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Sample records for bacterial infection induces

  1. Bacterial feeding, Leishmania infection and distinct infection routes induce differential defensin expression in Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telleria, Erich L; Sant'Anna, Maurício R Viana; Alkurbi, Mohammad O; Pitaluga, André N; Dillon, Rod J; Traub-Csekö, Yara M

    2013-01-11

    Phlebotomine insects harbor bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens that can cause diseases of public health importance. Lutzomyia longipalpis is the main vector of visceral leishmaniasis in the New World. Insects can mount a powerful innate immune response to pathogens. Defensin peptides take part in this response and are known to be active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and some parasites. We studied the expression of a defensin gene from Lutzomyia longipalpis to understand its role in sand fly immune response. We identified, sequenced and evaluated the expression of a L. longipalpis defensin gene by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The gene sequence was compared to other vectors defensins and expression was determined along developmental stages and after exposure of adult female L. longipalpis to bacteria and Leishmania. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the L. longipalpis defensin is closely related to a defensin from the Old World sand fly Phlebotomus duboscqi. Expression was high in late L4 larvae and pupae in comparison to early larval stages and newly emerged flies. Defensin expression was modulated by oral infection with bacteria. The Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus induced early high defensin expression, whilst the Gram-negative entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens induced a later response. Bacterial injection also induced defensin expression in adult insects. Female sand flies infected orally with Leishmania mexicana showed no significant difference in defensin expression compared to blood fed insects apart from a lower defensin expression 5 days post Leishmania infection. When Leishmania was introduced into the hemolymph by injection there was no induction of defensin expression until 72 h later. Our results suggest that L. longipalpis modulates defensin expression upon bacterial and Leishmania infection, with patterns of expression that are distinct among bacterial species and routes of infection.

  2. SOCS Proteins as Regulators of Inflammatory Responses Induced by Bacterial Infections: A Review

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    Skyla A. Duncan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe bacterial infections can lead to both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. Innate immunity is the first defense mechanism employed against invading bacterial pathogens through the recognition of conserved molecular patterns on bacteria by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, especially the toll-like receptors (TLRs. TLRs recognize distinct pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs that play a critical role in innate immune responses by inducing the expression of several inflammatory genes. Thus, activation of immune cells is regulated by cytokines that use the Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT signaling pathway and microbial recognition by TLRs. This system is tightly controlled by various endogenous molecules to allow for an appropriately regulated and safe host immune response to infections. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family of proteins is one of the central regulators of microbial pathogen-induced signaling of cytokines, principally through the inhibition of the activation of JAK/STAT signaling cascades. This review provides recent knowledge regarding the role of SOCS proteins during bacterial infections, with an emphasis on the mechanisms involved in their induction and regulation of antibacterial immune responses. Furthermore, the implication of SOCS proteins in diverse processes of bacteria to escape host defenses and in the outcome of bacterial infections are discussed, as well as the possibilities offered by these proteins for future targeted antimicrobial therapies.

  3. Photodynamic therapy can induce non-specific protective immunity against a bacterial infection

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    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Mroz, Pawel; Dai, Tianhong; Kinoshita, Manabu; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer is known to induce an immune response against the tumor, in addition to its well-known direct cell-killing and vascular destructive effects. PDT is becoming increasingly used as a therapy for localized infections. However there has not to date been a convincing report of an immune response being generated against a microbial pathogen after PDT in an animal model. We have studied PDT as a therapy for bacterial arthritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection in the mouse knee. We had previously found that PDT of an infection caused by injection of MRSA (5X107 CFU) into the mouse knee followed 3 days later by 1 μg of Photofrin and 635- nm diode laser illumination with a range of fluences within 5 minutes, gave a biphasic dose response. The greatest reduction of MRSA CFU was seen with a fluence of 20 J/cm2, whereas lower antibacterial efficacy was observed with fluences that were either lower or higher. We then tested the hypothesis that the host immune response mediated by neutrophils was responsible for most of the beneficial antibacterial effect. We used bioluminescence imaging of luciferase expressing bacteria to follow the progress of the infection in real time. We found similar results using intra-articular methylene blue and red light, and more importantly, that carrying out PDT of the noninfected joint and subsequently injecting bacteria after PDT led to a significant protection from infection. Taken together with substantial data from studies using blocking antibodies we believe that the pre-conditioning PDT regimen recruits and stimulates neutrophils into the infected joint which can then destroy bacteria that are subsequently injected and prevent infection.

  4. Identification of Genes Induced in Lolium multiflorum by Bacterial Wilt Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Asp, Torben; Widmer, Franco

    2010-01-01

    expressed upon infection will serve as the basis for the identification of key genes involved in bacterial wilt resistance and to develop molecular markers for marker assisted breeding. Fluorescently labelled cDNA prepared from plant leaves collected at four different time points after infection......Xanthomonas translucens pv. graminis(Xtg) causes bacterial wilt in many forage grasses including Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam), seriously reducing yield and quality. Breeding for resistance is currently the only practicable means of disease control. Molecular markers closely linked...... to resistance genes or QTL could complement and support phenotypic selection. We used comparative gene expression analysis of a partially resistant L. multiflorum genotype infected and not infected with Xtg to identify genes involved in the control of resistance to bacterial wilt. The genes differentially...

  5. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...... about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria......-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial...

  6. [Bacterial biofilms and infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, I; Del Pozo, J L; Penadés, J R; Leiva, J

    2005-01-01

    In developed countries we tend to think of heart disease and the numerous forms of cancer as the main causes of mortality, but on a global scale infectious diseases come close, or may even be ahead: 14.9 million deaths in 2002 compared to cardiovascular diseases (16.9 million deaths) and cancer (7.1 million deaths) (WHO report 2004). The infectious agents responsible for human mortality have evolved as medical techniques and hygienic measures have changed. Modern-day acute infectious diseases caused by specialized bacterial pathogens such as diphtheria, tetanus, cholera, plague, which represented the main causes of death at the beginning of XX century, have been effectively controlled with antibiotics and vaccines. In their place, more than half of the infectious diseases that affect mildly immunocompromised patients involve bacterial species that are commensal with the human body; these can produce chronic infections, are resistant to antimicrobial agents and there is no effective vaccine against them. Examples of these infections are the otitis media, native valve endocarditis, chronic urinary infections, bacterial prostatitis, osteomyelitis and all the infections related to medical devices. Direct analysis of the surface of medical devices or of tissues that have been foci of chronic infections shows the presence of large numbers of bacteria surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix, which has been named the "biofilm". Inside the biofilm, bacteria grow protected from the action of the antibodies, phagocytic cells and antimicrobial treatments. In this article, we describe the role of bacterial biofilms in human persistent infections.

  7. Diagnosis of bacterial infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rapid and easy-to-use test for bacterial infections. Clearly, this is a very ... detect antigens or specific antibodies, e.g. group A streptococcal antigen testing can be employed to reduce antibiotic use. Culture-based tests are often ... White blood cell count 12 000 cells/mm³; or the presence of >10% ...

  8. Interferon-induced protein 56 (IFI56) is induced by VHSV infection but not by bacterial infection in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

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    Hwang, Jee Youn; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kwon, Mun-Gyeong; Seo, Jung Soo; Hwang, Seong Don; Son, Maeng-Hyun

    2017-07-01

    Interferon-inducible protein 56 (IFI56, also known as ISG56/IFIT1, interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 1) is strongly induced in response to interferon and a potent inhibitor of viral replication and translational initiation. Here, we describe the identification of IFI56 (OfIFI56) in olive flounder, its characteristic features, and expression levels in various tissues before and after viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infection. The full-length OfIFI56 sequence was identified from rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. The complete coding sequence of OfIFI56 is 1971 bp in length and encodes 431 amino acids. The putative OfIFI56 protein has multiple tetratricopeptide (TPR) motifs, which regulate diverse biological processes, such as organelle targeting, protein import, and vesicle fusion. Based on sequence analysis, the Larimichthys crocea IFI56 protein (61%) had the highest sequence homology to OfIFI56. In healthy olive flounder, OfIFI56 mRNA expression was detected in many tissues such as intestine, gill, head kidney, heart, spleen, and trunk kidney tissues. After VHSV challenge, OfIFI56 mRNA was significantly up-regulated in these tissues. Additionally, OfIFI56 expression was induced by poly I:C but not by Streptococcus parauberis and S. iniae infection or lipopolysaccharide injection in kidney and spleen tissues of olive flounder. These results demonstrate that piscine OfIFI56 expression is not induced by bacterial infection but is selectively induced by viral infection, especially VHSV, and that OfIFI56 may play an important role in the host response against VHSV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Melatonin induces nitric oxide and the potential mechanisms relate to innate immunity against bacterial pathogen infection in Arabidopsis.

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    Shi, Haitao; Chen, Yinhua; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; Chan, Zhulong; He, Chaozu

    2015-08-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a naturally occurring small molecule, serving as important secondary messenger in the response of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the interactions between melatonin and other important molecules in the plant stress response, especially in plant immunity, are largely unknown. In this study, we found that both melatonin and nitric oxide (NO) levels in Arabidopsis leaves were significantly induced by bacterial pathogen (Pst DC3000) infection. The elevated NO production was caused by melatonin as melatonin application enhanced endogenous NO level with great efficacy. Moreover, both melatonin and NO conferred improved disease resistance against Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection in Arabidopsis. NO scavenger significantly suppressed the rise of NO which was induced by exogenous application of melatonin. As a result, the beneficial effects of melatonin on the expression of salicylic acid (SA)-related genes and disease resistance against bacterial pathogen infection were jeopardized by use of a NO scavenger. Consistently, melatonin application significantly lost its effect on the innate immunity against P. syringe pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection in NO-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis. The results indicate that melatonin-induced NO production is responsible for innate immunity response of Arabidopsis against Pst DC3000 infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus-induced G2/M phase transition delay in host epithelial cells increases bacterial infective efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Alekseeva

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a highly versatile, opportunistic pathogen and the etiological agent of a wide range of infections in humans and warm-blooded animals. The epithelial surface is its principal site of colonization and infection. In this work, we investigated the cytopathic effect of S. aureus strains from human and animal origins and their ability to affect the host cell cycle in human HeLa and bovine MAC-T epithelial cell lines. S. aureus invasion slowed down cell proliferation and induced a cytopathic effect, resulting in the enlargement of host cells. A dramatic decrease in the number of mitotic cells was observed in the infected cultures. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an S. aureus-induced delay in the G2/M phase transition in synchronous HeLa cells. This delay required the presence of live S. aureus since the addition of the heat-killed bacteria did not alter the cell cycle. The results of Western blot experiments showed that the G2/M transition delay was associated with the accumulation of inactive cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1, a key inducer of mitosis entry, and with the accumulation of unphosphorylated histone H3, which was correlated with a reduction of the mitotic cell number. Analysis of S. aureus proliferation in asynchronous, G1- and G2-phase-enriched HeLa cells showed that the G2 phase was preferential for bacterial infective efficiency, suggesting that the G2 phase delay may be used by S. aureus for propagation within the host. Taken together, our results divulge the potential of S. aureus in the subversion of key cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, and shed light on the biological significance of S. aureus-induced host cell cycle alteration.

  11. Detection of bacterial infection of agave plants by laser-induced fluorescence

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    Cervantes-Martinez, Jesus; Flores-Hernandez, Ricardo; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Santacruz-Ruvalcaba, Fernando

    2002-05-01

    Greenhouse-grown plants of Agave tequilana Weber var. azul were inoculated with Erwinia carotovora, the causal agent of stem soft rot. We investigated the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of agave plants to determine whether LIF can be used as a noninvasive sensing tool for pathological studies. The LIF technique was also investigated as a means of detecting the effect of the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor beta-hydroxyethylhydrazine as a bactericide against the pathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora. A He-Ne laser at 632.8 nm was used as the excitation source, and in vivo fluorescence emission spectra were recorded in the 660-790-range. Fluorescence maxima were at 690 and 740 nm. The infected plants that were untreated with the bactericide showed a definite increase in fluorescence intensity at both maxima within the first three days after infection. Beginning on the fifth day, a steady decrease in fluorescence intensity was observed, with a greater effect at 740 than at 690 nm. After 30 days there was no fluorescence. The infected plants that had been treated with the bactericide showed no significant change in fluorescence compared with that of the uninfected plants. The ratio of fluorescence intensities was determined to be F 690 nm/F 740 nm for all treatments. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of agave plants may be used for the early detection of certain types of disease and for determining the effect of a bactericide on bacteria. The results also showed that fluorescence intensity ratios can be used as a reliable indicator of the progress of disease.

  12. Plasmodium berghei induced priming in Anopheles albimanus independently of bacterial co-infection.

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    Contreras-Garduño, Jorge; Rodríguez, María Carmen; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Alvarado-Delgado, Alejandro; Izquierdo, Javier; Herrera-Ortiz, Antonia; Moreno-García, Miguel; Velazquez-Meza, Maria Elena; Valverde, Veronica; Argotte-Ramos, Rocio; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto

    2015-10-01

    Priming in invertebrates is the acquired capacity to better combat a pathogen due to a previous exposure to sub-lethal doses of the same organism. It is proposed to be functionally analogous to immune memory in vertebrates. Previous studies with Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes provide evidence that the inhibitory response to a second challenge by the malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei resulted from a sustained activation of hemocytes by midgut bacteria. These bacteria probably accessed the hemolymph during a first aborted infection through lesions produced by parasites invading the midgut. Since the mosquito immune responses to midgut bacteria and Plasmodium overlap, it is difficult to determine the priming responses of each. We herein document priming induced in the aseptic An. albimanus midgut by P. berghei, probably independent of the immune response induced by midgut bacteria. This idea is further evidenced by experiments with Pbs 25-28 knock out parasites (having an impaired capacity for invading the mosquito midgut) and dead ookinetes. Priming protection against a homologous challenge with P. berghei lasted up to 12 days. There was greater incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine into midgut cell nuclei (indicative of DNA synthesis without mitosis) and increased transcription of hnt (a gene required for the endocycle of midgut cells) in primed versus unprimed mosquitoes, suggesting that endoreplication was the underlying mechanism of priming. Moreover, the transcription of hnt and antimicrobial peptides related to an anti-Plasmodium response (attacin, cecropin and gambicin) was enhanced in a biphasic rather than sustained response after priming An. albimanus with P. berghei. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Infection of Human Gestational Membranes Induces Bacterial Biofilm Formation and Host Production of Cytokines.

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    Doster, Ryan S; Kirk, Leslie A; Tetz, Lauren M; Rogers, Lisa M; Aronoff, David M; Gaddy, Jennifer A

    2017-02-15

    Staphylococcus aureus, a metabolically flexible gram-positive pathogen, causes infections in a variety of tissues. Recent evidence implicates S. aureus as an emerging cause of chorioamnionitis and premature rupture of membranes, which are associated with preterm birth and neonatal disease. We demonstrate here that S. aureus infects and forms biofilms on the choriodecidual surface of explanted human gestational membranes. Concomitantly, S. aureus elicits the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which could ultimately perturb maternal-fetal tolerance during pregnancy. Therefore, targeting the immunological response to S. aureus infection during pregnancy could attenuate disease among infected individuals, especially in the context of antibiotic resistance. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Bacterial Skin Infections

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    ... other immune disorders, or hepatitis People who are undergoing chemotherapy or treatment with other drugs that suppress the immune system Skin that is inflamed or damaged by sunburn, scratching, or other trauma is more likely to become infected. In fact, ...

  15. Mucin dynamics in intestinal bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara K Lindén

    Full Text Available Bacterial gastroenteritis causes morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Murine Citrobacter rodentium infection is a model for gastroenteritis caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli. Mucin glycoproteins are the main component of the first barrier that bacteria encounter in the intestinal tract.Using Immunohistochemistry, we investigated intestinal expression of mucins (Alcian blue/PAS, Muc1, Muc2, Muc4, Muc5AC, Muc13 and Muc3/17 in healthy and C. rodentium infected mice. The majority of the C. rodentium infected mice developed systemic infection and colitis in the mid and distal colon by day 12. C. rodentium bound to the major secreted mucin, Muc2, in vitro, and high numbers of bacteria were found in secreted MUC2 in infected animals in vivo, indicating that mucins may limit bacterial access to the epithelial surface. In the small intestine, caecum and proximal colon, the mucin expression was similar in infected and non-infected animals. In the distal colonic epithelium, all secreted and cell surface mucins decreased with the exception of the Muc1 cell surface mucin which increased after infection (p<0.05. Similarly, during human infection Salmonella St Paul, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium difficile induced MUC1 in the colon.Major changes in both the cell-surface and secreted mucins occur in response to intestinal infection.

  16. (PCR) in the diagnosis of bacterial infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... bacterial infections that can be diagnosed using the technique which include among others; Tuberculosis (TB), whooping cough, brain abscesses and spinal infection, otitis media with effusion, Mycoplasmal pneumonia, endophthalmitis and bacterial meningitis. Keywords: Polymerase chain reaction, Diagnosis, Bacteria, ...

  17. Topical application of zinc oxide nanoparticles reduces bacterial skin infection in mice and exhibits antibacterial activity by inducing oxidative stress response and cell membrane disintegration in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Rashmirekha; Mehta, Ranjit Kumar; Mohanty, Soumitra; Padhi, Avinash; Sengupta, Mitali; Vaseeharan, Baskarlingam; Goswami, Chandan; Sonawane, Avinash

    2014-08-01

    Here we studied immunological and antibacterial mechanisms of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) against human pathogens. ZnO-NPs showed more activity against Staphylococcus aureus and least against Mycobacterium bovis-BCG. However, BCG killing was significantly increased in synergy with antituberculous-drug rifampicin. Antibacterial mechanistic studies showed that ZnO-NPs disrupt bacterial cell membrane integrity, reduce cell surface hydrophobicity and down-regulate the transcription of oxidative stress-resistance genes in bacteria. ZnO-NP treatment also augmented the intracellular bacterial killing by inducing reactive oxygen species production and co-localization with Mycobacterium smegmatis-GFP in macrophages. Moreover, ZnO-NPs disrupted biofilm formation and inhibited hemolysis by hemolysin toxin producing S. aureus. Intradermal administration of ZnO-NPs significantly reduced the skin infection, bacterial load and inflammation in mice, and also improved infected skin architecture. We envision that this study offers novel insights into antimicrobial actions of ZnO-NPs and also demonstrates ZnO-NPs as a novel class of topical anti-infective agent for the treatment of skin infections. This in-depth study demonstrates properties of ZnO nanoparticles in infection prevention and treatment in several skin infection models, dissecting the potential mechanisms of action of these nanoparticles and paving the way to human applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacterial biofilm and associated infections

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    Muhsin Jamal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic entities, microorganisms that drastically affect human health need to be thoroughly investigated. A biofilm is an architectural colony of microorganisms, within a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance that they produce. Biofilm contains microbial cells adherent to one-another and to a static surface (living or non-living. Bacterial biofilms are usually pathogenic in nature and can cause nosocomial infections. The National Institutes of Health (NIH revealed that among all microbial and chronic infections, 65% and 80%, respectively, are associated with biofilm formation. The process of biofilm formation consists of many steps, starting with attachment to a living or non-living surface that will lead to formation of micro-colony, giving rise to three-dimensional structures and ending up, after maturation, with detachment. During formation of biofilm several species of bacteria communicate with one another, employing quorum sensing. In general, bacterial biofilms show resistance against human immune system, as well as against antibiotics. Health related concerns speak loud due to the biofilm potential to cause diseases, utilizing both device-related and non-device-related infections. In summary, the understanding of bacterial biofilm is important to manage and/or to eradicate biofilm-related diseases. The current review is, therefore, an effort to encompass the current concepts in biofilm formation and its implications in human health and disease.

  19. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and 3 H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection. 3 H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis

  20. Giardia duodenalis infection reduces granulocyte infiltration in an in vivo model of bacterial toxin-induced colitis and attenuates inflammation in human intestinal tissue.

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    Cotton, James A; Motta, Jean-Paul; Schenck, L Patrick; Hirota, Simon A; Beck, Paul L; Buret, Andre G

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs) are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn's disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time that certain

  1. Giardia duodenalis infection reduces granulocyte infiltration in an in vivo model of bacterial toxin-induced colitis and attenuates inflammation in human intestinal tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Cotton

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn's disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time

  2. Stress significantly increases mortality following a secondary bacterial respiratory infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A variety of mechanisms contribute to the viral-bacterial synergy which results in fatal secondary bacterial respiratory infections. Epidemiological investigations have implicated physical and psychological stressors as factors contributing to the incidence and severity of respiratory infections and psychological stress alters host responses to experimental viral respiratory infections. The effect of stress on secondary bacterial respiratory infections has not, however, been investigated. A natural model of secondary bacterial respiratory infection in naive calves was used to determine if weaning and maternal separation (WMS) significantly altered mortality when compared to calves pre-adapted (PA) to this psychological stressor. Following weaning, calves were challenged with Mannheimia haemolytica four days after a primary bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) respiratory infection. Mortality doubled in WMS calves when compared to calves pre-adapted to weaning for two weeks prior to the viral respiratory infection. Similar results were observed in two independent experiments and fatal viral-bacterial synergy did not extend beyond the time of viral shedding. Virus shedding did not differ significantly between treatment groups but innate immune responses during viral infection, including IFN-γ secretion, the acute-phase inflammatory response, CD14 expression, and LPS-induced TNFα production, were significantly greater in WMS versus PA calves. These observations demonstrate that weaning and maternal separation at the time of a primary BHV-1 respiratory infection increased innate immune responses that correlated significantly with mortality following a secondary bacterial respiratory infection. PMID:22435642

  3. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

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    Demuth Donald R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacterial function of leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, T cells and B cells, providing a mechanistic explanation for increased infection risk. Further epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic research into this important area is warranted.

  4. Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through Relating Bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research ... Surgical procedures often lead to both intrinsic and extrinsic infections. ... This study demonstrated surgical procedures as precursory to intrinsic infections and that bacterial pathogens found on wounds and endogenous indicators of surgery are links to intrinsic infection.

  5. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed. PMID:26244150

  6. Metagenomic Diagnosis of Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shota; Maeda, Norihiro; Miron, Ionut Mihai; Yoh, Myonsun; Izutsu, Kaori; Kataoka, Chidoh; Honda, Takeshi; Yasunaga, Teruo; Nakaya, Takaaki; Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Horii, Toshihiro

    2008-01-01

    To test the ability of high-throughput DNA sequencing to detect bacterial pathogens, we used it on DNA from a patient’s feces during and after diarrheal illness. Sequences showing best matches for Campylobacter jejuni were detected only in the illness sample. Various bacteria may be detectable with this metagenomic approach. PMID:18976571

  7. Update on bacterial nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereket, W; Hemalatha, K; Getenet, B; Wondwossen, T; Solomon, A; Zeynudin, A; Kannan, S

    2012-08-01

    With increasing use of antimicrobial agents and advance in lifesaving medical practices which expose the patients for invasive procedures, are associated with the ever increasing of nosocomial infections. Despite an effort in hospital infection control measures, health care associated infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality adding additional health care expenditure which may leads to an economic crisis. The problem is further complicated with the emergence of difficult to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) microorganism in the hospital environment. Virtually every pathogen has the potential to cause infection in hospitalized patients but only limited number of both gram positive and gram negative bacteria are responsible for the majority of nosocomial infection. Among them Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococci takes the leading. Many intrinsic and extrinsic factors predispose hospitalized patients for these pathogens. Following simple hospital hygienic practices and strictly following standard medical procedures greatly reduces infection to a significant level although not all nosocomial infections are avoidable. The clinical spectrum caused by nosocomial pathogens depend on body site of infection, the involving pathogen and the patient's underlying condition. Structural and non structural virulence factors associated with the bacteria are responsible for the observed clinical manifestation. Bacteria isolation and characterization from appropriate clinical materials with antimicrobial susceptibility testing is the standard of laboratory diagnosis.

  8. Fluoride exposure abates pro-inflammatory response and induces in vivo apoptosis rendering zebrafish (Danio rerio) susceptible to bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rashmi; Khatri, Preeti; Srivastava, Nidhi; Jain, Shruti; Brahmachari, Vani; Mukhopadhyay, Asish; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2017-04-01

    The present study describes the immunotoxic effect of chronic fluoride exposure on adult zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish were exposed to fluoride (71.12 mg/L; 1/10 LC 50 ) for 30 d and the expression of selected genes studied. We observed significant elevation in the detoxification pathway gene cyp1a suggesting chronic exposure to non-lethal concentration of fluoride is indeed toxic to fish. Fluoride mediated pro-oxidative stress is implicated with the downregulation in superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 (sod1/2) genes. Fluoride affected DNA repair machinery by abrogating the expression of the DNA repair gene rad51 and growth arrest and DNA damage inducible beta a gene gadd45ba. The upregulated expression of casp3a coupled with altered Bcl-2 associated X protein/B-cell lymphoma 2 ratio (baxa/bcl2a) clearly suggested chronic fluoride exposure induced the apoptotic cascade in zebrafish. Fluoride-exposed zebrafish when challenged with non-lethal dose of fish pathogen A. hydrophila revealed gross histopathology in spleen, bacterial persistence and significant mortality. We report that fluoride interferes with system-level output of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interferon-γ, as a consequence, bacteria replicate efficiently causing significant fish mortality. We conclude, chronic fluoride exposure impairs the redox balance, affects DNA repair machinery with pro-apoptotic implications and suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines expression abrogating host immunity to bacterial infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sustainable strategies for treatment of bacterial infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics and the consequential failures of treatment based on antibiotics makes microbial infections a major threat to human health. This problem combined with rapidly increasing life-style disease problems challenge our healtcare system as well as the pharma industry, and if we do...... not in a foreseeable future develop novel approaches and strategies to combat bacterial infections, many people will be at risk of dying from even trivial infections for which we until recently had highly effective antibiotics. We have for a number of years investigated chronic bacterial lung infections in patients...... suffering from cystic fibrosis. These infections are optimal model scenarios for studies of antibiotic resistance development and microbial adaptation, and we suggest that this information should be useful when designing new anti-microbial strategies. In this respect it will be important to choose...

  10. Immunity to bacterial infection in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial infections remain important to the poultry industry both in terms of animal and public health, the latter due to the importance of poultry as a source of foodborne bacterial zoonoses such as Salmonella and Campylobacter. As such, much focus of research to the immune response to bacterial infection has been to Salmonella. In this review we will focus on how research on avian salmonellosis has developed our understanding of immunity to bacteria in the chicken from understanding the role of TLRs in recognition of bacterial pathogens, through the role of heterophils, macrophages and γδ lymphocytes in innate immunity and activation of adaptive responses to the role of cellular and humoral immunity in immune clearance and protection. What is known of the immune response to other bacterial infections and in particular infections that have emerged recently as major problems in poultry production including Campylobacter jejuni, Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli, Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale and Clostridium perfringens are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Giardia duodenalis Infection Reduces Granulocyte Infiltration in an In Vivo Model of Bacterial Toxin-Induced Colitis and Attenuates Inflammation in Human Intestinal Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Cotton, James A.; Motta, Jean-Paul; Schenck, L. Patrick; Hirota, Simon A.; Beck, Paul L.; Buret, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the develo...

  12. Respiratory bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Hansen, Christine R; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Bacterial respiratory infections are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains the main pathogen in adults, but other Gram-negative bacteria such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia...

  13. Optimising Antibiotic Usage to Treat Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Iona K.; Hoyle, Andy; Ochoa, Gabriela; Baker-Austin, Craig; Taylor, Nick G. H.

    2016-11-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria poses a threat to the continued use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics has been identified as a significant driver in the emergence of resistance. Finding optimal treatment regimens is therefore critical in ensuring the prolonged effectiveness of these antibiotics. This study uses mathematical modelling to analyse the effect traditional treatment regimens have on the dynamics of a bacterial infection. Using a novel approach, a genetic algorithm, the study then identifies improved treatment regimens. Using a single antibiotic the genetic algorithm identifies regimens which minimise the amount of antibiotic used while maximising bacterial eradication. Although exact treatments are highly dependent on parameter values and initial bacterial load, a significant common trend is identified throughout the results. A treatment regimen consisting of a high initial dose followed by an extended tapering of doses is found to optimise the use of antibiotics. This consistently improves the success of eradicating infections, uses less antibiotic than traditional regimens and reduces the time to eradication. The use of genetic algorithms to optimise treatment regimens enables an extensive search of possible regimens, with previous regimens directing the search into regions of better performance.

  14. Empiric Antibiotic Therapy of Nosocomial Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotics are commonly used by physicians to treat various infections. The source of infection and causative organisms are not always apparent during the initial evaluation of the patient, and antibiotics are often given empirically to patients with suspected sepsis. Fear of attempting cephalosporins and carbapenems in penicillin-allergic septic patients may result in significant decrease in the spectrum of antimicrobial coverage. Empiric antibiotic therapy should sufficiently cover all the suspected pathogens, guided by the bacteriologic susceptibilities of the medical center. It is important to understand the major pharmacokinetic properties of antibacterial agents for proper use and to minimize the development of resistance. In several septic patients, negative cultures do not exclude active infection and positive cultures may not represent the actual infection. This article will review the important differences in the spectrum of commonly used antibiotics for nosocomial bacterial infections with a particular emphasis on culture-negative sepsis and colonization.

  15. Secondary Bacterial Infections Associated with Influenza Pandemics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise E. Morris

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lower and upper respiratory infections are the fourth highest cause of global mortality (Lozano et al., 2012. Epidemic and pandemic outbreaks of respiratory infection are a major medical concern, often causing considerable disease and a high death toll, typically over a relatively short period of time. Influenza is a major cause of epidemic and pandemic infection. Bacterial co/secondary infection further increases morbidity and mortality of influenza infection, with Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus reported as the most common causes. With increased antibiotic resistance and vaccine evasion it is important to monitor the epidemiology of pathogens in circulation to inform clinical treatment and development, particularly in the setting of an influenza epidemic/pandemic.

  16. Bacterial Adaptation during Chronic Respiratory Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Cullen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infections are associated with increased morbidity and mortality for individuals with underlying respiratory conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The process of chronic colonisation allows pathogens to adapt over time to cope with changing selection pressures, co-infecting species and antimicrobial therapies. These adaptations can occur due to environmental pressures in the lung such as inflammatory responses, hypoxia, nutrient deficiency, osmolarity, low pH and antibiotic therapies. Phenotypic adaptations in bacterial pathogens from acute to chronic infection include, but are not limited to, antibiotic resistance, exopolysaccharide production (mucoidy, loss in motility, formation of small colony variants, increased mutation rate, quorum sensing and altered production of virulence factors associated with chronic infection. The evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection has been widely studied. More recently, the adaptations that other chronically colonising respiratory pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex and Haemophilus influenzae undergo during chronic infection have also been investigated. This review aims to examine the adaptations utilised by different bacterial pathogens to aid in their evolution from acute to chronic pathogens of the immunocompromised lung including CF and COPD.

  17. Fluoroquinolones as imaging agents for bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Drlica, Karl

    2017-10-31

    Diagnosis of deep-seated bacterial infection is difficult, as neither standard anatomical imaging nor radiolabeled, autologous leukocytes distinguish sterile inflammation from infection. Two recent imaging efforts are receiving attention: (1) radioactive derivatives of sorbitol show good specificity with Gram-negative bacterial infections, and (2) success in combining anatomical and functional imaging for cancer diagnosis has rekindled interest in 99m Tc-fluoroquinolone-based imaging. With the latter, computed tomography (CT) would be combined with single-photon-emission-computed tomography (SPECT) to detect 99m Tc-fluoroquinolone-bacterial interactions. The present minireview provides a framework for advancing fluoroquinolone-based imaging by identifying gaps in our understanding of the process. One issue is the reliance of 99m Tc labeling on the reduction of sodium pertechnetate, which can lead to colloid formation and loss of specificity. Specificity problems may be reduced by altering the quinolone structure (for example, switching from ciprofloxacin to sitafloxacin). Another issue is the uncharacterized nature of 99m Tc-ciprofloxacin binding to, or sequestration in, bacteria: specific interactions with DNA gyrase, an intracellular fluoroquinolone target, are unlikely. Labeling with 68 Ga rather than 99m Tc enables detection by positron emission tomography, but with similar biological uncertainties. Replacing the C6-F of the fluoroquinolone with 18 F provides an alternative to pertechnetate and gallium that may lead to imaging based on drug interactions with gyrase. Gyrase-based imaging requires knowledge of fluoroquinolone action, which we update. We conclude that quinolone-based probes show promise for the diagnosis of infection, but improvements in specificity and sensitivity are needed. These improvements include the optimization of the quinolone structure; such chemistry efforts can be accelerated by refining microbiological assays.

  18. Recurrent upper airway infections and bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, J; Ardito, F; Calò, L; Mancinelli, L; Imperiali, M; Parrilla, C; Picciotti, P M; Fadda, G

    2007-04-01

    Bacterial biofilms identified in various medical devices used in otorhinolaryngology, including tympanostomy tubes, voice prostheses, and cochlear implants, can directly colonise mucosal tissues. The upper airways seem to be at high risk for this type of colonisation. Chronic and/or recurrent upper airway infections may be related to the complex structural and biochemical (quorum sensing) organisation of the biofilm which interferes with the activity of antibiotics (including those with proven in vitro efficacy), thus promoting the establishment of a chronic infection eradicable only by surgical treatment. Biofilm formation plays a role in upper respiratory infections: it not only explains the resistance of these infections to antibiotic therapy but it also represents an important element that contributes to the maintenance of a chronic inflammatory reaction. To document the presence of biofilms in surgical tissue specimens from patients with recurrent infection diseases, and identify their possible role in the chronicity of these infectious processes. We examined 32 surgical specimens from the upper respiratory tract (tonsils, adenoids, mucosa from the ethmoid and maxillary sinuses) of 28 patients (20 adults, eight children) with upper airway infections that had persisted despite repeated treatment with anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics with demonstrated in vitro efficacy. Tissues were cultured using conventional methods and subjected to scanning electron microscopy for detection of biofilm formation. Over 80 per cent (26/32; 81.3 per cent) of the tissue specimens were culture-positive. Bacterial biofilms (associated in most cases with coccoid bacteria) were observed in 65.6 per cent of the tissue samples.

  19. Targeted imaging of bacterial infections : advances, hurdles and hopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, Marleen; Hahn, Markus; Crane, Lucia M. A.; Pleijhuis, Rick G.; Francis, Kevin P.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; van Dam, Gooitzen M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections represent an increasing problem in modern health care, in particular due to ageing populations and accumulating bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Diagnosis is rarely straightforward and consequently treatment is often delayed or indefinite. Therefore, novel tools that can be

  20. Transcriptional response of Musca domestica larvae to bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Tang

    Full Text Available The house fly Musca domestica, a cosmopolitan dipteran insect, is a significant vector for human and animal bacterial pathogens, but little is known about its immune response to these pathogens. To address this issue, we inoculated the larvae with a mixture of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and profiled the transcriptome 6, 24, and 48 h thereafter. Many genes known to controlling innate immunity in insects were induced following infection, including genes encoding pattern recognition proteins (PGRPs, various components of the Toll and IMD signaling pathways and of the proPO-activating and redox systems, and multiple antimicrobial peptides. Interestingly, we also uncovered a large set of novel immune response genes including two broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides (muscin and domesticin, which might have evolved to adapt to house-fly's unique ecological environments. Finally, genes mediating oxidative phosphorylation were repressed at 48 h post-infection, suggesting disruption of energy homeostasis and mitochondrial function at the late stages of infection. Collectively, our data reveal dynamic changes in gene expression following bacterial infection in the house fly, paving the way for future in-depth analysis of M. domestica's immune system.

  1. Bacterial infections of pulp and periodontal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Moles, Miguel Angel; González, Nabila M

    2004-01-01

    The anatomical and structural characteristics of the pulp make this structure prone to altering as a result of, for instance, periodontal conditions (proximity), iatrogenic alterations, infections and involvement of vascular and nerve structures (it is surrounded by hard tissues that prevent expansion), to name just a few. Pulpitis is a process that courses with pain of varying intensity that allows us to determine the location of the lesion in clinical terms. Its evolution varies and may even progress to pulpar necrosis that in turn, produces neuritis-like pain. Diagnosis is established by means of clinical symptomatology and supported by X-rays, palpation of tissues at painful sites, application of electrical stimuli, heat, etc. Periodontitis is a bacterial infection originating in the apex. The most important form is the so-called acute apical periodontitis that arises as a result of a prior episode of pulpitis. It is characterized by acute pain located in the tooth, accompanied by the feeling of having a long-tooth. The patient refers being unable to chew on that side; there may be painful mobility of the tooth and an outflow of pus that alleviates symptoms. X-rays do not provide a lot of information, but may attest to a widening of the apical space. This pathology may disseminate to surrounding tissues, leading to conditions of considerable severity.

  2. Bacterial Uropathogens in Urinary Tract Infection and Antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by clinicians in developing countries. Area-specific monitoring studies aimed to gain knowledge about the type of pathogens responsible for urinary tract infections and their resistance patterns may help the clinician to ...

  3. Procalcitonin as Predictor of Bacterial Infection in Meconium Aspiration Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, Mahendiran; Batra, Prerna; Faridi, M M A; Singh, N P

    2017-12-29

     There is a lack of definite consensus on indications for initiating antibiotics in neonates with meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), instigating researchers to search for a biomarker that can help differentiate MAS from MAS with bacterial infection.  Our primary objective was to compare serum procalcitonin (PCT) levels in full-term vigorous neonates having MAS with or without bacterial infection.  Seventy term vigorous neonates with diagnosis of MAS were enrolled. Blood samples were taken for sepsis screen, C-reactive protein (CRP), PCT, and blood culture at 6 ± 2 hours of respiratory distress. Neonates were categorized into group 1 (MAS without bacterial infection) and group 2 (MAS with bacterial infection) based on blood culture. The duration of our study was 18 months.  Mean ± standard deviation PCT level was 2.52 ± 3.99 in group 1 and 2.71 ± 4.22 in group 2, which was comparable. At cutoff of 0.1 ng/mL, PCT had a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 8% in detecting bacterial infection. Mean total leukocyte count, absolute neutrophil count, immature to total leucocyte ratio, microerythrocyte sedimentation rate, and CRP were comparable.  Though PCT is an early and reliable marker of neonatal infection, the levels were increased in neonates with MAS irrespective of the presence of bacterial infection. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Bacterial blood stream infections and antibiogram among febrile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , ceftriaxone and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The present study revealed that bacterial blood stream infections linked with high levels of drug resistance would pose a challenge in treatment of patients with BSIs. Hence, blood culture with ...

  5. Bacterial pathogens associated with infected wounds in Ogun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OSUTH) between August 1999 and July 2000 in the Orthopaedics, Obstetrics and Gynaecological units to identify the bacterial pathogens associated with infected wounds as well as their antibiotic sensitivity profile. A total of 1670 patients were ...

  6. Exploring bacterial infections: theoretical and experimental studies of the bacterial population dynamics and antibiotic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xinxian

    Bacterial infections are very common in human society. Thus extensive research has been conducted to reveal the molecular mechanisms of the pathogenesis and to evaluate the antibiotics' efficacy against bacteria. Little is known, however, about the population dynamics of bacterial populations and their interactions with the host's immune system. In this dissertation, a stochatic model is developed featuring stochastic phenotypic switching of bacterial individuals to explain the single-variant bottleneck discovered in multi strain bacterial infections. I explored early events in a bacterial infection establishment using classical experiments of Moxon and Murphy on neonatal rats. I showed that the minimal model and its simple variants do not work. I proposed modifications to the model that could explain the data quantitatively. The bacterial infections are also commonly established in physical structures, as biofilms or 3-d colonies. In contrast, most research on antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections has been conducted in well-mixed liquid cultures. I explored the efficacy of antibiotics to treat such bacterial colonies, a broadly applicable method is designed and evaluated where discrete bacterial colonies on 2-d surfaces were exposed to antibiotics. I discuss possible explanations and hypotheses for the experimental results. To verify these hypotheses, we investigated the dynamics of bacterial population as 3-d colonies. We showed that a minimal mathematical model of bacterial colony growth in 3-d was able to account for the experimentally observed presence of a diffusion-limited regime. The model further revealed highly loose packing of the cells in 3-d colonies and smaller cell sizes in colonies than plancktonic cells in corresponding liquid culture. Further experimental tests of the model predictions have revealed that the ratio of the cell size in liquid culture to that in colony cultures was consistent with the model prediction, that the dead cells

  7. Concomitant Bacterial Meningitis in Infants With Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Joanna; Cruz, Andrea T; Nigrovic, Lise E; Freedman, Stephen B; Garro, Aris C; Ishimine, Paul T; Kulik, Dina M; Uspal, Neil G; Grether-Jones, Kendra L; Miller, Aaron S; Schnadower, David; Shah, Samir S; Aronson, Paul L; Balamuth, Fran

    2017-09-01

    To determine age-stratified prevalence of concomitant bacterial meningitis in infants ≤60 days with a urinary tract infection, we performed a 23-center, retrospective study of 1737 infants with urinary tract infection. Concomitant bacterial meningitis was rare, but more common in infants 0-28 days of age [0.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4%-1.9%) compared with infants 29-60 days of age (0.2%; 95% CI: 0%-0.8%).

  8. Chronic filarial infection provides protection against bacterial sepsis by functionally reprogramming macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Gondorf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helminths immunomodulate their hosts and induce a regulatory, anti-inflammatory milieu that prevents allergies and autoimmune diseases. Helminth immunomodulation may benefit sepsis outcome by preventing exacerbated inflammation and severe pathology, but the influence on bacterial clearance remains unclear. To address this, mice were chronically infected with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis (L.s. and the outcome of acute systemic inflammation caused by i.p. Escherichia coli injection was determined. L.s. infection significantly improved E. coli-induced hypothermia, bacterial clearance and sepsis survival and correlated with reduced concentrations of associated pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and a less pronounced pro-inflammatory macrophage gene expression profile. Improved sepsis outcome in L.s.-infected animals was mediated by macrophages, but independent of the alternatively activated macrophage subset. Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria that are present in most human pathogenic filariae, as well as L.s., signal via TLR2 and modulate macrophage function. Here, gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from L.s.-infected mice revealed a downregulation of genes involved in TLR signaling, and pulsing of macrophages in vitro with L.s. extract reduced LPS-triggered activation. Subsequent transfer improved sepsis outcome in naïve mice in a Wolbachia- and TLR2-dependent manner. In vivo, phagocytosis was increased in macrophages from L.s.-infected wild type, but not TLR2-deficient animals. In association, L.s. infection neither improved bacterial clearance in TLR2-deficient animals nor ameliorated E. coli-induced hypothermia and sepsis survival. These results indicate that chronic L.s. infection has a dual beneficial effect on bacterial sepsis, reducing pro-inflammatory immune responses and improving bacterial control. Thus, helminths and their antigens may not only improve the outcome of autoimmune and allergic diseases

  9. Community-acquired bacterial bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, Michaëla A. M.; Stolp, Sebastiaan M.; van der Poll, Tom; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    Information on community-acquired bacterial bloodstream infections (BSIs) in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is limited. We conducted a systematic literature review. The case fraction of community-acquired bacterial BSIs in hospitalized patients is 20% and 30% in adults

  10. AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Nurs. Times. 1985; 81:16-19. 5. Calvin M. Cutaneous wound repair. Wounds. 1998; 10(1): 12-32. 6. Brook I. Aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of necrotizing fasciitis in children. PediatrDermatol. 1996; 13:281-284. 7. Madsen SM, Westh H, Danielson L,. Rosadahi VT Bacterial colonization and healing of venous leg ulcers.

  11. TBK1 protects vacuolar integrity during intracellular bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Radtke

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available TANK-binding kinase-1 (TBK1 is an integral component of Type I interferon induction by microbial infection. The importance of TBK1 and Type I interferon in antiviral immunity is well established, but the function of TBK1 in bacterial infection is unclear. Upon infection of murine embryonic fibroblasts with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella, more extensive bacterial proliferation was observed in tbk1(-/- than tbk1(+/+ cells. TBK1 kinase activity was required for restriction of bacterial infection, but interferon regulatory factor-3 or Type I interferon did not contribute to this TBK1-dependent function. In tbk1(-/-cells, Salmonella, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pyogenes escaped from vacuoles into the cytosol where increased replication occurred, which suggests that TBK1 regulates the integrity of pathogen-containing vacuoles. Knockdown of tbk1 in macrophages and epithelial cells also resulted in increased bacterial localization in the cytosol, indicating that the role of TBK1 in maintaining vacuolar integrity is relevant in different cell types. Taken together, these data demonstrate a requirement for TBK1 in control of bacterial infection distinct from its established role in antiviral immunity.

  12. Bacterial infection increases risk of carcinogenesis by targeting mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A.B.; Desler, Claus; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-01-01

    pathways, and compares the impact of the bacterial alteration of mitochondrial function to that of cancer. Bacterial virulence factors have been demonstrated to induce mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and to modulate DNA repair pathways of the mitochondria. Furthermore, virulence factors can induce...... or impair the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. The effect of bacterial targeting of mitochondria is analogous to behavior of mitochondria in a wide array of tumours, and this strongly suggests that mitochondrial targeting of bacteria is a risk factor for carcinogenesis....

  13. Atypical bacterial pneumonia in the HIV-infected population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Breanne M; Trajtman, Adriana; Rueda, Zulma V; Vélez, Lázaro; Keynan, Yoav

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are more susceptible to respiratory tract infections by other infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi) as their disease progresses to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Despite effective antiretroviral therapy, bacterial pneumonia (the most frequently occurring HIV-associated pulmonary illness) remains a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the HIV-infected population. Over the last few decades, studies have looked at the role of atypical bacterial pneumonia (i.e. pneumonia that causes an atypical clinical presentation or responds differently to typical therapeutics) in association with HIV infection. Due to the lack of available diagnostic strategies, the lack of consideration, and the declining immunity of the patient, HIV co-infections with atypical bacteria are currently believed to be underreported. Thus, following an extensive database search, this review aimed to highlight the current knowledge and gaps regarding atypical bacterial pneumonia in HIV. The authors discuss the prevalence of Chlamydophila pneumoniae , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , Coxiella burnetii , Legionella species and others in the HIV-infected population as well as their clinical presentation, methods of detection, and treatment. Further studies looking at the role of these microbes in association with HIV are required. Increased knowledge of these atypical bacteria will lead to a more rapid diagnosis of these infections, resulting in an improved quality of life for the HIV-infected population.

  14. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    32). In the case of the latter infective agents, miltefosine proved to be an effective antibacterial agent against P. aeruginosa; its administration ...neutropenic via intraperitoneal administration of 150 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg cyclophosphamide in sterile saline on day 4 and day 1 prior to infection (day...319 putative nicotinate -nucleotide diphosphorylase is located downstream of plc1 and transcribed in 320 the opposite direction. The plc1 gene

  15. Innate Immune Sensors and Gastrointestinal Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina L. Hold

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal microbiota is a major source of immune stimulation. The interaction between host pattern-recognition receptors and conserved microbial ligands profoundly influences infection dynamics. Identifying and understanding the nature of these interactions is a key step towards obtaining a clearer picture of microbial pathogenesis. These interactions underpin a complex interplay between microbe and host that has far reaching consequences for both. Here, we review the role of pattern recognition receptors in three prototype diseases affecting the stomach, the small intestine, and large intestine, respectively (Helicobacter pylori infection, Salmonella infection, and inflammatory bowel disease. Specifically, we review the nature and impact of pathogen:receptor interactions, their impact upon pathogenesis, and address the relevance of pattern recognition receptors in the development of therapies for gastrointestinal diseases.

  16. common bacterial isolates from infected eyes abstract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    Pathogenic microorganisms cause diseases to the eyes due to their virulence and host's reduced resistance from many factors such as personal hygiene, living conditions, socio-economic status, nutrition, genetics, physiology, fever and age . The areas in the eye that are frequently infected are the conjunctiva, lid and ...

  17. Combinations of bacterial species in endodontic infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, LB; Wesselink, P.R.; van Winkelhoff, AJ

    Aim This study was undertaken to investigate combinations of bacteria found in root-canal infections of teeth with periapical bone destruction without clinical signs and symptoms. Methodology Endodontic samples from 58 root canals were cultured anaerobically and microorganisms were counted and

  18. Circulating Chemokine Levels in Febrile Infants With Serious Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Lin Chen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of serious bacterial infections (SBI in febrile young infants based on clinical symptoms and signs is difficult. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic values of circulating chemokines and C-reactive protein (CRP levels in febrile young infants < 3 months of age with suspected SBI. We enrolled 43 febrile young infants < 3 months of age with clinically suspected SBI who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit or complete nursing unit of the pediatric department of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital between December 2006 and July 2007. Blood was drawn from the patients at admission, and complete blood counts, plasma levels of CRP, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and chemokines, including interleukin-8 (IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, monokine induced by interferon-γ, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were measured. Patients’ symptoms and signs, length of hospital stay, main diagnosis, and results of routine blood tests and microbiological culture results were recorded. Twenty-six infants (60.5% were diagnosed with SBI, while 17 (39.5% had no evidence of SBI based on the results of bacterial cultures. CRP, IL-8 and G-CSF levels were significantly higher in the infants with SBI than in those without SBI. Plasma levels of other chemokines were not significantly different between the groups. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve for differentiating between the presence and absence of SBI was 0.79 for CRP level. Diagnostic accuracy was further improved by combining CRP and IL-8, when the area under the ROC curve increased to 0.91. CRP levels were superior to IL-8 and G-CSF levels for predicting SBI in febrile infants at initial survey. IL-8 levels could be used as an additional diagnostic tool in the initial evaluation of febrile young infants, allowing clinicians to treat these patients more appropriately.

  19. Increased Sleep Promotes Survival during a Bacterial Infection in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Williams, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The relationship between sleep and immune function is not well understood at a functional or molecular level. We therefore used a genetic approach in Drosophila to manipulate sleep and evaluated effects on the ability of flies to fight bacterial infection. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Methods and Results: We used a genetic approach to transiently alter neuronal excitability in the mushroom body, a region in the central brain that is known to regulate sleep. Flies with increased sleep for up to two days prior to a bacterial infection showed increased resistance to the infection and improved survival. These flies also had increased expression levels of a subset of anti-microbial peptide mRNA prior to infection, as well as increased NFκB activity during infection as indicated by in vivo luciferase reporter activity. In contrast, flies that experienced reduced sleep for up to two days prior to infection had no effect on survival or on NFκB activity during infection. However, flies with reduced sleep showed an altered defense mechanism, such that resistance to infection was increased, but at the expense of reduced tolerance. This effect was dependent on environmental condition. Conclusions: Increasing sleep enhanced activity of an NFκB transcription factor, increased resistance to infection, and strongly promoted survival. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that sleep is beneficial to the host by maintaining a robust immune system. Citation: Kuo TH, Williams JA. Increased sleep promotes survival during a bacterial infection in Drosophila. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1077-1086. PMID:24882902

  20. DMPD: Role of Nods in bacterial infection. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17379560 Role of Nods in bacterial infection. Bourhis LL, Werts C. Microbes Infect.... 2007 Apr;9(5):629-36. Epub 2007 Jan 27. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Role of Nods in bacterial infection.... PubmedID 17379560 Title Role of Nods in bacterial infection. Authors Bourhis LL, Werts C. Publication M

  1. Search for microRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens in infected mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Yuki; Finethy, Ryan; Saka, Hector A; Xet-Mull, Ana M; Sisk, Dana M; Smith, Kristen L Jurcic; Lee, Sunhee; Coers, Jörn; Valdivia, Raphael H; Tobin, David M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are expressed by all multicellular organisms and play a critical role as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Moreover, different microRNA species are known to influence the progression of a range of different diseases, including cancer and microbial infections. A number of different human viruses also encode microRNAs that can attenuate cellular innate immune responses and promote viral replication, and a fungal pathogen that infects plants has recently been shown to express microRNAs in infected cells that repress host cell immune responses and promote fungal pathogenesis. Here, we have used deep sequencing of total expressed small RNAs, as well as small RNAs associated with the cellular RNA-induced silencing complex RISC, to search for microRNAs that are potentially expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens and translocated into infected animal cells. In the case of Legionella and Chlamydia and the two mycobacterial species M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis, we failed to detect any bacterial small RNAs that had the characteristics expected for authentic microRNAs, although large numbers of small RNAs of bacterial origin could be recovered. However, a third mycobacterial species, M. marinum, did express an ∼ 23-nt small RNA that was bound by RISC and derived from an RNA stem-loop with the characteristics expected for a pre-microRNA. While intracellular expression of this candidate bacterial microRNA was too low to effectively repress target mRNA species in infected cultured cells in vitro, artificial overexpression of this potential bacterial pre-microRNA did result in the efficient repression of a target mRNA. This bacterial small RNA therefore represents the first candidate microRNA of bacterial origin.

  2. Search for microRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens in infected mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Furuse

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are expressed by all multicellular organisms and play a critical role as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Moreover, different microRNA species are known to influence the progression of a range of different diseases, including cancer and microbial infections. A number of different human viruses also encode microRNAs that can attenuate cellular innate immune responses and promote viral replication, and a fungal pathogen that infects plants has recently been shown to express microRNAs in infected cells that repress host cell immune responses and promote fungal pathogenesis. Here, we have used deep sequencing of total expressed small RNAs, as well as small RNAs associated with the cellular RNA-induced silencing complex RISC, to search for microRNAs that are potentially expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens and translocated into infected animal cells. In the case of Legionella and Chlamydia and the two mycobacterial species M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis, we failed to detect any bacterial small RNAs that had the characteristics expected for authentic microRNAs, although large numbers of small RNAs of bacterial origin could be recovered. However, a third mycobacterial species, M. marinum, did express an ∼ 23-nt small RNA that was bound by RISC and derived from an RNA stem-loop with the characteristics expected for a pre-microRNA. While intracellular expression of this candidate bacterial microRNA was too low to effectively repress target mRNA species in infected cultured cells in vitro, artificial overexpression of this potential bacterial pre-microRNA did result in the efficient repression of a target mRNA. This bacterial small RNA therefore represents the first candidate microRNA of bacterial origin.

  3. Serious bacterial infections in febrile young children: Lack of value ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fever is both a marker of insignificant viral infection, as well as more serious bacterial sepsis. Therefore ... febrile children under the age of 5 years (with an axillary temperature ≥38°C) who presented to Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Pretoria, with signs and symptoms of pneumonia, meningitis and/or generalised sepsis.

  4. Klebsiella pneumoniae Siderophores Induce Inflammation, Bacterial Dissemination, and HIF-1α Stabilization during Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Victoria I; Breen, Paul; Houle, Sébastien; Dozois, Charles M; Bachman, Michael A

    2016-09-13

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, and is rapidly acquiring antibiotic resistance. K. pneumoniae requires secretion of siderophores, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators, for bacterial replication and full virulence. The specific combination of siderophores secreted by K. pneumoniae during infection can impact tissue localization, systemic dissemination, and host survival. However, the effect of these potent iron chelators on the host during infection is unknown. In vitro, siderophores deplete epithelial cell iron, induce cytokine secretion, and activate the master transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein that controls vascular permeability and inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae directly contributes to inflammation and bacterial dissemination during pneumonia. To examine the effects of siderophore secretion independently of bacterial growth, we performed infections with tonB mutants that persist in vivo but are deficient in siderophore import. Using a murine model of pneumonia, we found that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae induces the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL1, and CXCL2, as well as bacterial dissemination to the spleen, compared to siderophore-negative mutants at an equivalent bacterial number. Furthermore, we determined that siderophore-secreting K. pneumoniae stabilized HIF-1α in vivo and that bacterial dissemination to the spleen required alveolar epithelial HIF-1α. Our results indicate that siderophores act directly on the host to induce inflammatory cytokines and bacterial dissemination and that HIF-1α is a susceptibility factor for bacterial invasion during pneumonia. Klebsiella pneumoniae causes a wide range of bacterial diseases, including pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and sepsis. To cause infection, K. pneumoniae steals

  5. Hypoxia determines survival outcomes of bacterial infection through HIF-1α-dependent reprogramming of leukocyte metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, A.A.R.; Dickinson, R.S.; Murphy, F.; Thomson, J.P.; Marriott, H.M.; Tavares, A.; Willson, J.; Williams, L.; Lewis, A.; Mirchandani, A.; Coelho, P.D.S.; Doherty, C.; Ryan, E.; Watts, E.; Morton, N.M.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia and bacterial infection frequently coexist, in both acute and chronic clinical settings, and typically result in adverse clinical outcomes. To ameliorate this morbidity, we investigated the interaction between hypoxia and the host response. In the context of acute hypoxia, both Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae infections rapidly induced progressive neutrophil-mediated morbidity and mortality, with associated hypothermia and cardiovascular compromise. Preconditioning ...

  6. Bacterial interference in upper respiratory tract infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Michael; Brook, Itzhak; Bernstein, Joel M; Casey, Janet R; Roos, Kristian; Marple, Bradley; Farrar, Judith R

    2011-01-01

    Published definitions of bacterial interference (BI) differ, some focusing on changes in the normal flora and others on changes in subsequent infection. A need for consensus was identified at a roundtable discussion of BI in upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). We conducted a systematic review of the available data to justify a consensus definition of BI specific to URTI as "a dynamic, antagonistic interaction between at least 2 organisms that affects the life cycle of each, changes the microenvironment, and alters the organisms' colonization, invasiveness, and ability to affect the health of the host." Continued communication among the faculty postroundtable was used to identify and refine the search criteria to (1) in vitro and in vivo studies assessing bacterial URTI, (2) BI evaluated by response to treatment of URTI with antimicrobial agents, and (3) bacterial function in relation to interactions between normal (nonpathogenic) and pathological flora. The criteria were applied to systematic searches of MEDLINE (1950 onward), EMBASE (1974 onward), and the Cochrane Library (2007). Twenty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria, most focused on children with recurrent infections. Qualitative analysis supports the consensus definition. Interfering organisms affected the life cycle of test pathogens and inhibited their colonization, invasiveness, and health outcomes. Data were insufficient for statistical analysis. Interactions between interfering organisms and potential pathogens isolated from the same host can alter response to infection and treatment. More studies are needed, particularly in adults, to understand the role of interfering organisms, the influence of antibiotics, and the potential for recolonization posttreatment.

  7. Severe bacterial infections in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: prevalence and clinical risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattiya Teawtrakul

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients with NTDT was found to be moderate. Time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and iron overload may be clinical risk factors for severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. Bacterial infection should be recognized in splenectomized patients with NTDT, particularly those who have an iron overload.

  8. Acute Sleep Deprivation Enhances Post-Infection Sleep and Promotes Survival during Bacterial Infection in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Williams, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep is known to increase as an acute response to infection. However, the function of this behavioral response in host defense is not well understood. To address this problem, we evaluated the effect of acute sleep deprivation on post-infection sleep and immune function in Drosophila. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Methods and Results: Flies were subjected to sleep deprivation before (early DEP) or after (late DEP) bacterial infection. Relative to a non-deprived control, flies subjected to early DEP had enhanced sleep after infection as well as increased bacterial clearance and survival outcome. Flies subjected to late DEP experienced enhanced sleep following the deprivation period, and showed a modest improvement in survival outcome. Continuous DEP (early and late DEP) throughout infection also enhanced sleep later during infection and improved survival. However, improved survival in flies subjected to late or continuous DEP did not occur until after flies had experienced sleep. During infection, both early and late DEP enhanced NFκB transcriptional activity as measured by a luciferase reporter (κB-luc) in living flies. Early DEP also increased NFκB activity prior to infection. Flies that were deficient in expression of either the Relish or Dif NFκB transcription factors showed normal responses to early DEP. However, the effect of early DEP on post-infection sleep and survival was abolished in double mutants, which indicates that Relish and Dif have redundant roles in this process. Conclusions: Acute sleep deprivation elevated NFκB-dependent activity, increased post-infection sleep, and improved survival during bacterial infection. Citation: Kuo TH, Williams JA. Acute sleep deprivation enhances post-infection sleep and promotes survival during bacterial infection in Drosophila. SLEEP 2014;37(5):859-869. PMID:24790264

  9. Heparin-Related Thrombocytopenia Triggered by Severe Status of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with severe lupus nephritis developed thrombocytopenia during treatment with high-dose steroids. In addition to viral- or disease-induced cytopenia, the pathology was believed to arise from diverse contributing factors, such as thrombotic microangiopathy and heparin-related thrombocytopenia (HIT. By combining plasma exchange therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide, we successfully controlled the SLE activity and improved the thrombocytopenia. An antecedent bacterial infection or SLE activity is believed to have contributed to the concurrent HIT.

  10. Viral infection of the pregnant cervix predisposes to ascending bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racicot, Karen; Cardenas, Ingrid; Wünsche, Vera; Aldo, Paulomi; Guller, Seth; Means, Robert; Romero, Roberto; Mor, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is the major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity, and bacterial infections that ascend from the lower female reproductive tract (FRT) are the most common route of uterine infection leading to preterm birth. The uterus and growing fetus are protected from ascending infection by the cervix, which controls and limits microbial access by the production of mucus, cytokines and anti-microbial peptides (AMPs). If this barrier is compromised, bacteria may enter the uterine cavity leading to preterm birth. Using a mouse model, we demonstrate, for the first time, that viral infection of the cervix, during pregnancy, reduces the capacity of the FRT to prevent bacterial infection of the uterus. This is due to differences in susceptibility of the cervix to infection by virus during pregnancy and the associated changes in TLR and AMP expression and function. We suggest that preterm labor is a polymicrobial disease, which requires a multifactorial approach for its prevention and treatment. PMID:23752614

  11. Effects of Viral and Bacterial Infections on Marginal Periodontium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukhari Csilla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several risk factors, general and local, which favor the onset of periodontal destruction, and their knowledge is essential to their correct identification and for the adoption of a suitable therapeutic management. The aim of the study was to assess periodontal health status of patients suffering from viral and bacterial infections and to determine the eventual relationship between periodontal diseases and infectious diseases.

  12. MICROBIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTICS OF THE MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTION AND PURULENT BACTERIAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kraeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In the review modern data on taxonomy, biological features and clinical significance of agent of meningococcal infection and bacterial purulent meningitis are presented. Methods of laboratory diagnostics as well as recommendations about use of high-quality culture media and diagnostic kits for isolation and identification of microorganisms are described. Modern techniques to detect sensitivity of bacteria to antibiotics are proposed.

  13. Bacterial diversity of symptomatic primary endodontic infection by clonal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Maria Menezes NÓBREGA

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the bacterial diversity of 10 root canals with acute apical abscess using clonal analysis. Samples were collected from 10 patients and submitted to bacterial DNA isolation, 16S rRNA gene amplification, cloning, and sequencing. A bacterial genomic library was constructed and bacterial diversity was estimated. The mean number of taxa per canal was 15, ranging from 11 to 21. A total of 689 clones were analyzed and 76 phylotypes identified, of which 47 (61.84% were different species and 29 (38.15% were taxa reported as yet-uncultivable or as yet-uncharacterized species. Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Filifactor alocis, and Peptostreptococcus stomatis were the most frequently detected species, followed by Dialister invisus, Phocaeicola abscessus, the uncharacterized Lachnospiraceae oral clone, Porphyromonas spp., and Parvimonas micra. Eight phyla were detected and the most frequently identified taxa belonged to the phylum Firmicutes (43.5%, followed by Bacteroidetes (22.5% and Proteobacteria (13.2%. No species was detected in all studied samples and some species were identified in only one case. It was concluded that acute primary endodontic infection is characterized by wide bacterial diversity and a high intersubject variability was observed. Anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes, were the most frequently detected microorganisms.

  14. Bacterial sensitivity to fosfomycin in pregnant women with urinary infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Batista Souza

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim this study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility to fosfomycin of bacteria isolated from urine samples of pregnant women with urinary tract infection. Samples of urine culture with bacterial growth of pregnant women were collected from clinical laboratories in Tubarão, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, between September 2012 and May 2013. In the experimental stage, the colonies were tested for sensitivity to fosfomycin by using the Kirby–Bauer method. The following information relating to the samples was also collected: patients’ age, colony count, type(s of identified bacterial(s and result of the antimicrobial sensitivity test. Student's t-test was used for mean comparison. A total of 134 samples were selected for the study. The age of the subjects ranged from 15 to 40 years (mean 26.7. Escherichia coli (Gram-negative and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive were the most commonly identified species. In 89% of cases, the microorganisms were sensitive to fosfomycin. E. coli and S. aureus were the main species of bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections in women in the study area. The most prevalent microorganisms in pregnant women with urinary tract infection were susceptible to fosfomycin.

  15. Role of Honey in Topical and Systemic Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Muhammad Barkaat

    2018-01-01

    The development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has made it more difficult and expensive to treat infections. Honey is getting worldwide attention as a topical therapeutic agent for wound infections and potential future candidate for systemic infections. The purpose of this review was to summarise different antibacterial bio-active compounds in honey, their synergistic interaction and their clinical implications in topical and systemic infections. In addition, contemporary testing methods for evaluating peroxide and non-peroxide antibacterial activity of honey were also critically appraised. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Pub Med, reference lists and databases were used to review the literature. Honey contains several unique antibacterial components. These components are believed to act on diverse bacterial targets, are broad spectrum, operate synergistically, prevent biofilm formation, and decrease production of virulence factors. Moreover, honey has the ability to block bacterial communication (quorum sensing), and therefore, it is unlikely that bacteria develop resistance against honey. Bacterial resistance against honey has not been documented so far. Unlike conventional antibiotics, honey only targets pathogenic bacteria without disturbing the growth of normal gastrointestinal flora when taken orally. It also contains prebiotics, probiotics, and zinc and enhances the growth of beneficial gut flora. The presence of such plethora of antibacterial properties in one product makes it a promising candidate not only in wound infections but also in systemic and particularly for gastrointestinal infections. Agar diffusion assay, being used for evaluating antibacterial activity of honey, is not the most appropriate and sensitive assay as it only detects non-peroxide activity when present at a higher level. Therefore, there is a need to develop more sensitive techniques that may be capable of detecting and evaluating different important components in honey as

  16. Scintigraphic images of bacterial infection using aptamers directly labeled with 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, S.R.; Correa, C.R.; Andrade, A.S.R.; Barros, A.L.B.; Diniz, S.O.F.; Cardoso, V.N.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is specie of great medical importance and is the most commonly agent found in infections of soft tissues, bone infections and bone prostheses. In this study, aptamers selected to S. aureus were labeled by the direct method with 99m Tc and used for bacterial infection identification by scintigraphy. The radiolabeled aptamers radiochemical purity and stability were assessed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Three groups of Swiss mice (n=6) were used for the scintigraphic imaging studies. The first group was infected intramuscularly in the right thigh with S. aureus, the second group with C. albicans and the third group received zymosan to induce aseptic inflammation. After 24 h, radiolabeled aptamers (18 MBq) were injected by the tail vein. Scintigraphic images were acquired at 1 h and 4 h postinjection. The radiolabeling yield with 99m Tc was over 90%. The radiolabeled aptamers were stable in 0.9% saline, plasma and cysteine excess. The scintigraphic image profiles showed high uptake in the kidneys and bladder in all groups, indicating a main renal excretion consistent with the hydrophilic nature of the molecule. No accumulation of radioactivity was observed in the thyroid, stomach, liver and spleen, indicating acceptable levels of radiochemical impurities. The group infected with S. aureus showed a visible uptake in the infected right thigh at 1 h post-injection. For the control groups (C. albicans and zymosan) visible differences between the right and left thighs were not observed. The radiolabeled aptamers were able to distinguish aseptic inflammation from bacterial infection and bacterial from fungal infection. (author)

  17. Scintigraphic images of bacterial infection using aptamers directly labeled with {sup 99m}Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, S.R.; Correa, C.R.; Andrade, A.S.R., E-mail: sararoberta7@hotmail.com, E-mail: crisrcorrea@gmail.com, E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barros, A.L.B.; Diniz, S.O.F.; Cardoso, V.N., E-mail: brancodebarros@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: valbertcardoso@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: simoneodilia@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia. Departamento de Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is specie of great medical importance and is the most commonly agent found in infections of soft tissues, bone infections and bone prostheses. In this study, aptamers selected to S. aureus were labeled by the direct method with {sup 99m}Tc and used for bacterial infection identification by scintigraphy. The radiolabeled aptamers radiochemical purity and stability were assessed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Three groups of Swiss mice (n=6) were used for the scintigraphic imaging studies. The first group was infected intramuscularly in the right thigh with S. aureus, the second group with C. albicans and the third group received zymosan to induce aseptic inflammation. After 24 h, radiolabeled aptamers (18 MBq) were injected by the tail vein. Scintigraphic images were acquired at 1 h and 4 h postinjection. The radiolabeling yield with {sup 99m}Tc was over 90%. The radiolabeled aptamers were stable in 0.9% saline, plasma and cysteine excess. The scintigraphic image profiles showed high uptake in the kidneys and bladder in all groups, indicating a main renal excretion consistent with the hydrophilic nature of the molecule. No accumulation of radioactivity was observed in the thyroid, stomach, liver and spleen, indicating acceptable levels of radiochemical impurities. The group infected with S. aureus showed a visible uptake in the infected right thigh at 1 h post-injection. For the control groups (C. albicans and zymosan) visible differences between the right and left thighs were not observed. The radiolabeled aptamers were able to distinguish aseptic inflammation from bacterial infection and bacterial from fungal infection. (author)

  18. Nanosized Selenium: A Novel Platform Technology to Prevent Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi

    As an important category of bacterial infections, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are considered an increasing threat to the safety and health of patients worldwide. HAIs lead to extended hospital stays, contribute to increased medical costs, and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In the United States, infections encountered in the hospital or a health care facility affect more than 1.7 million patients, cost 35.7 billion to 45 billion, and contribute to 88,000 deaths in hospitals annually. The most conventional and widely accepted method to fight against bacterial infections is using antibiotics. However, because of the widespread and sometimes inappropriate use of antibiotics, many strains of bacteria have rapidly developed antibiotic resistance. Those new, stronger bacteria pose serious, worldwide threats to public health and welfare. In 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported antibiotic resistance as a global serious threat that is no longer a prediction for the future but is now reality. It has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. The most effective strategy to prevent antibiotic resistance is minimizing the use of antibiotics. In recent years, nanomaterials have been investigated as one of the potential substitutes of antibiotics. As a result of their vastly increased ratio of surface area to volume, nanomaterials will likely exert a stronger interaction with bacteria which may affect bacterial growth and propagation. A major concern of most existing antibacterial nanomaterials, like silver nanoparticles, is their potential toxicity. But selenium is a non-metallic material and a required nutrition for the human body, which is recommended by the FDA at a 53 to 60 μg daily intake. Nanosized selenium is considered to be healthier and less toxic compared with many metal-based nanomaterials due to the generation of reactive oxygen species from metals, especially heavy metals. Therefore, the objectives of

  19. Macrophage origin limits functional plasticity in helminth-bacterial co-infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Rückerl

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid reprogramming of the macrophage activation phenotype is considered important in the defense against consecutive infection with diverse infectious agents. However, in the setting of persistent, chronic infection the functional importance of macrophage-intrinsic adaptation to changing environments vs. recruitment of new macrophages remains unclear. Here we show that resident peritoneal macrophages expanded by infection with the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri altered their activation phenotype in response to infection with Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium in vitro and in vivo. The nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages efficiently upregulated bacterial induced effector molecules (e.g. MHC-II, NOS2 similarly to newly recruited monocyte-derived macrophages. Nonetheless, recruitment of blood monocyte-derived macrophages to Salmonella infection occurred with equal magnitude in co-infected animals and caused displacement of the nematode-expanded, tissue resident-derived macrophages from the peritoneal cavity. Global gene expression analysis revealed that although nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages made an anti-bacterial response, this was muted as compared to newly recruited F4/80low macrophages. However, the F4/80high macrophages adopted unique functional characteristics that included enhanced neutrophil-stimulating chemokine production. Thus, our data provide important evidence that plastic adaptation of MΦ activation does occur in vivo, but that cellular plasticity is outweighed by functional capabilities specific to the tissue origin of the cell.

  20. Acute sleep deprivation enhances post-infection sleep and promotes survival during bacterial infection in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Williams, Julie A

    2014-05-01

    Sleep is known to increase as an acute response to infection. However, the function of this behavioral response in host defense is not well understood. To address this problem, we evaluated the effect of acute sleep deprivation on post-infection sleep and immune function in Drosophila. Laboratory. Drosophila melanogaster. Flies were subjected to sleep deprivation before (early DEP) or after (late DEP) bacterial infection. Relative to a non-deprived control, flies subjected to early DEP had enhanced sleep after infection as well as increased bacterial clearance and survival outcome. Flies subjected to late DEP experienced enhanced sleep following the deprivation period, and showed a modest improvement in survival outcome. Continuous DEP (early and late DEP) throughout infection also enhanced sleep later during infection and improved survival. However, improved survival in flies subjected to late or continuous DEP did not occur until after flies had experienced sleep. During infection, both early and late DEP enhanced NFκB transcriptional activity as measured by a luciferase reporter (κB-luc) in living flies. Early DEP also increased NFκB activity prior to infection. Flies that were deficient in expression of either the Relish or Dif NFκB transcription factors showed normal responses to early DEP. However, the effect of early DEP on post-infection sleep and survival was abolished in double mutants, which indicates that Relish and Dif have redundant roles in this process. Acute sleep deprivation elevated NFκB-dependent activity, increased post-infection sleep, and improved survival during bacterial infection.

  1. Bacterial Flora Changes in Conjunctiva of Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Type I Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Fei, Yuda; Qin, Yali; Luo, Dan; Yang, Shufei; Kou, Xinyun; Zi, Yingxin; Deng, Tingting; Jin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota of both humans and animals plays an important role in their health and the development of disease. Therefore, the bacterial flora of the conjunctiva may also be associated with some diseases. However, there are no reports on the alteration of bacterial flora in conjunctiva of diabetic rats in the literature. Therefore, we investigated the changes in bacterial flora in bulbar conjunctiva of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type I diabetes. A high dose of STZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats to induce type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The diabetic rats were raised in the animal laboratory and at 8 months post-injection of STZ swab samples were taken from the bulbar conjunctiva for cultivation of aerobic bacteria. The bacterial isolates were identified by Gram staining and biochemical features. The identified bacteria from both diabetic and healthy rats were then compared. The diabetic and healthy rats had different bacterial flora present in their bulbar conjunctiva. In total, 10 and 8 bacterial species were found in the STZ and control groups, respectively, with only three species (Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus gallinarum and Escherichia coli) shared between the two groups. Gram-positive bacteria were common in both groups and the most abundant was Enterococcus faecium. However, after the development of T1DM, the bacterial flora in the rat bulbar conjunctiva changed considerably, with a reduced complexity evident. STZ-induced diabetes caused alterations of bacterial flora in the bulbar conjunctiva in rats, with some bacterial species disappearing and others emerging. Our results indicate that the conjunctival bacterial flora in diabetic humans should be surveyed for potential diagnostic markers or countermeasures to prevent eye infections in T1DM patients.

  2. Bacterial infections in cynomolgus monkeys given small molecule immunomodulatory antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Karen D

    2010-01-01

    Opportunistic infections (OIs) during the course of non-clinical toxicity studies can serve as a clinical indicator of immunosuppression. In monkeys, severity may be magnified since the possibility for fecal-oral and cage-to-cage transmission of bacteria exists, reserve capacity is low, and clinical signs of infection are not easily detected until the infectious process is well underway. This review summarizes a case study presented at the HESI-ILSI ITC-Sponsored workshop on Naturally Occurring Infections in Non-human Primates and Immunotoxicity Implications. It gives an overview on the impact of bacterial infections in monkeys on the development and regulatory assessment of three closely-related representative small molecule immunomodulatory (anti-inflammatory) drug candidates all inhibiting the same drug target. The infections, which sometimes progressed to bacteremia and death, originally manifested in the skin, upper respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and less frequently as soft tissue abscesses. Infections were sporadic and not observed in all studies despite coverage of equivalent or higher systemic exposures or longer durations of treatment. To address concerns regarding inconsistency in the presentation and type of findings and their potential relationship to infection, steps were taken to identify causative agents (via culture, microscopy), implement various intervention and treatment regimens (supportive care, antibiotics, drug holiday), demonstrate reversibility of clinical and immune effects, and study major immune components/mechanisms affected (cytokine/stress protein profiling, immune cell phenotyping, and humoral/innate immune cell function tests). Appropriate diagnosis and characterization of the infection was critical to discrimination of these findings as a secondary pharmacologic effect rather than a direct drug-related target organ effect, and also guided clinical protocol design and regulatory acceptance.

  3. Antimicrobial Nanoparticle for the Treatment of Bacterial Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya

    Liposomes are spherical lipid vesicles with bilayered membrane structure, which have been recognized as one of the most widely used carriers for delivering a myriad of pharmaceuticals. Liposomes can carry both hydrophilic and hydrophobic agents with high efficiency and protect them from undesired effects of external conditions. However, the applications of liposomes are usually limited by their instability during storage. They are inclined to fuse with one another immediately after preparation, resulting in undesired mixing, increase in size, and payload loss. To overcome this limitation, this dissertation will focus on the technology to stabilize liposomes during storage and destabilize at specific conditions in order to allow controllable therapeutic release, as well as demonstrate their application to treat one of the bacterial infection diseases, acne vulgaris. The first area of this research is stimuli-responsive liposomes development, where the liposomes are stabilized by introducing gold nanoparticles to adsorb to their surface. As a result, the liposomes are prevented from fusing with one another and undesirable payload release during storage or physiological environments. Moreover, therapeutic is controllably released depending on environment conditions, such as acidic pH and bacterial virulence factor. In case of acid-responsive liposomes, the bound gold nanoparticles can effectively prevent liposomes from fusing with one another at neutral pH value, while at acidic environment (e.g. pHhuman skin are typically acidic. Demonstrated by fluorescent and antimicrobial experiments, the bound gold nanoparticles effectively prevent LipoLA from fusing with one another at neutral pH value. However, at acidic condition, the gold particles detatch from LipoLA surface, allowing the fusion with P.acnes membrane and lauric acid delivery, resulting in a complete killing effect. The stimuli-responsive liposomes presented here provide a new, safe, and effective approach to

  4. Fibrinous pericarditis secondary to bacterial infection in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Michihito; Kurashima, Chihiro; Shimbo, Genya; Omura, Hiroshi; Koyama, Kenji; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Kawamoto, Keiko; Miyahara, Kazuro

    2017-06-10

    A three-year-old spayed domestic short-haired cat presented for evaluation of weight loss, cardiomegaly and pleural effusion. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated a thickened pericardium with mild pericardial effusion and a large volume of pleural effusion characterized by exudate. Although the cat was treated with antibiotics, the clinical symptoms did not improve. The cat developed dyspnea and died on day 7. Necropsy revealed a large amount of modified transudates ascites, pleural effusion and markedly dilated pericardium. Histopathological examination revealed severe exudation of fibrin and granulation tissue in a thick layer of the epicardium. The cat was diagnosed with fibrinous pericarditis secondary to bacterial infection.

  5. Protein malnutrition and metronidazole induced intestinal bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to assess the effects of protein malnutrition (PM) associated with antibiotic on growth weight, cecal bacterial overgrowth and enterobacteria translocation. Eighteen Gnotobiotic young Wistar rats (135 ± 2.35 g) were treated orally with antibiotic and submitted to dietary restriction based on maize diet ...

  6. [Biofilm and bacterial microrganisms in genito-urinary infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, Sandra

    2009-06-01

    Biofilms represent a cohesive matrix of microrganisms and other cellular constituents that might be present in any natural environment. Microrganisms able to produce biofilms undergo a number of distinctive and typical phenomenon, such as adhesiveness on infected cellular surfaces that consequently becomes irreversible, so deeply changing the microrganisms physiological status. In addition, biofilms play a central role in consenting microrganisms to survive and subsequently to spread in the host, since exocellular matrix protects pathogen bacteria from antibodies and immunocompetent cells devoted to their destruction, and from antimicrobial agents. So, use of antimicrobials able to penetrate cellular membrane and to act into the cell has to be considered as essential in the treatment of infections that may possibly involve biofilm-producer microrganisms, considering their aggressive and virulent behaviour and their intrinsic bacterial resistance.

  7. Preventing Bacterial Infections using Metal Oxides Nanocoatings on Bone Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceac, L. D.; Straticiuc, S.; Hanganu, E.; Stafie, L.; Calin, G.; Gavrilescu, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays bone implant removal is caused by infection that occurs around it possibly acquired after surgery or during hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to reveal some metal oxides applied as coatings on bone implant thus limiting the usual antibiotics-resistant bacteria colonization. Therefore ZnO, TiO2 and CuO were synthesized and structurally and morphologically analized in order to use them as an alternative antimicrobial agents deposited on bone implant. XRD, SEM, and FTIR characterization techniques were used to identify structure and texture of these nanoscaled metal oxides. These metal oxides nanocoatings on implant surface play a big role in preventing bacterial infection and reducing surgical complications.

  8. COEXISTENCE OF BACTERIAL INFECTION IN SPUTUM POSITIVE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Bhushan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM AND OBJECTIVES To study the coexistence of bacterial infection among patients with confirmed sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS Study conducted at department of pulmonary medicine Victoria Hospital Bangalore, Karnataka, India, from January 2015 to June 2015 in confirmed positive sputum pulmonary tuberculosis patient, all patients were subjected for sputum gram staining and culture and sensitivity and checked for bacterial growth. RESULTS Total 150 patients were confirmed to have sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis from January 2015 to June 2015 both inpatient and outpatient were subjected to undergo sputum gram stain and culture and sensitivity with the following growth Klebsiella 40% E coli 15.33% Pseudomonas 9.33% Pneumococci 4.66% gram negative non fermenters 2.66% methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus 1.33% Citrobacter 1.33% Enterobacter 1.33%, Serratia/Staphylococci aureus/Proteus .66%. CONCLUSION The most common secondary infection observed out of 150 patients is Klebsiella which is seen in 60 patients followed by E coli in 23 patients, pseudomonas in 14 patients Pneumococci in 7 pt gram negative non fermenter 4 pt, Methicillin resistant Staph aureus, Citrobacter, Enterobacter in 2 patients each Serratia, Proteus, Staphylococcus aureus in 1 patient each.

  9. Canine bacterial urinary tract infections: new developments in old pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mary F; Litster, Annette L; Platell, Joanne L; Trott, Darren J

    2011-10-01

    Uncomplicated bacterial urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur commonly in dogs. Persistent or recurrent infections are reported less frequently. They typically occur in dogs with an underlying disease and are sometimes asymptomatic, especially in dogs with predisposing chronic disease. Escherichia coli is the organism most frequently cultured in both simple and complicated UTIs. Organisms such as Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. are less common in uncomplicated UTI, but become increasingly prominent in dogs with recurrent UTI. The ability of bacteria to acquire resistance to antimicrobials and/or to evade host immune defence mechanisms is vital for persistence in the urinary tract. Antimicrobial therapy limitations and bacterial strains with such abilities require novel control strategies. Sharing of resistant bacteria between humans and dogs has been recently documented and is of particular concern for E. coli O25b:H4-ST131 strains that are both virulent and multi-drug resistant. The epidemiology of complicated UTIs, pathogenic traits of uropathogens and new therapeutic concepts are outlined in this review. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Observations of Bacterial Behavior during Infection Using the ARGOS Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, A. J.; Algarni, S.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2015-03-01

    This research employed the Area Recorded Generalized Optical Scattering (ARGOS) approach which allowed for the observation of bacterial changes in terms of individual particles and population dynamics in real time. This new approach allows for an aqueous environment to be manipulated while conducting time-specific measurements over an indefinite amount of time. This current study provides a more time-specific method in which the bacteria remained within the initial conditions and allows for more time precision than provided by analyzing concentrations of plaque-forming units (PFU). This study involved the bacteria (F-amp) during infection by bacteriophage (MS2). The relative total intensity allows for detailed measurements of the bacteria population over time. The bacteria characteristics were also evaluated such as the root mean square image difference (at specific wavevectors), fractal dimension and effective radius. The growth rate of the infected bacteria occurred at a rate higher than the uninfected bacteria similarly, the death rates were also higher for the infected bacteria than the uninfected bacteria. The present study indicates that bacteria may react to infection by increasing the rate of population growth.

  11. Prevalence and bacterial susceptibility of hospital acquired urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infection is the most common nosocomially acquired infection. It is important to know the etiology and antibiotic susceptibility infectious agents to guide the initial empirical treatment. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bacterial strains and their antibiotic susceptibility in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infection in a university hospital between January and June 2003. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 188 patients with positive urine culture (= 10(5 colony-forming units/mL following a period of 48 hours after admission. RESULTS: Half of patients were male. Mean age was 50.26 ± 22.7 (SD, range 3 months to 88 years. Gram-negative bacteria were the agent in approximately 80% of cases. The most common pathogens were E. coli (26%, Klebsiella sp. (15%, P. aeruginosa (15% and Enterococcus sp. (11%. The overall bacteria susceptibility showed that the pathogens were more sensible to imipenem (83%, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides; and were highly resistant to ampicillin (27% and cefalothin (30%. It is important to note the low susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (42% and norfloxacin (43%. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that if one can not wait the results of urine culture, the best choices to begin empiric treatment are imipenem, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Cefalothin and ampicillin are quite ineffective to treat these infections.

  12. Bacterial interference for prevention of urinary tract infection: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darouiche, R O; Hull, R A

    2000-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in this population. The bladders of patients with SCI, particularly those with indwelling bladder catheters, can become colonized by a variety of organisms, including those that may, and others that may not, cause symptoms of infection. The latter group of bacteria, so-called benign colonizers, are often left untreated because they may provide some protection against symptomatic infection with more pathogenic bacteria. In recent years, deliberate urogenital tract colonization with benign bacterial strains was studied with the objective of offering some protection against invasion by uropathogenic strains. When well-characterized strains of Lactobacillus sp. were used to colonize the vagina of women prone to frequent UTI, a moderate reduction in the rate of recurrent UTI was observed. In other studies, a non-pathogenic prototype of Escherichia coli (strain 83,972) causing asymptomatic bacteriuria was used for deliberate bladder colonization. These preliminary observations encourage the examination of the safety and preventive efficacy of this approach in human subjects.

  13. The Effects of Vaccination and Immunity on Bacterial Infection Dynamics In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Chris; Restif, Olivier; Dybowski, Richard; Grant, Andrew J.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica infections are a significant global health issue, and development of vaccines against these bacteria requires an improved understanding of how vaccination affects the growth and spread of the bacteria within the host. We have combined in vivo tracking of molecularly tagged bacterial subpopulations with mathematical modelling to gain a novel insight into how different classes of vaccines and branches of the immune response protect against secondary Salmonella enterica infections of the mouse. We have found that a live Salmonella vaccine significantly reduced bacteraemia during a secondary challenge and restrained inter-organ spread of the bacteria in the systemic organs. Further, fitting mechanistic models to the data indicated that live vaccine immunisation enhanced both the bacterial killing in the very early stages of the infection and bacteriostatic control over the first day post-challenge. T-cell immunity induced by this vaccine is not necessary for the enhanced bacteriostasis but is required for subsequent bactericidal clearance of Salmonella in the blood and tissues. Conversely, a non-living vaccine while able to enhance initial blood clearance and killing of virulent secondary challenge bacteria, was unable to alter the subsequent bacterial growth rate in the systemic organs, did not prevent the resurgence of extensive bacteraemia and failed to control the spread of the bacteria in the body. PMID:25233077

  14. Stimulation of host immune defenses by a small molecule protects C. elegans from bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Feinbaum, Rhonda; Kirienko, Natalia V; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2012-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offers currently untapped potential for carrying out high-throughput, live-animal screens of low molecular weight compound libraries to identify molecules that target a variety of cellular processes. We previously used a bacterial infection assay in C. elegans to identify 119 compounds that affect host-microbe interactions among 37,214 tested. Here we show that one of these small molecules, RPW-24, protects C. elegans from bacterial infection by stimulating the host immune response of the nematode. Using transcriptome profiling, epistasis pathway analyses with C. elegans mutants, and an RNAi screen, we show that RPW-24 promotes resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by inducing the transcription of a remarkably small number of C. elegans genes (∼1.3% of all genes) in a manner that partially depends on the evolutionarily-conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway and the transcription factor ATF-7. These data show that the immunostimulatory activity of RPW-24 is required for its efficacy and define a novel C. elegans-based strategy to identify compounds with activity against antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  15. Stimulation of host immune defenses by a small molecule protects C. elegans from bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Pukkila-Worley

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offers currently untapped potential for carrying out high-throughput, live-animal screens of low molecular weight compound libraries to identify molecules that target a variety of cellular processes. We previously used a bacterial infection assay in C. elegans to identify 119 compounds that affect host-microbe interactions among 37,214 tested. Here we show that one of these small molecules, RPW-24, protects C. elegans from bacterial infection by stimulating the host immune response of the nematode. Using transcriptome profiling, epistasis pathway analyses with C. elegans mutants, and an RNAi screen, we show that RPW-24 promotes resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by inducing the transcription of a remarkably small number of C. elegans genes (∼1.3% of all genes in a manner that partially depends on the evolutionarily-conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway and the transcription factor ATF-7. These data show that the immunostimulatory activity of RPW-24 is required for its efficacy and define a novel C. elegans-based strategy to identify compounds with activity against antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  16. The effects of vaccination and immunity on bacterial infection dynamics in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Coward

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica infections are a significant global health issue, and development of vaccines against these bacteria requires an improved understanding of how vaccination affects the growth and spread of the bacteria within the host. We have combined in vivo tracking of molecularly tagged bacterial subpopulations with mathematical modelling to gain a novel insight into how different classes of vaccines and branches of the immune response protect against secondary Salmonella enterica infections of the mouse. We have found that a live Salmonella vaccine significantly reduced bacteraemia during a secondary challenge and restrained inter-organ spread of the bacteria in the systemic organs. Further, fitting mechanistic models to the data indicated that live vaccine immunisation enhanced both the bacterial killing in the very early stages of the infection and bacteriostatic control over the first day post-challenge. T-cell immunity induced by this vaccine is not necessary for the enhanced bacteriostasis but is required for subsequent bactericidal clearance of Salmonella in the blood and tissues. Conversely, a non-living vaccine while able to enhance initial blood clearance and killing of virulent secondary challenge bacteria, was unable to alter the subsequent bacterial growth rate in the systemic organs, did not prevent the resurgence of extensive bacteraemia and failed to control the spread of the bacteria in the body.

  17. Hypoxia determines survival outcomes of bacterial infection through HIF-1alpha dependent re-programming of leukocyte metabolism *

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, A.A.R.; Dickinson, R.S.; Murphy, F.; Thomson, J. P.; Marriott, H.M.; Tavares, A.; Willson, J.; Williams, L.; Lewis, A.; Mirchandani, A.; Dos Santos Coelho, P.; Doherty, C.; Ryan, E.; Watts, E.; Morton, N. M.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia and bacterial infection frequently co-exist, in both acute and chronic clinical settings, and typically result in adverse clinical outcomes. To ameliorate this morbidity, we investigated the interaction between hypoxia and the host response. In the context of acute hypoxia, both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae infections rapidly induced progressive neutrophil mediated morbidity and mortality, with associated hypothermia and cardiovascular compromise. Preconditioning animals through longer...

  18. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette

    2009-01-01

    with measurements of interleukin-6 and selected acute phase proteins in serum. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A were clearly induced 14-18 h after infection. Extrahepatic expression of acute phase proteins was found to be dramatically altered as a result of the lung infection with an extrahepatic acute phase...... protein response occurring concomitantly with the hepatic response. This suggests that the acute phase protein response is a more disseminated systemic response than previously thought. The current study provides to our knowledge the first example of porcine extrahepatic expression and regulation of C...... parts of innate host defence reactions remain somewhat elusive. In order to gain new insight into this early host defence response in the context of bacterial infection we studied gene expression changes in peripheral lymphoid tissues as compared to hepatic expression changes, 14-18 h after lung...

  19. The burden of invasive bacterial infections in Pemba, Zanzibar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Thriemer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We conducted a surveillance study to determine the leading causes of bloodstream infection in febrile patients seeking treatment at three district hospitals in Pemba Island, Zanzibar, Tanzania, an area with low malaria transmission. METHODS: All patients above two months of age presenting to hospital with fever were screened, and blood was collected for microbiologic culture and malaria testing. Bacterial sepsis and malaria crude incidence rates were calculated for a one-year period and were adjusted for study participation and diagnostic sensitivity of blood culture. RESULTS: Blood culture was performed on 2,209 patients. Among them, 166 (8% samples yielded bacterial growth; 87 (4% were considered as likely contaminants; and 79 (4% as pathogenic bacteria. The most frequent pathogenic bacteria isolated were Salmonella Typhi (n = 46; 58%, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 12; 15%. The crude bacteremia rate was 6/100,000 but when adjusted for potentially missed cases the rate may be as high as 163/100,000. Crude and adjusted rates for S. Typhi infections and malaria were 4 and 110/100,000 and 4 and 47/100,000, respectively. Twenty three (51%, 22 (49% and 22 (49% of the S. Typhi isolates were found to be resistant toward ampicillin, chloramphenicol and cotrimoxazole, respectively. Multidrug resistance (MDR against the three antimicrobials was detected in 42% of the isolates. CONCLUSIONS: In the presence of very low malaria incidence we found high rates of S. Typhi and S. pneumoniae infections on Pemba Island, Zanzibar. Preventive measures such as vaccination could reduce the febrile disease burden.

  20. Innate immune system favors emergency monopoiesis at the expense of DC-differentiation to control systemic bacterial infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquevich, Karina A; Bieber, Kristin; Günter, Manina; Grauer, Matthias; Pötz, Oliver; Schleicher, Ulrike; Biedermann, Tilo; Beer-Hammer, Sandra; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Zender, Lars; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Lengerke, Claudia; Autenrieth, Stella E

    2015-10-01

    DCs are professional APCs playing a crucial role in the initiation of T-cell responses to combat infection. However, systemic bacterial infection with various pathogens leads to DC-depletion in humans and mice. The mechanisms of pathogen-induced DC-depletion remain poorly understood. Previously, we showed that mice infected with Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye) had impaired de novo DC-development, one reason for DC-depletion. Here, we extend these studies to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of DC-depletion and the impact of different bacteria on DC-development. We show that the number of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic progenitors committed to the DC lineage is reduced following systemic infection with different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This is associated with a TLR4- and IFN-γ-signaling dependent increase of committed monocyte progenitors in the BM and mature monocytes in the spleen upon Ye-infection. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that infection-induced monopoiesis occurs at the expense of DC-development. Our data provide evidence for a general response of hematopoietic progenitors upon systemic bacterial infections to enhance monocyte production, thereby increasing the availability of innate immune cells for pathogen control, whereas impaired DC-development leads to DC-depletion, possibly driving transient immunosuppression in bacterial sepsis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Surface charge-conversion polymeric nanoparticles for photodynamic treatment of urinary tract bacterial infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shijie; Shao, Chen; Qiao, Shenglin; Li, Lili; Qi, Guobin; Lin, Yaoxin; Qiao, Zengying; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are typical bacterial infections which result in a number of economic burdens. With increasing antibiotic resistance, it is urgent that new approaches are explored that can eliminate pathogenic bacteria without inducing drug resistance. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new promising tactic. It is a gentle in situ photochemical reaction in which a photosensitizer (PS) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) under laser irradiation. In this work, we have demonstrated Chlorin e6 (Ce6) encapsulated charge-conversion polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) for efficiently targeting and killing pathogenic bacteria in a weakly acidic urinary tract infection environment. Owing to the surface charge conversion of NPs in an acidic environment, the NPs exhibited enhanced recognition for Gram-positive (ex. S. aureus) and Gram-negative (ex. E. coli) bacteria due to the charge interaction. Also, those NPs showed significant antibacterial efficacy in vitro with low cytotoxicity. The MIC value of NPs to E. coli is 17.91 μg ml −1 , compared with the free Ce6 value of 29.85 μg ml −1 . Finally, a mouse acute cystitis model was used to assess the photodynamic therapy effects in urinary tract infections. A significant decline (P < 0.05) in bacterial cells between NPs and free Ce6 occurred in urine after photodynamic therapy treatment. And the plated counting results revealed a remarkable bacterial cells drop (P < 0.05) in the sacrificed bladder tissue. Above all, this nanotechnology strategy opens a new door for the treatment of urinary tract infections with minimal side effects. (paper)

  2. Surface charge-conversion polymeric nanoparticles for photodynamic treatment of urinary tract bacterial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shijie; Qiao, Shenglin; Li, Lili; Qi, Guobin; Lin, Yaoxin; Qiao, Zengying; Wang, Hao; Shao, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Urinary tract infections are typical bacterial infections which result in a number of economic burdens. With increasing antibiotic resistance, it is urgent that new approaches are explored that can eliminate pathogenic bacteria without inducing drug resistance. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new promising tactic. It is a gentle in situ photochemical reaction in which a photosensitizer (PS) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) under laser irradiation. In this work, we have demonstrated Chlorin e6 (Ce6) encapsulated charge-conversion polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) for efficiently targeting and killing pathogenic bacteria in a weakly acidic urinary tract infection environment. Owing to the surface charge conversion of NPs in an acidic environment, the NPs exhibited enhanced recognition for Gram-positive (ex. S. aureus) and Gram-negative (ex. E. coli) bacteria due to the charge interaction. Also, those NPs showed significant antibacterial efficacy in vitro with low cytotoxicity. The MIC value of NPs to E. coli is 17.91 μg ml-1, compared with the free Ce6 value of 29.85 μg ml-1. Finally, a mouse acute cystitis model was used to assess the photodynamic therapy effects in urinary tract infections. A significant decline (P < 0.05) in bacterial cells between NPs and free Ce6 occurred in urine after photodynamic therapy treatment. And the plated counting results revealed a remarkable bacterial cells drop (P < 0.05) in the sacrificed bladder tissue. Above all, this nanotechnology strategy opens a new door for the treatment of urinary tract infections with minimal side effects.

  3. The EXIT Strategy: an Approach for Identifying Bacterial Proteins Exported during Host Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkowski, E F; Zulauf, K E; Weerakoon, D; Hayden, J D; Ioerger, T R; Oreper, D; Gomez, S M; Sacchettini, J C; Braunstein, M

    2017-04-25

    Exported proteins of bacterial pathogens function both in essential physiological processes and in virulence. Past efforts to identify exported proteins were limited by the use of bacteria growing under laboratory ( in vitro ) conditions. Thus, exported proteins that are exported only or preferentially in the context of infection may be overlooked. To solve this problem, we developed a genome-wide method, named EXIT ( ex ported i n vivo t echnology), to identify proteins that are exported by bacteria during infection and applied it to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during murine infection. Our studies validate the power of EXIT to identify proteins exported during infection on an unprecedented scale (593 proteins) and to reveal in vivo induced exported proteins (i.e., proteins exported significantly more during in vivo infection than in vitro ). Our EXIT data also provide an unmatched resource for mapping the topology of M. tuberculosis membrane proteins. As a new approach for identifying exported proteins, EXIT has potential applicability to other pathogens and experimental conditions. IMPORTANCE There is long-standing interest in identifying exported proteins of bacteria as they play critical roles in physiology and virulence and are commonly immunogenic antigens and targets of antibiotics. While significant effort has been made to identify the bacterial proteins that are exported beyond the cytoplasm to the membrane, cell wall, or host environment, current methods to identify exported proteins are limited by their use of bacteria growing under laboratory ( in vitro ) conditions. Because in vitro conditions do not mimic the complexity of the host environment, critical exported proteins that are preferentially exported in the context of infection may be overlooked. We developed a novel method to identify proteins that are exported by bacteria during host infection and applied it to identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins exported in a mouse model of tuberculosis

  4. Differences of serum procalcitonin levels between bacterial infection and flare in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, J.; Marpaung, B.; Ginting, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Differentiate bacterial infections from flare in SLE patients is difficult to do because clinical symptoms of infection is similar to flare. SLE patients with infection require antibiotic therapy with decreased doses of immunosuppressant while in flare diseases require increased immunosuppressant. Procalcitonin (PCT), a biological marker, increased in serum patients with bacterial infections and expected to be a solution of problem. The aim of this study was to examine the function of PCT serum as marker to differentiate bacterial infection and flare in SLE patients. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Adam Malik Hospital from January-July 2017. We examined 80 patients SLE flare (MEX-SLEDAI>5), screen PCT and culture according to focal infection. Data were statistically analyzed. 80 SLE patients divided into 2 groups: bacterial infection group (31 patients) and non-infection/flare group (49 patients). Median PCT levels of bacterial infection group was 1.66 (0.04-8.45)ng/ml while flare group was 0.12 (0.02-0.81)ng/ml. There was significant difference of serum Procalcitonin level between bacterial infection and flare group in SLE patients (p=0.001). Procalcitonin serum levels can be used as a biomarker to differentiate bacterial infections and flare in SLE patients.

  5. Predicting bacterial infections among pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojha, Rohit P; Asdahl, Peter H; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Predicting Infectious Complications in Neutropenic Children and Young People with Cancer (PICNICC) model was recently developed for antibiotic stewardship among pediatric cancer patients, but limited information is available about its clinical usefulness. We aimed to assess...... the performance of the PICNICC model for predicting microbiologically documented bacterial infections among pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used data for febrile neutropenia episodes at a pediatric cancer center in Aarhus, Denmark between 2000 and 2016. We assessed...... calibration but did not improve net benefit. CONCLUSIONS: The PICNICC model has potential for reducing unnecessary antibiotic exposure for pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia, but continued validation and refinement is necessary to optimize clinical usefulness....

  6. Impact of bacterial infections on aging and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A B; Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2014-01-01

    The commensal floras that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract play critical roles in immune responses, energy metabolism, and even cancer prevention. Pathogenic and out of place commensal bacteria, can however have detrimental effects on the host, by introducing genomic instability and mitochondrial...... DNA repair subunits of major DNA repair pathways and increase production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Defects in DNA repair cause mutations and genomic instability and are found in several cancers as well as in progeroid syndromes. This review describes our contemporary view on how bacterial...... infections impact DNA repair and damage, and the consequence on the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. We argue that in the gastrointestinal tract, these mechanisms can contribute to tumorigenesis as well as cellular aging of the digestive system....

  7. Photorhabdus luminescens genes induced upon insect infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Kirsten

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus luminescens is a Gram-negative luminescent enterobacterium and a symbiote to soil nematodes belonging to the species Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. P.luminescens is simultaneously highly pathogenic to insects. This bacterium exhibits a complex life cycle, including one symbiotic stage characterized by colonization of the upper nematode gut, and a pathogenic stage, characterized by release from the nematode into the hemocoel of insect larvae, resulting in rapid insect death caused by bacterial toxins. P. luminescens appears to sense and adapt to the novel host environment upon changing hosts, which facilitates the production of factors involved in survival within the host, host-killing, and -exploitation. Results A differential fluorescence induction (DFI approach was applied to identify genes that are up-regulated in the bacterium after infection of the insect host Galleria mellonella. For this purpose, a P. luminescens promoter-trap library utilizing the mCherry fluorophore as a reporter was constructed, and approximately 13,000 clones were screened for fluorescence induction in the presence of a G. mellonella larvae homogenate. Since P. luminescens has a variety of regulators that potentially sense chemical molecules, like hormones, the screen for up-regulated genes or operons was performed in vitro, excluding physicochemical signals like oxygen, temperature or osmolarity as variables. Clones (18 were obtained exhibiting at least 2.5-fold induced fluorescence and regarded as specific responders to insect homogenate. In combination with a bioinformatics approach, sequence motifs were identified in these DNA-fragments that are similar to 29 different promoters within the P. luminescens genome. By cloning each of the predicted promoters upstream of the reporter gene, induction was verified for 27 promoters in vitro, and for 24 promoters in viable G. mellonella larvae. Among the validated promoters are some known

  8. Metabolic host responses to infection by intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eEisenreich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of bacterial pathogens with mammalian hosts leads to a variety of physiological responses of the interacting partners aimed at an adaptation to the new situation. These responses include multiple metabolic changes in the affected host cells which are most obvious when the pathogen replicates within host cells as in case of intracellular bacterial pathogens. While the pathogen tries to deprive nutrients from the host cell, the host cell in return takes various metabolic countermeasures against the nutrient theft. During this conflicting interaction, the pathogen triggers metabolic host cell responses by means of common cell envelope components and specific virulence-associated factors. These host reactions generally promote replication of the pathogen. There is growing evidence that pathogen-specific factors may interfere in different ways with the complex regulatory network that controls the carbon and nitrogen metabolism of mammalian cells. The host cell defence answers include general metabolic reactions, like the generation of oxygen- and/or nitrogen-reactive species, and more specific measures aimed to prevent access to essential nutrients for the respective pathogen. Accurate results on metabolic host cell responses are often hampered by the use of cancer cell lines that already exhibit various de-regulated reactions in the primary carbon metabolism. Hence, there is an urgent need for cellular models that more closely reflect the in vivo infection conditions. The exact knowledge of the metabolic host cell responses may provide new interesting concepts for antibacterial therapies.

  9. Infection-related hemolysis and susceptibility to Gram-negative bacterial co-infection

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    Katharine eOrf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased susceptibility to co-infection with enteric Gram-negative bacteria, particularly non-typhoidal Salmonella, is reported in malaria and Oroya fever (Bartonella bacilliformis infection, and can lead to increased mortality. Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates a causal association with risk of bacterial co-infection, rather than just co-incidence of common risk factors. Both malaria and Oroya fever are characterised by hemolysis, and observations in humans and animal models suggest that hemolysis causes the susceptibility to bacterial co-infection. Evidence from animal models implicates hemolysis in the impairment of a variety of host defence mechanisms, including macrophage dysfunction, neutrophil dysfunction and impairment of adaptive immune responses. One mechanism supported by evidence from animal models and human data, is the induction of heme oxygenase-1 in bone marrow, which impairs the ability of developing neutrophils to mount a competent oxidative burst. As a result, dysfunctional neutrophils become a new niche for replication of intracellular bacteria. Here we critically appraise and summarize the key evidence for mechanisms which may contribute to these very specific combinations of co-infections, and propose interventions to ameliorate this risk.

  10. Bacterial Infections Following Splenectomy for Malignant and Nonmalignant Hematologic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Giuseppe; Pizzigallo, Eligio

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy, while often necessary in otherwise healthy patients after major trauma, finds its primary indication for patients with underlying malignant or nonmalignant hematologic diseases. Indications of splenectomy for hematologic diseases have been reducing in the last few years, due to improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In high-income countries, there is a clear decrease over calendar time in the incidence of all indication splenectomy except nonmalignant hematologic diseases. However, splenectomy, even if with different modalities including laparoscopic splenectomy and partial splenectomy, continue to be a current surgical practice both in nonmalignant hematologic diseases, such as Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), Congenital Hemolytic Anemia such as Spherocytosis, Sickle Cell Anemia and Thalassemia and Malignant Hematological Disease, such as lymphoma. Today millions of people in the world are splenectomized. Splenectomy, independently of its cause, induces an early and late increase in the incidence of venous thromboembolism and infections. Infections remain the most dangerous complication of splenectomy. After splenectomy, the levels of antibody are preserved but there is a loss of memory B cells against pneumococcus and tetanus, and the loss of marginal zone monocytes deputed to immunological defense from capsulated bacteria. Commonly, the infections strictly correlated to the absence of the spleen or a decreased or absent splenic function are due to encapsulated bacteria that are the most virulent pathogens in this set of patients. Vaccination with polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines again Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis should be performed before the splenectomy. This practice reduces but does not eliminate the occurrence of overwhelming infections due to capsulated bacteria. At present, most of infections found in splenectomized patients are due to Gram

  11. The Nuclear Receptor LXR Limits Bacterial Infection of Host Macrophages through a Mechanism that Impacts Cellular NAD Metabolism

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    Jonathan Matalonga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages exert potent effector functions against invading microorganisms but constitute, paradoxically, a preferential niche for many bacterial strains to replicate. Using a model of infection by Salmonella Typhimurium, we have identified a molecular mechanism regulated by the nuclear receptor LXR that limits infection of host macrophages through transcriptional activation of the multifunctional enzyme CD38. LXR agonists reduced the intracellular levels of NAD+ in a CD38-dependent manner, counteracting pathogen-induced changes in macrophage morphology and the distribution of the F-actin cytoskeleton and reducing the capability of non-opsonized Salmonella to infect macrophages. Remarkably, pharmacological treatment with an LXR agonist ameliorated clinical signs associated with Salmonella infection in vivo, and these effects were dependent on CD38 expression in bone-marrow-derived cells. Altogether, this work reveals an unappreciated role for CD38 in bacterial-host cell interaction that can be pharmacologically exploited by activation of the LXR pathway.

  12. Using Natural Products to Treat Resistant and Persistent Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, Robert W.

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing threat to human health both worldwide and in the United States. Most concerning is the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens, especially the 'ESKAPE' pathogens for which treatment options are dwindling. To complicate the problem, approvals of antibiotic drugs are extremely low and many research and development efforts in the pharmaceutical industry have ceased, leaving little certainty that critical new antibiotics are nearing the clinic. New antibiotics are needed to continue treating these evolving infections. In addition to antibiotics, approaches that aim to inhibit or prevent antimicrobial resistance could be useful. Also, studies that improve our understanding of bacterial pathophysiology could lead to new therapies for infectious disease. Natural products, especially those from the microbial world, have been invaluable as resources for new antibacterial compounds and as insights into bacterial physiology. The goal of this dissertation is to find new ways to treat resistant bacterial infections and learn more about the pathophysiology of these bacteria. Investigations of natural products to find molecules able to be used as new antibiotics or to modulate resistance and other parts of bacterial physiology are crucial aspects of the included studies. The first included study, which is reported in chapter two, details a chemical investigation of a marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. Purification efforts of the microbial metabolites were guided by testing against a resistance nodulation of cell division model of efflux pumps expressed in E. coli. These pumps play an important role in the resistance of MDR Gram negative pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. Through this process, 3,4-dibromopyrrole-2,5-dione was identified as a potent inhibitor of the RND efflux pumps and showed synergistic effects against the E. coli strain with common antibiotics including fluoroquinolones, beta

  13. Clinical indicators for bacterial co-infection in Ghanaian children with P. falciparum infection.

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    Maja Verena Nielsen

    Full Text Available Differentiation of infectious causes in severely ill children is essential but challenging in sub- Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to determine clinical indicators that are able to identify bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children in rural Ghana. In total, 1,915 severely ill children below the age of 15 years were recruited at Agogo Presbyterian Hospital in Ghana between May 2007 and February 2011. In 771 (40% of the children malaria parasites were detected. This group was analyzed for indicators of bacterial co-infections using bivariate and multivariate regression analyses with 24 socio-economic variables, 16 terms describing medical history and anthropometrical information and 68 variables describing clinical symptoms. The variables were tested for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. In 46 (6.0% of the children with malaria infection, bacterial co-infection was detected. The most frequent pathogens were non-typhoid salmonellae (45.7%, followed by Streptococcus spp. (13.0%. Coughing, dehydration, splenomegaly, severe anemia and leukocytosis were positively associated with bacteremia. Domestic hygiene and exclusive breastfeeding is negatively associated with bacteremia. In cases of high parasitemia (>10,000/μl, a significant association with bacteremia was found for splenomegaly (OR 8.8; CI 1.6-48.9, dehydration (OR 18.2; CI 2.0-166.0 and coughing (OR 9.0; CI 0.7-118.6. In children with low parasitemia, associations with bacteremia were found for vomiting (OR 4.7; CI 1.4-15.8, severe anemia (OR 3.3; CI 1.0-11.1 and leukocytosis (OR 6.8 CI 1.9-24.2. Clinical signs of impaired microcirculation were negatively associated with bacteremia. Ceftriaxone achieved best coverage of isolated pathogens. The results demonstrate the limitation of clinical symptoms to determine bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children. Best clinical indicators are dependent on the

  14. Contribution of Vaccine-Induced Immunity toward either the HA or the NA Component of Influenza Viruses Limits Secondary Bacterial Complications▿

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Victor C.; Peltola, Ville; Iverson, Amy R.; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections contribute to morbidity and mortality from influenza. Vaccine effectiveness is typically assessed using prevention of influenza, not secondary infections, as an endpoint. We vaccinated mice with formalin-inactivated influenza virus vaccine preparations containing disparate HA and NA proteins and demonstrated an ability to induce the appropriate anti-HA and anti-NA immune profiles. Protection from both primary viral and secondary bacterial infection was demonstra...

  15. Influenza virus induces bacterial and nonbacterial otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Kirsty R; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A; Thornton, Ruth; Pedersen, John; Strugnell, Richard A; Wise, Andrew K; Reading, Patrick C; Wijburg, Odilia L

    2011-12-15

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common childhood diseases. OM can arise when a viral infection enables bacteria to disseminate from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Here, we provide the first infant murine model for disease. Mice coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus had high bacterial load in the middle ear, middle ear inflammation, and hearing loss. In contrast, mice colonized with S. pneumoniae alone had significantly less bacteria in the ear, minimal hearing loss, and no inflammation. Of interest, infection with influenza virus alone also caused some middle ear inflammation and hearing loss. Overall, this study provides a clinically relevant and easily accessible animal model to study the pathogenesis and prevention of OM. Moreover, we provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that influenza virus alone causes middle ear inflammation in infant mice. This inflammation may then play an important role in the development of bacterial OM.

  16. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The EXIT Strategy: an Approach for Identifying Bacterial Proteins Exported during Host Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkowski, E. F.; Zulauf, K. E.; Weerakoon, D.; Hayden, J. D.; Ioerger, T. R.; Oreper, D.; Gomez, S. M.; Sacchettini, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exported proteins of bacterial pathogens function both in essential physiological processes and in virulence. Past efforts to identify exported proteins were limited by the use of bacteria growing under laboratory (in vitro) conditions. Thus, exported proteins that are exported only or preferentially in the context of infection may be overlooked. To solve this problem, we developed a genome-wide method, named EXIT (exported in vivo technology), to identify proteins that are exported by bacteria during infection and applied it to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during murine infection. Our studies validate the power of EXIT to identify proteins exported during infection on an unprecedented scale (593 proteins) and to reveal in vivo induced exported proteins (i.e., proteins exported significantly more during in vivo infection than in vitro). Our EXIT data also provide an unmatched resource for mapping the topology of M. tuberculosis membrane proteins. As a new approach for identifying exported proteins, EXIT has potential applicability to other pathogens and experimental conditions. PMID:28442606

  18. The Fractional-Order mathematical modeling of bacterial resistance against multiple antibiotics in case of local bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahatdin Daşbaşı

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is described the general forms of fractional-order differential equations and asymtotic stability of their system’s equilibria. In addition that, the stability analysis of equilibrium points of the local bacterial infection model which is fractional-order differential equation system, is made. Results of this analysis are supported via numerical simulations drawn by datas obtained from literature for mycobacterium tuberculosis and the antibiotics isoniazid (INH, rifampicin (RIF, streptomycin (SRT and pyrazinamide (PRZ used against this bacterial infection.

  19. Bacterial infection affects protein synthesis in primary lymphoid tissues and circulating lymphocytes of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papet, Isabelle; Ruot, Benoît; Breuillé, Denis; Walrand, Stéphane; Farges, Marie-Chantal; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Obled, Christiane

    2002-07-01

    Bacterial infection alters whole-body protein homeostasis. Although immune cells are of prime importance for host defense, the effect of sepsis on their protein synthesis rates is poorly documented. We analyzed protein synthesis rates in rat primary lymphoid tissues and circulating lymphocytes after infection. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied 1, 2, 6 or 10 d after an intravenous injection of live Escherichia coli. Control healthy rats consumed food ad libitum (d 0) or were pair-fed to infected rats. Protein synthesis was quantified using a flooding dose of L-(4,4,4-(2)H(3))valine. Sepsis induced a delayed increase in total blood leukocytes and a rapid and persistent inversion of the counts. Basal fractional rates of protein synthesis (ks) were 117, 73 and 29%/d in bone marrow, thymus and circulating lymphocytes, respectively. Pair-feeding strongly depressed the absolute protein synthesis rates (ASR) of bone marrow (d 2 and 10) and thymus (d 2-10). The infection per se increased bone marrow, thymus and circulating lymphocyte ks but at various postinfection times. It decreased bone marrow (d 1) and thymus (d 1 and 2) ASR but increased lymphocyte (d 2 and 10) and bone marrow (d 10) ASR. Our results reflect the deleterious effect of anorexia on primary lymphoid tissues. The host defense against bacterial infection exhibited time- and tissue-dependent modifications of protein synthesis, indicating that blood lymphocyte protein data are not representative of the immune system as a whole. Optimization of nutritional supports would be facilitated by including protein synthesis measurements of the immune system.

  20. The role of bacterial infection and inflammation in the generation of overactive bladder symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, K.

    2016-01-01

    There is substantial evidence of considerable insensitivity affecting the current tests used to screen for urinary infection. The studies within this thesis provide original work in examining the performance of recommended diagnostic tests for urinary tract infection, and explore the bacterial ecology of urinary infection and its associated urothelial inflammatory response in patients with symptoms of overactive bladder. The association between lower urinary tract inflammation, bacterial colo...

  1. Development of quantitative PCR methods for diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis and vaginal yeast infection

    OpenAIRE

    Eiderbrant, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Vaginitis is a vaginal infection which affects many women all over the world. The disorder is characterized by an infection of the vaginal area which can cause problems like abnormal vaginal discharge, itching and redness. The two most common causes of vaginitis are bacterial vaginosis and Candida vaginitis. The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in Sweden is around 10-20 % and approximately 75 % of all women will once in their lifetime suffer from vaginal yeast infection. The clinical symptom...

  2. Bacterial Meningitis in HIV-Infected Patients: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

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    Robert Tommasini

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis is not an uncommon complication of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Purulent meningitis is not a well recognized infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients. Three cases of bacterial meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Listeria monocytogenes are presented. These cases illustrate that common community organisms may present in HIV positive patients. An acquired B cell defect may predispose to bacterial infections responsible for meningitis in HIV-infected patients.

  3. [Sports-induced infections--an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, P; Handrick, W; Haustein, U F

    2002-01-01

    Sportive activities are playing an increasing role for the spare time in our society. Subsequently, practicing of various kinds of sport can lead to direct and indirect exposures to and transmission of microorganisms between athletes and also passive observers. As a result, different microbial pathogens can be transmitted and might lead predominantly to cutaneous or mucosal infections. These include both bacteria--Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci and gram-negative bacteria, like Pseudomonas, viruses--herpes simplex virus, human papilloma virus--and, last but not least, also dermatophytes--e.g. Trichophyton tonsurans as particular pathogenic agent of tinea gladiatorum. Beside single cases of infections outbreaks through various virus-, bacteria- and dermatophytes-induced infections might happen and have indeed been reported. Surprisingly, there is only limited knowledge among physicians concerning sport-induced infections. Therefore, sport-induced infections are reviewed giving details about their route of transmission. Awareness of these infections might facilitate implementation of early treatment and preventive measures.

  4. Long-term impact of systemic bacterial infection on the cerebral vasculature and microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Püntener Ursula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic infection leads to generation of inflammatory mediators that result in metabolic and behavioural changes. Repeated or chronic systemic inflammation leads to a state of innate immune tolerance: a protective mechanism against overactivity of the immune system. In this study, we investigated the immune adaptation of microglia and brain vascular endothelial cells in response to systemic inflammation or bacterial infection. Methods Mice were given repeated doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS or a single injection of live Salmonella typhimurium. Inflammatory cytokines were measured in serum, spleen and brain, and microglial phenotype studied by immunohistochemistry. To assess priming of the innate immune response in the brain, mice were infected with Salmonella typhimurium and subsequently challenged with a focal unilateral intracerebral injection of LPS. Results Repeated systemic LPS challenges resulted in increased brain IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 levels, despite attenuated systemic cytokine production. Each LPS challenge induced significant changes in burrowing behaviour. In contrast, brain IL-1β and IL-12 levels in Salmonella typhimurium-infected mice increased over three weeks, with high interferon-γ levels in the circulation. Behavioural changes were only observed during the acute phase of the infection. Microglia and cerebral vasculature display an activated phenotype, and focal intracerebral injection of LPS four weeks after infection results in an exaggerated local inflammatory response when compared to non-infected mice. Conclusions These studies reveal that the innate immune cells in the brain do not become tolerant to systemic infection, but are primed instead. This may lead to prolonged and damaging cytokine production that may have a profound effect on the onset and/or progression of pre-existing neurodegenerative disease.

  5. Imaging of bacterial infections of the sacroiliac joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, C.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.

    2004-01-01

    Infection of the sacroiliac joint can be pyogenic or granulomatous and is usually unilateral. There are a number of predisposing conditions including drug abuse and intra articular steroid injection, but in 44% of cases, no definite predisposing factors can be identified. Considerable delay between presentation and diagnosis is recognized. The clinical picture may be non-specific and variable, and clinical suspicion may be low due to the relatively low incidence of the condition. This is compounded by difficulties in clinical examination of the SIJs. The diagnosis is based on a history suggestive of infection, clinical or radiographic localization to the SIJs, and a positive blood culture or joint aspirate. The pathology of pyogenic sacroiliitis is reviewed with respect to the anatomy of the SIJ, and the differential diagnoses considered. The imaging findings, and relative merits of all the modalities are discussed with particular consideration given to changes over the course of the disease. Imaging strategies are evaluated and proposed. As the commonest presenting symptom is low back pain, consideration should be given to the addition of a STIR sequence covering the SIJs on all routine lumbar spine MR examinations. MR imaging is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality, while CT-guided arthrocentesis improves diagnostic confidence. Tc 99 MDP blood pool imaging mirrors the clinical features of resolution, and scintigraphy may be the best method to monitor response to treatment. Targeted antibiotic therapy usually leads to a full recovery. A high incidence of clinical suspicion, with MR imaging at an early stage are the essential prerequisites to an accurate diagnosis of bacterial sacroiliitis. (orig.) [de

  6. Piperine suppresses pyroptosis and interleukin-1β release upon ATP triggering and bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Dan Liang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Piperine is a phytochemical present in black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn and other related herbs, possessing a wide array of pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory effects. Previously, we demonstrated that piperine has therapeutic effects on bacterial sepsis in mice, but the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influences of piperine on pyroptosis in murine macrophages. The results showed that piperine dose-dependently inhibited ATP-induced pyroptosis, thereby suppressing interleukin-1β (IL-1β or high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1 release in LPS-primed bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs and J774A.1 cells. Accompanying this, ATP-induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation was greatly suppressed by piperine, whereas AMPK agonist metformin counteracted piperine’s inhibitory effects on pyroptosis. Moreover, piperine administration greatly reduced both peritoneal and serum IL-1β levels in the mouse model intraperitoneally infected with Escherichia coli, suggestive of suppressing systemic inflammation and pyroptosis. Our data indicated that piperine could protect macrophages from pyroptosis and reduced IL-1β and HMGB1 release by suppressing ATP-induced AMPK activation, suggesting that piperine may become a potential therapeutic agent against bacterial sepsis.

  7. Protection against Helicobacter pylori and other bacterial infections by garlic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivam, G P

    2001-03-01

    Louis Pasteur was the first to describe the antibacterial effect of onion and garlic juices. Historically, garlic has been used worldwide to fight bacterial infections. Allium vegetables, particularly garlic (Allium sativum L.) exhibit a broad antibiotic spectrum against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Noteworthy results published include the following: 1) raw juice of garlic was found to be effective against many common pathogenic bacteria-intestinal bacteria, which are responsible for diarrhea in humans and animals; 2) garlic is effective even against those strains that have become resistant to antibiotics; 3) the combination of garlic with antibiotics leads to partial or total synergism; 4) complete lack of resistance has been observed repeatedly; 5) even toxin production by microorganisms is prevented by garlic. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a bacterium implicated in the etiology of stomach cancer and ulcers. The incidence of stomach cancer is lower in populations with a high intake of allium vegetables. We have demonstrated in vitro that H. pylori is susceptible to garlic extract at a fairly moderate concentration. Even some antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains are susceptible to garlic. Clinical trials are necessary to explore the possibility of using garlic as a low-cost remedy for eradicating H. pylori.

  8. Evaluation of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides as Topical Anti-Infectives with Broad-Spectrum Activity against Combat-Related Bacterial and Fungal Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    succeeded in developing resistance to a variety of AMPs. 2. Keywords Antimicrobial, peptides, anti-fungal, wounds, burns, bacterial resistance ...against Combat- Related Bacterial and Fungal Wound Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Louis Edward Clemens Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Riptide...Anti-Infectives with Broad- Spectrum Activity against Combat-Related Bacterial and Fungal Wound Infections 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  9. Neglected pathogens: bacterial infections in persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection. A review of the literature (1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, D N; Danziger, L H

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial infections, including those that cause infection in the healthy host as well as those that are more opportunistic, occur very commonly among persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial infections are a direct result of the severe humoral and cellular immune defects found in these patients. Epidemiologic factors such as intravenous drug use and stage of HIV infection may also play important roles. Pulmonary, bloodstream, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, skin and soft tissue, and catheter-related infections are common, as are endocarditis, prostatitis, and others. Frequently reported pathogens are common organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and enteric gram-negative pathogens, as well as less typical ones such as Listeria monocytogenes and Nocardia sp. The frequency of infection is specific to organ system and pathogen, often being many times higher than in immunocompetent hosts. Prompt recognition and aggressive therapy are required to reduce morbidity and mortality due to these infections.

  10. DMPD: The role of Toll-like receptors and Nod proteins in bacterial infection. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15476921 The role of Toll-like receptors and Nod proteins in bacterial infection. P...of Toll-like receptors and Nod proteins in bacterial infection. PubmedID 15476921 Title The role of Toll-like receptors and Nod prote...ins in bacterial infection. Authors Philpott DJ, Girardi

  11. Validity of procalcitonin for the diagnosis of bacterial infection in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cerquera, Juan Manuel; Daroca-Pérez, Rafael; Baeza-Trinidad, Ramón; Casañas-Martinez, Marta; Mosquera-Lozano, Jose Daniel; Ramalle-Gómara, Enrique

    2015-10-01

    PCT has been consolidated as a key tool in the diagnosis of bacterial infections in general population. Few studies have been conducted to determine the applicability of this test in elderly patients. Study of validity of PCT on elderly patients. Two groups were formed; the first group was formed by patients aged 75 years or older, under bacterial infection criteria and PCT on the initial Lab test. The second group was formed by patients aged 75 years or older with any noninfectious disease; these patients were asked PCT in the initial Lab test. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio were calculated. 161 patients were included, 95 with probable bacterial infection and 66 without infection. Patients with probable bacterial infection criteria, 72% of them had PCT >0.5 ng/mL. Patients without infection, 8% of the patients had PCT >0.5 ng/mL. Sensitivity and specificity of PCT to bacterial infection with the cutoff value of 0.5 ng/mL was 72% and 92%, respectively. PCT can be used in elderly patients to diagnose bacterial infections because it has proved good sensitivity and high specificity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Infection of orthopedic implants with emphasis on bacterial adhesion process and techniques used in studying bacterial-material interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marta; Monteiro, Fernando J; Ferraz, Maria P

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises up to two-thirds of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they are the principal causative agents of two major types of infection affecting bone: septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, which involve the inflammatory destruction of joint and bone. Bacterial adhesion is the first and most important step in implant infection. It is a complex process influenced by environmental factors, bacterial properties, material surface properties and by the presence of serum or tissue proteins. Properties of the substrate, such as chemical composition of the material, surface charge, hydrophobicity, surface roughness and the presence of specific proteins at the surface, are all thought to be important in the initial cell attachment process. The biofilm mode of growth of infecting bacteria on an implant surface protects the organisms from the host immune system and antibiotic therapy. The research for novel therapeutic strategies is incited by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This work will provide an overview of the mechanisms and factors involved in bacterial adhesion, the techniques that are currently being used studying bacterial-material interactions as well as provide insight into future directions in the field.

  13. Roles of the host oxidative immune response and bacterial antioxidant rubrerythrin during Porphyromonas gingivalis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Mydel

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The efficient clearance of microbes by neutrophils requires the concerted action of reactive oxygen species and microbicidal components within leukocyte secretory granules. Rubrerythrin (Rbr is a nonheme iron protein that protects many air-sensitive bacteria against oxidative stress. Using oxidative burst-knockout (NADPH oxidase-null mice and an rbr gene knockout bacterial strain, we investigated the interplay between the phagocytic oxidative burst of the host and the oxidative stress response of the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Rbr ensured the proliferation of P. gingivalis in mice that possessed a fully functional oxidative burst response, but not in NADPH oxidase-null mice. Furthermore, the in vivo protection afforded by Rbr was not associated with the oxidative burst responses of isolated neutrophils in vitro. Although the phagocyte-derived oxidative burst response was largely ineffective against P. gingivalis infection, the corresponding oxidative response to the Rbr-positive microbe contributed to host-induced pathology via potent mobilization and systemic activation of neutrophils. It appeared that Rbr also provided protection against reactive nitrogen species, thereby ensuring the survival of P. gingivalis in the infected host. The presence of the rbr gene in P. gingivalis also led to greater oral bone loss upon infection. Collectively, these results indicate that the host oxidative burst paradoxically enhances the survival of P. gingivalis by exacerbating local and systemic inflammation, thereby contributing to the morbidity and mortality associated with infection.

  14. Live Staphylococcus aureus and bacterial soluble factors induce different transcriptional responses in human airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreilhon, Chimène; Gras, Delphine; Hologne, Coralie; Bajolet, Odile; Cottrez, Françoise; Magnone, Virginie; Merten, Marc; Groux, Hervé; Puchelle, Edith; Barbry, Pascal

    2005-02-10

    To characterize the response of respiratory epithelium to infection by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), human airway cells were incubated for 1 to 24 h with a supernatant of a S. aureus culture (bacterial supernatant), then profiled with a pangenomic DNA microarray. Because an upregulation of many genes was noticed around 3 h, three independent approaches were then used to characterize the host response to a 3-h contact either with bacterial supernatant or with live bacteria: 1) a DNA microarray containing 4,200 sequence-verified probes, 2) a semiquantitative RT-PCR with a set of 537 pairs of validated primers, or 3) ELISA assay of IL-8, IL-6, TNFalpha, and PGE(2). Among others, Fos, Jun, and EGR-1 were upregulated by the bacterial supernatant and by live bacteria. Increased expression of bhlhb2 and Mig-6, promoter regions which harbor HIF responding elements, was explained by an increased expression of the HIF-1alpha protein. Activation of the inducible form of cyclooxygenase, COX-2, and of the interleukins IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8, as well as of the NF-kappaB pathway, was observed preferentially in cells in contact with bacterial supernatant. Early infection was characterized by an upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes and a downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes. This correlated with a necrotic, rather than apoptotic cell death. Overall, this first global description of an airway epithelial infection by S. aureus demonstrates a larger global response to bacterial supernatant (in term of altered genes and variation factors) than to exponentially growing live bacteria.

  15. Prosthesis infections after orthopedic joint replacement: the possible role of bacterial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Song

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore, important to understand the comprehensive interaction between the microbiological situation and the host immune responses that lead to prosthesis infections. Evidence indicates that prosthesis infections are actually biofilm-correlated infections that are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune responses. The authors reviewed the related literature in the context of their clinical experience, and discussed the possible etiology and mechanism leading to the infections, especially problems related to bacterial biofilm, and prophylaxis and treatment of infection, including both microbiological and surgical measures. Recent progress in research into bacterial biofilm and possible future treatment options of prosthesis-related infections are discussed.

  16. Periodontal bacterial invasion and infection: contribution to atherosclerotic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Leticia; Herrera, David; Kozarov, Emil; Roldán, Silvia; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this review was to perform a systematic evaluation of the literature reporting current scientific evidence for periodontal bacteria as contributors to atherosclerosis. Literature from epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies concerning periodontal bacteria and atherosclerosis were reviewed. Gathered data were categorized into seven "proofs" of evidence that periodontal bacteria: 1) disseminate from the oral cavity and reach systemic vascular tissues; 2) can be found in the affected tissues; 3) live within the affected site; 4) invade affected cell types in vitro; 5) induce atherosclerosis in animal models of disease; 6) non-invasive mutants of periodontal bacteria cause significantly reduced pathology in vitro and in vivo; and 7) periodontal isolates from human atheromas can cause disease in animal models of infection. Substantial evidence for proofs 1 to 6 was found. However, proof 7 has not yet been fulfilled. Despite the lack of evidence that periodontal bacteria obtained from human atheromas can cause atherosclerosis in animal models of infection, attainment of proofs 1 to 6 provides support that periodontal pathogens can contribute to atherosclerosis. © 2013 European Federation of Periodontology and American Academy of Periodontology.

  17. Evaluation of the ability of an experimental model to induce bacterial rhinosinusitis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Eduardo Landini Lutaif; Campos, Carlos Augusto Correia de; Silva, Leonardo da; Dolci, Ricardo Landini Lutaif; Dolci, José Eduardo Lutaif

    2014-01-01

    For decades, animals have been used in sinonasal experimental models, and the practice has increased substantially in the last few years. This study aimed to assess the pathogenesis of infectious process and medication efficiency to treat rhinosinusitis. To evaluate the efficiency of the proposed experimental model to induce an acute bacterial sinonasal infectious process through histological analysis and sinus secretion cultures. This was an experimental study with 22 New Zealand rabbits, divided into: group A (six rabbits), group B (seven rabbits), group C (seven rabbits), and group D (control group with two rabbits). Rhinosinusitis was induced by the insertion of a synthetic sponge into the right nasal cavity of 20 animals (study groups), followed by the instillation of bacterial strains (50% Staphylococcus sp. and 50% Streptococcus sp.). The groups were euthanized within 10 days (group A), 17 days (group B), and 30 days (groups C and D). All the rabbits of the study group developed acute bacterial rhinosinusitis, which was diagnosed through macroscopic evaluation, histological analysis, and sinus secretion culture. The proposed model is technically simple to perform, it is similar to the rhinogenic model in human beings, and it is highly efficient to reproduce an acute bacterial sinus infection. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlation between the neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio and bacterial infection in patient with human immunodeficiency virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnadi, D.; Liwang, M. N. I.; Katu, S.; Mubin, A. H.; Halim, R.

    2018-03-01

    Parameters for starting antibiotic therapy such as CRP andleukocytosis are considered non-specific. Previous studies have shown the Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Count Ratio (NLCR) can serve as the basis of bacterial infection, the level of infection, and the basis of antibiotic therapy. Compared with the Procalcitonin parameter, this NLCR is rapid, an inexpensive and requires no additional sampling. To determine the correlation between The Neutrophil-LymphocyteCount Ratio to bacterial infection in HIV patients. This study was a cross-sectional observational approach to HIV subject at Wahidin Sudirohusodo and Hasanuddin University Hospital. The subjects performed routine blood, microbiology test,and blood Procalcitonin levels tests. Then performed NLCR calculations based on routine blood results. The subjects then grouped the presence or absence of bacterial infection.In 146 study subjects, there were 78 (53.4%) with bacterial infections and 68 (46.6%) without bacterial infection as controls. Subjects with bacterial infections had higher total neutrophils (84.83) compared with non-bacterial infections. Subjects with bacterial infections had total lymphocytes with an average of 8.51 lower than non-bacterial infections. Subjects with bacterial infections had higher NLCR values with an average of 12.80. The Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Count Ratio can become a marker of bacterial infection in HIV patients.

  19. Association of RNA Biosignatures With Bacterial Infections in Febrile Infants Aged 60 Days or Younger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Prashant; Kuppermann, Nathan; Mejias, Asuncion; Suarez, Nicolas; Chaussabel, Damien; Casper, T. Charles; Smith, Bennett; Alpern, Elizabeth R.; Anders, Jennifer; Atabaki, Shireen M.; Bennett, Jonathan E.; Blumberg, Stephen; Bonsu, Bema; Borgialli, Dominic; Brayer, Anne; Browne, Lorin; Cohen, Daniel M.; Crain, Ellen F.; Cruz, Andrea T.; Dayan, Peter S.; Gattu, Rajender; Greenberg, Richard; Hoyle, John D.; Jaffe, David M.; Levine, Deborah A.; Lillis, Kathleen; Linakis, James G.; Muenzer, Jared; Nigrovic, Lise E.; Powell, Elizabeth C.; Rogers, Alexander J.; Roosevelt, Genie; Ruddy, Richard M.; Saunders, Mary; Tunik, Michael G.; Tzimenatos, Leah; Vitale, Melissa; Dean, J. Michael; Ramilo, Octavio

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Young febrile infants are at substantial risk of serious bacterial infections; however, the current culture-based diagnosis has limitations. Analysis of host expression patterns (“RNA biosignatures”) in response to infections may provide an alternative diagnostic approach. OBJECTIVE To assess whether RNA biosignatures can distinguish febrile infants aged 60 days or younger with and without serious bacterial infections. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective observational study involving a convenience sample of febrile infants 60 days or younger evaluated for fever (temperature >38° C) in 22 emergency departments from December 2008 to December 2010 who underwent laboratory evaluations including blood cultures. A random sample of infants with and without bacterial infections was selected for RNA biosignature analysis. Afebrile healthy infants served as controls. Blood samples were collected for cultures and RNA biosignatures. Bioinformatics tools were applied to define RNA biosignatures to classify febrile infants by infection type. EXPOSURE RNA biosignatures compared with cultures for discriminating febrile infants with and without bacterial infections and infants with bacteremia from those without bacterial infections. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Bacterial infection confirmed by culture. Performance of RNA biosignatures was compared with routine laboratory screening tests and Yale Observation Scale (YOS) scores. RESULTS Of 1883 febrile infants (median age, 37 days; 55.7%boys), RNA biosignatures were measured in 279 randomly selected infants (89 with bacterial infections—including 32 with bacteremia and 15 with urinary tract infections—and 190 without bacterial infections), and 19 afebrile healthy infants. Sixty-six classifier genes were identified that distinguished infants with and without bacterial infections in the test set with 87%(95%CI, 73%-95%) sensitivity and 89% (95%CI, 81%-93%) specificity. Ten classifier genes distinguished

  20. Disease-induced assemblage of a plant-beneficial bacterial consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendsen, Roeland L.; Vismans, Gilles; Yu, Ke

    2018-01-01

    these bacteria did not affect the plant significantly, together they induced systemic resistance against downy mildew and promoted growth of the plant. Moreover, we show that the soil-mediated legacy of a primary population of downy mildew infected plants confers enhanced protection against this pathogen...... that Arabidopsis thaliana specifically promotes three bacterial species in the rhizosphere upon foliar defense activation by the downy mildew pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. The promoted bacteria were isolated and found to interact synergistically in biofilm formation in vitro. Although separately...... in a second population of plants growing in the same soil. Together our results indicate that plants can adjust their root microbiome upon pathogen infection and specifically recruit a group of disease resistance-inducing and growth-promoting beneficial microbes, therewith potentially maximizing the chance...

  1. bacterial uropathogens in urinary tract infection and antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-07-02

    Jul 2, 2011 ... (prevalence, risk factors, bacterial isolates and antibiotic sensitivity) is fundamental for care givers and health planners to guide the expected interventions. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine bacterial etiologic agent of uropathogens and evaluate their in vitro susceptibility pattern to commonly used.

  2. 75 FR 52755 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), impetigo... of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of ABSSSI, impetigo, and minor cutaneous abscesses. This...

  3. Fish losses due to bacterial flora and infections of fishes in Kainji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper assesses the losses incurred as a result of bacterial flora and infection in captured and cultured fish. The role played by these bacterial flora on the overall quality and health of fish is discussed. Bacteria have been reported to cause diseases in ponds and increase in the spoilage rate of raw and preserved fish in ...

  4. Bacterial Toxin-Triggered Drug Release from Gold Nanoparticle-Stabilized Liposomes for the Treatment of Bacterial Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya; Zhang, Li; Olson, Sage; Aryal, Santosh; Obonyo, Marygorret; Vecchio, Kenneth; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhang, Liangfang

    2011-01-01

    We report a new approach to selectively delivering antimicrobials to the sites of bacterial infections by utilizing bacterial toxins to activate drug release from gold nanoparticle-stabilized phospholipid liposomes. The binding of chitosan modified gold nanoparticles to the surface of liposomes can effectively prevent them from fusing with one another and from undesirable payload release in regular storage or physiological environments. However, once these protected liposomes “see” bacteria that secrete toxins, the toxins will insert into the liposome membranes and form pores, through which the encapsulated therapeutic agents are released. The released drugs subsequently impose antimicrobial effects on the toxin-secreting bacteria. Using methicillin-resistant Staphycoccus aureus (MRSA) as a model bacterium and vacomycin as a model anti-MRSA antibiotic, we demonstrate that the synthesized gold nanoparticle-stabilized liposomes can completely release the encapsulated vacomycin within 24 h in the presence of MRSA bacteria and lead to inhibition of MRSA growth as effective as an equal amount of vacomycin loaded liposomes (without nanoparticle stabilizers) and free vacomycin. This bacterial toxin enabled drug release from nanoparticle-stabilized liposomes provides a new, safe and effective approach for the treatment of bacterial infections. This technique can be broadly applied to treat a variety of infections caused by bacteria that secrete pore-forming toxins. PMID:21344925

  5. [Risk factors of bacterial nosocomial infection after pediatric liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Gao, W

    2017-08-02

    Objective: To analyze the risk factors of nosocomial infection after liver transplantation in children, so as to provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of nosocomial infection. Method: Clinical data of 223 pediatric patients undergoing liver transplantation between January 2014 and December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out to investigate the risk factors of infection after transplantation. Result: Totally 51 children were infected among the 223 patients, the infection rate was 22.86%(51/223). Among the 74 cases with infection, 38 were infected with the blood (included peripherally inserted central catheters) accounting for 51.35 %; and surgical site infection accounted for 21.62%, the respiratory tract infections accounted for 18.92% and the other infections accounted for 8.11%. Totally 74 strains of infectious pathogens were found in 51 cases of infected patients, including Gram-negative bacteria accounting for 48.65%, Gram-positive bacteria accounting for 44.59% and the fungus accounting for 6.76%. According to a variety of survey factors, univariate analysis showed factors of hospitalization time, hospitalization time before surgery, surgical duration, and reoperation had statistically significant association with nosocomial infection( P nosocomial infection after pediatric liver transplantation. Conclusion: There are a variety of risk factors for the postoperative infections after liver transplantation in children. It is necessary to take into account the surgery factor, medical staff factor and hospital management factor. Management strengthening of these factors is necessary to reduce the infection rate.

  6. Differential effects of interleukin-17 receptor signaling on innate and adaptive immunity during central nervous system bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidlak Debbie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although IL-17A (commonly referred to as IL-17 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS autoimmune disease, its role during CNS bacterial infections remains unclear. To evaluate the broader impact of IL-17 family members in the context of CNS infection, we utilized IL-17 receptor (IL-17R knockout (KO mice that lack the ability to respond to IL-17, IL-17F and IL-17E (IL-25. In this article, we demonstrate that IL-17R signaling regulates bacterial clearance as well as natural killer T (NKT cell and gamma-delta (γδ T cell infiltrates during Staphylococcus aureus-induced brain abscess formation. Specifically, when compared with wild-type (WT animals, IL-17R KO mice exhibited elevated bacterial burdens at days 7 and 14 following S. aureus infection. Additionally, IL-17R KO animals displayed elevated neutrophil chemokine production, revealing the ability to compensate for the lack of IL-17R activity. Despite these differences, innate immune cell recruitment into brain abscesses was similar in IL-17R KO and WT mice, whereas IL-17R signaling exerted a greater influence on adaptive immune cell recruitment. In particular, γδ T cell influx was increased in IL-17R KO mice at day 7 post-infection. In addition, NK1.1high infiltrates were absent in brain abscesses of IL-17R KO animals and, surprisingly, were rarely detected in the livers of uninfected IL-17R KO mice. Although IL-17 is a key regulator of neutrophils in other infection models, our data implicate an important role for IL-17R signaling in regulating adaptive immunity during CNS bacterial infection.

  7. Bacterial infections after pediatric heart transplantation: Epidemiology, risk factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Christina A; Wehrheim, Karla; Kirklin, James K; Naftel, David; Pruitt, Elizabeth; Hoffman, Timothy M; L'Ecuyer, Thomas; Berkowitz, Katie; Mahle, William T; Scheel, Janet N

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial infections represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in heart transplant recipients. However, data describing the epidemiology and outcomes of these infections in children are limited. We analyzed the Pediatric Heart Transplant Study database of patients transplanted between 1993 and 2014 to determine the etiologies, risk factors and outcomes of children with bacterial infections post-heart transplantation. Of 4,458 primary transplants in the database, there were 4,815 infections that required hospitalization or intravenous therapy, 2,047 (42.51%) of which were bacterial. The risk of bacterial infection was highest in the first month post-transplant, and the bloodstream was the most common site (24.82%). In the early post-transplant period (transplant), coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common pathogens (16.97%), followed by Enterobacter sp (11.99%) and Pseudomonas sp (11.62%). In the late post-transplant period, community-acquired pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (6.27%) and Haemophilus influenzae (2.82%) were also commonly identified. Patients' characteristics independently associated with acquisition of bacterial infection included younger age (p transplant. Overall mortality post-bacterial infection was 33.78%, and previous cardiac surgery (p heart transplant recipients and were associated with high mortality rates. The risk of acquiring a bacterial infection was highest in the first month post-transplant, and a large proportion of the infections were caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intermittent fasting promotes bacterial clearance and intestinal IgA production in Salmonella typhimurium-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godínez-Victoria, M; Campos-Rodriguez, R; Rivera-Aguilar, V; Lara-Padilla, E; Pacheco-Yepez, J; Jarillo-Luna, R A; Drago-Serrano, M E

    2014-05-01

    The impact of intermittent fasting versus ad libitum feeding during Salmonella typhimurium infection was evaluated in terms of duodenum IgA levels, bacterial clearance and intestinal and extra-intestinal infection susceptibility. Mice that were intermittently fasted for 12 weeks or fed ad libitum were infected with S. typhimurium and assessed at 7 and 14 days post-infection. Next, we evaluated bacterial load in the faeces, Peyer's patches, spleen and liver by plate counting, as well as total and specific intestinal IgA and plasmatic corticosterone levels (by immunoenzymatic assay) and lamina propria IgA levels in plasma cells (by cytofluorometry). Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, α- and J-chains, Pax-5 factor, pro-inflammatory cytokine (tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (transforming growth factor-β) mRNA levels were assessed in mucosal and liver samples (by real-time PCR). Compared with the infected ad libitum mice, the intermittently fasted infected animals had (1) lower intestinal and systemic bacterial loads; (2) higher SIgA and IgA plasma cell levels; (3) higher mRNA expression of most intestinal parameters; and (4) increased or decreased corticosterone levels on day 7 and 14 post-infection, respectively. No contribution of liver IgA was observed at the intestinal level. Apparently, the changes following metabolic stress induced by intermittent fasting during food deprivation days increased the resistance to S. typhimurium infection by triggering intestinal IgA production and presumably, pathogen elimination by phagocytic inflammatory cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. New insights into valve-related intramural and intracellular bacterial diversity in infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbach, Andreas; Schlichting, Nadine; Feder, Stefan; Lehmann, Stefanie; Kullnick, Yvonne; Buschmann, Tilo; Blumert, Conny; Horn, Friedemann; Neuhaus, Jochen; Neujahr, Ralph; Bagaev, Erik; Hagl, Christian; Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Rodloff, Arne Christian; Gräber, Sandra; Kirsch, Katharina; Sandri, Marcus; Kumbhari, Vivek; Behzadi, Armirhossein; Behzadi, Amirali; Correia, Joao Carlos; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Friedrich, Maik

    2017-01-01

    In infective endocarditis (IE), a severe inflammatory disease of the endocardium with an unchanged incidence and mortality rate over the past decades, only 1% of the cases have been described as polymicrobial infections based on microbiological approaches. The aim of this study was to identify potential biodiversity of bacterial species from infected native and prosthetic valves. Furthermore, we compared the ultrastructural micro-environments to detect the localization and distribution patterns of pathogens in IE. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 16S rDNA, which allows analysis of the entire bacterial community within a single sample, we investigated the biodiversity of infectious bacterial species from resected native and prosthetic valves in a clinical cohort of 8 IE patients. Furthermore, we investigated the ultrastructural infected valve micro-environment by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). Biodiversity was detected in 7 of 8 resected heart valves. This comprised 13 bacterial genera and 16 species. In addition to 11 pathogens already described as being IE related, 5 bacterial species were identified as having a novel association. In contrast, valve and blood culture-based diagnosis revealed only 4 species from 3 bacterial genera and did not show any relevant antibiotic resistance. The antibiotics chosen on this basis for treatment, however, did not cover the bacterial spectra identified by our amplicon sequencing analysis in 4 of 8 cases. In addition to intramural distribution patterns of infective bacteria, intracellular localization with evidence of bacterial immune escape mechanisms was identified. The high frequency of polymicrobial infections, pathogen diversity, and intracellular persistence of common IE-causing bacteria may provide clues to help explain the persistent and devastating mortality rate observed for IE. Improved bacterial diagnosis by 16S rDNA NGS that increases the ability to tailor antibiotic therapy may

  10. New insights into valve-related intramural and intracellular bacterial diversity in infective endocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Oberbach

    Full Text Available In infective endocarditis (IE, a severe inflammatory disease of the endocardium with an unchanged incidence and mortality rate over the past decades, only 1% of the cases have been described as polymicrobial infections based on microbiological approaches. The aim of this study was to identify potential biodiversity of bacterial species from infected native and prosthetic valves. Furthermore, we compared the ultrastructural micro-environments to detect the localization and distribution patterns of pathogens in IE.Using next-generation sequencing (NGS of 16S rDNA, which allows analysis of the entire bacterial community within a single sample, we investigated the biodiversity of infectious bacterial species from resected native and prosthetic valves in a clinical cohort of 8 IE patients. Furthermore, we investigated the ultrastructural infected valve micro-environment by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM.Biodiversity was detected in 7 of 8 resected heart valves. This comprised 13 bacterial genera and 16 species. In addition to 11 pathogens already described as being IE related, 5 bacterial species were identified as having a novel association. In contrast, valve and blood culture-based diagnosis revealed only 4 species from 3 bacterial genera and did not show any relevant antibiotic resistance. The antibiotics chosen on this basis for treatment, however, did not cover the bacterial spectra identified by our amplicon sequencing analysis in 4 of 8 cases. In addition to intramural distribution patterns of infective bacteria, intracellular localization with evidence of bacterial immune escape mechanisms was identified.The high frequency of polymicrobial infections, pathogen diversity, and intracellular persistence of common IE-causing bacteria may provide clues to help explain the persistent and devastating mortality rate observed for IE. Improved bacterial diagnosis by 16S rDNA NGS that increases the ability to tailor antibiotic

  11. Desialylation of Spermatozoa and Epithelial Cell Glycocalyx Is a Consequence of Bacterial Infection of the Epididymis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Farhad; Michel, Vera; Galuska, Christina E.; Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Christian, Philipp; Schuppe, Hans-Christian; Pilatz, Adrian; Galuska, Sebastian P.; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in humans. In men, pathogens can also spread to the genital tract via the continuous ductal system, eliciting bacterial prostatitis and/or epididymo-orchitis. Antibiotic treatment usually clears pathogens in acute epididymitis; however, the fertility of patients can be permanently impaired. Because a premature acrosome reaction was observed in an UPEC epididymitis mouse model, and sialidases on the sperm surface are considered to be activated via proteases of the acrosome, we aimed to investigate whether alterations of the sialome of epididymal spermatozoa and surrounding epithelial cells occur during UPEC infection. In UPEC-elicited acute epididymitis in mice, a substantial loss of N-acetylneuraminic acid residues was detected in epididymal spermatozoa and epithelial cells using combined laser microdissection/HPLC-ESI-MS analysis. In support, a substantial reduction of sialic acid residues bound to the surface of spermatozoa was documented in men with a recent history of E. coli-associated epididymitis. In vitro, such an UPEC induced N-acetylneuraminic acid release from human spermatozoa was effectively counteracted by a sialidase inhibitor. These findings strongly suggest a substantial remodeling of the glycocalyx of spermatozoa and epididymal epithelial cells by endogenous sialidases after a premature acrosome reaction during acute epididymitis. PMID:27339898

  12. Desialylation of Spermatozoa and Epithelial Cell Glycocalyx Is a Consequence of Bacterial Infection of the Epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Farhad; Michel, Vera; Galuska, Christina E; Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Christian, Philipp; Schuppe, Hans-Christian; Pilatz, Adrian; Galuska, Sebastian P; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2016-08-19

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in humans. In men, pathogens can also spread to the genital tract via the continuous ductal system, eliciting bacterial prostatitis and/or epididymo-orchitis. Antibiotic treatment usually clears pathogens in acute epididymitis; however, the fertility of patients can be permanently impaired. Because a premature acrosome reaction was observed in an UPEC epididymitis mouse model, and sialidases on the sperm surface are considered to be activated via proteases of the acrosome, we aimed to investigate whether alterations of the sialome of epididymal spermatozoa and surrounding epithelial cells occur during UPEC infection. In UPEC-elicited acute epididymitis in mice, a substantial loss of N-acetylneuraminic acid residues was detected in epididymal spermatozoa and epithelial cells using combined laser microdissection/HPLC-ESI-MS analysis. In support, a substantial reduction of sialic acid residues bound to the surface of spermatozoa was documented in men with a recent history of E. coli-associated epididymitis. In vitro, such an UPEC induced N-acetylneuraminic acid release from human spermatozoa was effectively counteracted by a sialidase inhibitor. These findings strongly suggest a substantial remodeling of the glycocalyx of spermatozoa and epididymal epithelial cells by endogenous sialidases after a premature acrosome reaction during acute epididymitis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. [Relationship between periodontal diseases and ascending bacterial infection with preterm delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, Alfredo; Gamonal, Jorge; Martínez, M Angélica; Silva, Nora; Kakarieka, Elena; Fuentes, Ariel; Chaparro, Alejandra; Gajardo, Marta; León, Rubén; Ahumada, Alexis; Cisternas, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    There is an association between periodontal diseases and preterm delivery. To assess the relationship between periodontal diseases, ascending bacterial infection and placental pathology with preterm delivery. A periodontal examination and collection of amniotic fluid and subgingival plaque samples were performed in women with preterm labor with intact membranes, without an evident clinical cause or preterm premature rupture of membranes, without clinical chorioamnionitis or labor and a gestational age between 24 and 34 weeks. Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity was defined as the presence of a positive amniotic fluid culture. Cervicovaginal infection was defined as a bacterial vaginosis or positive culture of cervix or vagina with a high neutrophil count. Ascending bacterial infection was diagnosed as the microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity by ascending bacteria or cervicovaginal infection. Corioamnionitis, funisitis or vellositis were diagnosed. Fifty-nine women were included: forty-two with preterm labor with intact membranes and seventeen with preterm premature rupture of membranes. The prevalence of periodontal diseases was 93.2%. Microbial invasion of the amniotic fluid was detected in 27.1% of patients. periodontal pathogenic bacteria were isolated in 18.6% of amniotic fluid samples and 71.2% of subgingival plaque samples. The prevalence of ascending bacterial infection was 83.1% and in 72.9% of women it was associated with periodontal disease. Preterm delivery (<37 weeks) occurred in 64.4% of patients and was significantly associated with generalized periodontal disease and with the association of ascending bacterial infection and periodontal diseases. Patients with preterm delivery and generalized periodontal disease had a higher frequency of chorioamnionitis and funisitis. Generalized periodontal disease and its association with ascending bacterial infection are related to preterm delivery and placental markers of bacterial ascending infection.

  14. Vascular homograft use in a femoropopliteal rare bacterial infection bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainese, Luca; Saccu, Claudio; Zoli, Stefano; Trabattoni, Piero; Guarino, Anna; Cavallero, Annalisa; Spirito, Rita

    2012-12-01

    We report on a patient with a femoropopliteal bypass infected by Kytococcus sedentarius. Treatment consisted of resection of the infected prosthesis with homograft substitution and antibiotic therapy started postoperatively. At 6 months followup, the patient showed no signs of infection and results of laboratory findings were normal.

  15. Safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujal, A; Sola, J; Hernandez, M; Villarino, M-A; Machado, M-L; Baylina, M; Tajan, J; Oristrell, J

    2015-06-01

    Home intravenous antibiotic therapy is an alternative to hospital admission for moderately severe infections. However, few studies have analyzed its safety and effectiveness in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The purpose of this study is to analyze the safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. We analyzed prospectively all patients admitted to our service who underwent home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the period 2008-2012. All the treatments were administered by caretakers or self-administered by patients, through elastomeric infusion devices. Effectiveness was evaluated by analyzing the readmission rate for poor infection control. Safety was evaluated by analyzing adverse events, catheter-related complications, and readmissions not related to poor infection control. There were 433 admissions (in 355 patients) for home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the study period. There were 226 (52.2 %) admissions due to multidrug-resistant bacterial infections and 207 (47.8 %) due to non-multidrug-resistant infections. Hospital readmissions in patients with multidrug-resistant infections were uncommon. Multidrug-resistant enterococcal infections, healthcare-associated infections, and carbapenem therapy were independent variables associated with increased readmissions due to poor infection control. Readmissions not related to poor infection control, adverse events, and catheter-related complications were similar in multidrug-resistant compared to non-multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Home intravenous therapy, administered by patients or their caretakers using elastomeric infusion pumps, was safe and effective for the treatment of most multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

  16. High specificity ZnO quantum dots for diagnosis and treatment in bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    Early diagnosis and effective treatment of bacterial infection has become increasingly important. Herein, we developed a fluorescent nano-probe MPA@ZnO-PEP by conjugating SiO2-stabilized ZnO quantum dot (ZnO@SiO2) with bacteria-targeting peptide PEP, which was encapsulated with MPA, a near infrared (NIR) dye. The nanoprobe MPA@ZnO-PEP showed excellent fluorescence property and could specifically distinguish bacterial infection from sterile inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. The favorable biocompatability of MPA@ZnO-PEP was verified by MTT assay. This probe was further modified with antibiotic methicillin to form the theranostic nanoparticle MPA/Met@ZnO-PEP with amplified antibacterial activity. These results promised the great potential of MPA@ZnO-PEP for efficient non-invasive early diagnosis of bacterial infections and effective bacterial-targeting therapy.

  17. Immunization-induced anaplasma marginale-specific T lymphocyte reponses impaired by A. marginale infection are restored after eliminating the infection with tetracycline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection of cattle with Anaplasma marginale fails to prime sustained effector/memory T-cell responses, and high bacterial load may induce antigen-specific CD4 T exhaustion and deletion. We tested the hypothesis that clearance of persistent infection restores the exhausted T-cell response. We show t...

  18. Bacterial infections in Wegener's granulomatosis : mechanisms potentially involved in autoimmune pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tadema, Henko; Heeringa, Peter; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Purpose of review Wegener's granulomatosis is associated with bacterial infection, in particular nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus. Infection may play a role in the induction of autoimmunity as well as in the effector phase of the disease. Here, the current hypotheses aiming to explain the

  19. Bacterial persistence induced by salicylate via reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiebin; El Meouche, Imane; Dunlop, Mary J.

    2017-01-01

    Persisters are phenotypic variants of regular cells that exist in a dormant state with low metabolic activity, allowing them to exhibit high tolerance to antibiotics. Despite increasing recognition of their role in chronic and recalcitrant infections, the mechanisms that induce persister formation are not fully understood. In this study, we find that salicylate can induce persister formation in Escherichia coli via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Salicylate-induced ROS cause a decrease in the membrane potential, reduce metabolism and lead to an increase in persistence. These effects can be recovered by culturing cells in the presence of a ROS quencher or in an anaerobic environment. Our findings reveal that salicylate-induced oxidative stress can lead to persistence, suggesting that ROS, and their subsequent impact on membrane potential and metabolism, may play a broad role in persister formation. PMID:28281556

  20. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy using zinc phthalocyanine derivatives in treatment of bacterial skin infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Dong; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Shanyong; Huang, Joy H.; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is an effective method for killing bacterial cells in view of the increasing problem of multiantibiotic resistance. We herein reported the PACT effect on bacteria involved in skin infections using a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-Lys). Compared with its anionic ZnPc counterpart, ZnPc-Lys showed an enhanced antibacterial efficacy in vitro and in an animal model of localized infection. Meanwhile, ZnPc-Lys was observed to significantly reduce the wound skin blood flow during wound healing, indicating an anti-inflammation activity. This study provides new insight on the mechanisms of PACT in bacterial skin infection.

  1. Current concepts in the management of bacterial skin infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palit Aparna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial skin infections in children vary widely clinically, starting from mild superficial folliculitis to deep necrotizing fasciitis. The causative organisms are mostly Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus, with occasional involvement of Gram-negative organisms. Treatment of even the milder forms of bacterial skin infections is of importance because of the long-term morbidity associated with them. However, because of global emergence of resistant strains of bacteria, treatment of these conditions is becoming increasingly difficult. The current antibacterial resistance patterns in organisms causing skin and soft tissue infections and the problems encountered in their management in children have been discussed.

  2. Pathophysiology of bacterial infection of the central nervous system and its putative role in the pathogenesis of behavioral changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Barichello

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS by microorganisms is a severe and frequently fatal event during the course of many infectious diseases. It may lead to deafness, blindness, cerebral palsy, hydrocephalus, cognitive impairment or permanent neurological dysfunction in survivors. Pathogens can cross the blood-brain barrier by transcellular migration, paracellular migration and in infected macrophages. Pathogens may breach the blood-brain barrier and be recognized by antigen-presenting cells through the binding of Toll-like receptors. This induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B or mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and subsequently induces leukocyte infiltration and proliferation and the expression of numerous proteins involved in inflammation and the immune response. Many brain cells can produce cytokines, chemokines and other pro-inflammatory molecules in response to bacteria stimuli; as a consequence, polymorphonuclear cells are attracted and activated, and release large amounts of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, leading to peroxynitrite formation and oxidative stress. This cascade leads to lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial damage and blood-brain barrier breakdown, contributing to cellular injury during neuronal infection. Current evidence suggests that bacterial CNS infections can play a role in the etiopathogenesis of behavioral disorders by increasing pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial virulence factors. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the relevant pathophysiologic steps in CNS infections.

  3. Feline bacterial urinary tract infections: An update on an evolving clinical problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litster, Annette; Thompson, Mary; Moss, Susan; Trott, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Although feline urine is increasingly submitted for bacterial culture and susceptibility testing as part of a more general diagnostic work-up for a range of presentations in veterinary practice, bacterial urinary tract infections (UTIs) are relatively uncommon due to a variety of physical and immunological barriers to infection. Culture positive urine is most often obtained from older female cats and the clinical history may include hematuria, dysuria and pollakiuria, or the infection may be occult. Urinalysis usually reveals hematuria and pyuria, and Escherichia coli and Gram-positive cocci are cultured most frequently. Most feline UTIs can be successfully treated using oral amoxicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid administered for at least 14days, but the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance amongst infecting bacterial species is a growing concern. There is currently no conclusive information on the safety and efficacy of alternative therapeutic agents for the treatment of feline UTIs. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Models of Caenorhabditis elegans infection by bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jennifer R; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple model host for studying the relationship between the animal innate immune system and a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Extensive genetic and molecular tools are available in C. elegans, facilitating an in-depth analysis of host defense factors and pathogen virulence factors. Many of these factors are conserved in insects and mammals, indicating the relevance of the nematode model to the vertebrate innate immune response. Here, we describe pathogen assays for a selection of the most commonly studied bacterial and fungal pathogens using the C. elegans model system.

  5. Photodynamic therapy induces an immune response against a bacterial pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Vecchio, Daniela; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the triple combination of photosensitizers, visible light and ambient oxygen. When PDT is used for cancer, it has been observed that both arms of the host immune system (innate and adaptive) are activated. When PDT is used for infectious disease, however, it has been assumed that the direct antimicrobial PDT effect dominates. Murine arthritis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the knee failed to respond to PDT with intravenously injected Photofrin®. PDT with intra-articular Photofrin produced a biphasic dose response that killed bacteria without destroying host neutrophils. Methylene blue was the optimum photosensitizer to kill bacteria while preserving neutrophils. We used bioluminescence imaging to noninvasively monitor murine bacterial arthritis and found that PDT with intra-articular methylene blue was not only effective, but when used before infection, could protect the mice against a subsequent bacterial challenge. The data emphasize the importance of considering the host immune response in PDT for infectious disease. PMID:22882222

  6. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis - does standard empirical therapy need a rethink?

    OpenAIRE

    Shiran Shetty; Venkatakrishnan Leelakrishnan; Krishnaveni Janarthanan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with cirrhosis not only have a higher incidence and a greater severity of infections but infections increase the mortality and morbidity in cirrhosis. Third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones are currently the most commonly recommended first-line empirical therapy in most infections. This study was conducted to study the bacterial etiology, susceptibility of these organisms to these commonly used antibiotics. Methods: All patients of cirrhosis of liver admitted t...

  7. Subversion of the B-cell compartment during parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Borhis, Gwenoline; Richard, Yolande

    2015-01-01

    International audience; AbstractRecent studies on HIV infection have identified new human B-cell subsets with a potentially important impact on anti-viral immunity. Current work highlights the occurrence of similar B-cell alterations in other viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections, suggesting that common strategies have been developed by pathogens to counteract protective immunity. For this review, we have selected key examples of human infections for which B-cell alterations have been de...

  8. The Oral Bacterial Communities of Children with Well-Controlled HIV Infection and without HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Brittany E.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Jones, Cheron E.; Chung, Michelle; Fraser, Claire M.; Tate, Anupama; Zeichner, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The oral microbial community (microbiota) plays a critical role in human health and disease. Alterations in the oral microbiota may be associated with disorders such as gingivitis, periodontitis, childhood caries, alveolar osteitis, oral candidiasis and endodontic infections. In the immunosuppressed population, the spectrum of potential oral disease is even broader, encompassing candidiasis, necrotizing gingivitis, parotid gland enlargement, Kaposi’s sarcoma, oral warts and other diseases. Here, we used 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to examine the oral microbiome of saliva, mucosal and tooth samples from HIV-positive and negative children. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from a cross-section of patients undergoing routine dental care. Multiple specimens from different sampling sites in the mouth were collected for each patient. The goal of the study was to observe the potential diversity of the oral microbiota among individual patients, sample locations, HIV status and various dental characteristics. We found that there were significant differences in the microbiome among the enrolled patients, and between sampling locations. The analysis was complicated by uneven enrollment in the patient cohorts, with only five HIV-negative patients enrolled in the study and by the rapid improvement in the health of HIV-infected children between the time the study was conceived and completed. The generally good oral health of the HIV-negative patients limited the number of dental plaque samples that could be collected. We did not identify significant differences between well-controlled HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative controls, suggesting that well-controlled HIV-positive patients essentially harbor similar oral flora compared to patients without HIV. Nor were significant differences in the oral microbiota identified between different teeth or with different dental characteristics. Additional studies are needed to better

  9. The Oral Bacterial Communities of Children with Well-Controlled HIV Infection and without HIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany E Goldberg

    Full Text Available The oral microbial community (microbiota plays a critical role in human health and disease. Alterations in the oral microbiota may be associated with disorders such as gingivitis, periodontitis, childhood caries, alveolar osteitis, oral candidiasis and endodontic infections. In the immunosuppressed population, the spectrum of potential oral disease is even broader, encompassing candidiasis, necrotizing gingivitis, parotid gland enlargement, Kaposi's sarcoma, oral warts and other diseases. Here, we used 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to examine the oral microbiome of saliva, mucosal and tooth samples from HIV-positive and negative children. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from a cross-section of patients undergoing routine dental care. Multiple specimens from different sampling sites in the mouth were collected for each patient. The goal of the study was to observe the potential diversity of the oral microbiota among individual patients, sample locations, HIV status and various dental characteristics. We found that there were significant differences in the microbiome among the enrolled patients, and between sampling locations. The analysis was complicated by uneven enrollment in the patient cohorts, with only five HIV-negative patients enrolled in the study and by the rapid improvement in the health of HIV-infected children between the time the study was conceived and completed. The generally good oral health of the HIV-negative patients limited the number of dental plaque samples that could be collected. We did not identify significant differences between well-controlled HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative controls, suggesting that well-controlled HIV-positive patients essentially harbor similar oral flora compared to patients without HIV. Nor were significant differences in the oral microbiota identified between different teeth or with different dental characteristics. Additional studies are

  10. Drug resistance patterns of bacterial isolates from infected wounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    Conclusions: High frequency of mono and multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens were documented. Thus, an alternative method to the causative agent and antimicrobial susceptibility testing surveillance in areas where there is no culture facility is needed to assist health professionals for the selection of appropriate ...

  11. A Survey of Bacterial and Fungal Oppurtunistic Infections among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bacterial pathogens were isolated using Blood and Chocolate agar plates and identified biochemically except the Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) which was tested in all the HIV positive samples by Ziehl Neelson staining technique. The fungal pathogens were isolated using Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA) with antibiotics and ...

  12. Modulation of pulmonary innate immunity during bacterial infection: Animal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, Marcus J.; van der Poll, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Both the increasing number of immunocompromised patients susceptible to pneumonia and the development of bacterial resistance are significant problems related to the treatment of pneumonia. The primary outcome of treatment for pneumonia is to tip the balance towards a successful host response. An

  13. Human β-defensin-2 production upon viral and bacterial co-infection is attenuated in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Jason W; Murphy, James C; Kooi, Cora; Wiehler, Shahina; Traves, Suzanne L; Shelfoon, Christopher; Maciejewski, Barbara; Dumonceaux, Curtis J; Lewenza, W Shawn; Proud, David; Leigh, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Viral-bacterial co-infections are associated with severe exacerbations of COPD. Epithelial antimicrobial peptides, including human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2), are integral to innate host defenses. In this study, we examined how co-infection of airway epithelial cells with rhinovirus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates HBD-2 expression, and whether these responses are attenuated by cigarette smoke and in epithelial cells obtained by bronchial brushings from smokers with normal lung function or from COPD patients. When human airway epithelial cells from normal lungs were infected with rhinovirus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or the combination, co-infection with rhinovirus and bacteria resulted in synergistic induction of HBD-2 (p<0.05). The combination of virus and flagellin replicated this synergistic increase (p<0.05), and synergy was not seen using a flagella-deficient mutant Pseudomonas (p<0.05). The effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were mediated via interactions of flagellin with TLR5. The effects of HRV-16 depended upon viral replication but did not appear to be mediated via the intracellular RNA helicases, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I or melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5. Cigarette smoke extract significantly decreased HBD-2 production in response to co-infection. Attenuated production was also observed following co-infection of cells obtained from healthy smokers or COPD patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). We conclude that co-exposure to HRV-16 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces synergistic production of HBD-2 from epithelial cells and that this synergistic induction of HBD-2 is reduced in COPD patients. This may contribute to the more severe exacerbations these patients experience in response to viral-bacterial co-infections.

  14. Human β-defensin-2 production upon viral and bacterial co-infection is attenuated in COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W Arnason

    Full Text Available Viral-bacterial co-infections are associated with severe exacerbations of COPD. Epithelial antimicrobial peptides, including human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2, are integral to innate host defenses. In this study, we examined how co-infection of airway epithelial cells with rhinovirus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates HBD-2 expression, and whether these responses are attenuated by cigarette smoke and in epithelial cells obtained by bronchial brushings from smokers with normal lung function or from COPD patients. When human airway epithelial cells from normal lungs were infected with rhinovirus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or the combination, co-infection with rhinovirus and bacteria resulted in synergistic induction of HBD-2 (p<0.05. The combination of virus and flagellin replicated this synergistic increase (p<0.05, and synergy was not seen using a flagella-deficient mutant Pseudomonas (p<0.05. The effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were mediated via interactions of flagellin with TLR5. The effects of HRV-16 depended upon viral replication but did not appear to be mediated via the intracellular RNA helicases, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I or melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5. Cigarette smoke extract significantly decreased HBD-2 production in response to co-infection. Attenuated production was also observed following co-infection of cells obtained from healthy smokers or COPD patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.05. We conclude that co-exposure to HRV-16 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces synergistic production of HBD-2 from epithelial cells and that this synergistic induction of HBD-2 is reduced in COPD patients. This may contribute to the more severe exacerbations these patients experience in response to viral-bacterial co-infections.

  15. An abattoir survey of bacterial and fungal infections of cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As for fungi infections, Candida and Mucor spp. were observed with a higher prevalence of candidiasis, which varied significantly (P < 0.05) between localities and sex, but was comparable between breeds and different age groups. Mucor spp. Infections were recorded only in vulva, oviducts and ovaries. This study suggest ...

  16. The role of bacterial biofilms in chronic infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    wounds, chronic otitis media and implant- and catheter-associated infections, affect millions of people in the developed world each year and many deaths occur as a consequence. In general, bacteria have two life forms during growth and proliferation. In one form, the bacteria exist as single, independent...... cells (planktonic) whereas in the other form, bacteria are organized into sessile aggregates. The latter form is commonly referred to as the biofilm growth phenotype. Acute infections are assumed to involve planktonic bacteria, which are generally treatable with antibiotics, although successful......Acute infections caused by pathogenic bacteria have been studied extensively for well over 100 years. These infections killed millions of people in previous centuries, but they have been combated effectively by the development of modern vaccines, antibiotics and infection control measures. Most...

  17. The role of T cell subsets and cytokines in the regulation of intracellular bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immune responses are a critical part of the host's defense against intracellular bacterial infections. Immunity to Brucella abortus crucially depends on antigen-specific T cell-mediated activation of macrophages, which are the major effectors of cell-mediated killing of this organism. T lymphocytes that proliferate in response to B. abortus were characterized for phenotype and cytokine activity. Human, murine, and bovine T lymphocytes exhibited a type 1 cytokine profile, suggesting an analogous immune response in these different hosts. In vivo protection afforded by a particular cell type is dependent on the antigen presented and the mechanism of antigen presentation. Studies using MHC class I and class II knockout mice infected with B. abortus have demonstrated that protective immunity to brucellosis is especially dependent on CD8+ T cells. To target MHC class I presentation we transfected ex vivo a murine macrophage cell line with B. abortus genes and adoptively transferred them to BALB/c mice. These transgenic macrophage clones induced partial protection in mice against experimental brucellosis. Knowing the cells required for protection, vaccines can be designed to activate the protective T cell subset. Lastly, as a new strategy for priming a specific class I-restricted T cell response in vivo, we used genetic immunization by particle bombardment-mediated gene transfer

  18. Polymer-Ag nanocomposites with enhanced antimicrobial activity against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Lu, Zhentan; Zhang, Xinge; Li, Chaoxing; Jia, Yanxia

    2014-09-24

    Herein, a nontoxic nanocomposite is synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate in the presence of a cationic polymer displaying strong antimicrobial activity against bacterial infection. These nanocomposites with a large concentration of positive charge promote their adsorption to bacterial membranes through electrostatic interaction. Moreover, the synthesized nanocomposites with polyvalent and synergistic antimicrobial effects can effectively kill both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria without the emergence of bacterial resistance. Morphological changes obtained by transmission electron microscope observation show that these nanocomposites can cause leakage and chaos of intracellular contents. Analysis of the antimicrobial mechanism confirms that the lethal action of nanocomposites against the bacteria started with disruption of the bacterial membrane, subsequent cellular internalization of the nanoparticles, and inhibition of intracellular enzymatic activity. This novel antimicrobial material with good cytocompatibility promotes healing of infected wounds in diabetic rats, and has a promising future in the treatment of other infectious diseases.

  19. Bacterial Hyaluronidase Promotes Ascending GBS Infection and Preterm Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Vornhagen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Preterm birth increases the risk of adverse birth outcomes and is the leading cause of neonatal mortality. A significant cause of preterm birth is in utero infection with vaginal microorganisms. These vaginal microorganisms are often recovered from the amniotic fluid of preterm birth cases. A vaginal microorganism frequently associated with preterm birth is group B streptococcus (GBS, or Streptococcus agalactiae. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying GBS ascension are poorly understood. Here, we describe the role of the GBS hyaluronidase in ascending infection and preterm birth. We show that clinical GBS strains associated with preterm labor or neonatal infections have increased hyaluronidase activity compared to commensal strains obtained from rectovaginal swabs of healthy women. Using a murine model of ascending infection, we show that hyaluronidase activity was associated with increased ascending GBS infection, preterm birth, and fetal demise. Interestingly, hyaluronidase activity reduced uterine inflammation but did not impact placental or fetal inflammation. Our study shows that hyaluronidase activity enables GBS to subvert uterine immune responses, leading to increased rates of ascending infection and preterm birth. These findings have important implications for the development of therapies to prevent in utero infection and preterm birth.

  20. Bacterial lipoprotein-induced tolerance is reversed by overexpression of IRAK-1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Li, Chong Hui

    2012-03-01

    Tolerance to bacterial cell wall components including bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) represents an essential regulatory mechanism during bacterial infection. Reduced Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK-1) expression is a characteristic of the downregulated TLR signaling pathway observed in BLP-tolerised cells. In this study, we attempted to clarify whether TLR2 and\\/or IRAK-1 are the key molecules responsible for BLP-induced tolerance. Transfection of HEK293 cells and THP-1 cells with the plasmid encoding TLR2 affected neither BLP tolerisation-induced NF-κB deactivation nor BLP tolerisation-attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production, indicating that BLP tolerance develops despite overexpression of TLR2 in these cells. In contrast, overexpression of IRAK-1 reversed BLP-induced tolerance, as transfection of IRAK-1 expressing vector resulted in a dose-dependent NF-κB activation and TNF-α release in BLP-tolerised cells. Furthermore, BLP-tolerised cells exhibited markedly repressed NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and impaired binding of p65 to several pro-inflammatory cytokine gene promoters including TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Overexpression of IRAK-1 restored the nuclear transactivation of p65 at both TNF-α and IL-6 promoters. These results indicate a crucial role for IRAK-1 in BLP-induced tolerance, and suggest IRAK-1 as a potential target for manipulation of the TLR-mediated inflammatory response during microbial sepsis.

  1. Bovine pasteurellosis and other bacterial infections of the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dee

    2010-03-01

    Despite technological, biologic, and pharmacologic advances the bacterial component of the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex continues to have a major adverse effect on the health and wellbeing of stocker and feeder cattle. Overlooked in this disappointing assessment is evaluation of the effects that working with younger, lighter-weight cattle have on managing the bacterial component of the BRD complex. Most problems associated with BRD come from cattle taken from and comingled with cattle operations that have inconsistent or nonexistent cattle health management. This article reviews the biologic, clinical, and management aspects of Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Histophilus somni, and Mycoplasma bovis, primarily as related to current production management considerations of stocker and feeder cattle. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vincent F. Tablang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a severe and life-threatening complication in patients with ascites caused by advanced liver disease. The organisms most commonly involved are coliform bacteria and third-generation cephalosporins are the empiric antibiotics of choice. This is an uncommon case of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a female patient with liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis. She did not improve with ceftriaxone and her course was complicated by hepatic encephalopathy, seizures and multi-organ failure. This case emphasizes that a high index of suspicion should be maintained for timely diagnosis and treatment. Listerial peritonitis should be suspected in patients with end-stage liver disease and inadequate response to conventional antibiotics within 48–72 h. Ampicillin/sulbactam should be initiated while awaiting results of ascitic fluid or blood culture.

  3. Imaging of musculoskeletal bacterial infections by [124I]FIAU-PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A Diaz

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditional imaging techniques for the localization and monitoring of bacterial infections, although reasonably sensitive, suffer from a lack of specificity. This is particularly true for musculoskeletal infections. Bacteria possess a thymidine kinase (TK whose substrate specificity is distinct from that of the major human TK. The substrate specificity difference has been exploited to develop a new imaging technique that can detect the presence of viable bacteria.Eight subjects with suspected musculoskeletal infections and one healthy control were studied by a combination of [(124I]FIAU-positron emission tomography and CT ([(124I]FIAU-PET/CT. All patients with proven musculoskeletal infections demonstrated positive [(124I]FIAU-PET/CT signals in the sites of concern at two hours after radiopharmaceutical administration. No adverse reactions with FIAU were observed.[(124I]FIAU-PET/CT is a promising new method for imaging bacterial infections.

  4. The Relation between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Acute Bacterial Diarrhea in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Monajemzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. H. pylori infection leads to chronic gastritis in both children and adults. But recently, there are arising theories of its protective effect in diarrheal diseases. Aim. To explore the prevalence of H. pylori infection in children with bacterial diarrhea and compare it with healthy controls. Patients and Methods. Two matched groups consisted of 122 consecutive children, aged 24–72 months old, with acute bacterial diarrhea, who had Shigellosis (N=68 and Salmonellosis (N=54 as patients group and 204 healthy asymptomatic children as control group enrolled in this study. Results. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in healthy control children was significantly higher than in patients group, (odds ratio = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.33–9.5, P=0.007. In our study, only 2/54 Salmonella infected patients and 3/68 of Shigellosis had evidence of H. pylori infection, while normal control children had 27/204 infected individuals. Conclusion. H. pylori infection may play a protective role against bacterial diarrhea in children. So it is important to consider all of the positive and negative aspects of H. pylori infection before its eradication.

  5. Interferon in resistance to bacterial and protozoan infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Gould, Cheryl L.; Kierszenbaum, Felipe; Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of genetic differences in mouse strains on the modulation of protozoan infections by interferon (IFN) were investigated. In one set of experiments, three different strains of mice were injected with T. cruzi, and their sera were assayed at five time intervals for IFN titer. A greater quantity of IFN was produced by mouse strains that were susceptible to T. cruzi infection than by the more resistant strain. In another set of experiments, spleen cell cultures from inbred strains of mice were challenged with an antigen made from T.b. rhodesiense. The cells from mice resistant to infection, produced greater amounts of IFN-gamma than did cells from the susceptible mice. In a third set of experiments, it was found that mice injected with T.b. rhodesiense before being infected with a diabetogenic virus (EMC-D) were resistant to the effects of the virus and did not produce virus-specific antibody.

  6. [Microbiological diagnosis of bacterial infection associated with delivery and postpartum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Ortega, Belén; Delgado-Palacio, Susana; García-Garrote, Fernando; Rodríguez-Gómez, Juan Miguel; Romero-Hernández, Beatriz

    2016-05-01

    The newborn may acquire infections during delivery due to maternal colonization of the birth canal, by microorganisms such as Streptococcus agalactiae that caused early neonatal infection, or acquisition through the placenta, amniotic fluid or birth products. After birth, the newborn that needs hospitalization can develop nosocomial infections during their care and exceptionally through lactation by infectious mastitis or incorrect handling of human milk, which does not require to stop breastfeeding in most cases. It is important and necessary to perform microbiological diagnosis for the correct treatment of perinatal infections, especially relevant in preterm infants with low or very low weight with high mortality rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. A case of pneumonia and sepsis in cirrhosis as paradigm of the problems in the management of bacterial infections in cirrhosis and of the limitations of current knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Tufoni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are a major problem in the management of liver cirrhosis. They represent the first precipitating cause of death since patients with cirrhosis carry an increased risk of sepsis, sepsis-induced organ failure and death. Although the clinical presentation is often misleading, the presence of bacterial infection should always be actively searched and ruled out with certainty whenever a cirrhotic patient is admitted to the hospital with an acute clinical deterioration. Major changes in the epidemiology of bacterial infections have also occurred in the last decade making the choice of empirical antibiotic therapy a challenge. We report a paradigmatic case of a 54-year old man with hepatitis C-related cirrhosis admitted to the hospital for worsening of his ascites and onset of hepatic encephalopathy, an excellent example for the difficulties of management of sepsis in cirrhosis and the limits of current knowledge.

  8. Coxiella Burnetii: Host and Bacterial Responses to Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-16

    of Q fever organisms from paturient placentas of naturally infected dairy cows . Public Health Rep 1950;65:541. [9] Welsh HH, Lennette EH, Abinanti FR...sheep, and pos- ibly cows [8,9]. In the laboratory, C. burnetii is routinely ultured in chicken embryo yolk sacs, in cell cultures, and can e recovered...infecting SCV develop nto large cell variants (LCV) that are metabolically active. he SCV and LCV are antigenically different [13]. Tran- ition between

  9. Findings of bacterial microflora in piglets infected with conventional swine plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanov Jasna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Piglets infected with the conventional swine plague virus as a result of secondary bacterial infections sometimes show an insufficiently clear clinical and pathoanatomical picture, which is why the very procedure of diagnosis is complex and the final diagnosis unreliable. That is why these investigations were aimed at examining the presence of bacterial microflora in diseased and dead pilgets which were found to have the viral antigen for CSP using the fluorescent antibody technique, in cases where the pathomorphological finding was not characteristic for conventional swine plague. Autopsies of dead piglets most often showed changes in the digestive tract and lungs, with resulting technopathy and diseases of infective nature. Such findings on knowledge of a present bacterial microflora are especially important in cases when conventional swine plague is controlled on farms and an announcement that the disease has been contained is in the offing.

  10. Bacterial sexually transmitted infections among HIV-infected patients in the United States: estimates from the Medical Monitoring Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagg, Elaine W; Weinstock, Hillard S; Frazier, Emma L; Valverde, Eduardo E; Heffelfinger, James D; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial sexually transmitted infections may facilitate HIV transmission. Bacterial sexually transmitted infection testing is recommended for sexually active HIV-infected patients annually and more frequently for those at elevated sexual risk. We estimated percentages of HIV-infected patients in the United States receiving at least one syphilis, gonorrhea, or chlamydia test, and repeat (≥2 tests, ≥3 months apart) tests for any of these sexually transmitted infections from mid-2008 through mid-2010. The Medical Monitoring Project collects behavioral and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States using nationally representative sampling. Sexual activity included self-reported oral, vaginal, or anal sex in the past 12 months. Participants reporting more than 1 sexual partner or illicit drug use before/during sex in the past year were classified as having elevated sexual risk. Among participants with only 1 sex partner and no drug use before/during sex, those reporting consistent condom use were classified as low risk; those reporting sex without a condom (or for whom this was unknown) were classified as at elevated sexual risk only if they considered their sex partner to be a casual partner, or if their partner was HIV-negative or partner HIV status was unknown. Bacterial sexually transmitted infection testing was ascertained through medical record abstraction. Among sexually active patients, 55% were tested at least once in 12 months for syphilis, whereas 23% and 24% received at least one gonorrhea and chlamydia test, respectively. Syphilis testing did not vary by sex/sexual orientation. Receipt of at least 3 CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell counts and/or HIV viral load tests in 12 months was associated with syphilis testing in men who have sex with men (MSM), men who have sex with women only, and women. Chlamydia testing was significantly higher in sexually active women (30%) compared with men who have sex with women only

  11. Placental Inflammatory Changes and Bacterial Infection in Premature Neonates with Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal a relationship of placental inflammatory changes to bacterial infection in premature neonates with respiratory failure. Material and methods. Bronchoalveolar aspirate was bacteriologically studied in 157 premature neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS; the total and differential leukocyte counts were measured in their peripheral blood. The levels of the cytokines IL-1^3, IL-4, IL-6, and TNF-a were studied in different biological fluids of mothers and their babies; the placentas were also morphologically examined. Results. An analysis of bacterial cultures from the tracheobronchial tree revealed no growth of bacterial microflora in 61.8% of cases, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus epidermidis were isolated in 6.4 and 8.3% of the infants, respectively; Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus capitis, Enterobacter agglomerans, and hemolytic group A Streptococcus were seen in 1.9% each; moreover, 1.3% of the newborn infants were found to have Bacillus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp., and Serratia marcescens. Other microorganisms and a microbial association were encountered in 8.9% of cases. Placental morphological examination revealed different inflammatory changes concurrent with chronic and acute placental insufficiency. The investigation demonstrated that the maternal peripheral plasma levels of IL-1^, IL-4, IL-6, and TNF-a were within the physiological range at the end of the first period of delivery. The amniotic fluid displayed elevated IL-6 and TNF-a concentrations and normal IL-4 and IL-1e levels, suggesting that there was an intrauterine inflammatory process. Conclusion. Premature birth is associated with various placental inflammatory changes, which causes intrauterine stimulation of macrophages in the chorionic villi. Specific immune defense mechanisms that prevent the development of a fetal infectious process, i.e. the maternal infectious process, may induce

  12. Procalcitonin as a biomarker of bacterial infection in sickle cell vaso-occlusive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip Kumar; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Thomas, Ancil George; Patel, Siris; Purohit, Prasanta

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) patients with vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) have signs of inflammation and it is often difficult to diagnose a bacterial infection in them. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of serum procalcitonin (PCT) as a biomarker of bacterial infection in acute sickle cell vaso-occlusive crisis. Hundred homozygous SCA patients were studied at Sickle Cell Clinic and Molecular Biology Laboratory, V.S.S. Medical College, Burla, Odisha, India. All the patients were divided into three categories namely category-A (VOC/ACS with SIRS but without evidence of bacterial infection - 66 patients), category-B (VOC/ACS with SIRS and either proven or suspected bacterial infection - 24 patients) and category-C (SCA patients in steady state without VOC/ACS or SIRS - 10 patients). Complete blood count, C-reactive protein (CRP) estimation and PCT measurement were done in all the patients. There was no significant difference in TLC and CRP values between category-A and B. In category-A, the PCT level was value >0.5 ng/mL with 87.5% of patients having >2 ng/mL. In category-C, PCT value was value (100%) for bacterial infection at a cutoff value of 0.5 ng/mL; whereas the specificity is excellent at a cut-off value of 2 ng/mL. SCA patients with VOC/ACS and SIRS having a PCT level of value of >2 ng/mL is indicative of bacterial infection necessitating early antimicrobial therapy.

  13. Statin Treatment and Mortality in Bacterial Infections – A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Bergman, Peter; Andersson, Jan; Lindh, Jonatan D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported improved survival in severe bacterial infections among statin treated patients. In addition, statins have been ascribed beneficial anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of statin-treatment on mortality in patients with bacterial infections, by means of a systematic review and a meta-analysis. Methodology and Principal Findings Studies investigating the association between statin use and mortality in patients with bacterial disease were identified in a systematic literature review and a meta-analysis was performed to calculate the overall odds ratio of mortality in statin users. The literature search identified 947 citations from which 40 relevant studies were extracted. In all, 15 studies comprising 113 910 patients were included in the final analysis. Statin use was associated with a significantly (pstatin treatment was no longer significant, with an OR of 0.79 (95% CI 0.58–1.07). Conclusion/Significance According to the meta-analysis of observational studies presented here, patients on statin therapy seem to have a better outcome in bacterial infections. However, the association did not reach statistical significance after adjustment for apparent publication bias. Thus, there is a great need for randomised controlled trials investigating the possible beneficial effect of statins in bacterial infections. PMID:20502712

  14. Organelle targeting during bacterial infection: insights from Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Alice; Stavru, Fabrizia; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular bacterium responsible for severe foodborne infections, is now recognized as a multifaceted model in infection biology. Comprehensive studies of the molecular and cellular basis of the infection have unraveled how the bacterium crosses the intestinal and feto-placental barriers, invades several cell types in which it multiplies and moves, and spreads from cell to cell. Interestingly, although Listeria does not actively invade host cell organelles, it can interfere with their function. We discuss the effect of Listeria on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the mechanisms leading to the fragmentation of the mitochondrial network and its consequences, and review the strategies used by Listeria to subvert nuclear functions, more precisely to control host gene expression at the chromatin level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of 99mTc-amoxicillin sodium as an infection imaging agent in bacterially infected and sterile inflamed rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derya Ilem-Ozdemir; Oya Caglayan-Orumlu; Makbule Asikoglu; Hayal Ozkilic; Ferda Yilmaz; Mine Hosgor-Limoncu

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. The aim of this study was to develop a new radiopharmaceutical for imaging infection. The labeling conditions were optimized, and lyophilized kits were developed for instant preparing. The stability of 99m Tc-AMOX in human serum was identified, sterility and pyrogenicity of the radiopharmaceutical were estimated, gamma scintigraphy and in vivo biodistribution with infected rats were investigated. The promising properties of 99m Tc-AMOX combined with the development of reliable and instant lyophilized kit afford the opportunity of inflammatory process imaging. (author)

  16. Perinatal Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS Enhances Susceptibility to Viral and Secondary Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn A. Claude

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS leads to increased incidence of infections of the lower respiratory tract. The objective of this study was to determine whether perinatal exposure to ETS increases the incidence, morbidity and severity of respiratory influenza infection and whether a secondary bacterial challenge at the peak of a pre-existing viral infection creates an enhanced host-pathogen susceptibility to an opportunistic infection. Timed-pregnant female Balb/c mice were exposed to either ETS for 6 h/day, 7 d/week beginning on gestation day 14 and continuing with the neonates to 6 weeks of age. Control animals were exposed to filtered air (FA. At the end of exposure, mice were intranasally inoculated with a murine-adapted influenza A. One week later, an intranasal inoculation of S. aureus bacteria was administered. The respective treatment groups were: bacteria only, virus only or virus+bacteria for both FA and ETS-exposed animals for a total of six treatment groups. Animal behavior and body weights were documented daily following infection. Mice were necropsied 1-day post-bacterial infection. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cell analysis demonstrated perinatal exposure to ETS, compared to FA, leads to delayed but enhanced clinical symptoms and enhanced total cell influx into the lungs associated with viral infection followed by bacterial challenge. Viral infection significantly increases the number of neutrophils entering the lungs following bacterial challenge with either FA or ETS exposure, while the influx of lymphocytes and monocytes is significantly enhanced only by perinatal ETS exposure. There is a significant increase in peribronchiolar inflammation following viral infection in pups exposed to ETS compared with pups exposed to FA, but no change is noted in the degree of lung injury between FA and ETS-exposed animals following bacterial challenge. The data suggests perinatal exposure to ETS

  17. Bacterial Internalization, Localization, and Effectors Shape the Epithelial Immune Response during Shigella flexneri Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Juliane; Gwinner, Frederik; Rey, Camille; Tamir, Uyanga; Law, Helen K W; Schwikowski, Benno; Enninga, Jost

    2015-09-01

    Intracellular pathogens are differentially sensed by the compartmentalized host immune system. Nevertheless, gene expression studies of infected cells commonly average the immune responses, neglecting the precise pathogen localization. To overcome this limitation, we dissected the transcriptional immune response to Shigella flexneri across different infection stages in bulk and single cells. This identified six distinct transcriptional profiles characterizing the dynamic, multilayered host response in both bystander and infected cells. These profiles were regulated by external and internal danger signals, as well as whether bacteria were membrane bound or cytosolic. We found that bacterial internalization triggers a complex, effector-independent response in bystander cells, possibly to compensate for the undermined host gene expression in infected cells caused by bacterial effectors, particularly OspF. Single-cell analysis revealed an important bacterial strategy to subvert host responses in infected cells, demonstrating that OspF disrupts concomitant gene expression of proinflammatory, apoptosis, and stress pathways within cells. This study points to novel mechanisms through which bacterial internalization, localization, and injected effectors orchestrate immune response transcriptional signatures. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Bacterial pattern and antibiotic sensitivity in children and adolescents with infected atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samosir, C. T.; Ruslie, R. H.; Rusli, R. E.

    2018-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a pruritic and chronic inflammatory skin disease which affected approximately 20% in children. Bacterial infection is common in AD patients and correlates directly with AD severity. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of bacterial skin infection in AD patients and its relation with severity of AD and also to study bacteria in the infected AD and its antibiotic sensitivity. Samples were 86 children and adolescents with an AD in Helvetia Community Health Center Medan from March 2016 until February 2017. Index of SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) was used to evaluate the severity of AD. Lesion and nonlesional skinwere swabbed to take sterile cultures. All bacteria noted and tested for antibiotic sensitivity. Datawere by using Chi-Square and Mann Whitney test with 95% CI and p-value<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Fifty-six AD patients (65.1%) were bacterial infected. There was a significant relationship between severity of AD and bacterial infection (p = 0.006). Staphylococcus aureus was the leading bacteria from all degrees of AD severity. Isolated Staphylococcus aureuswas sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanate (93.3%), clindamycin (90%), erythromycin (90%), and gentamicin (90%), while sensitivity to tetracycline was low (20%).

  19. Phagocytes, Antibiotics, and Self-Limiting Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Bruce R; Baquero, Fernando; Ankomah, Peter Pierre; McCall, Ingrid C

    2017-11-01

    Most antibiotic use in humans is to reduce the magnitude and term of morbidity of acute, community-acquired infections in immune competent patients, rather than to save lives. Thanks to phagocytic leucocytes and other host defenses, the vast majority of these infections are self-limiting. Nevertheless, there has been a negligible amount of consideration of the contribution of phagocytosis and other host defenses in the research for, and the design of, antibiotic treatment regimens, which hyper-emphasizes antibiotics as if they were the sole mechanism responsible for the clearance of infections. Here, we critically review this approach and its limitations. With the aid of a heuristic mathematical model, we postulate that if the rate of phagocytosis is great enough, for acute, normally self-limiting infections, then (i) antibiotics with different pharmacodynamic properties would be similarly effective, (ii) low doses of antibiotics can be as effective as high doses, and (iii) neither phenotypic nor inherited antibiotic resistance generated during therapy are likely to lead to treatment failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacterial infections in alcoholic and nonalcoholic liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sargenti, Konstantina; Prytz, Hanne; Bertilsson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    .001), this relationship was not significant after adjustment for confounders in Cox regression analysis (P=0.056). Resistance to piperacilin-tazobactam and carbapenems was more common in infections occurring in alcoholic versus nonalcoholic cirrhosis (13 vs. 5%, P=0.057 and 12 vs. 2%, P=0.009). Alcoholic etiology...

  1. STUDIES ON BACTERIAL INFECTIONS OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    ABSTRACT. Microbial study for aerobic organisms from 100 cases of diabetic foot ulcers was carried out to determine the etiological agents and their antibiogram. Polymicrobial infection was observed in all the cases. The most frequently isolated aerobic organisms were Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas ...

  2. [Newborn bacterial infection caused by materno-fetal contamination. Retrospective epidemiologic study at a maternity unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blond, M H; Gold, F; Quentin, R; Pierre, F; Kompanietz, J; Soutoul, J H; Laugier, J

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study of neonatal bacterial infection due to contamination from the mother was carried out in maternity unit. We analysed the results of taking bacterial swabs from the skin and GI tract in newborn children when there was a possibility, or even probability, from the criteria given that there would be infection. These results compare with different criteria. In 19 months there were 2,622 live born children; 40.6% of those had swabs taken; the infection rate was 0.61% of newborns, but 16% of the newborns, had asymptomatic colonisation by bacteria. The high risks of finding positive swabs as shown by increased infection rates by colonisation occurred where the mothers had high temperatures. Our results led us to change the criteria for antibiotic treatment immediately after birth, in newborn babies.

  3. Periodontal bacterial colonization in synovial tissues exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis in B10.RIII mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes; Gehlot, Prashasnika; Velsko, Irina; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Calise, S John; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward K L; Holoshitz, Joseph; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2016-07-12

    It has been previously hypothesized that oral microbes may be an etiological link between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease. However, the mechanistic basis of this association is incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of periodontal bacteria in induction of joint inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in B10.RIII mice. CIA-prone B10.RIII mice were infected orally with a polybacterial mixture of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia for 24 weeks before induction of CIA. The ability of polybacterial mixture to colonize the periodontium and induce systemic response, horizontal alveolar bone resorption in infected B10.RIII mice was investigated. Arthritis incidence, severity of joint inflammation, pannus formation, skeletal damage, hematogenous dissemination of the infection, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) levels, and interleukin-17 expression levels were evaluated. B10.RIII mice had gingival colonization with all three bacteria, higher levels of anti-bacterial immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies, significant alveolar bone resorption, and hematogenous dissemination of P. gingivalis to synovial joints. Infected B10.RIII mice had more severe arthritis, and higher serum matrix metalloproteinase 3 levels and activity. Histopathological analysis showed increased inflammatory cell infiltration, destruction of articular cartilage, erosions, and pannus formation. Additionally, involved joints showed had expression levels of interleukin-17. These findings demonstrate that physical presence of periodontal bacteria in synovial joints of B10.RIII mice with collagen-induced arthritis is associated with arthritis exacerbation, and support the hypothesis that oral bacteria, specifically P. gingivalis, play a significant role in augmenting autoimmune arthritis due to their intravascular dissemination to the joints.

  4. [The value of fibrinogen concentrations in neonatal bacterial infections of maternal origin (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gamarra, E; Savaglio, N; Moriette, G; Relier, J P

    1980-03-01

    The changes of fibrinogen levels in the neonatal period have been systematically studied in the neonatal intensive care unit at Port-Royal Hospital. A prospective study has been performed in 29 children with bacterial infections which were definitely of maternal origin. High fibrinogen levels persist as long as the infection remains active. Return of fibrinogen levels to normal could be considered as a criterion, if not of cure, at least of the efficacy of treatment.

  5. A streptococcal protease that degrades CXC chemokines and impairs bacterial clearance from infected tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo-Grass, Carlos; Mishalian, Inbal; Dan-Goor, Mary; Belotserkovsky, Ilia; Eran, Yoni; Nizet, Victor; Peled, Amnon; Hanski, Emanuel

    2006-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes the life-threatening infection in humans known as necrotizing fasciitis (NF). Infected subcutaneous tissues from an NF patient and mice challenged with the same GAS strain possessed high bacterial loads but a striking paucity of infiltrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). Impaired PMN recruitment was attributed to degradation of the chemokine IL-8 by a GAS serine peptidase. Here, we use bioinformatics approach coupled with target mutagenesis to identif...

  6. The role of phagocytes and specific antibodies in gamma irradiated mice infected by intracellular bacterial pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarova, H.; Stulik, J.; Ledvina, M.

    1987-01-01

    The activation of oxygen metabolism in peritoneal macrophages during the defence against Francisella tularensis infection was inhibited by gamma irradiation of mice with 4.0 Gy. The application of specific antibodies protected the irradiated mice from the lethal infection without reactivation of oxygen metabolism in mononuclear phagocytes. These results demonstrated that the protecting function of the specific antibodies in the defence system against intracellular bacterial pathogens will be mediated by the oxygen-independent mechanisms. (author)

  7. Lack of Correlation between Bristol Stool Scale and Quantitative Bacterial Load in Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Abrar K. Thabit; David P. Nicolau

    2015-01-01

    Decision to test for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is usually made when patients have loose stools with Bristol stool score of ≤5. We aimed to assess the relationship between bacterial load of C. difficile and Bristol stool scale, as well as stool frequency in stool samples collected from patients infected with the organism. Samples were collected at baseline, during therapy, and at the end of therapy. Spearman correlation test was used to evaluate these relationships. No correlation ...

  8. Targeting bacterial membrane function: an underexploited mechanism for treating persistent infections

    OpenAIRE

    Hurdle, Julian G.; O’Neill, Alex J.; Chopra, Ian; Lee, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Persistent infections involving slow-growing or non-growing bacteria are hard to treat with antibiotics that target biosynthetic processes in growing cells. Consequently, there is a need for antimicrobials that can treat infections containing dormant bacteria. In this Review, we discuss the emerging concept that disrupting the bacterial membrane bilayer or proteins that are integral to membrane function (including membrane potential and energy metabolism) in dormant bacteria is a strategy for...

  9. Phenotypic T cell exhaustion in a murine model of bacterial infection in the setting of pre-existing malignancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Mittal

    Full Text Available While much of cancer immunology research has focused on anti-tumor immunity both systemically and within the tumor microenvironment, little is known about the impact of pre-existing malignancy on pathogen-specific immune responses. Here, we sought to characterize the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response following a bacterial infection in the setting of pre-existing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice with established subcutaneous pancreatic adenocarcinomas were infected with Listeria monocytogenes, and antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses were compared to those in control mice without cancer. While the kinetics and magnitude of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion and accumulation was comparable between the cancer and non-cancer groups, bacterial antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and total CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in cancer mice exhibited increased expression of the coinhibitory receptors BTLA, PD-1, and 2B4. Furthermore, increased inhibitory receptor expression was associated with reduced IFN-γ and increased IL-2 production by bacterial antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the cancer group. Taken together, these data suggest that cancer's immune suppressive effects are not limited to the tumor microenvironment, but that pre-existing malignancy induces phenotypic exhaustion in T cells by increasing expression of coinhibitory receptors and may impair pathogen-specific CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation.

  10. Widespread bacterial infection affecting Rana temporaria tadpoles in mountain areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Tiberti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodic mass die-offs of Rana temporaria tadpole populations have occurred in the ponds of prealpine mountain areas of Brescia (northern Italy since the early 2000s. The author reports some observational data and analytical results from three sites: tadpoles from mortality events had erythema, especially on the legs, suggestive of septicemia. Bacterial culture of these tadpoles revealed Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas sobria, two organisms often associated with Red leg disease. Egg mass counts from 29 pastureland ponds did not revealed breeding activity declines over five years in the Monte Guglielmo area. Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas sobria usually behave as opportunistic bacteria that can become pathogenic after suppression of the immune system by endogenous or exogenous stressors. Thus, a plurality of environmental factors may contribute to mortality events; some of them are discussed, including loss of high altitude breeding ponds resulting in overcrowding and poor water quality in remaining ponds and the presence of other pathogens.

  11. Comprehensive Diagnosis of Bacterial Infection Associated with Acute Cholecystitis Using Metagenomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Kujiraoka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute cholecystitis (AC, which is strongly associated with retrograde bacterial infection, is an inflammatory disease that can be fatal if inappropriately treated. Currently, bacterial culture testing, which is basically recommended to detect the etiological agent, is a time-consuming (4–6 days, non-comprehensive approach. To rapidly detect a potential pathogen and predict its antimicrobial susceptibility, we undertook a metagenomic approach to characterize the bacterial infection associated with AC. Six patients (P1–P6 who underwent cholecystectomy for AC were enrolled in this study. Metagenome analysis demonstrated possible single or multiple bacterial infections in four patients (P1, P2, P3, and P4 with 24-h experimental procedures; in addition, the CTX-M extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL gene was identified in two bile samples (P1 and P4. Further whole genome sequencing of Escherichia coli isolates suggested that CTX-M-27-producing ST131 and CTX-M-14-producing novel-ST were identified in P1 and P4, respectively. Metagenome analysis of feces and saliva also suggested some imbalance in the microbiota for more comprehensive assessment of patients with AC. In conclusion, metagenome analysis was useful for rapid bacterial diagnostics, including assessing potential antimicrobial susceptibility, in patients with AC.

  12. Porcine models of non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) and infective endocarditis (IE) caused by Staphylococcus aureus: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Johanna G; Jensen, Henrik E; Johansen, Louise K; Kochl, Janne; Koch, Jørgen; Aalbaek, Bent; Nielsen, Ole L; Leifsson, Páll S

    2013-05-01

    Non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) and, in particular, infective endocarditis (IE), are serious and potentially life-threatening diseases. An increasingly important agent of human IE is Staphylococcus aureus, which typically causes an acute endocarditis with high mortality. The study aim was to evaluate the pig as a model for non-bacterial as well as S. aureus-associated endocarditis, as these models would have several advantages compared to other laboratory animal models. Fourteen animals underwent surgery with placement of a plastic catheter in the left side of the heart. Six of the pigs did not receive a bacterial inoculation and were used to study the development of NBTE. The remaining eight pigs were inoculated intravenously once or twice with S. aureus, 10(5)-10(7) cfu/kg body weight. Two bacterial strains were used: S54F9 (porcine) and NCTC8325-4 (human). Clinical examination, echocardiography and bacterial blood cultures were used to diagnose and monitor the development of endocarditis. Animals were euthanized at between two and 15 days after catheter placement, and tissue samples were collected for bacteriology and histopathology. Pigs inoculated with 10(7) cfu/kg of S. aureus strain S54F9 developed clinical, echocardiographic and pathologic signs of IE. All other pigs, except one, developed NBTE. Serial blood cultures withdrawn after inoculation were positive in animals with IE, and negative in all other animals. S. aureus endocarditis was successfully induced in pigs with an indwelling cardiac catheter after intravenous inoculation of 10(7) cfu/kg of S. aureus strain S54F9. The model simulates typical pathological, clinical and diagnostic features seen in the human disease. Furthermore, NBTE was induced in all but one of the pigs without IE. Thus, the pig model can be used in future studies of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of NBTE and S. aureus endocarditis.

  13. Secondary bacterial infection in Ghanaian patients with scabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, O; Brenya, R C

    1997-11-01

    From 110 patients with secondarily infected scabies lesions, 105 bacteria consisting of 66 aerobes and 39 anaerobes were isolated. A mixture of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was present in 15 (13.6%). The predominant aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were staphylococcous aureus 39.1% and pepostreptococcus spp. 14.2% respectively. Organisms that resided in the mucus membranes close to or in contact with the lesions predominated in those infections. Most organisms were recovered from the finger and buttock lesions. These organisms were mainly staph. aureus, beta-haemolytic streptococci group. A and peptostreptococcus. More than 80% of staph. aureus isolated were resistant to penicillin. Less than 20% of the anaerobes were resistant to penicillin. The enteric Gram-negative, E. coli and Klebsiella spp. showed 100% sensitivity to Amoxycilin/clavulanic acid and gentamicin. Pseudomonas spp. were only susceptible to gentamicin, Amoxycillin/clavulanic acid proved to be the most active therapeutic agent in in vitro against the isolated microorganisms.

  14. Getting “Inside” Type I IFNs: Type I IFNs in Intracellular Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deann T. Snyder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons represent a unique and complex group of cytokines, serving many purposes during innate and adaptive immunity. Discovered in the context of viral infections, type I IFNs are now known to have myriad effects in infectious and autoimmune disease settings. Type I IFN signaling during bacterial infections is dependent on many factors including whether the infecting bacterium is intracellular or extracellular, as different signaling pathways are activated. As such, the repercussions of type I IFN induction can positively or negatively impact the disease outcome. This review focuses on type I IFN induction and downstream consequences during infection with the following intracellular bacteria: Chlamydia trachomatis, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus, Legionella pneumophila, and Coxiella burnetii. Intracellular bacterial infections are unique because the bacteria must avoid, circumvent, and even co-opt microbial “sensing” mechanisms in order to reside and replicate within a host cell. Furthermore, life inside a host cell makes intracellular bacteria more difficult to target with antibiotics. Because type I IFNs are important immune effectors, modulating this pathway may improve disease outcomes. But first, it is critical to understand the context-dependent effects of the type I IFN pathway in intracellular bacterial infections.

  15. Probiotics: a new way to fight bacterial pulmonary infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Y; Le Blay, G; Boisramé-Gastrin, S; Le Gall, F; Héry-Arnaud, G; Gouriou, S; Vallet, S; Le Berre, R

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics, of which Fleming has identified the first representative, penicillin, in 1928, allowed dramatical improvement of the treatment of patients presenting with infectious diseases. However, once an antibiotic is used, resistance may develop more or less rapidly in some bacteria. It is thus necessary to develop therapeutic alternatives, such as the use of probiotics, defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "micro-organisms which, administered live and in adequate amounts, confer a benefit to the health of the host". The scope of these micro-organisms is broad, concerning many areas including that of infectious diseases, especially respiratory infections. We describe the rational use of probiotics in respiratory tract infections and detail the results of various clinical studies describing the use of probiotics in the management of respiratory infections such as nosocomial or community acquired pneumonia, or on specific grounds such as cystic fibrosis. The results are sometimes contradictory, but the therapeutic potential of probiotics seems promising. Implementing research to understand their mechanisms of action is critical to conduct therapeutic tests based on a specific rational for the strains to be used, the dose, as well as the chosen mode and rhythm of administration. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  16. Drug repurposing as an alternative for the treatment of recalcitrant bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eRangel-Vega

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections remain one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and the therapeutic outlook for these infections is worsening, due the rise of antibiotic resistant strains. The pharmaceutical industry has produced few new types of antibiotics in more than a decade. Researchers are taking several approaches towards developing new classes of antibiotics, including (1 focusing on new targets and processes, such as bacterial cell-cell communication that upregulates virulence; (2 designing inhibitors of bacterial resistance, such as blockers of multi-drug efflux pumps; and (3 using alternative antimicrobials such as bacteriophages. In addition, the strategy of finding new uses for existing drugs is beginning to produce results: antibacterial properties have been discovered in existing anticancer, antifungal, anthelmintic, and anti-inflammatory drugs. In this work we discuss the antimicrobial properties of gallium based compounds, 5-fluorouracil, ciclopirox, diflunisal, and some other FDA-approved drugs.

  17. Acute bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract in children from low-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, A; Wolf, B.H.M.

    Acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and is responsible for 4 million childhood deaths each year. Most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia and occur in the youngest children in the poorest parts of the world. Severe

  18. Delayed metamorphosis and recurrence of bacterial infection in irradiated Rana clamitans tadpoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, D.R.

    1982-03-01

    X-ray doses of 5 and 10 Gy (1 Gy/min) given to premetamorphic Green Frog (Rana clamitans) tadpoles delayed their metamorphosis relative to unirradiated controls. Previous pathogenic bacterial infections recurred in irradiated animals prior to metamorphic climax. Limited mortality occurred during metamorphic climax, 80-105 days after irradiation

  19. Bacterial Infection as a Likely Cause of Adverse Reactions to Polyacrylamide Hydrogel Fillers in Cosmetic Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, Lise; Breiting, Vibeke; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Eickhardt, Steffen; Høgdall, Estrid; Janssen, Martin; Pallua, Norbert; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The etiology of long-lasting adverse reactions to gel fillers used in cosmetic surgery is not known. Bacterial infection and immunological reaction to the product have been suggested. Methods. We performed a case-control study, with 77 biopsies and 30 cytology specimens originating from

  20. The effect of HIV infection on the host response to bacterial sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, Michaëla A. M.; Grobusch, Martin P.; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV. HIV causes increased susceptibility to invasive infections and affects sepsis pathogenesis caused by pre-existing activation and exhaustion of the immune system. We review the effect of HIV on different

  1. Jamming bacterial communications: new strategies to combat bacterial infections and the development of biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givskov, Michael Christian; Hentzer, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The growth and activity of microorganisms affect our lives in both positive and negative ways. We have, since early times, tried to combat unwanted microbes and utilize those expressing useful traits. Microorganisms can cause diseases and chronic infections in humans, animals, and plants. In medi......The growth and activity of microorganisms affect our lives in both positive and negative ways. We have, since early times, tried to combat unwanted microbes and utilize those expressing useful traits. Microorganisms can cause diseases and chronic infections in humans, animals, and plants...... with surfaces and we as scientists must therefore turn our attention to this sessile mode of growth (33). It appears that the ability to form surface-associated, structured and cooperative consortia (referred to as biofilms) is one of the most remarkable and ubiquitous characteristics of bacteria (12...

  2. Clinical features of the course of localized and generalized bacterial infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Murhina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sepsis continues to be one of the most urgent problems of our time, as there is a tendency to an increase in the incidence and consistently high mortality. Objective: to study the clinical features of the course of bacterial infections in children. Materials and methods. 115 children with generalized and localized forms of bacterial infection were examined. The main group (47 children — children with sepsis, the comparison group (68 children — with a localized bacterial infection. Age of children was from 1 month to 18 years. Distribution to groups was carried out by the presence of signs of systemic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS and organ dysfunction. Results. The study found that the level and duration of the main symptoms of SIRS (hyperthermia, tachycardia and tachypnoe were statistically significantly higher in the sepsis group. With increasing signs of SIRS and the development of septic shock, the duration and severity of the clinical signs of SIRS increased in direct proportion. Tachycardia almost always (93 % accompanies the development of sepsis, while localized bacterial infections occur in only a third of children. 40 % of children with sepsis require oxygen therapy. Signs of SIRS are greater in children with localization of the bacterial focus in the ENT and chest cavity, while with central nervous system infection, they passed most quickly. In inotropic support, children with a primary outbreak in ENT were most in need — 44.4 % of cases, children with localization of the focus of bacterial infection in the abdominal cavity did not demand it at all. The average length of stay in the department of intensive care in the children of the comparison group was 5.14 days (95% confidence interval (CI 4.42–5.87, and in children of the main group — 13.1 days (95% CI 9.16–17, which was 2.5 times higher (p < 0.01. Conclusions. The indicator and duration of the main manifestations of SIRS (hyperthermia, tachycardia

  3. Biomarkers and bacterial pneumonia risk in patients with treated HIV infection: a case-control study.

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    Sonja M Bjerk

    Full Text Available Despite advances in HIV treatment, bacterial pneumonia continues to cause considerable morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Studies of biomarker associations with bacterial pneumonia risk in treated HIV-infected patients do not currently exist.We performed a nested, matched, case-control study among participants randomized to continuous combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial. Patients who developed bacterial pneumonia (cases and patients without bacterial pneumonia (controls were matched 1∶1 on clinical center, smoking status, age, and baseline cART use. Baseline levels of Club Cell Secretory Protein 16 (CC16, Surfactant Protein D (SP-D, C-reactive protein (hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and d-dimer were compared between cases and controls.Cases (n = 72 and controls (n = 72 were 25.7% female, 51.4% black, 65.3% current smokers, 9.7% diabetic, 36.1% co-infected with Hepatitis B/C, and 75.0% were on cART at baseline. Median (IQR age was 45 (41, 51 years with CD4+ count of 553 (436, 690 cells/mm(3. Baseline CC16 and SP-D were similar between cases and controls, but hsCRP was significantly higher in cases than controls (2.94 µg/mL in cases vs. 1.93 µg/mL in controls; p = 0.02. IL-6 and d-dimer levels were also higher in cases compared to controls, though differences were not statistically significant (p-value 0.06 and 0.10, respectively.In patients with cART-treated HIV infection, higher levels of systemic inflammatory markers were associated with increased bacterial pneumonia risk, while two pulmonary-specific inflammatory biomarkers, CC16 and SP-D, were not associated with bacterial pneumonia risk.

  4. Besifloxacin: a novel anti-infective for the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis

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    Timothy L Comstock

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Timothy L Comstock1, Paul M Karpecki2, Timothy W Morris3, Jin-Zhong Zhang41Global Medical Affairs, Pharmaceuticals, Bausch and Lomb, Inc., Rochester, NY, USA; 2Koffler Vision Group, Lexington, KY, USA; 3Research and Development Microbiology and Sterilization Sciences, Bausch and Lomb, Inc., Rochester, NY, USA; 4Global Preclinical Development, Bausch and Lomb, Inc., Rochester, NY, USAAbstract: Bacterial conjunctivitis, commonly known as pink eye, is demographically unbiased in its prevalence and can be caused by a variety of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Timely empiric treatment with a broad-spectrum anti-infective, such as a topical fluoroquinolone, is critical in preventing potentially irreversible ocular damage. However, the rise in ocular methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates and the patterns of fluoroquinolone resistance for patients with other ocular bacterial infections mandate the need for new agents targeted for ocular use. Besifloxacin, a novel broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone, is approved for the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis. It has a uniquely balanced dual-targeting activity that inhibits both DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and is associated with a lower incidence of resistance development. Besifloxacin is not marketed in other formulations, ensuring that its exposure is limited to bacterial populations in and around the eye. This specifically precludes any bacterial exposure to besifloxacin resulting from systemic use, which further reduces the likelihood of emergence of bacterial resistance. In vitro, besifloxacin has demonstrated equivalent or superior activity compared with other commonly used topical antibiotics. In clinical trials, besifloxacin has consistently demonstrated efficacy and safety in the treatment of patients with bacterial conjunctivitis. Besifloxacin is considered safe and is well tolerated with no observed contraindications.Keywords: conjunctivitis, fluoroquinolones, besifloxacin

  5. Neutralization of MMP-2 protects Staphylococcus aureus infection induced septic arthritis in mice and regulates the levels of cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Sahin; Adhikary, Rana; Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2016-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are crucial players in Staphylococcus aureus mediated synovial tissue destruction in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis. Bacterial insult increases proteolytic matrix fragments by activated chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts leading to induction of matrix metalloproteinases. Tissue destruction via MMPs induced by bacterial products, necrotic tissues and proinflammatory cytokines have been reported. Cytokines like TNF-α, IL-1β released from host cells in response to S. aureus infection promote cartilage degradation by stimulating the production of MMPs. Antibiotic treatment can eradicate invading bacteria but elevated levels of cytokines and cytokines induced MMPs activation lead to progressive and devastating bone and cartilage destruction even after bacterial clearance. Like other MMPs, MMP-2 also contributes to extracellular matrix degradation in different types of arthritis. Release of certain pro inflammatory cytokines can also be regulated by MMP-2 activation leading to further tissue destruction. The role of MMP-2 in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection induced septic arthritis and its influence on cytokines regulation needs further investigation. Whether neutralization of MMP-2 provides protection against Staphylococcus aureus infection induced septic arthritis in mice is an obvious question. Here we reported that neutralization of MMP-2 during S. aureus infection induced septic arthritis might be beneficial for preventing infection induced extracellular matrix destruction thereby decreasing bacterial burden in synovial tissues and regulating inflammatory cytokines in arthritic mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcriptional profiling at different sites in lungs of pigs during acute bacterial respiratory infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Shila; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Hedegaard, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The local transcriptional response was studied in different locations of lungs from pigs experimentally infected with the respiratory pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5B, using porcine cDNA microarrays. This infection gives rise to well-demarcated infection loci in the lung, char...... of induced genes as, in unaffected areas a large part of differently expressed genes were involved in systemic reactions to infections, while differently expressed genes in necrotic areas were mainly concerned with homeostasis regulation....

  7. Candida albicans infection of Caenorhabditis elegans induces antifungal immune defenses.

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    Read Pukkila-Worley

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans yeast cells are found in the intestine of most humans, yet this opportunist can invade host tissues and cause life-threatening infections in susceptible individuals. To better understand the host factors that underlie susceptibility to candidiasis, we developed a new model to study antifungal innate immunity. We demonstrate that the yeast form of C. albicans establishes an intestinal infection in Caenorhabditis elegans, whereas heat-killed yeast are avirulent. Genome-wide, transcription-profiling analysis of C. elegans infected with C. albicans yeast showed that exposure to C. albicans stimulated a rapid host response involving 313 genes (124 upregulated and 189 downregulated, ~1.6% of the genome many of which encode antimicrobial, secreted or detoxification proteins. Interestingly, the host genes affected by C. albicans exposure overlapped only to a small extent with the distinct transcriptional responses to the pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that there is a high degree of immune specificity toward different bacterial species and C. albicans. Furthermore, genes induced by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were strongly over-represented among the genes downregulated during C. albicans infection, suggesting that in response to fungal pathogens, nematodes selectively repress the transcription of antibacterial immune effectors. A similar phenomenon is well known in the plant immune response, but has not been described previously in metazoans. Finally, 56% of the genes induced by live C. albicans were also upregulated by heat-killed yeast. These data suggest that a large part of the transcriptional response to C. albicans is mediated through "pattern recognition," an ancient immune surveillance mechanism able to detect conserved microbial molecules (so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns or PAMPs. This study provides new information on the evolution and regulation of the innate

  8. Technetium-99m labelled antimicrobial peptides discriminate between bacterial infections and sterile inflammations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welling, M.M.; Pauwels, E.K.J.; Paulusma-Annema, A.; Nibbering, P.H.; Balter, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to select technetium-99m labelled peptides that can discriminate between bacterial infections and sterile inflammations. For this purpose, we first assessed the binding of various 99m Tc-labelled natural or synthetic peptides, which are based on the sequence of the human antimicrobial peptide ubiquicidin (UBI) or human lactoferrin (hLF), to bacteria and to leucocytes in vitro. In order to select peptides that preferentially bind to bacteria over host cells, radiolabelled peptides were injected into mice intraperitoneally infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) and the amount of radioactivity associated with the bacteria and with the leucocytes was quantitated. The next phase focussed on discrimination between bacterial infections and sterile inflammatory processes using 99m Tc-labelled peptides in mice intramuscularly infected with various bacteria (e.g. multi-drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and in animals that had been injected with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of bacterial origin to create a sterile inflammatory process. Also, we studied the distribution of 99m Tc-labelled UBI 29-41 and UBI 18-35 in rabbits having an experimental thigh muscle infection with K. pneumoniae and in rabbits injected with LPS. Based on the results of our in vitro and in vivo binding assays, two peptides, i.e. UBI 29-41 and UBI 18-35, were selected as possible candidates for infection imaging. The radiolabelled peptides can detect infections with both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in mice as early as 5-30 min after injection, with a target-to-non-target (T/NT) ratio between 2 and 3; maximum T/NT ratios were seen within 1 h after injection. In rabbits, high T/NT ratios (>5) for 99m Tc-labelled UBI 29-41 were observed from 1 h after injection. No accumulation of the selected 99m Tc-labelled UBI-derived peptides was observed in thighs of mice and rabbits previously injected with LPS. Scintigraphic investigation into the biodistribution of

  9. Synthetic Cationic Peptide IDR-1002 Provides Protection against Bacterial Infections through Chemokine Induction and Enhanced Leukocyte Recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Madera, Laurence; Ma, Shuhua

    2010-01-01

    , an immunomodulatory peptide IDR-1002 was selected from a library of bactenecin derivatives based on its substantially more potent ability to induce chemokines in human PBMCs. The enhanced chemokine induction activity of the peptide in vitro correlated with stronger protective activity in vivo in the Staphylococcus......With the rapid rise in the incidence of multidrug resistant infections, there is substantial interest in host defense peptides as templates for production of new antimicrobial therapeutics. Natural peptides are multifunctional mediators of the innate immune response, with some direct antimicrobial...... aureus-invasive infection model, with a >5-fold reduction in the protective dose in direct comparison with IDR-1. IDR-1002 also afforded protection against the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli. Chemokine induction by IDR-1002 was found to be mediated through a Gi-coupled receptor...

  10. RIG-I detects infection with live Listeria by sensing secreted bacterial nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Zeinab; Schlee, Martin; Roth, Susanne; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Barchet, Winfried; Böttcher, Jan; Hain, Torsten; Geiger, Sergej; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Fritz, Jörg H; Civril, Filiz; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Kurts, Christian; Ruland, Jürgen; Hartmann, Gunther; Chakraborty, Trinad; Knolle, Percy A

    2012-01-01

    Immunity against infection with Listeria monocytogenes is not achieved from innate immune stimulation by contact with killed but requires viable Listeria gaining access to the cytosol of infected cells. It has remained ill-defined how such immune sensing of live Listeria occurs. Here, we report that efficient cytosolic immune sensing requires access of nucleic acids derived from live Listeria to the cytoplasm of infected cells. We found that Listeria released nucleic acids and that such secreted bacterial RNA/DNA was recognized by the cytosolic sensors RIG-I, MDA5 and STING thereby triggering interferon β production. Secreted Listeria nucleic acids also caused RIG-I-dependent IL-1β-production and inflammasome activation. The signalling molecule CARD9 contributed to IL-1β production in response to secreted nucleic acids. In conclusion, cytosolic recognition of secreted bacterial nucleic acids by RIG-I provides a mechanistic explanation for efficient induction of immunity by live bacteria. PMID:23064150

  11. Traditional insulin-use practices and the incidence of bacterial contamination and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, L M; Bingham, P R; Riddle, M C

    1984-01-01

    While complex procedures are usually recommended to prevent infection at insulin injection sites, adherence to these procedures is imperfect and their value incompletely established. Among 254 adult insulin users in two clinic populations, the reported prevalence of complete performance of four traditional insulin-use practices (handwashing, vial prep, skin prep, discarding of plastic syringes after one use) was 29%, and none of the individual practices considered was performed regularly by more than two-thirds of the subjects. Even so, there was no infection at 2828 injection sites, and there was no significant bacterial contamination of insulin or syringes. These findings fail to support the view that traditional practices provide protection to insulin users against infection or bacterial growth in insulin or syringes. The authors suggest that modification of traditional teaching methods would do no harm, and that benefits could include financial savings, improved client success with self-care, and enhanced health care provider credibility.

  12. A new cytogenetic mechanism for bacterial endosymbiont-induced parthenogenesis in Hymenoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi-Hagimori, Tetsuya; Miura, Kazuki; Stouthamer, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Vertically transmitted endosymbiotic bacteria, such as Wolbachia, Cardinium and Rickettsia, modify host reproduction in several ways to facilitate their own spread. One such modification results in parthenogenesis induction, where males, which are unable to transmit the bacteria, are not produced. In Hymenoptera, the mechanism of diploidization due to Wolbachia infection, known as gamete duplication, is a post-meiotic modification. During gamete duplication, the meiotic mechanism is normal, but in the first mitosis the anaphase is aborted. The two haploid sets of chromosomes do not separate and thus result in a single nucleus containing two identical sets of haploid chromosomes. Here, we outline an alternative cytogenetic mechanism for bacterial endosymbiont-induced parthenogenesis in Hymenoptera. During female gamete formation in Rickettsia-infected Neochrysocharis formosa (Westwood) parasitoids, meiotic cells undergo only a single equational division followed by the expulsion of a single polar body. This absence of meiotic recombination and reduction corresponds well with a non-segregation pattern in the offspring of heterozygous females. We conclude that diploidy in N. formosa is maintained through a functionally apomictic cloning mechanism that differs entirely from the mechanism induced by Wolbachia. PMID:18713719

  13. Bacterial Infections across the Ants: Frequency and Prevalence of Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, and Asaia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Kautz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial endosymbionts are common across insects, but we often lack a deeper knowledge of their prevalence across most organisms. Next-generation sequencing approaches can characterize bacterial diversity associated with a host and at the same time facilitate the fast and simultaneous screening of infectious bacteria. In this study, we used 16S rRNA tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing to survey bacterial communities of 310 samples representing 221 individuals, 176 colonies and 95 species of ants. We found three distinct endosymbiont groups—Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria: Rickettsiales, Spiroplasma (Firmicutes: Entomoplasmatales, and relatives of Asaia (Alphaproteobacteria: Rhodospirillales—at different infection frequencies (at the ant species level: 22.1%, 28.4%, and 14.7%, resp. and relative abundances within bacterial communities (1.0%–99.9%. Spiroplasma was particularly enriched in the ant genus Polyrhachis, while Asaia relatives were most prevalent in arboreal ants of the genus Pseudomyrmex. While Wolbachia and Spiroplasma have been surveyed in ants before, Asaia, an acetic acid bacterium capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen, has received much less attention. Due to sporadic prevalence across all ant taxa investigated, we hypothesize facultative associations for all three bacterial genera. Infection patterns are discussed in relation to potential adaptation of specific bacteria in certain ant groups.

  14. Combinations of bacterial species associated with symptomatic endodontic infections in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Z; Cao, H; Jiang, H; Zhao, J; Tang, Z

    2016-01-01

    To use microarrays to detect 11 selected bacteria in infected root canals, revealing bacterial combinations that are associated with clinical symptoms and signs of primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population. DNA was extracted from 90 samples collected from the root canals of teeth with primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population, and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were hybridized to microarrays containing specific oligonucleotide probes targeting 11 species, and the arrays were screened with a confocal laser scanner. Pearson's chi-squared test and cluster analysis were performed to investigate the associations between the bacterial combinations and clinical symptoms and signs using SAS 8.02. Seventy-seven samples (86%) yielded at least one of the 11 target species. Parvimonas micra (56%), Porphyromonas endodontalis (51%), Tannerella forsythia (48%), Prevotella intermedia (44%) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (37%) were the most prevalent taxa and were often concomitant. The following positive associations were found between the bacterial combinations and clinical features: P. endodontalis and T. forsythia with abscess; P. gingivalis and P. micra with sinus tract; P. gingivalis and P. endodontalis or P. micra and P. endodontalis with abscess and sinus tract; and the combination of P. endodontalis, P. micra, T. forsythia and P. gingivalis with sinus tract (P endodontic origin with bacterial synergism in a Chinese population. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Use of Multiplex PCR for Diagnosis of Bacterial Infection Respiratory Mixed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-ssum, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical bacteria grow very slowly in culture or they do not grow at all leading to delays in detection and diagnosis. PCR multiplex was performed on template DNAs extracted from seventy three collected specimens. Thirty seven showed positive indication for the presence of bacterial infection. The incidence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumonia and Legionella pneumophila as a single infecting agent was 31.5%, 27.5% and 20 % respectively. Dual agent infection caused by Mycoplasma + Chlamydia, Mycoplasma + Legionella and Legionella + Chlamydia was 24%, 20% and 15% respectively. Triple agent infection caused by Legionella + Mycoplasma + Chlamydia was 17.5%. The etiology of the infection was M. pneumoniae, L. pneumophila or C. pneumoniae as a single etiology or in combination of two or three organisms.

  16. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, Eric; Biek, Donald; Jandourek, Alena; Mawal, Yogesh; Riccobene, Todd; Friedland, H David

    2014-03-01

    Skin infections have traditionally been classified by the US FDA as uncomplicated and complicated. In August 2010, the FDA released a new guidance document for the development of drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and this was updated in 2013. Several new issues were addressed and henceforth skin infections in clinical trials were termed ABSSSI. In the USA, the annual prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-related skin infections have continuously increased from 32.7% in 1998 to 53.8% in 2007. Ceftaroline fosamil is the only cephalosporin approved in the USA for monotherapy treatment of ABSSSI including infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil was shown in the CANVAS clinical trials. The CANVAS Day-3 analyses met an earlier, primary efficacy time point requested by the FDA. Ceftaroline has minimal drug-drug interactions, is well tolerated and possesses the safety profile associated with the cephalosporin class.

  17. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed.

  18. Bacterial infections in horses: a retrospective study at the University Equine Clinic of Bern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchaud, Y; Gerber, V; Rossano, A; Perreten, V

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial infections present a major challenge in equine medicine. Therapy should be based on bacteriological diagnosis to successfully minimize the increasing number of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The present study is a retrospective analysis of bacteriological results from purulent infections in horses admitted at the University Equine Clinic of Bern from 2004 to 2008. From 378 samples analyzed, 557 isolates were identified, of which Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus and coliforms were the most common. Special attention was paid to infections with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ST398 and a non-MRSA, multidrug-resistant S. aureus clone ST1 (BERN100). Screening of newly-admitted horses showed that 2.2 % were carriers of MRSA. Consequent hygiene measures taken at the Clinic helped to overcome a MRSA outbreak and decrease the number of MRSA infections.

  19. Bacterial infections in Lilongwe, Malawi: aetiology and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoka, Mwai H; Miller, William C; Hoffman, Irving F; Cholera, Rushina; Gilligan, Peter H; Kamwendo, Debbie; Malunga, Gabriel; Joaki, George; Martinson, Francis; Hosseinipour, Mina C

    2012-03-21

    Life-threatening infections present major challenges for health systems in Malawi and the developing world because routine microbiologic culture and sensitivity testing are not performed due to lack of capacity. Use of empirical antimicrobial therapy without regular microbiologic surveillance is unable to provide adequate treatment in the face of emerging antimicrobial resistance. This study was conducted to determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in order to inform treatment choices and generate hospital-wide baseline data. Culture and susceptibility testing was performed on various specimens from patients presenting with possible infectious diseases at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. Between July 2006 and December 2007 3104 specimens from 2458 patients were evaluated, with 60.1% from the adult medical service. Common presentations were sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and abscess. An etiologic agent was detected in 13% of patients. The most common organisms detected from blood cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella species and Streptococcus pneumoniae, whereas Streptococcus pneumoniae and Cryptococcus neoformans were most frequently detected from cerebrospinal fluid. Haemophilus influenzae was rarely isolated. Resistance to commonly used antibiotics was observed in up to 80% of the isolates while antibiotics that were not commonly in use maintained susceptibility. There is widespread resistance to almost all of the antibiotics that are empirically used in Malawi. Antibiotics that have not been widely introduced in Malawi show better laboratory performance. Choices for empirical therapy in Malawi should be revised accordingly. A microbiologic surveillance system should be established and prudent use of antimicrobials promoted to improve patient care.

  20. Prevalence of Bacterial Vaginosis and Associated Risk Factors among Women Complaining of Genital Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adane Bitew

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bacterial vaginosis is a global concern due to the increased risk of acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. Objectives. To determine the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and bacteria causing aerobic vaginitis. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 210 patients between September 2015 and July 2016 at St. Paul’s Hospital. Gram-stained vaginal swabs were examined microscopically and graded as per Nugent’s procedure. Bacteria causing aerobic vaginitis were characterized, and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was determined. Results. The overall prevalence of bacterial vaginosis was 48.6%. Bacterial vaginosis was significantly associated with number of pants used per day (p=0.001 and frequency of vaginal bathing (p=0.045. Of 151 bacterial isolates, 69.5% were Gram-negative and 30.5% were Gram-positive bacteria. The overall drug resistance level of Gram-positive bacteria was high against penicillin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. Cefoxitin and tobramycin were the most active drugs against Gram-positive bacteria. The overall drug resistance level of Gram-negative bacteria was high against tetracycline, ampicillin, and amoxicillin. Amikacin and tobramycin were the most active drugs against Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusions. The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis was high and was affected by individual hygiene. Routine culture of vaginal samples should be performed on patients with vaginitis and the drug susceptibility pattern of each isolate should be determined.

  1. Bacterial effector NleL promotes enterohemorrhagic E. coli-induced attaching and effacing lesions by ubiquitylating and inactivating JNK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiangpeng; You, Qing; Zhu, Hongnian; Chang, ZeNan; Li, Qingrun; Wang, Haifeng; Wang, Chen; Wang, Hongyan; Hui, Lijian; Du, Chongtao; Xie, Xiaoduo; Zeng, Rong; Lin, Anning; Shi, Dongfang; Ruan, Kangcheng; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George Fu; Shao, Feng; Hu, Ronggui

    2017-07-01

    As a major diarrheagenic human pathogen, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) produce attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions, characterized by the formation of actin pedestals, on mammalian cells. A bacterial T3SS effector NleL from EHEC O157:H7 was recently shown to be a HECT-like E3 ligase in vitro, but its biological functions and host targets remain elusive. Here, we report that NleL is required to effectively promote EHEC-induced A/E lesions and bacterial infection. Furthermore, human c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs) were identified as primary substrates of NleL. NleL-induced JNK ubiquitylation, particularly mono-ubiquitylation at the Lys 68 residue of JNK, impairs JNK's interaction with an upstream kinase MKK7, thus disrupting JNK phosphorylation and activation. This subsequently suppresses the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1), which modulates the formation of the EHEC-induced actin pedestals. Moreover, JNK knockdown or inhibition in host cells complements NleL deficiency in EHEC infection. Thus, we demonstrate that the effector protein NleL enhances the ability of EHEC to infect host cells by targeting host JNK, and elucidate an inhibitory role of ubiquitylation in regulating JNK phosphorylation.

  2. Bacterial effector NleL promotes enterohemorrhagic E. coli-induced attaching and effacing lesions by ubiquitylating and inactivating JNK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangpeng Sheng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As a major diarrheagenic human pathogen, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC produce attaching and effacing (A/E lesions, characterized by the formation of actin pedestals, on mammalian cells. A bacterial T3SS effector NleL from EHEC O157:H7 was recently shown to be a HECT-like E3 ligase in vitro, but its biological functions and host targets remain elusive. Here, we report that NleL is required to effectively promote EHEC-induced A/E lesions and bacterial infection. Furthermore, human c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs were identified as primary substrates of NleL. NleL-induced JNK ubiquitylation, particularly mono-ubiquitylation at the Lys 68 residue of JNK, impairs JNK's interaction with an upstream kinase MKK7, thus disrupting JNK phosphorylation and activation. This subsequently suppresses the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1, which modulates the formation of the EHEC-induced actin pedestals. Moreover, JNK knockdown or inhibition in host cells complements NleL deficiency in EHEC infection. Thus, we demonstrate that the effector protein NleL enhances the ability of EHEC to infect host cells by targeting host JNK, and elucidate an inhibitory role of ubiquitylation in regulating JNK phosphorylation.

  3. Bacterial infections in Lilongwe, Malawi: aetiology and antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoka Mwai H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Life-threatening infections present major challenges for health systems in Malawi and the developing world because routine microbiologic culture and sensitivity testing are not performed due to lack of capacity. Use of empirical antimicrobial therapy without regular microbiologic surveillance is unable to provide adequate treatment in the face of emerging antimicrobial resistance. This study was conducted to determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in order to inform treatment choices and generate hospital-wide baseline data. Methods Culture and susceptibility testing was performed on various specimens from patients presenting with possible infectious diseases at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. Results Between July 2006 and December 2007 3104 specimens from 2458 patients were evaluated, with 60.1% from the adult medical service. Common presentations were sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and abscess. An etiologic agent was detected in 13% of patients. The most common organisms detected from blood cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella species and Streptococcus pneumoniae, whereas Streptococcus pneumoniae and Cryptococcus neoformans were most frequently detected from cerebrospinal fluid. Haemophilus influenzae was rarely isolated. Resistance to commonly used antibiotics was observed in up to 80% of the isolates while antibiotics that were not commonly in use maintained susceptibility. Conclusions There is widespread resistance to almost all of the antibiotics that are empirically used in Malawi. Antibiotics that have not been widely introduced in Malawi show better laboratory performance. Choices for empirical therapy in Malawi should be revised accordingly. A microbiologic surveillance system should be established and prudent use of antimicrobials promoted to improve patient care.

  4. Persistent gut barrier damage and commensal bacterial influx following eradication of Giardia infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies of Giardia lamblia outbreaks have indicated that 40–80% of infected patients experience long-lasting functional gastrointestinal disorders after parasitic clearance. Our aim was to assess changes in the intestinal barrier and spatial distribution of commensal bacteria in the post-clearance phase of Giardia infection. Methods Mice were orogastrically inoculated with G. lamblia trophozoites (strain GS/M) or pair-fed with saline and were sacrificed on post-infective (PI) days 7 (colonization phase) and 35 (post-clearance phase). Gut epithelial barrier function was assessed by Western blotting for occludin cleavage and luminal-to-serosal macromolecular permeability. Gut-associated, superficial adherent, and mucosal endocytosed bacteria were measured by agar culturing and were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Intracellular bacteria cultured from isolated mucosal cells were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing. Neutrophil-specific esterase staining, a myeloperoxidase activity assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for cytokine concentrations were used to verify intestinal tissue inflammation. Results Tight junctional damage was detected in the intestinal mucosa of Giardia-infected mice on PI days 7 and 35. Although intestinal bacterial overgrowth was evident only during parasite colonization (PI day 7), enhanced mucosal adherence and endocytosis of bacteria were observed on PI days 7 and 35. Multiple bacterial strains, including Bacillus, Lactobacillus, Staphylococcus, and Phenylobacterium, penetrated the gut mucosa in the post-infective phase. The mucosal influx of bacteria coincided with increases in neutrophil infiltration and myeloperoxidase activity on PI days 7 and 35. Elevated intestinal IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-1β levels also were detected on PI day 35. Conclusions Giardia-infected mice showed persistent tight junctional damage and bacterial penetration, accompanied by mucosal inflammation, after parasite clearance

  5. Population pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Scott A; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Rubino, Christopher M; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Riccobene, Todd; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-11-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of ceftaroline fosamil, is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic. A population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model for ceftaroline was developed in NONMEM® using data from 185 healthy subjects and 92 patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI). Data from 128 patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were used for external model validation. Healthy subjects received 50-2,000 mg ceftaroline fosamil via intravenous (IV) infusion over 1 hour or intramuscular (IM) injection q12h or q24h. ABSSSI and CABP patients received 600 mg of ceftaroline fosamil IV over 1 hour q12h. A three-compartment model with zero-order IV or parallel first-order IM input and first-order elimination described ceftaroline fosamil PK. A two-compartment model with first-order conversion of prodrug to ceftaroline and parallel linear and saturable elimination described ceftaroline PK. Creatinine clearance was the primary determinant of ceftaroline exposure. Good agreement between the observed data and both population (r(2)  = 0.93) and individual post-hoc (r(2)  = 0.98) predictions suggests the PPK model can adequately approximate ceftaroline PK using covariate information. Such a PPK model can evaluate dose adjustments for patients with renal impairment and generate ceftaroline exposures for use in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessments of efficacy in patients with ABSSSI or CABP. © 2013, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  6. Infections and infestations of the gastrointestinal tract. Part 1: Bacterial, viral and fungal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, R., E-mail: rakslide@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Radiology, South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust, Warwick (United Kingdom); Rajesh, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Rawat, S. [Department of Radiology, Ruby Hall Clinic, Pune (India); Rajiah, P. [Imaging Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ramachandran, I. [Department of Clinical Radiology, South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust, Warwick (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the imaging findings of various infections affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Barium examinations, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonography all play an important role in the diagnostic workup of gastrointestinal tract infections. Knowledge of differential diagnosis, sites of involvement, and typical imaging features of different infections can help in accurate diagnosis and guide treatment.

  7. Diagnostic Test Accuracy of a 2-Transcript Host RNA Signature for Discriminating Bacterial vs Viral Infection in Febrile Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberg, Jethro A; Kaforou, Myrsini; Wright, Victoria J; Shailes, Hannah; Eleftherohorinou, Hariklia; Hoggart, Clive J; Cebey-López, Miriam; Carter, Michael J; Janes, Victoria A; Gormley, Stuart; Shimizu, Chisato; Tremoulet, Adriana H; Barendregt, Anouk M; Salas, Antonio; Kanegaye, John; Pollard, Andrew J; Faust, Saul N; Patel, Sanjay; Kuijpers, Taco; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Burns, Jane C; Coin, Lachlan J M; Levin, Michael

    Because clinical features do not reliably distinguish bacterial from viral infection, many children worldwide receive unnecessary antibiotic treatment, while bacterial infection is missed in others. To identify a blood RNA expression signature that distinguishes bacterial from viral infection in febrile children. Febrile children presenting to participating hospitals in the United Kingdom, Spain, the Netherlands, and the United States between 2009-2013 were prospectively recruited, comprising a discovery group and validation group. Each group was classified after microbiological investigation as having definite bacterial infection, definite viral infection, or indeterminate infection. RNA expression signatures distinguishing definite bacterial from viral infection were identified in the discovery group and diagnostic performance assessed in the validation group. Additional validation was undertaken in separate studies of children with meningococcal disease (n = 24) and inflammatory diseases (n = 48) and on published gene expression datasets. A 2-transcript RNA expression signature distinguishing bacterial infection from viral infection was evaluated against clinical and microbiological diagnosis. Definite bacterial and viral infection was confirmed by culture or molecular detection of the pathogens. Performance of the RNA signature was evaluated in the definite bacterial and viral group and in the indeterminate infection group. The discovery group of 240 children (median age, 19 months; 62% male) included 52 with definite bacterial infection, of whom 36 (69%) required intensive care, and 92 with definite viral infection, of whom 32 (35%) required intensive care. Ninety-six children had indeterminate infection. Analysis of RNA expression data identified a 38-transcript signature distinguishing bacterial from viral infection. A smaller (2-transcript) signature (FAM89A and IFI44L) was identified by removing highly correlated transcripts. When this 2-transcript

  8. [Epidemiology of nosocomial bacterial infection in a neonatal intensive care unit in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoulainine, F-M-R; Elidrissi, N-S; Chkil, G; Abba, F; Soraa, N; Chabaa, L; Amine, M; Aboussad, A

    2014-09-01

    In neonatal intensive care units, the incidence of nosocomial infection is high. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology of a nosocomial bacterial infection in the neonatal intensive care unit of Mohamed VI university hospital. A total of 702 newborns were included in this study. Of the 702 neonates studied, 91 had developed a nosocomial infection. The incidence rate was 13% and incidence density was 21.2 per 1000 patient-days. The types of infection were: bloodstream infections (89%), pneumonia (6.6%), meningitis (3.3%), and urinary tract infections (1.1%). Nosocomial infection was particularly frequent in cases of low birth weight, prematurity, young age at admission, umbilical venous catheter, and mechanical ventilation. Multiresistant bacteria included enterobacteria producing betalactamase (76.9%), especially enterobacteria that were dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae (39.7%). The mortality rate was 52.7% in nosocomial infections, 19 (20.87%) of whom had septic shock. The results of this study show that nosocomial infection is an intrahospital health problem that could be remedied by a prevention strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Induced mutations for bacterial leaf blight resistance in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, P.; Padmanabhan, S.Y.; Misra, S.N.

    1975-01-01

    Attempts were made for induction of resistance to bacterial leaf blight in some high yielding varieties through physical and chemical mutagens. Positive results could be obtained in Padma through NMU treatments. Further studies on the induction of bacterial leaf blight resistance in the varieties Sona and Vijaya indicated that it was possible to enhance the spectrum of variability in disease reaction by mutagenic treatments. The use of genotypes, possible enhancement of recombination frequencies through treatment of hybrids in the early generation, the choice of mutagen and the screening procedures for bacterial leaf blight resistance in rice are discussed. (author)

  10. Metabolic Requirements of Escherichia coli in Intracellular Bacterial Communities during Urinary Tract Infection Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Matt S; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria; Palermo, Joseph J; Hibbing, Michael E; Dodson, Karen W; Hultgren, Scott J

    2016-04-12

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary etiological agent of over 85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Mouse models of infection have shown that UPEC can invade bladder epithelial cells in a type 1 pilus-dependent mechanism, avoid a TLR4-mediated exocytic process, and escape into the host cell cytoplasm. The internalized UPEC can clonally replicate into biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) of thousands of bacteria while avoiding many host clearance mechanisms. Importantly, IBCs have been documented in urine from women and children suffering acute UTI. To understand this protected bacterial niche, we elucidated the transcriptional profile of bacteria within IBCs using microarrays. We delineated the upregulation within the IBC of genes involved in iron acquisition, metabolism, and transport. Interestingly, lacZ was highly upregulated, suggesting that bacteria were sensing and/or utilizing a galactoside for metabolism in the IBC. A ΔlacZ strain displayed significantly smaller IBCs than the wild-type strain and was attenuated during competitive infection with a wild-type strain. Similarly, a galK mutant resulted in smaller IBCs and attenuated infection. Further, analysis of the highly upregulated gene yeaR revealed that this gene contributes to oxidative stress resistance and type 1 pilus production. These results suggest that bacteria within the IBC are under oxidative stress and, consistent with previous reports, utilize nonglucose carbon metabolites. Better understanding of the bacterial mechanisms used for IBC development and establishment of infection may give insights into development of novel anti-virulence strategies. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections, impacting mostly women. Every year, millions of UTIs occur in the U.S. with most being caused by uropathogenic E. coli(UPEC). During a UTI, UPEC invade bladder cells and form an intracellular bacterial community

  11. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Narusaka

    Full Text Available Housaku Monogatari (HM is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods.

  12. Allergic Airway Inflammation Decreases Lung Bacterial Burden following Acute Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection in a Neutrophil- and CCL8-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulek, Daniel E.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Moore, Martin L.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2014-01-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infection, we developed a combined model in which allergic airway inflammation and lung IL-4 and IL-13 expression were induced by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge prior to acute lung infection with K. pneumoniae. We hypothesized that preexisting allergic airway inflammation decreases lung IL-17A expression and airway neutrophil recruitment in response to acute K. pneumoniae infection and thereby increases the lung K. pneumoniae burden. As hypothesized, we found that allergic airway inflammation decreased the number of K. pneumoniae-induced airway neutrophils and lung IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 expression. Despite the marked reduction in postinfection airway neutrophilia and lung expression of Th17 cytokines, allergic airway inflammation significantly decreased the lung K. pneumoniae burden and postinfection mortality. We showed that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden was independent of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17A and partially dependent on IL-13 and STAT6. Additionally, we demonstrated that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden associated with allergic airway inflammation was both neutrophil and CCL8 dependent. These findings suggest a novel role for CCL8 in lung antibacterial immunity against K. pneumoniae and suggest new mechanisms of orchestrating lung antibacterial immunity. PMID:24958709

  13. Hindlimb suspension and SPE-like radiation impairs clearance of bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghong Li

    Full Text Available A major risk of extended space travel is the combined effects of weightlessness and radiation exposure on the immune system. In this study, we used the hindlimb suspension model of microgravity that includes the other space stressors, situational and confinement stress and alterations in food intake, and solar particle event (SPE-like radiation to measure the combined effects on the ability to control bacterial infections. A massive increase in morbidity and decrease in the ability to control bacterial growth was observed using 2 different types of bacteria delivered by systemic and pulmonary routes in 3 different strains of mice. These data suggest that an astronaut exposed to a strong SPE during extended space travel is at increased risk for the development of infections that could potentially be severe and interfere with mission success and astronaut health.

  14. Critical appraisal of ceftaroline in the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and skin infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman JJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Julian J Goodman, Stanley I MartinDivision of Infectious Diseases, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline is a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin ß-lactam antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA as well as multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae among other routine Gram positive and Gram negative organisms. It has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs. Ceftaroline is approved for treatment of ABSSSI due to MRSA, however currently there are no data for pneumonia due to MRSA in humans. Herein we review the major clinical trials as well as ceftaroline microbiology, pharmacokinetics, and safety, followed by a look at further directions for investigation of this new agent.Keywords: ceftaroline, pneumonia, skin infection

  15. CRISPR interference can prevent natural transformation and virulence acquisition during in vivo bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikard, David; Hatoum-Aslan, Asma; Mucida, Daniel; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2012-08-16

    Pathogenic bacterial strains emerge largely due to transfer of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes between bacteria, a process known as horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci of bacteria and archaea encode a sequence-specific defense mechanism against bacteriophages and constitute a programmable barrier to HGT. However, the impact of CRISPRs on the emergence of virulence is unknown. We programmed the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae with CRISPR sequences that target capsule genes, an essential pneumococcal virulence factor, and show that CRISPR interference can prevent transformation of nonencapsulated, avirulent pneumococci into capsulated, virulent strains during infection in mice. Further, at low frequencies bacteria can lose CRISPR function, acquire capsule genes, and mount a successful infection. These results demonstrate that CRISPR interference can prevent the emergence of virulence in vivo and that strong selective pressure for virulence or antibiotic resistance can lead to CRISPR loss in bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tachypleus lysate test for endotoxin in patients with Gram negative bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usawattanakul, W; Tharavanij, S; Limsuwan, A

    1979-03-01

    Amoebocyte lysate from the horseshoe crabs (Tachypleus gigas) which abounds in the Gulf of Thailand was used to detect endotoxin in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia, in patients with Gram-positive bacterial infections as well as in the control. The Tachypleus lysate test (TLT) was positive in 94.4% of 36 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia before initiation of antibiotic therapy. Only 4% of 50 healthy individuals were positive and all 7 patients with Gram-positive bacterial infections were negative. The threshold sensitivity of TLT was 0.625 micrograms endotoxin per ml of the plasma. In comparison with the commercial Limulus lysate test (LLT), the TLT was slightly more sensitive in exhibiting higher grade of reaction, eventhough the threshold sensitivity was the same.

  17. The Bacterial Effector HopX1 Targets JAZ Transcriptional Repressors to Activate Jasmonate Signaling and Promote Infection in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Boter, Marta; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chini, Andrea; Rathjen, John P.; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae is dependent on a type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of virulence effector proteins into the host cytoplasm, and the production of a number of toxins such as coronatine (COR), which is a mimic of the plant hormone jasmonate-isoleuce (JA-Ile). Inside the plant cell, effectors target host molecules to subvert the host cell physiology and disrupt defenses. However, despite the fact that elucidating effector action is essential to understanding bacterial pathogenesis, the molecular function and host targets of the vast majority of effectors remain largely unknown. Here, we found that effector HopX1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) 11528, a strain that does not produce COR, interacts with and promotes the degradation of JAZ proteins, a key family of JA-repressors. We show that hopX1 encodes a cysteine protease, activity that is required for degradation of JAZs by HopX1. HopX1 associates with JAZ proteins through its central ZIM domain and degradation occurs in a COI1-independent manner. Moreover, ectopic expression of HopX1 in Arabidopsis induces the expression of JA-dependent genes, represses salicylic acid (SA)-induced markers, and complements the growth of a COR-deficient P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 strain during natural bacterial infections. Furthermore, HopX1 promoted susceptibility when delivered by the natural type III secretion system, to a similar extent as the addition of COR, and this effect was dependent on its catalytic activity. Altogether, our results indicate that JAZ proteins are direct targets of bacterial effectors to promote activation of JA-induced defenses and susceptibility in Arabidopsis. HopX1 illustrates a paradigm of an alternative evolutionary solution to COR with similar physiological outcome. PMID:24558350

  18. Etiologic structure of bacterial intestinal infections in monkeys of Adler breeding center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardasheliya, S N; Kalashnikova, V A; Dzhikidze, E K

    2011-10-01

    We studied etiologic structure of bacterial intestinal infections in monkeys of Adler nursery. A total of 533 monkeys with diarrhea syndrome and monkeys dead from intestinal infections, as well as clinically healthy monkeys and animals dead from other pathologies were examined by bacteriological and molecular-genetic methods. Pathogenic enterobacteria Shigella and Salmonella and microaerophile Campylobacter were found in 5 and 19%, respectively. A high percentage (49%) of intestinal diseases of unknown etiology was revealed in monkeys. The fact that the number of detected opportunistic enterobacteria did not differ in healthy and diseased monkeys suggests that they are not involved into the etiology of intestinal disease.

  19. Primary role of electron work function for evaluation of nanostructured titania implant surface against bacterial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golda-Cepa, M., E-mail: golda@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Syrek, K. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Brzychczy-Wloch, M. [Department of Bacteriology, Microbial Ecology and Parasitology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Czysta 18, 31-121 Krakow (Poland); Sulka, G.D. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Kotarba, A., E-mail: kotarba@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    The electron work function as an essential descriptor for the evaluation of metal implant surfaces against bacterial infection is identified for the first time. Its validity is demonstrated on Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to nanostructured titania surfaces. The established correlation: work function–bacteria adhesion is of general importance since it can be used for direct evaluation of any electrically conductive implant surfaces. - Highlights: • The correlation between work function and bacteria adhesion was discovered. • The discovered correlation is rationalized in terms of electrostatic bacteria–surface repulsion. • The results provide basis for the simple evaluation of implant surfaces against infection.

  20. Review of oritavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Alejandra García Robles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess critically oritavancin, a second-generation lipoglycopeptide, for the treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Method: An evaluation report of oritavancin in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections was carried out according to the methodology of the Group for drug evaluation, standardization and research in drug selection of the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH1, with the MADRE 4.0 program. A search was made in PubMed, in the web www.clinicaltrials. gov, Embase, PubMed and UptoDate. The European Medication Agency and Food and Drug Administration evaluation reports were also used. Results: Single-dose oritavancin demonstrated its non-inferiority efficacy versus vancomycin in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure nfections, with a similar safety profile. Its potential advantage over other therapeutic alternatives lies in its administration in single dose and in its no need for plasma levels monitoring, which would allow its administration on an outpatient basis. Regarding to the other alternative possibilities of oral (linezolid, tedizolid or IM (teicoplanin treatment, oritavancin would improve the adherence to the treatment. Although oritavancin could be more efficient in certain scenarios (outpatient treatment versus inpatient treatment with alternatives, there are no convincing studies in this regard so far. On the other hand, alternative drugs above-mentioned, can also allow outpatient treatment, reducing advantages of oritavancin and further increasing cost differences. Therefore, given that the efficacy is similar to the alternatives, a cost minimization analysis could be considered. Conclusions: Oritavancin is comparable in terms of efficacy and safety to the existing alternatives in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections, without improvements in the cost

  1. Inflammatory Monocyte Recruitment Is Regulated by Interleukin-23 during Systemic Bacterial Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indramohan, Mohanalaxmi; Sieve, Amy N.; Break, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular pathogen that causes meningitis and septicemia in immunocompromised individuals and spontaneous abortion in pregnant women. The innate immune response against L. monocytogenes is primarily mediated by neutrophils and monocytes. Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is an important proinflammatory cytokine well known for its role in neutrophil recruitment in various infectious and autoimmune diseases. We have previously shown that IL-23 is required for host resistance against L. monocytogenes and for neutrophil recruitment to the liver, but not the spleen, during infection. Despite efficient neutrophil recruitment to the spleen, IL-23p19 knockout (KO) mice have an increased bacterial burden in this organ, suggesting that IL-23 may regulate the recruitment/function of another cell type to the spleen. In this study, we show that specific depletion of neutrophils abrogated the differences in bacterial burdens in the livers but not the spleens of C57BL/6 (B6) and IL-23p19 KO mice. Interestingly, L. monocytogenes-infected IL-23p19 KO mice had fewer monocytes in the spleen than B6 mice, as well as a reduction in the monocyte-recruiting chemokines CCL2 and CCL7. Additionally, the overall concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO•), as well as the percentages and total numbers of monocytes producing TNF-α and NO•, were reduced in IL-23p19 KO mice compared to levels in B6 mice, leading to increased bacterial burdens in the spleens of L. monocytogenes-infected IL-23p19 KO mice. Collectively, our data establish that IL-23 is required for the optimal recruitment of TNF-α- and NO•-producing inflammatory monocytes, thus revealing a novel mechanism by which this proinflammatory cytokine provides protection against bacterial infection. PMID:22966045

  2. A Perfect Storm: Increased Colonization and Failure of Vaccination Leads to Severe Secondary Bacterial Infection in Influenza Virus-Infected Obese Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik A. Karlsson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a risk factor for developing severe disease following influenza virus infection; however, the comorbidity of obesity and secondary bacterial infection, a serious complication of influenza virus infections, is unknown. To fill this gap in knowledge, lean and obese C57BL/6 mice were infected with a nonlethal dose of influenza virus followed by a nonlethal dose of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Strikingly, not only did significantly enhanced death occur in obese coinfected mice compared to lean controls, but also high mortality was seen irrespective of influenza virus strain, bacterial strain, or timing of coinfection. This result was unexpected, given that most influenza virus strains, especially seasonal human A and B viruses, are nonlethal in this model. Both viral and bacterial titers were increased in the upper respiratory tract and lungs of obese animals as early as days 1 and 2 post-bacterial infection, leading to a significant decrease in lung function. This increased bacterial load correlated with extensive cellular damage and upregulation of platelet-activating factor receptor, a host receptor central to pneumococcal invasion. Importantly, while vaccination of obese mice against either influenza virus or pneumococcus failed to confer protection, antibiotic treatment was able to resolve secondary bacterial infection-associated mortality. Overall, secondary bacterial pneumonia could be a widespread, unaddressed public health problem in an increasingly obese population.

  3. Use of procalcitonin for the prediction and treatment of acute bacterial infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Richard; Bigham, Michael T; Giuliano, John S

    2014-06-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is increasingly utilized to determine the presence of infection or to guide antibiotic therapy. This review will highlight the diagnostic and prognostic utility of serum PCT in children. Recent studies endorse the use of serum PCT to detect invasive infection, to differentiate sepsis from noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and to guide antibiotic therapy. Typical values for maximal sensitivity and specificity are less than 0.5  ng/ml for noninfectious inflammation and greater than 2.0  ng/ml for bacterial sepsis. PCT appears to be a reliable indicator of infection. PCT has performed better than C-reactive protein in some settings, though pediatric comparative data are lacking. PCT may aid in diagnosing infection in challenging patient populations such as those with sickle cell disease, congenital heart defects, neutropenia, and indwelling central venous catheters. Antibiotic therapy tailored to serial PCT measurements may shorten the antibiotic exposure without increasing treatment failure. PCT is a reliable serum marker for determining the presence or absence of invasive bacterial infection and response to antibiotic therapy. Tailoring antibiotics to PCT levels may reduce the duration of therapy without increasing treatment failure, but more research is needed in children.

  4. Evaluation of aztreonam and ampicillin vs. amikacin and ampicillin for treatment of neonatal bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaña, M A; Odio, C M; Castro, E; Salas, J L; McCracken, G H

    1990-03-01

    In a prospective randomized, open study we evaluated aztreonam (AZ) for treatment of neonatal bacterial infections. There were 147 patients enrolled in the study; 75 received AZ and ampicillin (AMP) and 72 amikacin (AM) and AMP (conventional therapy). Twenty-eight AZ/AMP-treated patients and 32 conventionally treated patients had bacteriologically documented infections caused by gram-negative enteric bacilli or Pseudomonas species. Treatment groups were comparable in age, clinical status, and type and severity of underlying disease at the time of enrollment. Bronchopneumonia and infections caused by Pseudomonas species occurred significantly more often in AM/AMP-treated patients compared with patients given AZ/AMP. Sepsis was documented in 83% of patients in each treatment group and Gram-negative enteric bacilli and Pseudomonas species were the principal pathogens. Median peak serum bactericidal titers against the etiologic agent were 1:64 for the AZ/AMP and 1:16 for AM/AMP-treated patients. Case fatality rates resulting from the primary infection were 7 and 22% (P = 0.011), superinfection occurred in 39% and 34% and treatment failure occurred in 7 and 28% (P = 0.036) of the AZ/AMP and AM/AMP-treated patients, respectively. No clinical adverse reactions were observed in either group. Based on these results aztreonam appears to be at least as effective as and possibly more effective than amikacin when used initially with ampicillin for empiric treatment of neonatal bacterial infections.

  5. Clinical characteristics, pathogens implicated and therapeutic outcomes of mixed infection in adult bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chen Tsai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed retrospectively the data for adult patients with bacterial meningitis over a period of 10.5 years in our hospital. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data of the 21 cases (52 strains of mixed infection were analyzed. Two hundred and fifteen cases of single pathogen adult bacterial meningitis (ABM were also included for comparison. Post-neurosurgical type of ABM was presented in 86% of the mixed infection group. Brain abscess was found in three patients. Fourteen patients survived and seven cases died. The analysis showed a statistical significance for the mixed infection group having a higher rate of nosocomially-acquired, post-neurosurgical condition, hydrocephalus, and lower level of cerebrospinal fluid white cell count, protein and lactate than the single pathogen group. Logistic regression analysis showed the independent factor of “hydrocephalus” (p = 0.002. Presence of hydrocephalus is a significant neuroimaging feature when compared with the single pathogen group. As compared with the previous study results of mixed infection in ABM, the present study showed a change of pathogens implicated of increasing Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. infections, and an emergence of anaerobic pathogens. All these changes deserve special attention because of the need for an appropriate choice of empirical antibiotics and choice of culture method.

  6. Identification of a human neonatal immune-metabolic network associated with bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire L; Dickinson, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Craigon, Marie; Ross, Alan; Khondoker, Mizanur R; France, Rebecca; Ivens, Alasdair; Lynn, David J; Orme, Judith; Jackson, Allan; Lacaze, Paul; Flanagan, Katie L; Stenson, Benjamin J; Ghazal, Peter

    2014-08-14

    Understanding how human neonates respond to infection remains incomplete. Here, a system-level investigation of neonatal systemic responses to infection shows a surprisingly strong but unbalanced homeostatic immune response; developing an elevated set-point of myeloid regulatory signalling and sugar-lipid metabolism with concomitant inhibition of lymphoid responses. Innate immune-negative feedback opposes innate immune activation while suppression of T-cell co-stimulation is coincident with selective upregulation of CD85 co-inhibitory pathways. By deriving modules of co-expressed RNAs, we identify a limited set of networks associated with bacterial infection that exhibit high levels of inter-patient variability. Whereas, by integrating immune and metabolic pathways, we infer a patient-invariant 52-gene-classifier that predicts bacterial infection with high accuracy using a new independent patient population. This is further shown to have predictive value in identifying infection in suspected cases with blood culture-negative tests. Our results lay the foundation for future translation of host pathways in advancing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neonatal sepsis.

  7. The effect of vacuum-assisted closure in bacterial clearance of the infected abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliakos, Ioannis; Michalopoulos, Nikolaos; Papavramidis, Theodossis S; Arampatzi, Stergiani; Diza-Mataftsi, Eudoxia; Papavramidis, Spiros

    2014-02-01

    Laparostomy with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) plays an important role in improving survival in the presence of abdominal infection. We conducted a study of the qualitative changes in the bacterial flora of the peritoneal cavity in patients with severe abdominal infection treated with laparostomy and a VAC device. Thirty-nine patients with severe abdominal infection treated with abdominal opening and VAC were registered in a clinical study. When an incidence of 53.8% of hospital-acquired peritoneal infection (HAPI) was found in the study patient population, it was decided to divide the patients in two groups according to whether or not they developed a HAPI. The patients' outcomes were then analyzed. The durations of abdominal opening (p=0.04), length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) (p=0.01), and of hospitalization (p=0.04) were significantly greater in patients with HAPI than in those without it, whereas mortality did not differ on the basis of these three variables. Superinfection is common in laparostomy done with a VAC device for managing severe abdominal infection. The data in the present study show that VAC does not alter the quality of the bacterial burden in primary abdominal contamination, nor does it seem to prevent a high incidence of HAPI. However, VAC is as effective in reducing mortality among patients with HAPI as among those without it.

  8. Legionella pneumophila infection of Drosophila S2 cells induces only minor changes in mitochondrial dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Wen Sun

    Full Text Available During infection of cells by Legionella pneumophila, the bacterium secretes a large number of effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm, allowing it to alter many cellular processes and make the vacuole and the host cell into more hospitable environments for bacterial replication. One major change induced by infection is the recruitment of ER-derived vesicles to the surface of the vacuole, where they fuse with the vacuole membrane and prevent it from becoming an acidified, degradative compartment. However, the recruitment of mitochondria to the region of the vacuole has also been suggested by ultrastructural studies. In order to test this idea in a controlled and quantitative experimental system, and to lay the groundwork for a genome-wide screen for factors involved in mitochondrial recruitment, we examined the behavior of mitochondria during the early stages of Legionella pneumophila infection of Drosophila S2 cells. We found that the density of mitochondria near vacuoles formed by infection with wild type Legionella was not different from that found in dotA(- mutant-infected cells during the first 4 hours after infection. We then examined 4 parameters of mitochondrial motility in infected cells: velocity of movement, duty cycle of movement, directional persistence and net direction. In the 4 hours following infection, most of these measures were indistinguishable between wild type and dotA(-.infection. However, wild type Legionella did induce a modest shift in the velocity distribution toward faster movement compared dotA(- infection, and a small downward shift in the duty cycle distribution. In addition, wild type infection produced mitochondrial movement that was biased in the direction of the bacterial vacuole relative to dotA-, although not enough to cause a significant accumulation within 10 um of the vacuole. We conclude that in this host cell, mitochondria are not strongly recruited to the vacuole, nor is their motility

  9. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Secondary to Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections or Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, Jose A.; Maggiore, Christy R.; Cole, Phillip; Smith, Alexander; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, H. David

    2014-01-01

    Background The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro? Utilization Registry is designed to collect information on the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in the Unites States. This report presents data on the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) secondary to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Methods Patients diagnosed with ABSSSI or CABP were identified through sequential review of rando...

  10. Norfloxacin and metronidazole topical formulations for effective treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Kamal; Malipeddi, Venkata Ramana; Madan, Jyotsna; Gupta, Gaurav; Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Awasthi, Rajendra; Kikuchi, Irene Satiko; De Jesus Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha

    2016-06-01

    Our various previous findings have shown the suitability of norfloxacin in the treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds in alone as well as in combination with Curcuma longa in various topical (ointments, gels, and creams) and transdermal drug delivery systems. Keeping these facts in consideration, we have made an another attempt to prepare semisolid formulations containing 1% w/w of norfloxacin and metronidazole with different bases like Carbopol, polyethylene glycol, and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose for effective treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds. The prepared formulations were evaluated for physicochemical parameters, in vitro drug release, antimicrobial activity, and burn wound healing properties. The prepared formulations were compared with Silver Sulfadiazine cream 1%, USP. Antimicrobial activity of norfloxacin semisolid formulations was found to be equally effective against both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in comparison to a marketed formulation of Silver Sulfadiazine 1% cream, USP. Based on the burn wound healing property, the prepared norfloxacin semisolid formulation was found to be in good agreement with marketed Silver Sulfadiazine 1% cream, USP. These findings suggest formulations containing norfloxacin and metronidazole may also prove as an effective alternative for existing remedies in the treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds.

  11. Emerging treatment options for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: focus on intravenous delafloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Righi E

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Elda Righi, Alessia Carnelutti, Antonio Vena, Matteo Bassetti Infectious Diseases Division, Santa Maria della Misericordia University Hospital, Udine, Italy Abstract: The increase in hospitalization due to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI caused by resistant pathogens supports the need for new treatment options. Antimicrobial options for ABSSSI that provide broad-spectrum coverage, including gram-negative pathogens and multidrug-resistant gram-positive bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, are limited. Delafloxacin is a novel fluoroquinolone available as intravenous and oral formulations and is characterized by an increased efficacy in acidic environments and activity on bacterial biofilm. Delafloxacin displays enhanced in vitro activity against MRSA, and enterococci, while maintaining efficacy against gram-negative pathogens and anaerobes. Delafloxacin has been studied for the treatment of ABSSSI and respiratory infections. Phase III studies have demonstrated noninferiority of delafloxacin compared to vancomycin, linezolid, tigecycline, and the combination of vancomycin plus aztreonam in the treatment of ABSSSI. Due to its favorable pharmacokinetic characteristics, the wide spectrum of action, and the potential for sequential therapy, delafloxacin represents a promising option in the empirical and targeted treatment of ABSSSI, both in hospital- and in community-based care. Keywords: bacterial skin and skin structure infections, multidrug-resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, delafloxacin

  12. Serious infection associated with induced abortion in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Angela

    2012-12-01

    Though serious infection after induced abortion is rare, infections account for one third of abortion-related deaths in the United States. Most fatal cases of infection after induced medical abortion have involved clostridial species. These reported cases share important clinical features that may guide clinicians to earlier recognition and institution of therapy. This article reviews our current knowledge regarding serious clostridial infections postabortion including the typical clinical presentation, pathophysiology, modes of diagnosis, and available treatment.

  13. IL-27 signaling compromises control of bacterial growth in mycobacteria-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, John E; Khader, Shabaana A; Solache, Alejandra; Gilmartin, Leigh; Ghilardi, Nico; deSauvage, Fred; Cooper, Andrea M

    2004-12-15

    Resistance to tuberculosis (TB) is dependent on the induction of Ag-specific CD4 Th1 T cells capable of expressing IFN-gamma. Generation of these T cells is dependent upon IL-12p70, yet other cytokines have also been implicated in this process. One such cytokine, IL-27, augments differentiation of naive T cells toward an IFN-gamma-producing phenotype by up-regulating the transcription factor T-bet and promoting expression of the IL-12Rbeta2 chain allowing T cells to respond to IL-12p70. We show that the components of IL-27 are induced during TB and that the absence of IL-27 signaling results in an altered disease profile. In the absence of the IL-27R, there is reduced bacterial burden and an increased lymphocytic character to the TB granuloma. Although the number of Ag-specific CD4 IFN-gamma-producing cells is unaffected by the absence of the IL-27R, there is a significant decrease in the level of mRNA for IFN-gamma and T-bet within the lungs of infected IL-27R(-/-) mice. Ag-specific CD4 T cells in the lungs of IL-27R(-/-) also produce less IFN-gamma protein per cell. The data show that expression of IL-27 during TB is detrimental to the control of bacteria and that although it does not affect the number of cells capable of producing IFN-gamma it does reduce the ability of CD4 T cells to produce large amounts of IFN-gamma. Because IFN-gamma is detrimental to the survival of effector T cells, we hypothesize that the reduced IFN-gamma within the IL-27R(-/-) lung is responsible for the increased accumulation of lymphocytes within the mycobacterial granuloma.

  14. Waddlia chondrophila induces systemic infection, organ pathology and elicits Th1-associated humoral immunity in a murine model of genital infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam eVasilevsky

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Waddlia chondrophila is a known bovine abortigenic Chlamydia-related bacterium that has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in human. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how W. chondrophila infection spreads, its ability to elicit an immune response and induce pathology. A murine model of genital infection was developed to investigate the pathogenicity and immune response associated with a W. chondrophila infection. Genital inoculation of the bacterial agent resulted in a dose-dependent infection that spread to lumbar lymph nodes and successively to spleen and liver. Bacterial-induced pathology peaked on day 14, characterized by leukocyte infiltration (uterine horn, liver and spleen, necrosis (liver and extramedullary hematopoiesis (spleen. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of a large number of W. chondrophila in the spleen on day 14. Robust IgG titers were detected by day 14 and remained high until day 52. IgG isotypes consisted of high IgG2a, moderate IgG3 and no detectable IgG1, indicating a Th1-associated immune response. This study provides the first evidence that W. chondrophila genital infection is capable of inducing a systemic infection that spreads to major organs, induces uterus, spleen and liver pathology and elicits a Th1-skewed humoral response. This new animal model will help our understanding of the mechanisms related to intracellular bacteria-induced miscarriages, the most frequent complication of pregnancy that affects one in four women.

  15. Waddlia chondrophila induces systemic infection, organ pathology, and elicits Th1-associated humoral immunity in a murine model of genital infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevsky, Sam; Gyger, Joel; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Pilloux, Ludovic; Greub, Gilbert; Stojanov, Milos; Baud, David

    2015-01-01

    Waddlia chondrophila is a known bovine abortigenic Chlamydia-related bacterium that has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in human. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how W. chondrophila infection spreads, its ability to elicit an immune response and induce pathology. A murine model of genital infection was developed to investigate the pathogenicity and immune response associated with a W. chondrophila infection. Genital inoculation of the bacterial agent resulted in a dose-dependent infection that spread to lumbar lymph nodes and successively to spleen and liver. Bacterial-induced pathology peaked on day 14, characterized by leukocyte infiltration (uterine horn, liver, and spleen), necrosis (liver) and extramedullary hematopoiesis (spleen). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of a large number of W. chondrophila in the spleen on day 14. Robust IgG titers were detected by day 14 and remained high until day 52. IgG isotypes consisted of high IgG2a, moderate IgG3 and no detectable IgG1, indicating a Th1-associated immune response. This study provides the first evidence that W. chondrophila genital infection is capable of inducing a systemic infection that spreads to major organs, induces uterus, spleen, and liver pathology and elicits a Th1-skewed humoral response. This new animal model will help our understanding of the mechanisms related to intracellular bacteria-induced miscarriages, the most frequent complication of pregnancy that affects one in four women.

  16. Interleukin-8 and leukotriene B4 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from HIV-infected patients with bacterial pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, E; Vestbo, Jørgen; Benfield, T L

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are at increased risk of contracting bacterial infections, mainly pneumonia. Despite this, little is known about immunopathogenic mechanisms in HIV-related bacterial pneumonia. This paper investigates the presence of the neutrophil chemotactic...... mediators, interleukin-8 (IL_8) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 27 HIV-infected patients with bacterial pneumonia. Significantly elevated levels of IL-8 were found in BAL fluid of patients with bacterial pneumonia [529 pg ml-1 (296-1161 pg ml-1)] compared to matched...... patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) [59 pg ml-1 (42-254 pg ml-1)] and healthy controls [58 pg ml-1 (37-82 pg ml-1)]. Levels of LTB4 were not elevated during bacterial pneumonia when compared to PCP patients and healthy controls. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between IL-8...

  17. Metabolic Requirements of Escherichia coli in Intracellular Bacterial Communities during Urinary Tract Infection Pathogenesis

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    Matt S. Conover

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is the primary etiological agent of over 85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs. Mouse models of infection have shown that UPEC can invade bladder epithelial cells in a type 1 pilus-dependent mechanism, avoid a TLR4-mediated exocytic process, and escape into the host cell cytoplasm. The internalized UPEC can clonally replicate into biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs of thousands of bacteria while avoiding many host clearance mechanisms. Importantly, IBCs have been documented in urine from women and children suffering acute UTI. To understand this protected bacterial niche, we elucidated the transcriptional profile of bacteria within IBCs using microarrays. We delineated the upregulation within the IBC of genes involved in iron acquisition, metabolism, and transport. Interestingly, lacZ was highly upregulated, suggesting that bacteria were sensing and/or utilizing a galactoside for metabolism in the IBC. A ΔlacZ strain displayed significantly smaller IBCs than the wild-type strain and was attenuated during competitive infection with a wild-type strain. Similarly, a galK mutant resulted in smaller IBCs and attenuated infection. Further, analysis of the highly upregulated gene yeaR revealed that this gene contributes to oxidative stress resistance and type 1 pilus production. These results suggest that bacteria within the IBC are under oxidative stress and, consistent with previous reports, utilize nonglucose carbon metabolites. Better understanding of the bacterial mechanisms used for IBC development and establishment of infection may give insights into development of novel anti-virulence strategies.

  18. A Novel 3D Skin Explant Model to Study Anaerobic Bacterial Infection

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    Grazieli Maboni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin infection studies are often limited by financial and ethical constraints, and alternatives, such as monolayer cell culture, do not reflect many cellular processes limiting their application. For a more functional replacement, 3D skin culture models offer many advantages such as the maintenance of the tissue structure and the cell types present in the host environment. A 3D skin culture model can be set up using tissues acquired from surgical procedures or post slaughter, making it a cost effective and attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The majority of 3D culture models have been established for aerobic pathogens, but currently there are no models for anaerobic skin infections. Footrot is an anaerobic bacterial infection which affects the ovine interdigital skin causing a substantial animal welfare and financial impact worldwide. Dichelobacter nodosus is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium and the causative agent of footrot. The mechanism of infection and host immune response to D. nodosus is poorly understood. Here we present a novel 3D skin ex vivo model to study anaerobic bacterial infections using ovine skin explants infected with D. nodosus. Our results demonstrate that D. nodosus can invade the skin explant, and that altered expression of key inflammatory markers could be quantified in the culture media. The viability of explants was assessed by tissue integrity (histopathological features and cell death (DNA fragmentation over 76 h showing the model was stable for 28 h. D. nodosus was quantified in all infected skin explants by qPCR and the bacterium was visualized invading the epidermis by Fluorescent in situ Hybridization. Measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the culture media revealed that the explants released IL1β in response to bacteria. In contrast, levels of CXCL8 production were no different to mock-infected explants. The 3D skin model realistically simulates the interdigital skin and has

  19. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-10-15

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. The Red Flour Beetle as a Model for Bacterial Oral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Stolpe, Clemens; Peuβ, Robert; Armitage, Sophie A. O.; Kurtz, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Experimental infection systems are important for studying antagonistic interactions and coevolution between hosts and their pathogens. The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and the spore-forming bacterial insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used and tractable model organisms. However, they have not been employed yet as an efficient experimental system to study host-pathogen interactions. We used a high throughput oral infection protocol to infect T. castaneum insects with coleopteran specific B. thuringiensis bv. tenebrionis (Btt) bacteria. We found that larval mortality depends on the dietary spore concentration and on the duration of exposure to the spores. Furthermore, differential susceptibility of larvae from different T. castaneum populations indicates that the host genetic background influences infection success. The recovery of high numbers of infectious spores from the cadavers indicates successful replication of bacteria in the host and suggests that Btt could establish infectious cycles in T. castaneum in nature. We were able to transfer plasmids from Btt to a non-pathogenic but genetically well-characterised Bt strain, which was thereafter able to successfully infect T. castaneum, suggesting that factors residing on the plasmids are important for the virulence of Btt. The availability of a genetically accessible strain will provide an ideal model for more in-depth analyses of pathogenicity factors during oral infections. Combined with the availability of the full genome sequence of T. castaneum, this system will enable analyses of host responses during infection, as well as addressing basic questions concerning host-parasite coevolution. PMID:23737991

  1. The red flour beetle as a model for bacterial oral infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Milutinović

    Full Text Available Experimental infection systems are important for studying antagonistic interactions and coevolution between hosts and their pathogens. The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and the spore-forming bacterial insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are widely used and tractable model organisms. However, they have not been employed yet as an efficient experimental system to study host-pathogen interactions. We used a high throughput oral infection protocol to infect T. castaneum insects with coleopteran specific B. thuringiensis bv. tenebrionis (Btt bacteria. We found that larval mortality depends on the dietary spore concentration and on the duration of exposure to the spores. Furthermore, differential susceptibility of larvae from different T. castaneum populations indicates that the host genetic background influences infection success. The recovery of high numbers of infectious spores from the cadavers indicates successful replication of bacteria in the host and suggests that Btt could establish infectious cycles in T. castaneum in nature. We were able to transfer plasmids from Btt to a non-pathogenic but genetically well-characterised Bt strain, which was thereafter able to successfully infect T. castaneum, suggesting that factors residing on the plasmids are important for the virulence of Btt. The availability of a genetically accessible strain will provide an ideal model for more in-depth analyses of pathogenicity factors during oral infections. Combined with the availability of the full genome sequence of T. castaneum, this system will enable analyses of host responses during infection, as well as addressing basic questions concerning host-parasite coevolution.

  2. Foreign Body Infection Models to Study Host-Pathogen Response and Antimicrobial Tolerance of Bacterial Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Nowakowska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of implanted medical devices is steadily increasing and has become an effective intervention improving life quality, but still carries the risk of infection. These infections are mainly caused by biofilm-forming staphylococci that are difficult to treat due to the decreased susceptibility to both antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. To understand the particular pathogenesis and treatment tolerance of implant-associated infection (IAI animal models that closely resemble human disease are needed. Applications of the tissue cage and catheter abscess foreign body infection models in the mouse will be discussed herein. Both models allow the investigation of biofilm and virulence of various bacterial species and a comprehensive insight into the host response at the same time. They have also been proven to serve as very suitable tools to study the anti-adhesive and anti-infective efficacy of different biomaterial coatings. The tissue cage model can additionally be used to determine pharmacokinetics, efficacy and cytotoxicity of antimicrobial compounds as the tissue cage fluid can be aspirated repeatedly without the need to sacrifice the animal. Moreover, with the advance in innovative imaging systems in rodents, these models may offer new diagnostic measures of infection. In summary, animal foreign body infection models are important tools in the development of new antimicrobials against IAI and can help to elucidate the complex interactions between bacteria, the host immune system, and prosthetic materials.

  3. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin for the imaging of bacterial infections with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, Oliver; Brunner, Martin; Zeitlinger, Markus; Mueller, Ulrich; Lackner, Edith; Joukhadar, Christian; Mueller, Markus [Medical University Vienna, Division of Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Vienna (Austria); Ziegler, Sophie; Minar, Erich [Medical University Vienna, Division of Angiology, Department of Internal Medicine II, Vienna (Austria); Dobrozemsky, Georg [Medical University Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Medical University Vienna, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Vienna (Austria); Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Dudczak, Robert; Kletter, Kurt [Medical University Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2005-02-01

    The suitability of the{sup 18}F-labelled fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin ([{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin) for imaging of bacterial infections with positron emission tomography (PET) was assessed in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro experiments, suspensions of various E. colistrains were incubated with different concentrations of [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin (0.01-5.0 {mu}g/ml) and radioactivity retention was measured in a gamma counter. For the in vivo experiments, 725 {+-} 9 MBq [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin was injected intravenously into four patients with microbiologically proven bacterial soft tissue infections of the lower extremities and time-radioactivity curves were recorded in infected and uninfected tissue for 5 h after tracer injection. Binding of [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin to bacterial cells was rapid, non-saturable and readily reversible. Moreover, bacterial binding of the agent was similar in ciprofloxacin-resistant and ciprofloxacin-susceptible clinical isolates. These findings suggest that non-specific binding rather than specific binding to bacterial type II topoisomerase enzymes is the predominant mechanism of bacterial retention of the radiotracer. PET studies in the four patients with microbiologically proven bacterial soft tissue infections demonstrated locally increased radioactivity uptake in infected tissue, with peak ratios between infected and uninfected tissue ranging from 1.8 to 5.5. Radioactivity was not retained in infected tissue and appeared to wash out with a similar elimination half-life as in uninfected tissue, suggesting that the kinetics of [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin in infected tissue are governed by increased blood flow and vascular permeability due to local infection rather than by a binding process. Taken together, our results indicate that [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin is not suited as a bacteria-specific infection imaging agent for PET. (orig.)

  4. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elks, Philip M; Brizee, Sabrina; van der Vaart, Michiel; Walmsley, Sarah R; van Eeden, Fredericus J; Renshaw, Stephen A; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB) remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α) transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for therapeutic

  5. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Elks

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for

  6. Value of serum PCT in early diagnosis of bacterial infection in patients with liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chuanmin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the value of serum procalcitonin (PCT in early diagnosis of bacterial infection in patients with liver failure. MethodsA total of 463 patients with hepatitis B were selected from January to December, 2014, in the Department of Infectious Diseases, Taihe Hospital. According to the degree of liver injury, the patients were divided into four groups: mild liver injury group (n=120, moderate liver injury group (n=222, sever liver injury group (n=53, and liver failure group (n=68. Serum PCT was measured for all patients, and the white blood cell count (WBC and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP were measured for patients with liver failure. The clinical manifestations were observed and recorded. The t test was used for comparison of normally distributed continuous data, while the Kruskal-Wallis H test was used for non-normally distributed continuous data; the Mann-Whitney U test was used for pairwise comparison of continuous data. The chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used for the analysis of predictive value. ResultsThe liver failure group had a significantly higher PCT level than the severe liver injury group, moderate liver injury group, and mild liver injury group (0.81[0.34-2.15] vs 0.53[0.21-1.59], 0.35[010-1.18], and 0.17[0.10-0.60], χ2=25.091, P<0.05. The liver failure patients with PCT levels of <0.25 ng/ml (n=10, 0.25-0.5 ng/ml (n=10, and >0.5 ng/ml (n=48 had infection rates of 20%, 30%, and 66.7%, respectively, with a significant difference between the patients with a PCT level of >0.5 ng/ml and those with PCT levels of <0.25 ng/ml and 0.25-0.5 ng/ml (χ2=5631,4650,P=0018,0031. Among the liver failure patients, the infection cases had significantly higher PCT, WBC, and hsCRP than the non-infection cases (PCT: 3.72±1.33 ng/ml vs 0.34±0.12 ng/ml, t=-2.547, P=0.015; hsCRP: 16.70±7.03 mg

  7. Post-splenectomy infections in chronic schistosomiasis as a consequence of bacterial translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedma de Magalhães Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Bacterial translocation is the invasion of indigenous intestinal bacteria through the gut mucosa to normally sterile tissues and internal organs. Schistosomiasis may cause alterations in the immune system and damage to the intestines, portal system and mesenteric lymph nodes. This study investigated bacterial translocation and alterations in the intestinal microbiota and mucosa in schistosomiasis and splenectomized mice. METHODS : Forty female 35-day-old Swiss Webster mice were divided into the following four groups with 10 animals each: schistosomotic (ESF, splenectomized schistosomotic (ESEF, splenectomized (EF and control (CF. Infection was achieved by introduction of 50 Schistosoma mansoni (SLM cercariae through the skin. At 125 days after birth, half of the parasitized and unparasitized mice were subjected to splenectomy. Body weights were recorded for one week after splenectomy; then, the mice were euthanized to study bacterial translocation, microbiota composition and intestinal morphometry. RESULTS : We observed significant reductions in the weight increases in the EF, ESF and ESEF groups. There were increases of at least 1,000 CFU of intestinal microbiota bacteria in these groups compared with the CF. The EF, ESF and ESEF mice showed decreases in the heights and areas of villi and the total villus areas (perimeter. We observed frequent co-infections with various bacterial genera. CONCLUSIONS : The ESEF mice showed a higher degree of sepsis. This finding may be associated with a reduction in the immune response associated with the absence of the spleen and a reduction in nutritional absorption strengthened by both of these factors (Schistosoma infection and splenectomy.

  8. UGT-29 protein expression and localization during bacterial infection in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rui-Rui; Lee, Song-Hua; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is routinely used as an animal model to delineate complex molecular mechanisms involved in the host response to pathogen infection. Following up on an earlier study on host-pathogen interaction, we constructed a ugt-29::GFP transcriptional fusion transgenic worm strain to examine UGT-29 protein expression and localization upon bacterial infection. UGT-29 orthologs can be found in higher organisms including humans and is proposed as a member of the UDP-Glucoronosyl Transferase family of proteins which are involved in phase II detoxification of compounds detrimental to the host organism. Under uninfected conditions, UGT-29::GFP fusion protein was highly expressed in the C. elegans anterior pharynx and intestine, two major organs involved in detoxification. We further evaluated the localization of the enzyme in worms infected with the bacterial pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei. The infected ugt-29::GFP transgenic strain exhibited increased fluorescence in the pharynx and intestine with pronounced fluorescence also extending to body wall muscle. This transcriptional fusion GFP transgenic worm is a convenient and direct tool to provide information on UGT detoxification enzyme gene expression and could be a useful tool for a number of diverse applications.

  9. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M.; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host–pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:25699030

  10. Challenges in the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis with concomitant bacterial infections and chronic infectious colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Chen; Chang, Chen-Wang; Chen, Ming-Jen; Chu, Cheng-Hsin; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Hsu, Tzu-Chi; Wang, Horng-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammation of the large bowel characterized by diarrhea and a negative stool culture. However, several enteropathogens have been implicated as causative agents in UC. The differentiation between chronic infectious colitis (IC) and UC with concurrent infection is difficult owing to their similar clinical presentations. The study aimed to explore the presentations and diagnostic clues that enable differentiation between UC with concomitant infections and chronic IC. The study included 17 UC patients with a bacterial infection and 46 with chronic IC. The UC patients (47 ± 19 years) were younger than the chronic IC patients (58 ± 20 years) (P = 0.022). Bloody diarrhea was more common in UC than in chronic IC (58.8% vs 10.9%, P UC patients had lower antibiotic response rates than chronic IC patients (60.0% vs 87.2%, P = 0.026). Aeromonas species and Clostridium difficile were common in both groups. Histological features of cryptitis and crypt abscess were useful in the diagnosis of UC (P = 0.052 and P = 0.016, respectively). Bloody diarrhea in a young adult, decreased response to antibiotic treatment, and results of endoscopy with biopsy are important features in the diagnosis of UC with bacterial infection.

  11. Role of neutrophil to lymphocyte and monocyte to lymphocyte ratios in the diagnosis of bacterial infection in patients with fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naess, Are; Nilssen, Siri Saervold; Mo, Reidun; Eide, Geir Egil; Sjursen, Haakon

    2017-06-01

    To study the role of the neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and monocyte:lymphocyte ratio (MLR) in discriminating between different patient groups hospitalized for fever due to infection and those without infection. For 299 patients admitted to hospital for fever with unknown cause, a number of characteristics including NLR and MLR were recorded. These characteristics were used in a multiple multinomial regression analysis to estimate the probability of a final diagnostic group of bacterial, viral, clinically confirmed, or no infection. Both NLR and MLR significantly predicted final diagnostic group. Being highly correlated, however, both variables could not be retained in the same model. Both variables also interacted significantly with duration of fever. Generally, higher values of NLR and MLR indicated larger probabilities for bacterial infection and low probabilities for viral infection. Patients with septicemia had significantly higher NLR compared to patients with other bacterial infections with fever for less than one week. White blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, and C-reactive proteins did not differ significantly between septicemia and the other bacterial infection groups. NLR is a more useful diagnostic tool to identify patients with septicemia than other more commonly used diagnostic blood tests. NLR and MLR may be useful in the diagnosis of bacterial infection among patients hospitalized for fever.

  12. Anemia Rate Assessment in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Bacterial Infection in Qom Hospitals, Qom, Iran, 2007-2008

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    A.H. Ghanuni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectivesImmunosuppression is regarded among the risk factors for bacterial infection. But in recent studies, anemia was considered a predisposing factor for bacterial infections. The main goals of this study was to assess the rate of anemia in hospitalized patients with acute bacterial infection and to determine the relationship between anemia and bacterial infection as a predisposing factor.Methods 311 hospitalized patients whose bacterial infection was well documented based on the files present in Kamkar, Arabnia, Fatemi, and Sahamieh hospitals in Qom, Iran, were selected for the present study. They were categorized into various age groups from newborns to the elderly. The data included, age, sex, Hb of the patients the first, third and discharge day, HCT in the first, third and discharge day, MCV, MCH, MCHC, WBC in the first, third, fourth day, Diff in the first and fourth days, ESR, CRP, maximum of fever and disease, chronic disease, smoking. A P<0.05 was considered as being significant.Results On the basis of hemoglobin rate, 43.9 % of patients had anemia as a co-disease. There was no anemia among newborns, but 57% of infants had it. Patients who had pyorrheal lymphadenitis had maximum rate of anemia among other patients. ConclusionOn the average, the rate of anemia in this study was 2.1 times more than that of general population in Qom, as well as in any of the age groups. This difference indicates that anemia rate in patients with acute bacterial infections is more common than general population. However, more studies are needed for the assessment of the relationship between anemia and bacterial infection as a predisposing factor. But it seems that the hemoglobin level and severity of disease have direct effects on each other. Keywords: Anemia; Bacterial Infections; Patients; Qom, Iran.

  13. Fungal and Bacterial Infection Mitigation with Antibiotic and Antifungal Loaded Biopolymer Sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ashley Cox

    Musculoskeletal injuries are some of the most prevalent injuries in both civilian and military populations and their infections can be difficult to treat, often resulting in multiple surgeries and increased costs. In both previous and recent military operations, extremity injuries have been the most common battlefield injuries and many involve complex, open fractures. These extremity injuries are especially susceptible to multiple pathogenic, and sometimes drug resistant, bacteria and fungi. Fungal infections have recently become increasingly problematic in both military and civilian populations and have significantly higher amputation rates than those from bacterial infections. Many of these bacterial and fungal strains adhere to tissue and implanted orthopaedic hardware within wounds, forming biofilms. These problematic, often polymicrobial, infections threaten the health of the patient, but the risk also exists of spreading within hospitals to become prominent resistant infections. Local antimicrobial delivery releases high levels of antimicrobials directly to injured wound tissue, overcoming sub-bactericidal or subfungicidal antimicrobial levels present in the avascular wound zones. This research will determine the ability of modified chitosan sponges, buffered with sodium acetate or blended with polyethylene glycol (PEG), to act as short term adjunctive therapies to initial surgical treatment for delivering both antibiotics and/or antifungals for early abatement of infection. The objective of this work was to evaluate both types of modified sponges for in vitro and in vivo material characteristics and device functionality. In vitro analysis demonstrated both the buffered and PEG modified chitosan sponges exhibited increased degradation and functional cytocompatibility. The chitosan/PEG sponges were able to be loaded with hydrophobic antifungals and the sponges released in vitro biologically active concentrations, alone or in combination with the antibiotic

  14. Demodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Background: Patients with rosacea demonstrate a higher density of Demodex mites in their skin than controls. A bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea (PPR) was previously shown to provoke an immune response in patients with PPR or ocular rosacea thus suggesting a possible role for bacterial proteins in the etiology of this condition. Objectives: To examine the response of neutrophils to proteins derived from a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite. Methods: Bacterial cells were lysed and proteins were partially purified by AKTA-FPLC. Isolated neutrophils were exposed to bacterial proteins and monitored for alterations in migration, degranulation and cytokine production. Results: Neutrophils exposed to proteins from Bacillus cells demonstrated increased levels of migration and elevated release of MMP-9, an enzyme known to degrade collagen and cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide. In addition neutrophils exposed to the bacterial proteins demonstrated elevated rates of Il-8 and TNF-alpha production. Conclusions: Proteins produced by a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite have the ability to increase the migration, degranulation and cytokine production abilities of neutrophils. These results suggest that bacteria may play a role in the inflammatory erythema associated with rosacea.

  15. Independent behavior of bacterial laccases to inducers and metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laccase, a blue copper oxidase, is an enzyme that is involved in the oxidation of aromatic compounds which prove otherwise difficult to degrade in the environment. The substrates of laccase are xenobiotics and synthetic dyes. The isolation of bacterial strains was investigated for laccase production and its activity.

  16. Comparative tissue transcriptomics reveal prompt inter-organ communication in response to local bacterial kidney infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhen Mikael

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosal infections elicit inflammatory responses via regulated signaling pathways. Infection outcome depends strongly on early events occurring immediately when bacteria start interacting with cells in the mucosal membrane. Hitherto reported transcription profiles on host-pathogen interactions are strongly biased towards in vitro studies. To detail the local in vivo genetic response to infection, we here profiled host gene expression in a recent experimental model that assures high spatial and temporal control of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC infection within the kidney of a live rat. Results Transcriptional profiling of tissue biopsies from UPEC-infected kidney tissue revealed 59 differentially expressed genes 8 h post-infection. Their relevance for the infection process was supported by a Gene Ontology (GO analysis. Early differential expression at 3 h and 5 h post-infection was of low statistical significance, which correlated to the low degree of infection. Comparative transcriptomics analysis of the 8 h data set and online available studies of early local infection and inflammation defined a core of 80 genes constituting a "General tissue response to early local bacterial infections". Among these, 25% were annotated as interferon-γ (IFN-γ regulated. Subsequent experimental analyses confirmed a systemic increase of IFN-γ in rats with an ongoing local kidney infection, correlating to splenic, rather than renal Ifng induction and suggested this inter-organ communication to be mediated by interleukin (IL-23. The use of comparative transcriptomics allowed expansion of the statistical data handling, whereby relevant data could also be extracted from the 5 h data set. Out of the 31 differentially expressed core genes, some represented specific 5 h responses, illustrating the value of comparative transcriptomics when studying the dynamic nature of gene regulation in response to infections. Conclusion Our hypothesis

  17. Osteomyelitis in a Paleozoic reptile: ancient evidence for bacterial infection and its evolutionary significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Robert R.; Scott, Diane M.; Pynn, Bruce R.; Modesto, Sean P.

    2011-06-01

    We report on dental and mandibular pathology in Labidosaurus hamatus, a 275 million-year-old terrestrial reptile from North America and associate it with bacterial infection in an organism that is characterized by reduced tooth replacement. Analysis of the surface and internal mandibular structure using mechanical and CT-scanning techniques permits the reconstruction of events that led to the pathology and the possible death of the individual. The infection probably occurred as a result of prolonged exposure of the dental pulp cavity to oral bacteria, and this exposure was caused by injury to the tooth in an animal that is characterized by reduced tooth replacement cycles. In these early reptiles, the reduction in tooth replacement is an evolutionary innovation associated with strong implantation and increased oral processing. The dental abscess observed in L. hamatus, the oldest known infection in a terrestrial vertebrate, provides clear evidence of the ancient association between terrestrial vertebrates and their oral bacteria.

  18. Synthesis and biodistribution of 99mTc-Vancomycin in a model of bacterial infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roohi, S.; Mushtaq, A.; Malik, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Vancomycin Hydrochloride is an antibiotic produced by the growth of certain strains of Streptomyces orientalis. As vancomycin hydrochloride is poorly absorbed after oral administration; it is given intravenously for therapy of systemic infections. Vancomycin was labeled with technetium-99m pertechnetate using SnCl 2 . 2H 2 O as reducing agent. The labeling efficiency depends on ligand/reductant ratio, pH, and volume of reaction mixture. Radiochemical purity and stability of 99m Tc-Vancomycin was determined by thin layer chromatography. Biodistribution studies of 99m Tc-Vancomycin were performed in a model of bacterial infection in Sprague-Dawley rats. A significantly higher accumulation of 99m Tc-Vancomycin was seen at sites of S. aureus infected animals. Whereas uptake of 99m Tc-Vancomycin in turpentine inflamed rats were quite low. (orig.)

  19. Osteomyelitis in a Paleozoic reptile: ancient evidence for bacterial infection and its evolutionary significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Robert R; Scott, Diane M; Pynn, Bruce R; Modesto, Sean P

    2011-06-01

    We report on dental and mandibular pathology in Labidosaurus hamatus, a 275 million-year-old terrestrial reptile from North America and associate it with bacterial infection in an organism that is characterized by reduced tooth replacement. Analysis of the surface and internal mandibular structure using mechanical and CT-scanning techniques permits the reconstruction of events that led to the pathology and the possible death of the individual. The infection probably occurred as a result of prolonged exposure of the dental pulp cavity to oral bacteria, and this exposure was caused by injury to the tooth in an animal that is characterized by reduced tooth replacement cycles. In these early reptiles, the reduction in tooth replacement is an evolutionary innovation associated with strong implantation and increased oral processing. The dental abscess observed in L. hamatus, the oldest known infection in a terrestrial vertebrate, provides clear evidence of the ancient association between terrestrial vertebrates and their oral bacteria.

  20. Synthesis and biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin in a model of bacterial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roohi, S.; Mushtaq, A. [Isotope Production Div., Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Malik, S.A. [Dept. of Biological Sciences, Quaid-e-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2005-07-01

    Vancomycin Hydrochloride is an antibiotic produced by the growth of certain strains of Streptomyces orientalis. As vancomycin hydrochloride is poorly absorbed after oral administration; it is given intravenously for therapy of systemic infections. Vancomycin was labeled with technetium-99m pertechnetate using SnCl{sub 2} . 2H{sub 2}O as reducing agent. The labeling efficiency depends on ligand/reductant ratio, pH, and volume of reaction mixture. Radiochemical purity and stability of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin was determined by thin layer chromatography. Biodistribution studies of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin were performed in a model of bacterial infection in Sprague-Dawley rats. A significantly higher accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin was seen at sites of S. aureus infected animals. Whereas uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin in turpentine inflamed rats were quite low. (orig.)

  1. Subversion of the B-cell compartment during parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhis, Gwenoline; Richard, Yolande

    2015-03-26

    Recent studies on HIV infection have identified new human B-cell subsets with a potentially important impact on anti-viral immunity. Current work highlights the occurrence of similar B-cell alterations in other viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections, suggesting that common strategies have been developed by pathogens to counteract protective immunity. For this review, we have selected key examples of human infections for which B-cell alterations have been described, to highlight the similarities and differences in the immune responses to a variety of pathogens. We believe that further comparisons between these models will lead to critical progress in the understanding of B-cell mechanisms and will open new target avenues for therapeutic interventions.

  2. Predictors of Early Readmission in Patients With Cirrhosis After the Resolution of Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Salvatore; Morando, Filippo; Carretta, Giovanni; Tonon, Marta; Vettore, Elia; Rosi, Silvia; Stanco, Marialuisa; Pilutti, Chiara; Romano, Antonietta; Brocca, Alessandra; Sticca, Antonietta; Donato, Daniele; Angeli, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    In patients with cirrhosis, infections represent a frequent trigger for complications, increasing frequency of hospitalizations and mortality rate. This study aimed to identify predictors of early readmission (30 days) and of mid-term mortality (6 months) in patients with liver cirrhosis discharged after a hospitalization for bacterial and/or fungal infection. A total of 199 patients with cirrhosis discharged after an admission for a bacterial and/or fungal infection were included in the study and followed up for a least 6 months. During follow-up, 69 patients (35%) were readmitted within 30 days from discharge. C-reactive protein (CRP) value at discharge (odds ratio (OR)=1.91; P=0.022), diagnosis of acute-on-chronic liver failure during the hospital stay (OR=2.48; P=0.008), and the hospitalization in the last 30 days previous to the admission/inclusion in the study (OR=1.50; P=0.042) were found to be independent predictors of readmission. During the 6-month follow-up, 47 patients (23%) died. Age (hazard ratio (HR)=1.05; P=0.001), model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score (HR=1.13; P10 mg/l at discharge had a significantly higher probability of being readmitted within 30 days (44% vs. 24%; P=0.007) and a significantly lower probability of 6-month survival (62% vs. 88%; P<0.001) than those with a CRP ≤10 mg/l. CRP showed to be a strong predictor of early hospital readmission and 6-month mortality in patients with cirrhosis after hospitalization for bacterial and/or fungal infection. CRP values could be used both in the stewardship of antibiotic treatment and to identify fragile patients who deserve a strict surveillance program.

  3. Effects of antihistamines on innate immune responses to severe bacterial infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Martin; Doyle, Elizabeth; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Watanabe, Takeshi; Zuberbier, Torsten; Maurer, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Sedating and non-sedating histamine H(1) receptor (H1R) antagonists and H2R blockers are widely used drugs which are generally considered to be safe medications. However, recently, these drugs have been shown to possibly impair the outcome of perforating appendicitis in children. It was the aim of this study to characterize the effects of histamine receptor blockade in severe bacterial infections in more detail. To obtain information on the safety of histamine receptor blockade in more detail, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches targeting histamine receptors and performed cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), a mouse model of septic peritonitis. After induction of septic peritonitis, morbidity and mortality were monitored closely. Here, we show that oral treatment with first-generation H1R antihistamine diphenhydramine, H2R blocker cimetidine and H3/4R blocker thioperamide impairs optimal innate immune responses in severe murine bacterial sepsis. However, these adverse effects are not mediated by H1R, as mice deficient for H1R show similar rates of morbidity and mortality after CLP as their wild-type controls. Similarly, the second-generation antihistamine desloratadine neither affects morbidity nor mortality after CLP. Our findings indicate that sedating first-generation H1R antihistamines and H2R blockers might impair innate immune responses to bacteria and that these drugs should be used with caution in patients with severe bacterial infections. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Phage Therapy in Bacterial Infections Treatment: One Hundred Years After the Discovery of Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisek, Agata Anna; Dąbrowska, Iwona; Gregorczyk, Karolina Paulina; Wyżewski, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    The therapeutic use of bacteriophages has seen a renewal of interest blossom in the last few years. This reversion is due to increased difficulties in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. Bacterial resistance to antibiotics, a serious problem in contemporary medicine, does not implicate resistance to phage lysis mechanisms. Lytic bacteriophages are able to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria at the end of the phage infection cycle. Thus, the development of phage therapy is potentially a way to improve the treatment of bacterial infections. However, there are antibacterial phage therapy difficulties specified by broadening the knowledge of the phage nature and influence on the host. It has been shown during experiments that both innate and adaptive immunity are involved in the clearance of phages from the body. Immunological reactions against phages are related to the route of administration and may vary depending on the type of bacterial viruses. For that reason, it is very important to test the immunological response of every single phage, particularly if intravenous therapy is being considered. The lack of these data in previous years was one of the reasons for phage therapy abandonment despite its century-long study. Promising results of recent research led us to look forward to a phage therapy that can be applied on a larger scale and subsequently put it into practice.

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Vitamin D on Human Immune Cells in the Context of Bacterial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Edwin; Nathanielsz, Jordan; Toh, Zheng Quan; Spry, Leena; Marimla, Rachel; Balloch, Anne; Mulholland, Kim; Licciardi, Paul V

    2016-12-12

    Vitamin D induces a diverse range of biological effects, including important functions in bone health, calcium homeostasis and, more recently, on immune function. The role of vitamin D during infection is of particular interest given data from epidemiological studies suggesting that vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of infection. Vitamin D has diverse immunomodulatory functions, although its role during bacterial infection remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of 1,25(OH)₂D₃, the active metabolite of vitamin D, on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and purified immune cell subsets isolated from healthy adults following stimulation with the bacterial ligands heat-killed pneumococcal serotype 19F (HK19F) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that 1,25(OH)₂D₃ significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β as well as the chemokine IL-8 for both ligands (three- to 53-fold), while anti-inflammatory IL-10 was increased (two-fold, p = 0.016) in HK19F-stimulated monocytes. Levels of HK19F-specific IFN-γ were significantly higher (11.7-fold, p = 0.038) in vitamin D-insufficient adults (50 nmol/L). Vitamin D also shifted the pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory balance towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype and increased the CD14 expression on monocytes ( p = 0.008) in response to LPS but not HK19F stimulation. These results suggest that 1,25(OH)₂D₃ may be an important regulator of the inflammatory response and supports further in vivo and clinical studies to confirm the potential benefits of vitamin D in this context.

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Vitamin D on Human Immune Cells in the Context of Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Hoe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D induces a diverse range of biological effects, including important functions in bone health, calcium homeostasis and, more recently, on immune function. The role of vitamin D during infection is of particular interest given data from epidemiological studies suggesting that vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of infection. Vitamin D has diverse immunomodulatory functions, although its role during bacterial infection remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of 1,25(OH2D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and purified immune cell subsets isolated from healthy adults following stimulation with the bacterial ligands heat-killed pneumococcal serotype 19F (HK19F and lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We found that 1,25(OH2D3 significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β as well as the chemokine IL-8 for both ligands (three- to 53-fold, while anti-inflammatory IL-10 was increased (two-fold, p = 0.016 in HK19F-stimulated monocytes. Levels of HK19F-specific IFN-γ were significantly higher (11.7-fold, p = 0.038 in vitamin D-insufficient adults (<50 nmol/L compared to sufficient adults (>50 nmol/L. Vitamin D also shifted the pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory balance towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype and increased the CD14 expression on monocytes (p = 0.008 in response to LPS but not HK19F stimulation. These results suggest that 1,25(OH2D3 may be an important regulator of the inflammatory response and supports further in vivo and clinical studies to confirm the potential benefits of vitamin D in this context.

  7. Immune responses induced by co-infection with Capillaria hepatica in Clonorchis sinensis-infected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, E-K; Lee, S-H; Goo, T W; Quan, F-S

    2017-08-08

    Clonorchis sinensis and Capillaria hepatica are zoonotic parasites that mainly infect the liver and cause serious liver disorders. However, immunological parameters induced by co-infection with these parasites remain unknown. In this study, for the first time, we investigated immunological profiles induced by co-infection with C. hepatica (CH) in C. sinensis (CS)-infected rats (Sprague-Dawley). Rats were infected primarily with 50 metacercariae of C. sinensis; 4 weeks later, they were subsequently infected with 1000 infective C. hepatica eggs. Significantly higher levels of C. sinensis- or C. hepatica-specific IgG antibodies were found in the sera of rats. Interestingly, no cross-reacting antibody was observed between C. sinensis and C. hepatica infections. Significantly raised eosinophil levels were found in the blood of C. sinensis/C. hepatica co-infected rats (CS + CH) compared to the blood of rats infected singly with C. sinensis. Co-infected rats showed significantly higher levels of lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production compared to a single C. sinensis infection. The worm burden of C. sinensis was significantly reduced in co-infected rats compared to the single C. sinensis infection. These results indicate that the eosinophils, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production induced by subsequent infection with C. hepatica in C. sinensis-infected rats might contribute to the observed C. sinensis worm reduction.

  8. Helminth infections induce immunomodulation : consequences and mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, Petronella Helena van

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, more than a billion people are infected with helminths. These worm infections are chronic in nature and can lead to considerable morbidity. Immunologically these infections are interesting; chronic helminth infections are characterized by skewing towards a T helper 2 type response as well

  9. Optimized localization of bacterial infections with technetium-99m labelled human immunoglobulin after protein charge selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welling, M.; Feitsma, H.I.J.; Calame, W.; Ensing, G.J.; Goedemans, W.; Pauwels, E.K.J.

    1994-01-01

    To improve the scintigraphic detection of bacterial infections a protein charge-purified fraction of polyclonal human immunoglobulin was applied as a radiopharmaceutical. This purification was achieved by attaching the immunoglobulin to an anion-exchanger column and by obtaining the column-bound fraction with buffer. The binding to bacteria in vitro and the target to non-target ratios of an experimental thigh infection with Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice were evaluated to compare the purified and the unpurified immunoglobulin. The percentage of binding to all gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria used in this study was significantly (P 99m Tc-labelled protein charge-purified polyclonal human immunoglobulin was administered intravenously. At all time intervals the target (infected thighs) to non-target (non-infected thighs) ratios for both infections were significantly higher (P 99m Tc-labelled protein charge-purified immunoglobulin localizes both a gram-positive and a gram-negative thigh infection more intensely and faster than 99m Tc-labelled unpurified immunoglobulin. (orig.)

  10. Relationship among bacterial virulence, bladder dysfunction, vesicoureteral reflux and patterns of urinary tract infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Douglas W; Patel, Ashay S; Horvath, Dennis J; Li, Birong; Koff, Stephen A; Justice, Sheryl S

    2012-07-01

    We hypothesized that virulence levels of Escherichia coli isolates causing pediatric urinary tract infections differ according to severity of infection and also among various uropathies known to contribute to pediatric urinary tract infections. We evaluated these relationships using in vitro cytokine interleukin-6 elicitation. E. coli isolates were cultured from children presenting with urinary tract infections. In vitro cytokine (interleukin-6) elicitation was quantified for each isolate and the bacteria were grouped according to type of infection and underlying uropathy (neurogenic bladder, nonneurogenic bowel and bladder dysfunction, primary vesicoureteral reflux, no underlying etiology). A total of 40 E. coli isolates were collected from children with a mean age of 61.5 months (range 1 to 204). Mean level of in vitro cytokine elicitation from febrile urinary tract infection producing E. coli was significantly lower than for nonfebrile strains (p = 0.01). The interleukin-6 response to E. coli in the neurogenic bladder group was also significantly higher than in the vesicoureteral reflux (p = 0.01) and no underlying etiology groups (p = 0.02). In vitro interleukin-6 elicitation, an established marker to determine bacterial virulence, correlates inversely with clinical urinary tract infection severity. Less virulent, high cytokine producing E. coli were more likely to cause cystitis and were more commonly found in patients with neurogenic bladder and nonneurogenic bowel and bladder dysfunction, whereas higher virulence isolates were more likely to produce febrile urinary tract infections and to affect children with primary vesicoureteral reflux and no underlying etiology. These findings suggest that bacteria of different virulence levels may be responsible for differences in severity of pediatric urinary tract infections and may vary among different underlying uropathies. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by

  11. [Characteristics of epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of gram-negative bacterial bloodstream infections in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, L; Zhang, X Y; Li, C C; Li, Z; Xia, Y Q

    2017-09-02

    Objective: To study the epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of Gram-negative bacterial bloodstream infections in children, and to guide the choice of antimicrobials and the control of nosocomial infection. Method: Clinical data, bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility test results were collected retrospectively in hospitalized children who were diagnosed with gram-negative bacterial bloodstream infections in Yuying Children's Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University from January, 2010 to December, 2015. Result: A total of 399 cases (253 male and 146 female) were identified. The age ranged from 16 hours to 16 years (median age 10.1 months). The majority of cases were collected from division of neonatology ( n =261, 65.4%), followed by 31 cases (7.8%) from pediatric intensive care unit and 29 cases (7.3%) from Gastroenterology Department; 275 cases (68.9%) had underlying diseases, mainly including preterm birth( n =172), neonatal respiratory distress syndrome( n =67) and newborn asphyxia( n =53). Eighty cases had received invasive procedures and 20 had surgical operation; 149 cases (37.3%) were community-acquired and 250 cases (62.7%) were hospital acquired. Fifty cases had complications, among those, 40 cases had septic shock, 32 cases had multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and 7 cases had disseminated intravascular coagulation; 288 cases were cured, 48 improved, 17 gave up treatment and discharged, and 46 died; totally 408 strains were isolated from 399 children, including Enterobacteriaceae (346, 84.8%), non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria (49, 12.0%) and other gram-negative bacteria (13, 3.2%). The resistance rates of Escherichia coli ( n =175) and Klebsiella pneumoniae ( n =106) to carbapenems, β-lactams enzyme and its inhibitors, amikacin and cefoxitin were all lower than 10%. Totally 245 multi-drug resistant strains (60.1%) were isolated, including 225 strains of Enterobacteriaceae and 18 strains of non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria ( P

  12. Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni infection in the gnotobiotic piglet and genome-wide identification of bacterial factors required for infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Stefan P W; Linn, Aileen; Macleod, Kareen; MacCallum, Amanda; Hardy, Simon P; Douce, Gill; Watson, Eleanor; Dagleish, Mark P; Thompson, Hal; Stevenson, Andy; Kennedy, David; Baig, Abiyad; Coward, Chris; Maskell, Duncan J; Smith, David G E; Grant, Andrew J; Everest, Paul

    2017-03-10

    To investigate how Campylobacter jejuni causes the clinical symptoms of diarrhoeal disease in humans, use of a relevant animal model is essential. Such a model should mimic the human disease closely in terms of host physiology, incubation period before onset of disease, clinical signs and a comparable outcome of disease. In this study, we used a gnotobiotic piglet model to study determinants of pathogenicity of C. jejuni. In this model, C. jejuni successfully established infection and piglets developed an increased temperature with watery diarrhoea, which was caused by a leaky epithelium and reduced bile re-absorption in the intestines. Further, we assessed the C. jejuni genes required for infection of the porcine gastrointestinal tract utilising a transposon (Tn) mutant library screen. A total of 123 genes of which Tn mutants showed attenuated piglet infection were identified. Our screen highlighted a crucial role for motility and chemotaxis, as well as central metabolism. In addition, Tn mutants of 14 genes displayed enhanced piglet infection. This study gives a unique insight into the mechanisms of C. jejuni disease in terms of host physiology and contributing bacterial factors.

  13. Demodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly, N.; Bergin, D.; Reeves, E.P.; McElvaney, N.G.; Kavanagh, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients with rosacea demonstrate a higher density of Demodex mites in their skin than do controls. A bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea (PPR) was previously shown to provoke an immune response in patients with PPR or ocular rosacea, thus suggesting a possible role for bacterial proteins in the aetiology of this condition. Objectives To examine the response of neutrophils to proteins derived from a bacterium isolated...

  14. Bacterial infection identification by an anti-peptidoglycan aptamer labeled with Technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro; Ferreira, Iêda Mendes [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barros, Andre Luis Branco de; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: A variety of radiopharmaceuticals is used to detect infection, but long-term clinical use has shown that the majority of them cannot distinguish between inflammation and infection. Nuclear medicine clinics are still awaiting the optimal scintigraphic imaging agents capable of discriminating between infection and inflammation, and between fungal and bacterial infections. Aptamers are oligonucleotides that display high affinity and specificity for their molecular targets and are emerging as promising molecules for radiopharmaceuticals development. Material and Methods: An aptamer for the peptidoglycan (main constituent of bacterial cell walls) termed Antibac1 was selected in a previous work. In the present study, this aptamer were labeled with {sup 99m}Tc and evaluated for bacterial infections identification by scintigraphy. All protocols were approved by the local Ethics Committee for Animal Experimentation of the Federal University of Minas Gerais (CETEA / UFMG), Protocol number 108/2014. Labeling with {sup 99m}Tc was performed by the direct method and the complex stability was evaluated in saline, plasma and presence of cysteine. The biodistribution and scintigraphic imaging studies with the {sup 99m}Tc-Antibac1 were carried out in two distinct experimental infection models: Swiss mice infected in the right thigh with Staphylococcus aureus or Candida albicans. {sup 99m}Tc radiolabeled library, consisting of oligonucleotides with random sequences, was used as a control in both experimental models. The direct radiolabeling allowed radiolabel yields above 90%. Results: A high complex stability was obtained in saline solution and plasma, but 51% of transchelation was verified after 24 h in the presence of cysteine. Scintigraphic images of S. aureus infected mice that received the {sup 99m}Tc-Antibac1 showed target to non-target ratios of 4.7 ± 0.90 and 4.6 ± 0.10 at 1.5 and 3.0 h, respectively. These values were statistically higher than

  15. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. [Transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection of a apheresis platelet concentrate with Streptococcus gallolyticus: Analysis of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Niger, C; Dalbies, F; Narbonne, V; Hery-Arnaud, G; Virmaux, M; Léostic, C; Hervé, F; Liétard, C

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial infections are uncommon complications of the blood products transfusion but they are potentially serious. Many advances have been done over the past few years to guarantee the microbiological security of blood products as the donors selection with a medical talk, the derivation of the first 30 millilitres blood during the donation, the deleucocytation of blood products… But in spite of these advances, cases of bacterial infection always remain. The purpose of this study was to point out the platelet concentrate's transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection with Streptococcus gallolyticus and the unusual consequence for the donor by uncovering an asymptomatic rectal neoplastic tumor. This study as raised as to whether the usefulness of systematic bacterial inactivation in the platelets concentrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Co-infections with respiratory viruses in dogs with bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, S J; Lappalainen, A; Rajamäki, M M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia (BP) is an inflammation of the lower airways and lung parenchyma secondary to bacterial infection. The pathogenesis of BP in dogs is complex and the role of canine respiratory viruses has not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of viral co-infections in dogs with BP and to assess demographic or clinical variables as well as disease severity associated with viral co-infections. Twenty household dogs with BP caused by opportunistic bacteria and 13 dogs with chronic (>30 days) tracheobronchitis caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica (BBTB). Prospective cross-sectional observational study. Diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and laboratory findings, diagnostic imaging, and cytologic and microbiologic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage or transtracheal wash fluid. Canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus, canine herpes virus, canine influenzavirus, canine distemper virus, canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) and canine pneumovirus, as well as B. bronchiseptica and Mycoplasma spp. were analyzed in respiratory samples using PCR assays. CPIV was detected in 7/20 and CRCoV in 1/20 dogs with BP. Respiratory viruses were not detected in dogs with BBTB. There were no significant differences in clinical variables between BP dogs with and without a viral co-infection. Respiratory viruses were found frequently in dogs with BP and may therefore play an important role in the etiology and pathogenesis of BP. Clinical variables and disease severity did not differ between BP dogs with and without viral co-infection. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  18. Occult bacterial lower urinary tract infections in cats-urinalysis and culture findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litster, Annette; Moss, Susan; Platell, Joanne; Trott, Darren J

    2009-04-14

    Bacterial urinary tract infections (UTIs) can be detected in feline urine submitted for urinalysis and culture as part of the diagnostic workup for a variety of conditions. Our aim was to investigate urinalysis and culture findings in urine specimens from cats with no history of lower urinary tract signs. Study inclusion criteria required cystocentesis specimens from cats with no history of lower urinary tract signs, inappropriate urination, or previous UTI (including pyelonephritis). Of 132 specimens, 38 were culture positive and 94 were culture negative. Culture positive urine specimens were more likely to come from older female cats (p=0.03, p<0.001, respectively) and they had higher pH (p=0.001), erythrocyte (p=0.013) and leukocyte counts (p=0.003) than culture negative urine specimens. Gram-negative infected specimens (n=15) had lower urine specific gravity and higher leukocyte counts than Gram-positive infected specimens (n=21; p=0.0012, p=0.005, respectively) and culture negative specimens (p=0.003, p<0.0001, respectively). Urine protein:creatinine ratio was higher in Gram-negative infected urine than in culture negative urine (p=0.013). Enterococcus faecalis was the most commonly isolated bacteria (19 of a total of 44 isolates; 43.2%) and E. coli phylogenetic group B2 was the most common Gram-negative isolate (14 of a total of 44 isolates; 31.8%). We conclude that feline bacterial urinary tract infections can occur in cats without lower urinary tract signs, particularly older females and that they are associated with high urine erythrocyte and leukocyte counts.

  19. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, L.D.; Sangwijit, K.; Prakrajang, K.; Phanchaisri, B.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Thopan, P.; Singkarat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion bombardment could induce DNA transfer into E. coli cells. • The DNA transfer induction depended on ion energy and fluence. • The mechanism was associated with the bacterial cell envelope structure. • A mechanism phase diagram was proposed to summarize the mechanism. - Abstract: As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10–20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence

  20. Optimized localization of bacterial infections with technetium-99m labelled human immunoglobulin after protein charge selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welling, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands)); Feitsma, H.I.J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands)); Calame, W. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands)); Ensing, G.J. (Mallinckrodt Medical, Petten (Netherlands)); Goedemans, W. (Mallinckrodt Medical, Petten (Netherlands)); Pauwels, E.K.J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands))

    1994-10-01

    To improve the scintigraphic detection of bacterial infections a protein charge-purified fraction of polyclonal human immunoglobulin was applied as a radiopharmaceutical. This purification was achieved by attaching the immunoglobulin to an anion-exchanger column and by obtaining the column-bound fraction with buffer. The binding to bacteria in vitro and the target to non-target ratios of an experimental thigh infection with Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice were evaluated to compare the purified and the unpurified immunoglobulin. The percentage of binding to all gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria used in this study was significantly (P<0.03) higher for the purified than for the unpurified immunoglobulin. For the in vivo study, mice were infected in the thigh muscle with Staph. aureus or K. pneumoniae. After 18 h 0.1 mg of technetium-99m labelled polyclonal immunoglobulin or [sup 99m]Tc-labelled protein charge-purified polyclonal human immunoglobulin was administered intravenously. At all time intervals the target (infected thighs) to non-target (non-infected thighs) ratios for both infections were significantly higher (P<0.03) for protein charge-purified polyclonal immunoglobulin than for unpurified polyclonal human immunoglobulin. Already within 1 h the infected tissues could be detected by the purified immunoglobulin. It is concluded that [sup 99m]Tc-labelled protein charge-purified immunoglobulin localizes both a gram-positive and a gram-negative thigh infection more intensely and faster than [sup 99m]Tc-labelled unpurified immunoglobulin. (orig.)

  1. Altered functionality of anti-bacterial antibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Lamontagne

    Full Text Available Using comparative glycoproteomics, we have previously identified a glycoprotein that is altered in both amount and glycosylation as a function of liver cirrhosis. The altered glycoprotein is an agalactosylated (G0 immunoglobulin G molecule (IgG that recognizes the heterophilic alpha-gal epitope. Since the alpha gal epitope is found on gut enterobacteria, it has been hypothesized that anti-gal antibodies are generated as a result of increased bacterial exposure in patients with liver disease.The N-linked glycosylation of anti-gal IgG molecules from patients with fibrosis and cirrhosis was determined and the effector function of anti-bacterial antibodies from over 100 patients examined. In addition, markers of microbial exposure were determined.Surprisingly, the subset of agalactosylated anti-gal antibodies described here, was impaired in their ability to mediate complement mediated lysis and inhibited the complement-mediated destruction of common gut bacteria. In an analysis of serum from more than 100 patients with liver disease, we have shown that those with increased levels of this modified anti-gal antibody had increased levels of markers of bacterial exposure.Anti-gal antibodies in patients with liver cirrhosis were reduced in their ability to mediate complement mediated lysis of target cells. As bacterial infection is a major complication in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial products such as LPS are thought to play a major role in the development and progression of liver fibrosis, this finding has many clinical implications in the etiology, prognosis and treatment of liver disease.

  2. Elevation of serum thymidine kinase 1 in a bacterial infection: canine pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, H; Hagman, R; Wang, L; Eriksson, S

    2013-01-01

    Pyometra is a bacterial infection of the uterus that is common in dogs and is potentially life-threatening if delayed in diagnosis and/or treatment. Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a cytosolic enzyme involved in DNA precursor synthesis, and it is also present in serum from patients with malignant diseases. TK1 has been used as a cell proliferation biomarker for many years in human medicine and recently in dogs. However, little is known regarding serum TK1 levels in individuals with bacterial infection. The objective of this study was to determine the activity of serum TK1 in dogs with pyometra and compare it with hematologic and biochemical parameters, e.g., acute phase proteins and inflammatory mediators such as C-reactive protein and Prostaglandin F(2α). Serum and plasma TK1 activity of 40 healthy female dogs and 54 dogs with pyometra were analyzed using an optimized [(3)H]-thymidine phosphorylation assay. TK1 activities in serum or plasma were significantly higher in dogs with pyometra as compared with healthy female dogs (mean ± SD: 4.0 ± 7.3 pmol/min/mL in the pyometra group and 1.07 ± 0.34 pmol/min/mL in healthy control group). However, there was no difference in TK1 activity between systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) positive (n = 38) and SIRS negative (n = 16) pyometra cases. Furthermore, the plasma TK1 activity decreased in six and increased in one pyometra patients (n = 10), 24 h after ovariohysterectomy. No significant correlations (P > 0.05) were found between TK1 activity and hematological or other biochemical parameters. In conclusion, the TK1 activity was significantly elevated in dogs with pyometra. Further studies are needed to evaluate the mechanism and role of serum TK1 activity in bacterial infections and its possible diagnostic or prognostic value. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthetic furanones inhibit quorum-sensing and enhance bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.; Hentzer, Morten

    2004-01-01

    lung infection by targeting bacterial quorum-sensing without directly killing bacteria or inhibiting their growth. Methods: Study I. Mice with Escherichia coli MT102 [luxR-PluxI-gfp(ASV)] lung infection were injected intravenously with N-acyl homoserine lactones with or without furanones to test...

  4. Usefulness of clinical data and rapid diagnostic tests to identify bacterial etiology in adult respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Toledano-Sierra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections are a common complaint and most of them, such as common cold and laryngitis, are viral in origin, so antibiotic use should be exceptional. However, there are other respiratory tract infections (sinusitis, pharyngitis, lower respiratory tract infections, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where a bacterial etiology is responsible for a non-negligible percentage, and antibiotics are often empirically indicated. The aim of the study is to identify the strength of the data obtained from the symptoms, physical examination and rapid diagnostic methods in respiratory infections in which antibiotic use is frequently proposed in order to improve diagnosis and influence the decision to prescribe these drugs. The review concludes that history, physical examination and rapid tests are useful to guide the need for antibiotic treatment in diseases such as acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, exacerbation of lower respiratory tract infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, no isolated data is accurate enough by itself to confirm or rule out the need for antibiotics. Therefore, clinical prediction rules bring together history and physical examination, thereby improving the accuracy of the decision to indicate or not antibiotics.

  5. Effects of low intensity laser in in vitro bacterial culture and in vivo infected wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela Rosa Pereira

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to compare the effects of low intensity laser therapy on in vitro bacterial growth and in vivo in infected wounds, and to analyze the effectiveness of the AsGa Laser technology in in vivo wound infections. METHODS: in vitro: Staphylococcus aureus were incubated on blood agar plates, half of them being irradiated with 904 nm wavelength laser and dose of 3J/cm2 daily for seven days. In vivo: 32 male Wistar rats were divided into control group (uninfected and Experimental Group (Infected. Half of the animals had their wounds irradiated. RESULTS: in vitro: there was no statistically significant variation between the experimental groups as for the source plates and the derived ones (p>0.05. In vivo: there was a significant increase in the deposition of type I and III collagen in the wounds of the infected and irradiated animals when assessed on the fourth day of the experiment (p=0.034. CONCLUSION: low-intensity Laser Therapy applied with a wavelength of 904nm and dose 3J/cm2 did not alter the in vitro growth of S. aureus in experimental groups; in vivo, however, it showed significant increase in the deposition of type I and III collagen in the wound of infected and irradiated animals on the fourth day of the experiment.

  6. Secondary bacterial infections of buruli ulcer lesions before and after chemotherapy with streptomycin and rifampicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Kpeli, Grace S; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Asan-Ampah, Kobina; Quenin-Fosu, Kwabena; Owusu-Mireku, Evelyn; Paintsil, Albert; Lamptey, Isaac; Anku, Benjamin; Kwakye-Maclean, Cynthia; Newman, Mercy; Pluschke, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a chronic necrotizing skin disease. It usually starts with a subcutaneous nodule or plaque containing large clusters of extracellular acid-fast bacilli. Surrounding tissue is destroyed by the cytotoxic macrolide toxin mycolactone produced by microcolonies of M. ulcerans. Skin covering the destroyed subcutaneous fat and soft tissue may eventually break down leading to the formation of large ulcers that progress, if untreated, over months and years. Here we have analyzed the bacterial flora of BU lesions of three different groups of patients before, during and after daily treatment with streptomycin and rifampicin for eight weeks (SR8) and determined drug resistance of the bacteria isolated from the lesions. Before SR8 treatment, more than 60% of the examined BU lesions were infected with other bacteria, with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most prominent ones. During treatment, 65% of all lesions were still infected, mainly with P. aeruginosa. After completion of SR8 treatment, still more than 75% of lesions clinically suspected to be infected were microbiologically confirmed as infected, mainly with P. aeruginosa or Proteus miriabilis. Drug susceptibility tests revealed especially for S. aureus a high frequency of resistance to the first line drugs used in Ghana. Our results show that secondary infection of BU lesions is common. This could lead to delayed healing and should therefore be further investigated.

  7. How nanotechnology-enabled concepts could contribute to the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Inge K

    2015-05-29

    This viewpoint summarizes a selection of nanotechnology-based key concepts relevant to critical care medicine. It focuses on novel approaches for a trigger-dependent release of antimicrobial substances from degradable nano-sized carriers, the ultra-sensitive detection of analytes in body fluid samples by plasmonic and fluorescent nanoparticles, and the rapid removal of pathogens from whole blood using magnetic nanoparticles. The concepts presented here could significantly contribute to the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of bacterial infections in future and it is now our turn to bring them from the bench to the bedside.

  8. Immunostimulation using bacterial antigens – mechanism ofaction and clinical practice inviral respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Feleszko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent respiratory tract infections constitute a significant problem in the practice of a general practitioner and paediatrician. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial strains, which has been growing for years, prompts the search for alternative ways of combating pathogens. One of them is the usage of preparations based on cell lysis of various bacterial strains. Bacterial lysates have been available in Europe for many years. In preclinical trials, they are characterised by the capability of reducing infections caused by bacteria and viruses that are not the components of the preparations. A range of clinical trials have demonstrated their usefulness in reducing the frequency of seasonal respiratory tract infections and antibiotic use. Moreover, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease gain an additional advantage in the form of the reduction of the risk of hospitalization due to disease exacerbations and a positive influence on the survival curve. The action of bacterial lysates is based on oral immunostimulation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, which results in increased antibody production. Moreover, they activate a range of mucosal mechanisms of non-specific immunity, mainly by enhancing the activity of TLR-dependent mechanisms. The efficacy of this group of drugs has been confirmed in a range of clinical trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Recent studies also indicate their immunoregulatory potential, suggesting that they might be used in the future in preventing allergies, asthma and autoimmune diseases. To conclude, physicians (paediatricians, laryngologists, pulmonologists should consider reducing the use of antibiotics in their daily practice. Instead, they should offer preparations that promote the immune system, thus controlling infections in a better way.

  9. BET 2: Can procalcitonin accurately diagnose serious bacterial infection in emergency department patients with SIRS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Joel; Baskerville, Jerry; Zarabi, Sahar

    2017-09-01

    A shortcut review was carried out to establish whether serum procalcitonin levels can be used to identify serious bacterial infection in ED patients with undifferentiated SIRS. 14 papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The review concludes that raised procalcitonin levels are associated with bacteraemia; however, there are no clinical management studies addressing this question in ED patients with SIRS. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Review of oritavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Robles, Ana Alejandra; López Briz, Eduardo; Fraga Fuentes, María Dolores; Asensi Diez, Rocío; Sierra Sánchez, Jesús Francisco

    2018-03-01

    To assess critically oritavancin, a second-generation  lipoglycopeptide, for the treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. An evaluation report of oritavancin in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin  Structure Infections was carried out according to the methodology of the Group  for drug evaluation, standardization and research in drug selection of the  Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH)1, with the MADRE 4.0 program. A  search was made in PubMed, in the web www.clinicaltrials. gov, Embase,  PubMed and UptoDate. The European Medication Agency and Food and Drug  Administration evaluation reports were also used. Single-dose oritavancin demonstrated its non-inferiority efficacy versus  vancomycin in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure  nfections, with a similar safety profile. Its potential advantage over other  therapeutic alternatives lies in its administration in single dose and in its no need for plasma levels monitoring, which would allow its administration on an outpatient basis. Regarding to the other alternative possibilities of oral  (linezolid, tedizolid) or IM (teicoplanin) treatment, oritavancin would improve the  adherence to the treatment. Although oritavancin could be more  efficient in certain scenarios (outpatient treatment versus inpatient treatment  with alternatives), there are no convincing studies in this regard so far. On the  other hand, alternative drugs above-mentioned, can also allow outpatient  treatment, reducing advantages of oritavancin and further increasing cost  differences. Therefore, given that the efficacy is similar to the alternatives, a  cost minimization analysis could be considered. Oritavancin is comparable in terms of efficacy and safety to the  existing alternatives in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections,  without improvements in the cost

  11. The Human Skin Microbiome Associates with the Outcome of and Is Influenced by Bacterial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Julia J; Lin, Huaiying; Gao, Xiang; Toh, Evelyn; Fortney, Kate R; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Janowicz, Diane M; Katz, Barry P; Nelson, David E; Dong, Qunfeng; Spinola, Stanley M

    2015-09-15

    The influence of the skin microbiota on host susceptibility to infectious agents is largely unexplored. The skin harbors diverse bacterial species that may promote or antagonize the growth of an invading pathogen. We developed a human infection model for Haemophilus ducreyi in which human volunteers are inoculated on the upper arm. After inoculation, papules form and either spontaneously resolve or progress to pustules. To examine the role of the skin microbiota in the outcome of H. ducreyi infection, we analyzed the microbiomes of four dose-matched pairs of "resolvers" and "pustule formers" whose inoculation sites were swabbed at multiple time points. Bacteria present on the skin were identified by amplification and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) using Bray-Curtis dissimilarity between the preinfection microbiomes of infected sites showed that sites from the same volunteer clustered together and that pustule formers segregated from resolvers (P = 0.001, permutational multivariate analysis of variance [PERMANOVA]), suggesting that the preinfection microbiomes were associated with outcome. NMDS using Bray-Curtis dissimilarity of the endpoint samples showed that the pustule sites clustered together and were significantly different than the resolved sites (P = 0.001, PERMANOVA), suggesting that the microbiomes at the endpoint differed between the two groups. In addition to H. ducreyi, pustule-forming sites had a greater abundance of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, Paracoccus, and Staphylococcus species, whereas resolved sites had higher levels of Actinobacteria and Propionibacterium species. These results suggest that at baseline, resolvers and pustule formers have distinct skin bacterial communities which change in response to infection and the resultant immune response. Human skin is home to a diverse community of microorganisms, collectively known as the skin microbiome. Some resident

  12. Helminth infections induce immunomodulation: consequences and mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Riet, Petronella Helena van

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, more than a billion people are infected with helminths. These worm infections are chronic in nature and can lead to considerable morbidity. Immunologically these infections are interesting; chronic helminth infections are characterized by skewing towards a T helper 2 type response as well as regulatory responses. The latter is thought to prevent strong immune responses against parasitic worms, allowing their long-term survival and restricting pathology. This regulatory network is t...

  13. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Activation during the Granulopoietic Response to Systemic Bacterial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin; Wei, Shengcai; Simms, Kevin J; Cumpston, Devan N; Ewing, Thomas J; Zhang, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Activation and reprogramming of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells play a critical role in the granulopoietic response to bacterial infection. Our current study determined the significance of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling in the regulation of hematopoietic precursor cell activity during the host defense response to systemic bacterial infection. Bacteremia was induced in male Balb/c mice via intravenous injection (i.v.) of Escherichia coli (5 × 10 7 CFUs/mouse). Control mice received i.v. saline. SHH protein level in bone marrow cell (BMC) lysates was markedly increased at both 24 and 48 h of bacteremia. By contrast, the amount of soluble SHH ligand in marrow elutes was significantly reduced. These contrasting alterations suggested that SHH ligand release from BMCs was reduced and/or binding of soluble SHH ligand to BMCs was enhanced. At both 12 and 24 h of bacteremia, SHH mRNA expression by BMCs was significantly upregulated. This upregulation of SHH mRNA expression was followed by a marked increase in SHH protein expression in BMCs. Activation of the ERK1/2-SP1 pathway was involved in mediating the upregulation of SHH gene expression. The major cell type showing the enhancement of SHH expression in the bone marrow was lineage positive cells. Gli1 positioned downstream of the SHH receptor activation serves as a key component of the hedgehog (HH) pathway. Primitive hematopoietic precursor cells exhibited the highest level of baseline Gli1 expression, suggesting that they were active cells responding to SHH ligand stimulation. Along with the increased expression of SHH in the bone marrow, expression of Gli1 by marrow cells was significantly upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels following bacteremia. This enhancement of Gli1 expression was correlated with activation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell proliferation. Mice with Gli1 gene deletion showed attenuation in activation of marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell proliferation and inhibition

  14. Bacterial infection as a likely cause of adverse reactions to polyacrylamide hydrogel fillers in cosmetic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise; Breiting, Vibeke; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background. The etiology of long-lasting adverse reactions to gel fillers used in cosmetic surgery is not known. Bacterial infection and immunological reaction to the product have been suggested. Methods. We performed a case-control study, with 77 biopsies and 30 cytology specimens originating from...... 59 patients with adverse reactions to polyacrylamide gel, and 54 biopsies and 2 cytology specimens from 28 control subjects with no adverse reactions. Samples from 5 patients and 4 controls could not be investigated for presence of bacteria owing to limited material. Samples from the remaining 54...... in bacteriologically investigated samples from 53 of 54 patients (98%), and in none of the 24 controls (0%). The bacteria were lying in small clusters, which in symptomatic lesions were detected up to 5 years postinjection. Conclusions. Commensal bacteria of low virulence are capable of producing long-term infection...

  15. Advances and Opportunities in Nanoparticle- and Nanomaterial-Based Vaccines against Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Leon Chien-Wei; Chattopadhyay, Saborni; Lin, Jung-Chen; Hu, Che-Ming Jack

    2018-03-06

    As the dawn of the postantibiotic era we approach, antibacterial vaccines are becoming increasingly important for managing bacterial infection and reducing the need for antibiotics. Despite the success of vaccination, vaccines remain unavailable for many pressing microbial diseases, including tuberculosis, chlamydia, and staphylococcus infections. Amid continuing research efforts in antibacterial vaccine development, the advancement of nanomaterial engineering has brought forth new opportunities in vaccine designs. With increasing knowledge in antibacterial immunity and immunologic adjuvants, innovative nanoparticles are designed to elicit the appropriate immune responses for effective antimicrobial defense. Rationally designed nanoparticles are demonstrated to overcome delivery barriers to shape the adaptive immunity. This article reviews the advances in nanoparticle- and nanomaterial-based antibacterial vaccines and summarizes the development of nanoparticulate adjuvants for immune potentiation against microbial pathogens. In addition, challenges and progress in ongoing antibacterial vaccine development are discussed to highlight the opportunities for future vaccine designs. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Parasitic and Bacterial Infections of Myocastor coypus in a Metropolitan Area of Northwestern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzani, Sergio A; Di Cerbo, Annarita; Gazzonis, Alessia L; Epis, Sara; Invernizzi, Anna; Tagliabue, Silvia; Manfredi, Maria T

    2016-01-01

    Coypus (Myocastor coypus) are widespread throughout Europe. In northern Italy, they are abundant in the flatland areas, and their high population densities can cause economic loss and ecosystem damage. We examined 153 coypus for selected parasitic and bacterial infections. We found Strongyloides myopotami (63.4% prevalence), Trichostrongylus duretteae (28.1%), Eimeria coypi (86.3%), and Eimeria seideli (6.8%), but did not find Giardia duodenalis or Cryptosporidium spp. We also isolated Staphylococcus aureus (10.1%), Escherichia coli (4.5%), and Streptococcus spp. (3.4%) from lung samples; no Salmonella spp. were isolated from fecal samples. Coypus had antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii (28.9%) and to four serovars of Leptospira interrogans (44.9%); Australis/Bratislava was the serovar most frequently detected. It is clear that coypu can be infected with pathogens of human and veterinary importance.

  17. Synergistic antimicrobial therapy using nanoparticles and antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akash; Saleh, Neveen M.; Das, Riddha; Landis, Ryan F.; Bigdeli, Arafeh; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Rosa Campos, Alexandre; Pomeroy, Kenneth; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2017-06-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria pose a serious global burden of mortality, causing thousands of deaths each year. Antibiotic treatment of resistant infections further contributes to the rapidly increasing number of antibiotic-resistant species and strains. Synthetic macromolecules such as nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit broad-spectrum activity against MDR species, however lack of specificity towards bacteria relative to their mammalian hosts limits their widespread therapeutic application. Here, we demonstrate synergistic antimicrobial therapy using hydrophobically functionalized NPs and fluoroquinolone antibiotics for treatment of MDR bacterial strains. An 8-16-fold decrease in antibiotic dosage is achieved in presence of engineered NPs to combat MDR strains. This strategy demonstrates the potential of using NPs to ‘revive’ antibiotics that have been rendered ineffective due to the development of resistance by pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Retrospective Analysis of Bacterial and Viral Co-Infections in Pneumocystis spp. Positive Lung Samples of Austrian Pigs with Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Weissenbacher-Lang

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was the retrospective investigation of viral (porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV, torque teno sus virus type 1 and 2 (TTSuV1, TTSuV2 and bacterial (Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. b., Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. h., and Pasteurella multocida (P. m. co-infections in 110 Pneumocystis spp. positive lung samples of Austrian pigs with pneumonia. Fifty-one % were positive for PCV2, 7% for PRRSV, 22% for TTSuV1, 48% for TTSuV2, 6% for B. b., 29% for M. h., and 21% for P. m. In 38.2% only viral, in 3.6% only bacterial and in 40.0% both, viral and bacterial pathogens were detected. In 29.1% of the cases a co-infection with 1 pathogen, in 28.2% with 2, in 17.3% with 3, and in 7.3% with 4 different infectious agents were observed. The exposure to Pneumocystis significantly decreased the risk of a co-infection with PRRSV in weaning piglets; all other odds ratios were not significant. Four categories of results were compared: I = P. spp. + only viral co-infectants, II = P. spp. + both viral and bacterial co-infectants, III = P. spp. + only bacterial co-infectants, and IV = P. spp. single infection. The evaluation of all samples and the age class of the weaning piglets resulted in a predomination of the categories I and II. In contrast, the suckling piglets showed more samples of category I and IV. In the group of fattening pigs, category II predominated. Suckling piglets can be infected with P. spp. early in life. With increasing age this single infections can be complicated by co-infections with other respiratory diseases.

  19. Antibiotic Resistance: New Challenge in the Management of Bacterial Eye Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, A K; Sultana, Z; Jahan, I; Khanam, M; Rahman, M; Rahman, M F; Rahman, M B

    2017-01-01

    Ophthalmologists are still facing difficulties in managing bacterial eye infections. The study was designed for the isolation and identification of bacteria from infected eyes and observation of the sensitivity and resistant pattern. This cross sectional study was performed among 160 patients of suspected bacterial eye infection at Dr. K. Zaman BNSB Eye Hospital, Mymensingh and Department of Microbiology and Hygiene, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh from March, 2010 to June, 2014. After collection of the samples from suspected infected eyes, it was nourished into nutrient broth in shaking incubator for three hours and then cultured into nutrient agar media followed by Mannitol salt agar, MacConkey's agar and blood agar. Bacteria were categorized by colony characteristics and Gram staining. Antibiogram was performed by disc diffusion method on Mueller Hinton agar media. McFarland Equivalence Turbidity Standard was maintained. The efficacy of the drug was evaluated by measuring the diameter of the zone of inhibition surrounding the disc. Ten percent Staphylococcus species isolates was resistant to Gatifloxacin, Gentamicin, Tobramycin and Cloxacillin, 26.0% to Ciprofloxacin, 40.0% to Azythromycin and Moxifloxacin, 58.0% to Cefixime and 64.0% to Cephalexin. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 62.8%. About 24.0% Streptococcus species isolates was resistant to Gatifloxacin, 33.3% to Azythromycin, Ciprofloxacin, Gentamycin, Moxifloxacin and Tobramycin, 52.4% to Cefixime and 71.4% to Cephalexin. About 9.0% of Pseudomonas species was resistant to Gatifloxacin and Tobramycin, 14.7% to Ciprofloxacin, 26.5% to Cefixime, 29.4% to Gentamicin and Moxifloxacin, 44.1% to Azythromycin and 82.3% to Cephalexin and Cloxacillin. Rational use of antibiotics and proper attentions of concerned authorities are necessary to overcome the emergent ocular situation leaded by antibiotic resistant.

  20. An "On-Site Transformation" Strategy for Treatment of Bacterial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guo-Bin; Zhang, Di; Liu, Fu-Hua; Qiao, Zeng-Ying; Wang, Hao

    2017-09-01

    To date, numerous nanosystems have been developed as antibiotic replacements for bacterial infection treatment. However, these advanced systems are limited owing to their nontargeting accumulation and the consequent side effects. Herein, transformable polymer-peptide biomaterials have been developed that enable specific accumulation in the infectious site and long-term retention, resulting in enhanced binding capability and killing efficacy toward bacteria. The polymer-peptide conjugates are composed of a chitosan backbone and two functional peptides, i.e., an antimicrobial peptide and a poly(ethylene glycol)-tethered enzyme-cleavable peptide (CPC-1). The CPC-1 initially self-assembles into nanoparticles with pegylated coronas. Upon the peptides are cleaved by the gelatinase secreted by a broad spectrum of bacterial species, the resultant compartments of nanoparticles spontaneously transformed into fibrous nanostructures that are stabilized by enhanced chain-chain interaction, leading to exposure of antimicrobial peptide residues for multivalent cooperative electrostatic interactions with bacterial membranes. Intriguingly, the in situ morphological transformation also critically improves the accumulation and retention of CPC-1 in infectious sites in vivo, which exhibits highly efficient antibacterial activity. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that pathological environment-driven smart self-assemblies may provide a new idea for design of high-performance biomaterials for disease diagnostics and therapeutics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection: An overview of bacterial virulence factors and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yen Kao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis and disease outcomes are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial virulence factors, host, and environmental factors. After H. pylori enters the host stomach, four steps are critical for bacteria to establish successful colonization, persistent infection, and disease pathogenesis: (1 Survival in the acidic stomach; (2 movement toward epithelium cells by flagella-mediated motility; (3 attachment to host cells by adhesins/receptors interaction; (4 causing tissue damage by toxin release. Over the past 20 years, the understanding of H. pylori pathogenesis has been improved by studies focusing on the host and bacterial factors through epidemiology researches and molecular mechanism investigations. These include studies identifying the roles of novel virulence factors and their association with different disease outcomes, especially the bacterial adhesins, cag pathogenicity island, and vacuolating cytotoxin. Recently, the development of large-scale screening methods, including proteomic, and transcriptomic tools, has been used to determine the complex gene regulatory networks in H. pylori. In addition, a more available complete genomic database of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastrointestinal diseases worldwide is helpful to characterize this bacterium. This review highlights the key findings of H. pylori virulence factors reported over the past 20 years.

  2. Giardia duodenalis induces paracellular bacterial translocation and causes postinfectious visceral hypersensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliez, Marie C. M.; Motta, Jean-Paul; Feener, Troy D.; Guérin, Gaetan; LeGoff, Laetitia; François, Arnaud; Colasse, Elodie; Favennec, Loic; Gargala, Gilles; Lapointe, Tamia K.; Altier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequent functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is characterized by abdominal hypersensitivity, leading to discomfort and pain, as well as altered bowel habits. While it is common for IBS to develop following the resolution of infectious gastroenteritis [then termed postinfectious IBS (PI-IBS)], the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Giardia duodenalis is a cosmopolitan water-borne enteropathogen that causes intestinal malabsorption, diarrhea, and postinfectious complications. Cause-and-effect studies using a human enteropathogen to help investigate the mechanisms of PI-IBS are sorely lacking. In an attempt to establish causality between giardiasis and postinfectious visceral hypersensitivity, this study describes a new model of PI-IBS in neonatal rats infected with G. duodenalis. At 50 days postinfection with G. duodenalis (assemblage A or B), long after the parasite was cleared, rats developed visceral hypersensitivity to luminal balloon distension in the jejunum and rectum, activation of the nociceptive signaling pathway (increased c-fos expression), histological modifications (villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia), and proliferation of mucosal intraepithelial lymphocytes and mast cells in the jejunum, but not in the rectum. G. duodenalis infection also disrupted the intestinal barrier, in vivo and in vitro, which in turn promoted the translocation of commensal bacteria. Giardia-induced bacterial paracellular translocation in vitro correlated with degradation of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-4. The extensive observations associated with gut hypersensitivity described here demonstrate that, indeed, in this new model of postgiardiasis IBS, alterations to the gut mucosa and c-fos are consistent with those associated with PI-IBS and, hence, offer avenues for new mechanistic research in the field. PMID:26744469

  3. Influenza virus induces bacterial and nonbacterial otitis media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Short, K.R.; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Thornton, R.; Pedersen, J.; Strugnell, R.A.; Wise, A.K.; Reading, P.C.; Wijburg, O.L.

    2011-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common childhood diseases. OM can arise when a viral infection enables bacteria to disseminate from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Here, we provide the first infant murine model for disease. Mice coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus

  4. Ascites bacterial burden and immune cell profile are associated with poor clinical outcomes in the absence of overt infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Fagan

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections, most commonly spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with ascites, occur in one third of admitted patients with cirrhosis, and account for a 4-fold increase in mortality. Bacteria are isolated from less than 40% of ascites infections by culture, necessitating empirical antibiotic treatment, but culture-independent studies suggest bacteria are commonly present, even in the absence of overt infection. Widespread detection of low levels of bacteria in ascites, in the absence of peritonitis, suggests immune impairment may contribute to higher susceptibility to infection in cirrhotic patients. However, little is known about the role of ascites leukocyte composition and function in this context. We determined ascites bacterial composition by quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing in 25 patients with culture-negative, non-neutrocytic ascites, and compared microbiological data with ascites and peripheral blood leukocyte composition and phenotype. Bacterial DNA was detected in ascitic fluid from 23 of 25 patients, with significant positive correlations between bacterial DNA levels and poor 6-month clinical outcomes (death, readmission. Ascites leukocyte composition was variable, but dominated by macrophages or T lymphocytes, with lower numbers of B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Consistent with the hypothesis that impaired innate immunity contributes to susceptibility to infection, high bacterial DNA burden was associated with reduced major histocompatibility complex class II expression on ascites (but not peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages. These data indicate an association between the presence of ascites bacterial DNA and early death and readmission in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. They further suggest that impairment of innate immunity contributes to increased bacterial translocation, risk of peritonitis, or both.

  5. Bacterial urinary tract infection after solid organ transplantation in the RESITRA cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, E; Torre-Cisneros, J; Blanes, M; Montejo, M; Cervera, C; Aguado, J M; Len, O; Carratalá, J; Cordero, E; Bou, G; Muñoz, P; Ramos, A; Gurguí, M; Borrell, N; Fortún, J

    2012-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection in renal transplant patients, but it is necessary to determine the risk factors for bacterial UTI in recipients of other solid organ transplants (SOTs), as well as changes in etiology, clinical presentation, and prognosis. In total, 4388 SOT recipients were monitored in 16 transplant centers belonging to the Spanish Network for Research on Infection in Transplantation (RESITRA). The frequency and characteristics of bacterial UTI in transplant patients were obtained prospectively from the cohort (September 2003 to February 2005). A total of 192 patients (4.4%) presented 249 episodes of bacterial UTI (0.23 episodes per 1000 transplantation days); 156 patients were kidney or kidney-pancreas transplant recipients, and 36 patients were liver, heart, and lung transplant recipients. The highest frequency was observed in renal transplants (7.3%). High frequency of cystitis versus pyelonephritis without related mortality was observed in both groups. The most frequent etiology was Escherichia coli (57.8%), with 25.7% producing extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). In all transplants but renal, most cases occurred in the first month after transplantation. Cases were uniformly distributed during the first 6 months after transplantation in renal recipients. Age (odds ratio [OR] per decade 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.17), female gender (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.42-2.13), and the need for immediate post-transplant dialysis (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.29-2.05) were independent variables associated with bacterial UTI in renal and kidney-pancreas recipients. The independent risk factors identified in non-renal transplants were age (OR per decade 1.79, 95% CI 1.09-3.48), female gender (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.43-2.49), and diabetes (OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.001-1.040). UTI was frequent in renal transplants, but also not unusual in non-renal transplants. Because E. coli continues to be the most frequent etiology, the emergence of ESBL

  6. Escherichia coli-induced immune paralysis is not exacerbated during chronic filarial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerfent, Benedikt C; Gondorf, Fabian; Wohlleber, Dirk; Schumak, Beatrix; Hoerauf, Achim; Hübner, Marc P

    2015-05-01

    Sepsis initially starts with a systemic inflammatory response (SIRS phase) and is followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) that causes impaired adaptive T-cell immunity, immune paralysis and an increased susceptibility to secondary infections. In contrast, parasitic filariae release thousands of microfilariae into the peripheral blood without triggering inflammation, as they induce regulatory, anti-inflammatory host responses. Hence, we investigated the impact of chronic filarial infection on adaptive T-cell responses during the SIRS and CARS phases of a systemic bacterial infection and analysed the development of T-cell paralysis following a subsequent adenovirus challenge in BALB/c mice. Chronic filarial infection impaired adenovirus-specific CD8(+) T-cell cytotoxicity and interferon-γ responses in the absence of a bacterial challenge and led to higher numbers of splenic CTLA-4(+)  CD4(+) T cells, whereas splenic T-cell expression of CD69 and CD62 ligand, serum cytokine levels and regulatory T-cell frequencies were comparable to naive controls. Irrespective of filarial infection, the SIRS phase dominated 6-24 hr after intravenous Escherichia coli challenge with increased T-cell activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, whereas the CARS phase occurred 6 days post E. coli challenge and correlated with high levels of transforming growth factor-β and increased CD62 ligand T-cell expression. Escherichia coli-induced impairment of adenovirus-specific CD8(+) T-cell cytotoxicity and interferon-γ production was not additionally impaired by chronic filarial infection. This suggests that filarial immunoregulation does not exacerbate E. coli-induced T-cell paralysis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Tedizolid for treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ye; Xiaoju, Lü

    2015-01-01

    Tedizolid is a newly approved drug of the oxazolidinone class. It has high in vitro activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains. Peak plasma concentration of tedizolid is obtained within 3 h of oral dosing (PO), with high bioavailability. Tedizolid is mostly metabolized via the liver, and is excreted in feces in the form of a sulfate conjugate. Tedizolid 200 mg taken once daily demonstrated non-inferior efficacy and a good safety profile in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. Results of two pivotal Phase III clinical trials showed that 6 days of 200 mg tedizolid PO or sequential intravenous (IV)/PO once-daily treatment was non-inferior to 10 days of 600 mg linezolid PO or sequential IV/PO twice-daily treatment at 48-72 h (primary end point) and at the test-of-cure in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. The Phase II and Phase III trials also demonstrated that tedizolid was well tolerated.

  8. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Javid

    Full Text Available Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted.

  9. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy using zinc phthalocyanine derivative for bacterial skin infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Yaxin; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Shanyong; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Huang, Mingdong

    2014-09-01

    Folliculitis, furunculosis and acne vulgaris are very common skin disorders of the hair follicles and are associated with large grease-producing (sebaceous) glands. Although the detailed mechanisms involved these skin disorders are not fully understood, it is believed that the bacteria Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus are the key pathogenic factors involved. Conventional treatments targeting the pathogenic factors include a variety of topical and oral medications such as antibiotics. The wide use of antibiotics leads to bacterial resistance, and hence there is a need for new alternatives in above bacterial skin treatment. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is based on an initial photosensitization of the infected area, followed by irradiation with visible light, producing singlet oxygen which is cytotoxic to bacteria. Herein we reported a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-(Lys)5) and its PACT effect for the bacteria involved in these skin infections. Our results demonstrated strong bactericidal effects of this photosensitizer on both strains of the bacteria, suggesting ZnPc-(Lys)5 as a promising antimicrobial photosensitizer for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by these bacteria.

  10. Bacterial urinary tract infection among pregnant women in Sana'a City Yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ghalibi, S.M.; Al-Moayad, E.; Al-Jaufy, A.

    2007-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is considered to be the most common bacterial infection during pregnancy. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of UTI among pregnant women, to identify the risk factors associated with UTI, to isolate and identify bacteria that are responsible for UTI and to determine the activity of some antibiotics against isolated bacteria. A total of 400 midstream urine specimens were collected from pregnant women (PW) and non-pregnant women (NPW). Identification and antibiotic sensitivity tests were made for the isolated bacteria. The prevalence rates of UTI in PW and NPW were 24.3% and 18.0% respectively. The association between pregnancy and UTI was not statistically significant (P=0.19). The higher prevalence rate of UTI was found in the age group 21-25 years old. However, there was no statistical significant association between age and UTI. The second trimester and third trimester were associated with higher prevalence of UTI (38.3%) and (37.0%), respectively but it was not statistically significant. High frequency of urination and lower abdominal pain were the most common symptoms. There was no statistical association between UTI and contraceptive use. The most common isolates were S. aureus and E.Coli, while the most effective antibiotics for most bacterial isolates were ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and norofloxacin. (author)

  11. Inhibition of bacterial adherence by cranberry juice: potential use for the treatment of urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, A E

    1984-05-01

    Cranberry juice has been widely used for the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections and is reputed to give symptomatic relief from these infections. Attempts to account for the potential benefit derived from the juice have focused on urine acidification and bacteriostasis. In this investigation it is demonstrated that cranberry juice is a potent inhibitor of bacterial adherence. A total of 77 clinical isolates of Escherichia coli were tested. Cranberry juice inhibited adherence by 75 per cent or more in over 60 per cent of the clinical isolates. Cranberry cocktail was also given to mice in the place of their normal water supply for a period of 14 days. Urine collected from these mice inhibited adherence of E. coli to uroepithelial cells by approximately 80 per cent. Antiadherence activity could also be detected in human urine. Fifteen of 22 subjects showed significant antiadherence activity in the urine 1 to 3 hours after drinking 15 ounces of cranberry cocktail. It is concluded that the reported benefits derived from the use of cranberry juice may be related to its ability to inhibit bacterial adherence.

  12. Characterization of Chemically-Induced Bacterial Ghosts (BGs Using Sodium Hydroxide-Induced Vibrio parahaemolyticus Ghosts (VPGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jung Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acellular bacterial ghosts (BGs are empty non-living bacterial cell envelopes, commonly generated by controlled expression of the cloned lysis gene E of bacteriophage PhiX174. In this study, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ghosts (VPGs were generated by chemically-induced lysis and the method is based on minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of sodium hydroxide (NaOH, acetic acid, boric acid, citric acid, maleic acid, hydrochloric acid, and sulfuric acid. The MIC values of the respective chemicals were 3.125, 6.25, <50.0, 25.0, 6.25, 1.56, and 0.781 mg/mL. Except for boric acid, the lysis efficiency reached more than 99.99% at 5 min after treatment of all chemicals. Among those chemicals, NaOH-induced VPGs appeared completely DNA-free, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Besides, lipopolysaccharides (LPS extracted from the NaOH-induced VPGs showed no distinctive band on SDS-PAGE gel after silver staining. On the other hand, LPS extracted from wild-type bacterial cells, as well as the organic acids-induced VPGs showed triple major bands and LPS extracted from the inorganic acids-induced VPGs showed double bands. It suggests that some surface structures in LPS of the NaOH-induced VPGs may be lost, weakened, or modified by the MIC of NaOH. Nevertheless, Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay revealed that there is no significant difference in endotoxic activity between the NaOH-induced VPGs and wild-type bacterial cells. Macrophages exposed to the NaOH-induced VPGs at 0.5 × 106 CFU/mL showed cell viability of 97.9%, however, the MIC of NaOH did not reduce the cytotoxic effect of wild-type bacterial cells. Like Escherichia coli LPS, the NaOH-induced VPGs are an excellent activator of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and iNOS, anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10, and dual activities (IL-6 in the stimulated macrophage cells. On the other hand, the induction of TNF-α mRNA was remarkable in the macrophages exposed with wild-type cells. Scanning

  13. Characterization of Chemically-Induced Bacterial Ghosts (BGs) Using Sodium Hydroxide-Induced Vibrio parahaemolyticus Ghosts (VPGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jung; Oh, Sung; Vinod, Nagarajan; Ji, Seongmi; Noh, Han Byul; Koo, Jung Mo; Lee, Su Hyeong; Kim, Sei Chang; Lee, Ki-Sung; Choi, Chang Won

    2016-11-15

    Acellular bacterial ghosts (BGs) are empty non-living bacterial cell envelopes, commonly generated by controlled expression of the cloned lysis gene E of bacteriophage PhiX174. In this study, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ghosts (VPGs) were generated by chemically-induced lysis and the method is based on minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), acetic acid, boric acid, citric acid, maleic acid, hydrochloric acid, and sulfuric acid. The MIC values of the respective chemicals were 3.125, 6.25, <50.0, 25.0, 6.25, 1.56, and 0.781 mg/mL. Except for boric acid, the lysis efficiency reached more than 99.99% at 5 min after treatment of all chemicals. Among those chemicals, NaOH-induced VPGs appeared completely DNA-free, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Besides, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from the NaOH-induced VPGs showed no distinctive band on SDS-PAGE gel after silver staining. On the other hand, LPS extracted from wild-type bacterial cells, as well as the organic acids-induced VPGs showed triple major bands and LPS extracted from the inorganic acids-induced VPGs showed double bands. It suggests that some surface structures in LPS of the NaOH-induced VPGs may be lost, weakened, or modified by the MIC of NaOH. Nevertheless, Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay revealed that there is no significant difference in endotoxic activity between the NaOH-induced VPGs and wild-type bacterial cells. Macrophages exposed to the NaOH-induced VPGs at 0.5 × 10⁶ CFU/mL showed cell viability of 97.9%, however, the MIC of NaOH did not reduce the cytotoxic effect of wild-type bacterial cells. Like Escherichia coli LPS, the NaOH-induced VPGs are an excellent activator of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and iNOS), anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and dual activities (IL-6) in the stimulated macrophage cells. On the other hand, the induction of TNF-α mRNA was remarkable in the macrophages exposed with wild-type cells. Scanning electron

  14. Antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial infections in afebrile neutropenic patients following chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Fraser, Abigail; Paul, Mical; Vidal, Liat; Lawrie, Theresa A; van de Wetering, Marianne D; Kremer, Leontien CM; Leibovici, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who are neutropenic following chemotherapy for malignancy. Trials have shown the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing the incidence of bacterial infections but not in reducing mortality rates. Our systematic review from 2006 also showed a reduction in mortality. Objectives This updated review aimed to evaluate whether there is still a benefit of reduction in mortality when compared to placebo or no intervention. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cancer Network Register of Trials (2011), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2011), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2011), EMBASE (1980 to March 2011), abstracts of conference proceedings and the references of identified studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing different types of antibiotic prophylaxis with placebo or no intervention, or another antibiotic, to prevent bacterial infections in afebrile neutropenic patients. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently appraised the quality of each trial and extracted data from the included trials. Analyses were performed using RevMan 5.1 software. Main results One-hundred and nine trials (involving 13,579 patients) that were conducted between the years 1973 to 2010 met the inclusion criteria. When compared with placebo or no intervention, antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced the risk of death from all causes (46 trials, 5635 participants; risk ratio (RR) 0.66, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.79) and the risk of infection-related death (43 trials, 5777 participants; RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.77). The estimated number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one death was 34 (all-cause mortality) and 48 (infection-related mortality). Prophylaxis also significantly reduced the occurrence of fever (54 trials, 6658 participants; RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.87), clinically documented infection

  15. Rotation-Induced Polymorphic Transitions in Bacterial Flagella

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    Vogel, Reinhard; Stark, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria propel themselves with the help of rotating helical flagella. They change their swimming direction during tumbling events in order to increase, for example, their supply of nutrients (chemotaxis). During tumbling a bacterial flagellum assumes different polymorphic states. Based on a continuum model for the motor-flagellum system, we demonstrate that a changing motor torque can initiate these polymorphic transformations. In particular, we investigate the run-and-stop tumble strategy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides which uses a coiled-to-normal transition in its single flagellum. We also show that torque reversal in single-flagellated Escherichia coli generates a normal-to-curly I transition as observed for tumbling E. coli that swim with a bundle of several flagella.

  16. Risk factors and features of recurrent bacterial complications of upper respiratory tract viral infections in children

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    Karpenko A.V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine risk factors for recurrent bacterial complications of the upper respiratory tract viral infection (URTI in children, as well as the clinical and immunological features of the course of such complications. We enrolled 214 children aged 3-18 years with URTIs complicated with acute otitis media or acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Frequency of bacterial complications of URI in 128 children was low (group I and in 86 children it met the criteria of recurrent course (group II. In addition to the standard examination, lysozyme levels in the oropharyngeal secretion were determined three times during the disease. It was found that children of group II were characterized by an early debut of respiratory morbidity (at the age of 6.00 (4.00, 12.00 months against 13.00 (4.50, 16.00 months in children of group I (p<0,0001, as well as a longer duration of catarrhal and intoxication syndromes in similar forms of the disease. The most significant risk factors for the formation of the recurring complication pattern were maternal smoking (OR=2.73, 95% CI [1.34, 5.48], along with gastroenterological pathology and frequent URTI in the mother and a shortened period of breastfeeding. In children with recurrent bacterial complications of URTI, there was an impaired local resistance of the upper respiratory tract mucous membranes (as a decrease in the concentrations of lysozyme in all periods of the disease, which persisted after recovery.

  17. Bacterial colonisation of suture material after routine neurosurgical procedures: relevance for wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bujung; Winkel, Andreas; Ertl, Philipp; Stumpp, Sascha Nico; Schwabe, Kerstin; Stiesch, Meike; Krauss, Joachim K

    2018-03-01

    Wound healing impairment is a serious problem in surgical disciplines which may be associated with chronic morbidity, increased cost and patient discomfort. Here we aimed to investigate the relevance of bacterial colonisation on suture material using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect and taxonomically classify bacterial DNA in patients with and without wound healing problems after routine neurosurgical procedures. Repeat surgery was performed in 25 patients with wound healing impairment and in 38 patients with well-healed wounds. To determine the presence of bacteria, a 16S rDNA-based PCR detection method was applied. Fragments of 500 bp were amplified using universal primers which target hypervariable regions within the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Amplicons were separated from each other by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and finally classified using Sanger sequencing. PCR/SSCP detected DNA of various bacteria species on suture material in 10/38 patients with well-healed wounds and in 12/25 patients with wound healing impairment including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Escherichia coli. Microbiological cultures showed bacterial growth in almost all patients with wound healing impairment and positive results in PCR/SSCP (10/12), while this was the case in only one patient with a well-healed wound (1/10). Colonisation of suture material with bacteria occurs in a relevant portion of patients with and without wound healing impairment after routine neurosurgical procedures. Suture material may provide a nidus for bacteria and subsequent biofilm formation. Most likely, however, such colonisation of sutures is not a general primer for subsequent wound infection.

  18. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Nanakorn, W.; Yu, L.D.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection

  19. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadtanapuk, S. [Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Teraarusiri, W. [Central Laboratory, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Nanakorn, W. [The Crown Property Bureau, 173 Nakhonratchasrima Road, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S., E-mail: soanu.1@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  20. Diagnosis of Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract Bacterial Infections with the Use of Multiplex PCR Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Kourea-Kremastinou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of respiratory infections by molecular techniques provides important information about the epidemiology of respiratory disease, especially during the post-vaccination era. The objective of the present study was the detection of bacterial pathogens directly in clinical samples from patients with upper and lower respiratory tract infections using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays developed in our laboratory. Clinical samples taken over a three-year period (2007–2009 and obtained from 349 patients (adults (n = 66; children (n = 283 with signs and symptoms of certain upper or lower respiratory tract infections, consisted of: bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL, n = 83, pleural fluids (n = 29, and middle-ear aspirates (n = 237. Overall, 212 samples (61% were confirmed by culture and/or PCR. Among the positive samples, Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly serotype 3 was predominant (104/212; 49.0%, followed by non-typable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi 59/212; 27.8% and Streptococcus pyogenes (47/212; 22%. Haemophilus influenzae type b was detected in only three samples. The underlying microbiology of respiratory infections is gradually changing in response to various selective pressures, such as vaccine use and antibiotic consumption. The application of multiplex PCR (mPCR assays is particularly useful since it successfully identified the microorganisms implicated in acute otitis media or lower respiratory tract infections in nearly 75% of patients with a positive result compared to conventional cultures. Non-culture identification of the implicated pneumococcal serotypes is also an important issue for monitoring pneumococcal infections in the era of conjugate pneumococcal vaccines.

  1. Elevated carbon monoxide in the exhaled breath of mice during a systemic bacterial infection.

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    Alan G Barbour

    Full Text Available Blood is the specimen of choice for most laboratory tests for diagnosis and disease monitoring. Sampling exhaled breath is a noninvasive alternative to phlebotomy and has the potential for real-time monitoring at the bedside. Improved instrumentation has advanced breath analysis for several gaseous compounds from humans. However, application to small animal models of diseases and physiology has been limited. To extend breath analysis to mice, we crafted a means for collecting nose-only breath samples from groups and individual animals who were awake. Samples were subjected to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry procedures developed for highly sensitive analysis of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the atmosphere. We evaluated the system with experimental systemic infections of severe combined immunodeficiency Mus musculus with the bacterium Borrelia hermsii. Infected mice developed bacterial densities of ∼10(7 per ml of blood by day 4 or 5 and in comparison to uninfected controls had hepatosplenomegaly and elevations of both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. While 12 samples from individual infected mice on days 4 and 5 and 6 samples from uninfected mice did not significantly differ for 72 different VOCs, carbon monoxide (CO was elevated in samples from infected mice, with a mean (95% confidence limits effect size of 4.2 (2.8-5.6, when differences in CO2 in the breath were taken into account. Normalized CO values declined to the uninfected range after one day of treatment with the antibiotic ceftriaxone. Strongly correlated with CO in the breath were levels of heme oxygenase-1 protein in serum and HMOX1 transcripts in whole blood. These results (i provide further evidence of the informativeness of CO concentration in the exhaled breath during systemic infection and inflammation, and (ii encourage evaluation of this noninvasive analytic approach in other various other rodent models of infection and for utility in

  2. Differential infection properties of three inducible prophages from an epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    James Chloe E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common bacterial pathogen infecting the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The Liverpool Epidemic Strain (LES is transmissible, capable of superseding other P. aeruginosa populations and is associated with increased morbidity. Previously, multiple inducible prophages have been found to coexist in the LES chromosome and to constitute a major component of the accessory genome not found in other sequenced P. aerugionosa strains. LES phages confer a competitive advantage in a rat model of chronic lung infection and may, therefore underpin LES prevalence. Here the infective properties of three LES phages were characterised. Results This study focuses on three of the five active prophages (LESφ2, LESφ3 and LESφ4 that are members of the Siphoviridae. All were induced from LESB58 by norfloxacin. Lytic production of LESφ2 was considerably higher than that of LESφ3 and LESφ4. Each phage was capable of both lytic and lysogenic infection of the susceptible P. aeruginosa host, PAO1, producing phage-specific plaque morphologies. In the PAO1 host background, the LESφ2 prophage conferred immunity against LESφ3 infection and reduced susceptibility to LESφ4 infection. Each prophage was less stable in the PAO1 chromosome with substantially higher rates of spontaneous phage production than when residing in the native LESB58 host. We show that LES phages are capable of horizontal gene transfer by infecting P. aeruginosa strains from different sources and that type IV pili are required for infection by all three phages. Conclusions Multiple inducible prophages with diverse infection properties have been maintained in the LES genome. Our data suggest that LESφ2 is more sensitive to induction into the lytic cycle or has a more efficient replicative cycle than the other LES phages.

  3. Disease interactions in a shared host plant: effects of pre-existing viral infection on cucurbit plant defense responses and resistance to bacterial wilt disease.

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    Lori R Shapiro

    Full Text Available Both biotic and abiotic stressors can elicit broad-spectrum plant resistance against subsequent pathogen challenges. However, we currently have little understanding of how such effects influence broader aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology in natural environments where plants interact with multiple antagonists simultaneously. In previous work, we have shown that healthy wild gourd plants (Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana contract a fatal bacterial wilt infection (caused by Erwinia tracheiphila at significantly higher rates than plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV. We recently reported evidence that this pattern is explained, at least in part, by reduced visitation of ZYMV-infected plants by the cucumber beetle vectors of E. tracheiphila. Here we examine whether ZYMV-infection may also directly elicit plant resistance to subsequent E. tracheiphila infection. In laboratory studies, we assayed the induction of key phytohormones (SA and JA in single and mixed infections of these pathogens, as well as in response to the feeding of A. vittatum cucumber beetles on healthy and infected plants. We also tracked the incidence and progression of wilt disease symptoms in plants with prior ZYMV infections. Our results indicate that ZYMV-infection slightly delays the progression of wilt symptoms, but does not significantly reduce E. tracheiphila infection success. This observation supports the hypothesis that reduced rates of wilt disease in ZYMV-infected plants reflect reduced visitation by beetle vectors. We also documented consistently strong SA responses to ZYMV infection, but limited responses to E. tracheiphila in the absence of ZYMV, suggesting that the latter pathogen may effectively evade or suppress plant defenses, although we observed no evidence of antagonistic cross-talk between SA and JA signaling pathways. We did, however, document effects of E. tracheiphila on induced responses to herbivory that may influence host

  4. Disease Interactions in a Shared Host Plant: Effects of Pre-Existing Viral Infection on Cucurbit Plant Defense Responses and Resistance to Bacterial Wilt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauck, Kerry E.; Pulido, Hannier; De Moraes, Consuelo M.; Stephenson, Andrew G.; Mescher, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Both biotic and abiotic stressors can elicit broad-spectrum plant resistance against subsequent pathogen challenges. However, we currently have little understanding of how such effects influence broader aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology in natural environments where plants interact with multiple antagonists simultaneously. In previous work, we have shown that healthy wild gourd plants (Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana) contract a fatal bacterial wilt infection (caused by Erwinia tracheiphila) at significantly higher rates than plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). We recently reported evidence that this pattern is explained, at least in part, by reduced visitation of ZYMV-infected plants by the cucumber beetle vectors of E. tracheiphila. Here we examine whether ZYMV-infection may also directly elicit plant resistance to subsequent E. tracheiphila infection. In laboratory studies, we assayed the induction of key phytohormones (SA and JA) in single and mixed infections of these pathogens, as well as in response to the feeding of A. vittatum cucumber beetles on healthy and infected plants. We also tracked the incidence and progression of wilt disease symptoms in plants with prior ZYMV infections. Our results indicate that ZYMV-infection slightly delays the progression of wilt symptoms, but does not significantly reduce E. tracheiphila infection success. This observation supports the hypothesis that reduced rates of wilt disease in ZYMV-infected plants reflect reduced visitation by beetle vectors. We also documented consistently strong SA responses to ZYMV infection, but limited responses to E. tracheiphila in the absence of ZYMV, suggesting that the latter pathogen may effectively evade or suppress plant defenses, although we observed no evidence of antagonistic cross-talk between SA and JA signaling pathways. We did, however, document effects of E. tracheiphila on induced responses to herbivory that may influence host-plant quality for (and

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection but not small intestinal bacterial overgrowth may play a pathogenic role in rosacea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, A; Ruocco, E; Lo Schiavo, A; Masarone, M; Tuccillo, C; Peccerillo, F; Miranda, A; Romano, L; de Sio, C; de Sio, I; Persico, M; Ruocco, V; Riegler, G; Loguercio, C; Romano, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Recent studies suggest a potential relationship between rosacea and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), but there is no firm evidence of an association between rosacea and H. pylori infection or SIBO. We performed a prospective study to assess the prevalence of H. pylori infection and/or SIBO in patients with rosacea and evaluated the effect of H. pylori or SIBO eradication on rosacea. Methods We enrolled 90 patients with rosacea from January 2012 to January 2013 and a control group consisting of 90 patients referred to us because of mapping of nevi during the same period. We used the 13C Urea Breath Test and H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) test to assess H. pylori infection and the glucose breath test to assess SIBO. Patients infected by H. pylori were treated with clarithromycin-containing sequential therapy. Patients positive for SIBO were treated with rifaximin. Results We found that 44/90 (48.9%) patients with rosacea and 24/90 (26.7%) control subjects were infected with H. pylori (p = 0.003). Moreover, 9/90 (10%) patients with rosacea and 7/90 (7.8%) subjects in the control group had SIBO (p = 0.6). Within 10 weeks from the end of antibiotic therapy, the skin lesions of rosacea disappeared or decreased markedly in 35/36 (97.2%) patients after eradication of H. pylori and in 3/8 (37.5%) patients who did not eradicate the infection (p Rosacea skin lesions decreased markedly in 6/7 (85.7%) after eradication of SIBO whereas of the two patients who did not eradicate SIBO, one (50%) showed an improvement in rosacea (p = 0.284). Conclusions Prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in patients with rosacea than control group, whereas SIBO prevalence was comparable between the two groups. Eradication of H. pylori infection led to a significant improvement of skin symptoms in rosacea patients. PMID:25653855

  6. Ionome changes in Xylella fastidiosa-infected Nicotiana tabacum correlate with virulence and discriminate between subspecies of bacterial isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J E; Sefick, S A; Parker, J K; Arnold, T; Cobine, P A; De La Fuente, L

    2014-10-01

    Characterization of ionomes has been used to uncover the basis of nutrient utilization and environmental adaptation of plants. Here, ionomic profiles were used to understand the phenotypic response of a plant to infection by genetically diverse isolates of Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterial plant pathogen. In this study, X. fastidiosa isolates were used to infect a common model host (Nicotiana tabacum 'SR1'), and leaf and sap concentrations of eleven elements together with plant colonization and symptoms were assessed. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that changes in the ionome were significantly correlated with symptom severity and bacterial populations in host petioles. Moreover, plant ionome modification by infection could be used to differentiate the X. fastidiosa subspecies with which the plant was infected. This report establishes host ionome modification as a phenotypic response to infection.

  7. Critical role of tedizolid in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

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    Ferrández O

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Olivia Ferrández,1,2 Olatz Urbina,1 Santiago Grau1,3 1Hospital Pharmacy, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Barcelona, Spain; 2Nursing Department, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain; 3Medicine Department, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Tedizolid phosphate has high activity against the Gram-positive microorganisms mainly involved in acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, such as strains of Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus strains, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, the Streptococcus anginosus group, and Enterococcus faecalis, including those with some mechanism of resistance limiting the use of linezolid. The area under the curve for time 0–24 hours/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC pharmacodynamic ratio has shown the best correlation with the efficacy of tedizolid, versus the time above MIC ratio and the maximum drug concentration/minimum inhibitory concentration ratio. Administration of this antibiotic for 6 days has shown its noninferiority versus administration of linezolid for 10 days in patients with skin and skin structure infections enrolled in two Phase III studies (ESTABLISH-1 and ESTABLISH-2. Tedizolid’s more favorable safety profile and dosage regimen, which allow once-daily administration, versus linezolid, position it as a good therapeutic alternative. However, whether or not the greater economic cost associated with this antibiotic is offset by its shorter treatment duration and possibility of oral administration in routine clinical practice has yet to be clarified. Keywords: tedizolid, tedizolid phosphate, acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, oxazolidinone, linezolid resistance

  8. Potential role of tedizolid phosphate in the treatment of acute bacterial skin infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Olatz; Ferrández, Olivia; Espona, Mercè; Salas, Esther; Ferrández, Irene; Grau, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Tedizolid phosphate (TR-701), a prodrug of tedizolid (TR-700), is a next-generation oxazolidinone that has shown favorable results in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections in its first Phase III clinical trial. Tedizolid has high bioavailability, penetration, and tissue distribution when administered orally or intravenously. The activity of tedizolid was greater than linezolid against strains of Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Enterococcus spp. in vitro studies, including strains resistant to linezolid and those not susceptible to vancomycin or daptomycin. Its pharmacokinetic characteristics allow for a once-daily administration that leads to a more predictable efficacy and safety profile than those of linezolid. No hematological adverse effects have been reported associated with tedizolid when used at the therapeutic dose of 200 mg in Phase I, II, or III clinical trials of up to 3 weeks of tedizolid administration. Given that the clinical and microbiological efficacy are similar for the 200, 300, and 400 mg doses, the lowest effective dose of 200 mg once daily for 6 days was selected for Phase III studies in acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections, providing a safe dosing regimen with low potential for development of myelosuppression. Unlike linezolid, tedizolid does not inhibit monoamine oxidase in vivo, therefore interactions with adrenergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic drugs are not to be expected. In conclusion, tedizolid is a novel antibiotic with potent activity against Gram-positive microorganisms responsible for skin and soft tissue infections, including strains resistant to vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin, thus answers a growing therapeutic need.

  9. Some viral and bacterial respiratory tract infections of dairy cattle during the summer season

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    Kale M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, dairy cattle with respiratory system problems that were brought to a private slaughterhouse in Burdur province were investigated for viral and bacterial infections present in the summer season. The blood samples were collected from 56 animals. The samples were tested for antibodies against bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3 and bovine adenovirus 3 (BAV-3 by ELISA. Bacteriological cultivation was carried out from lung samples taken after cutting the same animals. The seropositivity rates which were determined for 5 viruses in cattle (BoHV- 1, BVDV, BRSV, BPIV-3 and BAV-3 were 7.14%, 50%, 94.64%, 94.64% and 82.14% respectively. The presence of antibodies against the viruses was as follows; 5.36% of cattle had antibodies against only one virus, 14.29% against two, 30.36% against three, 44.64% against four and 5.36% against five viruses. A total of 36 bacterial agents were isolated from 30 out of 56 lung samples. From the lung samples, only one bacterium was isolated from 39.3% (22/56 samples, and more than one bacterium from 14.3% (8/56. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp. were detected as the most often isolated agents. Compared to bacteria, the rates of viral infections associated with Escherichia coli (BRSV+BPIV-3+BAV- 3+Escherichia coli; 8.92% and BRSV+BPIV-3+Escherichia coli; 5.35% were higher. As a consequence, it was thought that primary agents which were the viruses and bacteria may have attended as secondary factors in respiratory tract infections of dairy cattle.

  10. Brucella abortus-infected B cells induce osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterium that establishes lifelong infections in livestock and humans although the mechanisms of its chronicity are poorly understood. Activated B cells have long lifespan and B. abortus infection activates B cells. Our results indicate that the direct infection of B cells with B. abortus induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), receptor activator for NF κB ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells induced bone marrow-derived monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using osteoprotegerin, RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that RANKL is involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with B cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of brucellar osteoarticular disease. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Anhydride-functional silane immobilized onto titanium surfaces induces osteoblast cell differentiation and reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria, E-mail: maria.godoy.gallardo@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Guillem-Marti, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.guillem.marti@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Sevilla, Pablo, E-mail: psevilla@euss.es [Department of Mechanics, Escola Universitària Salesiana de Sarrià (EUSS), C/ Passeig de Sant Bosco, 42, 08017 Barcelona (Spain); Manero, José M., E-mail: jose.maria.manero@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gil, Francisco J., E-mail: francesc.xavier.gil@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial infection in dental implants along with osseointegration failure usually leads to loss of the device. Bioactive molecules with antibacterial properties can be attached to titanium surfaces with anchoring molecules such as silanes, preventing biofilm formation and improving osseointegration. Properties of silanes as molecular binders have been thoroughly studied, but research on the biological effects of these coatings is scarce. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro cell response and antibacterial effects of triethoxysilypropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA) silane anchored on titanium surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed a successful silanization. The silanized surfaces showed no cytotoxic effects. Gene expression analyses of Sarcoma Osteogenic (SaOS-2) osteoblast-like cells cultured on TESPSA silanized surfaces reported a remarkable increase of biochemical markers related to induction of osteoblastic cell differentiation. A manifest decrease of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation at early stages was observed on treated substrates, while favoring cell adhesion and spreading in bacteria–cell co-cultures. Surfaces treated with TESPSA could enhance a biological sealing on implant surfaces against bacteria colonization of underlying tissues. Furthermore, it can be an effective anchoring platform of biomolecules on titanium surfaces with improved osteoblastic differentiation and antibacterial properties. - Highlights: • TESPSA silane induces osteoblast differentiation. • TESPSA reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. • TESPSA is a promising anchoring platform of biomolecules onto titanium.

  12. Anhydride-functional silane immobilized onto titanium surfaces induces osteoblast cell differentiation and reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Sevilla, Pablo; Manero, José M.; Gil, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection in dental implants along with osseointegration failure usually leads to loss of the device. Bioactive molecules with antibacterial properties can be attached to titanium surfaces with anchoring molecules such as silanes, preventing biofilm formation and improving osseointegration. Properties of silanes as molecular binders have been thoroughly studied, but research on the biological effects of these coatings is scarce. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro cell response and antibacterial effects of triethoxysilypropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA) silane anchored on titanium surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed a successful silanization. The silanized surfaces showed no cytotoxic effects. Gene expression analyses of Sarcoma Osteogenic (SaOS-2) osteoblast-like cells cultured on TESPSA silanized surfaces reported a remarkable increase of biochemical markers related to induction of osteoblastic cell differentiation. A manifest decrease of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation at early stages was observed on treated substrates, while favoring cell adhesion and spreading in bacteria–cell co-cultures. Surfaces treated with TESPSA could enhance a biological sealing on implant surfaces against bacteria colonization of underlying tissues. Furthermore, it can be an effective anchoring platform of biomolecules on titanium surfaces with improved osteoblastic differentiation and antibacterial properties. - Highlights: • TESPSA silane induces osteoblast differentiation. • TESPSA reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. • TESPSA is a promising anchoring platform of biomolecules onto titanium.

  13. Intragenomic conflict in populations infected by Parthenogenesis Inducing Wolbachia ends with irreversible loss of sexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouthamer, Richard; Russell, James E; Vavre, Fabrice; Nunney, Leonard

    2010-07-28

    The maternally inherited, bacterial symbiont, parthenogenesis inducing (PI) Wolbachia, causes females in some haplodiploid insects to produce daughters from both fertilized and unfertilized eggs. The symbionts, with their maternal inheritance, benefit from inducing the production of exclusively daughters, however the optimal sex ratio for the nuclear genome is more male-biased. Here we examine through models how an infection with PI-Wolbachia in a previously uninfected population leads to a genomic conflict between PI-Wolbachia and the nuclear genome. In most natural populations infected with PI-Wolbachia the infection has gone to fixation and sexual reproduction is impossible, specifically because the females have lost their ability to fertilize eggs, even when mated with functional males. The PI Wolbachia infection by itself does not interfere with the fertilization process in infected eggs, fertilized infected eggs develop into biparental infected females. Because of the increasingly female-biased sex ratio in the population during a spreading PI-Wolbachia infection, sex allocation alleles in the host that cause the production of more sons are rapidly selected. In haplodiploid species a reduced fertilization rate leads to the production of more sons. Selection for the reduced fertilization rate leads to a spread of these alleles through both the infected and uninfected population, eventually resulting in the population becoming fixed for both the PI-Wolbachia infection and the reduced fertilization rate. Fertilization rate alleles that completely interfere with fertilization ("virginity alleles") will be selected over alleles that still allow for some fertilization. This drives the final resolution of the conflict: the irreversible loss of sexual reproduction and the complete dependence of the host on its symbiont. This study shows that dependence among organisms can evolve rapidly due to the resolution of the conflicts between cytoplasmic and nuclear genes, and

  14. Intragenomic conflict in populations infected by Parthenogenesis Inducing Wolbachia ends with irreversible loss of sexual reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The maternally inherited, bacterial symbiont, parthenogenesis inducing (PI) Wolbachia, causes females in some haplodiploid insects to produce daughters from both fertilized and unfertilized eggs. The symbionts, with their maternal inheritance, benefit from inducing the production of exclusively daughters, however the optimal sex ratio for the nuclear genome is more male-biased. Here we examine through models how an infection with PI-Wolbachia in a previously uninfected population leads to a genomic conflict between PI-Wolbachia and the nuclear genome. In most natural populations infected with PI-Wolbachia the infection has gone to fixation and sexual reproduction is impossible, specifically because the females have lost their ability to fertilize eggs, even when mated with functional males. Results The PI Wolbachia infection by itself does not interfere with the fertilization process in infected eggs, fertilized infected eggs develop into biparental infected females. Because of the increasingly female-biased sex ratio in the population during a spreading PI-Wolbachia infection, sex allocation alleles in the host that cause the production of more sons are rapidly selected. In haplodiploid species a reduced fertilization rate leads to the production of more sons. Selection for the reduced fertilization rate leads to a spread of these alleles through both the infected and uninfected population, eventually resulting in the population becoming fixed for both the PI-Wolbachia infection and the reduced fertilization rate. Fertilization rate alleles that completely interfere with fertilization ("virginity alleles") will be selected over alleles that still allow for some fertilization. This drives the final resolution of the conflict: the irreversible loss of sexual reproduction and the complete dependence of the host on its symbiont. Conclusions This study shows that dependence among organisms can evolve rapidly due to the resolution of the conflicts between

  15. Importance of Bacterial Replication and Alveolar Macrophage-Independent Clearance Mechanisms during Early Lung Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camberlein, Emilie; Cohen, Jonathan M.; José, Ricardo; Hyams, Catherine J.; Callard, Robin; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Edwards, Lindsey A.; Marshall, Helina; van Rooijen, Nico; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of alveolar macrophages for host immunity during early Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection is well established, the contribution and relative importance of other innate immunity mechanisms and of bacterial factors are less clear. We have used a murine model of S. pneumoniae early lung infection with wild-type, unencapsulated, and para-amino benzoic acid auxotroph mutant TIGR4 strains to assess the effects of inoculum size, bacterial replication, capsule, and alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent clearance mechanisms on bacterial persistence within the lungs. Alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent (calculated indirectly) clearance half-lives and bacterial replication doubling times were estimated using a mathematical model. In this model, after infection with a high-dose inoculum of encapsulated S. pneumoniae, alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms were dominant, with a clearance half-life of 24 min compared to 135 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance. In addition, after a high-dose inoculum, successful lung infection required rapid bacterial replication, with an estimated S. pneumoniae doubling time of 16 min. The capsule had wide effects on early lung clearance mechanisms, with reduced half-lives of 14 min for alveolar macrophage-independent and 31 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance of unencapsulated bacteria. In contrast, with a lower-dose inoculum, the bacterial doubling time increased to 56 min and the S. pneumoniae alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance half-life improved to 42 min and was largely unaffected by the capsule. These data demonstrate the large effects of bacterial factors (inoculum size, the capsule, and rapid replication) and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with S. pneumoniae. PMID:25583525

  16. Are bacterial volatile compounds poisonous odors to a fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, alarm signals to Arabidopsis seedlings for eliciting induced resistance, or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong-Min eRyu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological control (biocontrol agents act on plants via numerous mechanisms, and can be used to protect plants from pathogens. Biocontrol agents can act directly as pathogen antagonists or competitors or indirectly to promote plant induced systemic resistance (ISR. Whether a biocontrol agent acts directly or indirectly depends on the specific strain and the pathosystem type. We reported previously that bacterial volatile organic compounds (VOCs are determinants for eliciting plant ISR. Emerging data suggest that bacterial VOCs also can directly inhibit fungal and plant growth. The aim of the current study was to differentiate direct and indirect mechanisms of bacterial VOC effects against Botrytis cinerea infection of Arabidopsis. Volatile emissions from Bacillus subtilis GB03 successfully protected Arabidopsis seedlings against B. cinerea. First, we investigated the direct effects of bacterial VOCs on symptom development and different phenological stages of B. cinerea including spore germination, mycelial attachment to the leaf surface, mycelial growth, and sporulation in vitro and in planta. Volatile emissions inhibited hyphal growth in a dose-dependent manner in vitro, and interfered with fungal attachment on the hydrophobic leaf surface. Second, the optimized bacterial concentration that did not directly inhibit fungal growth successfully protected Arabidopsis from fungal infection, which indicates that bacterial VOC-elicited plant ISR has a more important role in biocontrol than direct inhibition of fungal growth on Arabidopsis. We performed qRT-PCR to investigate the priming of the defense-related genes PR1, PDF1.2, and ChiB at 0, 12, 24, and 36 hours post-infection and 14 days after the start of plant exposure to bacterial VOCs. The results indicate that bacterial VOCs potentiate expression of PR1 and PDF1.2 but not ChiB, which stimulates SA- and JA-dependent signaling pathways in plant ISR and protects plants against pathogen

  17. Effect of long-term voluntary exercise wheel running on susceptibility to bacterial pulmonary infections in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Weert-van Leeuwen, Pauline B; de Vrankrijker, Angélica M M; Fentz, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    moderate exercise has many health benefits, healthy mice showed increased bacterial (P. aeruginosa) load and symptoms, after regular voluntary exercise, with perseverance of the phagocytic capacity of monocytes and neutrophils. Whether patients, suffering from bacterial infectious diseases, should......Regular moderate exercise has been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects and improve immune effector functions, resulting in reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Whether regular exercise also affects bacterial infection susceptibility is unknown. The aim...... of this study was to investigate whether regular voluntary exercise wheel running prior to a pulmonary infection with bacteria (P. aeruginosa) affects lung bacteriology, sickness severity and phagocyte immune function in mice. Balb/c mice were randomly placed in a cage with or without a running wheel. After 28...

  18. Chlamydia induces anchorage independence in 3T3 cells and detrimental cytological defects in an infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E Knowlton

    Full Text Available Chlamydia are gram negative, obligate intracellular bacterial organisms with different species causing a multitude of infections in both humans and animals. Chlamydia trachomatis is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection (STI Chlamydia, the most commonly acquired bacterial STI in the United States. Chlamydial infections have also been epidemiologically linked to cervical cancer in women co-infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV. We have previously shown chlamydial infection results in centrosome amplification and multipolar spindle formation leading to chromosomal instability. Many studies indicate that centrosome abnormalities, spindle defects, and chromosome segregation errors can lead to cell transformation. We hypothesize that the presence of these defects within infected dividing cells identifies a possible mechanism for Chlamydia as a cofactor in cervical cancer formation. Here we demonstrate that infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is able to transform 3T3 cells in soft agar resulting in anchorage independence and increased colony formation. Additionally, we show for the first time Chlamydia infects actively replicating cells in vivo. Infection of mice with Chlamydia results in significantly increased cell proliferation within the cervix, and in evidence of cervical dysplasia. Confocal examination of these infected tissues also revealed elements of chlamydial induced chromosome instability. These results contribute to a growing body of data implicating a role for Chlamydia in cervical cancer development and suggest a possible molecular mechanism for this effect.

  19. Malaria-induced NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation mediates inflammation and hypersensitivity to bacterial superinfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Ataide

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14(+CD16(-Caspase-1(+ and CD14(dimCD16(+Caspase-1(+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria.

  20. Malaria-Induced NLRP12/NLRP3-Dependent Caspase-1 Activation Mediates Inflammation and Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Superinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataide, Marco A.; Andrade, Warrison A.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Wang, Donghai; Souza, Maria do Carmo; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Elian, Samir; Martins, Flaviano S.; Pereira, Dhelio; Reed, George; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14+CD16−Caspase-1+ and CD14dimCD16+Caspase-1+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria. PMID:24453977

  1. Annual Surveillance Summary: Bacterial Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus ( MRSA ) • Pseudomonas aeruginosa • Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) Note: To review the complete annual report for each...29.4 E. coli 702.3 592.2 157.4 ↑ 18.6 Klebsiella spp. 100.8 80.9 22.2 ↑ 24.6 MRSA 61.1 68.2 16.0 ↓ 10.4 P. aeruginosa 32.6 28.7 5.2 ↑ 13.6 VREc...VRE infections. c For MRSA only, the MDR IR column depicts the percentage of MRSA infections with inducible clindamycin resistance within the MHS

  2. Nocardia brasiliensis induces an immunosuppressive microenvironment that favors chronic infection in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G; Perez-Liñan, Amira R; Bocanegra-Ibarias, Paola; Perez-Rivera, Luz I; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C

    2012-07-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is an intracellular microorganism and the most common etiologic agent of actinomycetoma in the Americas. Several intracellular pathogens induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment through increases in CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), thus downregulating other T-cell subpopulations and assuring survival in the host. In this study, we determined whether N. brasiliensis modulates T-lymphocyte responses and their related cytokine profiles in a murine experimental model. We also examined the relationship between N. brasiliensis immunomodulation and pathogenesis and bacterial survival. In early infection, Th17/Tc17 cells were increased at day 3 (P 1 log) was also observed (P brasiliensis modulates the immune system to induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment that benefits its survival during the chronic stage of infection.

  3. Nocardia brasiliensis Induces an Immunosuppressive Microenvironment That Favors Chronic Infection in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G.; Perez-Liñan, Amira R.; Bocanegra-Ibarias, Paola; Perez-Rivera, Luz I.

    2012-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is an intracellular microorganism and the most common etiologic agent of actinomycetoma in the Americas. Several intracellular pathogens induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment through increases in CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), thus downregulating other T-cell subpopulations and assuring survival in the host. In this study, we determined whether N. brasiliensis modulates T-lymphocyte responses and their related cytokine profiles in a murine experimental model. We also examined the relationship between N. brasiliensis immunomodulation and pathogenesis and bacterial survival. In early infection, Th17/Tc17 cells were increased at day 3 (P 1 log) was also observed (P brasiliensis modulates the immune system to induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment that benefits its survival during the chronic stage of infection. PMID:22547544

  4. Astrocytic infection in canine distemper virus-induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutinelli, F; Vandevelde, M; Griot, C; Richard, A

    1989-01-01

    Acute canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating lesions were examined with double-labelling immunocytochemistry simultaneously demonstrating CDV antigen and glial fibrillary acidid protein (GFAP) as marker for astrocytes. It was shown that 64% of all astrocytes within the demyelinating lesions were infected and that 95% of all infected cells counted in the lesions were astrocytes. These results suggest that the astrocyte is the main target for CDV and that astroglial infection may play an important role in the mechanism of demyelination.

  5. [Bacterial culture and drug sensitivity analysis of upper urinary tract calculi complicating with infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu; Shi, Yong-kang; Huang, Xiao-bo; Ma, Kai; Xu, Qing-quan; Xiong, Lin-lin; Li, Jian-xing; Wang, Xia-feng

    2014-10-18

    To investigate the bacteriology and drug sensitivity of upper urinary tract calculi patients, and to provide information for choosing suitable antibiotics. In the study, 21 patients who suffered from lithiasis in upper urinary tract and required an emergency drainage for acute obstruction and infection were the "acute group"; 64 patients with calculi in upper urinary tract and accompanied with no infectious symptoms were the "common group". The bacteriology and drug sensitivity of the two groups were investigated. Gram-negative bacteria infected the most common of upper urinary tract calculi patients with infection, accounting for 71.4% in the acute group and 65.7% in the common group, among which Escherichia coli were the predominant ones (35.7% in the acute group and 32.9% in the common group). No difference was found between these two groups in bacterial distribution (P>0.05). Although the average drug resistance rate of Gram-negative bacteria in the acute group was higher than that in the common group, it revealed no significant difference (P>0.05). The drug resistance rate to semisynthetic penicillin, cefuroxime and ceftriaxone were more than 50%, 60%, and 50%, respectively. Quinolones, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, got a 45% drug resistance. Aminoglycoside, carbapenema were sensitive to Gram-negative bacteria. Cefoperazone/sulbactam and piperacillin/tazobactam were more effective than ceftriaxone and piperacillin, respectively. There was no significant difference between upper urinary tract calculi patients with acute infection and common infection in bacteriology and drug sensitivity. Semisynthetic penicillin, the second generation of cephalosporin and quinolone were no longer the good choices of empirical use. Antibiotics combined with β-lactamase inhibitors would be an ideal empirical therapeutic choice.

  6. [Treatment of superficial bacterial cutaneous infections: a survey among general practitioners in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourtillan, E; Tauveron, V; Binois, R; Lehr-Drylewicz, A-M; Machet, L

    2013-12-01

    Superficial bacterial skin infection and superinfection of skin diseases are usually treated by general practitioners using antiseptics or antibiotics. However, acquired resistance to biocidal agents, both systemic and topical, is growing. Our aim was to assess the skill of GPs in clinical situations involving common skin infections. On 16 June 2010, we sent a questionnaire to all GPs in a rural region of France (the Cher department) together with a stamped addressed envelope for the reply. The questionnaire contained seven pages of multiple-choice questions and five clinical cases, each one illustrated with a photograph (sty, furuncle, whitlow, colonized chronic wounds and impetigo). Anonymity of responses was guaranteed. Data was analysed using the Clinsight(®) software package. The response rate was 51% (102 responses). GPs reported little difficulty in treating these patients (median 3, range 1 to 8 on a scale of increasing difficulty from 0 to 10). The main results of the study are firstly the frequency of combination of at least one antiseptic with one antibiotic (46%); secondly, the frequency of combination of two antibiotics (20% of cases); thirdly, the frequent prescription of systemic antibiotics for chronic wounds colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (61%). Our study shows the high frequency of prescriptions for combined therapy to treat superficial skin infections despite the fact that monotherapy with either an antiseptic or an antibiotic would probably suffice. It also shows the unnecessary prescription of antibiotics for colonization of a chronic wound. The study was limited in terms of size and design: it was a questionnaire rather than an analysis of prescriptions actually made in "real life", and the response rate was 51%. In addition, aside from impetigo, for which randomised studies and recommendations were given, the other surface infections (sty, folliculitis, whitlow) tend to be treated more empirically. Dissemination of recommendations

  7. Host immune responses after hypoxic reactivation of IFN-γ induced persistent Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eJerchel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Genital tract infections with Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis are the most frequent sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Severe clinical sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID, tubal occlusion and tubal infertility are linked to chronic inflammatory processes of persistently infected tissues. The oxygen concentrations in the female urogenital tract are physiologically low and further diminished (0.5-5 % O2, hypoxia during an ongoing inflammation. However, little is known about the effect of a low oxygen environment on genital C. trachomatis infections. In this study, we investigated the host immune responses during reactivation of IFN-γ induced persistent C. trachomatis infection under hypoxia. For this purpose, the activation of the MAP-kinases p44/42 and p38 as well as the induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 were analyzed. Upon hypoxic reactivation of IFN-γ induced persistent C. trachomatis infection, the phosphorylation of the p44/42 but not of the p38 MAP-kinase was significantly diminished compared to IFN-γ induced chlamydial persistence under normoxic condition. In addition, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression levels were observed for reactivated Chlamydiae under hypoxia compared to a persistent chlamydial infection under normoxia. Our findings indicate that hypoxia not only reactivates IFN-γ induced persistent C. trachomatis infections resulting in increased bacterial growth and progeny but also dampens inflammatory host immune signaling responses that are normally observed in a normoxic environment.

  8. Bacterial elicitors and plant signaling in induced systemic resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pelt, J.A. van; Sluis, I. van der; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Plant root colonizing, fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades for their plant growth promoting properties and their effective suppression of soil borne plant diseases. The modes of action that play a role in disease suppression by these bacteria include siderophore-mediated competition for iron, antibiosis, and induced systemic resistance (ISR). The involvement of ISR is typically studied in systems in which the Pseudomonas bacteria and the pathogen are inoculated and rema...

  9. Ceftaroline fosamil and treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: CAPTURE study experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Paul D; Davis, Amanda; Jandourek, Alena; Smith, Alexander; David Friedland, H

    2013-12-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and TEFLARO Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicentre retrospective cohort study in the USA describing treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) with ceftaroline fosamil (CPT-F). Charts for review were chosen by random selection. Among 647 evaluable patients, 52% were obese, 46% had diabetes mellitus (DM), and 19% had peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was recovered in 28% and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), 11%. Antibiotics were administered prior to CPT-F treatment in 80%, and concurrently in 39%. Clinical success overall was 85%; in patients with DM, 83%; with PVD, 76%; and in obese patients, 88%. Clinical success was ≥ 79% across all infection types; 81% for MRSA and 83% for MSSA; and 86% for ceftaroline monotherapy and 84% for concurrent therapy. These high clinical success rates support CPT-F as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI, including infections due to MRSA and patients with significant co-morbidities.

  10. Mutual viral and bacterial infections after housing rats of various breeders within an experimental unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, R; van Herck, H; van der Logt, J

    1996-01-01

    Fifteen athymic rat strains from 11 breeding colonies were housed within an experimental facility for an immunological study. Health status records supplied with 14 of the strains listed infections by Kilham's rat virus (KRV), Clostridium piliforme (Bacillus piliformis) and Pasteurella pneumotropica for 2, 2 and 1 colonies respectively. In sera taken previous to the study from euthymic rats of 10 strains, antibodies to KRV were detected in 3 strains, to Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), Rat corona virus (RCV) and Sendai virus in one strain each and to P. pneumotropica in 2 strains. Only 2 of the KRV infections had been reported by the supplier. During the study rats of all 10 strains developed antibodies to 2-4 of viral antigens. Eight out of 10 rat strains seroconverted to 1-5 of the antigens C. piliforme (B. piliformis), Bordetella bronchiseptica, Haemophilus spp., P. pneumotropica and Streptobacillus moniliformis. Two rat strains housed in filtertop cages did not develop antibodies to bacterial antigens. The potential detrimental effects of intercurrent infections on the outcome of the comparative immunological study are discussed.

  11. Risk score to stratify children with suspected serious bacterial infection: observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Andrew J; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Thompson, Matthew; Collier, Jacqueline; Ray, Samiran; Ninis, Nelly; Levin, Michael; MacFaul, Roddy

    2011-04-01

    To derive and validate a clinical score to risk stratify children presenting with acute infection. Observational cohort study of children presenting with suspected infection to an emergency department in England. Detailed data were collected prospectively on presenting clinical features, laboratory investigations and outcome. Clinical predictors of serious bacterial infection (SBI) were explored in multivariate logistic regression models using part of the dataset, each model was then validated in an independent part of the dataset, and the best model was chosen for derivation of a clinical risk score for SBI. The ability of this score to risk stratify children with SBI was then assessed in the entire dataset. Final diagnosis of SBI according to criteria defined by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health working group on Recognising Acute Illness in Children. Data from 1951 children were analysed. 74 (3.8%) had SBI. The sensitivity of individual clinical signs was poor, although some were highly specific for SBI. A score was derived with reasonable ability to discriminate SBI (area under the receiver operator characteristics curve 0.77, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.83) and risk stratify children with suspected SBI. This study demonstrates the potential utility of a clinical score in risk stratifying children with suspected SBI. Further work should aim to validate the score and its impact on clinical decision making in different settings, and ideally incorporate it into a broader management algorithm including additional investigations to further stratify a child's risk.

  12. The bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa affects the leaf ionome of plant hosts during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo De La Fuente

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogenic bacterium that lives inside the host xylem vessels, where it forms biofilm believed to be responsible for disrupting the passage of water and nutrients. Here, Nicotiana tabacum was infected with X. fastidiosa, and the spatial and temporal changes in the whole-leaf ionome (i.e. the mineral and trace element composition were measured as the host plant transitioned from healthy to diseased physiological status. The elemental composition of leaves was used as an indicator of the physiological changes in the host at a specific time and relative position during plant development. Bacterial infection was found to cause significant increases in concentrations of calcium prior to the appearance of symptoms and decreases in concentrations of phosphorous after symptoms appeared. Field-collected leaves from multiple varieties of grape, blueberry, and pecan plants grown in different locations over a four-year period in the Southeastern US showed the same alterations in Ca and P. This descriptive ionomics approach characterizes the existence of a mineral element-based response to X. fastidiosa using a model system suitable for further manipulation to uncover additional details of the role of mineral elements during plant-pathogen interactions. This is the first report on the dynamics of changes in the ionome of the host plant throughout the process of infection by a pathogen.

  13. The Bacterial Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa Affects the Leaf Ionome of Plant Hosts during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente, Leonardo; Parker, Jennifer K.; Oliver, Jonathan E.; Granger, Shea; Brannen, Phillip M.; van Santen, Edzard; Cobine, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogenic bacterium that lives inside the host xylem vessels, where it forms biofilm believed to be responsible for disrupting the passage of water and nutrients. Here, Nicotiana tabacum was infected with X. fastidiosa, and the spatial and temporal changes in the whole-leaf ionome (i.e. the mineral and trace element composition) were measured as the host plant transitioned from healthy to diseased physiological status. The elemental composition of leaves was used as an indicator of the physiological changes in the host at a specific time and relative position during plant development. Bacterial infection was found to cause significant increases in concentrations of calcium prior to the appearance of symptoms and decreases in concentrations of phosphorous after symptoms appeared. Field-collected leaves from multiple varieties of grape, blueberry, and pecan plants grown in different locations over a four-year period in the Southeastern US showed the same alterations in Ca and P. This descriptive ionomics approach characterizes the existence of a mineral element-based response to X. fastidiosa using a model system suitable for further manipulation to uncover additional details of the role of mineral elements during plant-pathogen interactions. This is the first report on the dynamics of changes in the ionome of the host plant throughout the process of infection by a pathogen. PMID:23667547

  14. 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced metabolic stress enhances resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Fuchs, B. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to different forms of psychological and physiological stress can elicit a host stress response, which alters normal parameters of neuroendocrine homeostasis. The present study evaluated the influence of the metabolic stressor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG; a glucose analog, which when administered to rodents, induces acute periods of metabolic stress) on the capacity of mice to resist infection with the facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Female BDF1 mice were injected with 2-DG (500 mg/kg b. wt.) once every 48 h prior to, concurrent with, or after the onset of a sublethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes. Kinetics of bacterial growth in mice were not altered if 2-DG was applied concurrently or after the start of the infection. In contrast, mice exposed to 2-DG prior to infection demonstrated an enhanced resistance to the listeria challenge. The enhanced bacterial clearance in vivo could not be explained by 2-DG exerting a toxic effect on the listeria, based on the results of two experiments. First, 2-DG did not inhibit listeria replication in trypticase soy broth. Second, replication of L. monocytogenes was not inhibited in bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures exposed to 2-DG. Production of neopterin and lysozyme, indicators of macrophage activation, were enhanced following exposure to 2-DG, which correlated with the increased resistance to L. monocytogenes. These results support the contention that the host response to 2-DG-induced metabolic stress can influence the capacity of the immune system to resist infection by certain classes of microbial pathogens.

  15. Skin bacterial flora as a potential risk factor predisposing to late bacterial infection after cross-linked hyaluronic acid gel augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netsvyetayeva, Irina; Marusza, Wojciech; Olszanski, Romuald; Szyller, Kamila; Krolak-Ulinska, Aneta; Swoboda-Kopec, Ewa; Sierdzinski, Janusz; Szymonski, Zachary; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna

    2018-01-01

    Cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) gel is widely used in esthetic medicine. Late bacterial infection (LBI) is a rare, but severe complication after HA augmentation. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients who underwent the HA injection procedure and developed LBI had qualitatively different bacterial flora on the skin compared to patients who underwent the procedure without any complications. The study group comprised 10 previously healthy women with recently diagnosed, untreated LBI after HA augmentation. The control group comprised 17 healthy women who had a similar amount of HA injected with no complications. To assess the difference between the two groups, their skin flora was cultured from nasal swabs, both before and after antibiotic treatment in the study group. A significant increase in the incidence of Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected in the control group ( P =0.000) compared to the study group. The study group showed a significantly higher incidence of Staphylococcus aureus ( P =0.005), Klebsiella pneumoniae ( P =0.006), Klebsiella oxytoca ( P =0.048), and Staphylococcus haemolyticus ( P =0.048) compared to the control group. The bacterial flora on the skin differed in patients with LBI from the control group. The control group's bacterial skin flora was dominated by S. epidermidis . Patients with LBI had a bacterial skin flora dominated by potentially pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Modulation of bacterial ghosts--induced nitric oxide production in macrophages by bacterial ghost-delivered resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Verena J; Dirsch, Verena M; Beres, Hortenzia; Donath, Oliver; Reznicek, Gottfried; Lubitz, Werner; Kudela, Pavol

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the capacity of resveratrol (RV) delivered into macrophages by bacterial ghosts (BGs), representing intact empty nonliving envelopes of Gram-negative bacteria, to modulate nitric oxide (NO) production related to the presence of the pathogen-associated molecular patterns on the surface of BGs. Incubation of the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 with BGs leads to a dose-dependent activation of inducible NO synthase. To modify BG-induced NO formation in RAW 264.7 cells by RV; BGs were loaded with RV (RV-BGs) and incubated with murine macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. RV-BGs delivering RV to the target macrophages significantly reduced BG-induced NO production with concentration of RV more than one order of magnitude lower than the amount of RV capable of reducing NO formation when applied directly. Moreover, no cytotoxic impact of BGs on the viability of RAW 264.7 cells added to macrophages alone or loaded with RV was detected after a mutual 24 h incubation, whereas cell viability slightly decreased (~ 10%) when RV concentrations of 30 μm alone were applied. The results obtained in the present study clearly indicate that the intracellular delivery of RV by BGs significantly enhances the total RV effect. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  17. An antisense peptide nucleic acid against Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibiting bacterial-induced inflammatory responses in the cystic fibrosis IB3-1 cellular model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagner, Giulia; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cabrini, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    of the essential acpP gene of P. aeruginosa, and previously shown to inhibit bacterial growth, concomitantly also strongly inhibits induced up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory markers IL-8, IL-6, G-CSF, IFN-γ, IP-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α in IB3-1 cystic fibrosis cells infected by P. aeruginosa PAO1. Remarkably...... are significant considering the key role of this protein in the cystic fibrosis inflammatory process exacerbated by P. aeruginosa infection....

  18. The role of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifan, Mostafa; Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Ghasemi, Younes; Samani, Ali Khajeh; Berenjian, Aydin

    2018-04-01

    Recently, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) have been used to control and modify the characteristics of concrete and mortar. Concrete is one of the most used materials in the world; however, it is susceptible to cracking. Over recent years, a sustainable biotechnological approach has emerged as an alternative approach to conventional techniques to heal the concrete cracks by the incorporation of bacterial cells and nutrients into the concrete matrix. Once cracking occurs, CaCO 3 is induced and the crack is healed. Considering the positive effects of IONs on the concrete properties, the effect of these nanoparticles on bacterial growth and CaCO 3 biosynthesis needs to be evaluated for their possible application in bio self-healing concrete. In the present work, IONs were successfully synthesized and characterized using various techniques. The presence of IONs showed a significant effect on both bacterial growth and CaCO 3 precipitation. The highest bacterial growth was observed in the presence of 150 μg/mL IONs. The highest concentration of induced CaCO 3 (34.54 g/L) was achieved when the bacterial cells were immobilized with 300 μg/mL of IONs. This study provides new data and supports the possibility of using IONs as a new tool in designing the next generation of bio self-healing concrete.

  19. Lipocalin 2 Imparts Selective Pressure on Bacterial Growth in the Bladder and Is Elevated in Women with Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigedal, Magnus; Marstad, Anne; Haug, Markus; Damås, Jan K.; Strong, Roland K.; Roberts, Pacita L.; Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Stapleton, Ann; Hooton, Thomas M.; Mobley, Harry L. T.; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Competition for iron is a critical component of successful bacterial infections, but the underlying in vivo mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is an innate immunity protein that binds to bacterial siderophores and starves them for iron, thus representing a novel host defense mechanism to infection. In the present study we show that LCN2 is secreted by the urinary tract mucosa and protects against urinary tract infection (UTI). We found that LCN2 was expressed in the bladder, ureters, and kidneys of mice subject to UTI. LCN2 was protective with higher bacterial numbers retrieved from bladders of Lcn2-deficient mice than from wild-type mice infected with the LCN2-sensitive Escherichia coli strain H9049. Uropathogenic E. coli mutants in siderophore receptors for salmochelin, aerobactin, or yersiniabactin displayed reduced fitness in wild-type mice, but not in mice deficient of LCN2, demonstrating that LCN2 imparts a selective pressure on bacterial growth in the bladder. In a human cohort of women with recurrent E. coli UTIs, urine LCN2 levels were associated with UTI episodes and with levels of bacteriuria. The number of siderophore systems was associated with increasing bacteriuria during cystitis. Our data demonstrate that LCN2 is secreted by the urinary tract mucosa in response to uropathogenic E. coli challenge and acts in innate immune defenses as a colonization barrier that pathogens must overcome to establish infection. PMID:25398327

  20. Copper Is a Host Effector Mobilized to Urine during Urinary Tract Infection To Impair Bacterial Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyre, Amanda N; Kavanagh, Kylie; Kock, Nancy D; Donati, George L; Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan

    2017-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a major global infectious disease affecting millions of people annually. Human urinary copper (Cu) content is elevated during UTI caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). UPEC upregulates the expression of Cu efflux genes during clinical UTI in patients as an adaptive response to host-derived Cu. Whether Cu is mobilized to urine as a host response to UTI and its role in protection against UTI remain unresolved. To address these questions, we tested the hypothesis that Cu is a host effector mobilized to urine during UTI to limit bacterial growth. Our results reveal that Cu is mobilized to urine during UTI caused by the major uropathogens Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae , in addition to UPEC, in humans. Ceruloplasmin, a Cu-containing ferroxidase, is found at higher levels in UTI urine than in healthy control urine and serves as the molecular source of urinary Cu during UTI. Our results demonstrate that ceruloplasmin decreases the bioavailability of iron in urine by a transferrin-dependent mechanism. Experimental UTI with UPEC in nonhuman primates recapitulates the increased urinary Cu content observed during clinical UTI. Furthermore, Cu-deficient mice are highly colonized by UPEC, indicating that Cu is involved in the limiting of bacterial growth within the urinary tract. Collectively, our results indicate that Cu is a host effector that is involved in protection against pathogen colonization of the urinary tract. Because urinary Cu levels are amenable to modulation, augmentation of the Cu-based host defense against UTI represents a novel approach to limiting bacterial colonization during UTI. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Bacterial agents and antibiotic sensitivity in children with urinary infection in two hospitals of Popayan, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Álvarez-Czeczotta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI is a common condition in children. Isolation of bacteria and early management is a priority in order to contribute to the reduction of morbidity and avoid bacterial resistance. Objectives: To identify bacterial etiologic agents and antibiotic sensitivity in children (1 month to 5 years of age with UTI in two hospitals of Popayán, Colombia. Materials and methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in children aged 1 month to 5 years of age who consulted the emergency services of two hospitals with clinical suspicion of UTI. The sample was 123 children. Using an instrument collected demographic variables, signs and symptoms, results of urinalysis, urine culture, sensitivity testing, treatment, and UTI classification. We determined the frequency and proportions of sociodemographic and clinical variables, bacterial agents and antibiotic resistance. Data was analyzed using SPSS 11.5 program. Results: We included 129 children diagnosed with UTI with positive urine culture, bladder catheter taken with 97.7% of cases. 74.8% of patients were female. Escherichia coli was the seed that was isolated more frequently (95.4%, then Sp Proteus (2.4%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (1.6%. The antibiotics to which the bacteria showed adequate sensitivity were: ceftriaxone, amikacin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, cefuroxime and cephalexin. Showed low sensitivity: ampicillin and trimethoprim sulfa. Conclusions: Escherichia coli was the bacteria that cause of UTI in our study population. For initial empiric treatment of hospitalized patients would recommend parenteral drug third generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone and aminoglycosides (amikacin, gentamicin. For outpatient management, oral antibiotics showed greater sensitivity were nalidixic acid, cefuroxime and cephalexin.

  2. Isolation and in vitro evaluation of bacteriophages against MDR-bacterial isolates from septic wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavali, Roja Rani; Degati, Vijaya Lakshmi; Lomada, Dakshayani; Reddy, Madhava C; Durbaka, Vijaya Raghava Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance has become a major problem for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial infections. The use of bacteriophages is an attractive approach to overcome the problem of drug resistance in several pathogens that cause fatal diseases. Our study aimed to isolate multi drug resistant bacteria from patients with septic wounds and then isolate and apply bacteriophages in vitro as alternative therapeutic agents. Pus samples were aseptically collected from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Science (RIMS), Kadapa, A.P., and samples were analyzed by gram staining, evaluating morphological characteristics, and biochemical methods. MDR-bacterial strains were collected using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method against a variety of antibiotics. Bacteriophages were collected and tested in vitro for lytic activity against MDR-bacterial isolates. Analysis of the pus swab samples revealed that the most of the isolates detected had Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the predominant bacterium, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Our results suggested that gram-negative bacteria were more predominant than gram-positive bacteria in septic wounds; most of these isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, vancomycin and tetracycline. All the gram-positive isolates (100%) were multi-drug resistant, whereas 86% of the gram-negative isolates had a drug resistant nature. Further bacteriophages isolated from sewage demonstrated perfect lytic activity against the multi-drug resistant bacteria causing septic wounds. In vitro analysis of the isolated bacteriophages demonstrated perfect lysis against the corresponding MDR-bacteria, and these isolated phages may be promising as a first choice for prophylaxis against wound sepsis, Moreover, phage therapy does not enhance multi-drug resistance in bacteria and could work simultaneously on a wide variety of MDR-bacteria when used in a bacteriophage cocktail. Hence, our results suggest

  3. Development of Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors as Antibiotics for Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghih, Omeed; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Ranade, Ranae M; Gillespie, J Robert; Creason, Sharon A; Huang, Wenlin; Shibata, Sayaka; Barros-Álvarez, Ximena; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Hol, Wim G J; Fan, Erkang; Buckner, Frederick S

    2017-11-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are widespread and pose a growing threat to human health. New antibiotics acting by novel mechanisms of action are needed to address this challenge. The bacterial methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) enzyme is essential for protein synthesis, and the type found in Gram-positive bacteria is substantially different from its counterpart found in the mammalian cytoplasm. Both previously published and new selective inhibitors were shown to be highly active against Gram-positive bacteria with MICs of ≤1.3 μg/ml against Staphylococcus , Enterococcus , and Streptococcus strains. Incorporation of radioactive precursors demonstrated that the mechanism of activity was due to the inhibition of protein synthesis. Little activity against Gram-negative bacteria was observed, consistent with the fact that Gram-negative bacterial species contain a different type of MetRS enzyme. The ratio of the MIC to the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was consistent with a bacteriostatic mechanism. The level of protein binding of the compounds was high (>95%), and this translated to a substantial increase in MICs when the compounds were tested in the presence of serum. Despite this, the compounds were very active when they were tested in a Staphylococcus aureus murine thigh infection model. Compounds 1717 and 2144, given by oral gavage, resulted in 3- to 4-log decreases in the bacterial load compared to that in vehicle-treated mice, which was comparable to the results observed with the comparator drugs, vancomycin and linezolid. In summary, the research describes MetRS inhibitors with oral bioavailability that represent a class of compounds acting by a novel mechanism with excellent potential for clinical development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Isolation and in vitro evaluation of bacteriophages against MDR-bacterial isolates from septic wound infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roja Rani Pallavali

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance has become a major problem for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial infections. The use of bacteriophages is an attractive approach to overcome the problem of drug resistance in several pathogens that cause fatal diseases. Our study aimed to isolate multi drug resistant bacteria from patients with septic wounds and then isolate and apply bacteriophages in vitro as alternative therapeutic agents. Pus samples were aseptically collected from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Science (RIMS, Kadapa, A.P., and samples were analyzed by gram staining, evaluating morphological characteristics, and biochemical methods. MDR-bacterial strains were collected using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method against a variety of antibiotics. Bacteriophages were collected and tested in vitro for lytic activity against MDR-bacterial isolates. Analysis of the pus swab samples revealed that the most of the isolates detected had Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the predominant bacterium, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Our results suggested that gram-negative bacteria were more predominant than gram-positive bacteria in septic wounds; most of these isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, vancomycin and tetracycline. All the gram-positive isolates (100% were multi-drug resistant, whereas 86% of the gram-negative isolates had a drug resistant nature. Further bacteriophages isolated from sewage demonstrated perfect lytic activity against the multi-drug resistant bacteria causing septic wounds. In vitro analysis of the isolated bacteriophages demonstrated perfect lysis against the corresponding MDR-bacteria, and these isolated phages may be promising as a first choice for prophylaxis against wound sepsis, Moreover, phage therapy does not enhance multi-drug resistance in bacteria and could work simultaneously on a wide variety of MDR-bacteria when used in a bacteriophage cocktail. Hence

  5. Co-trimoxazole alone for prevention of bacterial infection in patients with acute leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, I D; Donnelly, P; Catovsky, D; Darrell, J; Johnson, S A; Goldman, J M; Galton, D A

    1982-01-02

    43 patients undergoing treatment for acute leukaemia were randomised to receive either co-trimoxazole alone or co-trimoxazole with framycetin and colistin as antibacterial prophylaxis during periods of neutropenia. There were no significant differences between the two treatment groups in the time before the onset of the first fever, the number of episodes of fever or of septicaemia per patient, the number of neutropenic days during which patients remained afebrile or did not require systemic antibiotics, or the number of resistant organisms acquired. Co-trimoxazole alone is cheaper and easier to take than co-trimoxazole with framycetin and colistin, and it is therefore preferable to the three-drug combination for the prophylaxis of bacterial infection.

  6. Bacterial isolates from burn wound infections and their antibiograms: A eight-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Manjula

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection is an important cause of mortality in burns. Rapidly emerging nosocomial pathogens and the problem of multi-drug resistance necessitates periodic review of isolation patterns and antibiogram in the burn ward. Aim: Keeping this in mind, the present retrospective study from wounds of patients admitted to burns unit was undertaken to determine the bacteriological profile and the resistance pattern from the burn ward over a period of three years (June 2002 to May 2005 and was compared with the results obtained during the previous five years (June 1997-May 2002, to ascertain any change in the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial resistance pattern. Materials and Methods: Bacterial isolates from 268 wound swabs taken from burn patients were identified by conventional biochemical methods and antimicrobial susceptibility was performed. Statistical comparison of bacterial isolates and their resistance pattern with previous five years data was done using c2 test. Results and Conclusions: During the period from 2002 to 2005 Pseudomonas species was the commonest pathogen isolated (51.5% followed by Acinetobacter species (14.28%, Staph. aureus (11.15%, Klebsiella species (9.23% and Proteus species (2.3%. When compared with the results of the previous five years i.e., 1997 to 2002, Pseudomonas species was still the commonest pathogen in the burns unit. However, the isolation of this organism and other gram-negative organisms had decreased in comparison to previous years. Newer drugs were found to be effective.

  7. Reptiles as Reservoirs of Bacterial Infections: Real Threat or Methodological Bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zancolli, Giulia; Mahsberg, Dieter; Sickel, Wiebke; Keller, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial infections secondary to snakebites and human pathogens (e.g., Salmonella) have been linked to the oral microbiota of snakes and pet reptiles. Based on culture-dependent studies, it is speculated that snakes' oral microbiota reflects the fecal flora of their ingested preys. However, cultured-based techniques have been shown to be limited as they fail to identify unculturable microorganisms which represent the vast majority of the microbial diversity. Here, we used culture-independent high-throughput sequencing to identify reptile-associated pathogens and to characterize the oral microbial community of five snakes, one gecko, and two terrapins. Few potential human pathogens were detected at extremely low frequencies. Moreover, bacterial taxa represented in the snake's oral cavity bore little resemblance to their preys' fecal microbiota. Overall, we found distinct, highly diverse microbial communities with consistent, species-specific patterns contrary to previous culture-based studies. Our study does not support the widely held assumption that reptiles' oral cavity acts as pathogen reservoir and provides important insights for future research.

  8. Herpesviral-bacterial co-infection in mandibular third molar pericoronitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Aleksandar; Andric, Miroslav; Knezevic, Aleksandra; Milicic, Biljana; Beljic-Ivanovic, Katarina; Perunovic, Neda; Nikolic, Nadja; Milasin, Jelena

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the presence of herpesviruses and periodontopathic bacteria and to establish their potential association with pericoronitis. Fifty samples obtained with paper points (30 from pericoronitis and 20 controls) were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. A single-stage and nested PCR assays were used to detect herpesviruses: human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and six periodontopathic anaerobic bacteria: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra, Treponema denticola, and Tannarella forsythia. Pericoronitis samples harbored HCMV and EBV at significantly higher rates than the control group (70 vs. 40 % and 46.7 vs. 15 %, P = 0.035, P = 0.021, respectively). P. micra and T. forsythia (66.7 vs. 0 %, and 40 vs. 10 %, P = 0.001, P = 0.021, respectively) were significantly more common in pericoronitis compared to the control group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of T. forsythia was associated with pericoronitis development (OR 7.3, 95 % CI, 1.2-43.2, P = 0.028). The occurrence of HCVM and EBV extends our previous knowledge on microbiota in pericoronitis. These PCR-based findings demonstrated that bacterial and viral DNA occurred concomitantly in pericoronitis samples. T. forsythia appeared to be significantly associated with pericoronitis development in the examined sample. Herpesviral-bacterial co-infections might exacerbate the progression of pericoronitis.

  9. Polymicrobial infection with major periodontal pathogens induced periodontal disease and aortic atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoE(null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes F Rivera

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (PD and atherosclerosis are both polymicrobial and multifactorial and although observational studies supported the association, the causative relationship between these two diseases is not yet established. Polymicrobial infection-induced periodontal disease is postulated to accelerate atherosclerotic plaque growth by enhancing atherosclerotic risk factors of orally infected Apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(null mice. At 16 weeks of infection, samples of blood, mandible, maxilla, aorta, heart, spleen, and liver were collected, analyzed for bacterial genomic DNA, immune response, inflammation, alveolar bone loss, serum inflammatory marker, atherosclerosis risk factors, and aortic atherosclerosis. PCR analysis of polymicrobial-infected (Porphyromonas gingivalis [P. gingivalis], Treponema denticola [T. denticola], and Tannerella forsythia [T. forsythia] mice resulted in detection of bacterial genomic DNA in oral plaque samples indicating colonization of the oral cavity by all three species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected P. gingivalis and T. denticola within gingival tissues of infected mice and morphometric analysis showed an increase in palatal alveolar bone loss (p<0.0001 and intrabony defects suggesting development of periodontal disease in this model. Polymicrobial-infected mice also showed an increase in aortic plaque area (p<0.05 with macrophage accumulation, enhanced serum amyloid A, and increased serum cholesterol and triglycerides. A systemic infection was indicated by the detection of bacterial genomic DNA in the aorta and liver of infected mice and elevated levels of bacterial specific IgG antibodies (p<0.0001. This study was a unique effort to understand the effects of a polymicrobial infection with P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia on periodontal disease and associated atherosclerosis in ApoE(null mice.

  10. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  11. Potential role of tedizolid phosphate in the treatment of acute bacterial skin infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbina O

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Olatz Urbina,1 Olivia Ferrández,1 Mercè Espona,1 Esther Salas,1 Irene Ferrández,2 Santiago Grau1 1Services of Hospital Pharmacy, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 2Ciència i Tecnologia dels Aliments, Pharmacy Department, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Tedizolid phosphate (TR-701, a prodrug of tedizolid (TR-700, is a next-generation oxazolidinone that has shown favorable results in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections in its first Phase III clinical trial. Tedizolid has high bioavailability, penetration, and tissue distribution when administered orally or intravenously. The activity of tedizolid was greater than linezolid against strains of Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Enterococcus spp. in vitro studies, including strains resistant to linezolid and those not susceptible to vancomycin or daptomycin. Its pharmacokinetic characteristics allow for a once-daily administration that leads to a more predictable efficacy and safety profile than those of linezolid. No hematological adverse effects have been reported associated with tedizolid when used at the therapeutic dose of 200 mg in Phase I, II, or III clinical trials of up to 3 weeks of tedizolid administration. Given that the clinical and microbiological efficacy are similar for the 200, 300, and 400 mg doses, the lowest effective dose of 200 mg once daily for 6 days was selected for Phase III studies in acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections, providing a safe dosing regimen with low potential for development of myelosuppression. Unlike linezolid, tedizolid does not inhibit monoamine oxidase in vivo, therefore interactions with adrenergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic drugs are not to be expected. In conclusion, tedizolid is a novel antibiotic with potent activity against Gram-positive microorganisms responsible for skin and soft tissue infections, including strains resistant to

  12. [Investigation of bacterial and viral etiology in community acquired central nervous system infections with molecular methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Hasip; Tünger, Alper; Şenol, Şebnem; Gazi, Hörü; Avcı, Meltem; Örmen, Bahar; Türker, Nesrin; Atalay, Sabri; Köse, Şükran; Ulusoy, Sercan; Işıkgöz Taşbakan, Meltem; Sipahi, Oğuz Reşat; Yamazhan, Tansu; Gülay, Zeynep; Alp Çavuş, Sema; Pullukçu, Hüsnü

    2017-07-01

    In this multicenter prospective cohort study, it was aimed to evaluate the bacterial and viral etiology in community-acquired central nervous system infections by standart bacteriological culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Patients hospitalized with central nervous system infections between April 2012 and February 2014 were enrolled in the study. Demographic and clinical information of the patients were collected prospectively. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of the patients were examined by standart bacteriological culture methods, bacterial multiplex PCR (Seeplex meningitis-B ACE Detection (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria monocytogenes, Group B streptococci) and viral multiplex PCR (Seeplex meningitis-V1 ACE Detection kits herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV1), herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV2), varicella zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and human herpes virus 6 (HHV6)) (Seeplex meningitis-V2 ACE Detection kit (enteroviruses)). Patients were classified as purulent meningitis, aseptic meningitis and encephalitis according to their clinical, CSF (leukocyte level, predominant cell type, protein and glucose (blood/CSF) levels) and cranial imaging results. Patients who were infected with a pathogen other than the detection of the kit or diagnosed as chronic meningitis and other diseases during the follow up, were excluded from the study. A total of 79 patients (28 female, 51 male, aged 42.1 ± 18.5) fulfilled the study inclusion criteria. A total of 46 patients were classified in purulent meningitis group whereas 33 were in aseptic meningitis/encephalitis group. Pathogens were detected by multiplex PCR in 41 patients. CSF cultures were positive in 10 (21.7%) patients (nine S.pneumoniae, one H.influenzae) and PCR were positive for 27 (58.6%) patients in purulent meningitis group. In this group one type of bacteria were detected in 18 patients (14 S.pneumoniae, two N

  13. Assessment of Sepsis-3 criteria and quick SOFA in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Salvatore; Bartoletti, Michele; Tonon, Marta; Baldassarre, Maurizio; Chies, Giada; Romano, Antonietta; Viale, Pierluigi; Vettore, Elia; Domenicali, Marco; Stanco, Marialuisa; Pilutti, Chiara; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Brocca, Alessandra; Bernardi, Mauro; Caraceni, Paolo; Angeli, Paolo

    2017-08-31

    Patients with cirrhosis have a high risk of sepsis, which confers a poor prognosis. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria have several limitations in cirrhosis. Recently, new criteria for sepsis (Sepsis-3) have been suggested in the general population (increase of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) ≥2 points from baseline). Outside the intensive care unit (ICU), the quick SOFA (qSOFA (at least two among alteration in mental status, systolic blood pressure ≤100 mm Hg or respiratory rate ≥22/min)) was suggested to screen for sepsis. These criteria have never been evaluated in patients with cirrhosis. The aim of the study was to assess the ability of Sepsis-3 criteria in predicting in-hospital mortality in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial/fungal infections. 259 consecutive patients with cirrhosis and bacterial/fungal infections were prospectively included. Demographic, laboratory and microbiological data were collected at diagnosis of infection. Baseline SOFA was assessed using preadmission data. Patients were followed up until death, liver transplantation or discharge. Findings were externally validated (197 patients). Sepsis-3 and qSOFA had significantly greater discrimination for in-hospital mortality (area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC)=0.784 and 0.732, respectively) than SIRS (AUROC=0.606) (p<0.01 for both). Similar results were observed in the validation cohort. Sepsis-3 (subdistribution HR (sHR)=5.47; p=0.006), qSOFA (sHR=1.99; p=0.020), Chronic Liver Failure Consortium Acute Decompensation score (sHR=1.05; p=0.001) and C reactive protein (sHR=1.01;p=0.034) were found to be independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Patients with Sepsis-3 had higher incidence of acute-on-chronic liver failure, septic shock and transfer to ICU than those without Sepsis-3. Sepsis-3 criteria are more accurate than SIRS criteria in predicting the severity of infections in patients with cirrhosis. qSOFA is a

  14. LYSOSOMAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES IN HUMAN "TOXIC" NEUTROPHILS DURING BACTERIAL INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Charles E.; Katayama, Isao; Cotran, Ramzi S.; Finland, Maxwell

    1969-01-01

    "Toxic" neutrophils from humans with severe bacterial infections, identified by the presence of Döhle bodies, "toxic" granules, and vacuoles were shown to differ from normal neutrophils both in ultrastructure and in lysosome activity. Döhle bodies were identified as lamellar aggregates of rough endoplasmic reticulum. Toxic granules corresponded to the azurophilic granules usually identified by Romanowsky stains only in neutrophil precursors. By electron microscopy such granules were large, electron-dense, and peroxidase positive; they could usually be distinguished from the smaller, less dense, "specific" granules also present in control neutrophils, but in the latter they became visible by light microscopy only after prolonged staining or following fixation with glutaraldehyde. These observations suggest that toxic granules represent an abnormal staining reaction of the large dense granules in the toxic cells, and not phagocytized material, newly formed abnormal granules or autophagic bodies. Alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly greater in toxic neutrophils than in normal ones; 80% of the activity of both was located in the lysosome fraction. Beta glucuronidase was normal. Total acid phosphatase was normal, but the percentage located in the nonlysosome fraction of toxic neutrophils was increased, suggesting that lysosomes were "labilized." Formation of neutral red vacuoles in supravitally stained preparations, an index of lysosome activity, occurred more rapidly in toxic neutrophils. This reaction paralleled degranulation and the formation of clear vacuoles in unstained wet mounts and could be blocked by colchicine, a lysosome stabilizer, or enhanced by procedures which activate lysosomes. "Autophagic" vacuoles were observed by electron microscopy in some toxic neutrophils. These observations are discussed in relation to the concept that the "toxic" neutrophils in severe bacterial infection reflect cellular immaturity and/or stimulation or

  15. Lysis-deficient phages as novel therapeutic agents for controlling bacterial infection

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    Kempashanaiah Nanjundappa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in phage therapy has grown over the past decade due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens. However, the use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes has raised concerns over the potential for immune response, rapid toxin release by the lytic action of phages, and difficulty in dose determination in clinical situations. A phage that kills the target cell but is incapable of host cell lysis would alleviate these concerns without compromising efficacy. Results We developed a recombinant lysis-deficient Staphylococcus aureus phage P954, in which the endolysin gene was rendered nonfunctional by insertional inactivation. P954, a temperate phage, was lysogenized in S. aureus strain RN4220. The native endolysin gene on the prophage was replaced with an endolysin gene disrupted by the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat gene through homologous recombination using a plasmid construct. Lysogens carrying the recombinant phage were detected by growth in presence of chloramphenicol. Induction of the recombinant prophage did not result in host cell lysis, and the phage progeny were released by cell lysis with glass beads. The recombinant phage retained the endolysin-deficient genotype and formed plaques only when endolysin was supplemented. The host range of the recombinant phage was the same as that of the parent phage. To test the in vivo efficacy of the recombinant endolysin-deficient phage, immunocompromised mice were challenged with pathogenic S. aureus at a dose that results in 80% mortality (LD80. Treatment with the endolysin-deficient phage rescued mice from the fatal S. aureus infection. Conclusions A recombinant endolysin-deficient staphylococcal phage has been developed that is lethal to methicillin-resistant S. aureus without causing bacterial cell lysis. The phage was able to multiply in lytic mode utilizing a heterologous endolysin expressed from a plasmid in the propagation host

  16. Lysis-deficient phages as novel therapeutic agents for controlling bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Interest in phage therapy has grown over the past decade due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens. However, the use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes has raised concerns over the potential for immune response, rapid toxin release by the lytic action of phages, and difficulty in dose determination in clinical situations. A phage that kills the target cell but is incapable of host cell lysis would alleviate these concerns without compromising efficacy. Results We developed a recombinant lysis-deficient Staphylococcus aureus phage P954, in which the endolysin gene was rendered nonfunctional by insertional inactivation. P954, a temperate phage, was lysogenized in S. aureus strain RN4220. The native endolysin gene on the prophage was replaced with an endolysin gene disrupted by the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat) gene through homologous recombination using a plasmid construct. Lysogens carrying the recombinant phage were detected by growth in presence of chloramphenicol. Induction of the recombinant prophage did not result in host cell lysis, and the phage progeny were released by cell lysis with glass beads. The recombinant phage retained the endolysin-deficient genotype and formed plaques only when endolysin was supplemented. The host range of the recombinant phage was the same as that of the parent phage. To test the in vivo efficacy of the recombinant endolysin-deficient phage, immunocompromised mice were challenged with pathogenic S. aureus at a dose that results in 80% mortality (LD80). Treatment with the endolysin-deficient phage rescued mice from the fatal S. aureus infection. Conclusions A recombinant endolysin-deficient staphylococcal phage has been developed that is lethal to methicillin-resistant S. aureus without causing bacterial cell lysis. The phage was able to multiply in lytic mode utilizing a heterologous endolysin expressed from a plasmid in the propagation host. The recombinant phage

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of presepsin (sCD14-ST) for prediction of bacterial infection in cerebrospinal fluid samples from children with suspected bacterial meningitis or ventriculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubljar, David; Kopitar, Andreja Natasa; Groselj-Grenc, Mojca; Suhadolc, Kristina; Fabjan, Teja; Skvarc, Miha

    2015-04-01

    Children with temporary external ventricular drains (EVD) are prone to nosocomial infections. Diagnosis of bacterial meningitis and ventriculitis in these children is challenging due to frequent blood contamination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the presence of chemical ventriculitis. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic accuracy of presepsin (sCD14-ST), a novel biomarker of bacterial infection in CSF, to predict bacterial infection in comparison to the accuracy of established biomarkers like those demonstrated in biochemical analysis of CSF. We conducted a prospective study with 18 children with suspected bacterial meningitis or ventriculitis who had 66 episodes of disease. CSF samples were taken from external ventricular drainage. We measured presepsin in CSF, as well as CSF leukocyte count, glucose, and proteins. CSF was also taken to prove bacterial infection with culture methods or with 16S rRNA gene broad-range PCR (SepsiTest; Molzym, Germany). Infection was clinically confirmed in 57 (86%) episodes of suspected meningitis or ventriculitis. Chemical ventriculitis was diagnosed in 9 (14%) episodes of suspected meningitis or ventriculitis. Diagnostic accuracies presented as area under the curve (AUC) for sCD14-ST, leukocytes, and proteins measured in CSF were 0.877 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.793 to 0.961), 0.798 (95% CI, 0.677 to 0.920), and 0.857 (95% CI, 0.749 to 0.964), respectively. With CSF culture, we detected bacteria in 17 samples, compared to 37 detected with broad-range PCR. It was found that presepsin was present at a significantly higher level in children with clinically proven ventriculitis than in those without meningitis or ventriculitis. Diagnostic accuracies of presepsin were superior to those of leukocytes or proteins in CSF. Presepsin-guided 16S rRNA gene PCR could be used in everyday clinical practice to improve etiological diagnosis of meningitis and ventriculitis and to prescribe more appropriate antibiotics. Copyright

  18. Host and bacterial proteins that repress recruitment of LC3 to Shigella early during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh A Baxt

    Full Text Available Shigella spp. are intracytosolic gram-negative pathogens that cause disease by invasion and spread through the colonic mucosa, utilizing host cytoskeletal components to form propulsive actin tails. We have previously identified the host factor Toca-1 as being recruited to intracellular S. flexneri and being required for efficient bacterial actin tail formation. We show that at early times during infection (40 min., the type three-secreted effector protein IcsB recruits Toca-1 to intracellular bacteria and that recruitment of Toca-1 is associated with repression of recruitment of LC3, as well as with repression of recruitment of the autophagy marker NDP52, around these intracellular bacteria. LC3 is best characterized as a marker of autophagosomes, but also marks phagosomal membranes in the process LC3-associated phagocytosis. IcsB has previously been demonstrated to be required for S. flexneri evasion of autophagy at late times during infection (4-6 hr by inhibiting binding of the autophagy protein Atg5 to the Shigella surface protein IcsA (VirG. Our results suggest that IcsB and Toca-1 modulation of LC3 recruitment restricts LC3-associated phagocytosis and/or LC3 recruitment to vacuolar membrane remnants. Together with published results, our findings suggest that IcsB inhibits innate immune responses in two distinct ways, first, by inhibiting LC3-associated phagocytosis and/or LC3 recruitment to vacuolar membrane remnants early during infection, and second, by inhibiting autophagy late during infection.

  19. The role of the bacterial mismatch repair system in SOS-induced mutagenesis: a theoretical background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.; Kapralov, M.I.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Sweilam, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical study is performed of the possible role of the methyl-directed mismatch repair system in the ultraviolet-induced mutagenesis of Escherichia coli bacterial cells. For this purpose, a mathematical model of the bacterial mismatch repair system is developed. Within this model, the key pathways of this type of repair are simulated on the basis of modern experimental data related to its mechanisms. Here we have modelled in detail five main pathways of DNA misincorporation removal with different DNA exonucleases. Using our calculations, we have tested the hypothesis that the bacterial mismatch repair system is responsible for the removal of the nucleotides misincorporated by DNA polymerase V (the UmuD' 2 C complex) during ultraviolet-induced SOS response. For the theoretical analysis of the mutation frequency, we have combined the proposed mathematical approach with the model of SOS-induced mutagenesis in the E.coli bacterial cell developed earlier. Our calculations support the hypothesis that methyl-directed mismatch repair influences the mutagenic effect of ultraviolet radiation

  20. Suggested guidelines for using systemic antimicrobials in bacterial skin infections: part?2? antimicrobial choice, treatment regimens and compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Beco, L.; Guagu?re, E.; M?ndez, C. Lorente; Noli, C.; Nuttall, T.; Vroom, M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic antimicrobials are critically important in veterinary healthcare, and resistance is a major concern. Antimicrobial stewardship will be important in maintaining clinical efficacy by reducing the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance. Bacterial skin infections are one of the most common reasons for using systemic antimicrobials in dogs and cats. Appropriate management of these infections is, therefore, crucial in any policy for responsible antimicrobial use. The goals of t...

  1. The potential of methylethylpiridinol in treatment of bacterial infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae (experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Brykhanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Investigated the activity of methylethylpiridinol (6-methyl-2-ethyl-pyridin-3-ol hydrochloride in the comprehensive treatment of the experimental bacterial infection caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae.Materials and methods. The study was conducted on clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. At the first stage of the study (in vitro studied the effect of methylethylpiridinol in concentrations 0,25–4 mM on the growth of the strain and the activity of the sublethal concentrations of antibiotics – gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, ceftazidime. In the second stage of the study (in vivo in rats Wistar simulated bacterial peritonitis by intraperitoneal injection of a suspension of Klebsiella pneumoniae and investigated the effect of methylethylpiridinol (80 mg/kg on the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy with gentamicin (30 mg/kg, ciprofloxacin (50 mg/kg, ceftazidime (120 mg/kg or tetracycline (80 mg/kg. The animal blood plasma was determined ceruloplasmin concentration (marker of the intensity of infectious-inflammatory process and thiobarbiturate-jet products, erythrocytes – the concentration of reduced glutathione, catalase and glutathione peroxidase.Results. It is found that a methylethylpiridinol inhibits the development of periodic bacterial cultures, but exhibits a pronounced antagonism with respect to gentamicin. Antioxidant slightly increases the activity of ciprofloxacin and tetracycline. The bacteriostatic effect of antioxidant reduces the action of ceftazidime in vitro. In conditions of chemotherapy by using of gentamicin and ciprofloxacin additional injection of methylethylpiridinol leads to the preservation of ceruloplasmin level to the level of non-treated animals without showing the antioxidant effect. Ceftazidime exhibits antioxidant effect, reduces the introduction of methylethylpiridinol. The antioxidant properties of methylethylpiridinol did not appear in the application of

  2. Multi-species bacterial biofilm and intracellular infection in otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornton Ruth B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria which are metabolically active yet unable to be cultured and eradicated by antibiotic treatment are present in the middle ear effusion of children with chronic otitis media with effusion (COME and recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM. These observations are suggestive of biofilm presence or intracellular sequestration of bacteria and may play a role in OM pathogenesis. The aim of this project is to provide evidence for the presence of otopathogenic bacteria intracellularly or within biofilm in the middle ear mucosa of children with COME or rAOM. Methods Middle ear mucosal biopsies from 20 children with COME or rAOM were examined for otopathogenic bacteria (either in biofilm or located intracellularly using transmission electron microscopy (TEM or species specific fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. One healthy control biopsy from a child undergoing cochlear implant surgery was also examined. Results No bacteria were observed in the healthy control sample. In 2 of the 3 biopsies imaged using TEM, bacteria were observed in mucus containing vacuoles within epithelial cells. Bacterial species within these could not be identified and biofilm was not observed. Using FISH with CLSM, bacteria were seen in 15 of the 17 otitis media mucosal specimens. In this group, 11 (65% of the 17 middle ear mucosal biopsies showed evidence of bacterial biofilm and 12 demonstrated intracellular bacteria. 52% of biopsies were positive for both biofilm and intracellular bacteria. At least one otopathogen was identified in 13 of the 15 samples where bacteria were present. No differences were observed between biopsies from children with COME and those with rAOM. Conclusion Using FISH and CLSM, bacterial biofilm and intracellular infection with known otopathogens are demonstrated on/in the middle ear mucosa of children with COME and/or rAOM. While their role in disease pathogenesis remains to be

  3. The utility of procalcitonin in the prediction of serious bacterial infection in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matha, S M; Rahiman, S N; Gelbart, B G; Duke, T D

    2016-09-01

    To determine utility of procalcitonin (PCT) for the prediction of bacterial infection in critically ill children, we analysed the relationship between serum PCT, cultures and other laboratory markers of bacterial sepsis or viral infection in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). The outcome measures were levels of PCT in proven bacteraemia, pneumonia and viral respiratory infection; and comparison of PCT to immature to total neutrophil ratio (ITR) in prediction of bacteraemia. In 420 children with suspected sepsis, 1,226 serum PCT levels were analysed. Children with bacteraemia had a higher median PCT (2.03 ng/ml, interquartile range [IQR] 0.67-42.4) than those who did not have bacteraemia (0.82 ng/ml, IQR 0.295-2.87) ( P =0.033). PCT was a significant but only moderate predictor of bacteraemia (AUC 0.65). In 866 episodes of suspected sepsis where paired PCT and ITR were performed, the median ITR in children with bacteraemia was 0.19 ng/ml (IQR 0.04-0.35), and the median PCT was 6.5 ng/ml (IQR 0.71-61.8). PCT was a marginally better predictor of bacteraemia (AUC 0.69) than the ITR (AUC 0.66). In children with viral respiratory tract infection only, the median PCT was 1.26 ng/ml (0.35-5.5), and in those with likely bacterial pneumonia the median PCT was 0.80 ng/ml (IQR 0.28-1.70). In a heterogeneous population of children in a tertiary PICU, PCT measured at a single timepoint was a moderate predictor of proven bacteraemia. In our population PCT did not reliably identify localised bacterial infection or distinguish bacterial from viral respiratory infection.

  4. Bacterial infections in patients with liver cirrhosis: clinical characteristics and the role of C-reactive protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Melanie; Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Andreadis, Ioannis; Giannaris, Markos; Kontos, George; Kranidioti, Hariklia; Pirounaki, Maria; Koskinas, John

    2018-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients may be difficult, because of the absence of classical signs such as fever and raised white blood cell count. The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in this context has not been clearly defined. Methods: Clinical and laboratory characteristics of 210 consecutive cirrhotic patients with (n=100) or without (n=110) bacterial infection were compared with a control group of non-cirrhotic patients with infection (n=106). Results: Significantly fewer patients with cirrhosis had a body temperature ≥37°C when presenting with bacterial infection (56% cirrhotic vs. 85.5% non-cirrhotic patients, P=0.01). Mean leukocyte count was 6.92 × 103/mm3 in patients with cirrhosis and infection, 5.75 × 103/mm3 (P=0.02) in cirrhotic patients without infection, and 11.28 × 103/mm3 in non-cirrhotic patients with infection (P10 mg/L indicated the presence of infection with a sensitivity of 68%, a specificity of 84.5% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.8197. CRP cutoff level differed according to the severity of the liver disease: Child-Pugh score (CPS) A: 21.3 mg/L, B: 17 mg/L, and C: 5.78 mg/L. Conclusions: CRP at admission could help diagnose infection in cirrhotic patients. Since the severity of liver disease seems to affect the CRP values, lower CRP levels might indicate infection. Clinical suspicion is necessary to avoid delay in diagnosis and initiate antibiotic treatment. PMID:29333070

  5. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

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    Sabine Dittrich

    Full Text Available Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP. To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require 90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i time-to-result <10 min (but maximally <2 hrs; ii storage conditions at 0-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity with a minimal shelf life of 12 months; iii operational conditions of 5-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity; and iv minimal sample collection needs (50-100μL, capillary blood. This expert approach to define assay requirements for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial assay should guide product development, and enable targeted and timely efforts by industry partners and academic institutions.

  6. Optimization of serious bacterial infections intensive therapy in children in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Department

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    M. Yu. Kurochkin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Effective selection of antibiotics in children with severe bacterial infections is often difficult because of microflora resistance. Extracorporeal detoxication methods, particularly discrete plasmapheresis are usually used for septic shock and total organ failure prevention. The aim of research. To conduct microbiological monitoring and to study a dynamics of medium molecular peptides in discrete plasmapheresis for intensive care optimization in children with severe bacterial infections in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Department (AICU. Materials and methods. We investigated respiratory tract microflora by bacteriological method in 120 newborns and 30 children from 1 month with severe bacterial infections at admission and during prolonged stay in AICU. Discrete plasmapheresis was held in four children. Dynamic of medium molecular peptides was studied at admission, before discrete plasmapheresis and after it. Statistical data processing was performed using the Microsoft Excel software package. Results. It was found that in AICU in older children in admission grampositive and gramnegative flora was defined in equal quantity. The best sensitivity of the respiratory tract microflora was for the glycopeptides, oxazolidinones , II generation cephalosporins and macrolides, more than 60% - for aminoglycosides and lincosamides. However, when children spent more than 7-14 days in the department, nosocomial microflora was represented primarily by gram-negative organisms (80%, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was found to be inappropriate to use cephalosporins and macrolides in AICU for older children after their long stay there; the sensitivity to aminoglycosides was less than 60%, to anti-pseudomonal carbapenems not more than 30%. In AICU of newborns grampositive flora was found in 95%, mostly Staphylococcus haemolyticus. It was entirely sensitive for glycopeptides, oxazolidinones, fluoroquinolones, carbapenems, and also for co-trimoxazole and

  7. ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling, but is not required for bacterial lipoprotein-induced tolerance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Liu, Jinghua

    2010-05-15

    Activation of TLR signaling is critical for host innate immunity against bacterial infection. Previous studies reported that the ST2 receptor, a member of the Toll\\/IL-1 receptor superfamily, functions as a negative regulator of TLR4 signaling and maintains LPS tolerance. However, it is undetermined whether ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling and furthermore, whether a TLR2 agonist, bacterial lipoprotein (BLP)-induced tolerance is dependent on ST2. In this study, we show that BLP stimulation-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines and immunocomplex formation of TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) were significantly enhanced in ST2-deficient macrophages compared with those in wild-type controls. Furthermore, overexpression of ST2 dose-dependently attenuated BLP-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting a negative regulatory role of ST2 in TLR2 signaling. A moderate but significantly attenuated production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 on a second BLP stimulation was observed in BLP-pretreated, ST2-deficient macrophages, which is associated with substantially reduced IRAK-1 protein expression and downregulated TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IRAK immunocomplex formation. ST2-deficient mice, when pretreated with a nonlethal dose of BLP, benefitted from an improved survival against a subsequent lethal BLP challenge, indicating BLP tolerance develops in the absence of the ST2 receptor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ST2 acts as a negative regulator of TLR2 signaling, but is not required for BLP-induced tolerance.

  8. The potential role of amlodipine on experimentally induced bacterial rhinosinusitis

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    Arzu Tatar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Antibiotics are frequently used for the treatment of rhinosinusitis. Concerns have been raised regarding the adverse effects of antibiotics and growing resistance. The lack of development of new antibiotic compounds has increased the necessity for exploration of non-antibiotic compounds that have antibacterial activity. Amlodipine is a non-antibiotic compound with anti-inflammatory activity. Objective: In this study we aimed to investigate the potential role of amlodipine in the treatment of rhinosinusitis by evaluating its effects on tissue oxidative status, mucosal histology and inflammation. Methods: Fifteen adult albino guinea pigs were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with saline, cefazolin sodium, or amlodipine for 7 days. The control group was composed by five healthy guinea pigs. Animals were sacrificed after the treatment. Histopathological changes were identified using Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. Inflammation was assessed by Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte infiltration density. Tissue levels of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione and an oxidative product (malondialdehyde were determined. Results: In rhinosinusitis induced animals, amlodipine reduced loss of cilia, lamina propria edema and collagen deposition compared to placebo (saline and although not superior to cefazolin, amlodipine decreased polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration. The superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were reduced, whereas the malondialdehyde levels were increased significantly in all three-treatment groups compared to the control group. Amlodipine treated group showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels and decreased malondialdehyde levels compared to all treatment groups. Conclusion: The non-antibiotic compound amlodipine may have a role in acute rhinosinusitis treatment through tissue protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  9. Fosfomycin i.v. for Treatment of Severely Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    Bacterial Infections; Bone Diseases, Infectious; Osteomyelitis; Central Nervous System Bacterial Infections; Meningitis, Bacterial; Encephalitis; Brain Abscess; Urinary Tract Infections; Respiratory Tract Infections; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Skin Diseases, Bacterial; Soft Tissue Infections; Intraabdominal Infections; Sepsis; Bacteremia; Endocarditis, Bacterial

  10. Critical role of tedizolid in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrández, Olivia; Urbina, Olatz; Grau, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Tedizolid phosphate has high activity against the Gram-positive microorganisms mainly involved in acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, such as strains of Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus strains), Streptococcus pyogenes , Streptococcus agalactiae , the Streptococcus anginosus group, and Enterococcus faecalis , including those with some mechanism of resistance limiting the use of linezolid. The area under the curve for time 0-24 hours/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) pharmacodynamic ratio has shown the best correlation with the efficacy of tedizolid, versus the time above MIC ratio and the maximum drug concentration/minimum inhibitory concentration ratio. Administration of this antibiotic for 6 days has shown its noninferiority versus administration of linezolid for 10 days in patients with skin and skin structure infections enrolled in two Phase III studies (ESTABLISH-1 and ESTABLISH-2). Tedizolid's more favorable safety profile and dosage regimen, which allow once-daily administration, versus linezolid, position it as a good therapeutic alternative. However, whether or not the greater economic cost associated with this antibiotic is offset by its shorter treatment duration and possibility of oral administration in routine clinical practice has yet to be clarified.

  11. Epidemiological analysis of bacterial strains involved in hospital infection in a University Hospital from Brazil

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    MORAES Bianca Aguiar de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospital infections cause an increase in morbidity and mortality of hospitalized patients with significant rise in hospital costs. The aim of this work was an epidemiological analysis of hospital infection cases occurred in a public University Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Hence, 238 strains were isolated from 14 different clinical materials of 166 patients hospitalized in the period between August 1995 and July 1997. The average age of the patients was 33.4 years, 72.9% used antimicrobials before having a positive culture. The most common risk conditions were surgery (19.3%, positive HIV or AIDS (18.1% and lung disease (16.9%. 24 different bacterial species were identified, S. aureus (21% and P. aeruginosa (18.5% were predominant. Among 50 S. aureus isolated strains 36% were classified as MRSA (Methicillin Resistant S. aureus. The Gram negative bacteria presented high resistance to aminoglycosides and cephalosporins. A diarrhea outbreak, detected in high-risk neonatology ward, was caused by Salmonella serovar Infantis strain, with high antimicrobial resistance and a plasmid of high molecular weight (98Mda containing virulence genes and positive for R factor.

  12. Effect of gut bacterial isolates from Apis mellifera jemenitica on Paenibacillus larvae infected bee larvae

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    Ahmad Al-Ghamdi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The probiotic effects of seven newly isolated gut bacteria, from the indegenous honey bees of Saudi Arabia were investigated. In vivo bioassays were used to investigate the effects of each gut bacterium namely, Fructobacillus fructosus (T1, Proteus mirabilis (T2, Bacillus licheniformis (T3, Lactobacillus kunkeei (T4, Bacillus subtilis (T5, Enterobacter kobei (T6, and Morganella morganii (T7 on mortality percentage of honey bee larvae infected with P. larvae spores along with negative control (normal diet and positive control (normal diet spiked with P. larvae spores. Addition of gut bacteria to the normal diet significantly reduced the mortality percentage of the treated groups. Mortality percentage in all treated groups ranged from 56.67% up to 86.67%. T6 treated group exhibited the highest mortality (86.67%, whereas T4 group showed the lowest mortality (56.67%. Among the seven gut bacterial treatments, T4 and T3 decreased the mortality 56.67% and 66.67%, respectively, whereas, for T2, T6, and T7 the mortality percentage was equal to that of the positive control (86.67%. Mortality percentages in infected larval groups treated with T1, and T5 were 78.33% and 73.33% respectively. Most of the mortality occurred in the treated larvae during days 2 and 3. Treatments T3 and T4 treatments showed positive effects and reduced mortality.

  13. Lack of Correlation between Bristol Stool Scale and Quantitative Bacterial Load in Infection

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    Abrar K. Thabit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decision to test for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is usually made when patients have loose stools with Bristol stool score of ≤5. We aimed to assess the relationship between bacterial load of C. difficile and Bristol stool scale, as well as stool frequency in stool samples collected from patients infected with the organism. Samples were collected at baseline, during therapy, and at the end of therapy. Spearman correlation test was used to evaluate these relationships. No correlation between Bristol stool scale and fecal load of C. difficile was found for both spores and vegetative cells at all time points as counts were persistently high ( P = non-significant. Weak positive correlations were found between stool frequency and fecal load of C. difficile spores and vegetative cells ( r s = 0.22 and 0.24, P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively. These findings indicate that quantitative colony counts were sufficiently high to detect C. difficile , irrespective of stool consistency, and suggest that semiformed stool should be sought for the pathogen in symptomatic patients with frequent stools.

  14. Lack of Correlation between Bristol Stool Scale and Quantitative Bacterial Load in Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabit, Abrar K; Nicolau, David P

    2015-01-01

    Decision to test for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is usually made when patients have loose stools with Bristol stool score of ≥5. We aimed to assess the relationship between bacterial load of C. difficile and Bristol stool scale, as well as stool frequency in stool samples collected from patients infected with the organism. Samples were collected at baseline, during therapy, and at the end of therapy. Spearman correlation test was used to evaluate these relationships. No correlation between Bristol stool scale and fecal load of C. difficile was found for both spores and vegetative cells at all time points as counts were persistently high (P = non-significant). Weak positive correlations were found between stool frequency and fecal load of C. difficile spores and vegetative cells (r s = 0.22 and 0.24, P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively). These findings indicate that quantitative colony counts were sufficiently high to detect C. difficile, irrespective of stool consistency, and suggest that semiformed stool should be sought for the pathogen in symptomatic patients with frequent stools.

  15. Bacterial Infection and Immune Responses in Lutzomyia longipalpis Sand Fly Larvae Midgut.

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    Matthew Heerman

    Full Text Available The midgut microbial community in insect vectors of disease is crucial for an effective immune response against infection with various human and animal pathogens. Depending on the aspects of their development, insects can acquire microbes present in soil, water, and plants. Sand flies are major vectors of leishmaniasis, and shown to harbor a wide variety of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Sand fly larval stages acquire microorganisms from the soil, and the abundance and distribution of these microorganisms may vary depending on the sand fly species or the breeding site. Here, we assess the distribution of two bacteria commonly found within the gut of sand flies, Pantoea agglomerans and Bacillus subtilis. We demonstrate that these bacteria are able to differentially infect the larval digestive tract, and regulate the immune response in sand fly larvae. Moreover, bacterial distribution, and likely the ability to colonize the gut, is driven, at least in part, by a gradient of pH present in the gut.

  16. Bacterial Infection and Immune Responses in Lutzomyia longipalpis Sand Fly Larvae Midgut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerman, Matthew; Weng, Ju-Lin; Hurwitz, Ivy; Durvasula, Ravi; Ramalho-Ortigao, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The midgut microbial community in insect vectors of disease is crucial for an effective immune response against infection with various human and animal pathogens. Depending on the aspects of their development, insects can acquire microbes present in soil, water, and plants. Sand flies are major vectors of leishmaniasis, and shown to harbor a wide variety of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Sand fly larval stages acquire microorganisms from the soil, and the abundance and distribution of these microorganisms may vary depending on the sand fly species or the breeding site. Here, we assess the distribution of two bacteria commonly found within the gut of sand flies, Pantoea agglomerans and Bacillus subtilis. We demonstrate that these bacteria are able to differentially infect the larval digestive tract, and regulate the immune response in sand fly larvae. Moreover, bacterial distribution, and likely the ability to colonize the gut, is driven, at least in part, by a gradient of pH present in the gut. PMID:26154607

  17. Microfluidic system for the identification of bacterial pathogens causing urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter; Lind, Anders; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbi; Turlej-Rogacka, Agata; Goossens, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections and pose a significant healthcare burden. The growing trend in antibiotic resistance makes it mandatory to develop diagnostic kits which allow not only the determination of a pathogen but also the antibiotic resistances. We have developed a microfluidic cartridge which takes a direct urine sample, extracts the DNA, performs an amplification using batch-PCR and flows the sample over a microarray which is printed into a microchannel for fluorescence detection. The cartridge is injection-molded out of COP and contains a set of two-component injection-molded rotary valves to switch between input and to isolate the PCR chamber during thermocycling. The hybridization probes were spotted directly onto a functionalized section of the outlet microchannel. We have been able to successfully perform PCR of E.coli in urine in this chip and perform a fluorescence detection of PCR products. An upgraded design of the cartridge contains the buffers and reagents in blisters stored on the chip.

  18. Prevalence of Selected Bacterial Infections Associated with the Use of Animal Waste in Louisiana

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    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Human health is a major concern when considering the disposal of large quantities of animal waste. Health concerns could arise from exposure to pathogens and excess nitrogen associated with this form of pollution. The objective was to collect and analyze health data related to selected bacterial infections associated with the use of animal waste in Louisiana. An analysis of adverse health effects has been conducted based on the incidence/prevalence rates of campylobacteriosis, E. coli O157:H7 infection, salmonellosis and shigellosis. The number of reported cases increased during the summer months. Analysis of health data showed that reported disease cases of E. coli O157:H7 were highest among Caucasian infants in the 0-4 year old age category and in Caucasian children in the 5-9 year old age category. Fatalities resulting from salmonellosis are low and increases sharply with age. The number of reported cases of shigellosis was found to be higher in African American males and females than in Caucasians. The high rate of identification in the younger population may result from the prompt seeking of medical care, as well as the frequent ordering of stool examination when symptoms become evident among this group of the population. The association with increasing age and fatality due to salmonellosis could be attributed to declining health and weaker immune systems often found in the older population. It is concluded that both animal waste and non-point source pollution may have a significant impact on human health.

  19. Amide side chain amphiphilic polymers disrupt surface established bacterial bio-films and protect mice from chronic Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Samaddar, Sandip; Ghosh, Chandradhish; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms represent the root-cause of chronic or persistent infections in humans. Gram-negative bacterial infections due to nosocomial and opportunistic pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii are more difficult to treat because of their inherent and rapidly acquiring resistance to antibiotics. Due to biofilm formation, A. baumannii has been noted for its apparent ability to survive on artificial surfaces for an extended period of time, therefore allowing it to persist in the hospital environment. Here we report, maleic anhydride based novel cationic polymers appended with amide side chains that disrupt surface established multi-drug resistant A. baumannii biofilms. More importantly, these polymers significantly (p polymers also show potent antibacterial efficacy against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE) and multi-drug resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii with minimal toxicity to mammalian cells. We observe that optimal hydrophobicity dependent on the side chain chemical structure of these polymers dictate the selective toxicity to bacteria. Polymers interact with the bacterial cell membranes by causing membrane depolarization, permeabilization and energy depletion. Bacteria develop rapid resistance to erythromycin and colistin whereas no detectable development of resistance occurs against these polymers even after several passages. These results suggest the potential use of these polymeric biomaterials in disinfecting biomedical device surfaces after the infection has become established and also for the topical treatment of chronic bacterial infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of CRISPR-Cas system in clinical Staphylococcus epidermidis strains revealed its potential association with bacterial infection sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiuchun; Xie, Xiaolei; Yin, Kequan

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is considered as a major cause of nosocomial infections, bringing an immense burden to healthcare systems. Virulent phages have been confirmed to be efficient in combating the pathogen, but the prensence of CRISPR-Cas system, which is a bacterial immune system eliminating...

  1. Effect of long-term voluntary exercise wheel running on susceptibility to bacterial pulmonary infections in a mouse model.

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    Pauline B van de Weert-van Leeuwen

    Full Text Available Regular moderate exercise has been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects and improve immune effector functions, resulting in reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Whether regular exercise also affects bacterial infection susceptibility is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether regular voluntary exercise wheel running prior to a pulmonary infection with bacteria (P. aeruginosa affects lung bacteriology, sickness severity and phagocyte immune function in mice. Balb/c mice were randomly placed in a cage with or without a running wheel. After 28 days, mice were intranasally infected with P. aeruginosa. Our study showed that regular exercise resulted in a higher sickness severity score and bacterial (P. aeruginosa loads in the lungs. The phagocytic capacity of monocytes and neutrophils from spleen and lungs was not affected. Although regular moderate exercise has many health benefits, healthy mice showed increased bacterial (P. aeruginosa load and symptoms, after regular voluntary exercise, with perseverance of the phagocytic capacity of monocytes and neutrophils. Whether patients, suffering from bacterial infectious diseases, should be encouraged to engage in exercise and physical activities with caution requires further research.

  2. Shivering in Febrile Children: Frequency and Usefulness in Predicting Serious Bacterial Infections - A Prospective Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erell, Yair; Youngster, Ilan; Abu-Kishk, Ibrahim; Kozer, Eran

    2017-11-01

    A prospective case-control study was conducted in a pediatric emergency department to describe the proportion of febrile children experiencing shivering and its clinical significance. Shivering was reported in 186 of 645 febrile children (28.8%). The rate of serious bacterial infection was similar in 86 children with shivering and 86 matched controls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A systematic literature review of the economic implications of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degener, F.; Ivanescu, C.; Casamayor, M.; Postma, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: During the years, acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) have seen an increase in incidence in many parts of the western world. Additionally, the treatment of ABSSSIs, generally consisting of surgical debridement or drainage and empiric antibiotics in the hospital,

  4. Endothelial cells are main producers of interleukin 8 through toll-like receptor 2 and 4 signaling during bacterial infection in leukopenic cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, CSMO; Vellenga, E; Daenen, SMGJ; Kamps, WA; de Bont, ESJM

    Cancer patients who are leukopenic due to chemotherapy are susceptible to bacterial infections. Normally, clinical conditions during bacterial infections are caused by pathogen-associated molecular patterns, which are components that bind to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 (TLR-2) and TLR-4 on

  5. Strains of bacterial species induce a greatly varied acute adaptive immune response: The contribution of the accessory genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Uri; Euler, Chad W; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2018-01-01

    A fundamental question in human susceptibility to bacterial infections is to what extent variability is a function of differences in the pathogen species or in individual humans. To focus on the pathogen species, we compared in the same individual the human adaptive T and B cell immune response to multiple strains of two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. We found wide variability in the acute adaptive immune response induced by various strains of a species, with a unique combination of activation within the two arms of the adaptive response. Further, this was also accompanied by a dramatic difference in the intensity of the specific protective T helper (Th) response. Importantly, the same immune response differences induced by the individual strains were maintained across multiple healthy human donors. A comparison of isogenic phage KO strains, demonstrated that of the pangenome, prophages were the major contributor to inter-strain immune heterogeneity, as the T cell response to the remaining "core genome" was noticeably blunted. Therefore, these findings extend and modify the notion of an adaptive response to a pathogenic bacterium, by implying that the adaptive immune response signature of a bacterial species should be defined either per strain or alternatively to the species' 'core genome', common to all of its strains. Further, our results demonstrate that the acquired immune response variation is as wide among different strains within a single pathogenic species as it is among different humans, and therefore may explain in part the clinical heterogeneity observed in patients infected with the same species.

  6. Strains of bacterial species induce a greatly varied acute adaptive immune response: The contribution of the accessory genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Sela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in human susceptibility to bacterial infections is to what extent variability is a function of differences in the pathogen species or in individual humans. To focus on the pathogen species, we compared in the same individual the human adaptive T and B cell immune response to multiple strains of two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. We found wide variability in the acute adaptive immune response induced by various strains of a species, with a unique combination of activation within the two arms of the adaptive response. Further, this was also accompanied by a dramatic difference in the intensity of the specific protective T helper (Th response. Importantly, the same immune response differences induced by the individual strains were maintained across multiple healthy human donors. A comparison of isogenic phage KO strains, demonstrated that of the pangenome, prophages were the major contributor to inter-strain immune heterogeneity, as the T cell response to the remaining "core genome" was noticeably blunted. Therefore, these findings extend and modify the notion of an adaptive response to a pathogenic bacterium, by implying that the adaptive immune response signature of a bacterial species should be defined either per strain or alternatively to the species' 'core genome', common to all of its strains. Further, our results demonstrate that the acquired immune response variation is as wide among different strains within a single pathogenic species as it is among different humans, and therefore may explain in part the clinical heterogeneity observed in patients infected with the same species.

  7. Intravaginal practices, bacterial vaginosis, and HIV infection in women: individual participant data meta-analysis.

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    Nicola Low

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying modifiable factors that increase women's vulnerability to HIV is a critical step in developing effective female-initiated prevention interventions. The primary objective of this study was to pool individual participant data from prospective longitudinal studies to investigate the association between intravaginal practices and acquisition of HIV infection among women in sub-Saharan Africa. Secondary objectives were to investigate associations between intravaginal practices and disrupted vaginal flora; and between disrupted vaginal flora and HIV acquisition.We conducted a meta-analysis of individual participant data from 13 prospective cohort studies involving 14,874 women, of whom 791 acquired HIV infection during 21,218 woman years of follow-up. Data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. The level of between-study heterogeneity was low in all analyses (I(2 values 0.0%-16.1%. Intravaginal use of cloth or paper (pooled adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-1.83, insertion of products to dry or tighten the vagina (aHR 1.31, 95% CI 1.00-1.71, and intravaginal cleaning with soap (aHR 1.24, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 remained associated with HIV acquisition after controlling for age, marital status, and number of sex partners in the past 3 months. Intravaginal cleaning with soap was also associated with the development of intermediate vaginal flora and bacterial vaginosis in women with normal vaginal flora at baseline (pooled adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.24, 95% CI 1.04-1.47. Use of cloth or paper was not associated with the development of disrupted vaginal flora. Intermediate vaginal flora and bacterial vaginosis were each associated with HIV acquisition in multivariable models when measured at baseline (aHR 1.54 and 1.69, p<0.001 or at the visit before the estimated date of HIV infection (aHR 1.41 and 1.53, p<0.001, respectively.This study provides evidence to suggest that some intravaginal practices increase

  8. Intravesical hyaluronic acid treatment improves bacterial cystitis and reduces cystitis-induced hypercontractility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Nurdan; Alpay, Harika; Tuğtepe, Halil; Özdemir Kumral, Zarife Nigar; Akakın, Dilek; İlki, Arzu; Şener, Göksel; Ç Yeğen, Berrak

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of intravesical hyaluronic acid on Escherichia coli-induced cystitis and cystitis-induced hypercontractility in rats. Bacterial cystitis was induced in Wistar female rats by intravesical inoculation of E. coli. Isotonic saline was instilled in the control group (n = 6). The rats were either non-treated, treated with gentamycin (4 mg/kg, 5 days) or treated intravesically with hyaluronic acid (0.5 mL, 0.5%). On the eighth day, the bladder tissues were excised for histological examination, and the measurements of myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Contraction/relaxation responses to carbachol, isoprotrenol and papaverine were studied. Tissue myeloperoxidase activity was increased, but superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were decreased in bacterial cystitis, while hyaluronic acid treatment reversed these changes. In the hyaluronic acid-treated group, healing of the uroepithelium was observed, while decreased inflammatory cell infiltration was obvious in gentamycin-treated group. E. coli-induced cystitis in all rats resulted in increased contraction responses to carbachol compared with controls (P hyaluronic acid, but not gentamycin, significantly (P hyaluronic acid, in addition to its supportive role in the healing of the epithelium, seems to lower the increased threshold for contraction and to reduce oxidative stress. These findings support a potential role for hyaluronic acid in the treatment of bacterial cystitis. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Sabine; Tadesse, Birkneh Tilahun; Moussy, Francis; Chua, Arlene; Zorzet, Anna; Tängdén, Thomas; Dolinger, David L; Page, Anne-Laure; Crump, John A; D'Acremont, Valerie; Bassat, Quique; Lubell, Yoel; Newton, Paul N; Heinrich, Norbert; Rodwell, Timothy J; González, Iveth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP). To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require 90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i) time-to-result targeted and timely efforts by industry partners and academic institutions.

  10. Basagran® induces developmental malformations and changes the bacterial community of zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jacinta M M; Galhano, Victor; Henriques, Isabel; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of Basagran ® on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The embryos were exposed to Basagran ® at concentrations ranging from 120.0 to 480.6 mg/L, and the effects on embryo development (up to 96 h) and bacterial communities of 96 h-larvae were assessed. The embryo development response was time-dependent and concentration-dependent (106.35  delay or anomaly in yolk sac absorption > change in swimming equilibrium > development of pericardial and/or yolk sac oedema > scoliosis. A PCR-DGGE analysis was used to evaluate changes in the structure, richness, evenness and diversity of bacterial communities after herbicide exposure. A herbicide-induced structural adjustment of bacterial community was observed. In this study, it was successfully demonstrated that Basagran ® affected zebrafish embryos and associated bacterial communities, showing time-dependent and concentration-dependent embryos' developmental response and structural changes in bacterial community. Thus, this work provides for the first time a complementary approach, which is useful to derive robust toxicity thresholds considering the embryo-microbiota system as a whole. The aquatic hazard assessment will be strengthened by combining current ecotoxicological tests with molecular microbiology tools. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid label-free identification of mixed bacterial infections by surface plasmon resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Weiling

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection of mixed aerobic-anaerobic infection has been a challenge in clinical practice due to the phenotypic changes in complex environments. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor is widely used to detect DNA-DNA interaction and offers a sensitive and label-free approach in DNA research. Methods In this study, we developed a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA amplification technique and modified the traditional SPR detection system for rapid and simultaneous detection of mixed infections of four pathogenic microorganisms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium tetani and Clostridium perfringens. Results We constructed the circulation detection well to increase the sensitivity and the tandem probe arrays to reduce the non-specific hybridization. The use of 16S rDNA universal primers ensured the amplification of four target nucleic acid sequences simultaneously, and further electrophoresis and sequencing confirmed the high efficiency of this amplification method. No significant signals were detected during the single-base mismatch or non-specific probe hybridization (P 2 values of >0.99. The lowest detection limits were 0.03 nM for P. aeruginosa, 0.02 nM for S. aureus, 0.01 nM for C. tetani and 0.02 nM for C. perfringens. The SPR biosensor had the same detection rate as the traditional culture method (P Conclusions Our method can rapidly and accurately identify the mixed aerobic-anaerobic infection, providing a reliable alternative to bacterial culture for rapid bacteria detection.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides and Their Therapeutic Potential for Bacterial Skin Infections and Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzgraff, Anja; Brandenburg, Klaus; Weindl, Günther

    2018-01-01

    Alarming data about increasing resistance to conventional antibiotics are reported, while at the same time the development of new antibiotics is stagnating. Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are mainly caused by the so called ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) which belong to the most recalcitrant bacteria and are resistant to almost all common antibiotics. S. aureus and P. aeruginosa are the most frequent pathogens isolated from chronic wounds and increasing resistance to topical antibiotics has become a major issue. Therefore, new treatment options are urgently needed. In recent years, research focused on the development of synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with lower toxicity and improved activity compared to their endogenous counterparts. AMPs appear to be promising therapeutic options for the treatment of SSTIs and wounds as they show a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, low resistance rates and display pivotal immunomodulatory as well as wound healing promoting activities such as induction of cell migration and proliferation and angiogenesis. In this review, we evaluate the potential of AMPs for the treatment of bacterial SSTIs and wounds and provide an overview of the mechanisms of actions of AMPs that contribute to combat skin infections and to improve wound healing. Bacteria growing in biofilms are more resistant to conventional antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts due to limited biofilm penetration and distinct metabolic and physiological functions, and often result in chronification of infections and wounds. Thus, we further discuss the feasibility of AMPs as anti-biofilm agents. Finally, we highlight perspectives for future therapies and which issues remain to bring AMPs successfully to the market. PMID:29643807

  13. Maternal bacterial infections impact expression of drug transporters in human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Vanja; Kojovic, Dea; Cressman, Alex; Piquette-Miller, Micheline

    2015-06-01

    Several efflux and uptake transporters in the placenta are involved in the transmembrane transport of endogenous substrates and xenobiotics. Their expression and function may be altered in maternal complications associated with inflammation. Our objective was to examine the effect of chorioamnionitis, a bacterial intra-amniotic infection on the expression of clinically important transporters in human placenta. Human placental samples were collected from preterm and term pregnancies diagnosed with chorioamnionitis infection and were gestational age-matched with samples from pregnancies with no obstetric complications, using predefined exclusion criteria. Transporter protein expression was quantified using Western blots while cytokine and transporter mRNA expression was measured via real-time polymerase chain reaction. mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α were markedly elevated by 2.5- to 3-fold in preterm placentas with infection, relative to preterm controls (pinfection and preterm parturition, relative to preterm healthy controls. Protein and mRNA expression changes were generally consistent. At term, ABCG2 mRNA and SLCO2B1 protein expression levels were significantly downregulated, relative to controls. Significant changes in ABCB1 and SLCO4A1 expression were not observed, however ABCB1 transcript levels strongly correlated with IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α expression (pinfections impact the expression of key drug transporters in placenta, suggesting that materno-fetal drug transport may be altered by changes in placental expression of ABC and OATP transporters. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation by biodistribution of two anti-peptidoglycan aptamers labeled with Technetium-99m for in vivo bacterial infection identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Iêda M.; Lacerda, Camila M.S.; Santos, Sara R.; Andrade, Antero S.R. de; Fernandes, Simone O.; Barros, André B. de; Cardoso, Valbert N.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine clinics are still awaiting optimal scintigraphic imaging agents capable of discriminating between infection and inflammation, and between fungal and bacterial infections. Aptamers are oligonucleotides that display high affinity and specificity for their molecular targets and are emerging as promising molecules for radiopharmaceuticals development. In the present study, two aptamers for peptidoglycan (termed Antibac1 and Antibac2) were labeled with 99m Tc and evaluated for bacterial infection identification by biodistribution. The direct labeling method with 99m Tc allowed radiolabel yields higher than 90% and the complexes were stable in saline, plasma and cysteine excess. The 99m Tc-Antibac1 in the group infected with S. aureus presented a target/non-target ratio (T/NT) of 2.81 ± 0.67, significantly higher than verified for the 99m Tc-library (control): 1.52 ± 0.07. A radiolabeled library of oligonucleotides with random sequences was used as a control for monitoring nonspecifi