WorldWideScience

Sample records for bacterial inhibition mechanical

  1. Bioluminescence inhibition of bacterial luciferase by aliphatic alcohol, amine and carboxylic acid: inhibition potency and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Yamada, Shuto; Takehara, Kô

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of hydrophobic molecules on the bacterial luciferase, BL, luminescence reaction were analyzed using an electrochemically-controlled BL luminescence system. The inhibition potency of alkyl amines, C(n)NH(2), and fatty acids, C(m)COOH (m = n - 1), on the BL reaction increased with an increase in the alkyl chain-length of these aliphatic compounds. C(m)COOH showed lower inhibition potency than C(n)NH(2) and alkyl alcohols, C(n)OH, data for which have been previously reported. To make clear the inhibition mechanisms of the aliphatic compounds on the BL reaction, the initial rate of the BL reaction was measured and analyzed using the Dixon plot and Cornish-Bowden plot. The C(12)OH inhibited the BL reaction in competition with the substrate C(11)CHO, while C(12)NH(2) and C(11)COOH inhibited in an uncompetitive manner with the C(11)CHO. These results suggest that the alkyl chain-length and the terminal unit of the aliphatic compound determine the inhibition potency and the inhibition mechanism, respectively.

  2. Influence of silver additions to type 316 stainless steels on bacterial inhibition, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tseng, I-Sheng; Møller, Per;

    2010-01-01

    techniques. The microstructure of these 316 stainless steels was examined, and the influences of silver additions to 316 stainless steels on bacterial inhibition, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance were investigated. This study suggested that silver-bearing 316 stainless steels could be used......Bacterial contamination is a major concern in many areas. In this study, silver was added to type 316 stainless steels in order to obtain an expected bacteria inhibiting property to reduce the occurrence of bacterial contamination. Silver-bearing 316 stainless steels were prepared by vacuum melting...

  3. Mechanism of fusidic acid inhibition of RRF- and EF-G-dependent splitting of the bacterial post-termination ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Anneli; Pavlov, Michael; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2016-04-20

    The antibiotic drug fusidic acid (FA) is commonly used in the clinic against gram-positive bacterial infections. FA targets ribosome-bound elongation factor G (EF-G), a translational GTPase that accelerates both messenger RNA (mRNA) translocation and ribosome recycling. How FA inhibits translocation was recently clarified, but FA inhibition of ribosome recycling by EF-G and ribosome recycling factor (RRF) has remained obscure. Here we use fast kinetics techniques to estimate mean times of ribosome splitting and the stoichiometry of GTP hydrolysis by EF-G at varying concentrations of FA, EF-G and RRF. These mean times together with previous data on uninhibited ribosome recycling were used to clarify the mechanism of FA inhibition of ribosome splitting. The biochemical data on FA inhibition of translocation and recycling were used to model the growth inhibitory effect of FA on bacterial populations. We conclude that FA inhibition of translocation provides the dominant cause of bacterial growth reduction, but that FA inhibition of ribosome recycling may contribute significantly to FA-induced expression of short regulatory open reading frames, like those involved in FA resistance.

  4. Anthocyanin Incorporated Dental Copolymer: Bacterial Growth Inhibition, Mechanical Properties, and Compound Release Rates and Stability by 1H NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna Hrynash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate bacterial growth inhibition, mechanical properties, and compound release rate and stability of copolymers incorporated with anthocyanin (ACY; Vaccinium macrocarpon. Methods. Resin samples were prepared (Bis-GMA/TEGDMA at 70/30 mol% and incorporated with 2 w/w% of either ACY or chlorhexidine (CHX, except for the control group. Samples were individually immersed in a bacterial culture (Streptococcus mutans for 24 h. Cell viability (n=3 was assessed by counting the number of colony forming units on replica agar plates. Flexural strength (FS and elastic modulus (E were tested on a universal testing machine (n=8. Compound release and chemical stability were evaluated by UV spectrophotometry and 1H NMR (n=3. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05. Results. Both compounds inhibited S. mutans growth, with CHX being most effective (P<0.05. Control resin had the lowest FS and E values, followed by ACY and CHX, with statistical difference between control and CHX groups for both mechanical properties (P<0.05. The 24 h compound release rates were ACY: 1.33 μg/mL and CHX: 1.92 μg/mL. 1H NMR spectra suggests that both compounds remained stable after being released in water. Conclusion. The present findings indicate that anthocyanins might be used as a natural antibacterial agent in resin based materials.

  5. Influence of silver additions to type 316 stainless steels on bacterial inhibition, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tseng, I-Sheng; Møller, Per;

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial contamination is a major concern in many areas. In this study, silver was added to type 316 stainless steels in order to obtain an expected bacteria inhibiting property to reduce the occurrence of bacterial contamination. Silver-bearing 316 stainless steels were prepared by vacuum melti...

  6. MECHANISMS OF BACTERIAL POLYHOSTALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markova Yu.A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the review data about factors of pathogenicity of the bacteria, capable to amaze both animals, and a plant are collected. Such properties of microorganisms as adhesion, secretion of some enzymes, mobility, a phenomenon of cooperative sensitivity - play an essential role at defeat of different organisms. They are used for many universal offensive strategy overcoming protection of an organism, irrespective of its evolutionary origin. Studying of these mechanisms, will allow to provide new approaches to monitoring illnesses.

  7. Inhibiting bacterial toxins by channel blockage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M

    2016-03-01

    Emergent rational drug design techniques explore individual properties of target biomolecules, small and macromolecule drug candidates, and the physical forces governing their interactions. In this minireview, we focus on the single-molecule biophysical studies of channel-forming bacterial toxins that suggest new approaches for their inhibition. We discuss several examples of blockage of bacterial pore-forming and AB-type toxins by the tailor-made compounds. In the concluding remarks, the most effective rationally designed pore-blocking antitoxins are compared with the small-molecule inhibitors of ion-selective channels of neurophysiology.

  8. Molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial persisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Gerdes, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    All bacteria form persisters, cells that are multidrug tolerant and therefore able to survive antibiotic treatment. Due to the low frequencies of persisters in growing bacterial cultures and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms, the phenomenon has been challenging to study. However, recent...

  9. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Díaz-Pérez, César; Vargas, Eréndira; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-06-01

    Chromium is a non-essential and well-known toxic metal for microorganisms and plants. The widespread industrial use of this heavy metal has caused it to be considered as a serious environmental pollutant. Chromium exists in nature as two main species, the trivalent form, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous, and the hexavalent form, Cr(VI), considered a more toxic species. At the intracellular level, however, Cr(III) seems to be responsible for most toxic effects of chromium. Cr(VI) is usually present as the oxyanion chromate. Inhibition of sulfate membrane transport and oxidative damage to biomolecules are associated with the toxic effects of chromate in bacteria. Several bacterial mechanisms of resistance to chromate have been reported. The best characterized mechanisms comprise efflux of chromate ions from the cell cytoplasm and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chromate efflux by the ChrA transporter has been established in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Cupriavidus metallidurans (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus) and consists of an energy-dependent process driven by the membrane potential. The CHR protein family, which includes putative ChrA orthologs, currently contains about 135 sequences from all three domains of life. Chromate reduction is carried out by chromate reductases from diverse bacterial species generating Cr(III) that may be detoxified by other mechanisms. Most characterized enzymes belong to the widespread NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein family of reductases. Several examples of bacterial systems protecting from the oxidative stress caused by chromate have been described. Other mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromate involve the expression of components of the machinery for repair of DNA damage, and systems related to the homeostasis of iron and sulfur.

  10. Ribosome-targeting antibiotics and mechanisms of bacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel N

    2014-01-01

    The ribosome is one of the main antibiotic targets in the bacterial cell. Crystal structures of naturally produced antibiotics and their semi-synthetic derivatives bound to ribosomal particles have provided unparalleled insight into their mechanisms of action, and they are also facilitating the design of more effective antibiotics for targeting multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this Review, I discuss the recent structural insights into the mechanism of action of ribosome-targeting antibiotics and the molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance, in addition to the approaches that are being pursued for the production of improved drugs that inhibit bacterial protein synthesis.

  11. Inhibition of bacterial ammonia oxidation by organohydrazines in soil microcosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucheng eWu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxylamine oxidation by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO is a key step for energy-yielding in support of the growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB. Organohydrazines have been shown to inactivate HAO from Nitrosomonas europaea, and may serve as selective inhibitors to differentiate bacterial from archaeal ammonia oxidation due to the absence of bacterial HAO gene homologue in known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA. In this study, the effects of three organohydrazines on activity, abundance and composition of AOB and AOA were evaluated in soil microcosms. The results indicate that phenylhydrazine and methylhydrazine at the concentration of 100 mol per gram dry weight soil completely suppressed the activity of soil nitrification. DGGE fingerprinting and sequencing analysis of bacterial ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene (amoA clearly demonstrated that nitrification activity change is well paralleled with the growth of Nitrosomonas europaea-like AOB in soil microcosms. No significant correlation between AOA community structure and nitrification activity was observed among all treatments during the incubation period, although incomplete inhibition of nitrification activity occurred in 2-hydroxyethylhydrazine-amended soil microcosms. These findings show that the HAO-targeted organohydrazines can effectively inhibit bacterial nitrification in soil, and the mechanism of organohydrazine affecting AOA remains unclear.

  12. Mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardal, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    Nine bacteria were tested for the ability to dehalogenate tetrachloromethane (CT), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) under anaerobic conditions. Three bacteria were able to reductively dehalogenate CT. Dehalogenation ability was not readily linked to a common metabolism or changes in culture redox potential. None of the bacteria tested were able to dehalogenate PCE or TCA. One of the bacteria capable of dehalogenating CT, Shewanella putrefaciens, was chosen as a model organism to study mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation. The effect of a variety of alternate electron acceptors on CT dehalogenation ability by S. putrefaciens was determined. oxygen and nitrogen oxides were inhibitory but Fe (III), trimethylamine oxide, and fumarate were not. A model of the electron transport chain of S. putrefaciens was developed to explain inhibition patterns. A period of microaerobic growth prior to CT exposure increased the ability of S. putrefaciens to dehalogenate CT. A microaerobic growth period also increased cytochrome concentrations. A relationship between cytochrome content and dehalogenation ability was developed from studies in which cytochrome concentrations in S. putrefaciens were manipulated by changing growth conditions. Stoichiometry studies using {sup 14}C-CT suggested that CT was first reduced to form a trichloromethyl radical. Reduction of the radical to produce chloroform and reaction of the radical with cellular biochemicals explained observed product distributions. Carbon dioxide or other fully dehalogenated products were not found.

  13. Inhibition of Bacterial RNase P RNA by Phenothiazine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiying Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to identify novel scaffolds and targets to develop new antibiotics. Methylene blue is a phenothiazine derivative, and it has been shown to possess anti-malarial and anti-trypanosomal activities. Here, we show that different phenothiazine derivatives and pyronine G inhibited the activities of three structurally different bacterial RNase P RNAs (RPRs, including that from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with Ki values in the lower μM range. Interestingly, three antipsychotic phenothiazines (chlorpromazine, thioridazine, and trifluoperazine, which are known to have antibacterial activities, also inhibited the activity of bacterial RPRs, albeit with higher Ki values than methylene blue. Phenothiazines also affected lead(II-induced cleavage of bacterial RPR and inhibited yeast tRNAPhe, indicating binding of these drugs to functionally important regions. Collectively, our findings provide the first experimental data showing that long, noncoding RNAs could be targeted by different phenothiazine derivatives.

  14. Pharmacological inhibition of quorum sensing for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that aim to kill or inhibit bacterial growth. A major concern with this approach is the frequently observed development of resistance to antimicrobial compounds. The discovery of bacterial-communication systems (quorum-sensing...... mechanisms and potential antipathogenic drugs that specifically target quorum-sensing systems in a manner unlikely to pose a selective pressure for the development of resistant mutants....

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Thilo Martin

    Cautious optimism has arisen over recent decades with respect to the long struggle against bacteria, viruses, and parasites. This has been offset, however, by a fatal complacency stemming from previous successes such as the development of antimicrobial drugs, the eradication of smallpox, and global immunization programs. Infectious diseases nevertheless remain the world's leading cause of death, killing at least 17 million persons annually [61]. Diarrheal diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae or Shigella dysenteriae kill about 3 million persons every year, most of them young children: Another 4 million die of tuberculosis or tetanus. Outbreaks of diphtheria in Eastern Europe threatens the population with a disease that had previously seemed to be overcome. Efforts to control infectious diseases more comprehensively are undermined not only by socioeconomic conditions but also by the nature of the pathogenic organisms itself; some isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter have become so resistant to drugs by horizontal gene transfer that they are almost untreatable. In addition, the mechanism of genetic variability helps pathogens to evade the human immune system, thus compromising the development of powerful vaccines. Therefore detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity is absolutely necessary to develop new strategies against infectious diseases and thus to lower their impact on human health and social development.

  16. A study of bacterial gene regulatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sabine

    the different regulatory mechanisms affect system dynamics. We have designed a synthetic gene regulatory network (GRN) in bacterial cells that enables us to study the dynamics of GRNs. The results presented in this PhD thesis show that model equations based on the established mechanisms of action of each...... of a particular type of regulatory mechanism. The synthetic system presented in this thesis is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind to allow a direct comparison of the dynamic behaviors of gene regulatory networks that employ different mechanisms of regulation. In addition to studying the dynamic behavior...... of GRNs this thesis also provided the first evidence of the sensor histidine kinase VC1831 being an additional player in the Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing (QS) GRN. Bacteria use a process of cell-cell communication called QS which enable the bacterial cells to collectively control their gene expression...

  17. Inhibition of gastric secretion by bacterial lipopolysaccharide in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenen, F.H.H.; Miert, A.S.J.P.A.M. van

    1969-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provoked an inhibition of gastric secretion in the rat. Reserpine and the catecholamine-synthesis inhibitors α-methyldopa and diethyl dithiocarbamate blocked this action of LPS, although adrenergic blocking agents or adrenalectomy were without effect. Direct stimul

  18. Antibody inhibition of polymorphonuclear phagocytosis. Dissociation of bacterial attachment and bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J P; Valeri, C R

    1980-06-01

    The inhibition of killing of Staphylococcus aureus 502A by PMNs treated with the IgG fraction of serum from a group of patients with demonstrable leukocyte antibodies was investigated. The uptake of opsonized thymidine-labeled S. aureus 502A by PMNs treated with allogeneic antibody was essentially unimpaired, despite significantly decreased killing. The findings were similar to bacteria opsonized by serum complement or bacteria opsonized with specific lapine antibody. An increased proportion of PMN-bound bacteria susceptible to lysis by lysostaphin indicated a reduced rate of translocation of bacteria from the surface of allogeneic antibody-treated PMNs. Antibody did not stimulate the basal oxidative metabolism, but the oxidative metabolism of antibody-treated PMNs during phagocytosis was increased. Although the precise mechanism of inhibition of PMN killing by antibody is uncertain, the data suggest that the impairment of bacterial killing by PMNs treated with allogeneic leukocyte antibody is associated with inefficient translocation of bacteria into phagolysosomes rather than by interference with the binding of bacteria to specific PMN opsonic receptors.

  19. Bacterial attraction and quorum sensing inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Fatma; Badri, Dayakar V; Zachariah, Cherian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Sandoval, Francisco J; Roje, Sanja; Levine, Lanfang H; Zhang, Fengli; Robinette, Steven L; Alborn, Hans T; Zhao, Wei; Stadler, Michael; Nimalendran, Rathika; Dossey, Aaron T; Brüschweiler, Rafael; Vivanco, Jorge M; Edison, Arthur S

    2009-08-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a bacterivorous nematode, lives in complex rotting fruit, soil, and compost environments, and chemical interactions are required for mating, monitoring population density, recognition of food, avoidance of pathogenic microbes, and other essential ecological functions. Despite being one of the best-studied model organisms in biology, relatively little is known about the signals that C. elegans uses to interact chemically with its environment or as defense. C. elegans exudates were analyzed by using several analytical methods and found to contain 36 common metabolites that include organic acids, amino acids, and sugars, all in relatively high abundance. Furthermore, the concentrations of amino acids in the exudates were dependent on developmental stage. The C. elegans exudates were tested for bacterial chemotaxis using Pseudomonas putida (KT2440), a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1), a soil bacterium pathogenic to C. elegans, and Escherichia coli (OP50), a non-motile bacterium tested as a control. The C. elegans exudates attracted the two Pseudomonas species, but had no detectable antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. To our surprise, the exudates of young adult and adult life stages of C. elegans exudates inhibited quorum sensing in the reporter system based on the LuxR bacterial quorum sensing (QS) system, which regulates bacterial virulence and other factors in Vibrio fischeri. We were able to fractionate the QS inhibition and bacterial chemotaxis activities, thus demonstrating that these activities are chemically distinct. Our results demonstrate that C. elegans can attract its bacterial food and has the potential of partially regulating the virulence of bacterial pathogens by inhibiting specific QS systems.

  20. Alleviating Cancer Drug Toxicity by Inhibiting a Bacterial Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Bret D.; Wang, Hongwei; Lane, Kimberly T.; Scott, John E.; Orans, Jillian; Koo, Ja Seol; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Jobin, Christian; Yeh, Li-An; Mani, Sridhar; Redinbo, Matthew R. (Einstein); (UNC); (North Carolina Central University)

    2011-08-12

    The dose-limiting side effect of the common colon cancer chemotherapeutic CPT-11 is severe diarrhea caused by symbiotic bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases that reactivate the drug in the gut. We sought to target these enzymes without killing the commensal bacteria essential for human health. Potent bacterial {beta}-glucuronidase inhibitors were identified by high-throughput screening and shown to have no effect on the orthologous mammalian enzyme. Crystal structures established that selectivity was based on a loop unique to bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases. Inhibitors were highly effective against the enzyme target in living aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, but did not kill the bacteria or harm mammalian cells. Finally, oral administration of an inhibitor protected mice from CPT-11-induced toxicity. Thus, drugs may be designed to inhibit undesirable enzyme activities in essential microbial symbiotes to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy.

  1. Organo-selenium-containing dental sealant inhibits bacterial biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, P; Hamood, A; Mosley, T; Gray, T; Jarvis, C; Webster, D; Amaechi, B; Enos, T; Reid, T

    2013-05-01

    Oral bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus salivarius, contribute to tooth decay and plaque formation; therefore, it is essential to develop strategies to prevent dental caries and plaque formation. We recently showed that organo-selenium compounds covalently attached to different biomaterials inhibited bacterial biofilms. Our current study investigates the efficacy of an organo-selenium dental sealant (SeLECT-Defense(TM) sealant) in inhibiting S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilm formation in vitro. The organo-selenium was synthesized and covalently attached to dental sealant material via standard polymer chemistry. By colony-forming unit (CFU) assay and confocal microscopy, SeLECT-Defense(TM) sealant was found to completely inhibit the development of S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilms. To assess the durability of the anti-biofilm effect, we soaked the SeLECT-Defense(TM) sealant in PBS for 2 mos at 37°C and found that the biofilm-inhibitory effect was not diminished after soaking. To determine if organo-selenium inhibits bacterial growth under the sealant, we placed SeLECT-Defense sealant over a lawn of S. mutans. In contrast to a control sealant, SeLECT-Defense(TM) sealant completely inhibited the growth of S. mutans. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of SeLECT-Defense(TM) sealant against S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilms is very effective and durable.

  2. Gyramides prevent bacterial growth by inhibiting DNA gyrase and altering chromosome topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendram, Manohary; Hurley, Katherine A; Foss, Marie H; Thornton, Kelsey M; Moore, Jared T; Shaw, Jared T; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-06-20

    Antibiotics targeting DNA gyrase have been a clinical success story for the past half-century, and the emergence of bacterial resistance has fueled the search for new gyrase inhibitors. In this paper we demonstrate that a new class of gyrase inhibitors, the gyramides, are bacteriostatic agents that competitively inhibit the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli gyrase and produce supercoiled DNA in vivo. E. coli cells treated with gyramide A have abnormally localized, condensed chromosomes that blocks DNA replication and interrupts chromosome segregation. The resulting alterations in DNA topology inhibit cell division through a mechanism that involves the SOS pathway. Importantly, gyramide A is a specific inhibitor of gyrase and does not inhibit the closely related E. coli enzyme topoisomerase IV. E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to gyramide A do not display cross-resistance to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin. The results demonstrate that the gyramides prevent bacterial growth by a mechanism in which the topological state of chromosomes is altered and halts DNA replication and segregation. The specificity and activity of the gyramides for inhibiting gyrase makes these compounds important chemical tools for studying the mechanism of gyrase and the connection between DNA topology and bacterial cell division.

  3. Sphingosine Prevents Bacterial Adherence to Endotracheal Tubes: A Novel Mechanism to Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    VAP is multifactorial, but is undeniably related to the presence of the endotracheal tube (ETT). Tracheal intubation inhibits the cough reflex...to the presence of the endotracheal tube (ETT). Tracheal intubation inhibits the cough reflex, affects mucociliary clearance, provides direct access...AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2016-0009 Sphingosine Prevents Bacterial Adherence to Endotracheal Tubes: A Novel Mechanism to Prevent Ventilator

  4. Examination of bacterial inhibition using a catalytic DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Qu

    Full Text Available Determination of accurate dosage of existing antibiotics and discovery of new antimicrobials or probiotics entail simple but effective methods that can conveniently track bacteria growth and inhibition. Here we explore the application of a previously reported fluorogenic E. coli-specific DNAzyme (catalytic DNA, RFD-EC1, as a molecular probe for monitoring bacterial inhibition exerted by antibiotics and for studying bacterial competition as a result of cohabitation. Because the DNAzyme method provides a convenient way to monitor the growth of E. coli, it is capable of determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of antibiotics much faster than the conventional optical density (OD method. In addition, since the target for RFD-EC1 is an extracellular protein molecule from E. coli, RFD-EC1 is able to identify pore-forming antibiotics or compounds that can cause membrane leakage. Finally, RFD-EC1 can be used to analyse the competition of cohabitating bacteria, specifically the inhibition of growth of E. coli by Bacillus subtilis. The current work represents the first exploration of a catalytic DNA for microbiological applications and showcases the utility of bacteria-sensing fluorogenic DNAzymes as simple molecular probes to facilitate antibiotic and probiotic research.

  5. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  6. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair J Standish

    Full Text Available Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  7. Geometry and mechanics of growing bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhihong; Pearce, Daniel; Sengupta, Anupam; Giomi, Luca

    Bacterial colonies are abundant on living and non-living surfaces, and are known to mediate a broad range of processes in ecology, medicine and industry. Although extensively researched - from single cells up to the population levels - a comprehensive biophysical picture, highlighting the cell-to-colony dynamics, is still lacking. Here, using numerical and analytical models, we study the mechanics of self-organization leading to the colony morphology of cells growing on a substrate with free boundary. We consider hard rods to mimic the growth of rod-shaped non-motile cells, and show that the colony, as a whole, does not form an ordered nematic phase, nor does it result in a purely disordered (isotropic) phase. Instead, different sizes of domains, in which cells are highly aligned at specific orientations, are found. The distribution of the domain sizes follows an exponential relation - indicating the existence of a characteristic length scale that determines the domain size relative to that of the colony. A continuum theory, based on the hydrodynamics of liquid crystals, is built to account for these phenomena, and is applied to describe the buckling transition from a planar to three-dimensional (3D) colony. The theory supports preliminary experiments conducted with different strains of rod shaped bacterial cells, and reveals that the buckling transition can be regulated by varying the cell stiffness and aspect ratio. This work proposes that, in addition to biochemical pathways, the spatio-temporal organization in microbial colonies is significantly tuned by the biomechanical and geometric properties of the microbes in consideration.

  8. Inhibition of Bacterial Adhesion by Subinhibitory Concentrations of Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs due to Escherichia coli is one of the most common diseases encountered in clinical practice. Most common recognised pathogenic factor in E.coli is adhesion. There is accumulating evidence that through subinhibitory concentrations (sub - MICs of many antibiotics do not kill bacteria, they are able to interfere with some important aspects of bacterial cell function. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted to investigate the effect of sub MICs (1/2-1/8 MIC of ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, gentamicin, ampicillin and co - trimoxazole on E. coli adhesiveness to human vaginal epithelial cells using three strains ATCC 25922, MTCC 729 and U 105. Results: The 1/2 MIC of all the antibiotics tested produced the greatest inhibition of bacterial adhesion. Morphological changes were observed with ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime and ampicillin at 1/2 MIC and to a lesser extent at 1/4 and 1/8 MIC. Co-trimoxazole caused the greatest suppression of adhesion at 1/2 MIC of E. coli strain MTCC 729 when compared with the controls, followed by ceftazidime. Conclusion: These results suggest that co - trimoxazole is the most effective antibiotic in the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli.

  9. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents.

  10. α-Hexylcinnamaldehyde inhibits the genotoxicity of environmental pollutants in the bacterial reverse mutation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Silvia; Mazzanti, Gabriela; Sarpietro, Maria Grazia; Di Sotto, Antonella

    2014-12-26

    The antimutagenicity of α-hexylcinnamaldehyde (1), a semisynthetic and more stable derivative of cinnamaldehyde, was evaluated against common environmental pollutants in the bacterial reverse mutation assay. The pre-, co-, and post-treatment protocols were applied to assess the involvement of desmutagenic and/or bioantimutagenic mechanisms. Compound 1 (9-900 μM) produced a strong antimutagenicity (>40% inhibition) in the Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain against the nitroarenes 2-nitrofluorene and 1-nitropyrene in almost all experimental conditions. A strong inhibition was also reached against the nitroarene 1,8-dinitropyrene and the arylamine 2-aminoanthracene in the cotreatment at the highest concentrations tested. In order to evaluate if an inhibition of bacterial nitroreductase (NR) and O-acetyltransferase (OAT) could be involved in the antimutagenicity of 1 against nitroarenes, the substance was further tested against 1-nitropyrene (activated by both NR and OAT) in TA98NR and TA98 1,8-DNP strains (lacking the NR and OAT enzymes, respectively). Although both desmutagenic and bioantimutagenic mechanisms appear mostly involved in the antimutagenicity of 1, based on data obtained in the TA98NR strain, applying the pretreatment protocol, compound 1 seems to act as an inhibitor of the OAT-mediated mutagen bioactivation. These results provide justification for further studies on 1 as a possible chemopreventive agent.

  11. Bacterial meningitis: Mechanisms of disease and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.F. Kornelisse (René); R. de Groot (Ronald); H.J. Neijens (Herman)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBacterial meningitis continues to be a serious infectious disease with a high morbidity and mortality in young children. Early recognition and initiation of adequate treatment are the major determinants for a good outcome. Recent advances in our understanding of the host inflammatory res

  12. Inhibition of bacterial surface colonization by immobilized silver nanoparticles depends critically on the planktonic bacterial concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Stacy M; Bertuccio, Alex J; Cao, Feng; Lowry, Gregory V; Tilton, Robert D

    2016-04-01

    Immobilization of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on surfaces has been proposed as a method to inhibit biofouling or as a possible route by which incidental releases of AgNPs may interfere with biofilms in the natural environment or in wastewater treatment. This study addresses the ability of planktonic Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria to colonize surfaces with pre-adsorbed AgNPs. The ability of the AgNP-coated surfaces to inhibit colonization was controlled by the dissolved silver in the system, with a strong dependence on the initial planktonic cell concentration in the suspension, i.e., a strong inoculum effect. This dependence was attributed to a decrease in dissolved silver ion bioavailability and toxicity caused by its binding to cells and/or cell byproducts. Therefore, when the initial cell concentration was high (∼1×10(7)CFU/mL), an excess of silver binding capacity removed most of the free silver and allowed both planktonic growth and surface colonization directly on the AgNP-coated surface. When the initial cell concentration was low (∼1×10(5)CFU/mL), 100% killing of the planktonic cell inoculum occurred and prevented colonization. When an intermediate initial inoculum concentration (∼1×10(6)CFU/mL) was sufficiently large to prevent 100% killing of planktonic cells, even with 99.97% initial killing, the planktonic population recovered and bacteria colonized the AgNP-coated surface. In some conditions, colonization of AgNP-coated surfaces was enhanced relative to silver-free controls, and the bacteria demonstrated a preferential attachment to AgNP-coated, rather than bare, surface regions. The degree to which the bacterial concentration dictates whether or not surface-immobilized AgNPs can inhibit colonization has significant implications both for the design of antimicrobial surfaces and for the potential environmental impacts of AgNPs.

  13. Genetic evidence for inhibition of bacterial division protein FtsZ by berberine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw M Boberek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Berberine is a plant alkaloid that is widely used as an anti-infective in traditional medicine. Escherichia coli exposed to berberine form filaments, suggesting an antibacterial mechanism that involves inhibition of cell division. Berberine is a DNA ligand and may induce filamentation through induction of the SOS response. Also, there is biochemical evidence for berberine inhibition of the cell division protein FtsZ. Here we aimed to assess possible berberine mechanism(s of action in growing bacteria using genetics tools. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we tested whether berberine inhibits bacterial growth through DNA damage and induction of the SOS response. The SOS response induced by berberine was much lower compared to that induced by mitomycin C in an SOS response reporter strain. Also, cell filamentation was observed in an SOS-negative E. coli strain. To test whether berberine inhibits FtsZ, we assessed its effects on formation of the cell division Z-rings, and observed a dramatic reduction in Z-rings in the presence of berberine. We next used two different strategies for RNA silencing of ftsZ and both resulted in sensitisation of bacteria to berberine, visible as a drop in the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC. Furthermore, Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Indices (FICIs showed a high level of synergy between ftsZ silencing and berberine treatment (FICI values of 0.23 and 0.25 for peptide nucleic acid- and expressed antisense RNA-based silencing of ftsZ, respectively. Finally, over-expression of ftsZ led to a mild rescue effect in berberine-treated cells. CONCLUSIONS: The results argue against DNA binding as the primary mechanism of action of berberine and support the hypothesis that its antibacterial properties are due to inhibition of the cell division protein FtsZ. In addition, the genetic approach used here provides a means to rapidly test the activity of other putative FtsZ inhibitors.

  14. Antifungal agents: mode of action, mechanisms of resistance, and correlation of these mechanisms with bacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, M A; Rice, L B

    1999-10-01

    The increased use of antibacterial and antifungal agents in recent years has resulted in the development of resistance to these drugs. The significant clinical implication of resistance has led to heightened interest in the study of antimicrobial resistance from different angles. Areas addressed include mechanisms underlying this resistance, improved methods to detect resistance when it occurs, alternate options for the treatment of infections caused by resistant organisms, and strategies to prevent and control the emergence and spread of resistance. In this review, the mode of action of antifungals and their mechanisms of resistance are discussed. Additionally, an attempt is made to discuss the correlation between fungal and bacterial resistance. Antifungals can be grouped into three classes based on their site of action: azoles, which inhibit the synthesis of ergosterol (the main fungal sterol); polyenes, which interact with fungal membrane sterols physicochemically; and 5-fluorocytosine, which inhibits macromolecular synthesis. Many different types of mechanisms contribute to the development of resistance to antifungals. These mechanisms include alteration in drug target, alteration in sterol biosynthesis, reduction in the intercellular concentration of target enzyme, and overexpression of the antifungal drug target. Although the comparison between the mechanisms of resistance to antifungals and antibacterials is necessarily limited by several factors defined in the review, a correlation between the two exists. For example, modification of enzymes which serve as targets for antimicrobial action and the involvement of membrane pumps in the extrusion of drugs are well characterized in both the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.

  15. Differential effects of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial products on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninkovic, Jana; Jana, Ninkovic; Anand, Vidhu; Vidhu, Anand; Dutta, Raini; Raini, Dutta; Zhang, Li; Saluja, Anuj; Meng, Jingjing; Koodie, Lisa; Lisa, Koodie; Banerjee, Santanu; Santanu, Banerjee; Roy, Sabita; Sabita, Roy

    2016-02-19

    Opioid drug abusers have a greater susceptibility to gram positive (Gram (+)) bacterial infections. However, the mechanism underlying opioid modulation of Gram (+) versus Gram (-) bacterial clearance has not been investigated. In this study, we show that opioid treatment resulted in reduced phagocytosis of Gram (+), when compared to Gram (-) bacteria. We further established that LPS priming of chronic morphine treated macrophages leads to potentiated phagocytosis and killing of both Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria in a P-38 MAP kinase dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, LTA priming lead to inhibition of both phagocytosis and bacterial killing. This study demonstrates for the first time the differential effects of TLR4 and TLR2 agonists on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis. Our results suggest that the incidence and severity of secondary infections with Gram (+) bacteria would be higher in opioid abusers.

  16. Complete kinetic mechanism for recycling of the bacterial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Anneli; Pavlov, Michael; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2016-01-01

    How EF-G and RRF act together to split a post-termination ribosomal complex into its subunits has remained obscure. Here, using stopped-flow experiments with Rayleigh light scattering detection and quench-flow experiments with radio-detection of GTP hydrolysis, we have clarified the kinetic mechanism of ribosome recycling and obtained precise estimates of its kinetic parameters. Ribosome splitting requires that EF-G binds to an already RRF-containing ribosome. EF-G binding to RRF-free ribosomes induces futile rounds of GTP hydrolysis and inhibits ribosome splitting, implying that while RRF is purely an activator of recycling, EF-G acts as both activator and competitive inhibitor of RRF in recycling of the post-termination ribosome. The ribosome splitting rate and the number of GTPs consumed per splitting event depend strongly on the free concentrations of EF-G and RRF. The maximal recycling rate, here estimated as 25 sec(-1), is approached at very high concentrations of EF-G and RRF with RRF in high excess over EF-G. The present in vitro results, suggesting an in vivo ribosome recycling rate of ∼5 sec(-1), are discussed in the perspective of rapidly growing bacterial cells.

  17. Biofilm formation and ethanol inhibition by bacterial contaminants of biofuel fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial contaminants can inhibit ethanol production in biofuel fermentations, and even result in stuck fermentations. Contaminants may persist in production facilities by forming recalcitrant biofilms. A two-year longitudinal study was conducted of bacterial contaminants from a Midwestern dry grin...

  18. Mechanical reaction-diffusion model for bacterial population dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ngamsaad, Waipot

    2015-01-01

    The effect of mechanical interaction between cells on the spreading of bacterial population was investigated in one-dimensional space. A nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation has been formulated as a model for this dynamics. In this model, the bacterial cells are treated as the rod-like particles that interact, when contacting each other, through the hard-core repulsion. The repulsion introduces the exclusion process that causes the fast diffusion in bacterial population at high density. The propagation of the bacterial density as the traveling wave front in long time behavior has been analyzed. The analytical result reveals that the front speed is enhanced by the exclusion process---and its value depends on the packing fraction of cell. The numerical solutions of the model have been solved to confirm this prediction.

  19. Proteome studies of bacterial antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranakis, Iosif; Goniotakis, Ioannis; Psaroulaki, Anna; Sandalakis, Vassilios; Tselentis, Yannis; Gevaert, Kris; Tsiotis, Georgios

    2014-01-31

    Ever since antibiotics were used to help humanity battle infectious diseases, microorganisms straight away fought back. Antibiotic resistance mechanisms indeed provide microbes with possibilities to by-pass and survive the action of antibiotic drugs. Several methods have been employed to identify these microbial resistance mechanisms in an ongoing effort to reduce the steadily increasing number of treatment failures due to multi-drug-resistant microbes. Proteomics has evolved to an important tool for this area of research. Following rapid advances in whole genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have been widely used to investigate microbial gene expression. This review highlights the contribution of proteomics in identifying microbial drug resistance mechanisms. It summarizes different proteomic studies on bacteria resistant to different antibiotic drugs. The review further includes an overview of the methodologies used, as well as lists key proteins identified, thus providing the reader not only a summary of research already done, but also directions for future research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Trends in Microbial Proteomics.

  20. The bacterial effector Cif interferes with SCF ubiquitin ligase function by inhibiting deneddylation of Cullin1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Hanako; Kim, Minsoo; Mimuro, Hitomi; Punginelli, Claire; Koyama, Tomohiro; Nagai, Shinya; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2010-10-15

    Cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is one of the effectors delivered into epithelial cells by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) via the type III secretion system (TTSS). Cif family proteins, which inhibit host cell-cycle progression via mechanisms not yet precisely understood, are highly conserved among EPEC, EHEC, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Photorhabdus luminescens and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Levels of several proteins relevant to cell-cycle progression are modulated by Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), which in turn are activated by conjugation and deconjugation of NEDD8 to Cullins. Here we show that Cif interacts with NEDD8 and interferes with SCF (Skp1-Cullin1-F-box protein) complex ubiquitin ligase function. We found that neddylated Cullin family proteins accumulated and ubiquitination of p27 decreased in cells infected with EPEC. Consequently, Cif stabilized SCF substrates such as CyclinD1, Cdt1, and p27, and caused G1 cell-cycle arrest. Using time-lapse-imaging of fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (Fucci)-expressing cells, we were able to monitor cell-cycle progression during EPEC infection and confirmed the arrest of infected cells at G1. Our in vitro and in vivo data show that Cif-NEDD8 interaction inhibits deneddylation of Cullins, suppresses CRL activity and induces G1 arrest. We thus conclude that the bacterial effector Cif interferes with neddylation-mediated cell-cycle control.

  1. Monensin inhibits growth of bacterial contaminants from fuel ethanol plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of commercial fermentation cultures by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a common and costly problem to the fuel ethanol industry. Virginiamycin (VIR) and penicillin (PEN) are frequently used to control bacterial contamination but extensive use of antibiotics may select for strains with d...

  2. Energy losses in mechanically modified bacterial magnetosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molcan, Matus; Gojzewski, Hubert; Skumiel, Andrzej; Dutz, Silvio; Kovac, Jozef; Kubovcikova, Martina; Kopcansky, Peter; Vekas, Ladislau; Timko, Milan

    2016-09-01

    Magnetosomes are isolated from the Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 bacteria. Two samples are compared: magnetosomes normally prepared of a ‘standard’ length and magnetosomes of a short length. Chains of magnetosomes are shortened by mechanical modification (cleavage) by means of sonication treatment. They represent a new geometry of magnetosomes that have not been investigated before. The effect of the sonication is analysed using transmission and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Scanning imaging reveals three types of shortening effect in a sample of shortened magnetosomes, namely, membrane collapse, membrane destruction, and magnetosome cleavage. Dynamic light scattering shows a reduction of hydrodynamic diameter in a sample of shortened magnetosomes. The magnetic properties of magnetosomes are analysed and compared in DC and AC magnetic fields based on the evaluation of quasi-static hysteresis loops (energy losses) and calorimetric hyperthermia measurements (specific absorption rate), respectively. A sample of shortened magnetosomes behaves magnetically in a different manner, showing that both the energy loss and the specific absorption rate are reduced, and thereby indicates a variation in the heating process. The magnetic properties of magnetosomes, together with the new and stable geometry, are balanced, which opens the way for a better adaptation of the magnetic field parameters for particular applications.

  3. Making healthier or killing enemies? Bacterial volatile-elicited plant immunity plays major role upon protection of Arabidopsis than the direct pathogen inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Rouhallah; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial volatiles protect plants either by directly inhibiting a pathogenic fungus or by improving the defense capabilities of plants. The effect of bacterial volatiles on fungal growth was dose-dependent. A low dosage did not have a noticeable effect on Botrytis cinerea growth and development, but was sufficient to elicit induced resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Bacterial volatiles displayed negative effects on biofilm formation on a polystyrene surface and in in planta leaf colonization of B. cinerea. However, bacterial volatile-mediated induced resistance was the major mechanism mediating protection of plants from B. cinerea. It was responsible for more than 90% of plant protection in comparison with direct fungal inhibition. Our results broaden our knowledge of the role of bacterial volatiles in plant protection.

  4. Inhibition of bacterial carbonic anhydrases and zinc proteases: from orphan targets to innovative new antibiotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, C T

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-containing enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrases (CAs) and metalloproteases (MPs) play critical functions in bacteria, being involved in various steps of their life cycle, which are important for survival, colonization, acquisition of nutrients for growth and proliferation, facilitation of dissemination, invasion and pathogenicity. The development of resistance to many classes of clinically used antibiotics emphasizes the need of new antibacterial drug targets to be explored. There is a wealth of data regarding bacterial CAs and zinc MPs present in many pathogenic species, such as Neisseria spp., Helycobacter pylori Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria spp, Vibrio spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, Streptomyces spp., Clostridium spp., Enterococcus spp., etc. Some of these enzymes have been cloned, purified and characterized by crystallographic techniques. However, for the moment, few potent and specific inhibitors for bacterial MPs have been reported except for Clostridium histolyticum collagenase, botulinum and tetanus neurotoxin and anthrax lethal factor, which will be reviewed in this article. Bacteria encode α-,β-, and/or γ-CA families, but up to now only the first two classes have been investigated in some detail in different species. The α-CAs from Neisseria spp. and H. pylori as well as the β-class enzymes from E. coli, H. pylori, M. tuberculosis, Brucella spp., S. pneumoniae, S. enterica and H. influenzae have been cloned and characterized. The catalytic/inhibition mechanisms of these CAs are well understood as X-ray crystal structures are available for some of them, but no adducts of these enzymes with inhibitors have been characterized so far. In vitro and in vivo studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates have been reported. Only for Neisseria spp., H. pylori, B. suis and S

  5. A host defense mechanism involving CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion in bacterial prostatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostatitis is associated with a characteristic increase in prostatic fluid pH; however, the underlying mechanism and its physiological significance have not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study a primary culture of rat prostatic epithelial cells and a rat prostatitis model were used. Here we reported the involvement of CFTR, a cAMP-activated anion channel conducting both Cl(- and HCO(3(-, in mediating prostate HCO(3(- secretion and its possible role in bacterial killing. Upon Escherichia coli (E. coli-LPS challenge, the expression of CFTR and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II, along with several pro-inflammatory cytokines was up-regulated in the primary culture of rat prostate epithelial cells. Inhibiting CFTR function in vitro or in vivo resulted in reduced bacterial killing by prostate epithelial cells or the prostate. High HCO(3(- content (>50 mM, rather than alkaline pH, was found to be responsible for bacterial killing. The direct action of HCO(3(- on bacterial killing was confirmed by its ability to increase cAMP production and suppress bacterial initiation factors in E. coli. The relevance of the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- secretion in humans was demonstrated by the upregulated expression of CFTR and CAII in human prostatitis tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CFTR and its mediated HCO(3(- secretion may be up-regulated in prostatitis as a host defense mechanism.

  6. Pulling the trigger: the mechanism of bacterial spore germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S J; Johnstone, K

    1990-01-01

    In spite of displaying the most extreme dormancy and resistance properties known among living systems, bacterial endospores retain an alert environment-sensing mechanism that can respond within seconds to the presence of specific germinants. This germination response is triggered in the absence of both germinant and germinant-stimulated metabolism. Genes coding for components of the sensing mechanism in spores of Bacillus subtilis have been cloned and sequenced. However, the molecular mechanism whereby these receptors interact with germinants to initiate the germination response is unknown. Recent evidence has suggested that in spores of Bacillus megaterium KM, proteolytic activation of an autolytic enzyme constitutes part of the germination trigger reaction.

  7. Sharing the sandbox: Evolutionary mechanisms that maintain bacterial cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruger, Eric; Waters, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Microbes are now known to participate in an extensive repertoire of cooperative behaviors such as biofilm formation, production of extracellular public-goods, group motility, and higher-ordered multicellular structures. A fundamental question is how these cooperative tasks are maintained in the face of non-cooperating defector cells. Recently, a number of molecular mechanisms including facultative participation, spatial sorting, and policing have been discovered to stabilize cooperation. Often these different mechanisms work in concert to reinforce cooperation. In this review, we describe bacterial cooperation and the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that maintain it.

  8. Novel linear polymers able to inhibit bacterial quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleiro, Eliana; Duarte, Ana Sofia; Esteves, Ana Cristina; Correia, António; Whitcombe, Michael J; Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Sergey A; Chianella, Iva

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial phenotypes, such as biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance and virulence expression, are associated with quorum sensing. Quorum sensing is a density-dependent regulatory system of gene expression controlled by specific signal molecules, such as N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), produced and released by bacteria. This study reports the development of linear polymers capable to attenuate quorum sensing by adsorption of AHLs. Linear polymers were synthesized using MMA as backbone monomer and methacrylic acid and itaconic acid as functional monomers. Two different quorum sensing-controlled phenotypes, Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence and Aeromonas hydrophila biofilm formation, were evaluated to test the polymers' efficiency. Results showed that both phenotypes were significantly affected by the polymers, with the itaconic acid-containing material being more effective than the methacrylic acid one. The polymer inhibitory effects were reverted by the addition of lactones, confirming attenuation of quorum sensing through sequestration of signal molecules. The polymers also showed no cytotoxicity when tested using a mammalian cell line.

  9. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  10. Silver-nanoparticle-coated biliary stent inhibits bacterial adhesion in bacterial cholangitis in swine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wen; Li-Mei Ma; Wei He; Xiao-Wei Tang; Yin Zhang; Xiang Wang; Li Liu; Zhi-Ning Fan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the major limitations of biliary stents is the stent occlusion, which is closely related to the over-growth of bacteria. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a novel silver-nanoparticle-coated polyurethane (Ag/PU) stent in bacterial cholangitis model in swine. METHODS: Ag/PU was designed by coating silver nanopar-ticles on polyurethane (PU) stent. Twenty-four healthy pigs with bacterial cholangitis using Ag/PU and PU stents were ran-domly divided into an Ag/PU stent group (n=12) and a PU stent group (n=12), respectively. The stents were inserted by standard endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Laboratory assay was performed for white blood cell (WBC) count, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at baseline time, 8 hours, 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after stent placements. The segment of bile duct containing the stent was examined histologically ex vivo. Implanted bili-ary stents were examined by a scan electron microscope. The amount of silver release was also measured in vitro. RESULTS: The number of inflammatory cells and level of ALT, IL-1β and TNF-α were significantly lower in the Ag/PU stent group than in the PU stent group. Hyperplasia of the mucosa was more severe in the PU stent group than in the Ag/PU stent group. In contrast to the biofilm of bacteria on the PU stent, fewer bacteria adhered to the Ag/PU stent. CONCLUSIONS: PU biliary stents modified with silver nanoparticles are able to alleviate the inflammation of pigs with bacterial cholangitis. Silver-nanoparticle-coated stents are resistant to bacterial adhesion.

  11. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Ana M. Rosa da [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica do Algarve, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, DQF, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Matos, Antonio Pedro [Servico de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Curry Cabral, Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-12-15

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  12. Reactive oxygen species mediated bacterial biofilm inhibition via zinc oxide nanoparticles and their statistical determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Dwivedi

    Full Text Available The formation of bacterial biofilm is a major challenge in clinical applications. The main aim of this study is to describe the synthesis, characterization and biocidal potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs against bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These nanoparticles were synthesized via soft chemical solution process in a very short time and their structural properties have been investigated in detail by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements. In this work, the potential of synthesized ZnO-NPs (∼ 10-15 nm has been assessed in-vitro inhibition of bacteria and the formation of their biofilms was observed using the tissue culture plate assays. The crystal violet staining on biofilm formation and its optical density revealed the effect on biofilm inhibition. The NPs at a concentration of 100 µg/mL significantly inhibited the growth of bacteria and biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition by ZnO-NPs was also confirmed via bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM. The Bio-TEM analysis of ZnO-NPs treated bacteria confirmed the deformation and damage of cells. The bacterial growth in presence of NPs concluded the bactericidal ability of NPs in a concentration dependent manner. It has been speculated that the antibacterial activity of NPs as a surface coating material, could be a feasible approach for controlling the pathogens. Additionally, the obtained bacterial solution data is also in agreement with the results from statistical analytical methods.

  13. Synthetic furanones inhibit quorum-sensing and enhance bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.; Hentzer, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections by killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth, but resistance to antibiotics can develop readily. The discovery that bacterial quorum-sensing regulates bacterial virulence as well as the formation of biofilms opens up new ways...

  14. Diversity and redundancy in bacterial chromosome segregation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errington, Jeff; Murray, Heath; Wu, Ling Juan

    2005-03-29

    Bacterial cells are much smaller and have a much simpler overall structure and organization than eukaryotes. Several prominent differences in cell organization are relevant to the mechanisms of chromosome segregation, particularly the lack of an overt chromosome condensation/decondensation cycle and the lack of a microtubule-based spindle. Although bacterial chromosomes have a rather dispersed appearance, they nevertheless have an underlying high level of spatial organization. During the DNA replication cycle, early replicated (oriC) regions are localized towards the cell poles, whereas the late replicated terminus (terC) region is medially located. This spatial organization is thought to be driven by an active segregation mechanism that separates the sister chromosomes continuously as replication proceeds. Comparisons of various well-characterized bacteria suggest that the mechanisms of chromosome segregation are likely to be diverse, and that in many bacteria, multiple overlapping mechanisms may contribute to efficient segregation. One system in which the molecular mechanisms of chromosome segregation are beginning to be elucidated is that of sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis. The key components of this system have been identified, and their functions are understood, in outline. Although this system appears to be specialized, most of the functions are conserved widely throughout the bacteria.

  15. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a... killing or growth inhibition of repair deficient bacteria in a set of repair proficient and...

  16. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    CERN Document Server

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions f...

  17. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (ppain modulation circuitry provides a framework for the future investigations into the neural mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of persistent pain conditions thought to involve altered analgesic circuitry.

  18. On the determining role of network structure titania in silicone against bacterial colonization: Mechanism and disruption of biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depan, D.; Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu

    2014-01-01

    Silicone-based biomedical devices are prone to microbial adhesion, which is the primary cause of concern in the functioning of the artificial device. Silicone exhibiting long-term and effective antibacterial ability is highly desirable to prevent implant related infections. In this regard, nanophase titania was incorporated in silicone as an integral part of the silicone network structure through cross-link mechanism, with the objective to reduce bacterial adhesion to a minimum. The bacterial adhesion was studied using crystal violet assay, while the mechanism of inhibition of biofilm formation was studied via electron microscopy. The incorporation of nanophase titania in silicone dramatically reduced the viability of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and the capability to adhere on the surface of hybrid silicone by ∼ 93% in relation to stand alone silicone. The conclusion of dramatic reduction in the viability of S. aureus is corroborated by different experimental approaches including biofilm inhibition assay, zone of inhibition, and through a novel experiment that involved incubation of biofilm with titania nanoparticles. It is proposed that the mechanism of disruption of bacterial film in the presence of titania involves puncturing of the bacterial cell membrane. - Highlights: • Network structure titania in silicone imparts antimicrobial activity. • Ability to microbial adhesion is significantly reduced. • Antimicrobial mechanism involves rupture of biofilm.

  19. Bacterial Adhesion of Streptococcus suis to Host Cells and Its Inhibition by Carbohydrate Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauli Haataja

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a Gram-positive bacterium, which causes sepsis and meningitis in pigs and humans. This review examines the role of known S. suis virulence factors in adhesion and S. suis carbohydrate-based adhesion mechanisms, as well as the inhibition of S. suis adhesion by anti-adhesion compounds in in vitro assays. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of S. suis have been identified, and these studies have shown that many strains recognize Galα1-4Gal-containing oligosaccharides present in host glycolipids. In the era of increasing antibiotic resistance, new means to treat infections are needed. Since microbial adhesion to carbohydrates is important to establish disease, compounds blocking adhesion could be an alternative to antibiotics. The use of oligosaccharides as drugs is generally hampered by their relatively low affinity (micromolar to compete with multivalent binding to host receptors. However, screening of a library of chemically modified Galα1-4Gal derivatives has identified compounds that inhibit S. suis adhesion in nanomolar range. Also, design of multivalent Galα1-4Gal-containing dendrimers has resulted in a significant increase of the inhibitory potency of the disaccharide. The S. suis adhesin binding to Galα1-4Gal-oligosaccharides, Streptococcal adhesin P (SadP, was recently identified. It has a Galα1-4Gal-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal LPNTG-motif for cell wall anchoring. The carbohydrate-binding domain has no homology to E. coli P fimbrial adhesin, which suggests that these Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial adhesins recognizing the same receptor have evolved by convergent evolution. SadP adhesin may represent a promising target for the design of anti-adhesion ligands for the prevention and treatment of S. suis infections.

  20. The Magnetosome Model: Insights into the Mechanisms of Bacterial Biomineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilah eRahn-Lee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Though the most ready example of biomineralization is the calcium phosphate of vertebrate bones and teeth, many bacteria are capable of creating biominerals inside their cells. Because of the diversity of these organisms and the minerals they produce, their study may reveal aspects of the fundamental mechanisms of biomineralization in more complex organisms. The best-studied case of intracellular biomineralization in bacteria is the magnetosome, an organelle produced by a diverse group of aquatic bacteria that contains single-domain crystals of the iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4 or the iron sulfide greigite (Fe3S4. Here, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of bacterial magnetite biomineralization are discussed and used as a framework for understanding less-well studied examples, including the bacterial intracellular biomineralization of cadmium, selenium, silver, nickel, uranium, and calcium carbonate. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological formation of these minerals will have important implications for technologies such as the fabrication of nanomaterials and the bioremediation of toxic compounds.

  1. Mechanisms and consequences of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, D I; Hughes, D; Kubicek-Sutherland, J Z

    2016-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an intrinsic part of the human innate immune system. Over 100 different human AMPs are known to exhibit broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Because of the increased frequency of resistance to conventional antibiotics there is an interest in developing AMPs as an alternative antibacterial therapy. Several cationic peptides that are derivatives of AMPs from the human innate immune system are currently in clinical development. There are also ongoing clinical studies aimed at modulating the expression of AMPs to boost the human innate immune response. In this review we discuss the potential problems associated with these therapeutic approaches. There is considerable experimental data describing mechanisms by which bacteria can develop resistance to AMPs. As for any type of drug resistance, the rate by which AMP resistance would emerge and spread in a population of bacteria in a natural setting will be determined by a complex interplay of several different factors, including the mutation supply rate, the fitness of the resistant mutant at different AMP concentrations, and the strength of the selective pressure. Several studies have already shown that AMP-resistant bacterial mutants display broad cross-resistance to a variety of AMPs with different structures and modes of action. Therefore, routine clinical administration of AMPs to treat bacterial infections may select for resistant bacterial pathogens capable of better evading the innate immune system. The ramifications of therapeutic levels of exposure on the development of AMP resistance and bacterial pathogenesis are not yet understood. This is something that needs to be carefully studied and monitored if AMPs are used in clinical settings.

  2. Effects of bacterial communities on biofuel-producing microalgae: stimulation, inhibition and harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Hill, Russell T; Zheng, Tianling; Hu, Xiaoke; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great interest in microalgae as a potential source of biofuel to substitute for fossil fuels, little information is available on the effects of bacterial symbionts in mass algal cultivation systems. The bacterial communities associated with microalgae are a crucial factor in the process of microalgal biomass and lipid production and may stimulate or inhibit growth of biofuel-producing microalgae. In addition, we discuss here the potential use of bacteria to harvest biofuel-producing microalgae. We propose that aggregation of microalgae by bacteria to achieve >90% reductions in volume followed by centrifugation could be an economic approach for harvesting of biofuel-producing microalgae. Our aims in this review are to promote understanding of the effects of bacterial communities on microalgae and draw attention to the importance of this topic in the microalgal biofuel field.

  3. Protease-dependent mechanisms of complement evasion by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Michal; Potempa, Jan

    2012-09-01

    The human immune system has evolved a variety of mechanisms for the primary task of neutralizing and eliminating microbial intruders. As the first line of defense, the complement system is responsible for rapid recognition and opsonization of bacteria, presentation to phagocytes and bacterial cell killing by direct lysis. All successful human pathogens have mechanisms of circumventing the antibacterial activity of the complement system and escaping this stage of the immune response. One of the ways in which pathogens achieve this is the deployment of proteases. Based on the increasing number of recent publications in this area, it appears that proteolytic inactivation of the antibacterial activities of the complement system is a common strategy of avoiding targeting by this arm of host innate immune defense. In this review, we focus on those bacteria that deploy proteases capable of degrading complement system components into non-functional fragments, thus impairing complement-dependent antibacterial activity and facilitating pathogen survival inside the host.

  4. Mechanism Underlying Protective Effect of Danbiqing Granule on Experimental Acute Bacterial Cholangitis in Rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINXiu-zhen; GONGYan-ling; WANGHong-bo

    2003-01-01

    Aim To study the mechanism of protective effects of Danbiqing granule (DBQ) on experimental acute bacterial cholangitis in rabbits. Methods The acute bacterial cholangitis was induced by injecting 1 mL of 1 × l03 cuf·mL-1 Escherchia coli suspension into common bile duit. The serum nitrous oxide (NO) levels were measured using nitric acid reductase kit. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity was assayed by a method of acid titration (microassay). Serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inferleukin-6 (IL-6) and plasma thromboxane B2 ( TXB2 ), 6-keto-platelet growth factor 1(PGF1α) were determined by radioimmunoassay. Results Compared with control group, serum NO, PLA2, TNF-α, IL-6 and plasma TXB2 levels increased significantly in model group ( P < 0.01) while those of DBQ groutm decreased significantly( P < 0.01). Conclusion DBQ dramatically inhibits the overproduction of pro-inflammatory factor PLA2 and inflammatory cytokine. Hence, the mechanism of DBQ underlying anti-inflammatory and protective effect against acute bacterial cholangitis in rabbits has been revealed.

  5. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Community Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter A. A. de Steenhuijsen Piters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The upper respiratory tract is colonized by a diverse array of commensal bacteria that harbor potential pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. As long as the local microbial ecosystem—also called “microbiome”—is in balance, these potentially pathogenic bacterial residents cause no harm to the host. However, similar to macrobiological ecosystems, when the bacterial community structure gets perturbed, potential pathogens can overtake the niche and cause mild to severe infections. Recent studies using next-generation sequencing show that S. pneumoniae, as well as other potential pathogens, might be kept at bay by certain commensal bacteria, including Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum spp. Bomar and colleagues are the first to explore a specific biological mechanism contributing to the antagonistic interaction between Corynebacterium accolens and S. pneumoniae in vitro [L. Bomar, S. D. Brugger, B. H. Yost, S. S. Davies, K. P. Lemon, mBio 7(1:e01725-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01725-15]. The authors comprehensively show that C. accolens is capable of hydrolyzing host triacylglycerols into free fatty acids, which display antipneumococcal properties, suggesting that these bacteria might contribute to the containment of pneumococcus. This work exemplifies how molecular epidemiological findings can lay the foundation for mechanistic studies to elucidate the host-microbe and microbial interspecies interactions underlying the bacterial community structure. Next, translation of these results to an in vivo setting seems necessary to unveil the magnitude and importance of the observed effect in its natural, polymicrobial setting.

  6. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka eVadyvaloo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria.

  7. Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps: mechanisms, physiology and pharmacological exploitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingjing; Deng, Ziqing; Yan, Aixin

    2014-10-17

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) refers to the capability of bacterial pathogens to withstand lethal doses of structurally diverse drugs which are capable of eradicating non-resistant strains. MDR has been identified as a major threat to the public health of human being by the World Health Organization (WHO). Among the four general mechanisms that cause antibiotic resistance including target alteration, drug inactivation, decreased permeability and increased efflux, drug extrusion by the multidrug efflux pumps serves as an important mechanism of MDR. Efflux pumps not only can expel a broad range of antibiotics owing to their poly-substrate specificity, but also drive the acquisition of additional resistance mechanisms by lowering intracellular antibiotic concentration and promoting mutation accumulation. Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps have been increasingly found to be associated with clinically relevant drug resistance. On the other hand, accumulating evidence has suggested that efflux pumps also have physiological functions in bacteria and their expression is subject tight regulation in response to various of environmental and physiological signals. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of drug extrusion, and regulation and physiological functions of efflux pumps is essential for the development of anti-resistance interventions. In this review, we summarize the development of these research areas in the recent decades and present the pharmacological exploitation of efflux pump inhibitors as a promising anti-drug resistance intervention.

  8. Final Report - Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation - UCSF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Susan M. [UCSF

    2014-04-24

    The bacterial mercury resistance (mer) operon functions in Hg biogeochemistry and bioremediation by converting reactive inorganic Hg(II) and organic [RHg(II)]1+ mercurials to relatively inert monoatomic mercury vapor, Hg(0). Its genes regulate operon expression (MerR, MerD, MerOP), import Hg(II) (MerT, MerP, and MerC), and demethylate (MerB) and reduce (MerA) mercurials. We focus on how these components interact with each other and with the host cell to allow cells to survive and detoxify Hg compounds. Understanding how this ubiquitous detoxification system fits into the biology and ecology of its bacterial host is essential to guide interventions that support and enhance Hg remediation. In the current overall project we focused on two aspects of this system: (1) investigations of the energetics of Hg(II)-ligand binding interactions, and (2) both experimental and computational approaches to investigating the molecular mechanisms of Hg(II) acquisition by MerA and intramolecular transfer of Hg(II) prior to reduction within the MerA enzyme active site. Computational work was led by Prof. Jeremy Smith and took place at the University of Tennessee, while experimental work on MerA was led by Prof. Susan Miller and took place at the University of California San Francisco.

  9. mTORC1-Activated Monocytes Increase Tregs and Inhibit the Immune Response to Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Huaijun; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shixuan; Xue, Ting; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yazhi; Wan, Qian; Shi, Zhexin; Zhan, Xulong

    2016-01-01

    The TSC1/2 heterodimer, a key upstream regulator of the mTOR, can inhibit the activation of mTOR, which plays a critical role in immune responses after bacterial infections. Monocytes are an innate immune cell type that have been shown to be involved in bacteremia. However, how the mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of monocytes is largely unknown. In our study, TSC1 KO mice and WT mice were infected with E. coli. When compared to WT mice, we found higher mortality, greater numbers of bacteria, decreased expression of coactivators in monocytes, increased numbers of Tregs, and decreased numbers of effector T cells in TSC1 KO mice. Monocytes obtained from TSC1 KO mice produced more ROS, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β and less IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibited immune functioning in TSC1 KO mice is influenced by mTORC1 activation in monocytes. The reduced expression of coactivators resulted in inhibited effector T cell proliferation. mTORC1-activated monocytes are harmful during bacterial infections. Therefore, inhibiting mTORC1 signaling through rapamycin administration could rescue the harmful aspects of an overactive immune response, and this knowledge provides a new direction for clinical therapy.

  10. Neural and behavioral mechanisms of proactive and reactive inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Heidi C; Bucci, David J

    2016-10-01

    Response inhibition is an important component of adaptive behavior. Substantial prior research has focused on reactive inhibition, which refers to the cessation of a motor response that is already in progress. More recently, a growing number of studies have begun to examine mechanisms underlying proactive inhibition, whereby preparatory processes result in a response being withheld before it is initiated. It has become apparent that proactive inhibition is an essential component of the overall ability to regulate behavior and has implications for the success of reactive inhibition. Moreover, successful inhibition relies on learning the meaning of specific environmental cues that signal when a behavioral response should be withheld. Proactive inhibitory control is mediated by stopping goals, which reflect the desired outcome of inhibition and include information about how and when inhibition should be implemented. However, little is known about the circuits and cellular processes that encode and represent features in the environment that indicate the necessity for proactive inhibition or how these representations are implemented in response inhibition. In this article, we will review the brain circuits and systems involved in implementing inhibitory control through both reactive and proactive mechanisms. We also comment on possible cellular mechanisms that may contribute to inhibitory control processes, noting that substantial further research is necessary in this regard. Furthermore, we will outline a number of ways in which the temporal dynamics underlying the generation of the proactive inhibitory signal may be particularly important for parsing out the neurobiological correlates that contribute to the learning processes underlying various aspects of inhibitory control.

  11. Inhibition of bacterial conjugation by phage M13 and its protein g3p: quantitative analysis and model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Lin

    Full Text Available Conjugation is the main mode of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Strategies for inhibiting conjugation may be useful for preserving the effectiveness of antibiotics and preventing the emergence of bacterial strains with multiple resistances. Filamentous bacteriophages were first observed to inhibit conjugation several decades ago. Here we investigate the mechanism of inhibition and find that the primary effect on conjugation is occlusion of the conjugative pilus by phage particles. This interaction is mediated primarily by phage coat protein g3p, and exogenous addition of the soluble fragment of g3p inhibited conjugation at low nanomolar concentrations. Our data are quantitatively consistent with a simple model in which association between the pili and phage particles or g3p prevents transmission of an F plasmid encoding tetracycline resistance. We also observe a decrease in the donor ability of infected cells, which is quantitatively consistent with a reduction in pili elaboration. Since many antibiotic-resistance factors confer susceptibility to phage infection through expression of conjugative pili (the receptor for filamentous phage, these results suggest that phage may be a source of soluble proteins that slow the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  12. Mechanical Genomics Identifies Diverse Modulators of Bacterial Cell Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, George K; Lee, Timothy K; Rajendram, Manohary; Cesar, Spencer; Miguel, Amanda; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-06-22

    Bacteria must maintain mechanical integrity to withstand the large osmotic pressure differential across the cell membrane and wall. Although maintaining mechanical integrity is critical for proper cellular function, a fact exploited by prominent cell-wall-targeting antibiotics, the proteins that contribute to cellular mechanics remain unidentified. Here, we describe a high-throughput optical method for quantifying cell stiffness and apply this technique to a genome-wide collection of ∼4,000 Escherichia coli mutants. We identify genes with roles in diverse functional processes spanning cell-wall synthesis, energy production, and DNA replication and repair that significantly change cell stiffness when deleted. We observe that proteins with biochemically redundant roles in cell-wall synthesis exhibit different stiffness defects when deleted. Correlating our data with chemical screens reveals that reducing membrane potential generally increases cell stiffness. In total, our work demonstrates that bacterial cell stiffness is a property of both the cell wall and broader cell physiology and lays the groundwork for future systematic studies of mechanoregulation.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of DNA repair inhibition by caffeine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, C.P.; Sancar, A. (Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Caffeine potentiates the mutagenic and lethal effects of genotoxic agents. It is thought that this is due, at least in some organisms, to inhibition of DNA repair. However, direct evidence for inhibition of repair enzymes has been lacking. Using purified Escherichia coli DNA photolyase and (A)BC excinuclease, we show that the drug inhibits photoreactivation and nucleotide excision repair by two different mechanisms. Caffeine inhibits photoreactivation by interfering with the specific binding of photolyase to damaged DNA, and it inhibits nucleotide excision repair by promoting nonspecific binding of the damage-recognition subunit, UvrA, of (A)BC excinuclease. A number of other intercalators, including acriflavin and ethidium bromide, appear to inhibit the excinuclease by a similar mechanism--that is, by trapping the UvrA subunit in nonproductive complexes on undamaged DNA.

  14. Dimethylsulphopropionate (DMSP) and proline from the surface of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus inhibit bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, M; Rempt, M; Gebser, B; Grueneberg, J; Pohnert, G; Weinberger, F

    2012-01-01

    It was demonstrated previously that polar and non-polar surface extracts of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus collected during winter from the Kiel Bight (Germany) inhibited bacterial attachment at natural concentrations. The present study describes the bioassay-guided identification of the active metabolites from the polar fraction. Chromatographic separation on a size-exclusion liquid chromatography column and bioassays identified an active fraction that was further investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. This fraction contained the metabolites dimethylsulphopropionate (DMSP), proline and alanine. DMSP and proline caused the anti-attachment activity. The metabolites were further quantified on the algal surface together with its associated boundary layer. DMSP and proline were detected in the range 0.12-1.08 ng cm(-2) and 0.09-0.59 ng cm(-2), respectively. These metabolites were tested in the concentration range from 0.1 to 1000 ng cm(-2) against the attachment of five bacterial strains isolated from algae and sediment co-occurring with F. vesiculosus. The surface concentrations for 50% inhibition of attachment of these strains were always vesiculosus were also tested, but proved to be the least sensitive. This study shows that DMSP and proline have an ecologically relevant role as surface inhibitors against bacterial attachment on F. vesiculosus.

  15. Mechanisms of dexamethasone-mediated inhibition of Toll-like receptor signaling induced by Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Trine; Berg, Randi S; Paludan, Søren R

    2008-01-01

    significantly reduces mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms behind the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone upon the inflammatory responses evoked by Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, two of the major causes of bacterial meningitis......B alpha synthesis. Our data also revealed that the timing of steroid treatment relative to infection was important for achieving strong inhibition, particularly in response to S. pneumoniae. Altogether, we describe important targets of dexamethasone in the inflammatory responses evoked by N. meningitidis...... and S. pneumoniae, which may contribute to our understanding of the clinical effect and the importance of timing with respect to corticosteroid treatment during bacterial meningitis. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Jan...

  16. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  17. A dynamic, mitotic-like mechanism for bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Michael A; Waldor, Matthew K

    2006-12-01

    The mechanisms that mediate chromosome segregation in bacteria are poorly understood. Despite evidence of dynamic movement of chromosome regions, to date, mitotic-like mechanisms that act on the bacterial chromosome have not been demonstrated. Here we provide evidence that the Vibrio cholerae ParAI and ParBI proteins are components of an apparatus that pulls the origin region of the large V. cholerae chromosome to the cell pole and anchors it there. ParBI interacts with a conserved origin-proximal, centromere-like site (parSI) that, following chromosome replication, segregates asymmetrically from one pole to the other. While segregating, parSI stretches far away from neighboring chromosomal loci. ParAI forms a dynamic band that extends from the pole to the segregating ParBI/parSI complex. Movement of ParBI/parSI across the cell occurs in concert with ParAI retraction. Deletion of parAI disrupts proper origin localization and segregation dynamics, and parSI no longer separates from nearby regions. These data suggest that ParAI forms a dynamic structure that pulls the ParBI-bound chromosome to the pole in a process analogous to anaphase of eukaryotic mitosis.

  18. A novel mechanism of bacterial toxin transfer within host blood cell-derived microvesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-lie Ståhl

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the main virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which are non-invasive strains that can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, associated with renal failure and death. Although bacteremia does not occur, bacterial virulence factors gain access to the circulation and are thereafter presumed to cause target organ damage. Stx was previously shown to circulate bound to blood cells but the mechanism by which it would potentially transfer to target organ cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that blood cell-derived microvesicles, shed during HUS, contain Stx and are found within patient renal cortical cells. The finding was reproduced in mice infected with Stx-producing Escherichia coli exhibiting Stx-containing blood cell-derived microvesicles in the circulation that reached the kidney where they were transferred into glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cells and further through their basement membranes followed by podocytes and tubular epithelial cells, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated that blood cell-derived microvesicles containing Stx undergo endocytosis in glomerular endothelial cells leading to cell death secondary to inhibited protein synthesis. This study demonstrates a novel virulence mechanism whereby bacterial toxin is transferred within host blood cell-derived microvesicles in which it may evade the host immune system.

  19. Distribution of drug inactive enzyme genes in bacterial isolates and mechanism of its induction and inhibition%细菌药物钝化酶基因分布及其表达诱导与抑制机制的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴亦斐; 孙爱华; 赵金方; 葛玉梅; 严杰

    2013-01-01

    目的:了解临床常见病原菌药物钝化酶基因及其优势基因携带模式,抗生素诱导药物钝化酶基因表达上调的作用及其与细菌组氨酸激酶的关系.方法:采用PCR和测序法,了解金黄色葡萄球菌、大肠埃希菌、肺炎克雷伯菌、鲍曼不动杆菌、阴沟肠杆菌临床菌株携带的β-内酰胺类、氨基糖苷类、大环内酯类钝化酶基因.采用实时荧光定量RT-PCR,了解抗生素诱导及组氨酸激酶阻断剂氯氰碘柳胺抑制药物钝化酶基因表达的作用.结果:63株大肠埃希菌中检出4种β-内酰胺类、2种氨基糖苷类和1种大环内酯类钝化酶基因,优势基因携带模式为[TEM+CTX-M]+aac(3)-Ⅱ+ mphA 16株(25.4%)和[TEM+CTX-M]+aac (6’)-Ⅰb13株(20.6%).24株金黄色葡萄球菌中检出2种β-内酰胺类、3种氨基糖苷类钝化酶基因,优势基因携带模式为aph (3')(41.7%)或aac(6)-Ⅰ e-aph(2)-Ⅰ a(25.0%).28株肺炎克雷伯菌中检出4种β-内酰胺酶、2种氨基糖苷类钝化酶基因,优势基因携带模式为[TEM +SHV]+[aac(6’)-Ⅰ b+aac(3)-Ⅱ](28.6%)和[TEM+SHV]+[aac (6')-Ⅰ b+aac(3)-Ⅱ]+mphA(17.8%).鲍曼不动杆菌和阴沟肠杆菌也以携带两类或三类药物钝化酶基因为优势模式.1/4 MIC青霉素、头胞噻肟和链霉素,能诱导3种β-内酰胺类和4种氨基糖苷类钝化酶基因表达显著上调(P<0.05),该诱导作用可被氯氰碘柳胺所抑制(P<0.05).结论:上述临床常见病原菌多携带多类药物钝化酶基因并存在不同的优势基因携带模式.低浓度抗生素可能诱导药物钝化酶基因表达上调,但可被组氨酸激酶阻断剂所抑制.%Objective; To determine the distribution and the predominant gene carrying model of drug inactive enzyme genes in bacterial isolates,and the mechanism of its induction and inhibition. Methods; The β-lactam, aminoglycosides and macrolides inactive enzyme genes were detected by PCR and sequencing in S. aureus, E. coli

  20. Physical and mechanical properties of modified bacterial cellulose composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrarti, Lucia; Indriyati, Syampurwadi, Anung; Pujiastuti, Sri

    2016-02-01

    To open wide range application opportunities of Bacterial Cellulose (BC) such as for agricultural purposes and edible film, BC slurries were blended with Glycerol (Gly), Sorbitol (Sor) and Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC). The physical and mechanical properties of BC composites were investigated to gain a better understanding of the relationship between BC and the additive types. Addition of glycerol, sorbitol and CMC influenced the water solubility of BC composite films. FTIR analysis showed the characteristic bands of cellulose. Addition of CMC, glycerol, and sorbitol slightly changed the FTIR spectrum of the composites. Tensile test showed that CMC not only acted as cross-linking agent where the tensile strength doubled up to 180 MPa, but also acted as plasticizer with the elongation at break increased more than 100% compared to that of BC film. On the other hand, glycerol and sorbitol acted as plasticizers that decreased the tensile strength and increased the elongation. Addition of CMC can improve film transparency, which is quite important in consumer acceptance of edible films in food industry.

  1. Inhibition of bacterial growth by different mixtures of propofol and thiopentone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Propofol is, as a result of its formulation, an ideal bacterial and yeast culture medium. An outbreak of sepsis in humans and an increase in wound infections in dogs has been ascribed to the use of propofol. It has been previously reported that a 1:1 mixture of propofol and thiopentone has bactericidal properties. This study was undertaken to determine if further serial mixtures of propofol and thiopentone maintained the bactericidal properties. Mixtures of 1:1 (solution A, 5:1 (solution B, 10:1 (solution C, 50:1 (solution D and 100:1 (solution E of 1 % propofol to 2.5 % thiopentone, 2.5 % thiopentone (solution T, 1 % propofol (solution P and saline (solution S were prepared and inoculated with between 105 and 106 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. A sample was withdrawn from each solution at 0, 1, 6, 12, 48 and 120 hours after inoculation and a bacterial count was performed. This study showed that thiopentone and solution A behaved in similar fashion by inhibiting bacterial growth and was bactericidal after 48 hours. Solution B was not bactericidal against S. aureus and C. albicans. Propofol and solutions D and E all supported growth of all the organisms tested. These data indicate that mixtures of propofol and thiopentone at a ratio less than 1:1 do not maintain the bactericidal properties.

  2. Calcium phosphate coating containing silver shows high antibacterial activity and low cytotoxicity and inhibits bacterial adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Yoshiki, E-mail: andoy@jmmc.jp [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Research Department, Japan Medical Materials Corporation, Uemura Nissei Bldg.9F 3-3-31 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-0003 (Japan); Miyamoto, Hiroshi [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Noda, Iwao; Sakurai, Nobuko [Research Department, Japan Medical Materials Corporation, Uemura Nissei Bldg.9F 3-3-31 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-0003 (Japan); Akiyama, Tomonori [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Yonekura, Yutaka; Shimazaki, Takafumi; Miyazaki, Masaki; Mawatari, Masaaki; Hotokebuchi, Takao [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the serious complications of orthopedic implants. In order to reduce the incidence of implant-associated infections, we developed a novel coating technology of calcium phosphate (CP) containing silver (Ag), designated Ag-CP coating, using a thermal spraying technique. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial efficacy and biological safety of this coating. In vitro antibacterial activity tests showed that the growths of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are completely suppressed on Ag-CP coating. In vitro bacterial adherence tests revealed that the number of adherent bacteria on the surface of this coating is significantly less (p < 0.02) than that on the surface of the CP coating. Moreover, the Ag-CP coating completely inhibits MRSA adhesion [<10 colony-forming units (CFU)] when 10{sup 2} CFU MRSA is inoculated. On the other hand, V79 Chinese hamster lung cells were found to grow on the Ag-CP coating as well as on the CP coating in a cytotoxicity test. These results indicate that the Ag-CP coating on the surface of orthopedic implants exhibits antibacterial activity and inhibits bacterial adhesion without cytotoxicity.

  3. Molecular mechanism of viomycin inhibition of peptide elongation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Mikael; Borg, Anneli; Ehrenberg, Måns; Sanyal, Suparna

    2016-01-26

    Viomycin is a tuberactinomycin antibiotic essential for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. It inhibits bacterial protein synthesis by blocking elongation factor G (EF-G) catalyzed translocation of messenger RNA on the ribosome. Here we have clarified the molecular aspects of viomycin inhibition of the elongating ribosome using pre-steady-state kinetics. We found that the probability of ribosome inhibition by viomycin depends on competition between viomycin and EF-G for binding to the pretranslocation ribosome, and that stable viomycin binding requires an A-site bound tRNA. Once bound, viomycin stalls the ribosome in a pretranslocation state for a minimum of ∼ 45 s. This stalling time increases linearly with viomycin concentration. Viomycin inhibition also promotes futile cycles of GTP hydrolysis by EF-G. Finally, we have constructed a kinetic model for viomycin inhibition of EF-G catalyzed translocation, allowing for testable predictions of tuberactinomycin action in vivo and facilitating in-depth understanding of resistance development against this important class of antibiotics.

  4. Inhibited Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Quaternized Chitosan-Loaded Titania Nanotubes with Various Diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-tao Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Titania nanotube-based local drug delivery is an attractive strategy for combating implant-associated infection. In our previous study, we demonstrated that the gentamicin-loaded nanotubes could dramatically inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on implant surfaces. Considering the overuse of antibiotics may lead to the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, we synthesized a new quaternized chitosan derivative (hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan, HACC with a 27% degree of substitution (DS; referred to as 27% HACC that had a strong antibacterial activity and simultaneously good biocompatibility with osteogenic cells. Titania nanotubes with various diameters (80, 120, 160, and 200 nm and 200 nm length were loaded with 2 mg of HACC using a lyophilization method and vacuum drying. Two standard strain, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (American Type Culture Collection 43300 and Staphylococcus epidermidis (American Type Culture Collection 35984, and two clinical isolates, S. aureus 376 and S. epidermidis 389, were selected to investigate the bacterial adhesion at 6 h and biofilm formation at 24, 48, and 72 h on the HACC-loaded nanotubes (NT-H using the spread plate method, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Smooth titanium (Smooth Ti was also investigated and compared. We found that NT-H could significantly inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on its surface compared with Smooth Ti, and the NT-H with 160 nm and 200 nm diameters had stronger antibacterial activity because of the extended HACC release time of NT-H with larger diameters. Therefore, NT-H can significantly improve the antibacterial ability of orthopedic implants and provide a promising strategy to prevent implant-associated infections.

  5. SB-RA-2001 inhibits bacterial proliferation by targeting FtsZ assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dipty; Bhattacharya, Anusri; Rai, Ankit; Dhaked, Hemendra Pal Singh; Awasthi, Divya; Ojima, Iwao; Panda, Dulal

    2014-05-13

    FtsZ has been recognized as a promising antimicrobial drug target because of its vital role in bacterial cell division. In this work, we found that a taxane SB-RA-2001 inhibited the proliferation of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Mycobacterium smegmatis cells with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 38 and 60 μM, respectively. Cell lengths of these microorganisms increased remarkably in the presence of SB-RA-2001, indicating that it inhibits bacterial cytokinesis. SB-RA-2001 perturbed the formation of the FtsZ ring in B. subtilis 168 cells and also affected the localization of the late cell division protein, DivIVA, at the midcell position. Flow cytometric analysis of the SB-RA-2001-treated cells indicated that the compound did not affect the duplication of DNA in B. subtilis 168 cells. Further, SB-RA-2001 treatment did not affect the localization of the chromosomal partitioning protein, Spo0J, along the two ends of the nucleoids and also had no discernible effect on the nucleoid segregation in B. subtilis 168 cells. The agent also did not appear to perturb the membrane potential of B. subtilis 168 cells. In vitro, SB-RA-2001 bound to FtsZ with modest affinity, promoted the assembly and bundling of FtsZ protofilaments, and reduced the GTPase activity of FtsZ. GTP did not inhibit the binding of SB-RA-2001 to FtsZ, suggesting that it does not bind to the GTP binding site on FtsZ. A computational analysis indicated that SB-RA-2001 binds to FtsZ in the cleft region between the C-terminal domain and helix H7, and the binding site of SB-RA-2001 on FtsZ resembled that of PC190723, a well-characterized inhibitor of FtsZ. The findings collectively suggested that SB-RA-2001 inhibits bacterial proliferation by targeting the assembly dynamics of FtsZ, and this can be exploited further to develop potent FtsZ-targeted antimicrobials.

  6. Simultaneous Assessment of Acidogenesis-Mitigation and Specific Bacterial Growth-Inhibition by Dentifrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Forbes

    Full Text Available Dentifrices can augment oral hygiene by inactivating bacteria and at sub-lethal concentrations may affect bacterial metabolism, potentially inhibiting acidogenesis, the main cause of caries. Reported herein is the development of a rapid method to simultaneously measure group-specific bactericidal and acidogenesis-mitigation effects of dentifrices on oral bacteria. Saliva was incubated aerobically and anaerobically in Tryptone Soya Broth, Wilkins-Chalgren Broth with mucin, or artificial saliva and was exposed to dentifrices containing triclosan/copolymer (TD; sodium fluoride (FD; stannous fluoride and zinc lactate (SFD1; or stannous fluoride, zinc lactate and stannous chloride (SFD2. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined turbidometrically whilst group-specific minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC were assessed using growth media and conditions selective for total aerobes, total anaerobes, streptococci and Gram-negative anaerobes. Minimum acid neutralization concentration (MNC was defined as the lowest concentration of dentifrice at which acidification was inhibited. Differences between MIC and MNC were calculated and normalized with respect to MIC to derive the combined inhibitory and neutralizing capacity (CINC, a cumulative measure of acidogenesis-mitigation and growth inhibition. The overall rank order for growth inhibition potency (MIC under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was: TD> SFD2> SFD1> FD. Acidogenesis-mitigation (MNC was ordered; TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1. CINC was ordered TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1 aerobically and TD> FD> SFD1> SFD2 anaerobically. With respect to group-specific bactericidal activity, TD generally exhibited the greatest potency, particularly against total aerobes, total anaerobes and streptococci. This approach enables the rapid simultaneous evaluation of acidity mitigation, growth inhibition and specific antimicrobial activity by dentifrices.

  7. Monocytes regulate the mechanism of T-cell death by inducing Fas-mediated apoptosis during bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Daigneault

    Full Text Available Monocytes and T-cells are critical to the host response to acute bacterial infection but monocytes are primarily viewed as amplifying the inflammatory signal. The mechanisms of cell death regulating T-cell numbers at sites of infection are incompletely characterized. T-cell death in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC showed 'classic' features of apoptosis following exposure to pneumococci. Conversely, purified CD3(+ T-cells cultured with pneumococci demonstrated necrosis with membrane permeabilization. The death of purified CD3(+ T-cells was not inhibited by necrostatin, but required the bacterial toxin pneumolysin. Apoptosis of CD3(+ T-cells in PBMC cultures required 'classical' CD14(+ monocytes, which enhanced T-cell activation. CD3(+ T-cell death was enhanced in HIV-seropositive individuals. Monocyte-mediated CD3(+ T-cell apoptotic death was Fas-dependent both in vitro and in vivo. In the early stages of the T-cell dependent host response to pneumococci reduced Fas ligand mediated T-cell apoptosis was associated with decreased bacterial clearance in the lung and increased bacteremia. In summary monocytes converted pathogen-associated necrosis into Fas-dependent apoptosis and regulated levels of activated T-cells at sites of acute bacterial infection. These changes were associated with enhanced bacterial clearance in the lung and reduced levels of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  8. Selection and inhibition mechanisms for human voluntary action decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Hughes, Laura E; Rowe, James B

    2012-10-15

    One can choose between action alternatives that have no apparent difference in their outcomes. Such voluntary action decisions are associated with widespread frontal-parietal activation, and a tendency to inhibit the repetition of a previous action. However, the mechanism of initiating voluntary actions and the functions of different brain regions during this process remains largely unknown. Here, we combine computational modeling and functional magnetic resonance imaging to test the selection and inhibition mechanisms that mediate trial-to-trial voluntary action decisions. We fitted an optimized accumulator model to behavioral responses in a finger-tapping task in which participants were instructed to make chosen actions or specified actions. Model parameters derived from each individual were then applied to estimate the expected accumulated metabolic activity (EAA) engaged in every single trial. The EAA was associated with blood oxygenation level-dependent responses in a decision work that was maximal in the supplementary motor area and the caudal anterior cingulate cortex, consistent with a competitive accumulation-to-threshold mechanism for action decision by these regions. Furthermore, specific inhibition of the previous action's accumulator was related to the suppression of response repetition. This action-specific inhibition correlated with the activity of the right inferior frontal gyrus, when the option to repeat existed. Our findings suggest that human voluntary action decisions are mediated by complementary processes of intentional selection and inhibition.

  9. Receptor interacting protein kinase-2 inhibition by CYLD impairs anti-bacterial immune responses in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina eWex

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon infection with intracellular bacteria, nucleotide oligomerization domain protein 2 (NOD2 recognizes bacterial muramyl dipeptide and binds, subsequently, to receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase 2 (RIPK2. RIPK2 mediates the activation of immune responses via the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK pathways. Previously, it has been shown that RIPK2 activation dependens on its K63-ubiquitination by the E3 ligases pellino-3 and ITCH, whereas the deubiquitinating enzyme A20 counter-regulates RIPK2 activity by cleaving K63-polyubiquitin chains from RIPK2. Here, we newly identify the deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD as a new interacting partner and inhibitor of RIPK2. We show that CYLD binds to and removes K63-polyubiquitin chains from RIPK2 in Listeria monocytogenes (Lm infected bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM. CYLD-mediated K63-deubiquitination of RIPK2 resulted in an impaired activation of both NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways, reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, anti-listerial ROS and NO, and, finally, impaired pathogen control. In turn, RIPK2 inhibition by siRNA prevented activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 and completely abolished the protective effect of CYLD-deficiency with respect to the production of IL-6, NO, ROS and pathogen control. Noteworthy, CYLD also inhibited autophagy of Listeria in a RIPK2-ERK1/2 dependent manner.The protective function of CYLD-deficiency was dependent on IFN-γ pre-stimulation of infected macrophages. Interestingly, the reduced NF-κB activation in CYLD-expressing macrophages limited the protective effect of IFN-γ by reducing NF-κB-dependent STAT1 activation. Taken together, our study identifies CYLD as an important inhibitor of RIPK2-dependent anti-bacterial immune responses in macrophages.

  10. Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron by lead nitrate in sulfate-rich systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongmei; Gong, Linfeng; Cravotta, Charles A.; Yang, Xiaofen; Tuovinen, Olli H.; Dong, Hailiang; Fu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) by Pb(NO3)2 was investigated with a mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The culture was incubated at 30 °C in ferrous-sulfate medium amended with 0–24.2 mM Pb(II) added as Pb(NO3)2. Anglesite (PbSO4) precipitated immediately upon Pb addition and was the only solid phase detected in the abiotic controls. Both anglesite and jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6) were detected in inoculated cultures. Precipitation of anglesite maintained dissolved Pb concentrations at 16.9–17.6 μM regardless of the concentrations of Pb(NO3)2 added. Fe(II) oxidation was suppressed by 24.2 mM Pb(NO3)2 addition even when anglesite was removed before inoculation. Experiments with 0–48 mM KNO3 demonstrated that bacterial Fe(II) oxidation decreased as nitrate concentration increased. Therefore, inhibition of Fe(II) oxidation at 24.2 mM Pb(NO3)2 addition resulted from nitrate toxicity instead of Pb addition. Geochemical modeling that considered the initial precipitation of anglesite to equilibrium followed by progressive oxidation of Fe(II) and the precipitation of jarosite and an amorphous iron hydroxide phase, without allowing plumbojarosite to precipitate were consistent with the experimental time-series data on Fe(II) oxidation under biotic conditions. Anglesite precipitation in mine tailings and other sulfate-rich systems maintains dissolved Pb concentrations below the toxicity threshold of A. ferrooxidans.

  11. Secreted bacterial effectors that inhibit host protein synthesis are critical for induction of the innate immune response to virulent Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary F Fontana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila causes an inflammatory pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. For virulence, L. pneumophila requires a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system that translocates bacterial effectors to the host cytosol. L. pneumophila lacking the Dot/Icm system is recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, leading to a canonical NF-κB-dependent transcriptional response. In addition, L. pneumophila expressing a functional Dot/Icm system potently induces unique transcriptional targets, including proinflammatory genes such as Il23a and Csf2. Here we demonstrate that this Dot/Icm-dependent response, which we term the effector-triggered response (ETR, requires five translocated bacterial effectors that inhibit host protein synthesis. Upon infection of macrophages with virulent L. pneumophila, these five effectors caused a global decrease in host translation, thereby preventing synthesis of IκB, an inhibitor of the NF-κB transcription factor. Thus, macrophages infected with wildtype L. pneumophila exhibited prolonged activation of NF-κB, which was associated with transcription of ETR target genes such as Il23a and Csf2. L. pneumophila mutants lacking the five effectors still activated TLRs and NF-κB, but because the mutants permitted normal IκB synthesis, NF-κB activation was more transient and was not sufficient to fully induce the ETR. L. pneumophila mutants expressing enzymatically inactive effectors were also unable to fully induce the ETR, whereas multiple compounds or bacterial toxins that inhibit host protein synthesis via distinct mechanisms recapitulated the ETR when administered with TLR ligands. Previous studies have demonstrated that the host response to bacterial infection is induced primarily by specific microbial molecules that activate TLRs or cytosolic pattern recognition receptors. Our results add to this model by providing a striking illustration of how the host immune response to a virulent

  12. The papain inhibitor (SPI) of Streptomyces mobaraensis inhibits bacterial cysteine proteases and is an antagonist of bacterial growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Zindel (Stephan); W.E. Kaman (Wendy); S. Fröls (Sabrina); F. Pfeifer (Felicitas); A. Peters (Annette); J.P. Hays (John); H.-L. Fuchsbauer (Hans-Lothar)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractA novel papain inhibitory protein (SPI) from Streptomyces mobaraensis was studied to measure its inhibitory effect on bacterial cysteine protease activity (Staphylococcus aureus SspB) and culture supernatants (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacillus anthracis). Further, growth of Bacillus ant

  13. On the mechanism of metformin-inhibited hepatic gluconeogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐红菊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of metformin in inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis.Methods Primary hepatocytes of mice were isolated by a modified version of the collagenase method.The effect of metformin on glucose production in primary hepatocytes was detected by glucose oxidation method.The

  14. Properties of bacterial corrosion of stainless steel and its inhibition by protamine coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yoshinobu; Yamada, Kaoru; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kikuchi, Yasushi; Tsuchido, Tetsuaki

    2007-03-01

    We investigated characteristics of the corrosion of stainless steel specimens by bacteria and the effects of using antimicrobial coating on the surface for inhibiting corrosion. Bacillus sp. 2-A and Staphylococcus sp. 2-1 cells adhered tightly to a stainless steel SUS304 specimen, formed a microcolony or biofilm, and had highly corrosive activities. Microbially influenced corrosion (MC) was observed under or around adhering cells. However, dead cells were markedly less active than viable cells not only in corroding the specimen but also in adhering to its surface. The culture supernatant was not able to induce the corrosion of SUS304 effectively. A protamine coating on the specimen killed bacterial cells only on its surface, interfered with cell adhesion, and inhibited MC. From these results, adhesion of viable cells to the surface of a SUS304 specimen led to the outbreak of MC. Protamine was also found to be an effective substance tested for protecting the specimen from both cell adhesion and surface MC. We suggest that a protamine coating can be applied as a convenient and inexpensive corrosion prevention method.

  15. Mechanism of Arsenic Trioxide Inhibiting Angiogenesis in Multiple Myeloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to explore the molecular mechanism of arsenic trioxide treating multiple myeloma (MM) via inhibition of angiogenesis, the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BD-NF) and its specific receptor TrkB in human MM cell line KM3 and endothelial cell line ECV304 was detected by Western blotting. The angiogenic activity was evaluated by wound migration assay and tubule formation assay in vitro. The results showed that BDNF was detected in the MM cells and TrkB in the endothelial cells. Furthermore, 100 ng/mL BDNF could significantly induced endo thelial cell tubule formation and wound migration. As2 O3 depressed the expression of BDNF and TrkB in the dose- and time-dependent manner. As2O3 inhibited BDNF-induced wound migration and capillary tube formation. It was concluded that BDNF is a novel angiogenic protein as well as VEGF and has a relation with the pathogenesis of MM. As2O3 interrupts a paracrine loop between MM cells and endothelial cells by down-regulating the TrkB expression in endothelial cells and inhibiting BDNF production in MM cells, finally resulting in inhibition of MM angiogenesis. This is probably one part of the mechanisms of the As2O3 treating MM via the inhibition of angiogenesis.

  16. Inhibition of Bacterial Toxin Activity by the Nuclear Stain, DRAQ5™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Joshua N; Koufos, Evan; Brown, Angela C

    2016-08-01

    The repeats-in-toxin family of toxins includes proteins produced by Gram negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli (α-hemolysin), Bordetella pertussis (adenylate cyclase toxin), and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (LtxA), which contribute to the pathogenesis of these organisms by killing host cells. In the case of LtxA produced by A. actinomycetemcomitans, white blood cells are targeted, allowing the bacteria to avoid clearance by the host immune system. In its association with target cells, LtxA binds to a receptor, lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, as well as membrane lipids and cholesterol, before being internalized via a lysosomal-mediated pathway. The motivation for this project comes from our discovery that DRAQ5™, a membrane-permeable nuclear stain, prevents the internalization of LtxA in a Jurkat T cell line. We hypothesized that DRAQ5™, in crossing the plasma membrane, alters the properties of the membrane to inhibit LtxA internalization. To investigate how DRAQ5™ interacts with the lipid membrane to prevent LtxA internalization, we used studied DRAQ5™-mediated membrane changes in model membranes using a variety of techniques, including differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy. Our results suggest that DRAQ5™ inhibits the activity of LtxA by decreasing the fluidity of the cellular lipid membrane, which decreases LtxA binding. These results present an interesting possible anti-virulence strategy; by altering bacterial toxin activity by modifying membrane fluidity, it may be possible to inhibit the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  17. Mechanisms of Bacterial Spore Germination and Its Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-10

    Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 in Chile , Emerging Infectious isease, (08 2012): 1370. doi: Arturo Ramirez-Peralta, Srishti Gupta, Xuan Yi Butzin...Molecular Biology, (09 2010): . doi: Lingbo Kong, Peter Setlow, Yong-qing Li. Direct analysis of water content and movement in single dormant bacterial... Students Received Book TOTAL: Received Book Chapter TOTAL: PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: Discipline John Sekar 1.00 Robert Sheehan

  18. MPLA inhibits release of cytotoxic mediators from human neutrophils while preserving efficient bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchaud-Sparagano, Marie-Hélène; Mills, Ross; Scott, Jonathan; Simpson, A John

    2014-10-01

    Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is a lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derivative associated with neutrophil-dependent anti-inflammatory outcomes in animal models of sepsis. Little is known about the effect of MPLA on neutrophil function. This study sought to test the hypothesis that MPLA would reduce release of cytotoxic mediators from neutrophils without impairing bacterial clearance. Neutrophils were isolated from whole blood of healthy volunteers. The effects of MPLA and LPS on autologous serum-opsonised Pseudomonas aeruginosa killing by neutrophils and phagocytosis of autologous serum-opsonised zymosan were examined. Neutrophil oxidative burst, chemotaxis, enzyme and cytokine release as well as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression were assessed following exposure to LPS or MPLA. LPS, but not MPLA, induced significant release of superoxide and myeloperoxidase from neutrophils. However, MPLA did not impair neutrophil capacity to ingest microbial particles and kill P. aeruginosa efficiently. MPLA was directly chemotactic for neutrophils, involving TLR4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and tyrosine and alkaline phosphatases. LPS, but not MPLA, impaired N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine-directed migration of neutrophils, increased surface expression of TLR4, increased interleukin-8 release and strongly activated the myeloid differentiation primary response 88 pathway. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibition significantly augmented IL-8 release from MPLA-treated neutrophils. The addition of MPLA to LPS-preincubated neutrophils led to a significant reduction in LPS-mediated superoxide release and TLR4 surface expression. Collectively, these findings suggest that MPLA directs efficient chemotaxis and bacterial killing in human neutrophils without inducing extracellular release of cytotoxic mediators and suggest that MPLA warrants further attention as a potential therapeutic in human sepsis.

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Bacterial Magnetite Formation and Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    human immunoglobin G (1gG) [35]. Also, the feasibility of Mmsl6 as an anchor molecule was established by manifesting the estrogen receptor hormone...functional foreign proteins. Similarly, immunoglobulin (IgG) binding cell wall protein and proteinA , 1Ml Magntetospillium magneticum AMB-1Protei nA magB...bacterial magnetic particle using magA gene fusion. were introduced to BMP membranes, using a proteinA -mrag.4 hybrid gene [34]. Using antibody bound proteinA

  20. Bacterial mechanisms to overcome inhibitory effects of dietary tannins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.H.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Mackie, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    High concentrations of tannins in fodder plants inhibit gastrointestinal bacteria and reduce ruminant performance. Increasing the proportion of tannin-resistant bacteria in the rumen protects ruminants from antinutritional effects. The reason for the protective effect is unclear, but could be elucid

  1. The host antimicrobial peptide Bac71-35 binds to bacterial ribosomal proteins and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirossian, Mario; Grzela, Renata; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry; Gennaro, Renato; Mergaert, Peter; Scocchi, Marco

    2014-12-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules from innate immunity with high potential as novel anti-infective agents. Most of them inactivate bacteria through pore formation or membrane barrier disruption, but others cross the membrane without damages and act inside the cells, affecting vital processes. However, little is known about their intracellular bacterial targets. Here we report that Bac71-35, a proline-rich AMP belonging to the cathelicidin family, can reach high concentrations (up to 340 μM) inside the E. coli cytoplasm. The peptide specifically and completely inhibits in vitro translation in the micromolar concentration range. Experiments of incorporation of radioactive precursors in macromolecules with E. coli cells confirmed that Bac71-35 affects specifically protein synthesis. Ribosome coprecipitation and crosslinking assays showed that the peptide interacts with ribosomes, binding to a limited subset of ribosomal proteins. Overall, these results indicate that the killing mechanism of Bac71-35 is based on a specific block of protein synthesis.

  2. Multiple mechanisms for CRISPR-Cas inhibition by anti-CRISPR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Garcia, Bianca; Strum, Scott; Du, Mingjian; Rollins, MaryClare F; Hidalgo-Reyes, Yurima; Wiedenheft, Blake; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2015-10-01

    The battle for survival between bacteria and the viruses that infect them (phages) has led to the evolution of many bacterial defence systems and phage-encoded antagonists of these systems. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-associated (cas) genes comprise an adaptive immune system that is one of the most widespread means by which bacteria defend themselves against phages. We identified the first examples of proteins produced by phages that inhibit a CRISPR-Cas system. Here we performed biochemical and in vivo investigations of three of these anti-CRISPR proteins, and show that each inhibits CRISPR-Cas activity through a distinct mechanism. Two block the DNA-binding activity of the CRISPR-Cas complex, yet do this by interacting with different protein subunits, and using steric or non-steric modes of inhibition. The third anti-CRISPR protein operates by binding to the Cas3 helicase-nuclease and preventing its recruitment to the DNA-bound CRISPR-Cas complex. In vivo, this anti-CRISPR can convert the CRISPR-Cas system into a transcriptional repressor, providing the first example-to our knowledge-of modulation of CRISPR-Cas activity by a protein interactor. The diverse sequences and mechanisms of action of these anti-CRISPR proteins imply an independent evolution, and foreshadow the existence of other means by which proteins may alter CRISPR-Cas function.

  3. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure...... that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature...... can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics...

  4. On bacterial role in hydrocarbon generation mechanism,Banqiao Sag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王铁冠; 钟宁宁; 侯读杰; 黄光辉; 于志海; 杨池银; 廖前进

    1995-01-01

    Terrestrial organic matter is a main primary source material for oil and gas generation in theEogene Shahejie Formation in Banqiao Sag,bacterial degradation and reworking of sedimentary organic matterwould be conducive to the enhancement of its sapropelification level and to the early generation of immatureoil.Bacteria-derived short-chain alkanes are a major material base for the light hydrocarbon formation ofcondensate and crude oil in Banqiao Sag,certain thermal maturation,formation temperature and pressure areexternal conditions for the condemate formation.The establishment of hydrocarbon generation model shouldbe favorable to the resource prediction of deep-lying high-mature and shallow-lying immature oils and gases.

  5. Modeling of the bacterial mechanism of methicillin-resistance by a systems biology approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Autiero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A microorganism is a complex biological system able to preserve its functional features against external perturbations and the ability of the living systems to oppose to these external perturbations is defined "robustness". The antibiotic resistance, developed by different bacteria strains, is a clear example of robustness and of ability of the bacterial system to acquire a particular functional behaviour in response to environmental changes. In this work we have modeled the whole mechanism essential to the methicillin-resistance through a systems biology approach. The methicillin is a beta-lactamic antibiotic that act by inhibiting the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs. These PBPs are involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycans, essential mesh-like polymers that surround cellular enzymes and are crucial for the bacterium survival. METHODOLOGY: The network of genes, mRNA, proteins and metabolites was created using CellDesigner program and the data of molecular interactions are stored in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML. To simulate the dynamic behaviour of this biochemical network, the kinetic equations were associated with each reaction. CONCLUSIONS: Our model simulates the mechanism of the inactivation of the PBP by methicillin, as well as the expression of PBP2a isoform, the regulation of the SCCmec elements (SCC: staphylococcal cassette chromosome and the synthesis of peptidoglycan by PBP2a. The obtained results by our integrated approach show that the model describes correctly the whole phenomenon of the methicillin resistance and is able to respond to the external perturbations in the same way of the real cell. Therefore, this model can be useful to develop new therapeutic approaches for the methicillin control and to understand the general mechanism regarding the cellular resistance to some antibiotics.

  6. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Phanchaisri, B. [Institute of Science and Technology Research, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singkarat, S. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion bombardment could induce DNA transfer into E. coli cells. • The DNA transfer induction depended on ion energy and fluence. • The mechanism was associated with the bacterial cell envelope structure. • A mechanism phase diagram was proposed to summarize the mechanism. - Abstract: As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10–20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  7. Inhibition mechanism of aspartic acid on crystal growth of hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Su-ping; ZHOU Ke-chao; LI Zhi-you

    2007-01-01

    The effects of aspartic acid on the crystal growth, morphology of hydroxyapatite(HAP) crystal were investigated, and the inhibition mechanism of aspartic acid on the crystal growth of hydroxyapatite was studied. The results show that the crystal growth rate of HAP decreases with the increase of the aspartic acid concentration, and the HAP crystal is thinner significantly compared with that without amino acid, which is mainly due to the (10(-)10) surface of HAP crystal being inhibited by the aspartic acids. The calculation analysis indicates that the crystal growth mechanism of HAP, following surface diffusion controlled mechanism, is not changed due to the presence of aspartic acid. AFM result shows that the front of terrace on vicinal growth hillocks is pinned, which suggests that the aspartic acid is adsorbed onto the (10(-)10) surface of HAP and interacts with the Ca2+ ions of HAP surface, so as to block the growth active sites and result in retarding of the growth of HAP crystal.

  8. Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on glutamine action in a bacterial translocation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rosana G C; Quirino, Iara E P; Viana, Mirelle L; Generoso, Simone V; Nicoli, Jacques R; Martins, Flaviano S; Nogueira-Machado, José A; Arantes, Rosa M E; Correia, Maria I T D; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2014-01-14

    Glutamine may be a precursor for NO synthesis, which may play a crucial role in bacterial translocation (BT). The goal of the present study was to investigate the potential effects of glutamine on BT and the immunological response in an experimental model of NO synthase inhibition by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). Mice were randomly assigned to four groups: sham; intestinal obstruction (IO); IO+500 mg/kg per d glutamine (GLN); IO+GLN plus 10 mg/kg per d l-NAME (GLN/LN). The groups were pretreated for 7 d. BT was induced by ileal ligation and was assessed 18 h later by measuring the radioactivity of 99mTc-Escherichia coli in the blood and organs. Mucosal damage was determined using a histological analysis. Intestinal permeability (IP) was assessed by measuring the levels of 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid in the blood at 4, 8 and 18 h after surgery. IgA and cytokine concentrations were determined by ELISA in the intestinal fluid and plasma, respectively. BT was increased in the GLN/LN and IO groups than in the GLN and sham groups. IP and intestinal mucosa structure of the sham, GLN and GLN/LN groups were similar. The GLN group had the highest levels of interferon-γ, while IL-10 and secretory IgA levels were higher than those of the IO group but similar to those of the GLN/LN group. The present results suggest that effects of the glutamine pathway on BT were mediated by NO. The latter also interferes with the pro-inflammatory systemic immunological response. On the other hand, IP integrity preserved by the use of glutamine is independent of NO.

  9. Mechanisms of bacterial morphogenesis: evolutionary cell biology approaches provide new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Caccamo, Paul D; Brun, Yves V

    2015-04-01

    How Darwin's "endless forms most beautiful" have evolved remains one of the most exciting questions in biology. The significant variety of bacterial shapes is most likely due to the specific advantages they confer with respect to the diverse environments they occupy. While our understanding of the mechanisms generating relatively simple shapes has improved tremendously in the last few years, the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of complex shapes and the evolution of shape diversity are largely unknown. The emerging field of bacterial evolutionary cell biology provides a novel strategy to answer this question in a comparative phylogenetic framework. This relatively novel approach provides hypotheses and insights into cell biological mechanisms, such as morphogenesis, and their evolution that would have been difficult to obtain by studying only model organisms. We discuss the necessary steps, challenges, and impact of integrating "evolutionary thinking" into bacterial cell biology in the genomic era.

  10. Exploration into the spatial and temporal mechanisms of bacterial polarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2007-01-01

    an inherent overall polarity, which affects not only their outer appearance but also many of their vital processes, has only recently been appreciated. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of polarized functions and cell...... polarity in bacteria....

  11. NKLP27: a teleost NK-lysin peptide that modulates immune response, induces degradation of bacterial DNA, and inhibits bacterial and viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Li, Mo-fei; Sun, Li

    2014-01-01

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial protein produced by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In this study, we examined the biological property of a peptide, NKLP27, derived from tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) NK-lysin. NKLP27 is composed of 27 amino acids and shares little sequence identity with known NK-lysin peptides. NKLP27 possesses bactericidal activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including common aquaculture pathogens. The bactericidal activity of NKLP27 was dependent on the C-terminal five residues, deletion of which dramatically reduced the activity of NKLP27. During its interaction with the target bacterial cells, NKLP27 destroyed cell membrane integrity, penetrated into the cytoplasm, and induced degradation of genomic DNA. In vivo study showed that administration of tongue sole with NKLP27 before bacterial and viral infection significantly reduced pathogen dissemination and replication in tissues. Further study revealed that fish administered with NKLP27 exhibited significantly upregulated expression of the immune genes including those that are known to be involved in antibacterial and antiviral defense. These results indicate that NKLP27 is a novel antimicrobial against bacterial and viral pathogens, and that the observed effect of NKLP27 on bacterial DNA and host gene expression adds new insights to the action mechanism of fish antimicrobial peptides.

  12. NKLP27: a teleost NK-lysin peptide that modulates immune response, induces degradation of bacterial DNA, and inhibits bacterial and viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhang

    Full Text Available NK-lysin is an antimicrobial protein produced by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In this study, we examined the biological property of a peptide, NKLP27, derived from tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis NK-lysin. NKLP27 is composed of 27 amino acids and shares little sequence identity with known NK-lysin peptides. NKLP27 possesses bactericidal activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including common aquaculture pathogens. The bactericidal activity of NKLP27 was dependent on the C-terminal five residues, deletion of which dramatically reduced the activity of NKLP27. During its interaction with the target bacterial cells, NKLP27 destroyed cell membrane integrity, penetrated into the cytoplasm, and induced degradation of genomic DNA. In vivo study showed that administration of tongue sole with NKLP27 before bacterial and viral infection significantly reduced pathogen dissemination and replication in tissues. Further study revealed that fish administered with NKLP27 exhibited significantly upregulated expression of the immune genes including those that are known to be involved in antibacterial and antiviral defense. These results indicate that NKLP27 is a novel antimicrobial against bacterial and viral pathogens, and that the observed effect of NKLP27 on bacterial DNA and host gene expression adds new insights to the action mechanism of fish antimicrobial peptides.

  13. Inhibition of HERG potassium channels by celecoxib and its mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V Frolov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celecoxib (Celebrex, a widely prescribed selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, can modulate ion channels independently of cyclooxygenase inhibition. Clinically relevant concentrations of celecoxib can affect ionic currents and alter functioning of neurons and myocytes. In particular, inhibition of Kv2.1 channels by celecoxib leads to arrhythmic beating of Drosophila heart and of rat heart cells in culture. However, the spectrum of ion channels involved in human cardiac excitability differs from that in animal models, including mammalian models, making it difficult to evaluate the relevance of these observations to humans. Our aim was to examine the effects of celecoxib on hERG and other human channels critically involved in regulating human cardiac rhythm, and to explore the mechanisms of any observed effect on the hERG channels. METHODS AND RESULTS: Celecoxib inhibited the hERG, SCN5A, KCNQ1 and KCNQ1/MinK channels expressed in HEK-293 cells with IC(50s of 6.0 µM, 7.5 µM, 3.5 µM and 3.7 µM respectively, and the KCND3/KChiP2 channels expressed in CHO cells with an IC(50 of 10.6 µM. Analysis of celecoxib's effects on hERG channels suggested gating modification as the mechanism of drug action. CONCLUSIONS: The above channels play a significant role in drug-induced long QT syndrome (LQTS and short QT syndrome (SQTS. Regulatory guidelines require that all new drugs under development be tested for effects on the hERG channel prior to first administration in humans. Our observations raise the question of celecoxib's potential to induce cardiac arrhythmias or other channel related adverse effects, and make a case for examining such possibilities.

  14. Chronic exposure to low dose bacterial lipopolysaccharide inhibits leptin signaling in vagal afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Serre, Claire B; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-02-01

    Bacterially derived factors are implicated in the causation and persistence of obesity. Ingestion of a high fat diet in rodents and obesity in human subjects is associated with chronic elevation of low plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a breakdown product of Gram-negative bacteria. The terminals of vagal afferent neurons are positioned within the gut mucosa to convey information from the gut to the brain to regulate food intake and are responsive to LPS. We hypothesized that chronic elevation of LPS could alter vagal afferent signaling. We surgically implanted osmotic mini-pumps that delivered a constant, low-dose of LPS into the intraperitoneal cavity of rats (12.5 μg/kg/hr for 6 weeks). LPS-treated rats developed hyperphagia and showed marked changes in vagal afferent neuron function. Chronic LPS treatment reduced vagal afferent leptin signaling, characterized by a decrease in leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, LPS treatment decreased cholecystokinin-induced satiety. There was no alteration in leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. These findings offer a mechanism by which a change in gut microflora can promote hyperphagia, possibly leading to obesity.

  15. Anti-bacterial activity of Achatina CRP and its mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sandip; Barman, Soma; Mandal, Narayan Chandra; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-07-01

    The physiological role of C-reactive protein (CRP), the classical acute-phase protein, is not well documented, despite many reports on biological effects of CRP in vitro and in model systems in vivo. It has been suggested that CRP protects mice against lethal toxicity of bacterial infections by implementing immunological responses. In Achatina fulica CRP is a constitutive multifunctional protein in haemolymph and considered responsible for their survival in the environment for millions of years. The efficacy of Achatina CRP (ACRP) was tested against both Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus subtilis infections in mice where endogenous CRP level is negligible even after inflammatory stimulus. Further, growth curves of the bacteria revealed that ACRP (50 microg/mL) is bacteriostatic against gram negative salmonellae and bactericidal against gram positive bacilli. ACRP induced energy crises in bacterial cells, inhibited key carbohydrate metabolic enzymes such as phosphofructokinase in glycolysis, isocitrate dehydrogenase in TCA cycle, isocitrate lyase in glyoxylate cycle and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in gluconeogenesis. ACRP disturbed the homeostasis of cellular redox potential as well as reduced glutathione status, which is accompanied by an enhanced rate of lipid peroxidation. Annexin V-Cy3/CFDA dual staining clearly showed ACRP induced apoptosis-like death in bacterial cell population. Moreover, immunoblot analyses also indicated apoptosis-like death in ACRP treated bacterial cells, where activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) and caspase-3 was noteworthy. It is concluded that metabolic impairment by ACRP in bacterial cells is primarily due to generation of reactive oxygen species and ACRP induced anti-bacterial effect is mediated by metabolic impairment leading to apoptosis-like death in bacterial cells.

  16. Kinetics and Mechanism of Bacterial Disinfection by Chlorine Dioxide1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarde, Melvin A.; Snow, W. Brewster; Olivieri, Vincent P.; Davidson, Burton

    1967-01-01

    Survival data are presented for a fecal strain of Escherichia coli exposed to three concentrations of chlorine dioxide at four temperatures. Chick's first-order reaction equation is generalized to a pseudo nth-order model. Nonlinear least squares curve-fitting of the survival data to the nth order model was performed on an analogue computer. The data were observed to follow fractional order kinetics with respect to survival concentration, with an apparent activation energy of 12,000 cal/mole. Initial experiments support the thesis that the mechanism of chlorine dioxide kill occurs via disruption of protein synthesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:5339839

  17. Assembly and Mechanical Properties of the Cargo-Free and Cargo-Loaded Bacterial Nanocompartment Encapsulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijder, Joost; Kononova, Olga; Barbu, Ioana M; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Rurup, W Frederik; Burnley, Rebecca J; Koay, Melissa S T; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heck, Albert J R

    2016-08-08

    Prokaryotes mostly lack membranous compartments that are typical of eukaryotic cells, but instead, they have various protein-based organelles. These include bacterial microcompartments like the carboxysome and the virus-like nanocompartment encapsulin. Encapsulins have an adaptable mechanism for enzyme packaging, which makes it an attractive platform to carry a foreign protein cargo. Here we investigate the assembly pathways and mechanical properties of the cargo-free and cargo-loaded nanocompartments, using a combination of native mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and multiscale computational molecular modeling. We show that encapsulin dimers assemble into rigid single-enzyme bacterial containers. Moreover, we demonstrate that cargo encapsulation has a mechanical impact on the shell. The structural similarity of encapsulins to virus capsids is reflected in their mechanical properties. With these robust mechanical properties encapsulins provide a suitable platform for the development of nanotechnological applications.

  18. [Ecology and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antibiotics in peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edern, Anita; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Castrale, Cindy; Ficheux, Maxence; Ryckelynck, Jean-Philippe; Lobbedez, Thierry

    2012-11-01

    Peritonitis remains a common complication of peritoneal dialysis. The aim of our study is to describe the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated during peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis, to determine whether antibiotic therapy proposed by the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) is adapted to the mechanisms of resistance. All causative microorganisms of peritonitis, isolated in 106 dialysis patients and reported 170 episodes of peritonitis, during the study period (01/01/2005 to 31/12/2010) were reviewed. According to the usual classification, twelve groups of microorganism were created. An interpretive reading of antibiograms was performed in each group to identify resistance phenotypes. The species most frequently isolated are coagulase-negative staphylococci (n=73) of which 46 had PBP2a (penicillin-binding protein). Many Enterobacteriaceae were also isolated (n=45), they are susceptible to third generation cephalosporins with the exception of Enterobacteriaceae producing an extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) or a cephalosporinase. Except for staphylococci, probabilistic antibiotic therapy recommended by the ISPD to treat peritonitis is effective. Indeed, many staphylococci producing a PBP2a, a first-generation cephalosporin cannot be administered in all cases. It is therefore necessary to identify patients with a strain of staphylococcus producing a PBP2a, it must be treated by vancomycin.

  19. Crystal structure and mechanism of a bacterial fluorinating enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Changjiang; Huang, Fanglu; Deng, Hai; Schaffrath, Christoph; Spencer, Jonathan B; O'Hagan, David; Naismith, James H

    2004-02-05

    Fluorine is the thirteenth most abundant element in the earth's crust, but fluoride concentrations in surface water are low and fluorinated metabolites are extremely rare. The fluoride ion is a potent nucleophile in its desolvated state, but is tightly hydrated in water and effectively inert. Low availability and a lack of chemical reactivity have largely excluded fluoride from biochemistry: in particular, fluorine's high redox potential precludes the haloperoxidase-type mechanism used in the metabolic incorporation of chloride and bromide ions. But fluorinated chemicals are growing in industrial importance, with applications in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and materials products. Reactive fluorination reagents requiring specialist process technologies are needed in industry and, although biological catalysts for these processes are highly sought after, only one enzyme that can convert fluoride to organic fluorine has been described. Streptomyces cattleya can form carbon-fluorine bonds and must therefore have evolved an enzyme able to overcome the chemical challenges of using aqueous fluoride. Here we report the sequence and three-dimensional structure of the first native fluorination enzyme, 5'-fluoro-5'-deoxyadenosine synthase, from this organism. Both substrate and products have been observed bound to the enzyme, enabling us to propose a nucleophilic substitution mechanism for this biological fluorination reaction.

  20. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Geisla Mary Silva Soares; Luciene Cristina de Figueiredo; Marcelo Faveri; Sheila Cavalca Cortelli; Poliana Mendes Duarte; Magda Feres

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibio...

  1. Assembly and Mechanical Properties of the Cargo-Free and Cargo-Loaded Bacterial Nanocompartment Encapsulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Joost; Kononova, Olga; Barbu, Ioana M; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Rurup, W Frederik; Koay, Melissa S T; Burnley, Rebecca J; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heck, Albert J R

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes mostly lack membranous compartments that are typical of eukaryotic cells, but instead, they have various protein-based organelles. These include bacterial microcompartments like the carboxysome and the virus-like nanocompartment encapsulin. Encapsulins have an adaptable mechanism for enz

  2. Assembly and mechanical properties of the cargo-free and cargo-loaded bacterial nanocompartment encapsulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Joost; Kononova, Olga; Barbu, Ioana M; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Rurup, W Frederik; Burnley, Rebecca J; Koay, Melissa S T; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heck, Albert J R

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes mostly lack membranous compartments that are typical of eukaryotic cells, but instead they have various protein-based organelles. These include bacterial microcompartments like the carboxysome and the virus-like nanocompartment encapsulin. Encapsulins have an adaptable mechanism for enzy

  3. Experimental Study of Bacterial Penetration into Chalk Rock: Mechanisms and Effect on Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Shapiro, Alexander; Eliasson Lantz, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial selective plugging is one of the mechanisms through which microorganisms can be applied for enhanced oil recovery, as bacteria can plug the water-swept zones of a reservoir, thus altering the flow paths and improving sweep efficiency. However, complete understanding of the penetration...

  4. Selenium nanoparticles incorporated into titania nanotubes inhibit bacterial growth and macrophage proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenwen; Golshan, Negar H; Deng, Xuliang; Hickey, Daniel J; Zeimer, Katherine; Li, Hongyi; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-08-25

    Since implants often fail due to infection and uncontrolled inflammatory responses, we designed an in vitro study to investigate the antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) incorporated with selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs). Selenium incorporation was achieved by the reaction of sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) with glutathione (GSH) under a vacuum in the presence of TNTs. Two types of bacteria and macrophages were cultured on the samples to determine their respective antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. The results showed that the TNT samples incorporating SeNPs (TNT-Se) inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus compared to unmodified TNTs, albeit the SeNP concentration still needs to be optimized for maximal effect. At their maximum effect, the TNT-Se samples reduced the density of E. coli by 94.6% and of S. aureus by 89.6% compared to titanium controls. To investigate the underlying mechanism of this effect, the expression of six E. coli genes were tracked using qRT-PCR. Results indicated that SeNPs weakened E. coli membranes (ompA and ompF were down-regulated), decreased the function of adhesion-mediating proteins (csgA and csgG were progressively down-regulated with increasing SeNP content), and induced the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ahpF was up-regulated). Moreover, TNT-Se samples inhibited the proliferation of macrophages, indicating that they can be used to control the inflammatory response and even prevent chronic inflammation, a condition that often leads to implant failure. In conclusion, we demonstrated that SeNP-TNTs display antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties that are promising for improving the performance of titanium-based implants for numerous orthopedic and dental applications.

  5. Grain coarsening of calcite: Fundamental mechanisms and biogenic inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    In a saturated solution, submicrometer calcite (CaCO3) crystals recrystallize and coarsen to minimize surface area. The thermodynamic driving force is described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation, but the rates and mechanism are poorly understood. Calcite grain coarsening has many implications...... in industry and nature, but the specific focus of this research project was to understand how small, biogenic calcite particles in chalk have resisted grain coarsening for over 60 million years in saturated reservoir fluids. A new method was developed to produce pure calcite powder that has submicrometer...... coarsening – small grains coarsen by aggregation at high temperatures, followed by Ostwald ripening. Alginate, a model for the acidic polysaccharides produced by coccolithiphores, inhibited coarsening at a steady rate. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm preserved particles for at least 60 days before...

  6. Sesamin inhibits bacterial formylpeptide-induced inflammatory responses in a murine air-pouch model and in THP-1 human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Youhong; Hou, Xinwei; Chen, Juan; Xie, Lianying; Yang, Lang; Le, Yingying

    2010-02-01

    The reaction of human leukocytes to chemoattractants is an important component of the host immune response and also plays a crucial role in the development of inflammation. Sesamin has been shown to inhibit lipid peroxidation and regulate cytokine production. In this study, we examined the effect of sesamin on inflammatory responses elicited by the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) in vitro and in vivo and explored the mechanisms involved. fMLF is recognized by a human G protein-coupled receptor formyl peptide receptor (FPR) on phagocytic leukocytes. Sesamin at concentrations between 12.5 and 50 micromol/L inhibited fMLF-induced chemotaxis of human monocyte cell line THP-1 differentiated with dibutyryl cyclic AMP (P sesamin inhibited FPR-transfected rat basophilic leukemia cell [epitope-tagged human FPR (ETFR) cell] migration toward fMLF (P sesamin (12 mgkg(-1)d(-1) for 2 d) suppressed leukocyte infiltration into the air pouch induced by fMLF [(62.89 +/- 7.93) x 10(4) vs. (19.67 +/- 4.43) x 10(4) cells/air pouch; n = 9; P sesamin inhibited fMLF-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner but did not affect fMLF-induced Ca(2+) flux. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that pretreatment of THP-1 cells with sesamin dose dependently inhibited fMLF-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. These results suggest that sesamin inhibits leukocyte activation by fMLF through ERK1/2- and NF-kappaB-related signaling pathways and thus is a potential compound for the management of inflammatory diseases.

  7. On the Mechanism of the Primary Charge Separation in Bacterial Photosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, C H; Egger, Reinhold

    1994-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the mechanism of the primary charge separation process in bacterial photosynthesis using real-time path integrals. Direct computer simulations as well as an approximate analytical theory have been employed to map out the dynamics of the charge separation process in many regions of the parameter space relevant to bacterial photosynthesis. Two distinct parameter regions, one characteristic of sequential transfer and the other characteristic of superexchange, have been found to yield charge separation dynamics in agreement with experiments. Nonadiabatic theory provides accurate rate estimates for low-lying and very high-lying bacteriochlorophyll state energies, but it breaks down in between these two regimes.

  8. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geisla Mary Silva Soares

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibiotics most commonly used in the periodontal treatment (i.e. penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide and metronidazole and the main mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs. Antimicrobial resistance can be classified into three groups: intrinsic, mutational and acquired. Penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin are broad-spectrum drugs, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Bacterial resistance to penicillin may occur due to diminished permeability of the bacterial cell to the antibiotic; alteration of the penicillin-binding proteins, or production of β-lactamases. However, a very small proportion of the subgingival microbiota is resistant to penicillins. Bacteria become resistant to tetracyclines or macrolides by limiting their access to the cell, by altering the ribosome in order to prevent effective binding of the drug, or by producing tetracycline/macrolide-inactivating enzymes. Periodontal pathogens may become resistant to these drugs. Finally, metronidazole can be considered a prodrug in the sense that it requires metabolic activation by strict anaerobe microorganisms. Acquired resistance to this drug has rarely been reported. Due to these low rates of resistance and to its high activity against the gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species, metronidazole is a promising drug for treating periodontal infections.

  9. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Geisla Mary Silva; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Faveri, Marcelo; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Duarte, Poliana Mendes; Feres, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibiotics most commonly used in the periodontal treatment (i.e. penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide and metronidazole) and the main mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs. Antimicrobial resistance can be classified into three groups: intrinsic, mutational and acquired. Penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin are broad-spectrum drugs, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Bacterial resistance to penicillin may occur due to diminished permeability of the bacterial cell to the antibiotic; alteration of the penicillin-binding proteins, or production of β-lactamases. However, a very small proportion of the subgingival microbiota is resistant to penicillins. Bacteria become resistant to tetracyclines or macrolides by limiting their access to the cell, by altering the ribosome in order to prevent effective binding of the drug, or by producing tetracycline/macrolide-inactivating enzymes. Periodontal pathogens may become resistant to these drugs. Finally, metronidazole can be considered a prodrug in the sense that it requires metabolic activation by strict anaerobe microorganisms. Acquired resistance to this drug has rarely been reported. Due to these low rates of resistance and to its high activity against the gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species, metronidazole is a promising drug for treating periodontal infections.

  10. Self-assembled poly(ethylene glycol)-co-acrylic acid microgels to inhibit bacterial colonization of synthetic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qichen; Uzunoglu, Emel; Wu, Yong; Libera, Matthew

    2012-05-01

    We explored the use of self-assembled microgels to inhibit the bacterial colonization of synthetic surfaces both by modulating surface cell adhesiveness at length scales comparable to bacterial dimensions (∼1 μm) and by locally storing/releasing an antimicrobial. Poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] and poly(ethylene glycol)-co-acrylic acid [PEG-AA] microgels were synthesized by suspension photopolymerization. Consistent with macroscopic gels, a pH dependence of both zeta potential and hydrodynamic diameter was observed in AA-containing microgels but not in pure PEG microgels. The microgels were electrostatically deposited onto poly(l-lysine) (PLL) primed silicon to form submonolayer surface coatings. The microgel surface density could be controlled via the deposition time and the microgel concentration in the parent suspension. In addition to their intrinsic antifouling properties, after deposition, the microgels could be loaded with a cationic antimicrobial peptide (L5) because of favorable electrostatic interactions. Loading was significantly higher in PEG-AA microgels than in pure PEG microgels. The modification of PLL-primed Si by unloaded PEG-AA microgels reduced the short-term (6 h) S. epidermidis surface colonization by a factor of 2, and the degree of inhibition increased when the average spacing between microgels was reduced. Postdeposition L5 peptide loading into microgels further reduced bacterial colonization to the extent that, after 10 h of S. epidermidis culture in tryptic soy broth, the colonization of L5-loaded PEG-AA microgel-modified Si was comparable to the very small level of colonization observed on macroscopic PEG gel controls. The fact that these microgels can be deposited by a nonline-of-sight self-assembly process and hinder bacterial colonization opens the possibility of modifying the surfaces of topographically complex biomedical devices and reduces the rate of biomaterial-associated infection.

  11. Control of bacterial biofilm growth on surfaces by nanostructural mechanics and geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, A. K.; Hochbaum, A. I.; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, J.

    2011-12-01

    Surface-associated communities of bacteria, called biofilms, pervade natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms are resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial treatments and therefore pose persistent pathogenic threats. The use of surface chemistry to inhibit biofilm growth has been found to only transiently affect initial attachment. In this work, we investigate the tunable effects of physical surface properties, including high-aspect-ratio (HAR) surface nanostructure arrays recently reported to induce long-range spontaneous spatial patterning of bacteria on the surface. The functional parameters and length scale regimes that control such artificial patterning for the rod-shaped pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa are elucidated through a combinatorial approach. We further report a crossover regime of biofilm growth on a HAR nanostructured surface versus the nanostructure effective stiffness. When the 'softness' of the hair-like nanoarray is increased beyond a threshold value, biofilm growth is inhibited as compared to a flat control surface. This result is consistent with the mechanoselective adhesion of bacteria to surfaces. Therefore by combining nanoarray-induced bacterial patterning and modulating the effective stiffness of the nanoarray—thus mimicking an extremely compliant flat surface—bacterial mechanoselective adhesion can be exploited to control and inhibit biofilm growth.

  12. Identification of Fic-1 as an enzyme that inhibits bacterial DNA replication by AMPylating GyrB, promoting filament formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Canhua; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Zhang, Li-Qun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-26

    The morphology of bacterial cells is important for virulence, evasion of the host immune system, and coping with environmental stresses. The widely distributed Fic proteins (filamentation induced by cAMP) are annotated as proteins involved in cell division because of the presence of the HPFx[D/E]GN[G/K]R motif. We showed that the presence of Fic-1 from Pseudomonas fluorescens significantly reduced the yield of plasmid DNA when expressed in Escherichia coli or P. fluorescens. Fic-1 interacted with GyrB, a subunit of DNA gyrase, which is essential for bacterial DNA replication. Fic-1 catalyzed the AMPylation of GyrB at Tyr(109), a residue critical for binding ATP, and exhibited auto-AMPylation activity. Mutation of the Fic-1 auto-AMPylated site greatly reduced AMPylation activity toward itself and toward GyrB. Fic-1-dependent AMPylation of GyrB triggered the SOS response, indicative of DNA replication stress or DNA damage. Fic-1 also promoted the formation of elongated cells when the SOS response was blocked. We identified an α-inhibitor protein that we named anti-Fic-1 (AntF), encoded by a gene immediately upstream of Fic-1. AntF interacted with Fic-1, inhibited the AMPylation activity of Fic-1 for GyrB in vitro, and blocked Fic-1-mediated inhibition of DNA replication in bacteria, suggesting that Fic-1 and AntF comprise a toxin-antitoxin module. Our work establishes Fic-1 as an AMPylating enzyme that targets GyrB to inhibit DNA replication and may target other proteins to regulate bacterial morphology.

  13. Potential mechanisms and environmental controls of TiO2 nanoparticle effects on soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuan; Priester, John H; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie C; Schimel, Joshua P; Holden, Patricia A

    2013-12-17

    It has been reported that engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) alter soil bacterial communities, but the underlying mechanisms and environmental controls of such effects remain unknown. Besides direct toxicity, ENPs may indirectly affect soil bacteria by changing soil water availability or other properties. Alternatively, soil water or other environmental factors may mediate ENP effects on soil bacterial communities. To test, we incubated nano-TiO2-amended soils across a range of water potentials for 288 days. Following incubation, the soil water characteristics, organic matter, total carbon, total nitrogen, and respiration upon rewetting (an indicator of bioavailable organic carbon) were measured. Bacterial community shifts were characterized by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The endpoint soil water holding had been reported previously as not changing with this nano-TiO2 amendment; herein, we also found that some selected soil properties were unaffected by the treatments. However, we found that nano-TiO2 altered the bacterial community composition and reduced diversity. Nano-TiO2-induced community dissimilarities increased but tended to approach a plateau when soils became drier. Taken together, nano-TiO2 effects on soil bacteria appear to be a result of direct toxicity rather than indirectly through nano-TiO2 affecting soil water and organic matter pools. However, such directs effects of nano-TiO2 on soil bacterial communities are mediated by soil water.

  14. Antiarrhythmic Mechanisms of SK Channel Inhibition in the Rat Atrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsbye, Lasse; Wang, Xiaodong; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: We speculated that together with a direct inhibition of repolarizing SK current, the previously observed depolarization of the atrial resting membrane potential (RMP) after SK channel inhibition reduces sodium channel availability thereby prolonging the effective refractory...

  15. Sclerostin antibody inhibits skeletal deterioration due to reduced mechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, Jordan M; Ellman, Rachel; Cloutier, Alison M; Louis, Leeann; van Vliet, Miranda; Suva, Larry J; Dwyer, Denise; Stolina, Marina; Ke, Hua Zhu; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2013-04-01

    Sclerostin, a product of the SOST gene produced mainly by osteocytes, is a potent negative regulator of bone formation that appears to be responsive to mechanical loading, with SOST expression increasing following mechanical unloading. We tested the ability of a murine sclerostin antibody (SclAbII) to prevent bone loss in adult mice subjected to hindlimb unloading (HLU) via tail suspension for 21 days. Mice (n = 11-17/group) were assigned to control (CON, normal weight bearing) or HLU and injected with either SclAbII (subcutaneously, 25 mg/kg) or vehicle (VEH) twice weekly. SclAbII completely inhibited the bone deterioration due to disuse, and induced bone formation such that bone properties in HLU-SclAbII were at or above values of CON-VEH mice. For example, hindlimb bone mineral density (BMD) decreased -9.2% ± 1.0% in HLU-VEH, whereas it increased 4.2% ± 0.7%, 13.1% ± 1.0%, and 30.6% ± 3.0% in CON-VEH, HLU-SclAbII, and CON-SclAbII, respectively (p bone volume, assessed by micro-computed tomography (µCT) imaging of the distal femur, was lower in HLU-VEH versus CON-VEH (p bone outcomes appeared to be enhanced by normal mechanical loading. Altogether, these results confirm the ability of SclAbII to abrogate disuse-induced bone loss and demonstrate that sclerostin antibody treatment increases bone mass by increasing bone formation in both normally loaded and underloaded environments.

  16. High-resolution bacterial growth inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for identification of antibacterial constituents in Chinese plants used to treat snakebites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yueqiu; Nielsen, Mia; Stærk, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The biochromatograms demonstrated that tannins play a main role for the bacterial growth inhibition observed for all above-mentioned plants except for Polygonum cuspidatum. Furthermore, the high-resolution bacterial...... growth inhibition profiling combined with HPLC–HRMS–SPE–NMR allowed fast identification of three non-tannin active compounds, i.e., piceid, resveratrol and emodin from ethanol extract of Polygonum cuspidatum. Conclusion The high-resolution bacterial growth inhibition profiling allowed fast pinpointing...... of constituents responsible for the bioactivity, e.g., either showing tannins being the main bacterial growth inhibitors as observed for the majority of the active plants, or combined with HPLC–HRMS–SPE–NMR for fast structural identification of non-tannin constituents correlated with antibacterial activity....

  17. Sharing the sandbox: Evolutionary mechanisms that maintain bacterial cooperation [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bruger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are now known to participate in an extensive repertoire of cooperative behaviors such as biofilm formation, production of extracellular public-goods, group motility, and higher-ordered multicellular structures. A fundamental question is how these cooperative tasks are maintained in the face of non-cooperating defector cells. Recently, a number of molecular mechanisms including facultative participation, spatial sorting, and policing have been discovered to stabilize cooperation. Often these different mechanisms work in concert to reinforce cooperation. In this review, we describe bacterial cooperation and the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that maintain it.

  18. Virtual Screening of Peptide and Peptidomimetic Fragments Targeted to Inhibit Bacterial Dithiol Oxidase DsbA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilko Duprez

    Full Text Available Antibacterial drugs with novel scaffolds and new mechanisms of action are desperately needed to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. The periplasmic oxidative folding system in Gram-negative bacteria represents a possible target for anti-virulence antibacterials. By targeting virulence rather than viability, development of resistance and side effects (through killing host native microbiota might be minimized. Here, we undertook the design of peptidomimetic inhibitors targeting the interaction between the two key enzymes of oxidative folding, DsbA and DsbB, with the ultimate goal of preventing virulence factor assembly. Structures of DsbB--or peptides--complexed with DsbA revealed key interactions with the DsbA active site cysteine, and with a hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site. The present work aimed to discover peptidomimetics that target the hydrophobic groove to generate non-covalent DsbA inhibitors. The previously reported structure of a Proteus mirabilis DsbA active site cysteine mutant, in a non-covalent complex with the heptapeptide PWATCDS, was used as an in silico template for virtual screening of a peptidomimetic fragment library. The highest scoring fragment compound and nine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for DsbA binding and inhibition. These experiments discovered peptidomimetic fragments with inhibitory activity at millimolar concentrations. Although only weakly potent relative to larger covalent peptide inhibitors that interact through the active site cysteine, these fragments offer new opportunities as templates to build non-covalent inhibitors. The results suggest that non-covalent peptidomimetics may need to interact with sites beyond the hydrophobic groove in order to produce potent DsbA inhibitors.

  19. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  20. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria....

  1. Mechanism of Action and Inhibition of dehydrosqualene Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F Lin; C Liu; Y Liu; Y Zhang; K Wang; W Jeng; T Ko; R Cao; A Wang; E Oldfield

    2011-12-31

    'Head-to-head' terpene synthases catalyze the first committed steps in sterol and carotenoid biosynthesis: the condensation of two isoprenoid diphosphates to form cyclopropylcarbinyl diphosphates, followed by ring opening. Here, we report the structures of Staphylococcus aureus dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM) complexed with its reaction intermediate, presqualene diphosphate (PSPP), the dehydrosqualene (DHS) product, as well as a series of inhibitors. The results indicate that, on initial diphosphate loss, the primary carbocation so formed bends down into the interior of the protein to react with C2,3 double bond in the prenyl acceptor to form PSPP, with the lower two-thirds of both PSPP chains occupying essentially the same positions as found in the two farnesyl chains in the substrates. The second-half reaction is then initiated by the PSPP diphosphate returning back to the Mg{sup 2+} cluster for ionization, with the resultant DHS so formed being trapped in a surface pocket. This mechanism is supported by the observation that cationic inhibitors (of interest as antiinfectives) bind with their positive charge located in the same region as the cyclopropyl carbinyl group; that S-thiolo-diphosphates only inhibit when in the allylic site; activity results on 11 mutants show that both DXXXD conserved domains are essential for PSPP ionization; and the observation that head-to-tail isoprenoid synthases as well as terpene cyclases have ionization and alkene-donor sites which spatially overlap those found in CrtM.

  2. Vitamin D inhibits lymphangiogenesis through VDR-dependent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Saleh; Poosti, Fariba; Toro, Luis; Wedel, Johannes; Mencke, Rik; Mirković, Katarina; de Borst, Martin H.; Alexander, J. Steven; Navis, Gerjan; van Goor, Harry; van den Born, Jacob; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2017-01-01

    Excessive lymphangiogenesis is associated with cancer progression and renal disease. Attenuation of lymphangiogenesis might represent a novel strategy to target disease progression although clinically approved anti-lymphangiogenic drugs are not available yet. VitaminD(VitD)-deficiency is associated with increased cancer risk and chronic kidney disease. Presently, effects of VitD on lymphangiogenesis are unknown. Given the apparently protective effects of VitD and the deleterious associations of lymphangiogenesis with renal disease, we here tested the hypothesis that VitD has direct anti-lymphangiogenic effects in vitro and is able to attenuate lymphangiogenesis in vivo. In vitro cultured mouse lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) expressed VitD Receptor (VDR), both on mRNA and protein levels. Active VitD (calcitriol) blocked LEC tube formation, reduced LEC proliferation, and induced LEC apoptosis. siRNA-mediated VDR knock-down reversed the inhibitory effect of calcitriol on LEC tube formation, demonstrating how such inhibition is VDR-dependent. In vivo, proteinuric rats were treated with vehicle or paricalcitol for 6 consecutive weeks. Compared with vehicle-treated proteinuric rats, paricalcitol showed markedly reduced renal lymphangiogenesis. In conclusion, our data show that VitD is anti-lymphangiogenic through VDR-dependent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic mechanisms. Our findings highlight an important novel function of VitD demonstrating how it may have therapeutic value in diseases accompanied by pathological lymphangiogenesis. PMID:28303937

  3. Inhibition mechanism of Tb(III) on horseradish peroxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaofen; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Huang, Xiaohua

    2008-10-01

    The inhibition mechanism of Tb(III) on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in vitro was discussed. The results from MALDI-TOF/MS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that Tb(III) mainly interacts with the O-containing groups of the amides in the polypeptide chains of the HRP molecules and forms the complex of Tb(III)-HRP, and, in the complex, the molar ratio Tb(III)/HRP is 2 : 1. The results from CD and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the coordination effect between Tb(III) and HRP can lead to the conformation change in the HRP molecule, in which the contents of alpha-helix and beta-sheet conformation in the peptide of the HRP molecules is decreased, and the content of the random coil conformation is increased. Meanwhile, the coordination effect also leads to the decrease in the content of inter- and intrapeptide-chain H-bonds in the HRP molecules, resulting in the HRP molecular looseness and/or aggregation. Thus, the conformation change in the HRP molecules can significantly decrease the electrochemical reaction of HRP and its electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of H2O2.

  4. S-layer proteins from Lactobacillus sp. inhibit bacterial infection by blockage of DC-SIGN cell receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado Acosta, Mariano; Ruzal, Sandra M; Cordo, Sandra M

    2016-11-01

    Many species of Lactobacillus sp. possess Surface(s) layer proteins in their envelope. Among other important characteristics S-layer from Lactobacillus acidophilus binds to the cellular receptor DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Non-integrin; CD209), which is involved in adhesion and infection of several families of bacteria. In this report we investigate the activity of new S-layer proteins from the Lactobacillus family (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus kefiri) over the infection of representative microorganisms important to human health. After the treatment of DC-SIGN expressing cells with these proteins, we were able to diminish bacterial infection by up to 79% in both gram negative and mycobacterial models. We discovered that pre-treatment of the bacteria with S-layers from Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus brevis reduced bacteria viability but also prevent infection by the pathogenic bacteria. We also proved the importance of the glycosylation of the S-layer from Lactobacillus kefiri in the binding to the receptor and thus inhibition of infection. This novel characteristic of the S-layers proteins may contribute to the already reported pathogen exclusion activity for these Lactobacillus probiotic strains; and might be also considered as a novel enzymatic antimicrobial agents to inhibit bacterial infection and entry to host cells.

  5. Salmonella plasmid virulence gene spvB enhances bacterial virulence by inhibiting autophagy in a zebrafish infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Ting; Gao, Song; Xu, Guang-Mei; Niu, Hua; Huang, Rui; Wu, Shu-Yan

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause gastroenteritis and systemic infection in a wide range of hosts. Salmonella plasmid virulence gene spvB is closely related to bacterial virulence in different cells and animal models, and the encoded protein acts as an intracellular toxin required for ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. However, until now there is no report about the pathogenecity of spvB gene on zebrafish. Due to the outstanding advantages of zebrafish in analyzing bacteria-host interactions, a S. typhimurium infected zebrafish model was set up here to study the effect of spvB on autophagy and intestinal pathogenesis in vivo. We found that spvB gene could decrease the LD50 of S. typhimurium, and the strain carrying spvB promoted bacterial proliferation and aggravated the intestinal damage manifested by the narrowed intestines, fallen microvilli, blurred epithelium cell structure and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Results demonstrated the enhanced virulence induced by spvB in zebrafish. In spvB-mutant strain infected zebrafish, the levels of Lc3 turnover and Beclin1 expression increased, and the double-membraned autophagosome structures were observed, suggesting that spvB can inhibit autophagy activity. In summary, our results indicate that S. typhimurium strain containing spvB displays more virulence, triggering an increase in bacterial survival and intestine injuries by suppressing autophagy for the first time. This model provides novel insights into the role of Salmonella plasmid virulence gene in bacterial pathogenesis, and can help to further elucidate the relationship between bacteria and host immune response.

  6. Inhibition of urease by bismuth(III): implications for the mechanism of action of bismuth drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Mulrooney, Scott B; Leung, Andy F K; Zeng, Yibo; Ko, Ben B C; Hausinger, Robert P; Sun, Hongzhe

    2006-10-01

    Bismuth compounds are widely used for the treatment of peptic ulcers and Helicobacter pylori infections. It has been suggested that enzyme inhibition plays an important role in the antibacterial activity of bismuth towards this bacterium. Urease, an enzyme that converts urea into ammonia and carbonic acid, is crucial for colonization of the acidic environment of the stomach by H. pylori. Here, we show that three bismuth complexes exhibit distinct mechanisms of urease inhibition, with some differences dependent on the source of the enzyme. Bi(EDTA) and Bi(Cys)(3) are competitive inhibitors of jack bean urease with K(i) values of 1.74 +/- 0.14 and 1.84 +/- 0.15 mM, while the anti-ulcer drug, ranitidine bismuth citrate (RBC) is a non-competitive inhibitor with a K (i) value of 1.17 +/- 0.09 mM. A (13)C NMR study showed that Bi(Cys)(3) reacts with jack bean urease during a 30 min incubation, releasing free cysteines from the metal complex. Upon incubation with Bi(EDTA) and RBC, the number of accessible cysteine residues in the homohexameric plant enzyme decreased by 5.80 +/- 0.17 and 11.94 +/- 0.13, respectively, after 3 h of reaction with dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). Kinetic analysis showed that Bi(EDTA) is both a competitive inhibitor and a time-dependent inactivator of the recombinant Klebsiella aerogenes urease. The active C319A mutant of the bacterial enzyme displays a significantly reduced sensitivity toward inactivation by Bi(EDTA) compared with the wild-type enzyme, consistent with binding of Bi(3+) to the active site cysteine (Cys(319)) as the mechanism of enzyme inactivation.

  7. Workshop report: modeling the molecular mechanism of bacterial spore germination and elucidating reasons for germination heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indest, Karl J; Buchholz, Wallace G; Faeder, Jim R; Setlow, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Over the course of 2 days, top researchers in the fields of bacterial spore biology and computational biology discussed approaches to determine the cause of spore germination heterogeneity. Biological and mathematical data gaps were identified, and experimental approaches and computational strategies for modeling spore germination were presented and evaluated. As a result of these interactions, future research directions were defined, the outcome of which should result in a robust model to help define the molecular mechanism(s) of spore germination. Mechanistic understanding of germination will be instrumental for developing novel sterilization, treatment, and decontamination strategies to mitigate threats posed by spores.

  8. Catalytic irreversible inhibition of bacterial and plant arginine decarboxylase activities by novel substrate and product analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitonti, A J; Casara, P J; McCann, P P; Bey, P

    1987-02-15

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity from Escherichia coli and two plant species (oats and barley) was inhibited by five new substrate (arginine) and product (agmatine) analogues. The five compounds, (E)-alpha-monofluoromethyldehydroarginine (delta-MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylarginine (MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylagatine (FMA), alpha-ethynylagmatine (EA) and alpha-allenylagmatine (AA), were all more potent inhibitors of ADC activity than was alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), the only irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme described previously. The inhibition caused by the five compounds was apparently enzyme-activated and irreversible, since the loss of enzyme activity followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, was time-dependent, the natural substrate of ADC (arginine) blocked the effects of the inhibitors, and the inhibition remained after chromatography of inhibited ADC on Sephadex G-25 or on overnight dialysis of the enzyme. DFMA, FMA, delta-MFMA and MFMA were effective at very low concentrations (10 nM-10 microM) at inhibiting ADC activity in growing E. coli. FMA was also shown to deplete putrescine effectively in E. coli, particularly when combined with an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, alpha-monofluoromethyl-putrescine. The potential uses of the compounds for the study of the role of polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants is discussed.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma cell inhibition by medicinal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelawat, Surang; Leelawat, Kawin

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is one of the most common causes of cancer-associated mortality in Thailand. Certain phytochemicals have been demonstrated to modulate apoptotic signaling pathways, which may be targeted for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of specific medicinal plants on the inhibition of CCA cell proliferation, and to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this. A WST-1 cell proliferation assay was performed using an RMCCA1 cell line, and apoptotic signaling pathways were also investigated using a PathScan Stress and Apoptosis Signaling Antibody Array Kit. The cell proliferation assay indicated that extracts from the Phyllanthus emblica fruit pulp (PEf), Phyllanthus emblica seed (PEs), Terminalia chebula fruit pulp (TCf), Terminalia chebula seed (TCs), Areca catechu seed (ACs), Curcuma longa (CL) and Moringa oleifera seed (MOs) exerted anti-proliferative activity in RMCCA1 cells. In addition, the PathScan assay revealed that certain pro-apoptotic molecules, including caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, checkpoint kinase 2 and tumor protein 53, exhibited increased activity in RMCCA1 cells treated with the aforementioned selected plant extracts, with the exception of PEf. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (including ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK) expression level was significantly increased in RMCCA1 cells pre-treated with extracts of PEs, TCf, CL and MOs. The activation of protein kinase B (Akt) was significantly demonstrated in RMCCA1 cells pre-treated with extracts of TCf, ACs and MOs. In summary, the present study demonstrated that extracts of PEs, TCf, TCs, ACs, CL and MOs exhibited anti-proliferative effects in CCA cells by inducing pro-apoptotic signals and modulating signal transduction molecules. Further studies in vivo are required to demonstrate the potential applications of specific plant extracts for the treatment of human cancer.

  10. Insight into invertebrate defensin mechanism of action: oyster defensins inhibit peptidoglycan biosynthesis by binding to lipid II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Paulina; Wilmes, Miriam; Pugnière, Martine; Aumelas, André; Bachère, Evelyne; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schneider, Tanja; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2010-09-17

    Three oyster defensin variants (Cg-Defh1, Cg-Defh2, and Cg-Defm) were produced as recombinant peptides and characterized in terms of activities and mechanism of action. In agreement with their spectrum of activity almost specifically directed against Gram-positive bacteria, oyster defensins were shown here to be specific inhibitors of a bacterial biosynthesis pathway rather than mere membrane-active agents. Indeed, at lethal concentrations, the three defensins did not compromise Staphylococcus aureus membrane integrity but inhibited the cell wall biosynthesis as indicated by the accumulation of the UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide cell wall precursor. In addition, a combination of antagonization assays, thin layer chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance measurements showed that oyster defensins bind almost irreversibly to the lipid II peptidoglycan precursor, thereby inhibiting the cell wall biosynthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed analysis of the mechanism of action of antibacterial defensins produced by invertebrates. Interestingly, the three defensins, which were chosen as representative of the oyster defensin molecular diversity, bound differentially to lipid II. This correlated with their differential antibacterial activities. From our experimental data and the analysis of oyster defensin sequence diversity, we propose that oyster defensin activity results from selective forces that have conserved residues involved in lipid II binding and diversified residues at the surface of oyster defensins that could improve electrostatic interactions with the bacterial membranes.

  11. First quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics studies of the inhibition mechanism of cruzain by peptidyl halomethyl ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafet, Kemel; Ferrer, Silvia; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-06-02

    Cruzain is a primary cysteine protease expressed by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi during Chagas disease infection, and thus, the development of inhibitors of this protein is a promising target for designing an effective therapy against the disease. In this paper, the mechanism of inhibition of cruzain by two different irreversible peptidyl halomethyl ketones (PHK) inhibitors has been studied by means of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics-molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain a complete representation of the possible free energy reaction paths. These have been traced on free energy surfaces in terms of the potential of mean force computed at AM1d/MM and DFT/MM levels of theory. An analysis of the possible reaction mechanisms of the inhibition process has been performed showing that the nucleophilic attack of an active site cysteine, Cys25, on a carbon atom of the inhibitor and the cleavage of the halogen-carbon bond take place in a single step. PClK appears to be much more favorable than PFK from a kinetic point of view. This result would be in agreement with experimental studies in other papain-like enzymes. A deeper analysis of the results suggests that the origin of the differences between PClK and PFK can be the different stabilizing interactions established between the inhibitors and the residues of the active site of the protein. Any attempt to explore the viability of the inhibition process through a stepwise mechanism involving the formation of a thiohemiketal intermediate and a three-membered sulfonium intermediate has been unsuccessful. Nevertheless, a mechanism through a protonated thiohemiketal, with participation of His159 as a proton donor, appears to be feasible despite showing higher free energy barriers. Our results suggest that PClK can be used as a starting point to develop a proper inhibitor of cruzain.

  12. Evolution of antibiotic resistance is linked to any genetic mechanism affecting bacterial duration of carriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Sonja; Blanquart, François; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Turner, Paul; Lipsitch, Marc; Fraser, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how changes in antibiotic consumption affect the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is important for public health. In a number of bacterial species, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the prevalence of resistance has remained relatively stable despite prolonged selection pressure from antibiotics. The evolutionary processes allowing the robust coexistence of antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains are not fully understood. While allelic diversity can be maintained at a locus by direct balancing selection, there is no evidence for such selection acting in the case of resistance. In this work, we propose a mechanism for maintaining coexistence at the resistance locus: linkage to a second locus that is under balancing selection and that modulates the fitness effect of resistance. We show that duration of carriage plays such a role, with long duration of carriage increasing the fitness advantage gained from resistance. We therefore predict that resistance will be more common in strains with a long duration of carriage and that mechanisms maintaining diversity in duration of carriage will also maintain diversity in antibiotic resistance. We test these predictions in S. pneumoniae and find that the duration of carriage of a serotype is indeed positively correlated with the prevalence of resistance in that serotype. These findings suggest heterogeneity in duration of carriage is a partial explanation for the coexistence of sensitive and resistant strains and that factors determining bacterial duration of carriage will also affect the prevalence of resistance. PMID:28096340

  13. Rapid functional definition of extended spectrum β-lactamase activity in bacterial cultures via competitive inhibition of fluorescent substrate cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallum, Ulysses W; Zheng, Xiang; Verma, Sarika; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-01-01

    The functional definition of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) activity is a clinical challenge. Here we report a rapid and convenient assay of β-lactamase activity through the competitive inhibition of fluorescent substrate hydrolysis that provides a read-out nearly 40× more rapidly than conventional techniques for functional definition. A panel of β-lactam antibiotics was used for competition against β-lactamase enzyme-activated photosensitizer (β-LEAP) yielding a competitive index (C(i)) in 30 min. Significant differences in the relative C(i) values of the panel of β-lactams were determined in vitro for Bacillus cereus penicillinase. Additionally, the relative C(i) values for whole bacterial cell suspensions of B. cereus 5/β were compared with the relative minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and a correlation coefficient of 0.899 was determined. We further demonstrated the ability of β-LEAP to probe the capacity of ceftazidime to inhibit the enzyme activity of a panel of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli. The bacteria were assayed for susceptibility to ceftazidime and the relative MIC values were compared with the relative C(i) values for ceftazidime yielding a correlation coefficient of 0.984. This work demonstrates for the first time the whole cell assay of the competitive inhibition of β-lactamase enzyme activity and derivation of associated constants.

  14. Inhibition of secondary caries in a bacterial based in vitro caries model

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Franziska

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preventive effect of fluoride precipitation with calcium hydroxide on secondary caries in a bacterial based in vitro caries model. Caries-free, retained wisdom teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=30). The enamel was cut off and cylindrical cavities 3 mm in diameter and 1,5 mm in depth were prepared on each dentine surface. The cavities of Group A and B were restored with composite (Z100) only. A fluoride solution (43,500 ppm Fˉ as magne...

  15. Mechanism of acid corrosion inhibition using magnetic nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Kinnari; Jauhari, Smita; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2016-12-01

    The inhibition effect of magnetic nanofluid on carbon steel in acid solutions was investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic and SEM measurement. The inhibition efficiency increases up to 95% and 75% for 51.7 mM concentration, respectively, in 1 M HCl and 1 M H2SO4 medium. The adsorption of nanoparticles to the steel surface forms a barrier between the metal and the aggressive environment, which is responsible for observed inhibition action. The adsorption of nanoparticles on steel surface is supported by the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm and surface morphology scanned through SEM.

  16. Inhibition of bacterial foodborne pathogens by the lactoperoxidase system in combination with monolaurin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLay, J C; Kennedy, M J; Orourke, A L; Elliot, R M; Simmonds, R S

    2002-02-25

    The lactoperoxidase system (LPS) and monolaurin (ML) are potential natural antimicrobial agents for use in foods. The LPS is considered to have greatest activity against Gram-negative bacteria while ML is usually considered to have greatest activity against Gram-positive bacteria. An LPS-ML combination system (utilizing lactoperoxidase (LPX) in the range 5-200 mg kg(-1) and ML in the range 50-1,000 ppm) inhibited growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus. Growth of S. aureus was inhibited more strongly in broth than in milk, in milk than in ground beef A similar pattern was observed for E. coli O157:H7, though enhanced inhibition by LPS-ML systems over that obtained in comparable LPS only systems was not observed in ground beef The inhibitory action of the LPS in combination with other lipids was also examined, with progressively weaker inhibition observed in combinations including palmitoleic acid, monopalmitolein, lauric acid, caprylic acid, and sodium lauryl sulphate.

  17. Vanadate inhibition of fungal phyA and bacterial appA2 histidine acid phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungal PhyA protein, which was first identified as an acid optimum phosphomonoesterase (EC 3.1.3.8), could also serve as a vanadate haloperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.10) provided the acid phosphatase activity is shutdown by vanadate. To understand how vanadate inhibits both phytate and pNPP degrading ac...

  18. Bacterial inhibiting surfaces caused by the effects of silver release and/or electrical field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Schroll, Casper;

    2008-01-01

    In this study, silver-palladium surfaces and silver-bearing stainless steels were designed and investigated focusing on electrochemical principles to form inhibiting effects on planktonic and/or biofilm bacteria in water systems. Silver-resistant Escherichia coli and silver-sensitive E. coli were...

  19. Immunity Provided by an Outer Membrane Vesicle Cholera Vaccine Is Due to O-Antigen-Specific Antibodies Inhibiting Bacterial Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu; Lazinski, David W; Camilli, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    An outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-based cholera vaccine is highly efficacious in preventing intestinal colonization in the suckling mouse model. Immunity from OMVs comes from immunoglobulin (Ig), particularly IgG, in the milk of mucosally immunized dams. Anti-OMV IgG renders Vibrio cholerae organisms immotile, thus they pass through the small intestine without colonizing. However, the importance of motility inhibition for protection and the mechanism by which motility is inhibited remain unclear. By using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we found that IgG inhibits motility by specifically binding to the O-antigen of V. cholerae We demonstrate that the bivalent structure of IgG, although not required for binding to the O-antigen, is required for motility inhibition. Finally, we show using competition assays in suckling mice that inhibition of motility appears to be responsible for most, if not all, of the protection engendered by OMV vaccination, thus providing insight into the mechanism of immune protection.

  20. Nε-lysine acetylation of a bacterial transcription factor inhibits Its DNA-binding activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Thao

    Full Text Available Evidence suggesting that eukaryotes and archaea use reversible N(ε-lysine (N(ε-Lys acetylation to modulate gene expression has been reported, but evidence for bacterial use of N(ε-Lys acetylation for this purpose is lacking. Here, we report data in support of the notion that bacteria can control gene expression by modulating the acetylation state of transcription factors (TFs. We screened the E. coli proteome for substrates of the bacterial Gcn5-like protein acetyltransferase (Pat. Pat acetylated four TFs, including the RcsB global regulatory protein, which controls cell division, and capsule and flagellum biosynthesis in many bacteria. Pat acetylated residue Lys180 of RcsB, and the NAD(+-dependent Sir2 (sirtuin-like protein deacetylase (CobB deacetylated acetylated RcsB (RcsB(Ac, demonstrating that N(ε-Lys acetylation of RcsB is reversible. Analysis of RcsB(Ac and variant RcsB proteins carrying substitutions at Lys180 provided biochemical and physiological evidence implicating Lys180 as a critical residue for RcsB DNA-binding activity. These findings further the likelihood that reversible N(ε-Lys acetylation of transcription factors is a mode of regulation of gene expression used by all cells.

  1. Competitive inhibition reaction mechanisms for the two-step model of protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whidden, Mark; Ho, Allison; Ivanova, Magdalena I; Schnell, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    We propose three new reaction mechanisms for competitive inhibition of protein aggregation for the two-step model of protein aggregation. The first mechanism is characterized by the inhibition of native protein, the second is characterized by the inhibition of aggregation-prone protein and the third mechanism is characterized by the mixed inhibition of native and aggregation-prone proteins. Rate equations are derived for these mechanisms, and a method is described for plotting kinetic results to distinguish these three types of inhibitors. The derived rate equations provide a simple way of estimating the inhibition constant of native or aggregation-prone protein inhibitors in protein aggregation. The new approach is used to estimate the inhibition constants of different peptide inhibitors of insulin aggregation.

  2. Ion Channels Activated by Mechanical Forces in Bacterial and Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokabe, Masahiro; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Since the first discovery of mechanosensitive ion channel (MSC) in non-sensory cells in 1984, a variety of MSCs has been identified both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. One of the central issues concerning MSCs is to understand the molecular and biophysical mechanisms of how mechanical forces activate/open MSCs. It has been well established that prokaryotic (mostly bacterial) MSCs are activated exclusively by membrane tension. Thus the problem to be solved with prokaryotic MSCs is the mechanisms how the MSC proteins receive tensile forces from the lipid bilayer and utilize them for channel opening. On the other hand, the activation of many eukaryotic MSCs crucially depends on tension in the actin cytoskeleton. By using the actin cytoskeleton as a force sensing antenna, eukaryotic MSCs have obtained sophisticated functions such as remote force sensing and force-direction sensing, which bacterial MSCs do not have. Actin cytoskeletons also give eukaryotic MSCs an interesting and important function called "active touch sensing", by which cells can sense rigidity of their substrates. The contractile actin cytoskeleton stress fiber (SF) anchors its each end to a focal adhesion (FA) and pulls the substrate to generate substrate-rigidity-dependent stresses in the FA. It has been found that those stresses are sensed by some Ca2+-permeable MSCs existing in the vicinity of FAs, thus the MSCs work as a substrate rigidity sensor that can transduce the rigidity into intracellular Ca2+ levels. This short review, roughly constituting of two parts, deals with molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying the MSC activation process mostly based on our recent studies; (1) structure-function in bacterial MSCs activation at the atomic level, and (2) roles of actin cytoskeletons in the activation of eukaryotic MSCs.

  3. Significance of bacterial flora in abdominal irradiation-induced inhibition of lung metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, T.; Ando, K.; Koike, S.

    1988-06-01

    We have previously reported that abdominal irradiation prior to i.v. injection of syngeneic tumor cells reduced metastases in lung. Our report described an investigation of the significance of intestinal organisms in the radiation effect. We found that eliminating intestinal organisms with antibiotics totally abolished the radiation effect. Monoassociation of germ-free mice revealed that the radiation effect was observable only for Enterobacter cloacae, never for Streptococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium adlesentis, or Escherichia coli. After abdominal irradiation of regular mice, E. cloacae multiplied in cecal contents, adhered to mucous membranes, invaded the cecal wall, and translocated to mesenteric lymph nodes. Intravenous administration of E. cloacae in place of abdominal irradiation inhibited metastases. E. cloacae-monoassociated mice developed fewer metastases than germ-free mice, and the reduction was further enhanced by abdominal irradiation. We concluded that abdominal irradiation caused the invasion of E. cloacae from the mucous membrane of the intestine and inhibited formation of lung metastases.

  4. Population Density Modulates Drug Inhibition and Gives Rise to Potential Bistability of Treatment Outcomes for Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltas, Jeff; Brumm, Peter; Wood, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    The inoculum effect (IE) is an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antibiotic as a function of the initial size of a microbial population. The IE has been observed in a wide range of bacteria, implying that antibiotic efficacy may depend on population density. Such density dependence could have dramatic effects on bacterial population dynamics and potential treatment strategies, but explicit measures of per capita growth as a function of density are generally not available. Instead, the IE measures MIC as a function of initial population size, and population density changes by many orders of magnitude on the timescale of the experiment. Therefore, the functional relationship between population density and antibiotic inhibition is generally not known, leaving many questions about the impact of the IE on different treatment strategies unanswered. To address these questions, here we directly measured real-time per capita growth of Enterococcus faecalis populations exposed to antibiotic at fixed population densities using multiplexed computer-automated culture devices. We show that density-dependent growth inhibition is pervasive for commonly used antibiotics, with some drugs showing increased inhibition and others decreased inhibition at high densities. For several drugs, the density dependence is mediated by changes in extracellular pH, a community-level phenomenon not previously linked with the IE. Using a simple mathematical model, we demonstrate how this density dependence can modulate population dynamics in constant drug environments. Then, we illustrate how time-dependent dosing strategies can mitigate the negative effects of density-dependence. Finally, we show that these density effects lead to bistable treatment outcomes for a wide range of antibiotic concentrations in a pharmacological model of antibiotic treatment. As a result, infections exceeding a critical density often survive otherwise effective treatments. PMID:27764095

  5. Superoxide anions produced by Streptococcus pyogenes group A-stimulated keratinocytes are responsible for cellular necrosis and bacterial growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, Elodie; Grange, Philippe A; Ollagnier, Guillaume; Crickx, Etienne; Elie, Laetitia; Chouzenoux, Sandrine; Weill, Bernard; Plainvert, Céline; Poyart, Claire; Batteux, Frédéric; Dupin, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Gram-positive Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus or GAS) is a major skin pathogen and interacts with keratinocytes in cutaneous tissues. GAS can cause diverse suppurative and inflammatory infections, such as cellulitis, a common acute bacterial dermo-hypodermitis with a high morbidity. Bacterial isolation yields from the lesions are low despite the strong local inflammation observed, raising numerous questions about the pathogenesis of the infection. Using an in vitro model of GAS-infected keratinocytes, we show that the major ROS produced is the superoxide anion ([Formula: see text]), and that its production is time- and dose-dependent. Using specific modulators of ROS production, we show that [Formula: see text] is mainly synthesized by the cytoplasmic NADPH oxidase. Superoxide anion production leads to keratinocyte necrosis but incomplete inhibition of GAS growth, suggesting that GAS may be partially resistant to the oxidative burst. In conclusion, GAS-stimulated keratinocytes are able to develop an innate immune response based on the production of ROS. This local immune response limits GAS development and induces keratinocyte cell death, resulting in the skin lesions observed in patients with cellulitis.

  6. Inhibition of bacterial growth in sweet cheese whey by carbon dioxide as determined by culture-independent community profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Raquel; Xue, Tian; Weeks, Mike; Turner, Mark S; Bansal, Nidhi

    2016-01-18

    Whey is a valuable co-product from cheese making that serves as a raw material for a wide range of products. Its rich nutritional content lends itself to rapid spoilage, thus it typically needs to be pasteurised and refrigerated promptly. Despite the extensive literature on milk spoilage bacteria, little is known about the spoilage bacteria of whey. The utility of carbon dioxide (CO2) to extend the shelf-life of raw milk and cottage cheese has been well established, but its application in whey preservation has not yet been explored. This study aims to characterise the microbial populations of fresh and spoiled sweet whey by culture-independent community profiling using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and to determine whether carbonation is effective in inhibiting bacterial growth in sweet whey. The microbiota of raw Cheddar and Mozzarella whey was dominated by cheese starter bacteria. After pasteurisation, two out of the three samples studied became dominated by diverse environmental bacteria from various phyla, with Proteobacteria being the most dominant. Diverse microbial profiles were maintained until spoilage occurred, when the entire population was dominated by just one or two genera. Whey spoilage bacteria were found to be similar to those of milk. Pasteurised Cheddar and Mozzarella whey was spoiled by Bacillus sp. or Pseudomonas sp., and raw Mozzarella whey was spoiled by Pseudomonas sp., Serratia sp., and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. CO2 was effective in inhibiting bacterial growth of pasteurised Cheddar and Mozzarella whey stored at 15°C and raw Mozzarella whey stored at 4°C. The spoilage bacteria of the carbonated samples were similar to those of the non-carbonated controls.

  7. Microbial dehalogenation of trichlorophenol by a bacterial consortium: characterization and mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorinated phenolic compounds are a class of toxic and refractory organic pollutants. The pollution caused by chlorophenols poses serious ecological and environmental problems. A stable bacterial consortium capable of reductively dechlorinating trichlorophenol was isolated using chlorophenol as the sole source of carbon and energy. The physiological characteristics of the mixed cultures were studied and the results show that the consortium could use pyruvate as the carbon and energy source. The fermentation of pyruvate, sulfate reduction and dechlorination process proceeded strictly in succession within this consortium. The effect of specific inhibitors on the dechlorinating activity of the consortium was investigated, and the results indicate that sulfate and molybdate (1 mmol/L) have a strong inhibitive influence on the dechlorination activity. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique was applied to analyzing the composition of the consortium and the results reveal that one major subpopulation within the consortium was phylogenetically affiliated to gamma and delta subclass of Proteobacteria.

  8. Surface-modified nanoparticles as a new, versatile, and mechanically robust nonadhesive coating: Suppression of protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, P.F.; Currie, E.P.K.; Thies, J.C.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of surface-modified silica nanoparticles, chemically grafted with acrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups, and the ability of the resulting crosslinked coatings to inhibit protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion are explored. Water contact angles, nanoindentation, and atomic

  9. Surface-modified nanoparticles as a new, versatile, and mechanically robust nonadhesive coating : Suppression of protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, P. F.; Currie, E. P. K.; Thies, J. C.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of surface-modified silica nanoparticles, chemically grafted with acrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups, and the ability of the resulting crosslinked coatings to inhibit protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion are explored. Water contact angles, nanoindentation, and atomic

  10. Patterned biofilm formation reveals a mechanism for structural heterogeneity in bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huan; Hou, Shuyu; Yongyat, Chanokpon; De Tore, Suzanne; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-09-03

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and are the major cause of chronic infections in humans and persistent biofouling in industry. Despite the significance of bacterial biofilms, the mechanism of biofilm formation and associated drug tolerance is still not fully understood. A major challenge in biofilm research is the intrinsic heterogeneity in the biofilm structure, which leads to temporal and spatial variation in cell density and gene expression. To understand and control such structural heterogeneity, surfaces with patterned functional alkanthiols were used in this study to obtain Escherichia coli cell clusters with systematically varied cluster size and distance between clusters. The results from quantitative imaging analysis revealed an interesting phenomenon in which multicellular connections can be formed between cell clusters depending on the size of interacting clusters and the distance between them. In addition, significant differences in patterned biofilm formation were observed between wild-type E. coli RP437 and some of its isogenic mutants, indicating that certain cellular and genetic factors are involved in interactions among cell clusters. In particular, autoinducer-2-mediated quorum sensing was found to be important. Collectively, these results provide missing information that links cell-to-cell signaling and interaction among cell clusters to the structural organization of bacterial biofilms.

  11. Mechanisms of Bacterial (Serratia marcescens) Attachment to, Migration along, and Killing of Fungal Hyphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hover, Tal; Maya, Tal; Ron, Sapir; Sandovsky, Hani; Shadkchan, Yana; Kijner, Nitzan; Mitiagin, Yulia; Fichtman, Boris; Harel, Amnon; Shanks, Robert M Q; Bruna, Roberto E; García-Véscovi, Eleonora; Osherov, Nir

    2016-05-01

    We have found a remarkable capacity for the ubiquitous Gram-negative rod bacterium Serratia marcescens to migrate along and kill the mycelia of zygomycete molds. This migration was restricted to zygomycete molds and several basidiomycete species. No migration was seen on any molds of the phylum Ascomycota. S. marcescens migration did not require fungal viability or surrounding growth medium, as bacteria migrated along aerial hyphae as well.S. marcescens did not exhibit growth tropism toward zygomycete mycelium. Bacterial migration along hyphae proceeded only when the hyphae grew into the bacterial colony. S. marcescens cells initially migrated along the hyphae, forming attached microcolonies that grew and coalesced to generate a biofilm that covered and killed the mycelium. Flagellum-defective strains of S. marcescens were able to migrate along zygomycete hyphae, although they were significantly slower than the wild-type strain and were delayed in fungal killing. Bacterial attachment to the mycelium does not necessitate type 1 fimbrial adhesion, since mutants defective in this adhesin migrated equally well as or faster than the wild-type strain. Killing does not depend on the secretion of S. marcescens chitinases, as mutants in which all three chitinase genes were deleted retained wild-type killing abilities. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which S. marcescens binds to, spreads on, and kills fungal hyphae might serve as an excellent model system for such interactions in general; fungal killing could be employed in agricultural fungal biocontrol.

  12. Structural Studies of Bacterial Enzymes and their Relation to Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β- lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes

  13. E. coli chaperones DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy inhibit bacterial functional amyloid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Margery L; Schmidt, Jens C; Ilbert, Marianne; Doyle, Shannon M; Quan, Shu; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula; Wickner, Sue; Chapman, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid formation is an ordered aggregation process, where β-sheet rich polymers are assembled from unstructured or partially folded monomers. We examined how two Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones, DnaK and Hsp33, and a more recently characterized periplasmic chaperone, Spy, modulate the aggregation of a functional amyloid protein, CsgA. We found that DnaK, the Hsp70 homologue in E. coli, and Hsp33, a redox-regulated holdase, potently inhibited CsgA amyloidogenesis. The Hsp33 anti-amyloidogenesis activity was oxidation dependent, as oxidized Hsp33 was significantly more efficient than reduced Hsp33 at preventing CsgA aggregation. When soluble CsgA was seeded with preformed amyloid fibers, neither Hsp33 nor DnaK were able to efficiently prevent soluble CsgA from adopting the amyloid conformation. Moreover, both DnaK and Hsp33 increased the time that CsgA was reactive with the amyloid oligomer conformation-specific A11 antibody. Since CsgA must also pass through the periplasm during secretion, we assessed the ability of the periplasmic chaperone Spy to inhibit CsgA polymerization. Like DnaK and Hsp33, Spy also inhibited CsgA polymerization in vitro. Overexpression of Spy resulted in increased chaperone activity in periplasmic extracts and in reduced curli biogenesis in vivo. We propose that DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy exert their effects during the nucleation stages of CsgA fibrillation. Thus, both housekeeping and stress induced cytosolic and periplasmic chaperones may be involved in discouraging premature CsgA interactions during curli biogenesis.

  14. High pressure and anesthesia: pressure stimulates or inhibits bacterial bioluminescence depending upon temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, S; Kamaya, H; Ueda, I

    1988-10-01

    Although high pressure is often viewed as a nonspecific stimulus counteracting anesthesia, pressure can either excite or inhibit biological activity depending on the temperature at application. Temperature and pressure are two independent variables that determine equilibrium quantity, e.g., the state of organisms in terms of activity and anesthesia depth. We used the light intensity of luminous bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) as an activity parameter, and studied the effects of pressure and anesthetics on the bacteria's light intensity at various temperatures. The light intensity was greatest at about 30 degrees C at ambient pressure. When the system was pressurized up to 204 atm, the temperature for maximum light intensity was shifted to higher temperatures. Above the optimal temperature for the maximal light intensity, high pressure increased the light intensity. Below the optimal temperature, pressure decreased light intensity. Pressure only shifts the reaction equilibrium to the lower volume state (Le Chatelier's principle). When the volume of the excited state is larger than the resting state, high pressure inhibits excitation, and vice versa. Halothane 0.008 atm and isoflurane 0.021 atm inhibited the light intensity both above and below the optimal temperature. When pressurized, the light intensity increased in the high temperature range but decreased in the low temperature range, as in the control. Thus, high pressure seemingly potentiated the anesthetic action at low temperatures. When the ratio of the light intensity in bacteria exposed to anesthesia and those not exposed to anesthesia was plotted against the pressure, however, the value approached unity in proportion to the pressure increase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Studies on inhibition of respiratory cytochrome bc1 complex by the fungicide pyrimorph suggest a novel inhibitory mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei Xiao

    Full Text Available The respiratory chain cytochrome bc1 complex (cyt bc1 is a major target of numerous antibiotics and fungicides. All cyt bc1 inhibitors act on either the ubiquinol oxidation (QP or ubiquinone reduction (QN site. The primary cause of resistance to bc1 inhibitors is target site mutations, creating a need for novel agents that act on alternative sites within the cyt bc1 to overcome resistance. Pyrimorph, a synthetic fungicide, inhibits the growth of a broad range of plant pathogenic fungi, though little is known concerning its mechanism of action. In this study, using isolated mitochondria from pathogenic fungus Phytophthora capsici, we show that pyrimorph blocks mitochondrial electron transport by affecting the function of cyt bc1. Indeed, pyrimorph inhibits the activities of both purified 11-subunit mitochondrial and 4-subunit bacterial bc1 with IC50 values of 85.0 μM and 69.2 μM, respectively, indicating that it targets the essential subunits of cyt bc1 complexes. Using an array of biochemical and spectral methods, we show that pyrimorph acts on an area near the QP site and falls into the category of a mixed-type, noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate ubiquinol. In silico molecular docking of pyrimorph to cyt b from mammalian and bacterial sources also suggests that pyrimorph binds in the vicinity of the quinol oxidation site.

  16. Studies on inhibition of respiratory cytochrome bc1 complex by the fungicide pyrimorph suggest a novel inhibitory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yu-Mei; Esser, Lothar; Zhou, Fei; Li, Chang; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Yu, Chang-An; Qin, Zhao-Hai; Xia, Di

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory chain cytochrome bc1 complex (cyt bc1) is a major target of numerous antibiotics and fungicides. All cyt bc1 inhibitors act on either the ubiquinol oxidation (QP) or ubiquinone reduction (QN) site. The primary cause of resistance to bc1 inhibitors is target site mutations, creating a need for novel agents that act on alternative sites within the cyt bc1 to overcome resistance. Pyrimorph, a synthetic fungicide, inhibits the growth of a broad range of plant pathogenic fungi, though little is known concerning its mechanism of action. In this study, using isolated mitochondria from pathogenic fungus Phytophthora capsici, we show that pyrimorph blocks mitochondrial electron transport by affecting the function of cyt bc1. Indeed, pyrimorph inhibits the activities of both purified 11-subunit mitochondrial and 4-subunit bacterial bc1 with IC50 values of 85.0 μM and 69.2 μM, respectively, indicating that it targets the essential subunits of cyt bc1 complexes. Using an array of biochemical and spectral methods, we show that pyrimorph acts on an area near the QP site and falls into the category of a mixed-type, noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate ubiquinol. In silico molecular docking of pyrimorph to cyt b from mammalian and bacterial sources also suggests that pyrimorph binds in the vicinity of the quinol oxidation site.

  17. Cellular mechanisms for presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie; delgado-lezama, rodolfo; Christensen, Rasmus Kordt;

    inhibited the DRP, suggesting that GABA could be released through a chloride conductance. In a thick slice preparation from the spinal cord, we loaded superficial astrocytes with sulforhodamine 101 and the calcium indicator Oregon-green BAPATA-AM. The calcium signal of double stained cells was monitored...

  18. Inhibition studies of bacterial, fungal and protozoan β-class carbonic anhydrases with Schiff bases incorporating sulfonamide moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Osman, Sameh M; Alothman, Zeid; Monti, Simona Maria; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-08-01

    A series of new Schiff bases derived from sulfanilamide, 3-fluorosulfanilamide or 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonamide containing either a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic tail, have been investigated as inhibitors of three β-carbonic anhydrases (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from three different microorganisms. Their antifungal, antibacterial and antiprotozoan activities have been determined against the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, the bacterial pathogen Brucella suis and the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani chagasi, responsible for Leishmaniasis. The results of these inhibition studies show that all three enzymes were efficiently inhibited by the Schiff base sulfonamides with KI values in the nanomolar or submicromolar range, depending on the nature of the tail, coming from the aryl/heteroaryl moiety present in the starting aldehyde employed in the synthesis. Furthermore, the compounds hereby investigated revealed high β-CAs selectivity over the ubiquitous, physiologically relevant and off-target human isoforms (CA I and II) and to be more potent as antifungal and antibacterial than as antiprotozoan potential drugs.

  19. Zebrafish CD59 has both bacterial-binding and inhibiting activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Wu, Jie; Liu, Shousheng; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-10-01

    CD59, known as protectin, usually plays roles as a regulatory inhibitor of complement, but it also exhibits activities independent of its function as a complement inhibitor. This study reported the identification and characterization of an ortholog of mammalian cd59 from zebrafish Danio rerio, which is similar to known cd59 in terms of both amino acid sequence and genomic structure as well as synteny conservation. We showed that zebrafish cd59 was maternally expressed in early embryos and expressed in a tissue-specific manner, with most abundant expression in the brain. We further showed that recombinant zebrafish CD59 was capable of binding to both the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as the microbial signature molecules LPS and LTA. In addition we demonstrated that recombinant zebrafish CD59 displayed slight antimicrobial activity capable of inhibiting the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. All these data indicate that zebrafish CD59 can not only binds to the bacteria and their signature molecules LPS and LTA but can also inhibit their growth, a novel role assigned to CD59.

  20. Aptamers to the sigma factor mimic promoter recognition and inhibit transcription initiation by bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miropolskaya, Nataliya; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2016-01-08

    Promoter recognition by bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a multi-step process involving multiple protein-DNA interactions and several structural and kinetic intermediates which remain only partially characterized. We used single-stranded DNA aptamers containing specific promoter motifs to probe the interactions of the Thermus aquaticus RNAP σ(A) subunit with the -10 promoter element in the absence of other parts of the promoter complex. The aptamer binding decreased intrinsic fluorescence of the σ subunit, likely as a result of interactions between the -10 element and conserved tryptophan residues of the σ DNA-binding region 2. By monitoring these changes, we demonstrated that DNA binding proceeds through a single rate-limiting step resulting in formation of very stable complexes. Deletion of the N-terminal domain of the σ(A) subunit increased the rate of aptamer binding while replacement of this domain with an unrelated N-terminal region 1.1 from the Escherichia coli σ(70) subunit restored the original kinetics of σ-aptamer interactions. The results demonstrate that the key step in promoter recognition can be modelled in a simple σ-aptamer system and reveal that highly divergent N-terminal domains similarly modulate the DNA-binding properties of the σ subunit. The aptamers efficiently suppressed promoter-dependent transcription initiation by the holoenzyme of RNA polymerase, suggesting that they may be used for development of novel transcription inhibitors.

  1. COX-2 Inhibition Reduces Brucella Bacterial Burden in Draining Lymph Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnaire, Aurélie; Gorvel, Laurent; Papadopoulos, Alexia; Von Bargen, Kristine; Mège, Jean-Louis; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Brucella is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium responsible for a chronic disease known as brucellosis, the most widespread re-emerging zoonosis worldwide. Establishment of a Th1-mediated immune response characterized by the production of IL-12 and IFNγ is essential to control the disease. Leukotrienes derived from arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism are known to negatively regulate a protective Th1 immune response against bacterial infections. Here, using genomics approaches we demonstrate that Brucella abortus strongly stimulates the prostaglandin (PG) pathway in dendritic cells (DC). We also show an induction of AA production by infected cells. This correlates with the expression of Ptgs2, a gene encoding the downstream cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme in infected DC. By comparing different infection routes (oral, intradermal, intranasal and conjunctival), we identified the intradermal inoculation route as the more potent in inducing Ptgs2 expression but also in inducing a local inflammatory response in the draining cervical lymph nodes (CLN). NS-398, a specific inhibitor of COX-2 enzymatic activity decreased B. melitensis burden in the CLN after intradermal infection. This effect was accompanied by a decrease of Il10 and a concomitant increase of Ifng expression. Altogether, these results suggest that Brucella has evolved to take advantage of the PG pathway in the harsh environment of the CLN in order to persist and subvert immune responses. This work also proposes that novel strategies to control brucellosis may include the use of COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:28018318

  2. Structural basis of response regulator inhibition by a bacterial anti-activator protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda D Baker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex interplay between the response regulator ComA, the anti-activator RapF, and the signaling peptide PhrF controls competence development in Bacillus subtilis. More specifically, ComA drives the expression of genetic competence genes, while RapF inhibits the interaction of ComA with its target promoters. The signaling peptide PhrF accumulates at high cell density and upregulates genetic competence by antagonizing the interaction of RapF and ComA. How RapF functions mechanistically to inhibit ComA activity and how PhrF in turn antagonizes the RapF-ComA interaction were unknown. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of RapF in complex with the ComA DNA binding domain. Along with biochemical and genetic studies, the X-ray crystal structure reveals how RapF mechanistically regulates ComA function. Interestingly, we found that a RapF surface mimics DNA to block ComA binding to its target promoters. Furthermore, RapF is a monomer either alone or in complex with PhrF, and it undergoes a conformational change upon binding to PhrF, which likely causes the dissociation of ComA from the RapF-ComA complex. Finally, we compare the structure of RapF complexed with the ComA DNA binding domain and the structure of RapH complexed with Spo0F. This comparison reveals that RapF and RapH have strikingly similar overall structures, and that they have evolved different, non-overlapping surfaces to interact with diverse cellular targets. To our knowledge, the data presented here reveal the first atomic level insight into the inhibition of response regulator DNA binding by an anti-activator. Compounds that affect the interaction of Rap and Rap-like proteins with their target domains could serve to regulate medically and commercially important phenotypes in numerous Bacillus species, such as sporulation in B. anthracis and sporulation and the production of Cry protein endotoxin in B. thuringiensis.

  3. The natural antimicrobial carvacrol inhibits quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and reduces bacterial biofilm formation at sub-lethal concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Sara A; Ojo-Fakunle, Victoria T A; Woertman, Jenifer; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm by bacteria confers resistance to biocides and presents problems in medical and veterinary clinical settings. Here we report the effect of carvacrol, one of the major antimicrobial components of oregano oil, on the formation of biofilms and its activity on existing biofilms. Assays were carried out in polystyrene microplates to observe (a) the effect of 0-0.8 mM carvacrol on the formation of biofilms by selected bacterial pathogens over 24 h and (b) the effect of 0-8 mM carvacrol on the stability of pre-formed biofilms. Carvacrol was able to inhibit the formation of biofilms of Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium DT104, and Staphylococcus aureus 0074, while it showed no effect on formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (field isolate) biofilms. This inhibitory effect of carvacrol was observed at sub-lethal concentrations (biofilm formation. In contrast, carvacrol had (up to 8 mM) very little or no activity against existing biofilms of the bacteria described, showing that formation of the biofilm also confers protection against this compound. Since quorum sensing is an essential part of biofilm formation, the effect of carvacrol on quorum sensing of C. violaceum was also studied. Sub-MIC concentrations of carvacrol reduced expression of cviI (a gene coding for the N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone synthase), production of violacein (pigmentation) and chitinase activity (both regulated by quorum sensing) at concentrations coinciding with carvacrol's inhibiting effect on biofilm formation. These results indicate that carvacrol's activity in inhibition of biofilm formation may be related to the disruption of quorum sensing.

  4. Antifungal Agents: Mode of Action, Mechanisms of Resistance, and Correlation of These Mechanisms with Bacterial Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Rice, Louis B

    1999-01-01

    The increased use of antibacterial and antifungal agents in recent years has resulted in the development of resistance to these drugs. The significant clinical implication of resistance has led to heightened interest in the study of antimicrobial resistance from different angles. Areas addressed include mechanisms underlying this resistance, improved methods to detect resistance when it occurs, alternate options for the treatment of infections caused by resistant organisms, and strategies to ...

  5. Mechanism of cellobiose inhibition in cellulose hydrolysis by cellobiohydrolase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yue; WU Bin; YAN Baixu; GAO Peiji

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of cellobiose inhibition in cellulose hydrolysis by synergism of cellobiohydrolyse I and endoglucanase I is presented. Cellobiose is the structural unit of cellulose molecules and also the main product in enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. It has been identified that cellobiose can strongly inhibit hydrolysis reaction of cellulase, whereas it has no effect on the adsorption of cellulase on cellulose surface. The experimental data of FT-IR spectra, fluorescence spectrum and circular dichroism suggested that cellobiose can be combined with tryptophan residue located near the active site of cellobiohydrolase and then form steric hindrance, which prevents cellulose molecule chains from diffusing into active site of cellulase. In addition, the molecular conformation of cellobiohydrolase changes after cellobiose binding, which also causes most of the non-productive adsorption. Under these conditions, microfibrils cannot be separated from cellulose chains, thus further hydrolysis of cellulose can hardly proceed.

  6. An antisense peptide nucleic acid against Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibiting bacterial-induced inflammatory responses in the cystic fibrosis IB3-1 cellular model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagner, Giulia; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cabrini, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of novel antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa able to inhibit bacterial growth as well as the resulting inflammatory response is a key goal in cystic fibrosis research. We report in this paper that a peptide nucleic acid (PNA3969) targeting the translation initiation regi...

  7. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M

    2015-07-15

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines.

  8. Bacterial endophytes from wild maize suppress Fusarium graminearum in modern maize and inhibit mycotoxin accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Kamel Mousa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Wild maize (teosinte has been reported to be less susceptible to pests than their modern maize (corn relatives. Endophytes, defined as microbes that inhabit plants without causing disease, are known for their ability to antagonize plant pests and pathogens. We hypothesized that the wild relatives of modern maize may host endophytes that combat pathogens. Fusarium graminearum is the fungus that causes Gibberella Ear Rot (GER in modern maize and produces the mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON. In this study, 215 bacterial endophytes, previously isolated from diverse maize genotypes including wild teosintes, traditional landraces and modern varieties, were tested for their ability to antagonize F. graminearum in vitro. Candidate endophytes were then tested for their ability to suppress GER in modern maize in independent greenhouse trials. The results revealed that three candidate endophytes derived from wild teosintes were most potent in suppressing F. graminearum in vitro and GER in a modern maize hybrid. These wild teosinte endophytes could suppress a broad spectrum of fungal pathogens of modern crops in vitro. The teosinte endophytes also suppressed DON mycotoxin during storage to below acceptable safety threshold levels. A fourth, less robust anti-fungal strain was isolated from a modern maize hybrid. Three of the anti-fungal endophytes were predicted to be Paenibacillus polymyxa, along with one strain of Citrobacter. Microscopy studies suggested a fungicidal mode of action by all four strains. Molecular and biochemical studies showed that the P. polymyxa strains produced the previously characterized anti-Fusarium compound, fusaricidin. Our results suggest that the wild relatives of modern crops may serve as a valuable reservoir for endophytes in the ongoing fight against serious threats to modern agriculture. We discuss the possible impact of crop evolution and domestication on endophytes in the context of plant defense.

  9. Impairment of the biomechanical compliance of P pili: a novel means of inhibiting uropathogenic bacterial infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinth, Jeanna E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Almqvist, Fredrik; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2012-03-01

    Gram-negative bacteria often initiate their colonization by use of extended attachment organelles, so called pili. When exposed to force, the rod of helix-like pili has been found to be highly extendable, mainly attributed to uncoiling and recoiling of its quaternary structure. This provides the bacteria with the ability to redistribute an external force among a multitude of pili, which enables them to withstand strong rinsing flows, which, in turn, facilitates adherence and colonization processes critical to virulence. Thus, pili fibers are possible targets for novel antibacterial agents. By use of a substance that compromises compliance of the pili, the ability of bacteria to redistribute external forces can be impaired, so they will no longer be able to resist strong urine flow and thus be removed from the host. It is possible such a substance can serve as an alternative to existing antibiotics in the future or be a part of a multi-drug. In this work we investigated whether it is possible to achieve this by targeting the recoiling process. The test substance was purified PapD. The effect of PapD on the compliance of P pili was assessed at the single organelle level by use of force-measuring optical tweezers. We showed that the recoiling process, and thus the biomechanical compliance, in particular the recoiling process, can be impaired by the presence of PapD. This leads to a new concept in the search for novel drug candidates combating uropathogenic bacterial infections--"coilicides", targeting the subunits of which the pilus rod is composed.

  10. Molecular mechanisms for the evolution of bacterial morphologies and growth modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randich, Amelia M; Brun, Yves V

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit a rich diversity of morphologies. Within this diversity, there is a uniformity of shape for each species that is replicated faithfully each generation, suggesting that bacterial shape is as selectable as any other biochemical adaptation. We describe the spatiotemporal mechanisms that target peptidoglycan synthesis to different subcellular zones to generate the rod-shape of model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We then demonstrate, using the related genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis as examples, how the modularity of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery permits repositioning of the machinery to achieve different growth modes and morphologies. Finally, we highlight cases in which the mechanisms that underlie morphological evolution are beginning to be understood, and how they depend upon the expansion and diversification of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery.

  11. Molecular mechanisms for the evolution of bacterial morphologies and growth modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia M Randich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria exhibit a rich diversity of morphologies. Within this diversity, there is a uniformity of shape for each species that is replicated faithfully each generation, suggesting that bacterial shape is as selectable as any other biochemical adaptation. We describe the spatiotemporal mechanisms that target peptidoglycan synthesis to different subcellular zones to generate the rod-shape of model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We then demonstrate, using the related genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis as examples, how the modularity of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery permits repositioning of the machinery to achieve different growth modes and morphologies. Finally, we highlight cases in which the mechanisms that underlie morphological evolution are beginning to be understood, and how they depend upon the expansion and diversification of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery.

  12. Flexible microfluidic device for mechanical property characterization of soft viscoelastic solids such as bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohne, Danial N; Younger, John G; Solomon, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    We introduce a flexible microfluidic device to characterize the mechanical properties of soft viscoelastic solids such as bacterial biofilms. In the device, stress is imposed on a test specimen by the application of a fixed pressure to a thin, flexible poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) membrane that is in contact with the specimen. The stress is applied by pressurizing a microfabricated air channel located above the test area. The strain resulting from the applied stress is quantified by measuring the membrane deflection with a confocal laser scanning microscope. The deflection is governed by the viscoelastic properties of the PDMS membrane and of the test specimen. The relative contributions of the membrane and test material to the measured deformation are quantified by comparing a finite element analysis with an independent (control) measurement of the PDMS membrane mechanical properties. The flexible microfluidic rheometer was used to characterize both the steady-state elastic modulus and the transient strain recoil of two soft materials: gellan gums and bacterial biofilms. The measured linear elastic moduli and viscoelastic relaxation times of gellan gum solutions were in good agreement with the results of conventional mechanical rheometry. The linear Young's moduli of biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which could not be measured using conventional methods, were found to be 3.2 and 1.1 kPa, respectively, and the relaxation time of the S. epidermidis biofilm was 13.8 s. Additionally, strain hardening was observed in all the biofilms studied. Finally, design parameters and detection limits of the method show that the device is capable of characterizing soft viscoelastic solids with elastic moduli in the range of 102-105 Pa. The flexible microfluidic rheometer addresses the need for mechanical property characterization of soft viscoelastic solids common in fields such as biomaterials, food, and consumer products. It requires only 200 p

  13. Fluoride inhibits the response of bone cells to mechanical loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, H.M.E.; van den Heuvel, E.G.H.M.; Castelein, S.; Keverling Buisman, J.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Bakker, A.D.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2011-01-01

    The response of bone cells to mechanical loading is mediated by the cytoskeleton. Since the bone anabolic agent fluoride disrupts the cytoskeleton, we investigated whether fluoride affects the response of bone cells to mechanical loading, and whether this is cytoskeleton mediated. The mechano-respon

  14. Vitamin B12 uptake by intestinal microorganisms: mechanism and relevance to syndromes of intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannella, R. A.; Broitman, S. A.; Zamcheck, N.

    1971-01-01

    The mechanism of bacterial uptake of vitamin B12, the spectrum of microorganisms capable of such uptake, and the factors involved were the subject of this study. Bacterial uptake of vitamin B12 was found to be at least a two stage process. A primary uptake phase which was rapid (1 min or less), pH dependent, nontemperature dependent, did not require viable organisms and was insensitive to either the metabolic inhibitor dinitrophenol or to the sulfhydryl inhibitor N-ethyl-maleimide. Protein denaturation (formalin treatment or autoclaving) abolished all B12 uptake. This primary uptake phase is thought to represent adsorption to binding or “receptor” sites on the cell wall. Second stage uptake was slower, pH and temperature dependent, required living bacteria, and was abolished by either dinitrophenol or N-ethyl-maleimide. This phase is dependent upon metabolic processes and may reflect transfer of B12 from surface “receptor” sites into the bacterial cell. Although differences among organisms were observed in total 1 hr uptake, number of surface “receptor” sites, and relative avidities for B12, all organisms except Streptococcus fecalis shared the two stage mechanism. Two Gram-positive organisms. Bacillus subtilis and Group A streptococcus, demonstrated the highest 1 hr vitamin B12 uptake values; Gram-negative bacteria required 2,000-10,000 the number of organisms for comparable uptake. Binding constants (Km) varied from 5.05 ±1.67 × 10-10M for B. subtilis to 6.18 ±3.08 × 10-9M for Klebsiella pneumoniae which approximate the Km for human intrinsic factor (0.38 × 10-10M). Competition between bacteria and intrinsic factor for vitamin B12 may be inferred from the similarity of these constants. These observations suggest that a variety of enteric and nonenteric organisms, not requiring exogenous B12, may play a role in the pathogenesis of the vitamin B12 malabsorption found in the intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndromes. PMID:4994753

  15. Inhibition of bacterial quorum sensing by extracts from aquatic fungi: first report from marine endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Alberto J; Reyes, Fernando; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Yépez, Juan; León-Barrios, Milagros; Couttolenc, Alan; Espinoza, César; Trigos, Angel; Martín, Víctor S; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J

    2014-11-19

    In our search for quorum-sensing (QS) disrupting molecules, 75 fungal isolates were recovered from reef organisms (endophytes), saline lakes and mangrove rhizosphere. Their QS inhibitory activity was evaluated in Chromobacterium violaceum CVO26. Four strains of endophytic fungi stood out for their potent activity at concentrations from 500 to 50 μg mL-1. The molecular characterization, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences (ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) between the rRNA of 18S and 28S, identified these strains as belonging to four genera: Sarocladium (LAEE06), Fusarium (LAEE13), Epicoccum (LAEE14), and Khuskia (LAEE21). Interestingly, three came from coral species and two of them came from the same organism, the coral Diploria strigosa. Metabolic profiles obtained by Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS) suggest that a combination of fungal secondary metabolites and fatty acids could be the responsible for the observed activities. The LC-HRMS analysis also revealed the presence of potentially new secondary metabolites. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of QS inhibition by marine endophytic fungi.

  16. Inhibition of Bacterial Quorum Sensing by Extracts from Aquatic Fungi: First Report from Marine Endophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Alberto J.; Reyes, Fernando; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Yépez, Juan; León-Barrios, Milagros; Couttolenc, Alan; Espinoza, César; Trigos, Ángel; Martín, Víctor S.; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J.

    2014-01-01

    In our search for quorum-sensing (QS) disrupting molecules, 75 fungal isolates were recovered from reef organisms (endophytes), saline lakes and mangrove rhizosphere. Their QS inhibitory activity was evaluated in Chromobacterium violaceum CVO26. Four strains of endophytic fungi stood out for their potent activity at concentrations from 500 to 50 μg mL−1. The molecular characterization, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences (ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) between the rRNA of 18S and 28S, identified these strains as belonging to four genera: Sarocladium (LAEE06), Fusarium (LAEE13), Epicoccum (LAEE14), and Khuskia (LAEE21). Interestingly, three came from coral species and two of them came from the same organism, the coral Diploria strigosa. Metabolic profiles obtained by Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS) suggest that a combination of fungal secondary metabolites and fatty acids could be the responsible for the observed activities. The LC-HRMS analysis also revealed the presence of potentially new secondary metabolites. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of QS inhibition by marine endophytic fungi. PMID:25415350

  17. Inhibition of Bacterial Quorum Sensing by Extracts from Aquatic Fungi: First Report from Marine Endophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto J. Martín-Rodríguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In our search for quorum-sensing (QS disrupting molecules, 75 fungal isolates were recovered from reef organisms (endophytes, saline lakes and mangrove rhizosphere. Their QS inhibitory activity was evaluated in Chromobacterium violaceum CVO26. Four strains of endophytic fungi stood out for their potent activity at concentrations from 500 to 50 μg mL−1. The molecular characterization, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region sequences (ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 between the rRNA of 18S and 28S, identified these strains as belonging to four genera: Sarocladium (LAEE06, Fusarium (LAEE13, Epicoccum (LAEE14, and Khuskia (LAEE21. Interestingly, three came from coral species and two of them came from the same organism, the coral Diploria strigosa. Metabolic profiles obtained by Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS suggest that a combination of fungal secondary metabolites and fatty acids could be the responsible for the observed activities. The LC-HRMS analysis also revealed the presence of potentially new secondary metabolites. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of QS inhibition by marine endophytic fungi.

  18. Mycobacterium leprae-induced Insulin-like Growth Factor I attenuates antimicrobial mechanisms, promoting bacterial survival in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista-Silva, L. R.; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Vivarini, Aislan de Carvalho; Costa, Fabrício da Mota Ramalho; Mattos, Katherine Antunes de; Costa, Maria Renata Sales Nogueira; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Toledo-Pinto, T. G.; Dias, André Alves; Moura, Danielle Fonseca; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (ML), the etiologic agent of leprosy, can subvert macrophage antimicrobial activity by mechanisms that remain only partially understood. In the present study, the participation of hormone insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in this phenomenum was investigated. Macrophages from the dermal lesions of the disseminated multibacillary lepromatous form (LL) of leprosy expressed higher levels of IGF-I than those from the self-limited paucibacillary tuberculoid form (BT). Higher levels of IGF-I secretion by ML-infected macrophages were confirmed in ex vivo and in vitro studies. Of note, the dampening of IGF-I signaling reverted the capacity of ML-infected human and murine macrophages to produce antimicrobial molecules and promoted bacterial killing. Moreover, IGF-I was shown to inhibit the JAK/STAT1-dependent signaling pathways triggered by both mycobacteria and IFN-γ most probably through its capacity to induce the suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3). Finally, these in vitro findings were corroborated by in vivo observations in which higher SOCS3 expression and lower phosphorylation of STAT1 levels were found in LL versus BT dermal lesions. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that IGF-I contributes to the maintenance of a functional program in infected macrophages that suits ML persistence in the host, reinforcing a key role for IGF-I in leprosy pathogenesis. PMID:27282338

  19. Suramin inhibits chikungunya virus replication through multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albulescu, Irina C; van Hoolwerff, Marcella; Wolters, Laura A; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Yang, Shih Chi; Tsay, Shwu-Chen; Hwu, Jih Ru; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J

    2015-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes severe and often persistent arthritis. In recent years, millions of people have been infected with this virus for which registered antivirals are still lacking. Using our recently established in vitro assay, we discovered that the approved anti-parasitic drug suramin inhibits CHIKV RNA synthesis (IC50 of ∼5μM). The compound inhibited replication of various CHIKV isolates in cell culture with an EC50 of ∼80μM (CC50>5mM) and was also active against Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus. In vitro studies hinted that suramin interferes with (re)initiation of RNA synthesis, whereas time-of-addition studies suggested it to also interfere with a post-attachment early step in infection, possibly entry. CHIKV (nsP4) mutants resistant against favipiravir or ribavirin, which target the viral RNA polymerase, did not exhibit cross-resistance to suramin, suggesting a different mode of action. The assessment of the activity of a variety of suramin-related compounds in cell culture and the in vitro assay for RNA synthesis provided more insight into the moieties required for antiviral activity. The antiviral effect of suramin-containing liposomes was also analyzed. Its approved status makes it worthwhile to explore the use of suramin to prevent and/or treat CHIKV infections.

  20. Visualizing the Mechanism of Epoxide Hydrolysis by the Bacterial Virulence Enzyme Cif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Christopher D; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Morisseau, Christophe; Gerber, Scott A; Madden, Dean R

    2016-02-09

    The CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif) is an epoxide hydrolase (EH) virulence factor secreted by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Sequence alignments reveal a pattern of Cif-like substitutions that proved to be characteristic of a new subfamily of bacterial EHs. At the same time, crystallographic and mutagenetic data suggest that EH activity is required for virulence and that Cif's active site remains generally compatible with a canonical two-step EH mechanism. A hallmark of this mechanism is the formation of a covalent hydroxyalkyl-enzyme intermediate by nucleophilic attack. In several well-studied EHs, this intermediate has been captured at near stoichiometric levels, presumably reflecting rate-limiting hydrolysis. Here we show by mass spectrometry that only minimal levels of the expected intermediate can be trapped with WT Cif. In contrast, substantial amounts of intermediate are recovered from an active-site mutant (Cif-E153Q) that selectively targets the second, hydrolytic release step. Utilizing Cif-E153Q and a previously reported nucleophile mutant (Cif-D129S), we then captured Cif in the substrate-bound, hydroxyalkyl-intermediate, and product-bound states for 1,2-epoxyhexane, yielding the first crystallographic snapshots of an EH at these key stages along the reaction coordinate. Taken together, our data illuminate the proposed two-step hydrolytic mechanism of a new class of bacterial virulence factor. They also suggest that the failure of WT Cif to accumulate a covalent hydroxyalkyl-enzyme intermediate reflects an active-site chemistry in which hydrolysis is no longer the rate-limiting step, a noncanonical kinetic regime that may explain similar observations with a number of other EHs.

  1. MECHANISMS OF FLUID SHEAR-INDUCED INHIBITION OF POPULATION GROWTH IN A RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Net population growth of some dinoflagellates is inhibited by fluid shear at shear stresses comparable with those generated during oceanic turbulence. Decreased net growth may occur through lowered cell division, increased mortality, or both. The dominant mechanism under various ...

  2. Mechanisms underlying the inhibition of interferon signaling by viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasthanam, Anand S

    2014-02-15

    A hallmark of the antiviral response is the induction of interferons. First discovered in 1957 by Issac and Lindeman, interferons are noted for their ability to interfere with viral replication. Interferons act via autocrine and paracrine pathways to induce an antiviral state in infected cells and in neighboring cells containing interferon receptors. Interferons are the frontline defenders against viral infection and their primary function is to locally restrict viral propagation. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to escape the host interferon response, thus gaining a replicative advantage in host cells. This review will discuss recent findings on the mechanisms viruses use to evade the host interferon response. This knowledge is important because the treatment of viral infections is a challenge of global proportions and a better understanding of the mechanisms viruses use to persist in the host may uncover valuable insights applicable to the discovery of novel drug targets.

  3. Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by two mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, S. P.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by at least two mechanisms. First, it inhibits auxin-induced H(+)-excretion needed for the initiation of rapid elongation. Galactose cannot be doing so by directly interfering with the ATPase since fusicoccin-induced H(+)-excretion is not affected. Secondly, galactose inhibits long-term auxin-induced growth, even in an acidic (pH 4.5) solution. This may be due to an inhibition of cell wall synthesis. However, galactose does not reduce the capacity of walls to be loosened by H+, given exogenously or excreted in response to fusicoccin.

  4. GTP analogue inhibits polymerization and GTPase activity of the bacterial protein FtsZ without affecting its eukaryotic homologue tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Läppchen, Tilman; Hartog, Aloysius F; Pinas, Victorine A; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2005-05-31

    The prokaryotic tubulin homologue FtsZ plays a key role in bacterial cell division. Selective inhibitors of the GTP-dependent polymerization of FtsZ are expected to result in a new class of antibacterial agents. One of the challenges is to identify compounds which do not affect the function of tubulin and various other GTPases in eukaryotic cells. We have designed a novel inhibitor of FtsZ polymerization based on the structure of the natural substrate GTP. The inhibitory activity of 8-bromoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (BrGTP) was characterized by a coupled assay, which allows simultaneous detection of the extent of polymerization (via light scattering) and GTPase activity (via release of inorganic phosphate). We found that BrGTP acts as a competitive inhibitor of both FtsZ polymerization and GTPase activity with a Ki for GTPase activity of 31.8 +/- 4.1 microM. The observation that BrGTP seems not to inhibit tubulin assembly suggests a structural difference of the GTP-binding pockets of FtsZ and tubulin.

  5. Naphthalimides Selectively Inhibit the Activity of Bacterial, Replicative DNA Ligases and Display Bactericidal Effects against Tubercle Bacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Korycka-Machala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA ligases, enzymes that seal breaks in the backbones of DNA, are essential for all organisms, however bacterial ligases essential for DNA replication use β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as their co-factor, whereas those that are essential in eukaryotes and viruses use adenosine-5′-triphosphate. This fact leads to the conclusion that NAD+-dependent DNA ligases in bacteria could be targeted by their co-factor specific inhibitors. The development of novel alternative medical strategies, including new drugs, are a top priority focus areas for tuberculosis research due to an increase in the number of multi-drug resistant as well as totally drug resistant tubercle bacilli strains. Here, through the use of a virtual high-throughput screen and manual inspection of the top 200 records, 23 compounds were selected for in vitro studies. The selected compounds were evaluated in respect to their Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+ DNA ligase inhibitory effect by a newly developed assay based on Genetic Analyzer 3500 Sequencer. The most effective agents (e.g., pinafide, mitonafide inhibited the activity of M. tuberculosis NAD+-dependent DNA ligase A at concentrations of 50 µM. At the same time, the ATP-dependent (phage DNA LigT4 was unaffected by the agents at concentrations up to 2 mM. The selected compounds appeared to also be active against actively growing tubercle bacilli in concentrations as low as 15 µM.

  6. Biogas production from coumarin-rich plants--inhibition by coumarin and recovery by adaptation of the bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Denny; Schrader, Steffi; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Harms, Hauke; Sträuber, Heike

    2015-09-01

    Plants like sweet clover (Melilotus spp.) are not suitable as fodder for cattle because of harmful effects of the plant secondary metabolite coumarin. As an alternative usage, the applicability of coumarin-rich plants as substrates for biogas production was investigated. When coumarin was added to continuous fermentation processes codigesting grass silage and cow manure, it caused a strong inhibition noticeable as decrease of biogas production by 19% and increase of metabolite concentrations to an organic acids/alkalinity ratio higher than 0.3(gorganic acids) gCaCO3 (-1). Microbial communities of methanogenic archaea were dominated by the genera Methanosarcina (77%) and Methanoculleus (11%). This community composition was not influenced by coumarin addition. The bacterial community analysis unraveled a divergence caused by coumarin addition correlating with the anaerobic degradation of coumarin and the recovery of the biogas process. As a consequence, biogas production resumed similar to the coumarin-free control with a biogas yield of 0.34 LN g(volatile solids) (-1) and at initial metabolite concentrations (∼ 0.2 g(organic acids) gCaCO3 (-1)). Coumarin acts as inhibitor and as substrate during anaerobic digestion. Hence, coumarin-rich plants might be suitable for biogas production, but should only be used after adaptation of the microbial community to coumarin.

  7. Perception mechanism of gravity stimuli in hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of azuki bean roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-10-01

    We reported that elongation growth of plant shoots and roots is suppressed by hypergravity, with the rate decreasing in proportion to logarithm of the magnitude of gravity. In hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of shoots, graviperception is supposed to be independent of that in gravitropism and to involve mechanoreceptors. However, the graviperception mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots is not known. In the present study, we compared the mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots with that in gravitropism. The removal of root cap did not influence hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots, although the gravitropic curvature was completely inhibited. Hypergravity had no effects on growth of azuki bean roots in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium, which are blockers of mechanoreceptors. On the contrary, lanthanum or gadolinium at the same concentration did not influence gravitropism of roots. These results suggest that the graviperception mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots is independent of that in gravitropism. Hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of azuki bean roots was observed irrespective of the direction of stimuli, which disappeared in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium. Thus, in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition, roots may perceive the gravity signal by mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane independently of the direction of stimuli, and may utilize it to regulate their growth rate.

  8. Architecture and signal transduction mechanism of the bacterial chemosensory array: progress, controversies, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Joseph J; Piasta, Kene N

    2014-12-01

    Recent research has deepened our understanding of the ancient, conserved chemosensory array that detects small molecule attractants and repellents, and directs the chemotaxis of bacterial and archaeal cells towards an optimal chemical environment. Here we review advances towards a molecular description of the ultrastable lattice architecture and ultrasensitive signal transduction mechanism of the chemosensory array, as well as controversies and challenges requiring further research. Ultimately, a full molecular understanding of array structure and on-off switching will foster (i) the design of novel therapies that block pathogenic wound seeking and infection, (ii) the development of highly specific, sensitive, stable biosensors, and (iii) the elucidation of general functional principles shared by receptor patches in all branches of life.

  9. Bacterial lipoprotein delays apoptosis in human neutrophils through inhibition of caspase-3 activity: regulatory roles for CD14 and TLR-2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Colm P

    2012-02-03

    The human sepsis syndrome resulting from bacterial infection continues to account for a significant proportion of hospital mortality. Neutralizing strategies aimed at individual bacterial wall products (such as LPS) have enjoyed limited success in this arena. Bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) is a major constituent of the wall of diverse bacterial forms and profoundly influences cellular function in vivo and in vitro, and has been implicated in the etiology of human sepsis. Delayed polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) apoptosis is a characteristic feature of human sepsis arising from Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacterial infection. Bacterial wall product ligation and subsequent receptor-mediated events upstream of caspase inhibition in neutrophils remain incompletely understood. BLP has been shown to exert its cellular effects primarily through TLR-2, and it is now widely accepted that lateral associations with the TLRs represent the means by which CD14 communicates intracellular messages. In this study, we demonstrate that BLP inhibits neutrophil mitochondrial membrane depolarization with a subsequent reduction in caspase-3 processing, ultimately leading to a significant delay in PMN apoptosis. Pretreatment of PMNs with an anti-TLR-2 mAb or anti-CD14 mAb prevented BLP from delaying PMN apoptosis to such a marked degree. Combination blockade using both mAbs completely prevented the effects of BLP (in 1 and 10 ng\\/ml concentrations) on PMN apoptosis. At higher concentrations of BLP, the antiapoptotic effects were observed, but were not as pronounced. Our findings therefore provide the first evidence of a crucial role for both CD14 and TLR-2 in delayed PMN apoptosis arising from bacterial infection.

  10. Use of chlorine dioxide in a secondary recovery process to inhibit bacterial fouling and corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knickrehm, M.; Caballero, E.; Romualdo, P.; Sandidge, J.

    1987-01-01

    A major oil company operates a secondary recovery waterflood in Inglewood, California. The waterflood currently processes 250,000 bbls. per day of produced fluid. The major economic and operational problems associated with a secondary recovery waterflood are: 1) corrosion due to oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and bacteria (sulfate reducers and slime biomass), 2) plugging from deposits due to salts, sulfides, and biofilms. These problems lead to deterioration of water handling equipment, injection lines (surface and subsurface), and decreased water quality resulting in the plugging of injection wells. During the last 8 years the operator has used varying mechanical and chemical technology to solve these problems. From 1978 to 1982 traditional chemical programs were in effect. Over this time period there was a continuing decline in water quality, and a substantial increase in chemical and operational costs. It was determined at that time that the major reason for this was due to microbiological activity. With this in mind, the operator proceeded to test the effects of using Aqueous Chlorine Dioxide in one portion of their water handling facilities. Due to the success of the program it was applied field wide. Presently, the primary problems associated with bacteria have been arrested. Solving one corrosion problem can lead to the onset of another. The operator is now in the process of making a concentrated effort to eliminate the other synergistically related corrosive and plugging agents (O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S). A field history of the problems, findings, and solutions, are discussed along with an overview of our present direction.

  11. A study on the ability of quaternary ammonium groups attached to a polyurethane foam wound dressing to inhibit bacterial attachment and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phat L; Hamood, Abdul N; de Souza, Anselm; Schultz, Gregory; Liesenfeld, Bernd; Mehta, Dilip; Reid, Ted W

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection of acute and chronic wounds impedes wound healing significantly. Part of this impediment is the ability of bacterial pathogens to grow in wound dressings. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a polyurethane (PU) foam wound dressings coated with poly diallyl-dimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC-PU) to inhibit the growth and biofilm development by three main wound pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, within the wound dressing. pDADMAC-PU inhibited the growth of all three pathogens. Time-kill curves were conducted both with and without serum to determine the killing kinetic of pDADMAC-PU. pDADMAC-PU killed S. aureus, A. baumannii, and P. aeruginosa. The effect of pDADMAC-PU on biofilm development was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Quantitative analysis, colony-forming unit assay, revealed that pDADMAC-PU dressing produced more than eight log reduction in biofilm formation by each pathogen. Visualization of the biofilms by either confocal laser scanning microscopy or scanning electron microscopy confirmed these findings. In addition, it was found that the pDADMAC-PU-treated foam totally inhibited migration of bacteria through the foam for all three bacterial strains. These results suggest that pDADMAC-PU is an effective wound dressing that inhibits the growth of wound pathogens both within the wound and in the wound dressing.

  12. [Inhibiting the pro-tumor and transcription factor FACT: Mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluchenko, N V; Chang, H W; Kozinova, M T; Valieva, M E; Gerasimova, N S; Kitashov, A V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Georgiev, P G; Studitsky, V M

    2016-01-01

    Conventional antitumor therapy is often complicated by the emergence of the so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are characterized by low metabolic rates and high resistance to almost all existing therapies. Many problems of clinical oncology and a poor efficacy of current treatments in particular are ascribed to CSCs. Therefore, it is important to develop new compounds capable of eliminating both rapidly proliferating tumor cells and standard treatment-resistant CSCs. Curaxins have been demonstrated to manifest various types of antitumor activity. Curaxins simultaneously affect at least three key molecular cascades involved in tumor development, including the p53, NF-κB, and HSF1 metabolic pathways. In addition, studies of some curaxins indicate that they can inhibit the transcriptional induction of the genes for matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 8 (MMP1 and MMP8); the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling cascades; cIAP-1 (apoptosis protein 1) inhibitor activity; topoisomerase II; and a number of oncogenes, such as c-MYC and others. In vivo experiments have shown that the CSC population increases on gemcitabine monotherapy and is reduced on treatment with curaxin CBL0137. The data support the prospective use of FACT inhibitors as new anticancer drugs with multiple effects on cell metabolism.

  13. Bacterial community variation and microbial mechanism of triclosan (TCS) removal by constructed wetlands with different types of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Congcong; Xie, HuiJun; Xu, Jingtao; Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Cui; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jingmin

    2015-02-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum synthetic antimicrobial agent that is toxic to microbes and other aquatic organisms. Constructed wetlands (CWs) are now popular in TCS removal. However, knowledge on the effects of TCS on the bacterial community and microbial removal mechanism in CWs is lacking. The effects of TCS (60 μg L(-1)) on bacterial communities in batch-loaded CWs with emergent (Typha angustifolia), submerged (Hydrilla verticillata), and floating plant (Salvinia natans) were analyzed by 454 pyrosequencing technology. After six periods of experiment, the TCS removal efficiencies were over 90% in CWs, and negative effects of TCS on bacterial community richness and diversity were observed. Moreover, plant species effect existed. Bacterial strains that contributed to TCS biodegradation in CWs were successfully identified. In TCS-treated T. angustifolia and H. verticillata CWs, beta-Proteobacteria increased by 16.63% and 18.20%, respectively. In TCS-treated S. natans CWs, delta- and gamma-Proteobacteria and Sphingobacteria increased by 9.36%, 19.49%, and 31.37%, respectively, and could relate to TCS biodegradation. TCS affected the development of certain bacteria, and eventually, the bacterial community structures in CWs. This research provided ecologically relevant information on bacterial community and microbial removal mechanism in CWs under TCS treatment.

  14. Mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride-inhibited protein synthesis in liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced alterations of protein synthesis in liver. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given CCl4 (1 mL/100 g body weight) and 3H-leucine incorporation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the liver, in vitro response of hepatocyte nuclei nucleotide triphosphatase (NTPase) to free radicals, and nuclear export of total mRNA with 3'-poly A+ were measured respectively. Survival response of HepG2 cells to CCl4 treatment was assessed by methyl thia...

  15. Effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on mechanical strength and bacterial inhibition of glass ionomer cements%玻璃离子水门汀加入二氧化钛纳米颗粒后的机械与抑菌性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莉霞; 陈琳

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Glass ionomer cements have been gradual y employed in many aspects of dental clinical field. However, low mechanical strength and antibacterial effect restrict its further applications. OBJECTIVE:To proportional y explore the effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the mechanical strength and antibacterial effect of traditional glass ionomer cements. METHODS:Base on different mass fractions of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in glass ionomer cements, al the glass ionomer cement samples were divided into control group (no titanium dioxide nanoparticles), low titanium dioxide group (containing 3%titanium dioxide nanoparticles), medium titanium dioxide group (containing 6%titanium dioxide nanoparticles), and high titanium dioxide group (containing 9%titanium dioxide nanoparticles). A universal material testing machine and a hardness tester were used to examine flexural strength, compressive strength, and surface hardness of glass ionomer cement samples, respectively. Glass ionomer cement samples were immerged into the artificial saliva, and fluoride release was measured by using a fluoride ion selective electrode. The direct contact test was used to investigate antibacterial effect of glass ionomer cement samples towards Streptococcus mutans. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Compared with the control group, few titanium dioxide nanoparticles (low and medium titanium dioxide group) could significantly improve flexural strength, compressive strength and surface hardness of glass ionomer cement samples (P<0.05), and high titanium dioxide nanoparticles (high titanium dioxide group) significantly decreased flexural strength, compressive strength and surface hardness (P<0.05). The introduction of titanium dioxide nanoparticles had little effect on fluorine release behavior of glass ionomer cement samples, and greatly improved antibacterial effect of glass ionomer cement samples towards Streptococcus mutans.%背景:玻璃离子水门汀已被逐渐应用于口腔

  16. Multifaceted mechanisms of HIV inhibition and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors PSC-RANTES and Maraviroc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobritz, Michael A; Ratcliff, Annette N; Marozsan, Andre J; Dudley, Dawn M; Tilton, John C; Arts, Eric J

    2013-06-01

    Small-molecule CCR5 antagonists, such as maraviroc (MVC), likely block HIV-1 through an allosteric, noncompetitive inhibition mechanism, whereas inhibition by agonists such as PSC-RANTES is less defined and may involve receptor removal by cell surface downregulation, competitive inhibition by occluding the HIV-1 envelope binding, and/or allosteric effects by altering CCR5 conformation. We explored the inhibitory mechanisms of maraviroc and PSC-RANTES by employing pairs of virus clones with differential sensitivities to these inhibitors. Intrinsic PSC-RANTES-resistant virus (YA versus RT) or those selected in PSC-RANTES treated macaques (M584 versus P3-4) only displayed resistance in multiple-cycle assays or with a CCR5 mutant that cannot be downregulated. In single-cycle assays, these HIV-1 clones displayed equal sensitivity to PSC-RANTES inhibition, suggesting effective receptor downregulation. Prolonged PSC-RANTES exposure resulted in desensitization of the receptor to internalization such that increasing virus concentration (substrate) could saturate the receptors and overcome PSC-RANTES inhibition. In contrast, resistance to MVC was observed with the MVC-resistant HIV-1 (R3 versus S2) in both multiple- and single-cycle assays and with altered virus concentrations, which is indicative of allosteric inhibition. MVC could also mediate inhibition and possibly resistance through competitive mechanisms.

  17. A Novel AT-Rich DNA Recognition Mechanism for Bacterial Xenogeneic Silencer MvaT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Ding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial xenogeneic silencing proteins selectively bind to and silence expression from many AT rich regions of the chromosome. They serve as master regulators of horizontally acquired DNA, including a large number of virulence genes. To date, three distinct families of xenogeneic silencers have been identified: H-NS of Proteobacteria, Lsr2 of the Actinomycetes, and MvaT of Pseudomonas sp. Although H-NS and Lsr2 family proteins are structurally different, they all recognize the AT-rich DNA minor groove through a common AT-hook-like motif, which is absent in the MvaT family. Thus, the DNA binding mechanism of MvaT has not been determined. Here, we report the characteristics of DNA sequences targeted by MvaT with protein binding microarrays, which indicates that MvaT prefers binding flexible DNA sequences with multiple TpA steps. We demonstrate that there are clear differences in sequence preferences between MvaT and the other two xenogeneic silencer families. We also determined the structure of the DNA-binding domain of MvaT in complex with a high affinity DNA dodecamer using solution NMR. This is the first experimental structure of a xenogeneic silencer in complex with DNA, which reveals that MvaT recognizes the AT-rich DNA both through base readout by an "AT-pincer" motif inserted into the minor groove and through shape readout by multiple lysine side chains interacting with the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. Mutations of key MvaT residues for DNA binding confirm their importance with both in vitro and in vivo assays. This novel DNA binding mode enables MvaT to better tolerate GC-base pair interruptions in the binding site and less prefer A tract DNA when compared to H-NS and Lsr2. Comparison of MvaT with other bacterial xenogeneic silencers provides a clear picture that nature has evolved unique solutions for different bacterial genera to distinguish foreign from self DNA.

  18. Bacterial radiosensitization by using radiation processing in combination with essential oil: Mechanism of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, Monique [Canadian Irradiation Center, Research Laboratory in Sciences Applied to Food, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 531, Boulevard des Prairies, Laval, Quebec, H7V 1B7 (Canada)], E-mail: monique.lacroix@iaf.inrs.ca; Caillet, Stephane [Canadian Irradiation Center, Research Laboratory in Sciences Applied to Food, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 531, Boulevard des Prairies, Laval, Quebec, H7V 1B7 (Canada); Shareck, Francois [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 531, Boulevard des Prairies, Laval, Quebec, H7V 1B7 (Canada)

    2009-07-15

    Spice extracts under the form of essential oils were tested for their efficiency to increase the relative radiosensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157H7 in culture media. The two pathogens were treated by gamma-irradiation alone or in combination with oregano essential oil to evaluate their mechanism of action. The membrane murein composition, and the intracellular and extracellular concentration of ATP was determined. The bacterial strains were treated with two irradiation doses: 1.2 kGy to induce cell damage and 3.5 kGy to cause cell death for L. monocytogenes. A dose of 0.4 kGy to induce cell damages, 1.1 kGy to obtain viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state and 1.3 kGy to obtain a lethal dose was also applied on E. coli O157H7. Oregano essential oil was used at 0.020% and 0.025% (w/v), which is the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for L. monocytogenes. For E. coli O157H7, a concentration of 0.006% and 0.025% (w/v) which is the minimum inhibitory concentration was applied. The use of essential oils in combination with irradiation has permitted an increase of the bacterial radiosensitization by more than 3.1 times. All treatments had also a significant effect (p{<=}0.05) on the murein composition, although some muropeptides did not seem to be affected by the treatment. Each treatment influenced differently the relative percentage and number of muropeptides. There was a significant (p{<=}0.05) correlation between the reduction of intracellular ATP and increase in extracellular ATP following treatment of the cells with oregano oil. The reduction of intracellular ATP was even more important when essential oil was combined with irradiation, but irradiation of L. monocytogenes alone induced a significant decrease (p{<=}0.05) of the internal ATP without affecting the external ATP.

  19. DBIO Best Thesis Award: Mechanics, Dynamics, and Organization of the Bacterial Cytoskeleton and Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria come in a variety of shapes. While the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall serves as an exoskeleton that defines the static cell shape, the internal bacterial cytoskeleton mediates cell shape by recruiting PG synthesis machinery and thus defining the pattern of cell-wall synthesis. While much is known about the chemistry and biology of the cytoskeleton and cell wall, much of their biophysics, including essential aspects of the functionality, dynamics, and organization, remain unknown. This dissertation aims to elucidate the detailed biophysical mechanisms of cytoskeleton guided wall synthesis. First, I find that the bacterial cytoskeleton MreB contributes nearly as much to the rigidity of an Escherichia coli cell as the cell wall. This conclusion implies that the cytoskeletal polymer MreB applies meaningful force to the cell wall, an idea favored by theoretical modeling of wall growth, and suggests an evolutionary origin of cytoskeleton-governed cell rigidity. Second, I observe that MreB rotates around the long axis of E. coli, and the motion depends on wall synthesis. This is the first discovery of a cell-wall assembly driven molecular motor in bacteria. Third, I prove that both cell-wall synthesis and the PG network have chiral ordering, which is established by the spatial pattern of MreB. This work links the molecular structure of the cytoskeleton and of the cell wall with organismal-scale behavior. Finally, I develop a mathematical model of cytoskeleton-cell membrane interactions, which explains the preferential orientation of different cytoskeleton components in bacteria.

  20. Bacterial radiosensitization by using radiation processing in combination with essential oil: Mechanism of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Monique; Caillet, Stéphane; Shareck, Francois

    2009-07-01

    Spice extracts under the form of essential oils were tested for their efficiency to increase the relative radiosensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157H7 in culture media. The two pathogens were treated by gamma-irradiation alone or in combination with oregano essential oil to evaluate their mechanism of action. The membrane murein composition, and the intracellular and extracellular concentration of ATP was determined. The bacterial strains were treated with two irradiation doses: 1.2 kGy to induce cell damage and 3.5 kGy to cause cell death for L. monocytogenes. A dose of 0.4 kGy to induce cell damages, 1.1 kGy to obtain viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state and 1.3 kGy to obtain a lethal dose was also applied on E. coli O157H7. Oregano essential oil was used at 0.020% and 0.025% (w/v), which is the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for L. monocytogenes. For E. coli O157H7, a concentration of 0.006% and 0.025% (w/v) which is the minimum inhibitory concentration was applied. The use of essential oils in combination with irradiation has permitted an increase of the bacterial radiosensitization by more than 3.1 times. All treatments had also a significant effect ( p⩽0.05) on the murein composition, although some muropeptides did not seem to be affected by the treatment. Each treatment influenced differently the relative percentage and number of muropeptides. There was a significant ( p⩽0.05) correlation between the reduction of intracellular ATP and increase in extracellular ATP following treatment of the cells with oregano oil. The reduction of intracellular ATP was even more important when essential oil was combined with irradiation, but irradiation of L. monocytogenes alone induced a significant decrease ( p⩽0.05) of the internal ATP without affecting the external ATP.

  1. An antisense peptide nucleic acid against Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibiting bacterial-induced inflammatory responses in the cystic fibrosis IB3-1 cellular model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, Giulia; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cabrini, Giulio; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Lampronti, Ilaria; Finotti, Alessia; Nielsen, Peter E; Gambari, Roberto

    2017-02-03

    Discovery of novel antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa able to inhibit bacterial growth as well as the resulting inflammatory response is a key goal in cystic fibrosis research. We report in this paper that a peptide nucleic acid (PNA3969) targeting the translation initiation region of the essential acpP gene of P. aeruginosa, and previously shown to inhibit bacterial growth, concomitantly also strongly inhibits PAO1 induced up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory markers IL-8, IL-6, G-CSF, IFN-γ, IP-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α in IB3-1 cystic fibrosis cells infected by P. aeruginosa PAO1. Remarkably, no effect on PAO1 induction of VEGF, GM-CSF and IL-17 was observed. Analogous experiments using a two base mis-match control PNA did not show such inhibition. Furthermore, no significant effects of the PNAs were seen on cell growth, apoptosis or secretome profile in uninfected IB3-1 cells (with the exception of a PNA-mediated up-regulation of PDGF, IL-17 and GM-CSF). Thus, we conclude that in cell culture an antimicrobial PNA against Pseudomonas can inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines otherwise induced by the infection. In particular, the effects of PNA-3969 on IL-8 gene expression are significant considering the key role of this protein in the cystic fibrosis inflammatory process exacerbated by P. aeruginosa infection.

  2. Mechanism of azithromycin inhibition of HSL synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianming; Zhang, Ni; Huang, Bin; Cai, Renxin; Wu, Binning; E, Shunmei; Fang, Chengcai; Chen, Cha

    2016-04-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Unfortunately, P. aeruginosa has low antibiotic susceptibility due to several chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes. Hence, we carried out mechanistic studies to determine how azithromycin affects quorum sensing and virulence in P. aeruginosa. lasI and rhlI single and double mutants were constructed. We then undertook a quantitative approach to determine the optimal concentration of azithromycin and culture time that can affect the expression of HSLs. Furthermore, based on the above results, the effect on quorum sensing was analyzed at a transcriptional level. It was found that 2 μg/mL azithromycin caused a 79% decrease in 3-oxo-C12-HSL secretion during cultivation, while C4-HSL secretion was strongly repressed in the early stages. Azithromycin acts on ribosomes; to determine whether this can elicit alternative modes of gene expression, transcriptional regulation of representative virulence genes was analyzed. We propose a new relationship for lasI and rhlI: lasI acts as a cell density sensor, and rhlI functions as a fine-tuning mechanism for coordination between different quorum sensing systems.

  3. Biochemistry of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanath Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens that are multi-drug resistant compromise the effectiveness of treatment when they are the causative agents of infectious disease. These multi-drug resistance mechanisms allow bacteria to survive in the presence of clinically useful antimicrobial agents, thus reducing the efficacy of chemotherapy towards infectious disease. Importantly, active multi-drug efflux is a major mechanism for bacterial pathogen drug resistance. Therefore, because of their overwhelming presence in bacterial pathogens, these active multi-drug efflux mechanisms remain a major area of intense study, so that ultimately measures may be discovered to inhibit these active multi-drug efflux pumps.

  4. Molecular modifiers reveal a mechanism of pathological crystal growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jihae; Granja, Ignacio; Taylor, Michael G.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Asplin, John R.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2016-08-01

    Crystalline materials are crucial to the function of living organisms, in the shells of molluscs, the matrix of bone, the teeth of sea urchins, and the exoskeletons of coccoliths. However, pathological biomineralization can be an undesirable crystallization process associated with human diseases. The crystal growth of biogenic, natural and synthetic materials may be regulated by the action of modifiers, most commonly inhibitors, which range from small ions and molecules to large macromolecules. Inhibitors adsorb on crystal surfaces and impede the addition of solute, thereby reducing the rate of growth. Complex inhibitor-crystal interactions in biomineralization are often not well elucidated. Here we show that two molecular inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization—citrate and hydroxycitrate—exhibit a mechanism that differs from classical theory in that inhibitor adsorption on crystal surfaces induces dissolution of the crystal under specific conditions rather than a reduced rate of crystal growth. This phenomenon occurs even in supersaturated solutions where inhibitor concentration is three orders of magnitude less than that of the solute. The results of bulk crystallization, in situ atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory studies are qualitatively consistent with a hypothesis that inhibitor-crystal interactions impart localized strain to the crystal lattice and that oxalate and calcium ions are released into solution to alleviate this strain. Calcium oxalate monohydrate is the principal component of human kidney stones and citrate is an often-used therapy, but hydroxycitrate is not. For hydroxycitrate to function as a kidney stone treatment, it must be excreted in urine. We report that hydroxycitrate ingested by non-stone-forming humans at an often-recommended dose leads to substantial urinary excretion. In vitro assays using human urine reveal that the molecular modifier hydroxycitrate is as effective an inhibitor of nucleation

  5. Bacterial Mitosis: ParM of Plasmid R1 Moves Plasmid DNA by an Actin-like Insertional Polymerization Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...

  6. Plant-insect interactions under bacterial influence: ecological implications and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugio, Akiko; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giron, David; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Plants and insects have been co-existing for more than 400 million years, leading to intimate and complex relationships. Throughout their own evolutionary history, plants and insects have also established intricate and very diverse relationships with microbial associates. Studies in recent years have revealed plant- or insect-associated microbes to be instrumental in plant-insect interactions, with important implications for plant defences and plant utilization by insects. Microbial communities associated with plants are rich in diversity, and their structure greatly differs between below- and above-ground levels. Microbial communities associated with insect herbivores generally present a lower diversity and can reside in different body parts of their hosts including bacteriocytes, haemolymph, gut, and salivary glands. Acquisition of microbial communities by vertical or horizontal transmission and possible genetic exchanges through lateral transfer could strongly impact on the host insect or plant fitness by conferring adaptations to new habitats. Recent developments in sequencing technologies and molecular tools have dramatically enhanced opportunities to characterize the microbial diversity associated with plants and insects and have unveiled some of the mechanisms by which symbionts modulate plant-insect interactions. Here, we focus on the diversity and ecological consequences of bacterial communities associated with plants and herbivorous insects. We also highlight the known mechanisms by which these microbes interfere with plant-insect interactions. Revealing such mechanisms in model systems under controlled environments but also in more natural ecological settings will help us to understand the evolution of complex multitrophic interactions in which plants, herbivorous insects, and micro-organisms are inserted.

  7. ATP synthase from Escherichia coli: Mechanism of rotational catalysis, and inhibition with the ε subunit and phytopolyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Sekiya, Mizuki; Futai, Masamitsu

    2016-02-01

    ATP synthases (FoF1) are found ubiquitously in energy-transducing membranes of bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. These enzymes couple proton transport and ATP synthesis or hydrolysis through subunit rotation, which has been studied mainly by observing single molecules. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of rotational catalysis of ATP synthases, mainly that from Escherichia coli, emphasizing the high-speed and stochastic rotation including variable rates and an inhibited state. Single molecule studies combined with structural information of the bovine mitochondrial enzyme and mutational analysis have been informative as to an understanding of the catalytic site and the interaction between rotor and stator subunits. We discuss the similarity and difference in structure and inhibitory regulation of F1 from bovine and E. coli. Unlike the crystal structure of bovine F1 (α3β3γ), that of E. coli contains a ε subunit, which is a known inhibitor of bacterial and chloroplast F1 ATPases. The carboxyl terminal domain of E. coli ε (εCTD) interacts with the catalytic and rotor subunits (β and γ, respectively), and then inhibits rotation. The effects of phytopolyphenols on F1-ATPase are also discussed: one of them, piceatannol, lowered the rotational speed by affecting rotor/stator interactions.

  8. Freestanding bacterial cellulose-graphene oxide composite membranes with high mechanical strength for selective ion permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qile; Zhou, Xufeng; Deng, Wei; Zheng, Zhi; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) based membranes have been widely applied in molecular separation based on the size exclusion effect of the nanochannels formed by stacked GO sheets. However, it’s still a challenge to prepare a freestanding GO-based membrane with high mechanical strength and structural stability which is prerequisite for separation application in aqueous solution. Here, a freestanding composite membrane based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and GO is designed and prepared. BC network provides a porous skeleton to spread GO sheets and uniformly incorporates into the GO layers, which endows the BC + GO composite membrane with well water-stability, excellent tensile strength, as well as improved toughness, guaranteeing its separation applicability in water environment. The resulting BC + GO membrane exhibits obviously discrepant permeation properties for different inorganic/organic ions with different size, and in particular, it can quickly separate ions in nano-scale from angstrom-scale. Therefore, this novel composite membrane is considered to be a promising candidate in the applications of water purification, food industry, biomedicine, and pharmaceutical and fuel separation. PMID:27615451

  9. Mechanical and thermal properties of bacterial-cellulose-fibre-reinforced Mater-Bi® bionanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamonangan Nainggolan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the addition of fibres of bacterial cellulose (FBC to commercial starch of Mater-Bi® have been investigated. FBC produced by cultivating Acetobacter xylinum for 21 days in glucose-based medium were purified by sodium hydroxide 2.5 wt % and sodium hypochlorite 2.5 wt % overnight, consecutively. To obtain water-free BC nanofibres, the pellicles were freeze dried at a pressure of 130 mbar at a cooling rate of 10 °C min−1. Both Mater-Bi and FBC were blended by using a mini twin-screw extruder at 160 °C for 10 min at a rotor speed of 50 rpm. Tensile tests were performed according to ASTM D638 to measure the Young’s modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break. A field emission scanning electron microscope was used to observe the morphology at an accelerating voltage of 10 kV. The crystallinity (Tc and melting temperature (Tm were measured by DSC. Results showed a significant improvement in mechanical and thermal properties in accordance with the addition of FBC into Mater-Bi. FBC is easily incorporated in Mater-Bi matrix and produces homogeneous Mater-Bi/FBC composite. The crystallinity of the Mater-Bi/FBC composites decrease in relation to the increase in the volume fraction of FBC.

  10. Freestanding bacterial cellulose-graphene oxide composite membranes with high mechanical strength for selective ion permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qile; Zhou, Xufeng; Deng, Wei; Zheng, Zhi; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) based membranes have been widely applied in molecular separation based on the size exclusion effect of the nanochannels formed by stacked GO sheets. However, it’s still a challenge to prepare a freestanding GO-based membrane with high mechanical strength and structural stability which is prerequisite for separation application in aqueous solution. Here, a freestanding composite membrane based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and GO is designed and prepared. BC network provides a porous skeleton to spread GO sheets and uniformly incorporates into the GO layers, which endows the BC + GO composite membrane with well water-stability, excellent tensile strength, as well as improved toughness, guaranteeing its separation applicability in water environment. The resulting BC + GO membrane exhibits obviously discrepant permeation properties for different inorganic/organic ions with different size, and in particular, it can quickly separate ions in nano-scale from angstrom-scale. Therefore, this novel composite membrane is considered to be a promising candidate in the applications of water purification, food industry, biomedicine, and pharmaceutical and fuel separation.

  11. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-10-01

    A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm-based infections that are difficult to eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic cells. Developing treatments against biofilms requires an understanding of bacterial biofilm-specific physiological traits. Research efforts have started to elucidate the intricate mechanisms underlying biofilm development. However, many aspects of these mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we addressed questions regarding biofilm metabolism using a genome-scale kinetic model of the P. aeruginosa metabolic network and gene expression profiles. Specifically, we computed metabolite concentration differences between known mutants with altered biofilm formation and the wild-type strain to predict drug targets against P. aeruginosa biofilms. We also simulated the altered metabolism driven by gene expression changes between biofilm and stationary growth-phase planktonic cultures. Our analysis suggests that the synthesis of important biofilm-related molecules, such as the quorum-sensing molecule Pseudomonas quinolone signal and the exopolysaccharide Psl, is regulated not only through the expression of genes in their own synthesis pathway, but also through the biofilm-specific expression of genes in pathways competing for precursors to these molecules. Finally, we investigated why mutants defective in anthranilate degradation have an impaired ability to form biofilms. Alternative to a previous hypothesis that this biofilm reduction is caused by a decrease in energy production, we proposed that the dysregulation of the synthesis of secondary metabolites derived from anthranilate and chorismate is what impaired the biofilms of these mutants. Notably, these insights generated through our kinetic model-based approach are not accessible from previous constraint-based model analyses of P. aeruginosa biofilm

  12. Mechanism of inhibition of human secretory phospholipase A2 by flavonoids: rationale for lead design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lättig, Jens; Böhl, Markus; Fischer, Petra; Tischer, Sandra; Tietböhl, Claudia; Menschikowski, Mario; Gutzeit, Herwig O.; Metz, Peter; Pisabarro, M. Teresa

    2007-08-01

    The human secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (PLA2-IIA) is a lipolytic enzyme. Its inhibition leads to a decrease in eicosanoids levels and, thereby, to reduced inflammation. Therefore, PLA2-IIA is of high pharmacological interest in treatment of chronic diseases such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Quercetin and naringenin, amongst other flavonoids, are known for their anti-inflammatory activity by modulation of enzymes of the arachidonic acid cascade. However, the mechanism by which flavonoids inhibit Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) remained unclear so far. Flavonoids are widely produced in plant tissues and, thereby, suitable targets for pharmaceutical extractions and chemical syntheses. Our work focuses on understanding the binding modes of flavonoids to PLA2, their inhibition mechanism and the rationale to modify them to obtain potent and specific inhibitors. Our computational and experimental studies focused on a set of 24 compounds including natural flavonoids and naringenin-based derivatives. Experimental results on PLA2-inhibition showed good inhibitory activity for quercetin, kaempferol, and galangin, but relatively poor for naringenin. Several naringenin derivatives were synthesized and tested for affinity and inhibitory activity improvement. 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin revealed comparable PLA2 inhibition to quercetin-like compounds. We characterized the binding mode of these compounds and the determinants for their affinity, selectivity, and inhibitory potency. Based on our results, we suggest C(6) as the most promising position of the flavonoid scaffold to introduce chemical modifications to improve affinity, selectivity, and inhibition of PLA2-IIA by flavonoids.

  13. Inhibition Mechanism of Emodin on Rabbit Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty and vein graft.In this study, MTT colormetry was used to test the effective scope of emodin to inhibit VSMCs proliferation.Flow cytometry and confocal image were adopted to investigate its inhibitive mechanism.The results show that emodin could inhibit the growth and proliferation of VSMCs and the inhibition rate of emodin on VSMCs is 24.6%-94.58%, which is time - and concentration - dependent.Emodin could reduce S phase entry, increase the apoptosis of VSMCs, and reduce the intensity of[Ca2+]i in hPDGF B/B stimulated VSMCs.This research provides theoretical basis for medical application of emodin.It is concluded that emodin could inhibit the growth and proliferation of VSMCs effectively.Decreasing the DNA synthesis, increasing the cell apoptosis and reducing the intensity of[Ca2+]i in hPDGF B/B stimulated VSMCs may be the inhibitive mechanism of emodin against VSMCs proliferation.

  14. The bacterial dicarboxylate transporter VcINDY uses a two-domain elevator-type mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Christopher; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Fitzgerald, Gabriel A; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Kaufmann, Desirée; Li, Yan; Forrest, Lucy R; Mindell, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    Secondary transporters use alternating-access mechanisms to couple uphill substrate movement to downhill ion flux. Most known transporters use a 'rocking bundle' motion, wherein the protein moves around an immobile substrate-binding site. However, the glutamate-transporter homolog GltPh translocates its substrate-binding site vertically across the membrane, through an 'elevator' mechanism. Here, we used the 'repeat swap' approach to computationally predict the outward-facing state of the Na(+)/succinate transporter VcINDY, from Vibrio cholerae. Our model predicts a substantial elevator-like movement of VcINDY's substrate-binding site, with a vertical translation of ~15 Å and a rotation of ~43°. Our observation that multiple disulfide cross-links completely inhibit transport provides experimental confirmation of the model and demonstrates that such movement is essential. In contrast, cross-links across the VcINDY dimer interface preserve transport, thus revealing an absence of large-scale coupling between protomers.

  15. COMPARE: a web accessible tool for investigating mechanisms of cell growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Daniel W; Holbeck, Susan L; Bowerman, Christopher; Svetlik, Penny A

    2002-01-01

    For more than 10 years the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has tested compounds for their ability to inhibit the growth of human tumor cell lines in culture (NCI screen). Work of Ken Paull [J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 81 (1989) 1088] demonstrated that compounds with similar mechanism of cell growth inhibition show similar patterns of activity in the NCI screen. This observation was developed into an algorithm called COMPARE and has been successfully used to predict mechanisms for a wide variety of compounds. More recently, this method has been extended to associate patterns of cell growth inhibition by compounds with measurements of molecular entities (such as gene expression) in the cell lines in the NCI screen. The COMPARE method and associated data are freely available on the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) web site (http://dtp.nci.nih.gov/). Examples of the use of COMPARE on these web pages will be explained and demonstrated. Published by Elsevier Science Inc.

  16. Elucidation of the mechanism of enzymatic browning inhibition by sodium chlorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium chlorite (SC) is a well known anti-microbial agent and its strong inhibitory effect on enzymatic browning of fresh-cut produce has recently been identified. We investigated the mechanisms of browning inhibition by SC using chlorogenic acid (CA) and PPO extracted from mushroom to emulate the b...

  17. Mechanism-based inhibition of cancer metastasis with (−)-epigallocatechin gallate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Atsushi [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Green Tea Laboratory, Saitama Prefectural Agriculture and Forestry Research Center, Saitama 358-0042 (Japan); Watanabe, Tatsuro; Mondal, Anupom; Suzuki, Kaori; Kurusu-Kanno, Miki [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Li, Zhenghao; Yamazaki, Takashi [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Fujiki, Hirota [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Suganuma, Masami, E-mail: masami@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •EGCG reduced cell motility of highly metastatic human lung cancer cells. •EGCG increased cell stiffness of the cells, indicating the inhibition of phenotypes of EMT. •EGCG inhibited expression of vimentin and Slug in the cells at the leading edge of scratch. •Treatment of MβCD increased cell stiffness, and inhibited cell motility and vimentin expression. •Inhibition of EMT phenotypes with EGCG is a mechanism-based inhibition of cancer metastasis. -- Abstract: Cell motility and cell stiffness are closely related to metastatic activity of cancer cells. (−)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has been shown to inhibit spontaneous metastasis of melanoma cell line into the lungs of mice, so we studied the effects of EGCG on cell motility, cell stiffness, and expression of vimentin and Slug, which are molecular phenotypes of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Treatments of human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines H1299 and Lu99 with 50 and 100 μM EGCG reduced cell motility to 67.5% and 43.7% in H1299, and 71.7% and 31.5% in Lu99, respectively in in vitro wound healing assay. Studies on cell stiffness using atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that treatment with 50 μM EGCG increased Young’s modulus of H1299 from 1.24 to 2.25 kPa and that of Lu99 from 1.29 to 2.28 kPa, showing a 2-fold increase in cell stiffness, i.e. rigid elasticity of cell membrane. Furthermore, treatment with 50 μM EGCG inhibited high expression of vimentin and Slug in the cells at a leading edge of scratch. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin, a reagent to deplete cholesterol in plasma membrane, showed inhibition of EMT phenotypes similar that by EGCG, suggesting that EGCG induces inhibition of EMT phenotypes by alteration of membrane organization.

  18. Bacterial Exopolysaccharide mediated heavy metal removal: A Review on biosynthesis, mechanism and remediation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratima Gupta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal contamination has been recognized as a major public health risk, particularly in developing countries and their toxicological manifestations are well known. Conventional remediation strategies are either expensive or they generate toxic by-products, which adversely affect the environment. Therefore, necessity for an environmentally safe strategy motivates interest towards biological techniques. One of such most profoundly driven approach in recent times is biosorption through microbial biomass and their products. Extracellular polymeric substances are such complex blend of high molecular weight microbial (prokaryotic and eukaryotic biopolymers. They are mainly composed of proteins, polysaccharides, uronic acids, humic substances, lipids etc. One of its essential constituent is the exopolysaccharide (EPS released out of self defense against harsh conditions of starvation, pH and temperature, hence it displays exemplary physiological, rheological and physio-chemical properties. Its net anionic makeup allows the biopolymer to effectively sequester positively charged heavy metal ions. The polysaccharide has been expounded deeply in this article with reference to its biosynthesis and emphasizes heavy metal sorption abilities of polymer in terms of mechanism of action and remediation. It reports current investigation and strategic advancements in dealing bacterial cells and their EPS in diverse forms – mixed culture EPS, single cell EPS, live, dead or immobilized EPS. A significant scrutiny is also involved highlighting the existing challenges that still lie in the path of commercialization. The article enlightens the potential of EPS to bring about bio-detoxification of heavy metal contaminated terrestrial and aquatic systems in highly sustainable, economic and eco-friendly manner.

  19. Study on the effect of juglone on inhibiting bacterial growth%胡桃醌抑制细菌生长作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴朝霞; 金楠; 张敏; 张旋

    2012-01-01

    目的:以大肠杆菌和金黄色葡萄球菌为研究对象,探讨胡桃醌对微生物不同阶段生长及形态特征的影响,为胡桃醌抑茵机理的研究奠定基础。方法:采用紫外分光光度计和平板计数法绘制生长曲线,通过透射电镜观察菌体形态特征的变化。结果:大肠杆菌的迟缓期和对数期受到胡桃醌的抑制作用明显;处于对数期的金黄色葡萄球菌对胡桃醌的抑制作用更为敏感。透射电镜的结果表明,最低抑茵浓度下的胡桃醌作用大肠杆菌2h,茵体即出现细胞质壁分离现象,细胞质分布不均匀;8h后,细胞壁破坏严重,内溶物流出。胡桃醌作用金黄色葡萄球菌4h,茵体细胞吸水膨胀,部分细胞隔膜已被破坏。8h后,茵体互相粘连,细胞与细胞间的界限变得模糊。结论:胡桃醌的抑菌效果主要表现在细菌生长的对数期,并可能通过破坏菌体的细胞壁或细胞膜结构来抑制细菌的生长。%Objective.The effect of juglone on S.aureaus and E cofi growth in different stages and morphological characteristics were studied, so as to discover the antibacterial mechanism of juglone. Method: The UV spectrophotometer and enumeration platecount method were used to determine cell growth curves.Observations of bacteria morphological characteristics were conducted by Transmission electron microscopy (TEX). Result: The result showed that the growth of E.cofi in lag phase and log phase were obviously influenced by juglone.While for S.aureaus,its growth in log phase was more sensitive to juglone.Result from observation by TEX showed that the cytoplasm was concentrated and the cell was plasmolysed 2 hours after adding juglone to cultivative medium at minimum inhibition concentration( MIC) .The cell wall was damaged seriously and the contents were leaked out after 8 hours.While for S.aureus,the cells absorbed water to expand,and part of the cell membrane was

  20. Mechanical Strength and Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus Collagen-Binding Protein Cna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman-Bausier, Philippe; Valotteau, Claire; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Rindi, Simonetta; Alsteens, David; Foster, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus expresses a variety of cell surface adhesion proteins that bind to host extracellular matrix proteins. Among these, the collagen (Cn)-binding protein Cna plays important roles in bacterium-host adherence and in immune evasion. While it is well established that the A region of Cna mediates ligand binding, whether the repetitive B region has a dedicated function is not known. Here, we report the direct measurement of the mechanical strength of Cna-Cn bonds on living bacteria, and we quantify the antiadhesion activity of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeting this interaction. We demonstrate that the strength of Cna-Cn bonds in vivo is very strong (~1.2 nN), consistent with the high-affinity “collagen hug” mechanism. The B region is required for strong ligand binding and has been found to function as a spring capable of sustaining high forces. This previously undescribed mechanical response of the B region is of biological significance as it provides a means to project the A region away from the bacterial surface and to maintain bacterial adhesion under conditions of high forces. We further quantified the antiadhesion activity of MAbs raised against the A region of Cna directly on living bacteria without the need for labeling or purification. Some MAbs are more efficient in blocking single-cell adhesion, suggesting that they act as competitive inhibitors that bind Cna residues directly involved in ligand binding. This report highlights the role of protein mechanics in activating the function of staphylococcal adhesion proteins and emphasizes the potential of antibodies to prevent staphylococcal adhesion and biofilm formation. PMID:27795393

  1. Mechanical Strength and Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus Collagen-Binding Protein Cna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Herman-Bausier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus expresses a variety of cell surface adhesion proteins that bind to host extracellular matrix proteins. Among these, the collagen (Cn-binding protein Cna plays important roles in bacterium-host adherence and in immune evasion. While it is well established that the A region of Cna mediates ligand binding, whether the repetitive B region has a dedicated function is not known. Here, we report the direct measurement of the mechanical strength of Cna-Cn bonds on living bacteria, and we quantify the antiadhesion activity of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs targeting this interaction. We demonstrate that the strength of Cna-Cn bonds in vivo is very strong (~1.2 nN, consistent with the high-affinity “collagen hug” mechanism. The B region is required for strong ligand binding and has been found to function as a spring capable of sustaining high forces. This previously undescribed mechanical response of the B region is of biological significance as it provides a means to project the A region away from the bacterial surface and to maintain bacterial adhesion under conditions of high forces. We further quantified the antiadhesion activity of MAbs raised against the A region of Cna directly on living bacteria without the need for labeling or purification. Some MAbs are more efficient in blocking single-cell adhesion, suggesting that they act as competitive inhibitors that bind Cna residues directly involved in ligand binding. This report highlights the role of protein mechanics in activating the function of staphylococcal adhesion proteins and emphasizes the potential of antibodies to prevent staphylococcal adhesion and biofilm formation.

  2. Optimization of the mechanical performance of bacterial cellulose/poly(L-lactic) acid composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Franck; Nogi, Masaya; Yano, Hiroyuki; Abdulsalami, Kovo; Holmes, Stuart M; Sakakini, Bahij H; Eichhorn, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the interface between nanofibers and polymer resins in composite materials is challenging because of the complexity of interactions that may occur between fibers and between the matrix and the fibers. The ability to select the most efficient amount of reinforcement for stress transfer, making a saving on both cost and weight, is also a key part of composite design. The use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate micromechanical properties of laminated bacterial cellulose (BC)/poly(l-lactic) acid (PLLA) resin composites is reported for the first time as a means for understanding the fundamental stress-transfer processes in these composites, but also as a tool to select appropriate processing and volume fraction of the reinforcing fibers. Two forms of BC networks are investigated, namely, one cultured for 3 days and another for 6 days. The mechanical properties of the latter were found to be higher than the former in terms of Young's modulus, stress at failure, and work of fracture. However, their specific Young's moduli (divided by density) were found to be similar. Young's modulus and stress at failure of transparent predominantly amorphous PLLA films were found to increase by 100 and 315%, respectively, for an 18% volume fraction of BC fibers. BC networks cultured for 3 days were shown to exhibit enhanced interaction with PLLA because of their higher total surface area compared, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, to the material cultured for 6 days. This enhanced interaction is confirmed by using the Raman spectroscopic approach, whereby larger band shift rates, of a peak initially located at 1095 cm(-1), with respect to both strain and stress, are observed, which is a quantitative measure of enhanced stress transfer. Thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry) and electron microscopy imaging (scanning electron microscopy) of the samples also confirms the enhanced coupling between the resin and the BC networks cultured for 3 days

  3. Alkali-Silica Reaction Inhibited by LiOH and Its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A high alkali reactive aggregate-zeolitization perlite was used to test the long-term effectiveness of LiOH in inhibiting alkali-silica reaction.In this paper,the rigorous conditions were designed that the mortar bars had been cured at 80℃ for 3 years after autoclaved 24 hours at 150℃.Under this condition,LiOH was able to inhibit the alkali-silica reaction long-term effectiveness.Not only the relationship between the molar ratio of n(Li)/(Na) and the alkali contents in systems was established, but also the governing mechanism of such effects was also studied by SEM.

  4. Local-global overlap in diversity informs mechanisms of bacterial biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Joshua A; Jones, Stuart E

    2015-11-01

    Spatial variation in environmental conditions and barriers to organism movement are thought to be important factors for generating endemic species, thus enhancing global diversity. Recent microbial ecology research suggested that the entire diversity of bacteria in the global oceans could be recovered at a single site, thus inferring a lack of bacterial endemism. We argue this is not the case in the global ocean, but might be in other bacterial ecosystems with higher dispersal rates and lower global diversity, like the human gut. We quantified the degree to which local and global bacterial diversity overlap in a diverse set of ecosystems. Upon comparison of observed local-global diversity overlap with predictions from a neutral biogeography model, human-associated microbiomes (gut, skin, mouth) behaved much closer to neutral expectations whereas soil, lake and marine communities deviated strongly from the neutral expectations. This is likely a result of differences in dispersal rate among 'patches', global diversity of these systems, and local densities of bacterial cells. It appears that overlap of local and global bacterial diversity is surprisingly large (but likely not one-hundred percent), and most importantly this overlap appears to be predictable based upon traditional biogeographic parameters like community size, global diversity, inter-patch environmental heterogeneity and patch connectivity.

  5. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-04

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes.

  6. Mechanism of inhibition of the tumor suppressor Patched by Sonic Hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukachinsky, Hanna; Petrov, Kostadin; Watanabe, Miyako; Salic, Adrian

    2016-10-04

    The Hedgehog cell-cell signaling pathway is crucial for animal development, and its misregulation is implicated in numerous birth defects and cancers. In unstimulated cells, pathway activity is inhibited by the tumor suppressor membrane protein, Patched. Hedgehog signaling is triggered by the secreted Hedgehog ligand, which binds and inhibits Patched, thus setting in motion the downstream events in signal transduction. Despite its critical importance, the mechanism by which Hedgehog antagonizes Patched has remained unknown. Here, we show that vertebrate Patched1 inhibition is caused by direct, palmitate-dependent interaction with the Sonic Hedgehog ligand. We find that a short palmitoylated N-terminal fragment of Sonic Hedgehog binds Patched1 and, strikingly, is sufficient to inhibit it and to activate signaling. The rest of Sonic Hedgehog confers high-affinity Patched1 binding and internalization through a distinct binding site, but, surprisingly, it is not absolutely required for signaling. The palmitate-dependent interaction with Patched1 is specifically impaired in a Sonic Hedgehog mutant causing human holoprosencephaly, the most frequent congenital brain malformation, explaining its drastically reduced potency. The palmitate-dependent interaction is also abolished in constitutively inhibited Patched1 point mutants causing the Gorlin cancer syndrome, suggesting that they might adopt a conformation distinct from the wild type. Our data demonstrate that Sonic Hedgehog signals via the palmitate-dependent arm of a two-pronged contact with Patched1. Furthermore, our results suggest that, during Hedgehog signaling, ligand binding inhibits Patched by trapping it in an inactive conformation, a mechanism that explains the dramatically reduced activity of oncogenic Patched1 mutants.

  7. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide inhibits influenza virus infection of human macrophages and the consequent induction of CD8+ T cell immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Short, K.R.; Vissers, M.; Kleijn, S. de; Zomer, A.L.; Kedzierska, K.; Grant, E.; Reading, P.C.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Ferwerda, G.; Diavatopoulos, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that infection with influenza A virus (IAV) facilitates secondary bacterial disease. However, there is a growing body of evidence that the microbial context in which IAV infection occurs can affect both innate and adaptive responses to the virus. To date, these studies have be

  8. GTP analogue inhibits polymerization and GTPase activity of the bacterial protein FtsZ without affecting its eukaryotic homologue tubulin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Läppchen, T.; Hartog, A.F.; Pinas, V.; Koomen, G.J.; den Blaauwen, T.

    2005-01-01

    The prokaryotic tubulin homologue FtsZ plays a key role in bacterial cell division. Selective inhibitors of the GTP-dependent polymerization of FtsZ are expected to result in a new class of antibacterial agents. One of the challenges is to identify compounds which do not affect the function of tubul

  9. Signal transduction mechanisms within the entorhinal cortex that support latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael C; Gould, Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    Latent inhibition is a phenomenon by which pre-exposure to a conditioned-stimulus (CS), prior to subsequent pairings of that same CS with an unconditioned-stimulus (US), results in decreased conditioned responding to the CS. Previous work in our laboratory has suggested that the entorhinal cortex is critically involved in the establishment of latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. Furthermore, utilizing systemic pharmacology, we have demonstrated a role for of NMDA receptors, protein kinase A (PKA), and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK, also known as ERK) in latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning, but until now, where these cell signaling cascades are critically activated during latent inhibition of cued fear was unknown. Here, we use direct drug infusion to demonstrate that cell signaling via NMDA receptors, the cAMP/PKA pathway, and the MAPK pathway within the entorhinal cortex are critically involved in latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. In the present study, CS pre-exposed mice received 20 CS pre-exposures 24h prior to two pairings of the same CS with a 0.53 mA foot shock US, while control animals receive no pre-exposure to the CS. The NMDA antagonist APV (0.25 or 2.5 microg/side), the cAMP inhibitor Rp-cAMP (1.8 or 18.0 microg/side), or the MAPK inhibitor U0126 (0.1 or 1.0 microg/side) were directly infused into the entorhinal cortex prior to pre-exposure. All three drugs produced dose-dependent disruptions in latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. Importantly, none of the drugs had any effect on cued fear conditioning when administered on training day, suggesting that the effects of each of the drugs were specific to CS pre-exposure. These results are discussed in relation to the potential mechanisms of plasticity that support latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning.

  10. Diverse toxicity associated with cardiac Na+/K+ pump inhibition: evaluation of electrophysiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetti, M; Besana, A; Mostacciuolo, G; Ferrari, P; Micheletti, R; Zaza, A

    2003-05-01

    (E,Z)-3-((2-Aminoethoxy)imino)androstane-6,17-dione hydrochloride (PST2744) is a novel Na(+)/K(+) pump inhibitor with positive inotropic effects. Compared with digoxin in various experimental models, PST2744 was consistently found to be less arrhythmogenic, thus resulting in a significantly higher therapeutic index. The present work compares the electrophysiological effects of PST2744 and digoxin in guinea pig ventricular myocytes, with the aim to identify a mechanism for their different toxicity. The work showed that 1) the action potential was transiently prolonged and then similarly shortened by both agents; 2) the ratio between Na(+)/K(+) pump inhibition and inotropy was somewhat larger for PST2744 than for digoxin; 3) both agents accelerated inactivation of high-threshold Ca(2+) current (I(CaL)), without affecting its peak amplitude; 4) the transient inward current (I(TI)) induced by a Ca(2+) transient in the presence of complete Na(+)/K(+) pump blockade was inhibited (-43%) by PST2744 but not by digoxin; 5) the conductance of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger current (I(NaCa)), recorded under Na(+)/K(+) pump blockade, was only slightly inhibited by PST2744 (-14%) and unaffected by digoxin; and 6) both agents inhibited delayed rectifier current I(Ks) (inhibited by PST2744 only, but the effect was marginal (-6%). Thus, 1) the higher therapeutic index of PST2744 may be accounted for by inhibition of I(TI), a current directly involved in digitalis-induced arrhythmias. Indeed, the other differences observed concern quantitatively small effects; and 2) I(TI) suppression by PST2744 may be only partly accounted for by inhibition of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger.

  11. Inheritance and mechanism of resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase in Sonchus oleraceus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutsalis, P; Powles, S B

    1995-07-01

    A biotype of Sonchus oleraceus L. (Compositae) has developed resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) following field selection with chlorsulfuron for 8 consecutive years. The aim of this study was to determine the inheritance and mechanism of resistance in this biotype. Determination of ALS activity and inhibition kinetics revealed that Km and Vmax did not vary greatly between the resistant and susceptible biotypes. ALS extracted from the resistant biotype was resistant to five ALS-inhibiting herbicides in an in vitro assay. ALS activity from the resistant biotype was 14 19, 2, 3 and 3 times more resistant to inhibition by chlorsulfuron, sulfometuron, imazethapyr, imazapyr and flumetsulam, respectively, than the susceptible biotype. Hybrids between the resistant and a susceptible biotype were produced, and inheritance was followed through the F1, F2 and F3 generations. F1 hybrids displayed a uniform intermediate level of resistance between resistant and susceptible parents. Three distinct phenotypes, resistant, intermediate and susceptible, were identified in the F2 generation following chlorsulfuron application. A segregation ratio of 1∶2∶1 was observed, indicative of the action of a single, nuclear, incompletely dominant gene. F3 families, derived from intermediate F2 individuals, segregated in a similar manner. Resistance to herbicides inhibiting ALS in this biotype of S. oleraceus is due to the effect of a single gene coding for a resistant form of the target enzyme, ALS.

  12. Non-specific SIRT inhibition as a mechanism for the cytotoxicity of ginkgolic acids and urushiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryckewaert, Lucie; Sacconnay, Lionel; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Nurisso, Alessandra; Simões-Pires, Claudia

    2014-09-02

    Ginkgolic acids and urushiols are natural alkylphenols known for their mutagenic, carcinogenic and genotoxic potential. However, the mechanism of toxicity of these compounds has not been thoroughly elucidated so far. Considering that the SIRT inhibitory potential of anacardic acids has been hypothesized by in silico techniques, we herein demonstrated through both in vitro and computational methods that structurally related compounds such as ginkgolic acids and urushiols are able to modulate SIRT activity. Moreover, their SIRT inhibitory profile and cytotoxicity were comparable to sirtinol, a non-specific SIRT inhibitor (SIRT1 and SIRT2), and different from EX-527, a SIRT1 specific inhibitor. This is the first report on the SIRT inhibition of ginkgolic acids and urushiols. The results reported here are in line with previously observed effects on the induction of apoptosis by this class of compounds, and the non-specific SIRT inhibition is suggested as a new mechanism for their in vitro cytotoxicity.

  13. Infection of Tribolium castaneum with Bacillus thuringiensis: Quantification of Bacterial Replication within Cadavers, Transmission via Cannibalism, and Inhibition of Spore Germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Höfling, Christina; Futo, Momir; Scharsack, Jörn P.

    2015-01-01

    Reproduction within a host and transmission to the next host are crucial for the virulence and fitness of pathogens. Nevertheless, basic knowledge about such parameters is often missing from the literature, even for well-studied bacteria, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, an endospore-forming insect pathogen, which infects its hosts via the oral route. To characterize bacterial replication success, we made use of an experimental oral infection system for the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and developed a flow cytometric assay for the quantification of both spore ingestion by the individual beetle larvae and the resulting spore load after bacterial replication and resporulation within cadavers. On average, spore numbers increased 460-fold, showing that Bacillus thuringiensis grows and replicates successfully in insect cadavers. By inoculating cadaver-derived spores and spores from bacterial stock cultures into nutrient medium, we next investigated outgrowth characteristics of vegetative cells and found that cadaver-derived bacteria showed reduced growth compared to bacteria from the stock cultures. Interestingly, this reduced growth was a consequence of inhibited spore germination, probably originating from the host and resulting in reduced host mortality in subsequent infections by cadaver-derived spores. Nevertheless, we further showed that Bacillus thuringiensis transmission was possible via larval cannibalism when no other food was offered. These results contribute to our understanding of the ecology of Bacillus thuringiensis as an insect pathogen. PMID:26386058

  14. Infection of Tribolium castaneum with Bacillus thuringiensis: quantification of bacterial replication within cadavers, transmission via cannibalism, and inhibition of spore germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Höfling, Christina; Futo, Momir; Scharsack, Jörn P; Kurtz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Reproduction within a host and transmission to the next host are crucial for the virulence and fitness of pathogens. Nevertheless, basic knowledge about such parameters is often missing from the literature, even for well-studied bacteria, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, an endospore-forming insect pathogen, which infects its hosts via the oral route. To characterize bacterial replication success, we made use of an experimental oral infection system for the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and developed a flow cytometric assay for the quantification of both spore ingestion by the individual beetle larvae and the resulting spore load after bacterial replication and resporulation within cadavers. On average, spore numbers increased 460-fold, showing that Bacillus thuringiensis grows and replicates successfully in insect cadavers. By inoculating cadaver-derived spores and spores from bacterial stock cultures into nutrient medium, we next investigated outgrowth characteristics of vegetative cells and found that cadaver-derived bacteria showed reduced growth compared to bacteria from the stock cultures. Interestingly, this reduced growth was a consequence of inhibited spore germination, probably originating from the host and resulting in reduced host mortality in subsequent infections by cadaver-derived spores. Nevertheless, we further showed that Bacillus thuringiensis transmission was possible via larval cannibalism when no other food was offered. These results contribute to our understanding of the ecology of Bacillus thuringiensis as an insect pathogen.

  15. Polysaccharide-capped silver Nanoparticles inhibit biofilm formation and eliminate multi-drug-resistant bacteria by disrupting bacterial cytoskeleton with reduced cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyasi, Sridhar; Majhi, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, Satish; Mishra, Mitali; Ghosh, Arnab; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Satyam, Parlapalli Venkata; Mohapatra, Harapriya; Goswami, Chandan; Goswami, Luna

    2016-04-01

    Development of effective anti-microbial therapeutics has been hindered by the emergence of bacterial strains with multi-drug resistance and biofilm formation capabilities. In this article, we report an efficient green synthesis of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) by in situ reduction and capping with a semi-synthetic polysaccharide-based biopolymer (carboxymethyl tamarind polysaccharide). The CMT-capped AgNPs were characterized by UV, DLS, FE-SEM, EDX and HR-TEM. These AgNPs have average particle size of ~20–40 nm, and show long time stability, indicated by their unchanged SPR and Zeta-potential values. These AgNPs inhibit growth and biofilm formation of both Gram positive (B. subtilis) and Gram negative (E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium) bacterial strains even at concentrations much lower than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints of antibiotics, but show reduced or no cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. These AgNPs alter expression and positioning of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins FtsZ and FtsA. CMT-capped AgNPs can effectively block growth of several clinical isolates and MDR strains representing different genera and resistant towards multiple antibiotics belonging to different classes. We propose that the CMT-capped AgNPs can have potential bio-medical application against multi-drug-resistant microbes with minimal cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells.

  16. Melnikov method to a bacteria-immunity model with bacterial quorum sensing mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhonghua [School of Sciences, Xi' an University of Science and Technology, Xi' an 710054 (China)], E-mail: wwwzhonghua@sohu.com; Peng Jigen [Research Center for Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhang Juan [Department of Mathematics, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2009-04-15

    A bacteria-immunity model with bacterial quorum sensing is formulated, which describes the competition between bacteria and immune cells. After periodic perturbation and a series of coordinate transformations, the model is brought into a standard form, and which is amenable to Melnikov method. By the method, the existences of chaotic motion and homoclinic bifurcations are proved.

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow during mechanical hyperventilation in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Høgh, Peter; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2000-01-01

    in the frontal and parietal cortex as well as in the basal ganglia. Focal perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of 12 patients. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities are frequent in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. Short-term hyperventilation does not enhance these abnormalities....

  18. Strategic down-regulation of attentional resources as a mechanism of proactive response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Zachary D; Krebs, Ruth M; Talsma, Durk; Woldorff, Marty G; Boehler, C N

    2016-08-01

    Efficiently avoiding inappropriate actions in a changing environment is central to cognitive control. One mechanism contributing to this ability is the deliberate slowing down of responses in contexts where full response cancellation might occasionally be required, referred to as proactive response inhibition. The present electroencephalographic (EEG) study investigated the role of attentional processes in proactive response inhibition in humans. To this end, we compared data from a standard stop-signal task, in which stop signals required response cancellation ('stop-relevant'), to data where possible stop signals were task-irrelevant ('stop-irrelevant'). Behavioral data clearly indicated the presence of proactive slowing in the standard stop-signal task. A novel single-trial analysis was used to directly model the relationship between response time and the EEG data of the go-trials in both contexts within a multilevel linear models framework. We found a relationship between response time and amplitude of the attention-related N1 component in stop-relevant blocks, a characteristic that was fully absent in stop-irrelevant blocks. Specifically, N1 amplitudes were lower the slower the response time, suggesting that attentional resources were being strategically down-regulated to control response speed. Drift diffusion modeling of the behavioral data indicated that multiple parameters differed across the two contexts, likely suggesting the contribution from independent brain mechanisms to proactive slowing. Hence, the attentional mechanism of proactive response control we report here might coexist with known mechanisms that are more directly tied to motoric response inhibition. As such, our study opens up new research avenues also concerning clinical conditions that feature deficits in proactive response inhibition.

  19. Azelnidipine inhibits cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cell death induced by cyclic mechanical stretch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    Full Text Available Acute aortic dissection is the most common life-threatening vascular disease, with sudden onset of severe pain and a high fatality rate. Clarifying the detailed mechanism for aortic dissection is of great significance for establishing effective pharmacotherapy for this high mortality disease. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of biomechanical stretch, which mimics an acute rise in blood pressure using an experimental apparatus of stretching loads in vitro, on rat aortic smooth muscle cell (RASMC death. Then, we examined the effects of azelnidipine and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors on mechanical stretch-induced RASMC death. The major findings of the present study are as follows: (1 cyclic mechanical stretch on RASMC caused cell death in a time-dependent manner up to 4 h; (2 cyclic mechanical stretch on RASMC induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 activation with peaks at 10 min; (3 azelnidipine inhibited RASMC death in a concentration-dependent manner as well as inhibited JNK and p38 activation by mechanical stretch; and (4 SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor and SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor protected against stretch-induced RASMC death; (5 Antioxidants, diphenylene iodonium and tempol failed to inhibit stretch-induced RASMC death. On the basis of the above findings, we propose a possible mechanism where an acute rise in blood pressure increases biomechanical stress on the arterial walls, which induces RASMC death, and thus, may lead to aortic dissection. Azelnidipine may be used as a pharmacotherapeutic agent for prevention of aortic dissection independent of its blood pressure lowering effect.

  20. The Nuclear Receptor LXR Limits Bacterial Infection of Host Macrophages through a Mechanism that Impacts Cellular NAD Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Matalonga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages exert potent effector functions against invading microorganisms but constitute, paradoxically, a preferential niche for many bacterial strains to replicate. Using a model of infection by Salmonella Typhimurium, we have identified a molecular mechanism regulated by the nuclear receptor LXR that limits infection of host macrophages through transcriptional activation of the multifunctional enzyme CD38. LXR agonists reduced the intracellular levels of NAD+ in a CD38-dependent manner, counteracting pathogen-induced changes in macrophage morphology and the distribution of the F-actin cytoskeleton and reducing the capability of non-opsonized Salmonella to infect macrophages. Remarkably, pharmacological treatment with an LXR agonist ameliorated clinical signs associated with Salmonella infection in vivo, and these effects were dependent on CD38 expression in bone-marrow-derived cells. Altogether, this work reveals an unappreciated role for CD38 in bacterial-host cell interaction that can be pharmacologically exploited by activation of the LXR pathway.

  1. Two distinct mechanisms for actin capping protein regulation--steric and allosteric inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Takeda

    Full Text Available The actin capping protein (CP tightly binds to the barbed end of actin filaments, thus playing a key role in actin-based lamellipodial dynamics. V-1 and CARMIL proteins directly bind to CP and inhibit the filament capping activity of CP. V-1 completely inhibits CP from interacting with the barbed end, whereas CARMIL proteins act on the barbed end-bound CP and facilitate its dissociation from the filament (called uncapping activity. Previous studies have revealed the striking functional differences between the two regulators. However, the molecular mechanisms describing how these proteins inhibit CP remains poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structures of CP complexed with V-1 and with peptides derived from the CP-binding motif of CARMIL proteins (CARMIL, CD2AP, and CKIP-1. V-1 directly interacts with the primary actin binding surface of CP, the C-terminal region of the alpha-subunit. Unexpectedly, the structures clearly revealed the conformational flexibility of CP, which can be attributed to a twisting movement between the two domains. CARMIL peptides in an extended conformation interact simultaneously with the two CP domains. In contrast to V-1, the peptides do not directly compete with the barbed end for the binding surface on CP. Biochemical assays revealed that the peptides suppress the interaction between CP and V-1, despite the two inhibitors not competing for the same binding site on CP. Furthermore, a computational analysis using the elastic network model indicates that the interaction of the peptides alters the intrinsic fluctuations of CP. Our results demonstrate that V-1 completely sequesters CP from the barbed end by simple steric hindrance. By contrast, CARMIL proteins allosterically inhibit CP, which appears to be a prerequisite for the uncapping activity. Our data suggest that CARMIL proteins down-regulate CP by affecting its conformational dynamics. This conceptually new mechanism of CP inhibition provides a

  2. Kinetics and Mechanism Study of Competitive Inhibition of Jack-Bean Urease by Baicalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Baicalin (BA is the principal component of Radix Scutellariae responsible for its pharmacological activity. In this study, kinetics and mechanism of inhibition by BA against jack-bean urease were investigated for its therapeutic potential. It was revealed that the IC50 of BA against jack-bean urease was 2.74 ± 0.51 mM, which was proved to be a competitive and concentration-dependent inhibition with slow-binding progress curves. The rapid formation of initial BA-urease complex with an inhibition constant of Ki=3.89 × 10−3 mM was followed by a slow isomerization into the final complex with an overall inhibition constant of Ki*=1.47×10-4 mM. High effectiveness of thiol protectors against BA inhibition indicated that the strategic role of the active-site sulfhydryl group of the urease was involved in the blocking process. Moreover, the inhibition of BA was proved to be reversible due to the fact that urease could be reactivated by dithiothreitol but not reactant dilution. Molecular docking assay suggested that BA made contacts with the important activating sulfhydryl group Cys-592 residues and restricted the mobility of the active-site flap. Taken together, it could be deduced that BA was a competitive inhibitor targeting thiol groups of urease in a slow-binding manner both reversibly and concentration-dependently, serving as a promising urease inhibitor for treatments on urease-related diseases.

  3. Kinetics and mechanism study of competitive inhibition of jack-bean urease by baicalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lirong; Su, Jiyan; Wu, Dianwei; Yu, Xiaodan; Su, Zuqing; He, Jingjin; Wu, Xiaoli; Kong, Songzhi; Lai, Xiaoping; Lin, Ji; Su, Ziren

    2013-01-01

    Baicalin (BA) is the principal component of Radix Scutellariae responsible for its pharmacological activity. In this study, kinetics and mechanism of inhibition by BA against jack-bean urease were investigated for its therapeutic potential. It was revealed that the IC₅₀ of BA against jack-bean urease was 2.74 ± 0.51 mM, which was proved to be a competitive and concentration-dependent inhibition with slow-binding progress curves. The rapid formation of initial BA-urease complex with an inhibition constant of K(i) = 3.89 × 10⁻³ mM was followed by a slow isomerization into the final complex with an overall inhibition constant of K(i)* = 1.47 × 10⁻⁴ mM. High effectiveness of thiol protectors against BA inhibition indicated that the strategic role of the active-site sulfhydryl group of the urease was involved in the blocking process. Moreover, the inhibition of BA was proved to be reversible due to the fact that urease could be reactivated by dithiothreitol but not reactant dilution. Molecular docking assay suggested that BA made contacts with the important activating sulfhydryl group Cys-592 residues and restricted the mobility of the active-site flap. Taken together, it could be deduced that BA was a competitive inhibitor targeting thiol groups of urease in a slow-binding manner both reversibly and concentration-dependently, serving as a promising urease inhibitor for treatments on urease-related diseases.

  4. Structure of a thermophilic F1-ATPase inhibited by an ε-subunit: deeper insight into the ε-inhibition mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakihara, Yasuo; Shiratori, Aya; Tanikawa, Hiromi; Nakasako, Masayoshi; Yoshida, Masasuke; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2015-08-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is the catalytic sector in F(o)F1-ATP synthase that is responsible for ATP production in living cells. In catalysis, its three catalytic β-subunits undergo nucleotide occupancy-dependent and concerted open-close conformational changes that are accompanied by rotation of the γ-subunit. Bacterial and chloroplast F1 are inhibited by their own ε-subunit. In the ε-inhibited Escherichia coli F1 structure, the ε-subunit stabilizes the overall conformation (half-closed, closed, open) of the β-subunits by inserting its C-terminal helix into the α3β3 cavity. The structure of ε-inhibited thermophilic F1 is similar to that of E. coli F1, showing a similar conformation of the ε-subunit, but the thermophilic ε-subunit stabilizes another unique overall conformation (open, closed, open) of the β-subunits. The ε-C-terminal helix 2 and hook are conserved between the two structures in interactions with target residues and in their positions. Rest of the ε-C-terminal domains are in quite different conformations and positions, and have different modes of interaction with targets. This region is thought to serve ε-inhibition differently. For inhibition, the ε-subunit contacts the second catches of some of the β- and α-subunits, the N- and C-terminal helices, and some of the Rossmann fold segments. Those contacts, as a whole, lead to positioning of those β- and α- second catches in ε-inhibition-specific positions, and prevent rotation of the γ-subunit. Some of the structural features are observed even in IF1 inhibition in mitochondrial F1.

  5. Simazine application inhibits nitrification and changes the ammonia-oxidizing bacterial communities in a fertilized agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Marcela; Jia, Zhongjun; Conrad, Ralf; Seeger, Michael

    2011-12-01

    s-Triazine herbicides are widely used for weed control, and are persistent in soils. Nitrification is an essential process in the global nitrogen cycle in soil, and involves ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA). In this study, we evaluated the effect of the s-triazine herbicide simazine on the nitrification and on the structure of ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in a fertilized agricultural soil. The effect of simazine on AOB and AOA were studied by PCR-amplification of amoA genes of nitrifying Bacteria and Archaea in soil microcosms and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses. Simazine [50 μg g(-1) dry weight soil (d.w.s)] completely inhibited the nitrification processes in the fertilized agricultural soil. The inhibition by simazine of ammonia oxidation observed was similar to the reduction of ammonia oxidation by the nitrification inhibitor acetylene. The application of simazine-affected AOB community DGGE patterns in the agricultural soil amended with ammonium, whereas no significant changes in the AOA community were observed. The DGGE analyses strongly suggest that simazine inhibited Nitrosobacteria and specifically Nitrosospira species. In conclusion, our results suggest that the s-triazine herbicide not only inhibits the target susceptible plants but also inhibits the ammonia oxidation and the AOB in fertilized soils.

  6. Peripheral afferent mechanisms underlying acupuncture inhibition of cocaine behavioral effects in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seol Ah Kim

    Full Text Available Administration of cocaine increases locomotor activity by enhancing dopamine transmission. To explore the peripheral mechanisms underlying acupuncture treatment for drug addiction, we developed a novel mechanical acupuncture instrument (MAI for objective mechanical stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether acupuncture inhibition of cocaine-induced locomotor activity is mediated through specific peripheral nerves, the afferents from superficial or deep tissues, or specific groups of nerve fibers. Mechanical stimulation of acupuncture point HT7 with MAI suppressed cocaine-induced locomotor activity in a stimulus time-dependent manner, which was blocked by severing the ulnar nerve or by local anesthesia. Suppression of cocaine-induced locomotor activity was elicited after HT7 stimulation at frequencies of either 50 (for Meissner corpuscles or 200 (for Pacinian corpuscles Hz and was not affected by block of C/Aδ-fibers in the ulnar nerve with resiniferatoxin, nor generated by direct stimulation of C/Aδ-fiber afferents with capsaicin. These findings suggest that HT7 inhibition of cocaine-induced locomotor activity is mediated by A-fiber activation of ulnar nerve that originates in superficial and deep tissue.

  7. Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis Inducing Mechanisms of Curcumin on Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Line A2780

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Li-duan; TONG Qiang-song; WU Cui-huan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the growth inhibition effects and apoptosis inducing mechanisms of curcumin on human ovarian cancer cell line A2780. Methods: After treatment with 10-50 μmol/L curcumin for 6-24 h, the growth activity of A2780 cancer cells were studied by [ 4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyItetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetry. Cellular apoptosis was inspected by flow cytometery and acridine orange-ethidium bromide fluorescent staining methods. The fragmentation of cellular chromosome DNA was detected by DNA ladder, the ultrastructural change was observed under a transmission electron microscope,and the protein levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, P65) and cysteinyl aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) in ovarian cancer cells were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: After treatment with various concentrations of curcumin, the growth inhibition rates of cancer cells reached 62.05%- 89.24%,with sub-G1 peaks appearing on histogram. Part of the cancer cells showed characteristic morphological changes of apoptosis under fluorescence and electron microscopes, and the rate of apoptosis was 21.5 % -33.5%. The protein expression of NF-κB was decreased, while that of Caspase-3 was increased in a timedependent manner. Conclusion: Curcumin could significantly inhibit the growth of human ovarian cancer cells;inducing apoptosis through up-regulating Caspase-3 and down-regulating gene expression of NF-κB is probably one of its molecular mechanisms.

  8. Molecular Dynamic Study to Determine the Ammonia Conduction Mechanisms in Human RhCG and Bacterial Homoloques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Ugur

    2014-03-01

    The transport of Ammonia is provided by Amt/MEP/Rh protein superfamily. The x-ray structures of AmtB from Escherichia coli, Rh50 from Nitrosomonas europaea, and human RhCG show only few differences on periplasmic vestibules. After more than microsecond simulation on three models, we determined the striking difference on conduction mechanism between bacterial AmtB and Human RhCG proteins. In AmtB the backbone carbonyl groups at the periplasmic vestibule direct charged ammonia to the conserved aromatic cage at the bottom of the vestibule. Furthermore, two partially stacked phenyl rings of F107 and F215, separating the periplasmic vestibule from the hydrophobic lumen, flip open and closed simultaneouslywith a frequency of approximately 108 flipping events per second. During the passage from the phenyl gates charged ammonia releases its proton and becomes gas. However, the absence of an aromatic cage on Rh proteins and a strongly conserved E166 residue in the vicinity hints different conduction mechanism. Our studies confirm the conserved E166 emerges as a strong charged ammonia recruitment site for Human RhCG. The conserved phenyl gate behaves different for Rh proteins and the synchronized motion is not observed. These findings suggest a different deprotonation mechanism than bacterial AmtB.

  9. RhoA S-nitrosylation as a regulatory mechanism influencing endothelial barrier function in response to G(+)-bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F; Wang, Y; Rafikov, R; Haigh, S; Zhi, W B; Kumar, S; Doulias, P T; Rafikova, O; Pillich, H; Chakraborty, T; Lucas, R; Verin, A D; Catravas, J D; She, J X; Black, S M; Fulton, D J R

    2017-03-01

    Disruption of the endothelial barrier in response to Gram positive (G(+)) bacterial toxins is a major complication of acute lung injury (ALI) and can be further aggravated by antibiotics which stimulate toxin release. The integrity of the pulmonary endothelial barrier is mediated by the balance of disruptive forces such as the small GTPase RhoA, and protective forces including endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO). How NO protects against the barrier dysfunction is incompletely understood and our goal was to determine whether NO and S-nitrosylation can modulate RhoA activity and whether this mechanism is important for G(+) toxin-induced microvascular permeability. We found that the G(+) toxin listeriolysin-O (LLO) increased RhoA activity and that NO and S-NO donors inhibit RhoA activity. RhoA was robustly S-nitrosylated as determined by biotin-switch and mercury column analysis. MS revealed that three primary cysteine residues are S-nitrosylated including cys16, cys20 and cys159. Mutation of these residues to serine diminished S-nitrosylation to endogenous NO and mutant RhoA was less sensitive to inhibition by S-NO. G(+)-toxins stimulated the denitrosylation of RhoA which was not mediated by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), thioredoxin (TRX) or thiol-dependent enzyme activity but was instead stimulated directly by elevated calcium levels. Calcium-promoted the direct denitrosylation of WT but not mutant RhoA and mutant RhoA adenovirus was more effective than WT in disrupting the barrier integrity of human lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we reveal a novel mechanism by which NO and S-nitrosylation reduces RhoA activity which may be of significance in the management of pulmonary endothelial permeability induced by G(+)-toxins.

  10. A mixture of bacterial mechanical lysates is more efficient than single strain lysate and of bacterial-derived soluble products for the induction of an activating phenotype in human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Barbara; Agazzi, Alessia; D'Agostino, Antonella; Antonini, Francesca; Costa, Gregorio; Sabatini, Federica; Ferlazzo, Guido; Melioli, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), following an optimal maturation, are able to drive an efficient immune-response. For this, both co-stimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), activation molecules (CD83) and peptide presenting molecules (HLA) are over-expressed. The in vitro treatment of immature DC with fragments of bacterial strains, obtained by using a mechanical lysis as well as with bacterial-derived molecules (such as lipopolysaccharide and protido-glycan), induced the maturation of DCs and the secretion of a panel of cytokines and chemokines. Of note, ex vivo treated circulating DCs and plasmacytoid DCs were also activated by these bacterial bodies. However, while the particulate fraction of single bacterial strains or soluble bacterial-derived molecules induced a sub-optimal maturation (as evaluated by the expression of an activating phenotype on DCs and the amount of cytokine secretion), the addition of the mixture of the particulate fractions of the different bacterial strains was able to mediate an optimal maturation. These results were also confirmed by using the secretion of both cytokines and chemokines as markers of DC activation. All these findings suggest that the particulate fraction of bacterial lysate mixtures, because of their ability to interact with different surface structures, might be exploited not only as an immunogen, but also as an adjuvant treatment to boost an immune-response to poorly "antigenic" proteins, such as cancer antigens or allergens.

  11. Investigation of a potential mechanism for the inhibition of SmTGR by Auranofin and its implications for Plasmodium falciparum inhibition

    KAUST Repository

    Caroli, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni and Plasmodium falciparum are pathogen parasites that spend part of their lives in the blood stream of the human host and are therefore heavily exposed to fluxes of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). SmTGR, an essential enzyme of the S. mansoni ROS detoxification machinery, is known to be inhibited by Auranofin although the inhibition mechanism has not been completely clarified. Auranofin also kills P. falciparum, even if its molecular targets are unknown. Here, we used computational and docking techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of interaction between SmTGR and Auranofin. Furthermore, we took advantage of the homology relationship and of docking studies to assess if PfTR, the SmTGR malaria parasite homologue, can be a putative target for Auranofin. Our findings support a recently hypothesized molecular mechanism of inhibition for SmTGR and suggest that PfTR is indeed a possible and attractive drug target in P. falciparum. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  12. Inhibition of bacterial adhesion and salmonella infection in BALB/c mice by sialyloligosaccharides and their derivatives from chicken egg yolk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Sakanaka, Senji; Sasaki, Ken; Juneja, Lekh Raj; Noda, Tetsuji; Amano, Fumio

    2002-06-05

    The effects of an egg-yolk-derived sialyloligosaccharide (YDS), asialo-YDS, and a sialylglycopeptide of YDS (SGP) on bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and on Salmonella infection in BALB/c mice were examined. YDS, its derivative asialo-YDS, and SGP strongly inhibited the binding of Salmonella enteritidis but not E. coli K-88 to a human epithelial cell line, Caco-2. In a Salmonella infection experiment using BALB/c mice, oral administration of these reagents effectively prevented the bacteria from proliferating in spleen, as well as preventing lethality. An experiment using radioactive SGP orally administered to mice revealed that the compound was absorbed from the intestine into blood and eliminated via urine within 8 h. However, these reagents did not influence the production of TNF-alpha or NO. in culture macrophages. The results suggest that they inhibit Salmonella infection not by activating macrophages but by inhibiting the entry of bacteria through the gut, suggesting that YDS and its derivatives are useful for preventing Salmonella infection when ingested continuously.

  13. Mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-mediated inhibition of leptin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, I K; Hansen, J A; Andersen, H S

    2005-01-01

    Upon leptin binding, the leptin receptor is activated, leading to stimulation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction cascade. The transient character of the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 suggests the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators...... of this signalling pathway. Specifically, recent evidence has suggested that PTP1B might be a key regulator of leptin signalling, based on the resistance to diet-induced obesity and increased leptin signalling observed in PTP1B-deficient mice. The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which...... PTP1B mediates the cessation of the leptin signal transduction. Leptin-induced activation of a STAT3 responsive reporter was dose-dependently inhibited by co-transfection with PTP1B. No inhibition was observed when a catalytically inactive mutant of PTP1B was used or when other PTPs were co...

  14. Quorum Sensing Inhibition by Asparagopsis taxiformis, a Marine Macro Alga: Separation of the Compound that Interrupts Bacterial Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Hartmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the marine algal species, though completing their life cycle in seawater, are rarely susceptible to fouling, making them an important source of quorum sensing (QS inhibitory substances. The separation and characterization of QS inhibitors are crucial for any potential application. Thirty marine macroalgae were tested for QS inhibition activity by using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as the reporter strain, and among them, Asparagopsis taxiformis showed antibacterial, as well as antiquorum, sensing activities. Cinnamaldehyde (75 mM and methanol were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The antiquorum sensing activity of A. taxiformis was further confirmed using the sensor strain, Serratia liquefaciens MG44, having green fluorescent protein (gfp. Methanolic extract of the alga was fractionated by solid phase extraction (SPE, and each fraction was tested for QS inhibition. Two types of activities were observed—zone of clearance (antibacterial activity and zone of inhibition with or without finger-like projections (QS inhibition. Out of five SPE cartridges, Bond Elut PH showed clear separation of these two fractions. The Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transformation Mass Spectrometer (ICR-FT/MS analysis of the fractions further supported the bioassay results. The presence of strong QS inhibitory compound in A. taxiformis indicates its potential use in antifouling preparations.

  15. Insights into the molecular mechanism of RGL2-mediated inhibition of seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamm Petra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed germination is of immense significance for agriculture and has been studied for centuries. Yet, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of dormancy and germination is still in its infancy. Gibberellins are the key phytohormones that promote germination, and the DELLA protein RGL2 is the main signalling intermediate involved in this response. Germination is completely inhibited if functional RGL2 is overexpressed and/or stabilized; however, the molecular mechanisms of RGL2 function are still largely unknown. We therefore attempted to shed light onto some of the genetic events downstream of RGL2. Results Gene ontology of the transcriptome differentially regulated by RGL2, as well as extensive cross-comparison with other available microarray data indicates that RGL2-mediated inhibition of germination causes seeds to enter a state of dormancy. RGL2 also appears to differentially regulate a number of transcription factors, many of which are known to be involved in light- or phytohormone-mediated aspects of germination. A promoter analysis of differentially expressed genes identified an enrichment of several motifs that can be bound by specific transcription factors, for example GAMYB, ARF1, or Dof-type zinc fingers. We show that Dof-binding motifs indeed play a role in RGL2-mediated transcription. Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP, we show that RGL2 directly downregulates at least one cell wall modifying enzyme, which is predicted to constrain cell growth thereby leading to inhibition of seed germination. Conclusions Our results reveal that RGL2 controls various aspects of germination. Through the repression of cell wall modifying enzymes, cell growth is directly constrained to inhibit germination. Furthermore, RGL2 likely interacts with various types of proteins to regulate transcription, and differentially regulates several transcription factors. Collectively, our data indicate that

  16. Corrosion inhibition mechanisms of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 by selected non-chromate inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Garrity, Omar A.

    The pursuit to find a chromate-alternative has led to the development of several chromate-free aerospace primers and coating systems that offer good protection. However, fundamental understanding of the functionality of the chromate-free pigments that are embedded within these coating systems is lacking. The objective of this study was to understand the fundamental mechanism of corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 by molybdate (MoO 42-), silicate (SiO32-), and praseodymium (Pr3+) with the goal of developing the kind of understanding that was accomplished for chromate. Furthermore, since most inhibiting conversion coatings and pigments act by releasing soluble species into the local environment, it was of interest to understand the mechanism of inhibition in aqueous 0.1 M NaCl solution. The mechanism of inhibition of AA2024-T3 by the select non-chromate inhibitors was investigated using various electrochemical, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Naturally aerated polarization curves showed that molybdate provided mixed inhibition in near-neutral pH and at a threshold concentration of 0.1 M. The largest effect was a 250 mV increase in the breakdown potential associated with pitting and a 350 mV decrease in the open-circuit potential (OCP). In addition, electrochemical impedance indicated that the corrosion inhibition mechanism is oxygen-dependent owing to the protection afforded by Mo(VI) species. It was proposed that the corrosion inhibition of AA2024-T3 by molybdate may occur following a two-step process whereby molybdate is rapidly reduced to MoO.(OH)2 over the intermetallic particles and is subsequently oxidized to intermediate molybdenum oxides (e.g. Mo4O11) in the presence of oxygen which is reduced. This in turn may lead to a local acidification, promoting the condensation and polymerization of molybdate species in solution to form polymolybdate species (Mo7O24 6- and Mo8O264-). Furthermore, S-phase particle dissolution is decreased

  17. Evaluation of the gene encoding the enzyme βHPMEH for the bacterial wilt inhibition caused by Ralstonia solanacearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Fernandez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal agent of the devastating bacterial wilt disease that attacks important agricultural crops such as potato, tomato, banana, among others, causing serious yield losses. Control of R. solanacearum is difficult because of its wide range of alternate hosts, its long survival in soil, its biological and genetic variation, the lack of natural resistance sources and the insufficiency of the appropriate chemical control measures. Quorum sensing is the term that describes the phenomenon whereby the accumulation of molecules allows bacteria to know the number of bacteria found in the environment (population density. R. solanacearum has a quorum sensing system for the regulation of the expression of virulence genes; the molecule 3-OH-PAME is the self-regulatory signal. The molecule ΒHPMEH hydrolyzes 3-OH-PAME nullifying the signal of virulence, and thus, the quorum sensing communication in R. solanacearum. In order to evaluate the βhpmeh gene we designed two vectors that express this gene under the control of two different promoters. Both vectors were verified by restriction analysis and sequencing. Agroinfiltration assays were used to analyze gene expression and the effect against R. solanacearum in potato (Solanum tuberosum leaves. The results of the transient expression experiments showed that the expression of gene βhpmeh caused a delay in the appearance of symptoms of bacterial wilt and thus is a good candidate for whole genetic plant transformation.

  18. Impact of bacterial priming on some stress tolerance mechanisms and growth of cold stressed wheat seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed E.H. Osman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential to enhance growth of cold stressed wheat by seed treatment (priming with the beneficial bacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 5113 and Azospirillum brasilense NO40 were tested. Results showed an improved ability of bacteria-treated seedlings to survive at −5°C up to 12 h. Cold stress increased transcript levels of three stress marker genes and increased activity for the ascorbate-glutathione redox enzymes. However, primed and stressed seedlings generally showed smaller effects on the stress markers correlating with better growth and improved stress tolerance. Bacterial priming to improve crop plant performance at low temperature seems a useful strategy to explore further.

  19. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori and Its Associated Urease by Palmatine: Investigation on the Potential Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li-Hua; Xu, Yi-Fei; Liu, Yu-Hong; Mo, Zhi-Zhun; Dou, Yao-Xing; Su, Rui; Su, Zi-Ren; Huang, Ping; Xie, Jian-Hui

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluated the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and the possible inhibitory effect on its associated urease by Palmatine (Pal) from Coptis chinensis, and explored the potential underlying mechanism. Results indicated that Pal exerted inhibitory effect on four tested H. pylori strains (ATCC 43504, NCTC 26695, SS1 and ICDC 111001) by the agar dilution test with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 100 to 200 μg/mL under neutral environment (pH 7.4), and from 75 to 100 μg/mL under acidic conditions (pH 5.3), respectively. Pal was observed to significantly inhibit both H. pylori urease (HPU) and jack bean urease (JBU) in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 0.53 ± 0.01 mM and 0.03 ± 0.00 mM, respectively, as compared with acetohydroxamic acid, a well-known urease inhibitor (0.07 ± 0.01 mM for HPU and 0.02 ± 0.00 mM for JBU, respectively). Kinetic analyses showed that the type of urease inhibition by Pal was noncompetitive for both HPU and JBU. Higher effectiveness of thiol protectors against urease inhibition than the competitive Ni2+ binding inhibitors was observed, indicating the essential role of the active-site sulfhydryl group in the urease inhibition by Pal. DTT reactivation assay indicated that the inhibition on the two ureases was reversible, further supporting that sulfhydryl group should be obligatory for urease inhibition by Pal. Furthermore, molecular docking study indicated that Pal interacted with the important sulfhydryl groups and inhibited the active enzymatic conformation through N-H ∙ π interaction, but did not interact with the active site Ni2+. Taken together, Pal was an effective inhibitor of H. pylori and its urease targeting the sulfhydryl groups, representing a promising candidate as novel urease inhibitor. This investigation also gave additional scientific support to the use of C. chinensis to treat H. pylori-related gastrointestinal diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. Pal might be

  20. Structural biology of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2015-05-11

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477-42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  1. Aerossol bacteriano gerado por respiradores mecânicos: estudo comparativo Bacterial aerosol generated by mechanical ventilators: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D'Agostino Dias

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiradores mecânicos emitem aerossóis que podem estar colonizados com bactérias. OBJETIVO. Estudar a contaminação ambiental gerada por respiradores, comparando-se dois siste-mas de umidificação. MÉTODOS. Realizaram-se 51 estudos, comparando-se a colonização dos aerossóis emitidos pela válvula expiratória dos aparelhos de ventilação mecânica, sendo em 31 com nebulizadores convencionais e em 20 com condensadores higroscópicos, em quinze minutos de observação. RESULTADOS. Houve emissão de bactérias para o ambiente, pela válvula expiratória, de 32,2% de respiradores equipados com sistema de nebulização convencional e de 5% com condensador (p = 0,0340. CONCLUSÃO. A umidificação da mistura gasosa com o uso de condensadores pode ser um meio eficiente de reduzir a contaminação bacteriana ambiental.Mechanical ventilators generate aerosol which may be bacterially colonized. PURPOSE - To determine the environmental contamination generated by ventilators with two different humidification techniques. METHODS - The study was done comparing the generation of bacterial colonized aerosol by the expiratory valve of mechanical respirators with conventional water nebulization or with hygroscopic condensator as the humidifier source during 15 minutes of observation. RESULTS - The aerosol got positive cultures in 32.2% of the conventional system and in 5% of the condensator system (p = 0.0340. CONCLUSION - We concluded that the humidification by the hygroscopic condensator may be an efficient way to reduce environmental bacterial contamination.

  2. Interferon-γ inhibits ghrelin expression and secretion via a somatostatin-mediated mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesper AB Strickertsson; Kristina BV Dφssing; Anna JM Aabakke; Hans-Olof Nilsson; Thomas VO Hansen; Ulrich Knigge; Andreas Kj(ae)r; Torkel Wadstr(o)m; Lennart Friis-Hansen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if and how the proinflammatory cytokine interferon γ (IFNγ) affects ghrelin expression in mice. METHODS: The plasma concentration of ghrelin, and gastric ghrelin and somatostatin expression, were examined in wild-type mice and mice infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ). Furthermore, ghrelin expression was examined in two achlorhydric mouse models with varying degrees of gastritis due to bacterial overgrowth. To study the effect of IFNγ alone, mice were given a subcutaneous infusion of IFNγ for 7 d. Finally, the influence of IFNγ and somatostatin on the ghrelin promoter was characterized. RESULTS: H. pylori infection was associated with a 50% reduction in ghrelin expression and plasma concentration. Suppression of ghrelin expression was inversely correlated with gastric inflammation in achlorhdyric mouse models. Subcutaneous infusion of IFNγ suppressed fundic ghrelin mRNA expression and plasma ghrelin concentrations. Finally, we showed that the ghrelin promoter operates under the control of somatostatin but not under that of IFNγ. CONCLUSION: Gastric infection and inflammation is associated with increased IFNγ expression and reduced ghrelin expression. IFNγ does not directly control ghrelin expression but inhibits it indirectly via somatostatin.

  3. Inhibition of pathogenic bacterial growth on excision wound by green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles leads to accelerated wound healing activity in Wistar Albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Renu; Baskaran, Athmanathan; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2015-07-01

    An impaired wound healing is one of the major health related problem in diabetic and non-diabetic patients around the globe. The pathogenic bacteria play a predominant role in delayed wound healing, owing to interaction in the wound area. In our previous work we developed green chemistry mediated copper oxide nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa leaf extract. In the present study we make an attempt to evaluate the anti-bacterial, and wound healing activity of green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles in male Wistar Albino rats. The agar well diffusion assay revealed copper oxide nanoparticles have substantial inhibition activity against human pathogenic strains such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella dysenteriae, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, which were responsible for delayed wound healing process. Furthermore, the analyses results of wound closure, histopathology and protein profiling confirmed that the F. religiosa leaf extract tailored copper oxide nanoparticles have enhanced wound healing activity in Wistar Albino rats.

  4. Applying mixture toxicity modelling to predict bacterial bioluminescence inhibition by non-specifically acting pharmaceuticals and specifically acting antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Peta A; Leusch, Frederic D L; Escher, Beate I

    2017-04-01

    Pharmaceuticals and antibiotics co-occur in the aquatic environment but mixture studies to date have mainly focused on pharmaceuticals alone or antibiotics alone, although differences in mode of action may lead to different effects in mixtures. In this study we used the Bacterial Luminescence Toxicity Screen (BLT-Screen) after acute (0.5 h) and chronic (16 h) exposure to evaluate how non-specifically acting pharmaceuticals and specifically acting antibiotics act together in mixtures. Three models were applied to predict mixture toxicity including concentration addition, independent action and the two-step prediction (TSP) model, which groups similarly acting chemicals together using concentration addition, followed by independent action to combine the two groups. All non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals had similar EC50 values at both 0.5 and 16 h, indicating together with a QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) analysis that they act as baseline toxicants. In contrast, the antibiotics' EC50 values decreased by up to three orders of magnitude after 16 h, which can be explained by their specific effect on bacteria. Equipotent mixtures of non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals only, antibiotics only and both non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals and antibiotics were prepared based on the single chemical results. The mixture toxicity models were all in close agreement with the experimental results, with predicted EC50 values within a factor of two of the experimental results. This suggests that concentration addition can be applied to bacterial assays to model the mixture effects of environmental samples containing both specifically and non-specifically acting chemicals.

  5. Mechanism of Growth Inhibition of Prostate Cancer Xenografts by Valproic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Sidana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproic Acid (VPA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, has been demonstrated to cause a marked decrease in proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa cells in vitro and a significant reduction in tumor volume in vivo. The goal of this study is to better understand the VPA-induced growth inhibition in vivo, by studying expression of various markers in PCa xenografts. Methods. For in vitro experiments, PCa cells were treated with 0, 0.6, and 1.2 mM VPA for 14 days. For in vivo models, experimental animals received 0.4% VPA in drinking water for 35 days. Tissue microarray was generated using cell pellets and excised xenografts. Results. VPA treatment causes cell cycle arrest in PCa cells in vivo, as determined by increase in p21 and p27 and decrease in cyclin D1 expression. Increased expression of cytokeratin18 was also seen in xenografts. LNCaP xenografts in treated animals had reduced androgen receptor (AR expression. While decreased proliferation was found in vitro, increase in apoptosis was found to be the reason for decreased tumor growth in vivo. Also, an anti-angiogenic effect was observed after VPA treatment. Conclusion. VPA inhibits tumor growth by multiple mechanisms including cell cycle arrest, induction of differentiation, and inhibition of growth of tumor vasculature.

  6. A mechanism for the inhibition of neural progenitor cell proliferation by cocaine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ting Lee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to cocaine causes morphological and behavioral abnormalities. Recent studies indicate that cocaine-induced proliferation inhibition and/or apoptosis in neural progenitor cells may play a pivotal role in causing these abnormalities. To understand the molecular mechanism through which cocaine inhibits cell proliferation in neural progenitors, we sought to identify the molecules that are responsible for mediating the effect of cocaine on cell cycle regulation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Microarray analysis followed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR was used to screen cocaine-responsive and cell cycle-related genes in a neural progenitor cell line where cocaine exposure caused a robust anti-proliferative effect by interfering with the G1-to-S transition. Cyclin A2, among genes related to the G1-to-S cell cycle transition, was most strongly down-regulated by cocaine. Down-regulation of cyclin A was also found in cocaine-treated human primary neural and A2B5+ progenitor cells, as well as in rat fetal brains exposed to cocaine in utero. Reversing cyclin A down-regulation by gene transfer counteracted the proliferation inhibition caused by cocaine. Further, we found that cocaine-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which involves N-oxidation of cocaine via cytochrome P450, promotes cyclin A down-regulation by causing an endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response, as indicated by increased phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and expression of ATF4. In the developing rat brain, the P450 inhibitor cimetidine counteracted cocaine-induced inhibition of neural progenitor cell proliferation as well as down-regulation of cyclin A. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that down-regulation of cyclin A underlies cocaine-induced proliferation inhibition in neural progenitors. The down-regulation of cyclin A is initiated by N-oxidative metabolism of cocaine and consequent ER stress. Inhibition of

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin inhibits BAFF production in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy - a new mechanism of action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Sandra; Tschernatsch, Marlene; Karg, Anne; Fuehlhuber, Verena; Trenczek, Tina E; Faltermeier, Kathrin; Hackstein, Holger; Kaps, Manfred; Blaes, Franz

    2013-03-15

    Chronic-inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated disease treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). The underlying mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. The B-cell activating factor BAFF contributes to B-cell homeostasis and (auto-)antibody production. BAFF was recently identified as one key molecule in the development of autoimmune diseases. Herein, we demonstrate that BAFF serum levels are elevated in CIDP patients. IVIg treatment resulted in a significant decrease of BAFF serum level. In vitro, IVIg inhibited BAFF in monocytes. Consequently, we identified BAFF as a new target for IVIg in CIDP treatment and provide a new, Fcγ-receptor independent, mechanism of action for IVIg.

  8. Structures of the Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase dodecamer reveal large intersubunit catalytic conformational changes linked to a unique feedback inhibition mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David S; Chinnam, Nagababu; Tonthat, Nam Ky; Whitfill, Travis; Wray, Lewis V; Fisher, Susan H; Schumacher, Maria A

    2013-12-13

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), which catalyzes the production of glutamine, plays essential roles in nitrogen metabolism. There are two main bacterial GS isoenzymes, GSI-α and GSI-β. GSI-α enzymes, which have not been structurally characterized, are uniquely feedback-inhibited by Gln. To gain insight into GSI-α function, we performed biochemical and cellular studies and obtained structures for all GSI-α catalytic and regulatory states. GSI-α forms a massive 600-kDa dodecameric machine. Unlike other characterized GS, the Bacillus subtilis enzyme undergoes dramatic intersubunit conformational alterations during formation of the transition state. Remarkably, these changes are required for active site construction. Feedback inhibition arises from a hydrogen bond network between Gln, the catalytic glutamate, and the GSI-α-specific residue, Arg(62), from an adjacent subunit. Notably, Arg(62) must be ejected for proper active site reorganization. Consistent with these findings, an R62A mutation abrogates Gln feedback inhibition but does not affect catalysis. Thus, these data reveal a heretofore unseen restructuring of an enzyme active site that is coupled with an isoenzyme-specific regulatory mechanism. This GSI-α-specific regulatory network could be exploited for inhibitor design against Gram-positive pathogens.

  9. Telomerase inhibition targets clonogenic multiple myeloma cells through telomere length-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Brennan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasma cells constitute the majority of tumor cells in multiple myeloma (MM but lack the potential for sustained clonogenic growth. In contrast, clonotypic B cells can engraft and recapitulate disease in immunodeficient mice suggesting they serve as the MM cancer stem cell (CSC. These tumor initiating B cells also share functional features with normal stem cells such as drug resistance and self-renewal potential. Therefore, the cellular processes that regulate normal stem cells may serve as therapeutic targets in MM. Telomerase activity is required for the maintenance of normal adult stem cells, and we examined the activity of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat against MM CSC. Moreover, we carried out both long and short-term inhibition studies to examine telomere length-dependent and independent activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human MM CSC were isolated from cell lines and primary clinical specimens and treated with imetelstat, a specific inhibitor of the reverse transcriptase activity of telomerase. Two weeks of exposure to imetelstat resulted in a significant reduction in telomere length and the inhibition of clonogenic MM growth both in vitro and in vivo. In addition to these relatively long-term effects, 72 hours of imetelstat treatment inhibited clonogenic growth that was associated with MM CSC differentiation based on expression of the plasma cell antigen CD138 and the stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase. Short-term treatment of MM CSC also decreased the expression of genes typically expressed by stem cells (OCT3/4, SOX2, NANOG, and BMI1 as revealed by quantitative real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS: Telomerase activity regulates the clonogenic growth of MM CSC. Moreover, reductions in MM growth following both long and short-term telomerase inhibition suggest that it impacts CSC through telomere length-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  10. Mechanisms for epigallocatechin gallate induced inhibition of drug metabolizing enzymes in rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Zuquan; Greenhaw, James; Salminen, William F; Shi, Qiang

    2012-11-15

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) inhibits drug metabolizing enzymes by unknown mechanisms. Here we examined if the inhibition is due to covalent-binding of EGCG to the enzymes or formation of protein aggregates. EGCG was incubated with rat liver microsomes at 1-100μM for 30min. The EGCG-binding proteins were affinity purified using m-aminophenylboronic acid agarose and probed with antibodies against glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), actin, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1/2, CYP2E1, CYP3A, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and microsomal glutathione transferase 1 (MGST1). All but actin and soluble COMT were positively detected at ≥1μM EGCG, indicating EGCG selectively bound to a subset of proteins including membrane-bound COMT. The binding correlated well with inhibition of CYP activities, except for CYP2E1 whose activity was unaffected despite evident binding. The antioxidant enzyme MGST1, but not cytosolic GSTs, was remarkably inhibited, providing novel evidence supporting the pro-oxidative effects of EGCG. When microsomes incubated with EGCG were probed on Western blots, all but the actin and CYP2E1 antibodies showed a significant reduction in binding at ≥1μM EGCG, suggesting that a fraction of the indicated proteins formed aggregates that likely contributed to the inhibitory effects of EGCG but were not recognizable by antibodies against the intact proteins. This raised the possibility that previous reports on EGCG regulating protein expression using GAPDH as a reference should be revisited for accuracy. Remarkable protein aggregate formation in EGCG-treated microsomes was also observed by analyzing Coomassie Blue-stained SDS-PAGE gels. EGCG effects were partially abolished in the presence of 1mM glutathione, suggesting they are particularly relevant to the in vivo conditions when glutathione is depleted by toxicant insults.

  11. Neural mechanism of central inhibition during physical fatigue: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Central inhibition plays an important role in physical performance during physical fatigue. We tried to clarify the neural mechanism of central inhibition during physical fatigue using the magnetoencephalography (MEG) and a classical conditioning technique. Twelve right-handed volunteers participated in this study. Participants underwent MEG recording during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds for 10 min. Thereafter, fatigue-inducing maximum handgrip trials were performed for 10 min; the metronome sounds were started 5 min after the beginning of the handgrip trials. We used metronome sounds as conditioned stimuli and maximum handgrip trials as unconditioned stimuli to cause central inhibition. The next day, MEG recording during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds were measured for 10 min. Levels of the fatigue sensation in the right hand and sympathetic nerve activity on the second day were significantly higher than those on the first day. In the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 46), the alpha-band event-related desynchronization (ERD) of the second MEG session relative to the first session with the time window of 200 to 300 ms after the onset of handgrip cue sounds was identified. The ERD level in this brain region was positively associated with the change in subjective level of right hand fatigue after the conditioning session and was negatively associated with that of the sympathetic nerve activity. We demonstrated that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is involved in the neural substrates of central inhibition during physical fatigue.

  12. Sodium hydrosulfide inhibits the differentiation of osteoclast progenitor cells via NRF2-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Laura; Lisignoli, Gina; Cattini, Luca; Manferdini, Cristina; Facchini, Andrea; Grassi, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which recently emerged as a potent regulator of tissues and organs, is broadly produced in mammalian cells but whether it can regulate bone cell function is still elusive. The main objective of this study was to establish the role of H2S in the regulation of human osteoclast differentiation and function. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a common H2S-donor, was administered in vitro to CD11b+ human monocytes, the pool of circulating osteoclasts precursors which are critically involved in osteoclast development and function in bone. NaHS dose-dependently decreased human osteoclast differentiation at concentrations which did not induce toxicity. The inhibition of human osteoclast differentiation was associated with a down-regulation in RANKL-dependent intracellular ROS levels in human pre-osteoclasts cells. Furthermore, NaHS up-regulated NRF2 protein expression, its nuclear translocation, and the transcription of the two key downstream antioxidant genes Peroxiredoxin-1 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1, suggesting that NRF2 activation may inhibit human osteoclast differentiation by activating a sustained antioxidant response in osteoclast progenitors; furthermore, NRF2 activators Sulforaphane and Tert-butylhydroquinone inhibited in vitro human osteoclast differentiation. Moreover, silencing NRF2 in human pre-osteoclasts totally abolished NaHS-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting that NRF2 is essential to the inhibitory function of NaHS in osteoclast development. Finally, we found that NaHS also downregulated the RANKL/OPG mRNA ratio in human mesenchymal stem cells, the key osteoclast-supporting cells. Our results suggest that NaHS shows a potential therapeutical role in erosive diseases of bone by regulating both direct and indirect mechanisms controlling the differentiation of circulating osteoclasts precursors.

  13. Bacterial receptors for host transferrin and lactoferrin: molecular mechanisms and role in host-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Pogoutse, Anastassia; Adamiak, Paul; Moraes, Trevor F; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2013-12-01

    Iron homeostasis in the mammalian host limits the availability of iron to invading pathogens and is thought to restrict iron availability for microbes inhabiting mucosal surfaces. The presence of surface receptors for the host iron-binding glycoproteins transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin (Lf) in globally important Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of humans and food production animals suggests that Tf and Lf are important sources of iron in the upper respiratory or genitourinary tracts, where they exclusively reside. Lf receptors have the additional function of protecting against host cationic antimicrobial peptides, suggesting that the bacteria expressing these receptors reside in a niche where exposure is likely. In this review we compare Tf and Lf receptors with respect to their structural and functional features, their role in colonization and infection, and their distribution among pathogenic and commensal bacteria.

  14. New insights into the mechanisms whereby low molecular weight CCR5 ligands inhibit HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Perez, Javier; Rueda, Patricia; Staropoli, Isabelle; Kellenberger, Esther; Alcami, Jose; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard

    2011-02-18

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for the chemokines CCL3, -4, and -5 and a coreceptor for entry of R5-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into CD4(+) T-cells. We investigated the mechanisms whereby nonpeptidic, low molecular weight CCR5 ligands block HIV-1 entry and infection. Displacement binding assays and dissociation kinetics demonstrated that two of these molecules, i.e. TAK779 and maraviroc (MVC), inhibit CCL3 and the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 binding to CCR5 by a noncompetitive and allosteric mechanism, supporting the view that they bind to regions of CCR5 distinct from the gp120- and CCL3-binding sites. We observed that TAK779 and MVC are full and weak inverse agonists for CCR5, respectively, indicating that they stabilize distinct CCR5 conformations with impaired abilities to activate G-proteins. Dissociation of [(125)I]CCL3 from CCR5 was accelerated by TAK779, to a lesser extent by MVC, and by GTP analogs, suggesting that inverse agonism contributes to allosteric inhibition of the chemokine binding to CCR5. TAK779 and MVC also promote dissociation of [(35)S]gp120 from CCR5 with an efficiency that correlates with their ability to act as inverse agonists. Displacement experiments revealed that affinities of MVC and TAK779 for the [(35)S]gp120-binding receptors are in the same range (IC(50) ∼6.4 versus 22 nm), although we found that MVC is 100-fold more potent than TAK779 for inhibiting HIV infection. This suggests that allosteric CCR5 inhibitors not only act by blocking gp120 binding but also alter distinct steps of CCR5 usage in the course of HIV infection.

  15. Inhibition of hERG Potassium Channels by Celecoxib and Its Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Roman V.; Ignatova, Irina I.; Singh, Satpal

    2011-01-01

    Background Celecoxib (Celebrex), a widely prescribed selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, can modulate ion channels independently of cyclooxygenase inhibition. Clinically relevant concentrations of celecoxib can affect ionic currents and alter functioning of neurons and myocytes. In particular, inhibition of Kv2.1 channels by celecoxib leads to arrhythmic beating of Drosophila heart and of rat heart cells in culture. However, the spectrum of ion channels involved in human cardiac excitability differs from that in animal models, including mammalian models, making it difficult to evaluate the relevance of these observations to humans. Our aim was to examine the effects of celecoxib on hERG and other human channels critically involved in regulating human cardiac rhythm, and to explore the mechanisms of any observed effect on the hERG channels. Methods and Results Celecoxib inhibited the hERG, SCN5A, KCNQ1 and KCNQ1/MinK channels expressed in HEK-293 cells with IC50s of 6.0 µM, 7.5 µM, 3.5 µM and 3.7 µM respectively, and the KCND3/KChiP2 channels expressed in CHO cells with an IC50 of 10.6 µM. Analysis of celecoxib's effects on hERG channels suggested gating modification as the mechanism of drug action. Conclusions The above channels play a significant role in drug-induced long QT syndrome (LQTS) and short QT syndrome (SQTS). Regulatory guidelines require that all new drugs under development be tested for effects on the hERG channel prior to first administration in humans. Our observations raise the question of celecoxib's potential to induce cardiac arrhythmias or other channel related adverse effects, and make a case for examining such possibilities. PMID:22039467

  16. Inhibition of platelet aggregation by polyaspartoyl L-arginine and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-ye WANG; Zhi-yu TANG; Min DONG; Xiao-yan LIU; Shi-qi PENG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe the oral anti-platelet efficacy and the potential action mechanism of polyaspartoyl L-arginine (PDR), a new L-arginine rich compound. METHODS: Platelet aggregation was conducted by Born's method;bleeding time was determined using tail's bleeding time in mice; platelet adhesion was carried out with glass bottle method; nitric oxide (NO) was tested with Griess' method; and cAMP, thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and 6-keto-PGF1a were assessed with commercial kits. RESULTS: The inhibition by PDR (15-60 mg/kg ig or 10 mg/kg iv) of platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen or thrombin at 1 h after oral administration or at 20 min after iv injection for rats (P<0.01), and its (15 mg/kg, ig) inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation for rabbits during 6 h after administration were observed. PDR (15-60 mg/kg) prolonged the bleeding time of mice (P<0.05) and (30 mg/kg) increased NO concentration in plasma. On the other hand PDR did not change the contents of cAMP in platelet and TXB2 or 6-keto-PGF1a in plasma. CONCLUSION: PDR is a novel, oral effective platelet aggregation inhibitor and its action mechanism possibly related to increasing NO generation.

  17. Resveratrol Inhibition of Cellular Respiration: New Paradigm for an Old Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Perez, Luis Alberto; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,4′,5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, RSV) has emerged as an important molecule in the biomedical area. This is due to its antioxidant and health benefits exerted in mammals. Nonetheless, early studies have also demonstrated its toxic properties toward plant-pathogenic fungi of this phytochemical. Both effects appear to be opposed and caused by different molecular mechanisms. However, the inhibition of cellular respiration is a hypothesis that might explain both toxic and beneficial properties of resveratrol, since this phytochemical: (1) decreases the production of energy of plant-pathogenic organisms, which prevents their proliferation; (2) increases adenosine monophosphate/adenosine diphosphate (AMP/ADP) ratio that can lead to AMP protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which is related to its health effects, and (3) increases the reactive oxygen species generation by the inhibition of electron transport. This pro-oxidant effect induces expression of antioxidant enzymes as a mechanism to counteract oxidative stress. In this review, evidence is discussed that supports the hypothesis that cellular respiration is the main target of resveratrol. PMID:26999118

  18. Resveratrol Inhibition of Cellular Respiration: New Paradigm for an Old Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Madrigal-Perez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3,4′,5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, RSV has emerged as an important molecule in the biomedical area. This is due to its antioxidant and health benefits exerted in mammals. Nonetheless, early studies have also demonstrated its toxic properties toward plant-pathogenic fungi of this phytochemical. Both effects appear to be opposed and caused by different molecular mechanisms. However, the inhibition of cellular respiration is a hypothesis that might explain both toxic and beneficial properties of resveratrol, since this phytochemical: (1 decreases the production of energy of plant-pathogenic organisms, which prevents their proliferation; (2 increases adenosine monophosphate/adenosine diphosphate (AMP/ADP ratio that can lead to AMP protein kinase (AMPK activation, which is related to its health effects, and (3 increases the reactive oxygen species generation by the inhibition of electron transport. This pro-oxidant effect induces expression of antioxidant enzymes as a mechanism to counteract oxidative stress. In this review, evidence is discussed that supports the hypothesis that cellular respiration is the main target of resveratrol.

  19. Saccadic inhibition and the remote distractor effect: One mechanism or two?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompas, Aline; Sumner, Petroc

    2015-01-01

    It has been hotly debated whether a single mechanism underlies two established and highly robust oculomotor phenomena thought to index the competitive nature of eye movement plans: the remote distractor effect and saccadic inhibition (SI). It has been suggested that a transient mechanism underlying SI would not be able to account for the shift in the saccade latency distribution produced by early distractors (e.g., those appearing 60 ms before target onset) without additional assumptions or a more sustained source of inhibition. Here we tested this prediction with a model previously optimized to capture SI for late distractors. Where behavioral studies have intermingled stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) within the same block, the model captures the pattern of RDEs and SI effects with no parameter changes. Where SOAs have been blocked behaviorally, the pattern of RDEs can also be captured by the same model architecture, but requires changes to the inputs of the model between SOAs. Such changes plausibly reflect likely changes in participants' expectations and attentional strategy across block types.

  20. Responding to the challenge of untreatable gonorrhea: ETX0914, a first-in-class agent with a distinct mechanism-of-action against bacterial Type II topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarab, Gregory S; Kern, Gunther H; McNulty, John; Mueller, John P; Lawrence, Kenneth; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Alm, Richard A; Barvian, Kevin; Doig, Peter; Galullo, Vincent; Gardner, Humphrey; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huband, Michael; Kimzey, Amy; Morningstar, Marshall; Kutschke, Amy; Lahiri, Sushmita D; Perros, Manos; Singh, Renu; Schuck, Virna J A; Tommasi, Ruben; Walkup, Grant; Newman, Joseph V

    2015-07-14

    With the diminishing effectiveness of current antibacterial therapies, it is critically important to discover agents that operate by a mechanism that circumvents existing resistance. ETX0914, the first of a new class of antibacterial agent targeted for the treatment of gonorrhea, operates by a novel mode-of-inhibition against bacterial type II topoisomerases. Incorporating an oxazolidinone on the scaffold mitigated toxicological issues often seen with topoisomerase inhibitors. Organisms resistant to other topoisomerase inhibitors were not cross-resistant with ETX0914 nor were spontaneous resistant mutants to ETX0914 cross-resistant with other topoisomerase inhibitor classes, including the widely used fluoroquinolone class. Preclinical evaluation of ETX0914 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics showed distribution into vascular tissues and efficacy in a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model that served as a surrogate for predicting efficacious exposures for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections. A wide safety margin to the efficacious exposure in toxicological evaluations supported progression to Phase 1. Dosing ETX0914 in human volunteers showed sufficient exposure and minimal adverse effects to expect a highly efficacious anti-gonorrhea therapy.

  1. Inhibition of bacterial DD-peptidases (penicillin-binding proteins) in membranes and in vivo by peptidoglycan-mimetic boronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhekieva, Liudmila; Kumar, Ish; Pratt, R F

    2012-04-03

    The DD-peptidases or penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) catalyze the final steps of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis and are inhibited by the β-lactam antibiotics. There is at present a question of whether the active site structure and activity of these enzymes is the same in the solubilized (truncated) DD-peptidase constructs employed in crystallographic and kinetics studies as in membrane-bound holoenzymes. Recent experiments with peptidoglycan-mimetic boronic acids have suggested that these transition state analogue-generating inhibitors may be able to induce reactive conformations of these enzymes and thus inhibit strongly. We have now, therefore, measured the dissociation constants of peptidoglycan-mimetic boronic acids from Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis PBPs in membrane preparations and, in the former case, in vivo, by means of competition experiments with the fluorescent penicillin Bocillin Fl. The experiments showed that the boronic acids bound measurably (K(i) DD-peptidase inhibitors are more or less effective in vivo than in homogeneous solution.

  2. The Study on Inhibition of Planktonic Bacterial Growth by Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Treated Surfaces for Dental Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Eun-Mi; Uhm, Soo-Hyuk; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Choi, Hye-Sook; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2015-02-01

    Investigation of the effects by non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ) treatment on the titanium dental implant surfaces for the inhibition of two common pathogens related with dental infections, Streptococcus mutans and Staphylococcus aureus, was carried out in this study. The commercially pure titanium was used as specimen, which were irradiated by NTAPPJ for 30, 60 and 120 seconds. Specimen without being treated with NTAPPJ was assigned as the control group. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and surface contact angle goniometer were used to analyze the effects of NTAPPJ treatment on surface chemistry and hydrophilicity of the specimen. The effects of the NTAPPJ treatment on surfaces, in terms of bacterial attachment, growth, morphology and structural changes were evaluated by the number of colony forming units (CFU) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. The results showed that there was a reduction of CFUs and the significant change in morphology of bacteria as they were cultured on the titanium surfaces treated with NTAPPJ. These results were related to surface chemical changes and hydrophilicity changes by NTAPPJ. The NTAPPJ treatment is very effective on the dental implant titanium surface treatment that resulted in the inhibition of bacteria and has a great potential to be a promising technique in various clinical dental applications.

  3. Insight into bacterial virulence mechanisms against host immune response via the Yersinia pestis-human protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiying; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Jian; Tan, Yafang; Myeni, Sebenzile K; Li, Dong; Shi, Qinghai; Yan, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Guo, Zhaobiao; Yuan, Yanzhi; Yang, Xiaoming; Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin

    2011-11-01

    A Yersinia pestis-human protein interaction network is reported here to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis. Up to 204 interactions between 66 Y. pestis bait proteins and 109 human proteins were identified by yeast two-hybrid assay and then combined with 23 previously published interactions to construct a protein-protein interaction network. Topological analysis of the interaction network revealed that human proteins targeted by Y. pestis were significantly enriched in the proteins that are central in the human protein-protein interaction network. Analysis of this network showed that signaling pathways important for host immune responses were preferentially targeted by Y. pestis, including the pathways involved in focal adhesion, regulation of cytoskeleton, leukocyte transendoepithelial migration, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cellular pathways targeted by Y. pestis are highly relevant to its pathogenesis. Interactions with host proteins involved in focal adhesion and cytoskeketon regulation pathways could account for resistance of Y. pestis to phagocytosis. Interference with TLR and MAPK signaling pathways by Y. pestis reflects common characteristics of pathogen-host interaction that bacterial pathogens have evolved to evade host innate immune response by interacting with proteins in those signaling pathways. Interestingly, a large portion of human proteins interacting with Y. pestis (16/109) also interacted with viral proteins (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV] and hepatitis C virus [HCV]), suggesting that viral and bacterial pathogens attack common cellular functions to facilitate infections. In addition, we identified vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a novel interaction partner of YpkA and showed that YpkA could inhibit in vitro actin assembly mediated by VASP.

  4. Leisingera sp. JC1, a Bacterial Isolate from Hawaiian Bobtail Squid Eggs, Produces Indigoidine and Differentially Inhibits Vibrios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromek, Samantha M; Suria, Andrea M; Fullmer, Matthew S; Garcia, Jillian L; Gogarten, Johann Peter; Nyholm, Spencer V; Balunas, Marcy J

    2016-01-01

    Female members of many cephalopod species house a bacterial consortium in the accessory nidamental gland (ANG), part of the reproductive system. These bacteria are deposited into eggs that are then laid in the environment where they must develop unprotected from predation, pathogens, and fouling. In this study, we characterized the genome and secondary metabolite production of Leisingera sp. JC1, a member of the roseobacter clade (Rhodobacteraceae) of Alphaproteobacteria isolated from the jelly coat of eggs from the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. Whole genome sequencing and MLSA analysis revealed that Leisingera sp. JC1 falls within a group of roseobacters associated with squid ANGs. Genome and biochemical analyses revealed the potential for and production of a number of secondary metabolites, including siderophores and acyl-homoserine lactones involved with quorum sensing. The complete biosynthetic gene cluster for the pigment indigoidine was detected in the genome and mass spectrometry confirmed the production of this compound. Furthermore, we investigated the production of indigoidine under co-culture conditions with Vibrio fischeri, the light organ symbiont of E. scolopes, and with other vibrios. Finally, both Leisingera sp. JC1 and secondary metabolite extracts of this strain had differential antimicrobial activity against a number of marine vibrios, suggesting that Leisingera sp. JC1 may play a role in host defense against other marine bacteria either in the eggs and/or ANG. These data also suggest that indigoidine may be partially, but not wholly, responsible for the antimicrobial activity of this squid-associated bacterium.

  5. Methylphenidate and atomoxetine inhibit social play behavior through prefrontal and subcortical limbic mechanisms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, E J Marijke; van Kerkhof, Linda W M; Damsteegt, Ruth; Trezza, Viviana; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2015-01-07

    Positive social interactions during the juvenile and adolescent phases of life, in the form of social play behavior, are important for social and cognitive development. However, the neural mechanisms of social play behavior remain incompletely understood. We have previously shown that methylphenidate and atomoxetine, drugs widely used for the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), suppress social play in rats through a noradrenergic mechanism of action. Here, we aimed to identify the neural substrates of the play-suppressant effects of these drugs. Methylphenidate is thought to exert its effects on cognition and emotion through limbic corticostriatal systems. Therefore, methylphenidate was infused into prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortical regions as well as into several subcortical limbic areas implicated in social play. Infusion of methylphenidate into the anterior cingulate cortex, infralimbic cortex, basolateral amygdala, and habenula inhibited social play, but not social exploratory behavior or locomotor activity. Consistent with a noradrenergic mechanism of action of methylphenidate, infusion of the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine into these same regions also reduced social play. Methylphenidate administration into the prelimbic, medial/ventral orbitofrontal, and ventrolateral orbitofrontal cortex, mediodorsal thalamus, or nucleus accumbens shell was ineffective. Our data show that the inhibitory effects of methylphenidate and atomoxetine on social play are mediated through a distributed network of prefrontal and limbic subcortical regions implicated in cognitive control and emotional processes. These findings increase our understanding of the neural underpinnings of this developmentally important social behavior, as well as the mechanism of action of two widely used treatments for ADHD.

  6. Inhibition of jack bean urease by 1,4-benzoquinone and 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone. Evaluation of the inhibition mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaborska, Wiesława; Kot, Mirosława; Superata, Kinga

    2002-08-01

    1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) and 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DMBQ) were studied as inhibitors of jack bean urease in 50 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.0. The mechanisms of inhibition were evaluated by progress curves studies and steady-state approach to data achieved by preincubation of the enzyme with the inhibitor. The obtained reaction progress curves were time-dependent and characteristic of slow-binding inhibition. The effects of different concentrations of BQ and DMBQ on the initial and steady-state velocities as well as the apparent first-order velocity constants obeyed the relationships of two-step enzyme-inhibitor interaction, qualified as mechanism B. The rapid formation of an initial BQ-urease complex with an inhibition constant of Ki = 0.031 mM was followed by a slow isomerization into the final BQ-urease complex with the overall inhibition constant of Ki* = 4.5 x 10(-5) mM. The respective inhibition constants for DMBQ were Ki = 0.42 mM, Ki* = 1.2 x 10(-3) mM. The rate constants of the inhibitor-urease isomerization indicated that forward processes were rapid in contrast to slow reverse reactions. The overall inhibition constants obtained by the steady-state analysis were found to be 5.1 x 10(-5) mM for BQ and 0.98 x 10(-3) mM for DMBQ. BQ was found to be a much stronger inhibitor of urease than DMBQ. A test, based on reaction with L-cysteine, confirmed the essential role of the sulfhydryl group in the inhibition of urease by BQ and DMBQ.

  7. Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ira J; Godinez, Guillermo L; Singh, Baljit K; McCaughey, Kelly M; Alcantara, Raniel R; Gururaja, Tarikere; Ho, Melissa S; Nguyen, Henry N; Friera, Annabelle M; White, Kathy A; McLaughlin, John R; Hansen, Derek; Romero, Jason M; Baltgalvis, Kristen A; Claypool, Mark D; Li, Wei; Lang, Wayne; Yam, George C; Gelman, Marina S; Ding, Rongxian; Yung, Stephanie L; Creger, Daniel P; Chen, Yan; Singh, Rajinder; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Sollanek, Kurt J; Powers, Scott K; Masuda, Esteban S; Taylor, Vanessa C; Payan, Donald G; Kinoshita, Taisei; Kinsella, Todd M

    2014-07-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is associated with the development of diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction, and respiratory muscle weakness is thought to contribute significantly to delayed weaning of patients. Therefore, therapeutic strategies for preventing these processes may have clinical benefit. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in CMV-mediated diaphragm wasting and weakness in rats. CMV-induced diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction coincided with marked increases in STAT3 phosphorylation on both tyrosine 705 (Tyr705) and serine 727 (Ser727). STAT3 activation was accompanied by its translocation into mitochondria within diaphragm muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction. Inhibition of JAK signaling during CMV prevented phosphorylation of both target sites on STAT3, eliminated the accumulation of phosphorylated STAT3 within the mitochondria, and reversed the pathologic alterations in mitochondrial function, reduced oxidative stress in the diaphragm, and maintained normal diaphragm contractility. In addition, JAK inhibition during CMV blunted the activation of key proteolytic pathways in the diaphragm, as well as diaphragm atrophy. These findings implicate JAK/STAT3 signaling in the development of diaphragm muscle atrophy and dysfunction during CMV and suggest that the delayed extubation times associated with CMV can be prevented by inhibition of Janus kinase signaling.-Smith, I. J., Godinez, G. L., Singh, B. K., McCaughey, K. M., Alcantara, R. R., Gururaja, T., Ho, M. S., Nguyen, H. N., Friera, A. M., White, K. A., McLaughlin, J. R., Hansen, D., Romero, J. M., Baltgalvis, K. A., Claypool, M. D., Li, W., Lang, W., Yam, G. C., Gelman, M. S., Ding, R., Yung, S. L., Creger, D. P., Chen, Y., Singh, R., Smuder, A. J., Wiggs, M. P., Kwon, O.-S., Sollanek, K. J., Powers, S. K., Masuda, E. S., Taylor, V. C., Payan, D. G

  8. Two-Swim Operators in the Modified Bacterial Foraging Algorithm for the Optimal Synthesis of Four-Bar Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betania Hernández-Ocaña

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two-swim operators to be added to the chemotaxis process of the modified bacterial foraging optimization algorithm to solve three instances of the synthesis of four-bar planar mechanisms. One swim favors exploration while the second one promotes fine movements in the neighborhood of each bacterium. The combined effect of the new operators looks to increase the production of better solutions during the search. As a consequence, the ability of the algorithm to escape from local optimum solutions is enhanced. The algorithm is tested through four experiments and its results are compared against two BFOA-based algorithms and also against a differential evolution algorithm designed for mechanical design problems. The overall results indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms other BFOA-based approaches and finds highly competitive mechanisms, with a single set of parameter values and with less evaluations in the first synthesis problem, with respect to those mechanisms obtained by the differential evolution algorithm, which needed a parameter fine-tuning process for each optimization problem.

  9. Nano- and macroscale structural and mechanical properties of in situ synthesized bacterial cellulose/PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO biocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tercjak, Agnieszka; Gutierrez, Junkal; Barud, Hernane S; Domeneguetti, Rafael R; Ribeiro, Sidney J L

    2015-02-25

    Highly transparent biocomposite based on bacterial cellulose (BC) mat modified with poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide-b-ethylene oxide) block copolymer (EPE) were fabricated in situ during biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose in a static culture from Gluconacetobacter xylinum. The effect of the addition to the culture medium of water-soluble EPE block copolymer on structure, morphology, crystallinity, and final properties of the novel biocomposites was investigated at nano- and macroscale. High compatibility between components was confirmed by ATR-FTIR indicating hydrogen bond formation between the OH group of BC and the PEO block of EPE block copolymer. Structural properties of EPE/BC biocomposites showed a strong effect of EPE block copolymer on the morphology of the BC mats. Thus, the increase of the EPE block copolymer content lead to the generation of spherulites of PEO block, clearly visualized using AFM and MO technique, changing crystallinity of the final EPE/BC biocomposites investigated by XRD. Generally, EPE/BC biocomposites maintain thermal stability and mechanical properties of the BC mat being 1 wt % EPE/BC biocomposite material with the best properties. Biosynthesis of EPE/BC composites open new strategy to the utilization of water-soluble block copolymers in the preparation of BC mat based biocomposites with tunable properties.

  10. Studying the Mechanism of Phototransformation of Light Signal by Various Mammal and Bacterial Photoreceptor Pigments  Rhodopsin, Iodopsin and Bacteriorhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Ignatov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review article outlines the structure and function of mammal and bacterial photoreceptor pigments (rhodopsin, iodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin and their aspects of bio-nanotechnological usage. On an example of bacteriorhodopsin is described the method of its isolation from purple membranes of photo-organotrophic halobacterium Halobacterium halobium ET 1001 by cellular autolysis by distilled water, processing of bacterial biomass by ultrasound at 22 KHz, alcohol extraction of low and high-weight molecular impurities, cellular RNA, carotenoids and lipids, the solubilization with 0,5 % (w/v SDS-Na and subsequent fractionation by methanol and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-200 Column balanced with 0,09 M Tris-buffer (pH = 8,35 with 0,1 % (w/v SDS-Na and 2,5 mM EDTA. Within the framework of the research the mechanism of color perception by the visual retina analyzer having the ability to analyze certain ranges of the optical spectrum as colors, was studied along with an analysis of the additive mixing of two or more colors. It was shown that at the mixing of electromagnetic waves with different wavelengths, the visual analyzer perceives them as the separate or average wave length corresponding to the mixing color.

  11. Bacterial cellulose synthesis mechanism of facultative anaerobe Enterobacter sp. FY-07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kaihua; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Bing; Chen, Sibin; Zhao, Qianqian; Chen, Yueqing; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Ting

    2016-02-25

    Enterobacter sp. FY-07 can produce bacterial cellulose (BC) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Three potential BC synthesis gene clusters (bcsI, bcsII and bcsIII) of Enterobacter sp. FY-07 have been predicted using genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis, in which bcsIII was confirmed as the main contributor to BC synthesis by gene knockout and functional reconstitution methods. Protein homology, gene arrangement and gene constitution analysis indicated that bcsIII had high identity to the bcsI operon of Enterobacter sp. 638; however, its arrangement and composition were same as those of BC synthesizing operon of G. xylinum ATCC53582 except for the flanking sequences. According to the BC biosynthesizing process, oxygen is not directly involved in the reactions of BC synthesis, however, energy is required to activate intermediate metabolites and synthesize the activator, c-di-GMP. Comparative transcriptome and metabolite quantitative analysis demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions genes involved in the TCA cycle were downregulated, however, genes in the nitrate reduction and gluconeogenesis pathways were upregulated, especially, genes in three pyruvate metabolism pathways. These results suggested that Enterobacter sp. FY-07 could produce energy efficiently under anaerobic conditions to meet the requirement of BC biosynthesis.

  12. Optimum synthesis of a four-bar mechanism using the modified bacterial foraging algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezura-Montes, Efrén; Portilla-Flores, Edgar A.; Hernández-Ocaña, Betania

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the mechanical synthesis of a four-bar mechanism, its definition as a constrained optimisation problem in the presence of one dynamic constraint and its solution with a swarm intelligence algorithm based on the bacteria foraging process. The algorithm is adapted to solve the optimisation problem by adding a suitable constraint-handling technique that is able to incorporate a selection criterion for the two objectives stated by the kinematic analysis of the problem. Moreover, a diversity mechanism, coupled with the attractor operator used by bacteria, is designed to favour the exploration of the search space. Four experiments are designed to validate the proposed model and to test the performance of the algorithm regarding constraint-satisfaction, sub-optimal solutions obtained, performance metrics and an analysis of the solutions based on the simulation of the four-bar mechanism. The results are compared with those provided by four algorithms found in the specialised literature used to solve mechanical design problems. On the basis of the simulation analysis, the solutions obtained by the proposed algorithm lead to a more suitable design based on motion generation and operation quality.

  13. Encephalitozoon intestinalis Inhibits Dendritic Cell Differentiation through an IL-6-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Carmen E.; Zorro, Maria M.; Sierra, Jelver; Gilchrist, Katherine; Botero, Jorge H.; Baena, Andres; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R.

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of intracellular pathogens causing self-limited and severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, respectively. A cellular type 1 adaptive response, mediated by IL-12, IFNγ, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells has been shown to be essential for host resistance, and dendritic cells (DC) play a key role at eliciting anti-microsporidial immunity. We investigated the in vitro response of DC and DC precursors/progenitors to infection with Encephalitozoon intestinalis (Ei), a common agent of human microsporidosis. Ei-exposed DC cultures up-regulated the surface expression of MHC class II and the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, only when high loads of spores were used. A vigorous secretion of IL-6 but not of IL-1β or IL-12p70 was also observed in these cultures. Ei-exposed DC cultures consisted of immature infected and mature bystander DC, as assessed by MHC class II and costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that intracellular Ei spores deliver inhibitory signals in DC. Moreover, Ei selectively inhibited the secretion of IL-12p70 in LPS-stimulated DC. Whereas Ei-exposed DC promoted allogeneic naïve T cell proliferation and IL-2 and IFNγ secretion in DC-CD4+ T cell co-cultures, separated co-cultures with bystander or infected DCs showed stimulation or inhibition of IFNγ secretion, respectively. When DC precursors/progenitors were exposed to Ei spores, a significant inhibition of DC differentiation was observed without shifting the development toward cells phenotypically or functionally compatible with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Neutralization experiments demonstrated that this inhibitory effect is IL-6-dependent. Altogether this investigation reveals a novel potential mechanism of immune escape of microsporidian parasites through the modulation of DC differentiation and maturation. PMID:26870700

  14. Neferine inhibits cultured hepatic stellate cell activation and facilitates apoptosis: A possible molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Shi, Jinghong; Wang, Ying; Guo, Jia; Zhao, Juhui; Dong, Lei

    2011-01-10

    Neferine is a major alkaloid component of "Lian Zi Xin", embryos of the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertner, Nymphaeaceae. Previous studies have shown that neferine has an inhibitory effect on pulmonary fibrosis through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities and inhibition of cytokines and NF-κB. However, it is unknown whether neferine also has an inhibitory effect on liver fibrosis through inhibition of TGF-β1 and collagen I and facilitation of apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells. This study examined the effects of neferine on cultured hepatic stellate (HSC-T6) cells and explored its possible action mechanisms by means of MTT assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow-cytometric annexin V-PI assay and Hoechst 33258 staining, as well as real-time PCR and western blotting. The results showed that neferine administration (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10μmol/l) significantly decreased the TGF-β1 and collagen I produced in HSC-T6 cells, and increased the HSC-T6 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Neferine treatment for 48h at concentrations of 6 and 10μmol/l significantly increased Bax and caspase 3 mRNAs and proteins, and reduced Bcl2 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) mRNAs and proteins. Our data indicate that neferine efficiently inhibits cultured HSC-T6 cell activation and induces apoptosis by increasing Bax and caspase 3 expression via the mitochondrial pathway.

  15. Encephalitozoon intestinalis Inhibits Dendritic Cell Differentiation through an IL-6-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Carmen E; Zorro, Maria M; Sierra, Jelver; Gilchrist, Katherine; Botero, Jorge H; Baena, Andres; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of intracellular pathogens causing self-limited and severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, respectively. A cellular type 1 adaptive response, mediated by IL-12, IFNγ, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells has been shown to be essential for host resistance, and dendritic cells (DC) play a key role at eliciting anti-microsporidial immunity. We investigated the in vitro response of DC and DC precursors/progenitors to infection with Encephalitozoon intestinalis (Ei), a common agent of human microsporidosis. Ei-exposed DC cultures up-regulated the surface expression of MHC class II and the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, only when high loads of spores were used. A vigorous secretion of IL-6 but not of IL-1β or IL-12p70 was also observed in these cultures. Ei-exposed DC cultures consisted of immature infected and mature bystander DC, as assessed by MHC class II and costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that intracellular Ei spores deliver inhibitory signals in DC. Moreover, Ei selectively inhibited the secretion of IL-12p70 in LPS-stimulated DC. Whereas Ei-exposed DC promoted allogeneic naïve T cell proliferation and IL-2 and IFNγ secretion in DC-CD4+ T cell co-cultures, separated co-cultures with bystander or infected DCs showed stimulation or inhibition of IFNγ secretion, respectively. When DC precursors/progenitors were exposed to Ei spores, a significant inhibition of DC differentiation was observed without shifting the development toward cells phenotypically or functionally compatible with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Neutralization experiments demonstrated that this inhibitory effect is IL-6-dependent. Altogether this investigation reveals a novel potential mechanism of immune escape of microsporidian parasites through the modulation of DC differentiation and maturation.

  16. Hedgehog signaling antagonist GDC-0449 (Vismodegib inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cell characteristics: molecular mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahma N Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies has demonstrated that aberrant reactivation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway regulates genes that promote cellular proliferation in various human cancer stem cells (CSCs. Therefore, the chemotherapeutic agents that inhibit activation of Gli transcription factors have emerged as promising novel therapeutic drugs for pancreatic cancer. GDC-0449 (Vismodegib, orally administrable molecule belonging to the 2-arylpyridine class, inhibits SHH signaling pathway by blocking the activities of Smoothened. The objectives of this study were to examine the molecular mechanisms by which GDC-0449 regulates human pancreatic CSC characteristics in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: GDC-0499 inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis in three pancreatic cancer cell lines and pancreatic CSCs. This inhibitor also suppressed cell viability, Gli-DNA binding and transcriptional activities, and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in pancreatic CSCs. GDC-0449-induced apoptosis in CSCs showed increased Fas expression and decreased expression of PDGFRα. Furthermore, Bcl-2 was down-regulated whereas TRAIL-R1/DR4 and TRAIL-R2/DR5 expression was increased following the treatment of CSCs with GDC-0449. Suppression of both Gli1 plus Gli2 by shRNA mimicked the changes in cell viability, spheroid formation, apoptosis and gene expression observed in GDC-0449-treated pancreatic CSCs. Thus, activated Gli genes repress DRs and Fas expressions, up-regulate the expressions of Bcl-2 and PDGFRα and facilitate cell survival. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that GDC-0499 can be used for the management of pancreatic cancer by targeting pancreatic CSCs.

  17. Efficacy of synaptic inhibition depends on multiple, dynamically interacting mechanisms implicated in chloride homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Doyon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloride homeostasis is a critical determinant of the strength and robustness of inhibition mediated by GABA(A receptors (GABA(ARs. The impact of changes in steady state Cl(- gradient is relatively straightforward to understand, but how dynamic interplay between Cl(- influx, diffusion, extrusion and interaction with other ion species affects synaptic signaling remains uncertain. Here we used electrodiffusion modeling to investigate the nonlinear interactions between these processes. Results demonstrate that diffusion is crucial for redistributing intracellular Cl(- load on a fast time scale, whereas Cl(-extrusion controls steady state levels. Interaction between diffusion and extrusion can result in a somato-dendritic Cl(- gradient even when KCC2 is distributed uniformly across the cell. Reducing KCC2 activity led to decreased efficacy of GABA(AR-mediated inhibition, but increasing GABA(AR input failed to fully compensate for this form of disinhibition because of activity-dependent accumulation of Cl(-. Furthermore, if spiking persisted despite the presence of GABA(AR input, Cl(- accumulation became accelerated because of the large Cl(- driving force that occurs during spikes. The resulting positive feedback loop caused catastrophic failure of inhibition. Simulations also revealed other feedback loops, such as competition between Cl(- and pH regulation. Several model predictions were tested and confirmed by [Cl(-](i imaging experiments. Our study has thus uncovered how Cl(- regulation depends on a multiplicity of dynamically interacting mechanisms. Furthermore, the model revealed that enhancing KCC2 activity beyond normal levels did not negatively impact firing frequency or cause overt extracellular K(- accumulation, demonstrating that enhancing KCC2 activity is a valid strategy for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Small Molecule Inhibition of the TNF Family Cytokine CD40 Ligand Through a Subunit Fracture Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Silvian; J Friedman; K Strauch; T Cachero; E Day; F Qian; B Cunningham; A Fung; L Sun; et al.

    2011-12-31

    BIO8898 is one of several synthetic organic molecules that have recently been reported to inhibit receptor binding and function of the constitutively trimeric tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family cytokine CD40 ligand (CD40L, aka CD154). Small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interfaces are relatively rare, and their discovery is often very challenging. Therefore, to understand how BIO8898 achieves this feat, we characterized its mechanism of action using biochemical assays and X-ray crystallography. BIO8898 inhibited soluble CD40L binding to CD40-Ig with a potency of IC{sub 50} = 25 {mu}M and inhibited CD40L-dependent apoptosis in a cellular assay. A co-crystal structure of BIO8898 with CD40L revealed that one inhibitor molecule binds per protein trimer. Surprisingly, the compound binds not at the surface of the protein but by intercalating deeply between two subunits of the homotrimeric cytokine, disrupting a constitutive protein-protein interface and breaking the protein's 3-fold symmetry. The compound forms several hydrogen bonds with the protein, within an otherwise hydrophobic binding pocket. In addition to the translational splitting of the trimer, binding of BIO8898 was accompanied by additional local and longer-range conformational perturbations of the protein, both in the core and in a surface loop. Binding of BIO8898 is reversible, and the resulting complex is stable and does not lead to detectable dissociation of the protein trimer. Our results suggest that a set of core aromatic residues that are conserved across a subset of TNF family cytokines might represent a generic hot-spot for the induced-fit binding of trimer-disrupting small molecules.

  19. Bacteriophage Resistance Mechanisms in the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum: Linking Genomic Mutations to Changes in Bacterial Virulence Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen in salmonid aquaculture worldwide. Due to increased antibiotic resistance, pathogen control using bacteriophages has been explored as a possible alternative treatment. However, the effective use of bacteriophages in pathogen control...... requires overcoming the selection for phage resistance in the bacterial populations. Here, we analyzed resistance mechanisms in F. psychrophilum after phage exposure using whole-genome sequencing of the ancestral phage-sensitive strain 950106-1/1 and six phage-resistant isolates. The phage......-resistant strains had all obtained unique insertions and/or deletions and point mutations distributed among intergenic and genic regions. Mutations in genes related to cell surface properties, gliding motility, and biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides and cell wall were found. The observed links between phage...

  20. Fabrication of flexible magnetic papers based on bacterial cellulose and barium hexaferrite with improved mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Guh-Hwan; Lee, Jooyoung; Kwon, Nayoung; Bok, Shingyu; Sim, Hwansu; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Lee, Sang-Eui; Lim, Byungkwon

    2016-09-01

    We report on a simple approach to fabricate mechanically robust magnetic cellulose papers containing M-type barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) nanoplates. BaFe12O19 nanoplates were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and then chemically functionalized by using a silane coupling agent. The magnetic cellulose papers prepared with the silane-treated BaFe12O19 nanoplates exhibited improved mechanical properties with tensile strength of 58.5 MPa and Young's modulus of 2.95 GPa.

  1. Mechanism of stabilization of a bacterial collagen triple helix in the absence of hydroxyproline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohs, Angela; Silva, Teresita; Yoshida, Takeshi; Amin, Ravish; Lukomski, Slawomir; Inouye, Masayori; Brodsky, Barbara

    2007-10-12

    The Streptococcus pyogenes cell-surface protein Scl2 contains a globular N-terminal domain and a collagen-like domain, (Gly-Xaa-X'aa)(79), which forms a triple helix with a thermal stability close to that seen for mammalian collagens. Hyp is a major contributor to triple-helix stability in animal collagens, but is not present in bacteria, which lack prolyl hydroxylase. To explore the basis of bacterial collagen triple-helix stability in the absence of Hyp, biophysical studies were carried out on recombinant Scl2 protein, the isolated collagen-like domain from Scl2, and a set of peptides modeling the Scl2 highly charged repetitive (Gly-Xaa-X'aa)(n) sequences. At pH 7, CD spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and differential scanning calorimetry of the Scl2 protein all showed a very sharp thermal transition near 36 degrees C, indicating a highly cooperative unfolding of both the globular and triple-helix domains. The collagen-like domain isolated by trypsin digestion showed a sharp transition at the same temperature, with an enthalpy of 12.5 kJ/mol of tripeptide. At low pH, Scl2 and its isolated collagen-like domain showed substantial destabilization from the neutral pH value, with two thermal transitions at 24 and 27 degrees C. A similar destabilization at low pH was seen for Scl2 charged model peptides, and the degree of destabilization was consistent with the strong pH dependence arising from the GKD tripeptide unit. The Scl2 protein contained twice as much charge as human fibril-forming collagens, and the degree of electrostatic stabilization observed for Scl2 was similar to the contribution Hyp makes to the stability of mammalian collagens. The high enthalpic contribution to the stability of the Scl2 collagenous domain supports the presence of a hydration network in the absence of Hyp.

  2. Mechanical Stimulus Inhibits the Growth of a Bone Tissue Model Cultured In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-ming Wan; Lu Liu; Jian-yu Li; Rui-xin Li; Yong Guo; Hao Li; Jian-ming Zhang; Xi-zheng Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To construct the cancellous bone explant model and a method of culturing these bone tissues in vitro, and to investigate the effect of mechanical load on growth of cancellous bone tissue in vitro. Methods Cancellous bone were extracted from rabbit femoral head and cut into 1-mm-thick and 8-mm-diameter slices under sterile conditions. HE staining and scanning electron microscopy were employed to identify the histomorphology of the model after being cultured with a new dynamic load and circulating perfusion bioreactor system for 0, 3, 5, and 7 days, respectively. We built a three-dimensional model using microCT and analyzed the loading effects using finite element analysis. The model was subjected to mechanical load of 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000μεrespectively for 30 minutes per day. After 5 days of continuous stimuli, the activities of alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) were detected. Apoptosis was analyzed by DNA ladder detection and caspase-3/8/9 activity detection. Results After being cultured for 3, 5, and 7 days, the bone explant model grew well. HE staining showed the apparent nucleus in cells at the each indicated time, and electron microscope revealed the living cells in the bone tissue. The activities of AKP and TRAP in the bone explant model under mechanical load of 3000 and 4000μεwere significantly lower than those in the unstressed bone tissues (all P Conclusions The cancellous bone explant model extracted from the rabbit femoral head could be alive at least for 7 days in the dynamic load and circulating perfusion bioreactor system, however, pathological mechanical load could affect the bone tissue growth by apoptosis in vitro. The differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts might be inhibited after the model is stimulated by mechanical load of 3000 and 4000με.

  3. Dissecting the mechanisms underlying short-interval intracortical inhibition using exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Steve; Cheah, Benjamin C; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2011-07-01

    Recently, 2 physiologically distinct phases of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) have been identified, a larger phase at interstimulus interval (ISI) 3 ms and a smaller phase at ISI 1 ms. While the former is mediated by synaptic processes, the mechanisms underlying the first phase of SICI remain a matter of debate. Separately, it is known that fatiguing hand exercise reduces SICI, a measure of cortical excitability. Consequently, the present study assessed effects of fatiguing hand exercise on the 2 SICI phases, using threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques, to yield further information on underlying mechanisms. Studies were undertaken on 22 subjects, with SICI assessed at baseline, after each voluntary contraction (VC) period of 120 s and 5, 10, and 20 min after last VC, with responses recorded over abductor pollicis brevis. Exercise resulted in significant reduction of SICI at ISI 1 ms (SICI(baseline) 9.5 ± 2.7%; SICI(MAXIMUM REDUCTION) 2.5 ± 2.5%, P < 0.05) and 3 ms (SICI(baseline) 16.8 ± 1.7%; SICI(MAXIMUM REDUCTION) 11.6 ± 2.1%, P < 0.05), with the time course of reduction being different for the 2 phases. Taken together, findings from the present study suggest that synaptic processes were the predominant mechanism underlying the different phases of SICI.

  4. Boron stress activates the general amino acid control mechanism and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irem Uluisik

    Full Text Available Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance.

  5. Mechanisms of Propidium Monoazide Inhibition of Polymerase Chain Reaction and implications for Propidium Monoazide Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. M.; Darrach, H.; Ponce, A.; McFarland, E.; Laymon, C.; Fingland, N. K.

    2015-12-01

    PMA-qPCR is a laboratory technique that can be used to identify viable microbes by employing the use of propidium monoazide (PMA), a DNA-intercalating dye, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The current model of PMA-qPCR operates under the assumption that PMA is only capable of entering membrane-compromised cells, where it irreversibly cross-links to DNA and makes it unavailable for amplification via qPCR. However, the exact mechanism behind PMA's entry into the cell and its interaction with genetic material is not well understood. To better understand PMA's capabilities, we have examined the effect PMA has on enzyme binding and processivity using endonucleases and exonucleases. Our results suggest that the current model behind PMA-qPCR inhibition is incomplete, in that rather than precipitating the entirety of the DNA, PMA also inhibits enzyme binding and/or processivity in soluble DNA. These results have important implications for studying the viable community of microorganisms in various applications, such as environmental monitoring, planetary protection and bioburden assessment, and biohazard detection.

  6. Molecular mechanism of serotonin transporter inhibition elucidated by a new flexible docking protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mari; Kurczab, Rafał; Ravna, Aina W; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2012-01-01

    The two main groups of antidepressant drugs, the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), as well as several other compounds, act by inhibiting the serotonin transporter (SERT). However, the binding mode and molecular mechanism of inhibition in SERT are not fully understood. In this study, five classes of SERT inhibitors were docked into an outward-facing SERT homology model using a new 4D ensemble docking protocol. Unlike other docking protocols, where protein flexibility is not considered or is highly dependent on the ligand structure, flexibility was here obtained by side chain sampling of the amino acids of the binding pocket using biased probability Monte Carlo (BPMC) prior to docking. This resulted in the generation of multiple binding pocket conformations that the ligands were docked into. The docking results showed that the inhibitors were stacked between the aromatic amino acids of the extracellular gate (Y176, F335) presumably preventing its closure. The inhibitors interacted with amino acids in both the putative substrate binding site and more extracellular regions of the protein. A general structure-docking-based pharmacophore model was generated to explain binding of all studied classes of SERT inhibitors. Docking of a test set of actives and decoys furthermore showed that the outward-facing ensemble SERT homology model consistently and selectively scored the majority of active compounds above decoys, which indicates its usefulness in virtual screening.

  7. Elucidation of the mechanism of enzymatic browning inhibition by sodium chlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Luo, Yaguang; Chen, Pei

    2008-10-15

    Sodium chlorite (SC) is a well known anti-microbial agent and its strong inhibitory effect on enzymatic browning of fresh-cut produce has recently been identified. We investigated the effect of SC on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and its substrate, chlorogenic acid (CA), as it relates to the mechanisms of browning inhibition by SC. Results indicate that the browning reaction of CA (1.0mM) catalyzed by PPO (33U/mL) was significantly inhibited by 1.0mM SC at pH 4.6. Two PPO isoforms were identified by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and both were inactivated by SC (3.0mM). This suggests that SC serves as a PPO inhibitor to prevent enzymatic browning. Furthermore, the effect of SC on the stability of CA in both acidic (pH 4.5) and basic conditions (pH 8.3) was studied by UV-Vis scan and LC-MS analysis. The results showed that at the presence of SC (3.0mM), CA (0.1mM) degraded to quinic acid and caffeic acid as well as other intermediates. Hence, the anti-browning property of SC can be attributed to the two modes of action: the inactivation of polyphenol oxidase directly and the oxidative degradation of phenolic substrates.

  8. Investigation of Formation and Inhibition Mechanism of Cerium Conversion Films on Al 2024 Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵敏华; 黄若双; 付燕; 林昌健

    2002-01-01

    To study the mechanism of formation and inhibition of Ce conversion films on Al 2024-T3 alloy, scanning microreference electrode technique (SMRE) is used to probe the potential map on Al 2024-T3 in CeCl3 solution, the localized corrosion of Al alloy decreases with immersion time and disappears finally, which results from the competition of Cl- aggression and Ce3+ inhibition on alloy surface. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that the Ce conversion films consist of Al2O3, CeO2 and Ce2O3(Ce(OH)3), and CeO2/Ce2O3 ratio decreases with the immersion time. When a critical pH for Ce(OH)3 formation was reached, Ce(OH)3 will precipitate on the micro cathodic area on alloy surface. Consequently, H2O2, the product of the catholic reaction will oxidize a part of Ce(OH)3 to CeO2, which appears a better corrosion resistance for Al alloys.

  9. Oestrogen inhibits human colonic motility by a non-genomic cell membrane receptor-dependent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Classical effects of oestrogen involve activation of target genes after binding nuclear receptors. Oestrogenic effects too rapid for DNA transcription (non-genomic) are known to occur. The effect of oestrogen on colonic motility is unknown despite the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in pregnant and premenopausal women. METHODS: Histologically normal colon was obtained from proximal resection margins of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended in organ baths under 1 g of tension. After equilibration, they were exposed to 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8) or bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8). Fulvestrant, an oestrogen receptor antagonist, was added to some baths (n = 8). Other strips were exposed to calphostin C or cycloheximide. Carbachol was added in increasing concentrations and contractile activity was recorded isometrically. RESULTS: Oestrogen inhibited colonic contractility (mean difference 19.7 per cent; n = 8, P < 0.001). In keeping with non-genomic, rapid-onset steroid action, the effect was apparent within minutes and reversible. It was observed with both 17beta-oestradiol and BSA-conjugated oestrogen, and was not altered by cycloheximide. Effects were inhibited by fulvestrant, suggesting receptor mediation. CONCLUSION: Oestrogen decreases contractility in human colonic smooth muscle by a non-genomic mechanism involving cell membrane coupling.

  10. Inhibitive Mechanisms of Two Silicon Compounds on Powdery Mildew of Melon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yu-rong; LIU Lei; ZHAO Hua; CHEN De-rong; BI Yang

    2005-01-01

    Seedlings of Yujinxiang melon were used to investigate the effect and inhibitive mechanism of sodium silicate and nanosized silicon oxide on powdery mildew. The results showed that the severity of powdery mildew on melon seedlings was lowered significantly by treatment with either of the two silicon compounds, although the effect of sodium silicate was more powerful than silicon oxide. Application of sodium silicate to the seedlings caused significant increases in the activity of peroxidase (POD) and of 3-1,3-glucosidase (GLU), both enzymes are known to be associated with the disease defence systems of plants. SEM-EDX analysis of sodium silicate-treated leaves of the melon seedlings showed an elevated level of silicon deposit at stomata and epidermis. Treatment with nanosized silicon oxide also resulted in a similar increase in silicon deposit, but the treatment did not cause a significant increase in POD activity.

  11. Nanosilver inhibits nitrification and reduces ammonia-oxidising bacterial but not archaeal amoA gene abundance in estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddow, Jessica; Stolpe, Björn; Cole, Paula A; Lead, Jamie R; Sapp, Melanie; Lyons, Brett P; Colbeck, Ian; Whitby, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) enter estuaries via wastewater treatment effluents, where they can inhibit microorganisms, because of their antimicrobial properties. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) are involved in the first step of nitrification and are important to ecosystem function, especially where effluent discharge results in high nitrogen inputs. Here, we investigated the effect of a pulse addition of AgNPs on AOB and AOA ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene abundances and benthic nitrification potential rates (NPR) in low-salinity and mesohaline estuarine sediments. Whilst exposure to 0.5 mg L(-1) AgNPs had no significant effect on amoA gene abundances or NPR, 50 mg L(-1) AgNPs significantly decreased AOB amoA gene abundance (up to 76% over 14 days), and significantly decreased NPR by 20-fold in low-salinity sediments and by twofold in mesohaline sediments, after one day. AgNP behaviour differed between sites, whereby greater aggregation occurred in mesohaline waters (possibly due to higher salinity), which may have reduced toxicity. In conclusion, AgNPs have the potential to reduce ammonia oxidation in estuarine sediments, particularly where AgNPs accumulate over time and reach high concentrations. This could lead to long-term risks to nitrification, especially in polyhaline estuaries where ammonia-oxidation is largely driven by AOB.

  12. Cycle inhibiting factors (CIFs are a growing family of functional cyclomodulins present in invertebrate and mammal bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Jubelin

    Full Text Available The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif produced by enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli was the first cyclomodulin to be identified that is injected into host cells via the type III secretion machinery. Cif provokes cytopathic effects characterized by G(1 and G(2 cell cycle arrests, accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs p21(waf1/cip1 and p27(kip1 and formation of actin stress fibres. The X-ray crystal structure of Cif revealed it to be a divergent member of a superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases that share a conserved catalytic triad. Here we report the discovery and characterization of four Cif homologs encoded by different pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria isolated from vertebrates or invertebrates. Cif homologs from the enterobacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Photorhabdus luminescens, Photorhabdus asymbiotica and the beta-proteobacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei all induce cytopathic effects identical to those observed with Cif from pathogenic E. coli. Although these Cif homologs are remarkably divergent in primary sequence, the catalytic triad is strictly conserved and was shown to be crucial for cell cycle arrest, cytoskeleton reorganization and CKIs accumulation. These results reveal that Cif proteins form a growing family of cyclomodulins in bacteria that interact with very distinct hosts including insects, nematodes and humans.

  13. Effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on peritoneal defense mechanisms and bacterial translocation after administration of systemic chemotherapy in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Celal Cerci; Cagri Ergin; Erol Eroglu; Canan Agalar; Fatih Agalar; Sureyya Cerci; Mahmut Bulbul

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on peritoneal defense mechanisms and bacterial translocation after systemic 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) administration.METHODS: Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups; the control, 5-FU and 5-FU + G-CSF groups. We measured bactericidal activity of the peritoneal fluid, phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid, total peritoneal cell counts and cell types of peritoneal washing fluid.Bacterial translocation was quantified by mesenteric lymph node, liver and spleen tissue cultures.RESULTS: Systemic 5-FU reduced total peritoneal cell counts, neutrophils and macrophage numbers. It also altered bactericidal activity of the peritoneal fluid and phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid. 5-FU also caused significant increase in frequencies of bacterial translocation at the liver and mesenteric lymph nodes. G-CSF decreased bacterial translocation, it significantly enhanced bactericidal activity of the peritoneal fluid and phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid. It also increased total peritoneal cell counts, neutrophils and macrophage numbers.CONCLUSION: Systemic 5-FU administration caused bacterial translocation, decreased the bactericidal activity of peritoneal fluid and phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid. G-CSF increased both bactericidal activity of the peritoneal fluid and phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid, and prevented the bacterial translocation. We conclude that intraperitoneal GCSF administration protects the effects of systemic 5-FU on peritoneal defense mechanisms.

  14. How Cellulose Elongates--A QM/MM Study of the Molecular Mechanism of Cellulose Polymerization in Bacterial CESA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Zimmer, Jochen; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Kubicki, James D

    2015-06-04

    The catalytic mechanism of bacterial cellulose synthase was investigated by using a hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The Michaelis complex model was built based on the X-ray crystal structure of the cellulose synthase subunits BcsA and BcsB containing a uridine diphosphate molecule and a translocating glucan. Our study identified an SN2-type transition structure corresponding to the nucleophilic attack of the nonreducing end O4 on the anomeric carbon C1, the breaking of the glycosidic bond C1-O1, and the transfer of proton from the nonreducing end O4 to the general base D343. The activation barrier found for this SN2-type transition state is 68 kJ/mol. The rate constant of polymerization is estimated to be ∼8.0 s(-1) via transition state theory. A similar SN2-type transition structure was also identified for a second glucose molecule added to the growing polysaccharide chain, which aligned with the polymer 180° rotated compared to the initially added unit. This study provides detailed insights into how cellulose is extended by one glucose molecule at a time and how the individual glucose units align into cellobiose repeating units.

  15. Streptococcus pyogenes Employs Strain-dependent Mechanisms of C3b Inactivation to Inhibit Phagocytosis and Killing of Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrahari, Garima; Liang, Zhong; Glinton, Kristofor; Lee, Shaun W; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2016-04-22

    Evasion of complement-mediated opsonophagocytosis enables group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) to establish infection. Different strain-dependent mechanisms are employed by the host to accomplish this goal. In general, GAS inhibits the amplification of the complement cascade on its cell surface by facilitating the degradation of C3b, an opsonin, to an inactive product, inactivated C3b (iC3b), in a step catalyzed by factor I (FI) and its cofactor, factor H (FH), with or without the participation of human host plasmin (hPm). GAS recruits FH to its cell surface via FH receptors, which are transcriptionally controlled by the two-component cluster of virulence responder-sensor system. The manner in which FI-FH and hPm function together on GAS cells is unknown. Using GAS strain AP53, which strongly binds host human plasminogen/plasmin (hPg/hPm) directly via an hPg/hPm surface receptor (PAM), we show that both FI-FH and hPm sequentially cleave C3b. Whereas FI-FH proteolytically cleaves C3b into iC3b, PAM-bound hPm catalyzes cleavage of iC3b into multiple smaller peptides. Unlike AP53, GAS strain M23ND weakly binds FH and recruits hPg/hPm to its cell surface indirectly via fibrinogen bound to M-protein, M23. In this case, FH-FI cleaves C3b into iC3b, with negligible degradation of iC3b by hPm that is bound to fibrinogen on the cells. AP53 and M23ND display similar resistance to human neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis, which results in a corresponding high lethality in mice after injection of these cells. These results suggest that GAS utilizes diverse mechanisms to degrade C3b and thus to protect bacterial cells from the complement response of the host.

  16. Antimicrobial Activity and Mechanism of Inhibition of Silver Nanoparticles against Extreme Halophilic Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombre, Rebecca S.; Shinde, Vinaya; Thaiparambil, Elvina; Zende, Samruddhi; Mehta, Sourabh

    2016-01-01

    Haloarchaea are salt-loving halophilic microorganisms that inhabit marine environments, sea water, salterns, and lakes. The resistance of haloarchaea to physical extremities that challenge organismic survival is ubiquitous. Metal and antibiotic resistance of haloarchaea has been on an upsurge due to the exposure of these organisms to metal sinks and drug resistance genes augmented in their natural habitats due to anthropogenic activities and environmental pollution. The efficacy of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) as a potent and broad spectrum inhibitory agent is known, however, there are no reports on the inhibitory activity of SNPs against haloarchaea. In the present study, we have investigated the antimicrobial potentials of SNPs synthesized using aqueous leaf extract of Cinnamomum tamala against antibiotic resistant haloarchaeal isolates Haloferax prahovense RR8, Haloferax lucentense RR15, Haloarcula argentinensis RR10 and Haloarcula tradensis RR13. The synthesized SNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The SNPs demonstrated potent antimicrobial activity against the haloarchaea with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300–400 μg/ml. Growth kinetics of haloarchaea in the presence of SNPs was studied by employing the Baranyi mathematical model for microbial growth using the DMFit curve fitting program. The C. tamala SNPs also demonstrated cytotoxic activity against human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A540) and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The mechanism of inhibition of haloarchaea by the SNPs was investigated. The plausible mechanism proposed is the alterations and disruption of haloarchaeal membrane permeability by turbulence, inhibition of respiratory dehydrogenases and lipid peroxidation causing cellular and DNA damage resulting in cell death. PMID:27679615

  17. Antimicrobial Activity and Mechanism of Inhibition of Silver Nanoparticles against Extreme Halophilic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombre, Rebecca S; Shinde, Vinaya; Thaiparambil, Elvina; Zende, Samruddhi; Mehta, Sourabh

    2016-01-01

    Haloarchaea are salt-loving halophilic microorganisms that inhabit marine environments, sea water, salterns, and lakes. The resistance of haloarchaea to physical extremities that challenge organismic survival is ubiquitous. Metal and antibiotic resistance of haloarchaea has been on an upsurge due to the exposure of these organisms to metal sinks and drug resistance genes augmented in their natural habitats due to anthropogenic activities and environmental pollution. The efficacy of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) as a potent and broad spectrum inhibitory agent is known, however, there are no reports on the inhibitory activity of SNPs against haloarchaea. In the present study, we have investigated the antimicrobial potentials of SNPs synthesized using aqueous leaf extract of Cinnamomum tamala against antibiotic resistant haloarchaeal isolates Haloferax prahovense RR8, Haloferax lucentense RR15, Haloarcula argentinensis RR10 and Haloarcula tradensis RR13. The synthesized SNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The SNPs demonstrated potent antimicrobial activity against the haloarchaea with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300-400 μg/ml. Growth kinetics of haloarchaea in the presence of SNPs was studied by employing the Baranyi mathematical model for microbial growth using the DMFit curve fitting program. The C. tamala SNPs also demonstrated cytotoxic activity against human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A540) and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The mechanism of inhibition of haloarchaea by the SNPs was investigated. The plausible mechanism proposed is the alterations and disruption of haloarchaeal membrane permeability by turbulence, inhibition of respiratory dehydrogenases and lipid peroxidation causing cellular and DNA damage resulting in cell death.

  18. Inhibition of methylation decreases osteoblast differentiation via a non-DNA-dependent methylation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaes, Bart L T; Lute, Carolien; van der Woning, Sebastian P; Piek, Ester; Vermeer, Jenny; Blom, Henk J; Mathers, John C; Müller, Michael; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2010-02-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methylation of biological molecules including DNA and proteins is rapidly being uncovered as a critical mechanism for regulation of cellular processes. We investigated the effects of reduced SAM-dependent methylation on osteoblast differentiation by using periodate oxidized adenosine (ADOX), an inhibitor of SAM-dependent methyltransferases. The capacity of this agent to modulate osteoblast differentiation was analyzed under non-osteogenic control conditions and during growth factor-induced differentiation and compared with the effect of inhibition of DNA methylation by 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR). Without applying specific osteogenic triggers, both ADOX and 5-Aza-CdR induced mRNA expression of the osteoblast markers Alp, Osx, and Ocn in murine C2C12 cells. Under osteogenic conditions, ADOX inhibited differentiation of both human mesenchymal stem cells and C2C12 cells. Gene expression analysis of early (Msx2, Dlx5, Runx2) and late (Alp, Osx, Ocn) osteoblast markers during bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced C2C12 osteoblast differentiation revealed that ADOX only reduced expression of the late phase Runx2 target genes. By using a Runx2-responsive luciferase reporter (6xOSE), we showed that ADOX reduced the activity of Runx2, while 5-Aza-CdR had no effect. Taken together, our data suggest that decreased SAM-dependent methyltransferase activity leads to impaired osteoblast differentiation via non-DNA-dependent methylation mechanisms and that methylation is a regulator of Runx2-controlled gene expression.

  19. The most important marine bacterial toxins; a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Najafi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial toxins are toxic compounds which are produced in order to present microbial pathogenicity or to combat with the host immune system response. There is a cumulating evidence indicating bacterial origin for marine toxins such as tetrodotoxin, palytoxin, neosurugatoxin, etc. The most important marine toxins produced by different marine bacteria, their origin, structure and mechanisms of action were evaluated in a systematic review. Materials & Methods: Marine bacteria, marine bacterial toxins, and their mechanisms of action and structure were keywords for a comprehensive search in online databases including Pubmed, Science Direct, Google Scholar and Scirus. A total of 120 papers were evaluated, however, by omitting similar reports, 103 papers were included in the study. Results: The most of marine bacterial toxins are classified in one of the following groups: neurotoxins, hepatotoxins and cytotoxins. These toxins have distinct mechanisms of action including blocking of sodium channels in nerve cells, functioning as agonists of acetylcholine receptors, inhibiting of membrane pumps, the inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A types' enzyme activities and inhibiting of protein synthesis. Conclusion: The clarification of the marine bacterial toxins structures and their mechanisms of action may be helpful for novel drug design, therapeutic measures and to overcome against bacterial pathogenicity.

  20. Kinetics and mechanism of jack bean urease inhibition by Hg2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Nana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jack bean urease (EC 3.5.1.5 is a metalloenzyme, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide. The heavy metal ions are common inhibitors to control the rate of the enzymatic urea hydrolysis, which take the Hg2+ as the representative. Hg2+ affects the enzyme activity causing loss of the biological function of the enzyme, which threatens the survival of many microorganism and plants. However, inhibitory kinetics of urease by the low concentration Hg2+ has not been explored fully. In this study, the inhibitory effect of the low concentration Hg2+ on jack bean urease was investigated in order to elucidate the mechanism of Hg2+ inhibition. Results According to the kinetic parameters for the enzyme obtained from Lineweaver–Burk plot, it is shown that the Km is equal to 4.6±0.3 mM and Vm is equal to 29.8±1.7 μmol NH3/min mg. The results show that the inhibition of jack bean urease by Hg2+ at low concentration is a reversible reaction. Equilibrium constants have been determined for Hg2+ binding with the enzyme or the enzyme-substrate complexes (Ki =0.012 μM. The results show that the Hg2+ is a noncompetitive inhibitor. In addition, the kinetics of enzyme inhibition by the low concentration Hg2+ has been studied using the kinetic method of the substrate reaction. The results suggest that the enzyme first reversibly and quickly binds Hg2+ and then undergoes a slow reversible course to inactivation. Furthermore, the rate constant of the forward reactions (k+0 is much larger than the rate constant of the reverse reactions (k-0. By combining with the fact that the enzyme activity is almost completely lost at high concentration, the enzyme is completely inactivated when the Hg2+ concentration is high enough. Conclusions These results suggest that Hg2+ has great impacts on the urease activity and the established inhibition kinetics model is suitable.

  1. Inhibition of carboxypeptidase A by D-penicillamine: mechanism and implications for drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, C R; Auld, D S

    2000-06-27

    Zinc metalloprotease inhibitors are usually designed to inactivate the enzyme by forming a stable ternary complex with the enzyme and active-site zinc. D-Cysteine inhibits carboxypeptidase, ZnCPD, by forming such a complex, with a K(i) of 2.3 microM. In contrast, the antiarthritis drug D-penicillamine, D-PEN, which differs from D-Cys only by the presence of two methyl groups on the beta-carbon, inhibits ZnCPD by promoting the release of the active-site zinc. We have given the name catalytic chelator to such inhibitors. Inhibition is a two-step process characterized by formation of a complex with the enzyme (K(i(initial)) = 1.2 mM) followed by release of the active-site zinc at rates up to 420-fold faster than the spontaneous release. The initial rate of substrate hydrolysis at completion of the second step also depends on D-PEN concentration, reflecting formation of a thermodynamic equilibrium governed by the stability constants of chelator and apocarboxypeptidase for zinc (K(i(final)) = 0.25 mM). The interaction of D-PEN and D-Cys with the active-site metal has been examined by replacing the active-site zinc by a chromophoric cobalt atom. Both inhibitors perturb the d-d transitions of CoCPD in the 500-600 nm region within milliseconds of mixing but only the CoCPD.D-Cys complex displays a strong S --> Co(II) charge-transfer band at 340 nm indicative of a metal-sulfur bond. While the D-Cys complex is stable, the CoCPD.D-PEN complex breaks down to apoenzyme and Co(D-PEN)(2) with a half-life of 0.5 s. D-PEN is the first drug found to inhibit a metalloprotease by increasing the dissociation rate constant of the active-site metal. The ability of D-PEN to catalyze metal removal from carboxypeptidase A and other zinc proteases suggests a possible mechanism of action in arthritis and Wilson's disease and may also underlie complications associated with its clinical use.

  2. IL-18 inhibits growth of murine orthotopic prostate carcinomas via both adaptive and innate immune mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Wan-Chi Tse

    Full Text Available Interleukin(IL-18 is a pleiotrophic cytokine with functions in immune modulation, angiogenesis and bone metabolism. In this study, the potential of IL-18 as an immunotherapy for prostate cancer (PCa was examined using the murine model of prostate carcinoma, RM1 and a bone metastatic variant RM1(BM/B4H7-luc. RM1 and RM1(BM/B4H7-luc cells were stably transfected to express bioactive IL-18. These cells were implanted into syngeneic immunocompetent mice, with or without an IL-18-neutralising antibody (αIL-18, SK113AE4. IL-18 significantly inhibited the growth of both subcutaneous and orthotopic RM1 tumors and the IL-18 neutralizing antibody abrogated the tumor growth-inhibition. In vivo neutralization of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ completely eliminated the anti-tumor effects of IL-18 confirming an essential role of IFN-γ as a down-stream mediator of the anti-tumor activity of IL-18. Tumors from mice in which IL-18 and/or IFN-γ was neutralized contained significantly fewer CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells than those with functional IL-18. The essential role of adaptive immunity was demonstrated as tumors grew more rapidly in RAG1(-/- mice or in mice depleted of CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ cells than in normal mice. The tumors in RAG1(-/- mice were also significantly smaller when IL-18 was present, indicating that innate immune mechanisms are involved. IL-18 also induced an increase in tumor infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils but not NK cells. In other experiments, direct injection of recombinant IL-18 into established tumors also inhibited tumor growth, which was associated with an increase in intratumoral macrophages, but not T cells. These results suggest that local IL-18 in the tumor environment can significantly potentiate anti-tumor immunity in the prostate and clearly demonstrate that this effect is mediated by innate and adaptive immune mechanisms.

  3. Mechanism study of endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation of low molecular weight fucoidan from Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anjin; Zhang, Fang; Shi, Jie; Zhao, Xue; Yan, Meixing

    2016-10-01

    Several studies have indicated that fucoidan fractions with low molecular weight and different sulfate content from Laminaria japonica could inhibit the activation of platelets directly by reducing the platelet aggregation. To explore the direct effect of LMW fucoidan on the platelet system furthermore and examine the possible mechanism, the endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation effects of two LMW fucoidan were investigated. In the present study, Endothelial injury model of rats was made by injection of adrenaline (0.4 mg kg-1) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured. vWF level was be investigated in vivo and in vitro as an important index of endothelial injury. LMW fucoidan could significantly reduce vWF level in vascular endothelial injury rats and also significantly reduce vWF level in vitro. The number of EMPs was be detected as another important index of endothelial injury. The results showed that LMW fucoidan reduced EMPs stimulated by tumor necrosis factor. In this study, it was found that by inhibiting platelet adhesion, LMW fucoidan played a role in anti-thrombosis and the specific mechanism of action is to inhibit the flow of extracellular Ca2+. All in a word, LMW fucoidan could inhibit the activation of platelets indirectly by reducing the concentration of EMPs and vWF, at the same time; LMW fucoidan inhibited the activation of platelets directly by inhibiting the flow of extracellular Ca2+.

  4. Mechanism of bacterial inactivation by (+)-limonene and its potential use in food preservation combined processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espina, Laura; Gelaw, Tilahun K; de Lamo-Castellví, Sílvia; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the bactericidal effect of (+)-limonene, the major constituent of citrus fruits' essential oils, against E. coli. The degree of E. coli BJ4 inactivation achieved by (+)-limonene was influenced by the pH of the treatment medium, being more bactericidal at pH 4.0 than at pH 7.0. Deletion of rpoS and exposure to a sub-lethal heat or an acid shock did not modify E. coli BJ4 resistance to (+)-limonene. However, exposure to a sub-lethal cold shock decreased its resistance to (+)-limonene. Although no sub-lethal injury was detected in the cell envelopes after exposure to (+)-limonene by the selective-plating technique, the uptake of propidium iodide by inactivated E. coli BJ4 cells pointed out these structures as important targets in the mechanism of action. Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared Microspectroscopy (ATR-IRMS) allowed identification of altered E. coli BJ4 structures after (+)-limonene treatments as a function of the treatment pH: β-sheet proteins at pH 4.0 and phosphodiester bonds at pH 7.0. The increased sensitivity to (+)-limonene observed at pH 4.0 in an E. coli MC4100 lptD4213 mutant with an increased outer membrane permeability along with the identification of altered β-sheet proteins by ATR-IRMS indicated the importance of this structure in the mechanism of action of (+)-limonene. The study of mechanism of inactivation by (+)-limonene led to the design of a synergistic combined process with heat for the inactivation of the pathogen E. coli O157:H7 in fruit juices. These results show the potential of (+)-limonene in food preservation, either acting alone or in combination with lethal heat treatments.

  5. Novel antagonists of alcohol inhibition of l1-mediated cell adhesion: multiple mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkemeyer, Michael F; Menkari, Carrie E; Charness, Michael E

    2002-11-01

    1-Octanol antagonizes ethanol inhibition of L1-mediated cell adhesion and prevents ethanol teratogenesis in mouse whole embryo culture. Herein, we identify a new series of alcohol antagonists and study their mechanism of action. Cell aggregation assays were carried out in ethanol-sensitive, human L1-transfected NIH/3T3 cells in the absence and presence of 100 mM ethanol or 2 mM 1-butanol and candidate antagonists. Antagonist potency for 1-alcohols increased progressively over 5 log orders from 1-pentanol (C5) to 1-dodecanol (C12). Antagonist potency declined from 1-dodecanol (C12) to 1-tridecanol (C13), and 1-tetradecanol (C14) and 1-pentadecanol (C15) were inactive. The presence and position of a double bond in the 1-butanol molecule determined whether a compound was a full agonist (1-butanol), a mixed agonist-antagonist (2-buten-1-ol), or an antagonist (3-buten-1-ol). Increasing the concentration of agonist (1-butanol or ethanol) overcame the antagonism of 3-buten-1-ol, benzyl alcohol, cyclopentanol, and 3-pentanol, but not that of 4-methyl-1-pentanol, 2-methyl-2-pentanol, 1-pentanol, 2-pentanol, 1-octanol, and 2,6-di-isopropylphenol (propofol), suggesting that the mechanisms of antagonism may differ between these groups of compounds. These findings suggest that selective straight, branched, and cyclic alcohols may act at multiple, discrete sites to antagonize the actions of ethanol and 1-butanol on L1-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

  6. Mechanisms of depolarizing inhibition at the crayfish giant motor synapse. II. Quantitative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D H

    1990-08-01

    1. The relative strengths of four mechanisms of depolarizing synaptic inhibition described in the previous paper were evaluated with an electrical model of the giant motor synapse (GMS) and postsynaptic region of the motor giant motoneuron (MoG). 2. The model consists of one compartment that represents the presynaptic region of the medial giant (MG) interneuron and three compartments that represent the postsynaptic region and proximal axon of the MoG. The presynaptic MG compartment is linked to a postsynaptic MoG compartment by a rectifying conductance that represents the GMS. Each compartment consists of parallel paths to ground for active and/or passive membrane currents. 3. Parameter values of the model were set so the MG compartment would replicate an MG impulse and the MoG compartments would replicate the current-clamp, voltage-clamp, and synaptic responses of a single MoG neuron described in the previous paper. The Hodgkin-Huxley equations described voltage-sensitive sodium and potassium currents. 4. Comparison of the MoG compartment currents that mediate an inhibited excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) [triggered during a depolarizing inhibitory postsynaptic potential (d-IPSP)] with those of an uninhibited EPSP indicate that all four mechanisms have significant inhibitory effects. Reverse bias of the GMS by the d-IPSP reduced the GMS current by 65 nA (12%). The remaining inward current was further reduced by a 243-nA outward current through the inhibitory postsynaptic conductance. The d-IPSP inactivated sodium conductance so the inward sodium current evoked by the EPSP was reduced by 319 nA (-68%). The d-IPSP reduced the latency for potassium activation by the EPSP so that the outward potassium current coincided with the inward sodium current and reduced the net inward current by 100 nA. Together, these mechanisms reduced the EPSP amplitude by 69%. 5. The resting potential of MoG is normally 15 mV more positive than MG rest potential, but in some

  7. Structure and Mechanism of the S Component of a Bacterial ECF Transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Zhang; J Wang; Y Shi

    2011-12-31

    The energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters, responsible for vitamin uptake in prokaryotes, are a unique family of membrane transporters. Each ECF transporter contains a membrane-embedded, substrate-binding protein (known as the S component), an energy-coupling module that comprises two ATP-binding proteins (known as the A and A' components) and a transmembrane protein (known as the T component). The structure and transport mechanism of the ECF family remain unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of RibU, the S component of the ECF-type riboflavin transporter from Staphylococcus aureus at 3.6-{angstrom} resolution. RibU contains six transmembrane segments, adopts a previously unreported transporter fold and contains a riboflavin molecule bound to the L1 loop and the periplasmic portion of transmembrane segments 4-6. Structural analysis reveals the essential ligand-binding residues, identifies the putative transport path and, with sequence alignment, uncovers conserved structural features and suggests potential mechanisms of action among the ECF transporters.

  8. Comparative genomics analysis of the companion mechanisms of Bacillus thuringiensis Bc601 and Bacillus endophyticus Hbe603 in bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Nan; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Gao, Feng; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-06-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus endophyticus both act as the companion bacteria, which cooperate with Ketogulonigenium vulgare in vitamin C two-step fermentation. Two Bacillus species have different morphologies, swarming motility and 2-keto-L-gulonic acid productivities when they co-culture with K. vulgare. Here, we report the complete genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis Bc601 and eight plasmids of B. endophyticus Hbe603, and carry out the comparative genomics analysis. Consequently, B. thuringiensis Bc601, with greater ability of response to the external environment, has been found more two-component system, sporulation coat and peptidoglycan biosynthesis related proteins than B. endophyticus Hbe603, and B. endophyticus Hbe603, with greater ability of nutrients biosynthesis, has been found more alpha-galactosidase, propanoate, glutathione and inositol phosphate metabolism, and amino acid degradation related proteins than B. thuringiensis Bc601. Different ability of swarming motility, response to the external environment and nutrients biosynthesis may reflect different companion mechanisms of two Bacillus species. Comparative genomic analysis of B. endophyticus and B. thuringiensis enables us to further understand the cooperative mechanism with K. vulgare, and facilitate the optimization of bacterial consortium.

  9. Anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis kill cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Massaguer, Anna; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Key players in translational regulation such as ribosomes might represent powerful, but hitherto largely unexplored, targets to eliminate drug-refractory cancer stem cells (CSCs). A recent study by the Lisanti group has documented how puromycin, an old antibiotic derived from Streptomyces alboniger that inhibits ribosomal protein translation, can efficiently suppress CSC states in tumorspheres and monolayer cultures. We have used a closely related approach based on Biolog Phenotype Microarrays (PM), which contain tens of lyophilized antimicrobial drugs, to assess the chemosensitivity profiles of breast cancer cell lines enriched for stem cell-like properties. Antibiotics directly targeting active sites of the ribosome including emetine, puromycin and cycloheximide, inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis such as dactinomycin, ribotoxic stress agents such as daunorubicin, and indirect inhibitors of protein synthesis such as acriflavine, had the largest cytotoxic impact against claudin-low and basal-like breast cancer cells. Thus, biologically aggressive, treatment-resistant breast cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties exhibit exacerbated chemosensitivities to anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics targeting protein synthesis. These results suggest that old/existing microbicides might be repurposed not only as new cancer therapeutics, but also might provide the tools and molecular understanding needed to develop second-generation inhibitors of ribosomal translation to eradicate CSC traits in tumor tissues.

  10. Anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis kill cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Massaguer, Anna; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Key players in translational regulation such as ribosomes might represent powerful, but hitherto largely unexplored, targets to eliminate drug-refractory cancer stem cells (CSCs). A recent study by the Lisanti group has documented how puromycin, an old antibiotic derived from Streptomyces alboniger that inhibits ribosomal protein translation, can efficiently suppress CSC states in tumorspheres and monolayer cultures. We have used a closely related approach based on Biolog Phenotype Microarrays (PM), which contain tens of lyophilized antimicrobial drugs, to assess the chemosensitivity profiles of breast cancer cell lines enriched for stem cell-like properties. Antibiotics directly targeting active sites of the ribosome including emetine, puromycin and cycloheximide, inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis such as dactinomycin, ribotoxic stress agents such as daunorubicin, and indirect inhibitors of protein synthesis such as acriflavine, had the largest cytotoxic impact against claudin-low and basal-like breast cancer cells. Thus, biologically aggressive, treatment-resistant breast cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties exhibit exacerbated chemosensitivities to anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics targeting protein synthesis. These results suggest that old/existing microbicides might be repurposed not only as new cancer therapeutics, but also might provide the tools and molecular understanding needed to develop second-generation inhibitors of ribosomal translation to eradicate CSC traits in tumor tissues. PMID:25970790

  11. Mechanism of poly(acrylic acid) acceleration of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin: implications for the design of novel heparin mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Bernhard H; Cheang, Kai I; Desai, Umesh R

    2005-08-11

    The bridging mechanism of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin is a dominant mechanism contributing a massive approximately 2500-fold acceleration in the reaction rate and is also a key reason for the clinical usage of heparin. Our recent study of the antithrombin-activating properties of a carboxylic acid-based polymer, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), demonstrated a surprisingly high acceleration in thrombin inhibition (Monien, B. H.; Desai, U. R. J. Med. Chem. 2005, 48, 1269). To better understand this interesting phenomenon, we have studied the mechanism of PAA-dependent acceleration in antithrombin inhibition of thrombin. Competitive binding studies with low-affinity heparin and a heparin tetrasaccharide suggest that PAA binds antithrombin in both the pentasaccharide- and the extended heparin-binding sites, and these results are corroborated by molecular modeling. The salt-dependence of the K(D) of the PAA-antithrombin interaction shows the formation of five ionic interactions. In contrast, the contribution of nonionic forces is miniscule, resulting in an interaction that is significantly weaker than that observed for heparins. A bell-shaped profile of the observed rate constant for antithrombin inhibition of thrombin as a function of PAA concentration was observed, suggesting that inhibition proceeds through the "bridging" mechanism. The knowledge gained in this mechanistic study highlights important rules for the rational design of orally available heparin mimics.

  12. Micro-robot design based on swimming mechanism of bacterial flagella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANG Lu-bin; WU Jun; CUI Jun-wen

    2009-01-01

    Nanomachines are controllable machines at the nano meter or molecular scale that are composed of nano-scale components. They have their own mechanochemistry, dynamics, workspace, and usability and are composed of natures building blocks: namely proteins, DNA, and other compounds. Some bacteria (i. e. Escherichia coli) swim by rotating helical flagella. The structure and motion character of the flagellum are introduced. Through the study, a micro-robot was designed and its mechanical structure was explained in this paper. In the future, the bionic micro-robot is expected tobe built, which can travel inside the human body and carry out a host of complex operations such as minimally invasive surgery, highly localized drug delivery, and screening for diseases that are in their very early stages. It is important to medicine and could be applied in other areas, including space exploration, electronics and military.

  13. Ion Selectivity Mechanism in a Bacterial Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, Sebastian M [ORNL; Ivanov, Ivaylo N [ORNL; Wang, Hailong [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine; Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The proton-gated ion channel from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) is a prokaryotic homolog of the eukaryotic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) that responds to the binding of neurotransmitter acetylcholine and mediates fast signal transmission. Recent emergence of a high resolution crystal structure of GLIC captured in a potentially open state allowed detailed, atomic-level insight into ion conduction and selectivity mechanisms in these channels. Herein, we have examined the barriers to ion conduction and origins of ion selectivity in the GLIC channel by the construction of potential of mean force (PMF) profiles for sodium and chloride ions inside the transmembrane region. Our calculations reveal that the GLIC channel is open for a sodium ion to transport, but presents a ~10 kcal/mol free energy barrier for a chloride ion, which arises primarily from the unfavorable interactions with a ring of negatively charged glutamate residues (E-2 ) at the intracellular end and a ring of hydrophobic residues (I9 ) in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Our collective findings further suggest that the charge selection mechanism can, to a large extent, be attributed to the narrow intracellular end and a ring of glutamate residues in this position their strong negative electrostatics and ability to bind cations. By contrast, E19 at the extracellular entrance only plays a minor role in ion selectivity of GLIC. In addition to electrostatics, both ion hydration and protein dynamics are found to be crucial for ion conduction as well, which explains why a chloride ion experiences a much greater barrier than a sodium ion in the hydrophobic region of the pore.

  14. Pharmacological Inhibition of Host Heme Oxygenase-1 Suppresses Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection In Vivo by a Mechanism Dependent on T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Diego L.; Namasivayam, Sivaranjani; Amaral, Eduardo P.; Arora, Kriti; Chao, Alex; Mittereder, Lara R.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Boshoff, Helena I.; Barry, Clifton E.; Goulding, Celia W.; Andrade, Bruno B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress response antioxidant enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme released during inflammation. HO-1 expression is upregulated in both experimental and human Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and in patients it is a biomarker of active disease. Whether the enzyme plays a protective versus pathogenic role in tuberculosis has been the subject of debate. To address this controversy, we administered tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX), a well-characterized HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, to mice during acute M. tuberculosis infection. These SnPPIX-treated animals displayed a substantial reduction in pulmonary bacterial loads comparable to that achieved following conventional antibiotic therapy. Moreover, when administered adjunctively with antimycobacterial drugs, the HO-1 inhibitor markedly enhanced and accelerated pathogen clearance. Interestingly, both the pulmonary induction of HO-1 expression and the efficacy of SnPPIX treatment in reducing bacterial burden were dependent on the presence of host T lymphocytes. Although M. tuberculosis expresses its own heme-degrading enzyme, SnPPIX failed to inhibit its enzymatic activity or significantly restrict bacterial growth in liquid culture. Together, the above findings reveal mammalian HO-1 as a potential target for host-directed monotherapy and adjunctive therapy of tuberculosis and identify the immune response as a critical regulator of this function.

  15. Wnt signaling inhibits adrenal steroidogenesis by cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Elisabeth M; Kuick, Rork; Finco, Isabella; Bohin, Natacha; Hrycaj, Steven M; Wellik, Deneen M; Hammer, Gary D

    2014-09-01

    Wnt/β-catenin (βcat) signaling is critical for adrenal homeostasis. To elucidate how Wnt/βcat signaling elicits homeostatic maintenance of the adrenal cortex, we characterized the identity of the adrenocortical Wnt-responsive population. We find that Wnt-responsive cells consist of sonic hedgehog (Shh)-producing adrenocortical progenitors and differentiated, steroidogenic cells of the zona glomerulosa, but not the zona fasciculata and rarely cells that are actively proliferating. To determine potential direct inhibitory effects of βcat signaling on zona fasciculata-associated steroidogenesis, we used the mouse ATCL7 adrenocortical cell line that serves as a model system of glucocorticoid-producing fasciculata cells. Stimulation of βcat signaling caused decreased corticosterone release consistent with the observed reduced transcription of steroidogenic genes Cyp11a1, Cyp11b1, Star, and Mc2r. Decreased steroidogenic gene expression was correlated with diminished steroidogenic factor 1 (Sf1; Nr5a1) expression and occupancy on steroidogenic promoters. Additionally, βcat signaling suppressed the ability of Sf1 to transactivate steroidogenic promoters independent of changes in Sf1 expression level. To investigate Sf1-independent effects of βcat on steroidogenesis, we used Affymetrix gene expression profiling of Wnt-responsive cells in vivo and in vitro. One candidate gene identified, Ccdc80, encodes a secreted protein with unknown signaling mechanisms. We report that Ccdc80 is a novel βcat-regulated gene in adrenocortical cells. Treatment of adrenocortical cells with media containing secreted Ccdc80 partially phenocopies βcat-induced suppression of steroidogenesis, albeit through an Sf1-independent mechanism. This study reveals multiple mechanisms of βcat-mediated suppression of steroidogenesis and suggests that Wnt/βcat signaling may regulate adrenal homeostasis by inhibiting fasciculata differentiation and promoting the undifferentiated state of progenitor

  16. Kinetic analysis and molecular modeling of the inhibition mechanism of roneparstat (SST0001) on human heparanase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Daniele; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco; Milazzo, Ferdinando Maria; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Pavoni, Emiliano; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is a β-d-glucuronidase which cleaves heparan sulfate chains in the extracellular matrix and on cellular membranes. A dysregulated heparanase activity is intimately associated with cell invasion, tumor metastasis and angiogenesis, making heparanase an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapies. SST0001 (roneparstat; Sigma-Tau Research Switzerland S.A.) is a non-anticoagulant 100% N-acetylated and glycol-split heparin acting as a potent heparanase inhibitor, currently in phase I in advanced multiple myeloma. Herein, the kinetics of heparanase inhibition by roneparstat is reported. The analysis of dose-inhibition curves confirmed the high potency of roneparstat (IC50 ≈ 3 nM) and showed, at higher concentrations, a Hill coefficient consistent with the engagement of two molecules of inhibitor. A homology model of human heparanase GS3 construct was built and used for docking experiments with inhibitor fragments. The model has high structural similarity with the recently reported crystal structure of human heparanase. Different interaction schemes are proposed, which support the hypothesis of a complex binding mechanism involving the recruitment of one or multiple roneparstat chains, depending on its concentration. In particular, docking solutions were obtained in which (i) a single roneparstat molecule interacts with both heparin-binding domains (HBDs) of heparanase or (ii) two fragments of roneparstat interact with either HBD-1 or HBD-2, consistent with the possibility of different inhibitor:enzyme binding stoichiometries. This study provides unique insights into the mode of action of roneparstat as well as clues of its interaction with heparanase at a molecular level, which could be exploited to design novel potential inhibitor molecules. PMID:26762172

  17. Inhibition of angiogenesis: a novel antitumor mechanism of the herbal compound arctigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Scheuer, Claudia; Feng, Dilu; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2013-09-01

    Arctigenin, a functional ingredient of several traditional Chinese herbs, has been reported to have potential antitumor activity. However, its mechanisms of action are still not well elucidated. Because the establishment and metastatic spread of tumors is crucially dependent on angiogenesis, here we investigated whether arctigenin inhibits tumor growth by disturbing blood vessel formation. For this purpose, human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to different arctigenin doses to study their viability, proliferation, protein expression, migration, and tube formation compared with vehicle-treated controls. In addition, arctigenin action on vascular sprouting was analyzed in an aortic ring assay. Furthermore, we studied direct arctigenin effects on CT26.WT colon carcinoma cells. Spheroids of these tumor cells were transplanted into the dorsal skinfold chamber of arctigenin-treated and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice for the in-vivo analysis of tumor vascularization and growth by intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, and immunohistochemistry. We found that noncytotoxic doses of arctigenin dose dependently reduced the proliferation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells without affecting their migratory and tube-forming capacity. Arctigenin treatment also resulted in a decreased cellular expression of phosphorylated serine/threonine protein kinase AKT, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and inhibited vascular sprouting from aortic rings. In addition, proliferation, but not secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor, was decreased in arctigenin-treated tumor cells. Finally, arctigenin suppressed the vascularization and growth of engrafting CT26.WT tumors in the dorsal skinfold chamber model. Taken together, these results show for the first time an antiangiogenic action of arctigenin, which may contribute considerably toward its antitumor activity.

  18. Chronic alcohol exposure inhibits biotin uptake by pancreatic acinar cells: possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Kapadia, Rubina; Biswas, Arundhati; Said, Hamid M

    2014-11-01

    Chronic exposure to alcohol affects different physiological aspects of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC), but its effect on the uptake process of biotin is not known. We addressed this issue using mouse-derived pancreatic acinar 266-6 cells chronically exposed to alcohol and wild-type and transgenic mice (carrying the human SLC5A6 5'-promoter) fed alcohol chronically. First we established that biotin uptake by PAC is Na(+) dependent and carrier mediated and involves sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT). Chronic exposure of 266-6 cells to alcohol led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake, expression of SMVT protein, and mRNA as well as in the activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC5A6 promoter led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake by PAC, as well as in the expression of SMVT protein and mRNA and the activity of the SLC5A6 promoters expressed in the transgenic mice. We also found that chronic alcohol feeding of mice is associated with a significant increase in the methylation status of CpG islands predicted to be in the mouse Slc5a6 promoters and a decrease in the level of expression of transcription factor KLF-4, which plays an important role in regulating SLC5A6 promoter activity. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts biotin uptake in PAC and that this effect is exerted (at least in part) at the level of transcription of the SLC5A6 gene and may involve epigenetic/molecular mechanisms.

  19. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  20. Mechanisms of Neuroblastoma Cell Growth Inhibition by CARP-1 Functional Mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Magesh; Cheriyan, Vino T.; Munie, Sara; Levi, Edi; Frank, John; Ashour, Abdelkader E.; Singh, Mandip; Rishi, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastomas (NBs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of extra cranial pediatric tumors. Patients with high-risk, metastatic NBs have a long-term survival rate of below 40%, and are often resistant to current therapeutic modalities. Due to toxic side effects associated with radiation and chemotherapies, development of new agents is warranted to overcome resistance and effectively treat this disease in clinic. CARP-1 functional mimetics (CFMs) are an emerging class of small molecule compounds that inhibit growth of diverse cancer cell types. Here we investigated NB inhibitory potential of CFMs and the molecular mechanisms involved. CFM-1, -4, and -5 inhibited NB cell growth, in vitro, independent of their p53 and MYCN status. CFM-4 and -5 induced apoptosis in NB cells in part by activating pro-apoptotic stress-activated kinases (SAPKs) p38 and JNK, stimulating CARP-1 expression and cleavage of PARP1, while promoting loss of the oncogenes C and N-myc as well as mitotic cyclin B1. Treatments of NB cells with CFM-4 or -5 also resulted in loss of Inhibitory κB (IκB) α and β proteins. Micro-RNA profiling revealed upregulation of XIAP-targeting miR513a-3p in CFM-4-treated NB, mesothelioma, and breast cancer cells. Moreover, exposure of NB and breast cancer cells to CFM-4 or -5 resulted in diminished expression of anti-apoptotic XIAP1, cIAP1, and Survivin proteins. Expression of anti-miR513a-5p or miR513a-5p mimic, however, interfered with or enhanced, respectively, the breast cancer cell growth inhibition by CFM-4. CFMs also impacted biological properties of the NB cells by blocking their abilities to migrate, form colonies in suspension, and invade through the matrix-coated membranes. Our studies indicate anti-NB properties of CFM-4 and 5, and suggest that these CFMs and/or their future analogs have potential as anti-NB agents. PMID:25033461

  1. Notch inhibition by the ligand DELTA-LIKE 3 defines the mechanism of abnormal vertebral segmentation in spondylocostal dysostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Gavin; Sparrow, Duncan B; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Dunwoodie, Sally L

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in the DELTA-LIKE 3 (DLL3) gene cause the congenital abnormal vertebral segmentation syndrome, spondylocostal dysostosis (SCD). DLL3 is a divergent member of the DSL family of Notch ligands that does not activate signalling in adjacent cells, but instead inhibits signalling when expressed in the same cell as the Notch receptor. Targeted deletion of Dll3 in the mouse causes a developmental defect in somite segmentation, and consequently vertebral formation is severely disrupted, closely resembling human SCD. In contrast to the canonical Notch signalling pathway, very little is known about the mechanism of cis-inhibition by DSL ligands. Here, we report that Dll3 is not presented on the surface of presomitic mesoderm (PSM) cells in vivo, but instead interacts with Notch1 in the late endocytic compartment. This suggests for the first time a mechanism for Dll3-mediated cis-inhibition of Notch signalling, with Dll3 targeting newly synthesized Notch1 for lysosomal degradation prior to post-translational processing and cell surface presentation of the receptor. An inhibitory role for Dll3 in vivo is further supported by the juxtaposition of Dll3 protein and Notch1 signalling in the PSM. Defining a mechanism for cis-inhibition of Notch signalling by Dll3 not only contributes greatly to our understanding of this ligand's function during the formation of the vertebral column, but also provides a paradigm for understanding how other ligands of Notch cis-inhibit signalling.

  2. Inhibitive effect of cordyceps sinensis on experimental hepatic fibrosis and its possible mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Kan Liu; Wei Shen

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitive effect and its possible mechanism of Cordyceps Sinensis (CS) on CCl4-plus ethanolinduced hepatic fibrogenesis in experimental rats.METHODS: Rats were randomly allocated into a normal control group, a model control group and a CS group. The latter two groups were administered with CCl4 and ethanol solution at the beginning of the experiment to induce hepatic fibrosis. The CS group was also treated with CS 10 days after the beginning of CCl4 and ethanol administration. All control groups were given corresponding placebo at the same time. At the end of the 9th week, rats in each group were humanely sacrificed. Blood and tissue specimens were taken.Biochemical, radioimmunological, immunohistochemical and molecular biological examinations were used to determine the level change of ALT, AST, HA, LN content in serum and TGFβ1, PDGF, collagen Ⅰ and Ⅲ expression in tissue at either protein or mRNA level or both of them.RESULTS: As compared with the model control group,serum ALr, AST, HA, and LN content levels were markedly dropped in CS group (86.0±34.4 vs224.3±178.9, 146.7±60.2vs272.6±130.1, 202.0±79.3 vs316.5±94.1 and 50.4±3.0vs 59.7±9.8, respectively, P<0.05). Tissue expression of TGFβ1 and its mRNA, collagen I mRNA were also markedly decreased (0.2±0.14 vs1.73±1.40, 1.68±0.47 vs3.17±1.17,1.10±0.84 vs 2.64±1.40, respectively, P<0.05). More dramatical drop could be seen in PDGF expression (0.87±0.43vs1.91±0.74, P<0.01). Although there was no statistical significance, it was still strongly suggested that collagen Ⅲ mRNA expression was also decreased in CS group as compared with model control group (0.36±0.27 vs0.95±0.65,P=0.0615). In this experiment, no significant change could be found in PDGF mRNA expression between two groups (0.35±0.34 vs 0.70±0.46, P>0.05).CONCLUSION: Cordyceps sinensis could inhibit hepatic fibrogenesis derived from chronic liver injury, retard the development of cirrhosis, and

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Allosteric Inhibition of Brain Glycogen Phosphorylase by Neurotoxic Dithiocarbamate Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cécile; Bui, Linh-Chi; Petit, Emile; Haddad, Iman; Agbulut, Onnik; Vinh, Joelle; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2017-02-03

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are important industrial chemicals used extensively as pesticides and in a variety of therapeutic applications. However, they have also been associated with neurotoxic effects and in particular with the development of Parkinson-like neuropathy. Although different pathways and enzymes (such as ubiquitin ligases or the proteasome) have been identified as potential targets of DTCs in the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying their neurotoxicity remain poorly understood. There is increasing evidence that alteration of glycogen metabolism in the brain contributes to neurodegenerative processes. Interestingly, recent studies with N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate suggest that brain glycogen phosphorylase (bGP) and glycogen metabolism could be altered by DTCs. Here, we provide molecular and mechanistic evidence that bGP is a target of DTCs. To examine this system, we first tested thiram, a DTC pesticide known to display neurotoxic effects, observing that it can react rapidly with bGP and readily inhibits its glycogenolytic activity (kinact = 1.4 × 10(5) m(-1) s(-1)). Using cysteine chemical labeling, mass spectrometry, and site-directed mutagenesis approaches, we show that thiram (and certain of its metabolites) alters the activity of bGP through the formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond (Cys(318)-Cys(326)), known to act as a redox switch that precludes the allosteric activation of bGP by AMP. Given the key role of glycogen metabolism in brain functions and neurodegeneration, impairment of the glycogenolytic activity of bGP by DTCs such as thiram may be a new mechanism by which certain DTCs exert their neurotoxic effects.

  4. Mechanism of Nonpolar Model Substances to Inhibit Primary Gushing Induced by Hydrophobin HFBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokribousjein, Zahra; Riveros Galan, David; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Wagner, Patrick; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Arghir, Iulia; Golreihan, Asefeh; Verachtert, Hubert; Aydın, Ahmet Alper; De Maeyer, Marc; Titze, Jean; Ilberg, Vladimír; Derdelinckx, Guy

    2015-05-13

    In this work, the interactions of a well-studied hydrophobin with different types of nonpolar model substances and their impact on primary gushing is evaluated. The nature, length, and degree of saturation of nonpolar molecules are key parameters defining the gushing ability or inhibition. When mixed with hydrophobins, the nonpolar molecule-hydrophobin assembly acts as a less gushing or no gushing system. This effect can be explained in the framework of a competition effect between non-polar systems and CO2 to interact with the hydrophobic patch of the hydrophobin. Interactions of these molecules with hydrophobins are promoted as a result of the similar size of the nonpolar molecules with the hydrophobic patch of the protein, at the expense of the formation of nanobubbles with CO2. In order to prove the presence of interactions and to unravel the mechanisms behind them, a complete set of experimental techniques was used. Surface sensitive techniques clearly show the presence of the interactions, whose nature is not covalent nor hydrogen bonding according to infrared spectroscopy results. Interactions were also reflected by particle size analysis in which mixtures of particles displayed larger size than their pure component counterparts. Upon mixing with nonpolar molecules, the gushing ability of the protein is significantly disrupted.

  5. Synthesis, molecular structure, quantum mechanical studies and urease inhibition assay of two new isatin derived sulfonylhydrazides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Muhammad; Jadoon, Mehwish; Iqbal, Zafar; Fatima, Mehwish; Ali, Muhammad; Ayub, Khurshid; Qureshi, Ashfaq Mahmood; Ashraf, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Waseem, Amir; Mahmood, Tariq

    2017-04-01

    Two new isatin derivatives (E)-N‧-(1-allyl-2-oxoindolin-3-ylidene)-4-methylbenzenesulfono-hydrazide (5) and (E)-N‧-(1-allyl-2-oxoindolin-3-ylidene)-4-chlorobenzenesulfono-hydrazide (6) were synthesized in good yields by adopting two component synthetic methodology. The structure elucidation was accomplished with the help of UV-vis., FT-IR and NMR (1H and 13C) spectroscopic techniques. Suitable crystals were grown by slow evaporation method and structures were confirmed unequivocally with the help of single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Both isatin derivatives 5 and 6 exist in triclinic crystal packing having space group P-1. Crystal structures of both compounds showed that the geometries are stabilized by several intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Quantum mechanical calculations performed at density functional theory (DFT) level confirmed the experimental spectroscopic (UV-vis., FT-IR and 1H NMR) as well as X-ray diffraction results. Kinetic stability, reactivity, electrophilicity and nucleophilic behavior of both the derivatives was elaborated using frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analyses. Enzyme inhibition potential of both compounds was tested in vitro against Bacillus pasteurii urease and both compounds retarded the enzymatic activity with IC50 values of 39.46 ± 0.12 μM and 148.35 ± 0.16 μM respectively.

  6. Multiple Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Action of Lycopene in Cancer Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Trejo-Solís

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  7. Multiple molecular and cellular mechanisms of action of lycopene in cancer inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Solís, Cristina; Pedraza-Chaverrí, Jose; Torres-Ramos, Mónica; Jiménez-Farfán, Dolores; Cruz Salgado, Arturo; Serrano-García, Norma; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Sotelo, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  8. Corrosion Inhibition Mechanism of Rare Earth Metal on LC4 Al Alloy with Spilt Cell Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new method of studying the corrosion inhibition mechanism of rare earth metal(REM) on LC4 Al alloy with the spilt cell technique was studied. The principle and experimental method of the spilt cell technique were analyzed. By measuring the change of net-electric current between the two electrodes caused by the change of the amount of oxygen in the solution and the addition of CeCl3, the influence of corrosive performance of CeCl3 on LC4 super-power aluminum alloy in the 0.1 mol*L-1 NaCl solution was investigated. Meanwhile, the conditional changes of pH values, CeCl3 solution, additire and time of performance were also studied. Finally, the features of electrode surface were revealed by using SEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS). By combining these with other electric chemical techniques, such as potential-time curve, polarization curve et al.

  9. Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition for Cytoprotection: Direct versus Indirect Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Martel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are fascinating organelles, which fulfill multiple cellular functions, as diverse as energy production, fatty acid β oxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS production and detoxification, and cell death regulation. The coordination of these functions relies on autonomous mitochondrial processes as well as on sustained cross-talk with other organelles and/or the cytosol. Therefore, this implies a tight regulation of mitochondrial functions to ensure cell homeostasis. In many diseases (e.g., cancer, cardiopathies, nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases, mitochondria can receive harmful signals, dysfunction and then, participate to pathogenesis. They can undergo either a decrease of their bioenergetic function or a process called mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT that can coordinate cell death execution. Many studies present evidence that protection of mitochondria limits disease progression and severity. Here, we will review recent strategies to preserve mitochondrial functions via direct or indirect mechanisms of MPT inhibition. Thus, several mitochondrial proteins may be considered for cytoprotective-targeted therapies.

  10. Will the Amaranthus tuberculatus Resistance Mechanism to PPO-Inhibiting Herbicides Evolve in Other Amaranthus Species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chance W. Riggins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to herbicides that inhibit protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO has been slow to evolve and, to date, is confirmed for only four weed species. Two of these species are members of the genus Amaranthus L. Previous research has demonstrated that PPO-inhibitor resistance in A. tuberculatus (Moq. Sauer, the first weed to have evolved this type of resistance, involves a unique codon deletion in the PPX2 gene. Our hypothesis is that A. tuberculatus may have been predisposed to evolving this resistance mechanism due to the presence of a repetitive motif at the mutation site and that lack of this motif in other amaranth species is why PPO-inhibitor resistance has not become more common despite strong herbicide selection pressure. Here we investigate inter- and intraspecific variability of the PPX2 gene—specifically exon 9, which includes the mutation site—in ten amaranth species via sequencing and a PCR-RFLP assay. Few polymorphisms were observed in this region of the gene, and intraspecific variation was observed only in A. quitensis. However, sequencing revealed two distinct repeat patterns encompassing the mutation site. Most notably, A. palmeri S. Watson possesses the same repetitive motif found in A. tuberculatus. We thus predict that A. palmeri will evolve resistance to PPO inhibitors via the same PPX2 codon deletion that evolved in A. tuberculatus.

  11. Structure-based rationalization of urease inhibition by phosphate: novel insights into the enzyme mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benini, S; Rypniewski, W R; Wilson, K S; Ciurli, S; Mangani, S

    2001-10-01

    The structure of Bacillus pasteurii urease (BPU) inhibited with phosphate was solved and refined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data from a vitrified crystal (1.85 A resolution, 99.3% completeness, data redundancy 4.6, R-factor 17.3%, PDB code 6UBP). A distance of 3.5 A separates the two Ni ions in the active site. The binding mode of the inhibitor involves the formation of four coordination bonds with the two Ni ions: one phosphate oxygen atom symmetrically bridges the two metal ions (1.9-2.0 A), while two of the remaining phosphate oxygen atoms bind to the Ni atoms at 2.4 A. The fourth phosphate oxygen is directed into the active site channel. Analysis of the H-bonding network around the bound inhibitor indicates that phosphate is bound as the H2PO4- anion, and that an additional proton is present on the Odelta2 atom of Asp(alpha363), an active site residue involved in Ni coordination through Odelta1. The flexible flap flanking the active site cavity is in the open conformation. Analysis of the complex reveals why phosphate is a relatively weak inhibitor and why sulfate does not bind to the nickels in the active site. The implications of the results for the understanding of the urease catalytic mechanism are reviewed. A novel alternative for the proton donor is presented.

  12. Corn-derived carbohydrate inositol hexaphosphate inhibits Barrett's adenocarcinoma growth by pro-apoptotic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, David W; Riggs, Dale R; Jackson, Barbara J; Cunningham, Cynthia

    2008-02-01

    Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a naturally occurring polyphosphorylated carbohydrate that is found in food sources high in fiber content. IP6 has been reported to have significant inhibitory effects against a variety of primary tumors. We hypothesized that IP6 would inhibit the cell growth rate of Barrett's adenocarcinoma in vitro. Two Barrett's-associated adenocarcinoma cell lines, SEG-1 and BIC-1, were treated with IP6 at 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 mM concentrations. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis and necrosis were evaluated by the Annexin V FITC assay. Reductions (PIP6 decreased late apoptosis and necrosis in BIC cells, whereas in SEG-1 cells, early apoptosis, late apoptosis and necrosis were all increased by IP6. IP6 decreases cellular growth by pro-apoptotic mechanisms. Our findings suggest that IP6 has the potential to become an effective adjunct for Barrett's adenocarcinoma. Further studies are needed to evaluate safety and clinical utility of this agent in patients with Barrett's adenocarcinoma.

  13. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome and mechanism of inhibition by a peptidyl boronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu,G.; Lin, G.; Wang, M.; Dick, L.; Xu, R.; Nathan, C.; Li, H.

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has the remarkable ability to resist killing by human macrophages. The 750 kDa proteasome, not available in most eubacteria except Actinomycetes, appears to contribute to Mtb's resistance. The crystal structure of the Mtb proteasome at 3.0 Angstroms resolution reveals a substrate-binding pocket with composite features of the distinct {beta}1, {beta}2 and {beta}5 substrate binding sites of eukaryotic proteasomes, accounting for the broad specificity of the Mtb proteasome towards oligopeptides described in the companion article [Lin et al. (2006), Mol Microbiol doi:10.1111/j.1365-2958.2005.05035.x]. The substrate entrance at the end of the cylindrical proteasome appears open in the crystal structure due to partial disorder of the a-subunit N-terminal residues. However, cryo-electron microscopy of the core particle reveals a closed end, compatible with the density observed in negative-staining electron microscopy that depended on the presence of the N-terminal octapeptides of the a-subunits in the companion article, suggesting that the Mtb proteasome has a gated structure. We determine for the first time the proteasomal inhibition mechanism of the dipeptidyl boronate N-(4-morpholine)carbonyl-{beta}-(1-naphthyl)-l-alanine-l-leucine boronic acid (MLN-273), an analogue of the antimyeloma drug bortezomib. The structure improves prospects for designing Mtb-specific proteasomal inhibitors as a novel approach to chemotherapy of tuberculosis.

  14. Insights into the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Action of Human RNase6: Structural Determinants for Bacterial Cell Agglutination and Membrane Permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, David; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Velázquez, Diego; Torrent, Marc; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-04-13

    Human Ribonuclease 6 is a secreted protein belonging to the ribonuclease A (RNaseA) superfamily, a vertebrate specific family suggested to arise with an ancestral host defense role. Tissue distribution analysis revealed its expression in innate cell types, showing abundance in monocytes and neutrophils. Recent evidence of induction of the protein expression by bacterial infection suggested an antipathogen function in vivo. In our laboratory, the antimicrobial properties of the protein have been evaluated against Gram-negative and Gram-positive species and its mechanism of action was characterized using a membrane model. Interestingly, our results indicate that RNase6, as previously reported for RNase3, is able to specifically agglutinate Gram-negative bacteria as a main trait of its antimicrobial activity. Moreover, a side by side comparative analysis with the RN6(1-45) derived peptide highlights that the antimicrobial activity is mostly retained at the protein N-terminus. Further work by site directed mutagenesis and structural analysis has identified two residues involved in the protein antimicrobial action (Trp1 and Ile13) that are essential for the cell agglutination properties. This is the first structure-functional characterization of RNase6 antimicrobial properties, supporting its contribution to the infection focus clearance.

  15. Insights into the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Action of Human RNase6: Structural Determinants for Bacterial Cell Agglutination and Membrane Permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, David; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Velázquez, Diego; Torrent, Marc; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Human Ribonuclease 6 is a secreted protein belonging to the ribonuclease A (RNaseA) superfamily, a vertebrate specific family suggested to arise with an ancestral host defense role. Tissue distribution analysis revealed its expression in innate cell types, showing abundance in monocytes and neutrophils. Recent evidence of induction of the protein expression by bacterial infection suggested an antipathogen function in vivo. In our laboratory, the antimicrobial properties of the protein have been evaluated against Gram-negative and Gram-positive species and its mechanism of action was characterized using a membrane model. Interestingly, our results indicate that RNase6, as previously reported for RNase3, is able to specifically agglutinate Gram-negative bacteria as a main trait of its antimicrobial activity. Moreover, a side by side comparative analysis with the RN6(1–45) derived peptide highlights that the antimicrobial activity is mostly retained at the protein N-terminus. Further work by site directed mutagenesis and structural analysis has identified two residues involved in the protein antimicrobial action (Trp1 and Ile13) that are essential for the cell agglutination properties. This is the first structure-functional characterization of RNase6 antimicrobial properties, supporting its contribution to the infection focus clearance. PMID:27089320

  16. Inhibition mechanism of P-glycoprotein mediated efflux by mPEG-PLA and influence of PLA chain length on P-glycoprotein inhibition activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Li, Xinru; Gao, Yajie; Zhou, Yanxia; Ma, Shujin; Zhao, Yong; Li, Jinwen; Liu, Yan; Wang, Xinglin; Yin, Dongdong

    2014-01-06

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(D,L-lactic acid) (mPEG-PLA) on the activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in Caco-2 cells and further unravel the relationship between PLA chain length in mPEG-PLA and influence on P-gp efflux and the action mechanism. The transport results of rhodamine 123 (R123) across Caco-2 cell monolayers suggested that mPEG-PLA unimers were responsible for its P-gp inhibitory effect. Furthermore, transport studies of R123 revealed that the inhibitory potential of P-gp efflux by mPEG-PLA analogues was strongly correlated with their structural features and showed that the hydrophilic mPEG-PLA copolymers with an intermediate PLA chain length and 10.20 of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance were more effective at inhibiting P-gp efflux in Caco-2 cells. The fluorescence polarization measurement results ruled out the plasma membrane fluidization as a contributor for inhibition of P-gp by mPEG-PLA. Concurrently, mPEG-PLA inhibited neither basal P-gp ATPase (ATP is adenosine triphosphate) activity nor substrate stimulated P-gp ATPase activity, suggesting that mPEG-PLA seemed not to be a substrate of P-gp and a competitive inhibitor. No evident alteration in P-gp surface level was detected by flow cytometry upon exposure of the cells to mPEG-PLA. The depletion of intracellular ATP, which was likely to be a result of partial inhibition of cellular metabolism, was directly correlated with inhibitory potential for P-gp mediated efflux by mPEG-PLA analogues. Hence, intracellular ATP-depletion appeared to be possible explanation to the inhibition mechanism of P-gp by mPEG-PLA. Taken together, the establishment of a relationship between PLA chain length and impact on P-gp efflux activity and interpretation of action mechanism of mPEG-PLA on P-gp are of fundamental importance and will facilitate future development of mPEG-PLA in the drug delivery area.

  17. Administration of a polyvalent mechanical bacterial lysate to elderly patients with COPD: Effects on circulating T, B and NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzilli, Giulia; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Braido, Fulvio; Garelli, Valentina; Folli, Chiara; Chiappori, Alessandra; Riccio, Anna Maria; Bazurro, Gyada; Agazzi, Alessia; Magnani, Alessandra; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Melioli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The modifications of the subsets of circulating lymphocytes were evaluated in a group of patients with COPD undergoing treatment with a polyvalent mechanical bacterial lysate (PMBL), a drug that is able to significantly modify the natural history of these patients. Using multicolor immune-florescence and flow cytometry, T, B subsets and NK cells were extensively studied both in the group of treated patients and in a disease and age matched controls. Despite the age, in treated patients, T and NK cells were significantly increased in numbers of circulating cells, but not in percentages, while B cells remained unmodified. CD3+4+T cells were increased in treated patients, while CD3+CD8T cells were unmodified by the treatment. Activated T cells were increased but Treg, resulted reduced both in percentage than in absolute numbers. Transitional B cells resulted increased (in percentage and in absolute numbers) in their late maturation step (T3), while only early Naïve B cells were increased by the treatment, while other naïve subpopulations were unmodified. Memory B cells were reduced in percentage (but remained unmodified as absolute numbers), while the most immature form of memory B cells was significantly increased. Finally, both switch memory B cells and plasma cells resulted unmodified by the PMBL treatment. These results clearly indicated that the administration of the PMBL, even in elderly patients with COPD, was able to induce a significant immune-stimulation and these results, at cellular level, clearly support the evidence that the mechanism of action of PMBL is strictly related to a direct effect on immune-competent cells.

  18. THE MECHANISM AND DIAGNOSTIC-VALUE OF ANGIOTENSIN-I CONVERTING ENZYME-INHIBITION RENOGRAPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEZEEUW, D; JONKER, GJ; HOVINGA, TKK; BEEKHUIS, H; PIERS, DA; HUISMAN, RM; DEJONG, PE

    1991-01-01

    The effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on the sensitivity of radionuclide renography in the diagnosis of a unilateral renal artery stenosis was tested both in a conscious dog model and in the human situation. ACE inhibition (10 mg enalaprilic acid, intravenously) markedly impro

  19. 细菌的噬菌体感染抗性机制%Bacterial Resistance Mechanisms to Bacteriophage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐嘉良; 阚飙

    2013-01-01

      噬菌体广泛存在于生态环境中。细菌在与噬菌体长期的共进化过程中,衍化出了多种针对噬菌体感染的抗性机制。我们从宿主菌的抑制吸附、阻止噬菌体DNA注入、切断噬菌体DNA和影响其功能及流产感染等方面,对宿主菌抵抗噬菌体感染的机制进行了综述。%  Phages widely exist in ecological environment. In the long-term co-evolution of phage-bacteria, bacte⁃ria evolved series of resistance mechanisms. Here mechanisms involved in adsorption inhibition, preventing phage DNA injection, cutting DNA and interference in the function of DNA and abortive infection were reviewed.

  20. Trichothecene Mycotoxins Inhibit Mitochondrial Translation—Implication for the Mechanism of Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan McCormick

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB reduces crop yield and results in contamination of grains with trichothecene mycotoxins. We previously showed that mitochondria play a critical role in the toxicity of a type B trichothecene. Here, we investigated the direct effects of type A and type B trichothecenes on mitochondrial translation and membrane integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sensitivity to trichothecenes increased when functional mitochondria were required for growth, and trichothecenes inhibited mitochondrial translation at concentrations, which did not inhibit total translation. In organello translation in isolated mitochondria was inhibited by type A and B trichothecenes, demonstrating that these toxins have a direct effect on mitochondrial translation. In intact yeast cells trichothecenes showed dose-dependent inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species, but only at doses higher than those affecting mitochondrial translation. These results demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial translation is a primary target of trichothecenes and is not secondary to the disruption of mitochondrial membranes.

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibition overcomes drug resistance through a miRNA-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Hanigan, Christin L; Woster, Patrick M; Marton, Laurence J; Casero, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    The treatment of specific tumor cell lines with poly- and oligoamine analogs results in a superinduction of polyamine catabolism that is associated with cytotoxicity; however, other tumor cells show resistance to analog treatment. Recent data indicate that some of these analogs also have direct epigenetic effects. We, therefore, sought to determine the effects of combining specific analogs with an epigenetic targeting agent in phenotypically resistant human lung cancer cell lines. We show that the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275, when combined with (N(1), N(11))-bisethylnorspermine (BENSpm) or (N(1), N(12))-bis(ethyl)-cis-6,7-dehydrospermine tetrahydrochloride (PG-11047), synergistically induces the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), a major determinant of sensitivity to the antitumor analogs. Evidence indicates that the mechanism of this synergy includes reactivation of miR-200a, which targets and destabilizes kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) mRNA, resulting in the translocation and binding of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) to the polyamine-responsive element of the SSAT promoter. This transcriptional stimulation, combined with positive regulation of SSAT mRNA and protein by the analogs, results in decreased intracellular concentrations of natural polyamines and growth inhibition. The finding that an epigenetic targeting agent is capable of inducing a rate-limiting step in polyamine catabolism to overcome resistance to the antitumor analogs represents a completely novel chemotherapeutic approach. In addition, this is the first demonstration of miRNA-mediated regulation of the polyamine catabolic pathway. Furthermore, the individual agents used in this study have been investigated clinically; therefore, translation of these combinations into the clinical setting holds promise.

  2. IFITM Proteins Inhibit Entry Driven by the MERS-Coronavirus Spike Protein: Evidence for Cholesterol-Independent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Wrensch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins 1, 2 and 3 inhibit the host cell entry of several enveloped viruses, potentially by promoting the accumulation of cholesterol in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 is essential for control of influenza virus infection in mice and humans. In contrast, the role of IFITM proteins in coronavirus infection is less well defined. Employing a retroviral vector system for analysis of coronavirus entry, we investigated the susceptibility of human-adapted and emerging coronaviruses to inhibition by IFITM proteins. We found that entry of the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV is sensitive to inhibition by IFITM proteins. In 293T cells, IFITM-mediated inhibition of cellular entry of the emerging MERS- and SARS-CoV was less efficient than blockade of entry of the globally circulating human coronaviruses 229E and NL63. Similar differences were not observed in A549 cells, suggesting that cellular context and/or IFITM expression levels can impact inhibition efficiency. The differential IFITM-sensitivity of coronaviruses observed in 293T cells afforded the opportunity to investigate whether efficiency of entry inhibition by IFITMs and endosomal cholesterol accumulation correlate. No such correlation was observed. Furthermore, entry mediated by the influenza virus hemagglutinin was robustly inhibited by IFITM3 but was insensitive to accumulation of endosomal cholesterol, indicating that modulation of cholesterol synthesis/transport did not account for the antiviral activity of IFITM3. Collectively, these results show that the emerging MERS-CoV is a target of the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins and demonstrate that mechanisms other than accumulation of endosomal cholesterol can contribute to viral entry inhibition by IFITMs.

  3. Biosorption Behavior and Mechanism of Lead (Ⅱ) from Aqueous Solution by Aerobic Granules (AG) and Bacterial Alginate (BA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin; LI Yu

    2012-01-01

    Lead (Pb) and its compounds are common pollutants in industrial wastewaters.To develop appropriate Pb2+ treatment technologies,aerobic granules (AG) and bacterial alginates (BA) were studied as alternative biosorbents to remove Pb2+ from aqueous solutions.The biosorption mechanism of AG and BA were further analyzed to determine which functional groups in AG and BA are active in Pb2+ biosorption.In this paper,the Pb2+ biosorption behavior of AG and BA was respectively investigated in batch experiments from the perspectives of the initial pH,contact time,and initial Pb2+ concentration.The results showed that biosorption of Pb2+ by AG and BA occurred within 60min at the initial Pb2+ concentrations (0-150mg L-1).The actual saturated Pb2+ biosorption capability of AG was 101.97 mg g-1 (dry weight of aerobic granular biomass).When the initial pH was 5,the biosorption capability of AG and BA was highest at the initial Pb2+ concentrations (0-20mg L-1).During the process of Pb2+ biosorption,K+,Ca2+,and Mg2+ were released.The Ion Chromatography (IC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) further highlighted the main role of ion exchange between Ca2+ and Pb2+ and sequestration of Pb2+ with carboxyl (-COO-) of AG and BA.This analogical analysis verifies that BA is responsible for biosorption of Pb2+ by AG.At the same optimal pH,AG cultivated with different carbon source has different Pb2+ biosorption capacity.The Pb2+ biosorption by AG with sodium acetate as the sole carbon source is higher than AG with glucose as carbon source.

  4. Biosorption behavior and mechanism of lead (II) from aqueous solution by aerobic granules (AG) and bacterial alginate (BA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Yu

    2012-12-01

    Lead (Pb) and its compounds are common pollutants in industrial wastewaters. To develop appropriate Pb2+ treatment technologies, aerobic granules (AG) and bacterial alginates (BA) were studied as alternative biosorbents to remove Pb2+ from aqueous solutions. The biosorption mechanism of AG and BA were further analyzed to determine which functional groups in AG and BA are active in Pb2+ biosorption. In this paper, the Pb2+ biosorption behavior of AG and BA was respectively investigated in batch experiments from the perspectives of the initial pH, contact time, and initial Pb2+ concentration. The results showed that biosorption of Pb2+ by AG and BA occurred within 60min at the initial Pb2+ concentrations (0-150 mg L-1). The actual saturated Pb2+ biosorption capability of AG was 101.97 mg g-1 (dry weight of aerobic granular biomass). When the initial pH was 5, the biosorption capability of AG and BA was highest at the initial Pb2+ concentrations (0-20mg L-1). During the process of Pb2+ biosorption, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ were released. The Ion Chromatography (IC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) further highlighted the main role of ion exchange between Ca2+ and Pb2+ and sequestration of Pb2+ with carboxyl (-COO-) of AG and BA. This analogical analysis verifies that BA is responsible for biosorption of Pb2+ by AG. At the same optimal pH, AG cultivated with different carbon source has different Pb2+ biosorption capacity. The Pb2+ biosorption by AG with sodium acetate as the sole carbon source is higher than AG with glucose as carbon source.

  5. Structural and Molecular Mechanism of CdpR Involved in Quorum-Sensing and Bacterial Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingru Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although quorum-sensing (QS systems are important regulators of virulence gene expression in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, their detailed regulatory mechanisms have not been fully characterized. Here, we show that deletion of PA2588 resulted in increased production of pyocyanin and biofilm, as well as enhanced pathogenicity in a mouse model. To gain insights into the function of PA2588, we performed a ChIP-seq assay and identified 28 targets of PA2588, including the intergenic region between PA2588 and pqsH, which encodes the key synthase of Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS. Though the C-terminal domain was similar to DNA-binding regions of other AraC family members, structural studies revealed that PA2588 has a novel fold at the N-terminal region (NTR, and its C-terminal HTH (helix-turn-helix domain is also unique in DNA recognition. We also demonstrated that the adaptor protein ClpS, an essential regulator of ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, directly interacted with PA2588 before delivering CdpR to ClpAP for degradation. We named PA2588 as CdpR (ClpAP-degradation and pathogenicity Regulator. Moreover, deletion of clpP or clpS/clpA promotes bacterial survival in a mouse model of acute pneumonia infection. Taken together, this study uncovered that CdpR is an important QS regulator, which can interact with the ClpAS-P system to regulate the expression of virulence factors and pathogenicity.

  6. IL-4 inhibits TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation by inhibition of RANKL expression in TNF-α-activated stromal cells and direct inhibition of TNF-α-activated osteoclast precursors via a T-cell-independent mechanism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiya; Kitaura, Hideki; Kimura, Keisuke; Hakami, Zaki Weli; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2012-10-01

    It has been reported that osteoclastogenesis is induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Interleukin (IL)-4 is the most important cytokine involved in humoral immunity. However, no studies have investigated the effect of IL-4 on TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-4 on TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. TNF-α was administered with and without IL-4 into the supracalvariae of mice. The number of osteoclasts and the levels of mRNA for cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphate, both osteoclast markers, in mice administered TNF-α and IL-4 were lower than those in mice administered TNF-α alone. The level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase form 5b (TRACP5b) as a marker of bone resorption in mice administered both TNF-α and IL-4 was also lower. We showed that IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in osteoclast precursors in vitro. Expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in TNF-α-activated stromal cells was also inhibited. Furthermore, we investigated whether IL-4 had effects on both stromal cells and osteoclast precursors in TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. Using mice whose stromal cells and osteoclast precursors were chimeric for the presence of TNF receptors, IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in the presence of TNF-α-responsive stromal cells, and TNF-α-responsive osteoclast precursors in vivo. IL-4 also inhibited TNF-α-induced RANKL expression in the presence of TNF-α-responsive stromal cells in vivo. This event is dependent on p38 inhibition in vitro. Additionally, IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in T cell-depleted mice. In summary, we conclude that IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation by inhibiting expression of RANKL in TNF-α-activated stromal cells, and directly inhibited TNF-α-activated osteoclast precursors in vivo via a T cell-independent mechanism.

  7. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  8. Inhibition of cAMP-activated intestinal chloride secretion by diclofenac: cellular mechanism and potential application in cholera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawin Pongkorpsakol

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl- secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl- secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl- secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84 cells with IC50 of ∼ 20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell monolayers to diclofenac, either in apical or basolateral solutions, produced similar degree of inhibitions. Analyses of the apical Cl- current showed that diclofenac reversibly inhibited CFTR Cl- channel activity (IC50 ∼ 10 µM via mechanisms not involving either changes in intracellular cAMP levels or CFTR channel inactivation by AMP-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Of interest, diclofenac had no effect on Na(+-K(+ ATPases and Na(+-K(+-Cl- cotransporters, but inhibited cAMP-activated basolateral K(+ channels with IC50 of ∼ 3 µM. In addition, diclofenac suppressed Ca(2+-activated Cl- channels, inwardly rectifying Cl- channels, and Ca(2+-activated basolateral K(+ channels. Furthermore, diclofenac (up to 200 µM; 24 h of treatment had no effect on cell viability and barrier function in T84 cells. Importantly, cholera toxin (CT-induced Cl- secretion across T84 cell monolayers was effectively suppressed by diclofenac. Intraperitoneal administration of diclofenac (30 mg/kg reduced both CT and Vibrio cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion by ∼ 70% without affecting intestinal fluid absorption in mice. Collectively, our results indicate that diclofenac inhibits both cAMP-activated and Ca(2+-activated Cl- secretion by inhibiting both apical Cl- channels and basolateral K+ channels in intestinal epithelial cells. Diclofenac may be useful in the treatment of cholera and other types of secretory diarrheas resulting from intestinal

  9. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of continuous light inhibition of Atlantic salmon parr-smolt transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, S.O.; Nilsen, Tom O.; Ebbesson, Lars O.E.; Wargelius, A.; Madsen, Steffen S.; Bjornsson, B. Th; McCormick, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) rely on changes in photoperiod for the synchronization of the developmental events constituting the parr-smolt transformation. In the absence of photoperiod cues, parr-smolt transformation is incomplete, and such 'pseudo-smolts' normally fail to adapt to seawater. The present study addresses the endocrine and molecular mechanisms controlling the development of hypo-osmoregulatory ability and how artificial photoperiod can disrupt these changes. Juvenile Atlantic salmon reared under constant light (LL) from first feeding, were separated into two groups, and exposed to either LL or simulated natural photoperiod (LDN) from October, eight months prior to the expected completion of smoltification. Juveniles reared on LL grew well, but failed to show the smolt-related reduction in condition factor in spring. Gill mRNA levels of Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA) isoform ??1a decreased in LDN fish through completion of parr-smolt transformation, while levels remained unchanged in the LL group. In contrast, ??1b expression increased 6-fold in the LDN group between February and May, again with no change in the LL group. Further, Na+, K+, 2Cl- co-transporter (NKCC) showed a transient increase in expression in smolts on LDN between February and May, while no changes in mRNA levels were seen in juveniles under LL. Consequently, gill NKA activity and NKA ?? and NKCC protein abundance were significantly lower in juveniles on LL than in smolts on LDN. LL fish in spring had lower circulating levels of thyroid hormones (THs), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol. Gill GH-receptor mRNA levels, determined by quantitative PCR, were less than 50% of controls. In contrast, circulating levels of IGF-1 and gill IGF-1 receptor expression, were comparable to controls. Our findings show that continuous light prevents the completion of parr-smolt transformation at a very basic level, disrupting the natural up-regulation of key elements of the endocrine system involved in the

  11. A new mechanism of invader success: Exotic plant inhibits natural vegetation restoration by changing soil microbe community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xingjun; YU Dan; LU Zhijun; MA Keping

    2005-01-01

    Since the 1950s of the last century, the exotic plant, Eupatorium adenophorum, has spread rapidly across southwest China, damaging native ecosystems and causing great economic losses. We examined the pH, N, P, K, and organic matter concentrations, and the bacterial community character (by Biolog EcoPlateTM) in soils from sites heavily and lightly invaded by this exotic species. Also, soil from the lightly invaded site was treated with a water extract of E. adenophorum roots to examine the effect of the plant on soil properties. We grew three plant species, one native and two exotic, in pot experiment using soil from heavily invaded site to examine the effects of the soil on these plants growth. The soil analysis demonstrated that the pH, organic matter, total N, total P and total K in soils from the heavily invaded site were only slightly different from those of the lightly invaded site, but concentrations of NH4+, NO3? and available P and K in the heavily invaded site were greater than those in the lightly invaded site. The catabolic activity of soil bacterial community in the heavily invaded site was different from that in the lightly invaded site. The catabolic activity of bacterial community in soils treated by the water extract of E. adenophorum roots changed and became similar to that in soils from the heavily invaded site. The pot experiment showed that the exotic plants growth in heavily invaded soil were not different from in lightly invaded soil; however, the native plant biomass decreased dramatically when grown in soil from the heavily invaded site as compared to soil from the lightly invaded site; and the same phenomenon was found when any potential allelopathic effects by E. adenophorum were eliminated by added activated carbon to those soils. Difference in soil nutrient availability and allelopathy could not explain this phenomenon of the native plant in the soils from the heavily and lightly invaded sites. Changes observed in the soil bacterial

  12. Inhibition of DNA restrictive endonucleases by aqueous nanoparticle suspension of methanophosphonate fullerene derivatives and its mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG GaoGuang; YAO Lu; HUANG Cheng; XIE Xin; TAN Xin; YANG XinLin

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous nanoparticle suspension of fullerene and its derivatives are currently attracting much atten-tion. To determine the effects of aqueous nanoparticle suspension of a mono-methanophosphonate fuIlerene and bis-methanophosphonate fuIlerene (denoted as n-MMPF and n-BMPF, respectively) on the activities of ONA restrictive endonucleases, plasmid pEGFP-N1 was cleaved at a single but differently restrictive site by EcoR I, BamH I, and isozymes Cfr9 I and Xma I, respectively. Both n-MMPF and n-BMPF inhibited the activity of EcoR I, while n-BMPF exhibited stronger inhibition than n-MMPF. Addi-tion of n-BMPF into reaction mixtures inhibited the activities of all the four enzymes, and IC50 values for EcoR I, BamH I, Cfr9 I and Xma I were 4.3, 30, 11.7 and 8.3 μmol/L, respectively. When EcoR I was completely inhibited by n-BMPF, addition of excess amounts of pEGFP-N1 could not produce the product linear plasmid; however, increase of EcoR I amounts antagonized EcoR I inhibition of n-BMPF. Two scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mannitol and sodium azide at the concentrations of 2-10 mmool/L, did not reverse inhibition of n-BMPF, implying that this inhibition probably is not corre-lated to ROS. These results suggested that aqueous nano-fullerenee might act as inhibitors of DNA restrictive endonucleases.

  13. Inhibition of DNA restrictive endonucleases by aqueous nanoparticle suspension of methanophosphonate fullerene derivatives and its mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous nanoparticle suspension of fullerene and its derivatives are currently attracting much attention. To determine the effects of aqueous nanoparticle suspension of a mono-methanophosphonate fullerene and bis-methanophosphonate fullerene (denoted as n-MMPF and n-BMPF, respectively) on the activities of DNA restrictive endonucleases, plasmid pEGFP-N1 was cleaved at a single but differently restrictive site by EcoR I, BamH I, and isozymes Cfr9 I and Xma I, respectively. Both n-MMPF and n-BMPF inhibited the activity of EcoR I, while n-BMPF exhibited stronger inhibition than n-MMPF. Addition of n-BMPF into reaction mixtures inhibited the activities of all the four enzymes, and IC50 values for EcoR I, BamH I, Cfr9 I and Xma I were 4.3, >30, 11.7 and 8.3 μmol/L, respectively. When EcoR I was completely inhibited by n-BMPF, addition of excess amounts of pEGFP-N1 could not produce the product linear plasmid; however, increase of EcoR I amounts antagonized EcoR I inhibition of n-BMPF. Two scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mannitol and sodium azide at the concentrations of 2-10 mmol/L, did not reverse inhibition of n-BMPF, implying that this inhibition probably is not correlated to ROS. These results suggested that aqueous nano-fullerenes might act as inhibitors of DNA restrictive endonucleases.

  14. The symbiotic bacterial surface factor polysaccharide A on Bacteroides fragilis inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammation in human fetal enterocytes via toll receptors 2 and 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Meng, Di; Weng, Meiqian; Zhu, Weishu; Wu, Wenxue; Kasper, Dennis; Walker, W. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Colonizing bacteria interacting with the immature, unlike the mature, human intestine favors inflammation over immune homeostasis. As a result, ten percent of premature infants under 1500 grams weight develop an inflammatory necrosis of the intestine after birth, e.g., necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). NEC is a major health problem in this population causing extensive morbidity and mortality and an enormous expenditure of health care dollars. NEC can be prevented by giving preterm infants their mother’s expressed breast milk or ingesting selective probiotic organisms. Vaginally delivered, breast fed newborns develop health promoting bacteria (“pioneer” bacteria) which preferentially stimulate intestinal host defense and anti-inflammation. One such “pioneer” organism is Bacteroides fragilis with a polysaccharide (PSA) on its capsule. B. fragilis has been shown developmentally in intestinal lymphocytes and dendritic cells to produce a balanced T-helper cell (TH1/TH2) response and to reduce intestinal inflammation by activity through the TLR2 receptor stimulating IL-10 which inhibits IL-17 causing inflammation. No studies have been done on the role of B. fragilis PSA on fetal enterocytes and its increased inflammation. Accordingly, using human and mouse fetal intestinal models, we have shown that B. fragilis with PSA and PSA alone inhibits IL-1β-induced IL-8 inflammation in fetal and NEC intestine. We have also begun to define the mechanism for this unique inflammation noted in fetal intestine. We have shown that B. fragilis PSA anti-inflammation requires both the TLR2 and TLR4 receptor and is in part mediated by the AP1 transcription factor (TLR2) which is developmentally regulated. These observations may help to devise future preventative treatments of premature infants against NEC. PMID:28278201

  15. 致病疫霉拮抗细菌的筛选及抑菌作用研究%Screening of Antagonistic Bacterial Strain against Phytophthora infestans and Its Inhibition Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽艳; 蒋继志; 郭文

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The paper was to screen bacterial strain with significant antagonistic effect against Phytophthora infestans, so as to provide basis for further development and utilization of antagonistic bacteria to control P. infestans and potato late bright. [ Method] Plant confrontation and filter paper method was used to determine the inhibition effect of living, fermentation product, and bacterial fluid of 61 strains a-gainst P. infestans and the induced resistance of SR13-2 strain. [Result] The inhibition rate of 24 strains among 61 tested strains against my-celial growth of P. infestans was greater than 60% , and the inhibition effect of HT-6 strain was the strongest with the inhibition rate of 89.92%. However, fermentation product of all tested strains had no significant inhibition effect on P. infestans, while the inhibition effect of bacterial fluid of most strains was significantly higher than living strain; the inhibition effect of S34-1 strain was the strongest with inhibition rate of 91.50%. The bacterial fluid of SR13-2 strain was found to have significant resistance-induction effect with protection rate of 60%. [Conclusion] The inhibition effect of living and fermentation product of antagonistic strains S34-1 and SR13-2 had no relationship with each other, while bacterial fluid had great potential in controlling potato late bright.%[目的]筛选获得显著拮抗致病疫霉的细菌菌株,为深入开发利用拮抗细菌抑制致病疫霉并控制马铃薯晚疫病提供依据.[方法]用平板对峙法和滤纸片法测定61株细菌活体、发酵液及茵液对致病疫霉的抑制作用并进一步测定了SR13-2菌株的诱导抗病作用.[结果]供试的61株细菌活体对致病疫霉菌丝生长的抑制率达到60%以上的有24株,其中HT-6菌株的抑茵作用最强,抑茵率达到了89.92%:但所有供试菌株的发酵液均无显著抑菌作用,而大部分菌株茵液的抑茵作用却明显高于活体菌株,其中以S34-1菌

  16. A membrane-access mechanism of ion channel inhibition by voltage sensor toxins from spider venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok-Yong; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2004-07-01

    Venomous animals produce small protein toxins that inhibit ion channels with high affinity. In several well-studied cases the inhibitory proteins are water-soluble and bind at a channel's aqueous-exposed extracellular surface. Here we show that a voltage-sensor toxin (VSTX1) from the Chilean Rose Tarantula (Grammostola spatulata) reaches its target by partitioning into the lipid membrane. Lipid membrane partitioning serves two purposes: to localize the toxin in the membrane where the voltage sensor resides and to exploit the free energy of partitioning to achieve apparent high-affinity inhibition. VSTX1, small hydrophobic poisons and anaesthetic molecules reveal a common theme of voltage sensor inhibition through lipid membrane access. The apparent requirement for such access is consistent with the recent proposal that the sensor in voltage-dependent K+ channels is located at the membrane-protein interface.

  17. Mechanism of Excretion of a Bacterial Proteinase: Demonstration of Two Proteolytic Enzymes Produced by a Sarcina Strain (Coccus P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SARNER, NITZA Z; BISSELL, MINA J; GIROLAMO, MARIO Di; GORINI, LUIGI

    1970-06-29

    A Sarcina strain (Coccus P) produces two proteolytic enzymes. One is found only extracellularly, is far more prevalent, and is actively excreted during exponential growth. It is the enzyme responsible for the known strong proteolytic activity of the cultures of this strain. A second protease is, however, produced which remains associated with the intact cells but is released by the protoplasts. The two enzymes appear unrelated in their derivation. Calcium ions play an essential role in preventing autodigestion of the excreted enzyme. Bacterial proteins are found outside the cell boundary as a consequence either of passive processes such as leakage or lysis or of active excretion. Under conditions in which leakage and lysis do not occur, as during exponential growth, the cell boundary is a barrier causing a complete separation of the bulk of the intracellular proteins from the one or very few extracellular proteins, with no trace of either type being detectable on the wrong side of the boundary. Since in bacteria there is no evidence of protein being produced other than internally, the separation into intraand extracellular proteins should occur after peptide chain formation. The question arises as to whether the structure of the cell boundary or that of the excreted proteins themselves determines this separation. Coccus P, a Sarcina closely related to Micrococcus lysodeikticus (3), produces an extracellular proteinase during the exponential phase of growth so that the process appears to be active excretion. The organism grows exponentially in a defined synthetic medium (12) to relatively high cell density (10{sup 9} cells/ml); therefore the mechanism of excretion can be studied over an extended period of time without the difficulties of changing growth rates. Coagulation of reconstituted skim milk provides a simple and sensitive assay for enzyme activity (I 1). The extracellular proteinase has also been purified and partially characterized (6-8). It has been shown

  18. Mechanisms, molecular and sero-epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial respiratory pathogens isolated from Japanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunakawa Keisuke

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical management of community-acquired respiratory tract infections (RTIs is complicated by the increasing worldwide prevalence of antibacterial resistance, in particular, β-lactam and macrolide resistance, among the most common causative bacterial pathogens. This study aimed to determine the mechanisms and molecular- and sero-epidemiology of antibacterial resistance among the key paediatric respiratory pathogens in Japan. Methods Isolates were collected at 18 centres in Japan during 2002 and 2003 from children with RTIs as part of the PROTEKT surveillance programme. A proportion of Haemophilus influenzae isolates was subjected to sequencing analysis of the ftsI gene; phylogenetic relatedness was assessed using multilocus sequence typing. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were screened for macrolide-resistance genotype by polymerase chain reaction and serotyped using the capsular swelling method. Susceptibility of isolates to selected antibacterials was performed using CLSI methodology. Results and Discussion Of the 557 H. influenzae isolates collected, 30 (5.4% were β-lactamase-positive [BL+], 115 (20.6% were BL-nonproducing ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR; MIC ≥ 4 mg/L and 79 (14.2% were BL-nonproducing ampicillin-intermediate (BLNAI; MIC 2 mg/L. Dabernat Group III penicillin binding protein 3 (PBP3 amino acid substitutions in the ftsI gene were closely correlated with BLNAR status but phylogenetic analysis indicated marked clonal diversity. PBP mutations were also found among BL+ and BL-nonproducing ampicillin-sensitive isolates. Of the antibacterials tested, azithromycin and telithromycin were the most active against H. influenzae (100% and 99.3% susceptibility, respectively. A large proportion (75.2% of the 468 S. pneumoniae isolates exhibited macrolide resistance (erythromycin MIC ≥ 1 mg/L; erm(B was the most common macrolide resistance genotype (58.8%, followed by mef(A (37.2%. The most common pneumococcal

  19. Comparison of Helicobacter pylori Urease Inhibition by Rhizoma Coptidis, Cortex Phellodendri and Berberine: Mechanisms of Interaction with the Sulfhydryl Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cailan; Xie, Jianhui; Chen, Xiaoying; Mo, Zhizhun; Wu, Wen; Liang, Yeer; Su, Zuqing; Li, Qian; Li, Yucui; Su, Ziren; Yang, Xiaobo

    2016-03-01

    Rhizoma Coptidis, Cortex Phellodendri, and berberine were reported to inhibit Helicobacter pylori. However, the underlying mechanism remained elusive. Urease plays a vital role in H. pylori colonization and virulence. In this work, aqueous extracts of Rhizoma Coptidis, Cortex Phellodendri of different origins, and purified berberine were investigated against H. pylori urease and jack bean urease to elucidate the inhibitory capacity, kinetics, and mechanism. Results showed that berberine was the major chemical component in Rhizoma Coptidis and Cortex Phellodendri, and the content of berberine in Rhizoma Coptidis was higher than in Cortex Phellodendri. The IC50 values of Rhizoma Coptidis were significantly lower than those Cortex Phellodendri and purified berberine, of which Coptis chinensis was shown to be the most active concentration- and time-dependent urease inhibitor. The Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis indicated that the inhibition pattern of C. chinensis against urease was noncompetitive for both H. pylori urease and jack bean urease. Thiol protectors (L-cysteine, glutathione, and dithiothreithol) significantly protected urease from the loss of enzymatic activity, while fluoride and boric acid showed weaker protection, indicating the active-site sulfhydryl group was possibly responsible for its inhibition. Furthermore, the urease inhibition proved to be reversible since C. chinensis-blocked urease could be reactivated by glutathione. The results suggested that the anti-urease activity of Rhizoma Coptidis was superior to that of Cortex Phellodendri and berberine, which was believed to be more likely to correlate to the content of total alkaloids rather than berberine monomer. The concentration- and time-dependent, reversible, and noncompetitive inhibition against urease by C. chinensis might be attributed to its interaction with the sulfhydryl group of the active site of urease.

  20. Inhibition of brain cell excitability by lidocaine, QX314, and tetrodotoxin: a mechanism for analgesia from infused local anesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, J; Cole, L; Marlow, G

    1993-07-01

    Local anesthetic infusions have been used to provide analgesia in a variety of painful conditions. The mechanism for this drug effect remains unknown. To better define the electrical effects of lidocaine concentrations comparable to those obtained during analgesic infusions, lidocaine (0.05-3 mmol.l-1), QX314 (an obligatorily charged, quaternary lidocaine derivative applied within the cells), and tetrodotoxin (10 mmol.l-1) were applied to rat hippocampal pyramidal cells. The three drugs, which inhibit Na+ currents by varying mechanisms, produced tonic increases in (firing) current threshold, and decreases in the amplitude of action potentials measured using an intracellular microelectrode technique. Lidocaine inhibited action potential spikes and increased current threshold in a concentration-dependent fashion. Lidocaine 50 and 100 mumol.l-1 did not inhibit action potentials, but increased firing threshold by nearly 100%. Lidocaine 1-3 mmol.l-1 significantly inhibited action potential amplitude and increased threshold by as much as 800%. Similarly, QX314 and tetrodotoxin produced greater increases in current threshold than in action potential amplitude. QX314 produced phasic (or frequency-dependent) block during trains of stimuli at 1 Hz, even when almost no tonic block was present. Lidocaine produced less phasic block than QX314, and required both greater tonic block and more frequent stimulation to produce the phenomenon. Tetrodotoxin demonstrated no phasic block. Increases in current threshold occurred in lidocaine concentrations associated with analgesia and toxicity; inhibition of action potentials occurred scarcely at all at these concentrations. Thus, tonic increases in current threshold may underlie analgesia and supplementation of general anesthesia by intravenous lidocaine.

  1. Identification of Potential Therapeutc Mechanisms for HIP1 Inhibition in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Preparation of HIP1 antigen. A glutathione S-transferase-3’HIP1 (GST- 3’HIP1) fusion construct was used to generate 3’HIP1 antigen. Briefly, GST was fused in...initially fractionated from other bacterial proteins with glutathione -Sepharose. GST was then cleaved off of the partially pure protein with thrombin...of HIP 1 leads to testicular degeneration, it should be noted that the prostate glands from Hip] knockout mice are normal histologically and serum

  2. Antibacterial compounds of Canadian honeys target bacterial cell wall inducing phenotype changes, growth inhibition and cell lysis that resemble action of β-lactam antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Brudzynski

    Full Text Available Honeys show a desirable broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive and negative bacteria making antibacterial activity an intrinsic property of honey and a desirable source for new drug development. The cellular targets and underlying mechanism of action of honey antibacterial compounds remain largely unknown. To facilitate the target discovery, we employed a method of phenotypic profiling by directly comparing morphological changes in Escherichia coli induced by honeys to that of ampicillin, the cell wall-active β-lactam of known mechanism of action. Firstly, we demonstrated the purity of tested honeys from potential β-lactam contaminations using quantitative LC-ESI-MS. Exposure of log-phase E. coli to honey or ampicillin resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in bacterial cell shape with the appearance of filamentous phenotypes at sub-inhibitory concentrations and spheroplasts at the MBC. Cell wall destruction by both agents, clearly visible on microscopic micrographs, was accompanied by increased permeability of the lipopolysaccharide outer membrane as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. More than 90% E. coli exposed to honey or ampicillin became permeable to propidium iodide. Consistently with the FACS results, both honey-treated and ampicillin-treated E. coli cells released lipopolysaccharide endotoxins at comparable levels, which were significantly higher than controls (p<0.0001. E. coli cells transformed with the ampicillin-resistance gene (β-lactamase remained sensitive to honey, displayed the same level of cytotoxicity, cell shape changes and endotoxin release as ampicillin-sensitive cells. As expected, β-lactamase protected the host cell from antibacterial action of ampicillin. Thus, both honey and ampicillin induced similar structural changes to the cell wall and LPS and that this ability underlies antibacterial activities of both agents. Since the cell wall is critical for cell growth and

  3. Mechanism of product inhibition for cellobiohydrolase Cel7A during hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Johan P.; Alasepp, Kadri; Kari, Jeppe;

    2016-01-01

    implemented an electrochemical biosensor assay for product inhibition studies of cellulases acting on their natural substrate, cellulose. Using this method we measured the hydrolytic rate of Cel7A as a function of both product (inhibitor) concentration and substrate load. This data enabled analyses along...

  4. Whole-body prepulse inhibition protocol to test sensorymotor gating mechanisms in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletti, Patricia G; Maior, Rafael S; Hori, Etsuro; Almeida, Ricardo Miyasaka de; Nishijo, Hisao; Tomaz, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is the decrease of startle reflex amplitude when a slight stimulus is previously generated. This paradigm may provide valuable information about sensorimotor gating functionality. Here we aimed at determining the inhibited and uninhibited startle response of capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.), and to evaluate the role of the superior colliculus in PPI. Capuchin monkeys were tested in a whole-body protocol, to determine the best startle amplitude and interstimuli interval. Additionally we tested two subjects with bilateral superior colliculus damage in this protocol. Results show that 115 dB auditory pulse has induced the best startle response. In contrast to reports in other species, no habituation to the auditory stimuli was observed here in capuchins. Also, startle reflex inhibition was optimal after 120 msec interstimuli interval. Finally, there was a downward tendency of percentage inhibition in superior colliculus-lesioned monkeys. Our data provides the possibility of further studies with whole-body protocol in capuchin monkeys and reinforces the importance of the superior colliculus in PPI.

  5. Hypochlorous Acid as a Potential Wound Care Agent: Part II. Stabilized Hypochlorous Acid: Its Role in Decreasing Tissue Bacterial Bioburden and Overcoming the Inhibition of Infection on Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Martin C; Payne, Wyatt G; Ko, Francis; Mentis, Marni; Donati, Guillermo; Shafii, Susan M; Culverhouse, Susan; Wang, Lu; Khosrovi, Behzad; Najafi, Ramin; Cooper, Diane M; Bassiri, Mansour

    2007-04-11

    Background: A topical antimicrobial that can decrease the bacterial bioburden of chronic wounds without impairing the wound's ability to heal is a therapeutic imperative. A stabilized form of hypochlorous acid (NVC-101) has been demonstrated in vitro and in standard toxicity testing to possess properties that could fulfill these criteria. Materials and Methods: Using a standard rodent model of a chronically infected granulating wound, various preparations of NVC-101 and multiple treatment regimens were investigated to evaluate the role of NVC-101 in decreasing tissue bacterial bioburden and overcoming the inhibition of infection on wound healing. Quantitative bacteriology of tissue biopsies and wound healing trajectories were used to compare the various NVC-101 preparations and regimens to saline-treated negative controls and silver sulfadiazine-treated positive controls. Results: NVC-101 at 0.01% hypochlorous acid with a pH of 3.5 to 4.0 proved to be an effective topical antimicrobial. It was most effective when used for a brief period (15-30 minutes), and followed with another application. Possibly this was due to its rapid neutralization in the wound bed environment. Although not as effective at decreasing the tissue bacterial bioburden as silver sulfadiazine, NVC-101 was associated with improved wound closure. Conclusions: This stabilized form of hypochlorous acid (NVC-101) could have potential application as an antimicrobial wound irrigation and treatment solution if its effective pH range can be maintained in the clinical situation. NVC-101 solution was equally effective at pH 3.5 or 4.0 and more efficient soon after its application. As opposed to other antimicrobials investigated in this animal model, NVC-101 controls the tissue bacterial bioburden without inhibiting the wound healing process.

  6. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in mouse spleen cells: a potential mechanism for cannabinoid-mediated immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, A R; Kessler, F K; Kaminski, N E

    1992-01-01

    The ability of delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) to modulate adenylate cyclase activity in mouse spleen cells was investigated. These studies were prompted by the recent identification and cloning of a G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptor localized in certain regions of the brain and the potential for a common mechanism between cannabinoid-mediated CNS effects and immunosuppression. Temporal addition studies were initially performed to identify the period of time when spleen cells in culture were most susceptible to the inhibitory effects of delta 9-THC, as measured by the day 5 IgM antibody forming cell response. delta 9-THC was only inhibitory when added to spleen cell cultures during the first 2 hr following antigen sensitization. In light of this time course, adenylate cyclase activity was measured in spleen cells incubated in the presence of 22 microM delta 9-THC for 5 min and subsequently stimulated with forskolin. delta 9-THC treated spleen cells demonstrated a 33% inhibition and a 66% inhibition in intracellular cAMP after a 5 or 15 min stimulation with forskolin, respectively. These studies suggest that inhibition of immune function by delta 9-THC may be mediated through the inhibition of intracellular cAMP early after antigen stimulation.

  7. Quercetin Inhibits Peripheral and Spinal Cord Nociceptive Mechanisms to Reduce Intense Acute Swimming-Induced Muscle Pain in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Sergio M.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Fattori, Victor; Bussmann, Allan J. C.; Vignoli, Josiane A.; Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the flavonoid quercetin (3,3´,4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in a mice model of intense acute swimming-induced muscle pain, which resembles delayed onset muscle soreness. Quercetin intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment dose-dependently reduced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia. Quercetin inhibited myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D- glucosaminidase (NAG) activities, cytokine production, oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and gp91phox mRNA expression and muscle injury (creatinine kinase [CK] blood levels and myoblast determination protein [MyoD] mRNA expression) as well as inhibited NFκB activation and induced Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA expression in the soleus muscle. Beyond inhibiting those peripheral effects, quercetin also inhibited spinal cord cytokine production, oxidative stress and glial cells activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 [Iba-1] mRNA expression). Concluding, the present data demonstrate that quercetin is a potential molecule for the treatment of muscle pain conditions related to unaccustomed exercise. PMID:27583449

  8. High glucose disrupts oligosaccharide recognition function via competitive inhibition: a potential mechanism for immune dysregulation in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Rebecca; Wallis, Russell; Soilleux, Elizabeth J; Townsend, Paul; Zehnder, Daniel; Tan, Bee K; Sim, Robert B; Lehnert, Hendrik; Randeva, Harpal S; Mitchell, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic complications include infection and cardiovascular disease. Within the immune system, host-pathogen and regulatory host-host interactions operate through binding of oligosaccharides by C-type lectin. A number of C-type lectins recognise oligosaccharides rich in mannose and fucose - sugars with similar structures to glucose. This raises the possibility that high glucose conditions in diabetes affect protein-oligosaccharide interactions via competitive inhibition. Mannose-binding lectin, soluble DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR, and surfactant protein D, were tested for carbohydrate binding in the presence of glucose concentrations typical of diabetes, via surface plasmon resonance and affinity chromatography. Complement activation assays were performed in high glucose. DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR expression in adipose tissues was examined via immunohistochemistry. High glucose inhibited C-type lectin binding to high-mannose glycoprotein and binding of DC-SIGN to fucosylated ligand (blood group B) was abrogated in high glucose. Complement activation via the lectin pathway was inhibited in high glucose and also in high trehalose - a nonreducing sugar with glucoside stereochemistry. DC-SIGN staining was seen on cells with DC morphology within omental and subcutaneous adipose tissues. We conclude that high glucose disrupts C-type lectin function, potentially illuminating new perspectives on susceptibility to infectious and inflammatory disease in diabetes. Mechanisms involve competitive inhibition of carbohydrate binding within sets of defined proteins, in contrast to broadly indiscriminate, irreversible glycation of proteins.

  9. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, James C; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states.

  10. Bacterial wall products induce downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors on endothelial cells via a CD14-dependent mechanism: implications for surgical wound healing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogenic cytokine which has been identified as the principal polypeptide growth factor influencing endothelial cell (EC) migration and proliferation. Ordered progression of these two processes is an absolute prerequisite for initiating and maintaining the proliferative phase of wound healing. The response of ECs to circulating VEGF is determined by, and directly proportional to, the functional expression of VEGF receptors (KDR\\/Flt-1) on the EC surface membrane. Systemic sepsis and wound contamination due to bacterial infection are associated with significant retardation of the proliferative phase of wound repair. The effects of the Gram-negative bacterial wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) on VEGF receptor function and expression are unknown and may represent an important biological mechanism predisposing to delayed wound healing in the presence of localized or systemic sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a series of in vitro experiments investigating this phenomenon and its potential implications for infective wound repair. VEGF receptor density on ECs in the presence of LPS and BLP was assessed using flow cytometry. These parameters were assessed in hypoxic conditions as well as in normoxia. The contribution of CD14 was evaluated using recombinant human (rh) CD14. EC proliferation in response to VEGF was quantified in the presence and absence of LPS and BLP. RESULTS: Flow cytometric analysis revealed that LPS and BLP have profoundly repressive effects on VEGF receptor density in normoxic and, more pertinently, hypoxic conditions. The observed downregulation of constitutive and inducible VEGF receptor expression on ECs was not due to any directly cytotoxic effect of LPS and BLP on ECs, as measured by cell viability and apoptosis assays. We identified a pivotal role for soluble\\/serum CD14, a highly specific bacterial wall product receptor, in

  11. The Arabidopsis RING Domain Protein BOI Inhibits Flowering via CO-dependent and CO-independent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoa Thi; Park, Jeongmoo; Park, Eunae; Lee, Ilha; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-12-07

    BOTRYTIS SUSCEPTIBLE1 INTERACTOR (BOI) and its three homologs (BOIs) are RING domain-containing proteins that repress flowering. Here, we investigated how BOIs repress flowering. Genetic analysis of the boiQ quadruple mutant indicates that BOIs repress flowering mainly through FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). BOIs repress the expression of FT by CONSTANS (CO)-dependent and -independent mechanisms: in the CO-dependent mechanism, BOIs bind to CO, inhibit the targeting of CO to the FT locus, and thus repress the expression of FT; in the CO-independent mechanism, BOIs target the FT locus via a mechanism that requires DELLAs but not CO. This dual repression of FT makes BOIs strong repressors of flowering in both CO-dependent and CO-independent pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our finding that BOIs inhibit CO targeting further suggests that, in addition to modulating CO mRNA expression and CO protein stability, flowering regulation can also modulate the targeting of CO to FT.

  12. Characterization of mechanisms involved in presynaptic inhibition of sympathetic pressor effects induced by some 5-HT1 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M M; Calama, E; Morán, A; Martín, M L; San Román, L

    2000-01-01

    1. In a previous study, we showed that the presynaptic inhibitory action of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor agonists on sympathetic pressor effects obtained in the pithed rats were mainly mediated by activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1D receptor subtypes. At the time, we observed that some 5-HT1 receptors antagonists - WAY 100,635 and NAN-190 (both 5-HT1A receptor antagonists), methiothepin (a 5-HT1,2,5,6,7 receptor antagonist) and spiperone (a 5-HT1,2 receptor antagonist) - reduced per se the pressor effects obtained by electrical stimulation. The aim of the present work was to investigate the mechanism participating in this inhibitory effect. 2. The inhibition induced by WAY 100,635 (1000 microg kg-1, i.v.) was blocked after i.v. treatment with idazoxan, an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist (300 and 1000 microg kg-1) and was not modified after i.v. treatment with propranolol, a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist (1000 microg kg-1) and sulpiride, a D2 receptor antagonist (1000 microg kg-1). The inhibition induced by spiperone (500 microg kg-1 i.v.) was significantly blocked by sulpiride (1000 microg kg-1) and was not modified by idazoxan or propranolol. 3. Sulpiride (1000 microg kg-1) partially blocked the inhibition induced by methiothepin (50 microg kg-1 i.v.). Only pretreatment with idazoxan (300 microg kg-1) modified the inhibition induced by NAN-190 (100 microg kg-1 i.v.), such inhibition increasing after intravenous administration of idazoxan. 4. All the antagonists used in our experiments failed to inhibit the pressor responses elicited by i.v. noradrenaline administration. 5. The above results suggest that the inhibitory effects of these 5-HT1 receptor antagonists are presynaptic in nature, but not related to the blockade of 5-HT1 receptors subtypes. The simultaneous activation or inhibition of other receptor systems could explain the inhibition produced by each 5-HT1 receptor antagonist studied.

  13. Inhibition of transcription by the Caenorhabditis elegans germline protein PIE-1: genetic evidence for distinct mechanisms targeting initiation and elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dolan; Seydoux, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, specification of the germ lineage depends on PIE-1, a maternal protein that blocks mRNA transcription in germline blastomeres. Studies in mammalian cell culture have suggested that PIE-1 inhibits P-TEFb, a kinase that phosphorylates serine 2 in the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) repeats of RNA polymerase II during transcriptional elongation. We have tested this hypothesis using an in vivo complementation assay for PIE-1 function. Our results support the view that PIE-1 inhibits P-TEFb using the CTD-like motif YAPMAPT. This activity is required to block serine 2 phosphorylation in germline blastomeres, but unexpectedly is not essential for transcriptional repression or specification of the germline. We find that sequences outside of the YAPMAPT are required to inhibit serine 5 phosphorylation, and that this second inhibitory mechanism is essential for transcriptional repression and specification of the germ lineage. Our results suggest that PIE-1 uses partially redundant mechanisms to block transcription by targeting both the initiation and elongation phases of the transcription cycle.

  14. Inhibition of MLC phosphorylation restricts replication of influenza virus--a mechanism of action for anti-influenza agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Haidari

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses are a severe threat worldwide, causing large epidemics that kill thousands every year. Prevention of influenza infection is complicated by continuous viral antigenic changes. Newer anti-influenza agents include MEK/ERK and protein kinase C inhibitors; however, the downstream effectors of these pathways have not been determined. In this study, we identified a common mechanism for the inhibitory effects of a significant group of anti-influenza agents. Our studies showed that influenza infection activates a series of signaling pathways that converge to induce myosin light chain (MLC phosphorylation and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Inhibiting MLC phosphorylation by blocking RhoA/Rho kinase, phospholipase C/protein kinase C, and HRas/Raf/MEK/ERK pathways with the use of genetic or chemical manipulation leads to the inhibition of influenza proliferation. In contrast, the induction of MLC phosphorylation enhances influenza proliferation, as does activation of the HRas/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway. This effect is attenuated by inhibiting MLC phosphorylation. Additionally, in intracellular trafficking studies, we found that the nuclear export of influenza ribonucleoprotein depends on MLC phosphorylation. Our studies provide evidence that modulation of MLC phosphorylation is an underlying mechanism for the inhibitory effects of many anti-influenza compounds.

  15. Role of a novel PH-kinase domain interface in PKB/Akt regulation: structural mechanism for allosteric inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Calleja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt belongs to the AGC superfamily of related serine/threonine protein kinases. It is a key regulator downstream of various growth factors and hormones and is involved in malignant transformation and chemo-resistance. Full-length PKB protein has not been crystallised, thus studying the molecular mechanisms that are involved in its regulation in relation to its structure have not been simple. Recently, the dynamics between the inactive and active conformer at the molecular level have been described. The maintenance of PKB's inactive state via the interaction of the PH and kinase domains prevents its activation loop to be phosphorylated by its upstream activator, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. By using a multidisciplinary approach including molecular modelling, classical biochemical assays, and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET/two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM, a detailed model depicting the interaction between the different domains of PKB in its inactive conformation was demonstrated. These findings in turn clarified the molecular mechanism of PKB inhibition by AKT inhibitor VIII (a specific allosteric inhibitor and illustrated at the molecular level its selectivity towards different PKB isoforms. Furthermore, these findings allude to the possible function of the C-terminus in sustaining the inactive conformer of PKB. This study presents essential insights into the quaternary structure of PKB in its inactive conformation. An understanding of PKB structure in relation to its function is critical for elucidating its mode of activation and discovering how to modulate its activity. The molecular mechanism of inhibition of PKB activation by the specific drug AKT inhibitor VIII has critical implications for determining the mechanism of inhibition of other allosteric inhibitors and for opening up opportunities for the design of new generations of modulator drugs.

  16. Fisetin Inhibits Hyperglycemia-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Production by Epigenetic Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Hye Joo Kim; Seong Hwan Kim; Jung-Mi Yun

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by a proinflammatory state, and several inflammatory processes have been associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and the resulting complications. High glucose levels induce the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Fisetin, a flavonoid dietary ingredient found in the smoke tree (Cotinus coggygria), and is also widely distributed in fruits and vegetables. Fisetin is known to exert anti-inflammatory effects via inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. In this...

  17. Mechanism of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Inhibition of Angiotensin II-induced Apoptosis in Primary Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    joints. In addition, they may experience enlargement and bulb-like development of the fingertips and nails , a condition called clubbing [41]. Clinical...2 family, which act to regulate the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane and its release of cytochrome . Initiator caspase 9 is activated in...either a Bax channel blocker (BCB) or a Bax inhibiting peptide (V-5), while a control peptide had no effect (Fig 3B). We found that cell permeable

  18. A Common Mechanism for Resistance to Oxime Reactivation of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibited by Organophosphorus Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphates and Carbamates, Butterworth & Heinemann, Oxford, 1992. pp. 555–577. [2] P. Taylor, Anticholinesterase agents, in: L.L. Brunton, J.S...agent poisoning by in vitro analysis, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 219 (2007) 226–234. [7] A. Ashani, Z. Radic, I. Tsigelny, D.C. Vellom, N.A. Pickering... organophosphate -inhibited fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase by monoquaternary and bisquaternary ligands, Mol. Pharmacol. 55 (1998) 718– 726. [19] Z. Kovarik

  19. Chronic hyperosmotic stress inhibits renal Toll-Like Receptors expression in striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, Sauvage) exposed or not to bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Mélodie; Baekelandt, Sébastien; Bequet, Sandrine; Kestemont, Patrick

    2017-03-24

    Toll-like Receptors (TLRs) are the first innate receptors in recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In fish, upregulation of toll-like receptors during infection has been largely demonstrated while the effects of abiotic stressors on their expression remain poorly investigated. In this study, striped catfish were submitted during 20 days to three salinity profiles (freshwater, low saline water, saline water), followed by injection of a bacterial strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri. The expression of TLRs 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 19, 21, and 22 was measured in kidney at different time points in non infected and infected striped catfish. Infection induced overexpression of TLRs 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 21 and 22. With elevated salinity, the expression of all TLRs, except TLR5, was severely decreased, particularly after bacterial infection. The TLRs responsiveness of striped catfish facing bacterial disease and salinity stress and possible consequences on striped catfish immune response's efficiency are discussed.

  20. Inhibition of kinesin-5 improves regeneration of injured axons by a novel microtubule-based mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter W. Baas; Andrew J. Matamoros

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules have been identiifed as a powerful target for augmenting regeneration of injured adult axons in the central nervous system. Drugs that stabilize microtubules have shown some promise, but there are concerns that abnormally stabilizing microtubules may have only limited beneifts for regeneration, while at the same time may be detrimental to the normal work that microtubules perform for the axon. Kinesin-5 (also called kif11 or Eg5), a molecular motor protein best known for its crucial role in mitosis, acts as a brake on microtubule movements by other motor proteins in the axon. Drugs that inhibit kinesin-5, originally developed to treat cancer, result in greater mobility of microtubules in the axon and an overall shift in the forces on the microtubule array. As a result, the axon grows faster, retracts less, and more readily enters environments that are inhibitory to axonal regeneration. Thus, drugs that inhibit kinesin-5 offer a novel microtubule-based means to boost axonal regeneration without the concerns that ac-company abnormal stabilization of the microtubule array. Even so, inhibiting kinesin-5 is not without its own caveats, such as potential problems with navigation of the regenerating axon to its target, as well as morphological effects on dendrites that could affect learning and memory if the drugs reach the brain.

  1. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mansur Medina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L., which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic, a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT, which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens.

  2. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Jorge Mansur; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes; Moreira, Otacilio C; Atella, Geórgia; de Souza, Wanderley; Barrabin, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L.), which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic), a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT), which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens. PMID:25742263

  3. Inhibition mechanism exploration of investigational drug TAK-441 as inhibitor against Vismodegib-resistant Smoothened mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Yuji; Nakashima, Kosuke; Kondo, Shigeru; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Satoshi; Matsui, Hideki

    2014-01-15

    Hedgehog signaling is a driving force in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), making it an attractive therapeutic target. Vismodegib recently received FDA approval for the treatment of inoperable BCC, but a drug-resistant Smoothened (Smo) mutant (D473H) was identified in a clinical study. TAK-441 is a pyrrolo[3,2-c]pyridine-4-one derivative that potently inhibits Hh signal transduction and is currently under investigation in clinical trials. We demonstrated that TAK-441 inhibits reporter activity in D473H-transfected cells with an IC50 of 79nM, while Vismodegib showed an IC50=7100nM. In order to investigate the mode of inhibition, we evaluated the Smo inhibitors with three different binding assays, such as [(3)H]-TAK-441 membrane binding assay, affinity selection-MS detection assay, and bodipy-cylopamine whole cell assay. In three different assays, Vismodegib and cyclopamine showed lower affinity for the D473H mutant in comparison with wild-type Smo. On the other hand, TAK-441 showed almost equal binding affinity for the D473H mutant compared with wild-type Smo in the binding assays, although TAK-441 binds to the same binding site as two other well-known inhibitors. These in vitro findings suggest that TAK-441 has the potential for clinical use in cancers that are dependent on Hedgehog signaling, including wild-type tumors and Vismodegib-resistant D473H mutants.

  4. Inhibition of kinesin-5 improves regeneration of injured axons by a novel microtubule-based mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Baas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules have been identified as a powerful target for augmenting regeneration of injured adult axons in the central nervous system. Drugs that stabilize microtubules have shown some promise, but there are concerns that abnormally stabilizing microtubules may have only limited benefits for regeneration, while at the same time may be detrimental to the normal work that microtubules perform for the axon. Kinesin-5 (also called kif11 or Eg5, a molecular motor protein best known for its crucial role in mitosis, acts as a brake on microtubule movements by other motor proteins in the axon. Drugs that inhibit kinesin-5, originally developed to treat cancer, result in greater mobility of microtubules in the axon and an overall shift in the forces on the microtubule array. As a result, the axon grows faster, retracts less, and more readily enters environments that are inhibitory to axonal regeneration. Thus, drugs that inhibit kinesin-5 offer a novel microtubule-based means to boost axonal regeneration without the concerns that accompany abnormal stabilization of the microtubule array. Even so, inhibiting kinesin-5 is not without its own caveats, such as potential problems with navigation of the regenerating axon to its target, as well as morphological effects on dendrites that could affect learning and memory if the drugs reach the brain.

  5. Enzyme Mechanism and Slow-Onset Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase by an Inorganic Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Patrícia Soares de Maria; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Malaria continues to be a major cause of children's morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing nearly one million deaths annually. The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, synthesizes fatty acids employing the Type II fatty acid biosynthesis system (FAS II), unlike humans that rely on the Type I (FAS I) pathway. The FAS II system elongates acyl fatty acid precursors of the cell membrane in Plasmodium. Enoyl reductase (ENR) enzyme is a member of the FAS II system. Here we present steady-state kinetics, pre-steady-state kinetics, and equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy data that allowed proposal of P. falciparum ENR (PfENR) enzyme mechanism. Moreover, building on previous results, the present study also evaluates the PfENR inhibition by the pentacyano(isoniazid)ferrateII compound. This inorganic complex represents a new class of lead compounds for the development of antimalarial agents focused on the inhibition of PfENR. PMID:21603269

  6. Systematic study of imidazoles inhibiting IDO1 via the integration of molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yi; Wang, Fang; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wenjie; Zhang, Yihua; Xu, Qiang; Lai, Yisheng

    2017-03-14

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is regarded as an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. To rationalize the detailed interactions between IDO1 and its inhibitors at the atomic level, an integrated computational approach by combining molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics methods was employed in this report. Specifically, the binding modes of 20 inhibitors was initially investigated using the induced fit docking (IFD) protocol, which outperformed other two docking protocols in terms of correctly predicting ligand conformations. Secondly, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and MM/PBSA free energy calculations were employed to determine the dynamic binding process and crucial residues were confirmed through close contact analysis, hydrogen-bond analysis and binding free energy decomposition calculations. Subsequent quantum mechanics and nonbonding interaction analysis were carried out to provide in-depth explanations on the critical role of those key residues, and Arg231 and 7-propionate of the heme group were major contributors to ligand binding, which lowed a great amount of interaction energy. We anticipate that these findings will be valuable for enzymatic studies and rational drug design.

  7. Evaluation of organic cation transporter 3 (SLC22A3) inhibition as a potential mechanism of antidepressant action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao-Jie; Appel, David I; Gründemann, Dirk; Richelson, Elliott; Markowitz, John S

    2012-04-01

    Organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3, SLC22A3) is a low-affinity, high-capacity transporter widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and other major organs in both humans and rodents. It is postulated that OCT3 has a role in the overall regulation of neurotransmission and maintenance of homeostasis within the CNS. It is generally believed that all antidepressant drugs in current clinical use exert their primary therapeutic effects through inhibition of one or more of the high-affinity neuronal plasma membrane monoamine transporters, such as the norepinephrine transporter and the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of selected antidepressants on OCT3 activity in OCT3-transfected cells to evaluate whether OCT3 inhibition may at least in part contribute to the pharmacological effects of tested antidepressants. The studies demonstrated that all examined antidepressants inhibited OCT3-mediated uptake of the established OCT3 substrate 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (4-Di-1-ASP) in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC(50) values were determined to be 4.7 μM, 7.4 μM, 12.0 μM, 18.6 μM, 11.2 μM, and 21.9 μM for desipramine, sertraline, paroxetine, amitriptyline, imipramine, and fluoxetine, respectively. Additionally, desipramine had an IC(50) value of 0.7 μM for the uptake of NE by OCT3, while the IC(50) value of sertraline was 2.3 μM for 5-HT uptake. Both desipramine and sertraline appeared to inhibit OCT3 activity via a non-competitive mechanism. In vivo studies are warranted to determine whether such effects on OCT3 inhibition are of sufficient magnitude to contribute to the overall therapeutic effects of antidepressants.

  8. Inhibition of the PLP-dependent enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase by cycloserine: evidence for a novel decarboxylative mechanism of inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowther, Jonathan; Yard, Beverley A.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Carter, Lester G.; Bhat, Venugopal T.; Raman, Marine C. C.; Clarke, David J.; Ramakers, Britta; McMahon, Stephen A.; Naismith, James H.; Campopiano, Dominic J.

    2013-01-01

    Cycloserine (CS, 4-amino-3-isoxazolidone) is a cyclic amino acid mimic that is known to inhibit many essential pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Two CS enantiomers are known; d-cycloserine (DCS, also known as Seromycin), is a natural product that is used to treat resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections as well as neurological disorders since it is a potent NMDA receptor agonist, and l-cycloserine (LCS), is a synthetic enantiomer whose usefulness as a drug has been hampered by its inherent toxicity arising through inhibition of sphingolipid metabolism. Previous studies on various PLP-dependent enzymes revealed a common mechanism of inhibition by both enantiomers of CS; the PLP cofactor is disabled by forming a stable 3-hydroxyisoxazole/pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate (PMP) adduct at the active site where the cycloserine ring remains intact. Here we describe a novel mechanism of CS inactivation of the PLP-dependent enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) from Sphingomonas paucimobilis. SPT catalyses the condensation of l-serine and palmitoyl-CoA, the first step in the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. We have used a range of kinetic, spectroscopic and structural techniques to postulate that both LCS and DCS inactivate SPT by transamination to form a free pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate (PMP) and β-aminooxyacetaldehyde that remain bound at the active site. We suggest this occurs by ring opening of the cycloserine ring followed by decarboxylation. Enzyme kinetics show that inhibition is reversed by incubation with excess PLP and that LCS is a more effective SPT inhibitor than DCS. UV-visible spectroscopic data, combined with site-directed mutagenesis, suggest that a mobile Arg378 residue is involved in cycloserine inactivation of SPT. PMID:20445930

  9. Angiotensin II inhibits insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and Akt activation through tyrosine nitration-dependent mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Csibi

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II plays a major role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and diabetes by inhibiting insulin's metabolic and potentiating its trophic effects. Whereas the precise mechanisms involved remain ill-defined, they appear to be associated with and dependent upon increased oxidative stress. We found Ang II to block insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation in L6 myotubes in an NO- and O(2(*--dependent fashion suggesting the involvement of peroxynitrite. This hypothesis was confirmed by the ability of Ang II to induce tyrosine nitration of the MAP kinases ERK1/2 and of protein kinase B/Akt (Akt. Tyrosine nitration of ERK1/2 was required for their phosphorylation on Thr and Tyr and their subsequent activation, whereas it completely inhibited Akt phosphorylation on Ser(473 and Thr(308 as well as its activity. The inhibitory effect of nitration on Akt activity was confirmed by the ability of SIN-1 to completely block GSK3alpha phosphorylation in vitro. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase and NAD(PHoxidase and scavenging of free radicals with myricetin restored insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and GLUT4 translocation in the presence of Ang II. Similar restoration was obtained by inhibiting the ERK activating kinase MEK, indicating that these kinases regulate Akt activation. We found a conserved nitration site of ERK1/2 to be located in their kinase domain on Tyr(156/139, close to their active site Asp(166/149, in agreement with a permissive function of nitration for their activation. Taken together, our data show that Ang II inhibits insulin-mediated GLUT4 translocation in this skeletal muscle model through at least two pathways: first through the transient activation of ERK1/2 which inhibit IRS-1/2 and second through a direct inhibitory nitration of Akt. These observations indicate that not only oxidative but also nitrative stress play a key role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. They underline the role of protein

  10. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet S. H. Lorv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  11. Crystal structures of the SAM-III/S[subscript MK] riboswitch reveal the SAM-dependent translation inhibition mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, C.; Smith, A.M.; Fuchs, R.T.; Ding, F.; Rajashankar, K.; Henkin, T.M.; Ke, A. (Cornell); (OSU)

    2010-01-07

    Three distinct classes of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-responsive riboswitches have been identified that regulate bacterial gene expression at the levels of transcription attenuation or translation inhibition. The SMK box (SAM-III) translational riboswitch has been identified in the SAM synthetase gene in members of the Lactobacillales. Here we report the 2.2-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Enterococcus faecalis SMK box riboswitch. The Y-shaped riboswitch organizes its conserved nucleotides around a three-way junction for SAM recognition. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence, which is sequestered by base-pairing with the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence in response to SAM binding, also directly participates in SAM recognition. The riboswitch makes extensive interactions with the adenosine and sulfonium moieties of SAM but does not appear to recognize the tail of the methionine moiety. We captured a structural snapshot of the SMK box riboswitch sampling the near-cognate ligand S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) in which SAH was found to adopt an alternative conformation and fails to make several key interactions.

  12. Resistance mechanisms of bacterial and rational use of antibiotics%细菌耐药机制与抗菌药物的合理应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何洪海

    2011-01-01

    随着抗菌药物的广泛应用,越来越多的细菌出现耐药性,而且耐药程度也越来越高.细菌的耐药成为感染性疾病中治疗的难题,常因此而导致疗程的延长、费用的增加以及死亡率的升高,造成了巨大的经济损失.本文综述了近年来国内外细菌耐药机制的研究进展,并结合本院实际工作提出合理使用抗菌药物的建议.%With the extensive use of anti-bacterial agents, the bacteria appear more and more resistance. Bacteria become resistant to the treatment of infectious diseases, often leading to extended treatment course, in-creased costs and increased mortality and causing enormous economic losses. In this paper, the mechanism of bacterial resistance in recent years were elaborated, as well as how to use anti-bacterial agents reasonably combining with the actual work.

  13. Bacterial Modulation of Plant Ethylene Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamalero, Elisa; Glick, Bernard R

    2015-09-01

    A focus on the mechanisms by which ACC deaminase-containing bacteria facilitate plant growth.Bacteria that produce the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, when present either on the surface of plant roots (rhizospheric) or within plant tissues (endophytic), play an active role in modulating ethylene levels in plants. This enzyme activity facilitates plant growth especially in the presence of various environmental stresses. Thus, plant growth-promoting bacteria that express ACC deaminase activity protect plants from growth inhibition by flooding and anoxia, drought, high salt, the presence of fungal and bacterial pathogens, nematodes, and the presence of metals and organic contaminants. Bacteria that express ACC deaminase activity also decrease the rate of flower wilting, promote the rooting of cuttings, and facilitate the nodulation of legumes. Here, the mechanisms behind bacterial ACC deaminase facilitation of plant growth and development are discussed, and numerous examples of the use of bacteria with this activity are summarized.

  14. Hyperosmotic stress inhibits insulin receptor substrate-1 function by distinct mechanisms in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gual, Philippe; Gonzalez, Teresa; Grémeaux, Thierry;

    2003-01-01

    . Furthermore, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin prevented the osmotic shock-induced phosphorylation of IRS-1 on Ser307. The inhibition of mTOR completely reversed the inhibitory effect of hyperosmotic stress on insulin-induced IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and PI 3-kinase activation....... In addition, prolonged osmotic stress enhanced the degradation of IRS proteins through a rapamycin-insensitive pathway and a proteasome-independent process. These data support evidence of new mechanisms involved in osmotic stress-induced cellular insulin resistance. Short-term osmotic stress induces...

  15. A Dynamic Model for Cellulosic Biomass Hydrolysis: a Comprehensive Analysis and Validation of Hydrolysis and Product Inhibition Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsai, Chien Tai; Morales Rodriguez, Ricardo; Sin, Gürkan;

    2014-01-01

    product inhibitors such as glucose, cellobiose and xylose) to test the hydrolysis and product inhibition mechanisms of the model. A nonlinear least squares method was used to identify the model and estimate kinetic parameters based on the experimental data. The suitable mathematical model for industrial...... of cellulose hydrolysis behaviour over a broad range of substrate concentrations (50–150 g/L) and enzyme loadings (15.8–31.6 and 1–5.9 mg protein/g cellulose for Celluclast and Novozyme 188, respectively) was possible. This is the first study introducing transglycosylation into the semimechanistic model...

  16. Salvianolic Acid B inhibits platelet adhesion under conditions of flow by a mechanism involving the collagen receptor alpha 2 beta 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Ya Ping; Zhao, Xiao Min; Pan, Shao Dong; Guo, De An; Wei, Ran; Han, Ji Ju; Kainoh, Mie; Xia, Zuo Li; de Groot, Philip G.; Lisman, Ton

    2008-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (SAB) is a component of Danshen, a herb widely used in Chinese medicine, and was previously shown to exert a number of biological activities including inhibition of platelet function, but the exact mechanisms involved are unclear. SAB dose-dependently inhibited platelet deposition

  17. A role of TRPA1 in mechanical hyperalgesia is revealed by pharmacological inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynh Truc

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mechanical hyperalgesia is a clinically-relevant form of pain sensitization that develops through largely unknown mechanisms. TRPA1, a Transient Receptor Potential ion channel, is a sensor of pungent chemicals that may play a role in acute noxious mechanosensation and cold thermosensation. We have developed a specific small molecule TRPA1 inhibitor (AP18 that can reduce cinnameldehyde-induced nociception in vivo. Interestingly, AP18 is capable of reversing CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Although TRPA1-deficient mice develop normal CFA-induced hyperalgeisa, AP18 is ineffective in the knockout mice, consistent with an on-target mechanism. Therefore, TRPA1 plays a role in sensitization of nociception, and that compensation in TRPA1-deficient mice masks this requirement.

  18. Mechanism of Activation and Inhibition of the HER4/ErbB4 Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu,C.; Tarrant, M.; Choi, S.; Sathyamurthy, A.; Bose, R.; Banjade, S.; Pal, A.; Bornmann, W.; Lemmon, M.; et al

    2008-01-01

    HER4/ErbB4 is a ubiquitously expressed member of the EGF/ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases that is essential for normal development of the heart, nervous system, and mammary gland. We report here crystal structures of the ErbB4 kinase domain in active and lapatinib-inhibited forms. Active ErbB4 kinase adopts an asymmetric dimer conformation essentially identical to that observed to be important for activation of the EGF receptor/ErbB1 kinase. Mutagenesis studies of intact ErbB4 in Ba/F3 cells confirm the importance of this asymmetric dimer for activation of intact ErbB4. Lapatinib binds to an inactive form of the ErbB4 kinase in a mode equivalent to its interaction with the EGF receptor. All ErbB4 residues contacted by lapatinib are conserved in the EGF receptor and HER2/ErbB2, which lapatinib also targets. These results demonstrate that key elements of kinase activation and inhibition are conserved among ErbB family members.

  19. A novel regulatory mechanism of naringenin through inhibition of T lymphocyte function in contact hypersensitivity suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Feng; Tang, Yijun; Gao, Zhe [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Qiang, E-mail: molpharm@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-06-25

    Naringenin, a flavonoid in grapefruits and citrus fruits, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a T cell-mediated immune reaction, and the factors released from macrophages also contribute to this response. Previous studies showed that naringenin suppressed CHS by inhibiting activation and migration of macrophages. However, little is known about naringenin's effects on T lymphocytes. Our study indicated that naringenin potently suppressed picryl chloride (PCl)-induced contact hypersensitivity by inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes. In vitro, both of the activated hapten-specific T cells and the T cells stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 showed growth arrest after naringenin treatment. Furthermore, naringenin reduced CD69 (the protein level) and cytokines such as IL-2, TNF-{alpha}, and IFN-{gamma} (the mRNA level) expressions which highly expressed by activated T cells. Meanwhile, naringenin also induced T cell apoptosis by upregulation of Bax, Bad, PARP, cleaved-caspase 3 and downregulation of phosphorylated Akt, Bcl-2. These findings suggest that, besides its anti-inflammatory activities in macrophages, naringenin also showed inhibitory effects on the activation and proliferation of T cells to alleviate symptoms of contact hypersensitivity.

  20. Bacterial radiosensitivity to gamma and ultraviolet. Compositional dependence and repair mechanisms; Radiosensibilidad bacteriana frente a gamma y ultravioleta. Dependencia composicional y mecanismos de reparacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez Angulo, R. M.; Davila, C. A.

    1974-07-01

    The gamma and ultraviolet radiosensitivity of several species of bacteria has been determined its dependence on DNAs composition and repair processes has been studied. Base composition are evaluated by chromatography, DNA melting temperature and isopycnic sedimentation on CsCl gradient. Repair capacity of gamma -and UV- lesions has been studied in two bacterial strains with same DMA base composition. It is concluded that the postulated correlation between radiosensitivity and base composition can not be generalized, the enzymatic repair mechanisms being of determining on radiosensitivity. (Author) 248 refs.

  1. AT1-IR-beta Association: A New Mechanism for the Inhibition of Insulin Receptor Function in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Pulakat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological evidence show that increased mortality in breast cancer is linked to hypertension and insulin resistance. Because Angiotensin II (Ang II, a hormone implicated in hypertension and insulin resistance, is a normal mitogen for breast tissue and elevated expression of the Ang II receptor AT1 is seen in breast cancer, we analyzed the effects of Ang II exposure on the functions of IR in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Exposure of MCF-7 to Ang II for 2 hours a significantly reduced 125I-insulin binding to IR, and b induced co-immuno-precipitation of the AT1 with IR-beta subunit. These Ang II-mediated effects on IR were inhibited by the AT1 antagonist losartan, and were not observed when exposure time was below 1-hour. These observations suggest extended exposure to Ang II have detrimental effects on insulin binding to IR that were not discovered in the previous studies where Ang II-exposure of insulin responsive cells was performed for periods less than one hour. In addition, they suggest a novel mechanism that involves AT1-IR-beta association for the inhibition of insulin binding to IR in response to extended exposure (2-hours of breast cancer cells to elevated levels of Ang II (as seen in hypertensive patients, and provides a molecular link for the inhibition of normal IR signaling by Ang II in breast cancer.

  2. Investigation of scale inhibition mechanisms based on the effect of scale inhibitor on calcium carbonate crystal forms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG GuiCai; GE JiJiang; SUN MingQin; PAN BinLin; MAO Tao; SONG ZhaoZheng

    2007-01-01

    To probe the scale inhibition mechanisms, calcium carbonate scale occurring before and after the addition of scale inhibitors was collected. The results from scale SEM confirm that, without scale inhibitor, calcium carbonate scale shows rhombohedron and hexagon, which are the characteristic feathers of calcite. After addition of inhibitors, morphology of scale is changed, and the more efficient the scale inhibitor is, the more greatly the morphology is modified. To elucidate the scale constitute, they were further analyzed by FT-IR, XRD. Besides calcite, vaterite and aragonite occur in calcium carbonate scale after addition of inhibitors, and the higher scale inhibition efficiency is, the more vaterite presents in scale. It can be concluded that the alteration of morphology is ascribed to the change of crystal form. There are three stages in the crystallizing process including occurrence and disappearing of unstable phase, occurrence and disappearing of metastable phase, development of stable phase. Without scale inhibitors, metastable phases usually transform into stable phase, thus the main constitute of formed scale is calcite. When scale inhibitors are added, both formation and transformation of metastable phases are inhibited, which results in the occurrence of aragonite and vaterite. From the fact that more vaterite presents in scale with a more efficient scale inhibitor added, we can see that the function of scale inhibitor is realized mainly by controlling the crystallizing process at the second stage.

  3. Investigation of scale inhibition mechanisms based on the effect of scale inhibitor on calcium carbonate crystal forms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To probe the scale inhibition mechanisms,calcium carbonate scale occurring before and after the ad- dition of scale inhibitors was collected.The results from scale SEM confirm that,without scale inhibitor, calcium carbonate scale shows rhombohedron and hexagon,which are the characteristic feathers of calcite.After addition of inhibitors,morphology of scale is changed,and the more efficient the scale inhibitor is,the more greatly the morphology is modified.To elucidate the scale constitute,they were further analyzed by FT-IR,XRD.Besides calcite,vaterite and aragonite occur in calcium carbonate scale after addition of inhibitors,and the higher scale inhibition efficiency is,the more vaterite presents in scale.It can be concluded that the alteration of morphology is ascribed to the change of crystal form. There are three stages in the crystallizing process including occurrence and disappearing of unstable phase,occurrence and disappearing of metastable phase,development of stable phase.Without scale inhibitors,metastable phases usually transform into stable phase,thus the main constitute of formed scale is calcite.When scale inhibitors are added,both formation and transformation of metastable phases are inhibited,which results in the occurrence of aragonite and vaterite.From the fact that more vaterite presents in scale with a more efficient scale inhibitor added,we can see that the function of scale inhibitor is realized mainly by controlling the crystallizing process at the second stage.

  4. Creation of an artificial metalloprotein with a Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst moiety through the intrinsic inhibition mechanism of α-chymotrypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Takashi; Imai, Chie; Yoshida, Takefumi; Saito, Takashi; Hayashi, Takashi; Hirota, Shun

    2012-02-01

    An L-phenylalanyl chloromethylketone-based inhibitor equipped with a Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst moiety was regioselectively incorporated into the cleft of α-chymotrypsin through the intrinsic inhibition mechanism of the protein to construct an artificial organometallic protein.

  5. Peripherally injected linalool and bergamot essential oil attenuate mechanical allodynia via inhibiting spinal ERK phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahata, Hikari; Komatsu, Takaaki; Katsuyama, Soh; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Takahama, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    Bergamot essential oil (BEO) is one of the most common essential oil containing linalool and linalyl acetate as major volatile components. This study investigated the effect of intraplantar (i.pl.) bergamot essential oil (BEO) or linalool on neuropathic hypersensitivity induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) in mice. The i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool into the ipsilateral hindpaw to PSNL reduced PSNL-induced mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. Peripheral (i.pl.) injection of BEO or linalool into the contralateral hindpaw did not yield anti-allodynic effects, suggesting a local anti-mechanical allodynic effect of BEO or linalool in PSNL mice. Anti-mechanical hypersensitivity of morphine was enhanced by the combined injection of BEO or linalool at an ineffective dose when injected alone. We also examined the possible involvement of spinal extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) in BEO or linalool-induced anti-mechanical allodynia. In western blotting analysis, i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool resulted in a significant blockade of spinal ERK activation induced by PSNL. These results suggest that i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool may reduce PSNL-induced mechanical allodynia followed by decreasing spinal ERK activation.

  6. Mechanism of inhibition of HSV-1 replication by tumor necrosis factor and interferon gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1991-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) synergizes with interferon (IFN gamma) in the blockade of HSV-1 replication. Antibodies against IFN beta block this synergism, implying a role of IFN beta in the antiviral activity of TNF plus IFN gamma. IFN beta 1 added exogenously to Hep-2 cells shows antiviral activity against HSV-1 only at high concentrations, whereas IFN beta 2 (also known as IL-6) alone has no effect on the replication of VSV or HSV-1 even when 1,000 U/ml are present. Our results are in accordance with the idea that TNF induces IFN beta 1 and that both cytokines must be present in the culture medium to synergize with IFN gamma in order to inhibit HSV-1 replication.

  7. Topological effects of charge transfer in telomere G-quadruplex: Mechanism on telomerase activation and inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    We explore charge transfer in the telomere G-Quadruplex (TG4) DNA theoretically by the nonequilibrium Green's function method, and reveal the topological effect of charge transport in TG4 DNA. The consecutive TG4(CTG4) is semiconducting with 0.2 ~ 0.3eV energy gap. Charges transfers favorably in the consecutive TG4, but are trapped in the non-consecutive TG4 (NCTG4). The global conductance is inversely proportional to the local conductance for NCTG4. The topological structure transition from NCTG4 to CTG4 induces abruptly ~ 3nA charge current, which provide a microscopic clue to understand the telomerase activated or inhibited by TG4. Our findings reveal the fundamental property of charge transfer in TG4 and its relationship with the topological structure of TG4.

  8. Topological Effects of Charge Transfer in Telomere G-Quadruplex Mechanism on Telomerase Activation and Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2013-02-01

    We explore the charge transfer in the telomere G-Quadruplex (TG4) DNA theoretically by the nonequilibrium Green's function method, and reveal the topological effect of the charge transport in TG4 DNA. The consecutive TG4 (CTG4) is semiconducting with 0.2 0.3 eV energy gap. Charges transfer favorably in the CTG4, but are trapped in the nonconsecutive TG4 (NCTG4). The global conductance is inversely proportional to the local conductance for NCTG4. The topological structure transition from NCTG4 to CTG4 induces abruptly 3nA charge current, which provide a microscopic clue to understand the telomerase activated or inhibited by TG4. Our findings reveal the fundamental property of charge transfer in TG4 and its relationship with the topological structure of TG4.

  9. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  10. Bacterial leaching of metal sulfides proceeds by two indirect mechanisms via thiosulfate or via polysulfides and sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schippers, A.; Sand, W. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Botanik

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial leaching, the biooxidation of metal sulfides to soluble metal sulfates and sulfuric acid, is effected by specialized bacteria. The acid-insoluble metal sulfides FeS{sub 2}, MoS{sub 2}, and WS{sub 2} are chemically attacked by iron(III) hexahydrate ions, generating thiosulfate, which is oxidized to sulfuric acid. Other metal sulfides are attacked by iron(III) ions and by protons, resulting in the formation of elemental sulfur via intermediary polysulfides. Sulfur is biooxidized to sulfuric acid. This explains leaching of metal sulfides by Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

  11. Retinoic acid inhibits endometrial cancer cell growth via multiple genomic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, You-Hong; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Yin, Ping; Bulun, Serdar E

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated that retinoic acid (RA) may be therapeutic for endometrial cancer. However, the downstream target genes and pathways triggered by ligand-activated RA receptor α (RARα) in endometrial cancer cells are largely unknown. In this study, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting assays were used to assess the roles of RA and the RA agonist (AM580) in the growth of endometrial cancer cells. Illumina-based microarray expression profiling of endometrial Ishikawa cells incubated with and without AM580 for 1, 3, and 6 h was performed. We found that both RA and AM580 markedly inhibited endometrial cancer cell proliferation, while knockdown of RARα could block AM580 inhibition. Knockdown of RARα significantly increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen and BCL2 protein levels. Incubation of Ishikawa cells with or without AM580 followed by microarray expression profiling showed that 12 768 genes out of 47 296 gene probes were differentially expressed with significant P values. We found that 90 genes were the most regulated genes with the most significant P value (PAM580 highly regulated these genes, whereas chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assay demonstrated that ligand-activated RARα interacted with the promoter of these genes in intact endometrial cancer cells. AM580 also significantly altered 18 pathways including those related to cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In conclusion, AM580 treatment of Ishikawa cells causes the differential expression of a number of RARα target genes and activation of signaling pathways. These pathways could, therefore, mediate the carcinogenesis of human endometrial cancer.

  12. Fisetin Inhibits Hyperglycemia-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Production by Epigenetic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Joo Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is characterized by a proinflammatory state, and several inflammatory processes have been associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and the resulting complications. High glucose levels induce the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Fisetin, a flavonoid dietary ingredient found in the smoke tree (Cotinus coggygria, and is also widely distributed in fruits and vegetables. Fisetin is known to exert anti-inflammatory effects via inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. In this study, we analyzed the effects of fisetin on proinflammatory cytokine secretion and epigenetic regulation, in human monocytes cultured under hyperglycemic conditions. Human monocytic (THP-1 cells were cultured under control (14.5 mmol/L mannitol, normoglycemic (NG, 5.5 mmol/L glucose, or hyperglycemic (HG, 20 mmol/L glucose conditions, in the absence or presence of fisetin. Fisetin was added (3–10 μM for 48 h. While the HG condition significantly induced histone acetylation, NF-κB activation, and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-6 and TNF-α release from THP-1 cells, fisetin suppressed NF-κB activity and cytokine release. Fisetin treatment also significantly reduced CBP/p300 gene expression, as well as the levels of acetylation and HAT activity of the CBP/p300 protein, which is a known NF-κB coactivator. These results suggest that fisetin inhibits HG-induced cytokine production in monocytes, through epigenetic changes involving NF-κB. We therefore propose that fisetin supplementation be considered for diabetes prevention.

  13. Silver-Palladium Surfaces Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Schroll, Casper; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    Undesired biofilm formation is a major concern in many areas. In the present study, we investigated biofilm-inhibiting properties of a silver-palladium surface that kills bacteria by generating microelectric fields and electrochemical redox processes. For evaluation of the biofilm inhibition...... efficacy and study of the biofilm inhibition mechanism, the silver-sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and the silver-resistant E. coli J53[pMG101] strains were used as model organisms, and batch and flow chamber setups were used as model systems. In the case of the silver-sensitive strain, the silver......-palladium surfaces killed the bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low or high bacterial load. In the case of the silver-resistant strain, the silver-palladium surfaces killed surface-associated bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low bacterial load, whereas under...

  14. Cyclic mechanical stretching promotes migration but inhibits invasion of rat bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingyu; Luo, Qing; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Jinghui; Xu, Baiyao; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin

    2015-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also broadly known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are multipotent stem cells that have a self-renewal capacity and multilineage differentiation potential. Mechanical stretching plays a vital role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. However, little is known about the effects of cyclic stretching on BMSC migration and invasion. In this study, using a custom-made cell-stretching device, we studied the effects of cyclic mechanical stretching on rat BMSC migration and invasion using a Transwell Boyden Chamber. The protein secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was detected by gelatin zymography, and the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) was measured by western blot. We found that cyclic mechanical stretching with 10% amplitude at 1Hz frequency for 8h promotes BMSC migration, but reduces BMSC invasion. FAK and ERK1/2 signals were activated in BMSCs after exposure to cyclic stretching. In the presence of the FAK phosphorylation blocker PF573228 or the ERK1/2 phosphorylation blocker PD98059, the cyclic-stretch-promoted migration of BMSCs was completely suppressed. On the other hand, cyclic mechanical stretching reduced the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in BMSCs, and PF573228 suppressed the cyclic-stretch-reduced secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The decrease of BMSC invasion induced by mechanical stretching is partially restored by PF573228 but remained unaffected by PD98059. Taken together, these data show that cyclic mechanical stretching promotes BMSC migration via the FAK-ERK1/2 signalling pathway, but reduces BMSC invasion by decreasing secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 via FAK, independent of the ERK1/2 signal.

  15. The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans escapes macrophages by a phagosome emptying mechanism that is inhibited by Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A Johnston

    Full Text Available The lysis of infected cells by disease-causing microorganisms is an efficient but risky strategy for disseminated infection, as it exposes the pathogen to the full repertoire of the host's immune system. Cryptococcus neoformans is a widespread fungal pathogen that causes a fatal meningitis in HIV and other immunocompromised patients. Following intracellular growth, cryptococci are able to escape their host cells by a non-lytic expulsive mechanism that may contribute to the invasion of the central nervous system. Non-lytic escape is also exhibited by some bacterial pathogens and is likely to facilitate long-term avoidance of the host immune system during latency. Here we show that phagosomes containing intracellular cryptococci undergo repeated cycles of actin polymerisation. These actin 'flashes' occur in both murine and human macrophages and are dependent on classical WASP-Arp2/3 complex mediated actin filament nucleation. Three dimensional confocal imaging time lapse revealed that such flashes are highly dynamic actin cages that form around the phagosome. Using fluorescent dextran as a phagosome membrane integrity probe, we find that the non-lytic expulsion of Cryptococcus occurs through fusion of the phagosome and plasma membranes and that, prior to expulsion, 95% of phagosomes become permeabilised, an event that is immediately followed by an actin flash. By using pharmacological agents to modulate both actin dynamics and upstream signalling events, we show that flash occurrence is inversely related to cryptococcal expulsion, suggesting that flashes may act to temporarily inhibit expulsion from infected phagocytes. In conclusion, our data reveal the existence of a novel actin-dependent process on phagosomes containing cryptococci that acts as a potential block to expulsion of Cryptococcus and may have significant implications for the dissemination of, and CNS invasion by, this organism.

  16. The influence of nicotine on granulocytic differentiation – Inhibition of the oxidative burst and bacterial killing and increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Diane E

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils leave the bone marrow as terminally differentiated cells, yet little is known of the influence of nicotine or other tobacco smoke components on neutrophil differentiation. Therefore, promyelocytic HL-60 cells were differentiated into neutrophils using dimethylsulfoxide in the presence and absence of nicotine (3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl pyridine. Differentiation was evaluated over 5 days by monitoring terminal differentiation markers (CD11b expression and formazan deposition; cell viability, growth phase, kinetics, and apoptosis; assessing cellular morphology and ultrastructure; and conformational changes to major cellular components. Key neutrophil effector functions (oxidative burst, bacterial killing, matrix metalloproteinase release were also examined. Results Nicotine increased the percentage of cells in late differentiation phases (metamyelocytes, banded neutrophils and segmented neutrophils compared to DMSO alone (p p p p in vivo (p Conclusion These findings may partially explain the known increase in susceptibility to bacterial infection and neutrophil-associated destructive inflammatory diseases in individuals chronically exposed to nicotine.

  17. Enzymology of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases: reaction mechanisms, inhibition and biochemical roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Peter J; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2014-02-15

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are a large family of non-heme iron (II) dependent enzymes. CCDs catalyse the selective oxidative cleavage of carotenoids to produce apocarotenoids. Apocarotenoid derived molecules form important signalling molecules in plants in the form of abscisic acid and strigolactone and in mammals in the form of retinal. Very little is known biochemically about the CCDs and only a handful of CCDs have been biochemically characterised. Mechanistically, debate surrounds whether CCDs utilise a mono or dioxygenase mechanism. Here, we review the biochemical roles of CCDs, discuss the mechanisms by which CCD cleavage is proposed to occur, and discuss recent reports of selective CCD enzyme inhibitors.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of bacterial persistence and phenotypic antibiotic resistance%细菌持留与抗生素表型耐药机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔鹏; 许涛; 张文宏; 张颖

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persistence refers to a state of reduced metabolic activity that endows a subpopulation of isogenic bacteria with multidrug tolerance. Persisters are phenotypic variants but not mutants. Since its discovery in 1944, bacterial persistence has not received enough attention until recently when its implications in persistent infections and biofilm infections become apparent. Much research has been done in recent years to investigate the mechanisms underlying bacterial persistence and phenotypic antibiotic resistance. The mechanisms of bacterial persistence are complex and the following pathways are involved in persister formation: toxin-antitoxin systems, reduced metabolism, energy production, protein and nucleic acid synthesis, DNA repair and protection, protein degradation, transporters/efflux systems, and transcriptional regulators etc. Although persistence mechanisms are conserved in terms of the gene function and pathways involved among different bacterial species, they may vary in gene homology and relative importance of a given pathway. For example, Escherichia coli toxin-antitoxin systems play an important role in persister formation, while Staphylococcus aureus persister formation does not appear to use toxin-antitoxin systems. Here we provide an update on recent progress in persistence mechanisms using E. coli and S. aureus as models, as well as discuss approaches in the treatment of persistent bacterial infections.%持留菌是细菌群体中一小部分具有表型耐药的细菌。自1944年被发现后,近几十年来因其在慢性持续性感染和生物膜感染中的重要作用而得到越来越多的重视。已有的研究结果表明,细菌持留的机理复杂,涉及的相关信号通路有毒素-抗毒素系统、细胞能量代谢及蛋白核酸合成等生理状态的降低、DNA保护修复系统、蛋白酶系统、反式翻译、外排泵系统等。虽然不同细菌的持留机理有一定的相似性和保守性,但

  19. Mechanism of action of the antibiotic NXL101, a novel nonfluoroquinolone inhibitor of bacterial type II topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Michael T; Stachyra, Thérèse; Platel, Denis; Girard, Anne-Marie; Claudon, Monique; Bruneau, Jean-Michel; Miossec, Christine

    2008-09-01

    NXL101 is one of a new class of quinoline antibacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors showing potent activity against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. NXL101 inhibited topoisomerase IV more effectively than gyrase from Escherichia coli, whereas the converse is true of enzymes from Staphylococcus aureus. This apparent target preference is opposite to that which is associated with most fluoroquinolone antibiotics. In vitro isolation of S. aureus mutants resistant to NXL101 followed by cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding gyrase and topoisomerase IV led to the identification of several different point mutations within, or close to, the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of GyrA. However, the mutations were not those that are most frequently associated with decreased sensitivity to quinolones. A fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant variant of gyrase generated in vitro was highly resistant to inhibition by the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin but remained fully susceptible to inhibition by NXL101. Two mutant gyrases constructed in vitro, with mutations in gyrA engineered according to those most frequently found in S. aureus strains resistant to NXL101, were insensitive to inhibition by NXL101 and had a diminished sensitivity to ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Certain combinations of mutations giving rise to NXL101 resistance and those giving rise to fluoroquinolone resistance may be mutually exclusive.

  20. A novel mechanism regulating a sexual signal: the testosterone-based inhibition of female sex pheromone expression in garter snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M Rockwell; Mason, Robert T

    2014-08-01

    Vertebrates communicate their sex to conspecifics through the use of sexually dimorphic signals, such as ornaments, behaviors and scents. Furthermore, the physiological connection between hormones and secondary sexual signal expression is key to understanding their dimorphism, seasonality and evolution. The red-sided garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis) is the only reptile for which a described pheromone currently exists, and because garter snakes rely completely on the sexual attractiveness pheromone for species identification and mate choice, they constitute a unique model species for exploring the relationship between pheromones and the endocrine system. We recently demonstrated that estrogen can activate female pheromone production in male garter snakes. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) acting to prevent female pheromone production in males. We found that castrated males (GX) are courted by wild males in the field and produce appreciable amounts of female sex pheromone. Furthermore, pheromone production is inhibited in castrates given testosterone implants (GX+T), suggesting that pheromone production is actively inhibited by the presence of testosterone. Lastly, testosterone supplementation alone (T) increased the production of several saturated methyl ketones in the pheromone but not the unsaturated ketones; this may indicate that saturated ketones are testosterone-activated components of the garter snake's skin lipid milieu. Collectively, our research has shown that pheromone expression in snakes results from two processes: activation by the feminizing steroid estradiol and inhibition by testosterone. We suggest that basal birds and garter snakes share common pathways of activation that modulate crucial intraspecific signals that originate from skin.

  1. Apolipoprotein E inhibits toll-like receptor (TLR)-3- and TLR-4-mediated macrophage activation through distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanjuan; Kodvawala, Ahmer; Hui, David Y

    2010-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that apoE (apolipoprotein E) expression in macrophages suppresses inflammatory responses; however, whether endogenously synthesized apoE acts intracellularly or after its secretion in suppressing macrophage inflammation remains unclear. The present study used the murine monocyte macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to examine the influence of exogenous apoE on macrophage inflammatory responses induced by TLR (Toll-like receptor)-4 and TLR-3 agonists LPS (lipopolysaccharide) and poly(I-C) respectively. Results showed that exogenously added apoE suppressed the LPS and poly(I-C) induction of IL (interleukin)-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) secretion by RAW 264.7 cells. The mechanism was related to apoE suppression of TLR-agonist-induced phosphorylation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and c-Jun. A peptide containing the tandem repeat sequence of the receptor-binding domain of apoE, apoE-(141-155)2, was similarly effective in inhibiting LPS- and poly(I-C)-induced macrophage inflammatory responses. Reductive methylation of lysine residues in apoE, which abolished its receptor-binding capability without affecting its ability to interact with HSPGs (heparin sulfate proteoglycans), inhibited the ability of apoE to suppress macrophage responses to LPS, but had no effect on apoE suppression of poly(I-C)-induced macrophage activation. The ability of apoE to suppress poly(I-C)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production was abolished by heparinase treatment of RAW 264.7 cells to remove cell-surface HSPGs. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenous apoE inhibits macrophage inflammatory responses to TLR-4 and TLR-3 agonists through distinct mechanisms related to receptor and HSPG binding respectively, and that these inhibitory effects converged on suppression of JNK and c-Jun activation which are necessary for macrophage activation.

  2. Antibody-Mediated Fcγ Receptor-Based Mechanisms of HIV Inhibition: Recent Findings and New Vaccination Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Moog

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS pandemic is one of the most devastating pandemics worldwide. Today, the major route of infection by HIV is sexual transmission. One of the most promising strategies for vaccination against HIV sexual infection is the development of a mucosal vaccine, which should be able to induce strong local and systemic protective immunity. It is believed that both humoral and cellular immune responses are needed for inducing a sterilizing protection against HIV. Recently, passive administration of monoclonal neutralizing antibodies in macaques infected by vaginal challenge demonstrated a crucial role of FcγRs in the protection afforded by these antibodies. This questioned about the role of innate and adaptive immune functions, including ADCC, ADCVI, phagocytosis of opsonized HIV particles and the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, in the mechanism of HIV inhibition in vivo. Other monoclonal antibodies - non-neutralizing inhibitory antibodies - which recognize immunogenic epitopes, have been shown to display potent FcγRs-dependent inhibition of HIV replication in vitro. The potential role of these antibodies in protection against sexual transmission of HIV and their biological relevance for the development of an HIV vaccine therefore need to be determined. This review highlights the potential role of FcγRsmediated innate and adaptive immune functions in the mechanism of HIV protection.

  3. Mechanism of metamifop inhibition of the carboxyltransferase domain of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase in Echinochloa crus-galli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiangdong; Tang, Wenjie; He, Shun; Kang, Jing; Ma, Hongju; Li, Jianhong

    2016-09-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) plays crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for herbicide discovery. Metamifop is a novel ACCase-inhibiting herbicide that can be applied to control sensitive weeds in paddy fields. In this study, the effects of metamifop on the chloroplasts, ACCase activity and carboxyltransferase (CT) domain gene expression in Echinochloa crus-galli were investigated. The results showed that metamifop interacted with the CT domain of ACCase in E. crus-galli. The three-dimensional structure of the CT domain of E. crus-galli ACCase in complex with metamifop was examined by homology modelling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Metamifop has a different mechanism of inhibiting the CT domain compared with other ACCase inhibitors as it interacted with a different region in the active site of the CT domain. The protonation of nitrogen in the oxazole ring of metamifop plays a crucial role in the interaction between metamifop and the CT domain. The binding mode of metamifop provides a foundation for elucidating the molecular mechanism