Rough diamond is employed for grinding applications. Multilayers of fine-grained and coarse-grained diamond have been developed, showing increased shock resistance due to reduced crack propagation. Hot-filament CVD is also used for in situ deposition of carbide coatings and diamond-carbide composites, and the deposition of non-diamond, silicon-based films. These coatings are suitable as diffusion barriers and are also applied for adhesion and stress engineering and for semiconductor applications, respectively

  15. INSIGHTS INTO FILAMENT ERUPTION ONSET FROM SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the buildup to and onset of an active region filament confined eruption of 2010 May 12, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Array and line-of-sight magnetic data from the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. Over the hour preceding eruption the filament undergoes a slow rise averaging ∼3 km s-1, with a step-like trajectory. Accompanying a final rise step ∼20 minutes prior to eruption is a transient preflare brightening, occurring on loops rooted near the site where magnetic field had canceled over the previous 20 hr. Flow-type motions of the filament are relatively smooth with speeds ∼50 km s-1 prior to the preflare brightening and appear more helical, with speeds ∼50-100 km s-1, after that brightening. After a final plateau in the filament's rise, its rapid eruption begins, and concurrently an outer shell 'cocoon' of the filament material increases in emission in hot EUV lines, consistent with heating in a newly formed magnetic flux rope. The main flare brightenings start ∼5 minutes after eruption onset. The main flare arcade begins between the legs of an envelope-arcade loop that is nearly orthogonal to the filament, suggesting that the flare results from reconnection among the legs of that loop. This progress of events is broadly consistent with flux cancellation leading to formation of a helical flux rope that subsequently erupts due to onset of a magnetic instability and/or runaway tether cutting.

  16. Simulations of Filament Channel Formation in a Coronal Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizhnik, Kalman; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    A major unanswered problem in solar physics has been explaining the presence of sheared filament channels above photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs) and the simultaneous lack of structure in the ‘loop’ portion of the coronal magnetic field. The shear inherent in filament channels represents not only a form of magnetic energy, but also magnetic helicity. As a result, models of filament channel formation need to explain not only why helicity is observed above PILs, but also why it is apparently not observed anywhere else in the corona. Previous results (Knizhnik, Antiochos & DeVore, 2015) have suggested that any helicity injected into the coronal field inverse-cascades in scale, a process known as magnetic helicity condensation (Antiochos, 2013). In this work, we present high resolution numerical simulations of photospheric helicity injection into a coronal magnetic field that contains both a PIL and a coronal hole (CH). We show conclusively that the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity terminates at the PIL, resulting in the formation of highly sheared filament channels and a smooth, untwisted corona. We demonstrate that even though magnetic helicity is injected throughout the flux system, it accumulates only at the PIL, where it manifests itself in the form of highly sheared filament channels, while any helicity obtained by the CH is ejected out of the system. We show that the formation of filament channels is both qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with observations and discuss the implications of our simulations for observations.This work was supported by the NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship, LWS TR&T and H-SR Programs.

  17. Temporal self-restoration of compressed optical filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Bergé, L; Steinmeyer, G

    2008-01-01

    We numerically investigate the propagation of a self-compressed optical filament through a gas-glass-gas interface. Few-cycle light pulses survive a sudden and short order-of-magnitude increase of nonlinearity and dispersion, even when all conservative estimates predict temporal spreading or spatial breakup. Spatio-temporal distortions are shown to self-heal upon further propagation when the pulse refocuses in the second gas. This self-healing mechanism has important implications for pulse compression techniques handled by filamentation and explains the robustness of such sources.

  18. Stellar Filaments in Self-Interacting Brans-Dicke Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study cylindrically symmetric stellar filaments in self-interacting Brans-Dicke gravity. For this purpose, we construct polytropic filamentary models through generalized Lane-Emden equation in Newtonian regime. The resulting models depend upon the values of cosmological constant (due to scalar field) along with polytropic index and represent a generalization of the corresponding models in general relativity. We also investigate fragmentation of filaments by exploring the radial oscillations through stability analysis. This stability criteria depends only upon the adiabatic index.

  19. Spin alignment of dark matter haloes in filaments and walls

    OpenAIRE

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; van der Hulst, J. M. Thijs

    2006-01-01

    The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter haloes are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host structures. The shape orientation is such that the halo minor axes tend to lie perpendicular to the host structure, be it a wall or filament. The orientation of the halo spin vector is mass dependent. Low mass haloes...

  20. Interaction of NO with a hot polycrystalline tungsten filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was undertaken to relate the NO/W adsorption-desorption process with a hot tungsten filament. With this idea two sets of experiments have been carried out. In the first (adsorption-desorption), the energies of activation, interstate transformation, dissociation and desorption have been determined. In the second (NO reaction with hot filament), the authors have determined the order and activation energy of the reaction. With these data the dissociative reaction is explained as a series of elementary adsorption-desorption processes. (Auth.)