WorldWideScience

Sample records for bacterial hemoglobin alters

  1. Aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with normal and altered glycated hemoglobin levels in two regions in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Pimentel Moreno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with regard to the management of diabetes, assessed using glycated hemoglobin levels. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using conjunctival smears of diabetic patients from both sexes and with different ages, residing in two different Brazilian cities (Sorocaba and Rio Branco. A control group of non-diabetic patients was also included. The diabetic patients were considered to have controlled diabetes when their glycated hemoglobin level was ≤7% and blood glucose level was ≤126 mg/dL. Patients with non-controlled diabetes were those with glycated hemoglobin levels >7% and blood glucose levels >126 mg/dL. The samples obtained were inoculated in Brain-Heart Infusion broth and in culture media for aerobic bacteria (blood and chocolate agars; bacterial growth was evaluated in a microbiology laboratory. Results: A total of 120 eyes of 120 patients were included in the present study. The percentage of cultures in which bacterial growth was observed was greater in diabetic patients, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.103. There was a greater trend toward bacterial growth in the conjunctiva of diabetic patients with altered fasting blood glucose. There was no difference in the frequency of bacterial growth on the conjunctiva between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. In Sorocaba, conjunctival bacterial growth was similar to that observed in Rio Branco. The microorganism most frequently detected in the present study was Staphylococcus epidermidis, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. Conclusion: There was no difference between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. The microorganisms found were similar to those found in studies investigating the conjunctival bacterial flora of diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  2. Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hemoglobin Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Hgb; Hb; H and H (Hemoglobin and Hematocrit) Formal name: Hemoglobin Related tests: Complete ...

  3. Mutational Analysis of Hemoglobin Binding and Heme Utilization by a Bacterial Hemoglobin Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Fusco, W. G.; Choudhary, N. R.; Council, S.E.; Collins, E J; Leduc, I.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most living organisms. To acquire iron from their environment, Gram-negative bacteria use TonB-dependent transporters that bind host proteins at the bacterial surface and transport iron or heme to the periplasm via the Ton machinery. TonB-dependent transporters are barrel-shaped outer membrane proteins with 22 transmembrane domains, 11 surface-exposed loops, and a plug domain that occludes the pore. To identify key residues of TonB-dependent transporters invo...

  4. Phylogenetic Relationships of 3/3 and 2/2 Hemoglobins in Archaeplastida Genomes to Bacterial and Other Eukaryote Hemoglobins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serge N. Vinogradov; Iván Fernández; David Hoogewijs; Raúl Arredondo-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Land plants and algae form a supergroup, the Archaeplastida, believed to be monophyletic. We report the results of an analysis of the phylogeny of putative globins in the currently available genomes to bacterial and other eu-karyote hemoglobins (Hbs). Archaeplastida genomes have 3/3 and 2/2 Hbs, with the land plant genomes having group 2 2/2 Hbs, except for the unexpected occurrence of two group 1 2/2 Hbs in Ricinus communis. Bayesian analysis shows that plant 3/3 Hbs are related to vertebrate neuroglobins and bacterial flavohemoglobins (FHbs). We sought to define the bacterial groups, whose ancestors shared the precursors of Archaeplastida Hbs, via Bayesian and neighbor-joining anal-yses based on COBALTalignment of representative sets of bacterial 3/3 FHb-like globins and group 1 and 2 2/2 Hbs with the corresponding Archaeplastida Hbs. The results suggest that the Archaeplastida 3/3 and group 1 2/2 Hbs could have orig-inated from the horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) that accompanied the two generally accepted endosymbioses of a pro-teobacterium and a cyanobacterium with a eukaryote ancestor. In contrast, the origin of the group 2 2/2 Hbs unexpectedly appears to involve HGT from a bacterium ancestral to Chloroflexi, Deinococcales, Bacilli, and Actinomycetes. Furthermore,although intron positions and phases are mostly conserved among the land plant 3/3 and 2/2 globin genes, introns are absent in the algal 3/3 genes and intron positions and phases are highly variable in their 2/2 genes. Thus, introns are irrelevant to globin evolution in Archaeplastida.

  5. Recombinant bacterial hemoglobin alters metabolism of Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Gerald; Diano, Audrey; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is used extensively for the production of enzymes and organic acids. A major problem in industrial fermentations with this fungus is to ensure sufficient supply of oxygen required for respiratory metabolism of the fungus. In case of oxygen limitation, the ...... to attenuate unwanted side effects resulting from oxygen limitation during industrial fermentations with A. niger.......The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is used extensively for the production of enzymes and organic acids. A major problem in industrial fermentations with this fungus is to ensure sufficient supply of oxygen required for respiratory metabolism of the fungus. In case of oxygen limitation, the...... behind the strong gpdA promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. Analysis of secreted metabolites, oxygen uptake, CO2 evolution and biomass formation points towards a relief of stress in the mutant expressing VHB when it is exposed to oxygen limitation. Our findings therefore point to an interesting strategy...

  6. Human hemoglobin structural and functional alterations and heme degradation upon interaction with benzene: A spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Here, the effect of benzene on hemoglobin structure, stability and heme prosthetic group integrity was studied by different methods. These included UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, normal and synchronous fluorescence techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our results indicated that benzene has high hemolytic potential even at low concentrations. The UV-vis spectroscopic results demonstrated that benzene altered both the globin chain and the heme prosthetic group of hemoglobin increasing met- and deoxy-Hb, while decreasing oxy-Hb. However, with increasing benzene the concentration of all species decreased due to heme destruction. The spectrophotometric results show that benzene has a high potential for penetrating the hydrophobic pocket of hemoglobin. These results were consistent with the molecular docking simulation results of benzene-hHb. Aggregation and thermal denaturation studies show that the increased benzene concentration induced hemoglobin aggregation with a decrease in stability, which is consistent with the DSC results. Conventional fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the heme degradation species were produced in the presence of benzene. The results of constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (CWSFS) indicated that at least five heme-degraded species were produced. Together, our results indicated that benzene has adverse effects on hemoglobin structure and function, and heme degradation.

  7. Transgenic tobacco expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin exhibits enhanced growth and altered metabolite production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, N; Lilius, G; Bailey, J E; Bülow, L

    1997-03-01

    The gene for Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) has been introduced and expressed in Nicotiana tabaccum (tobacco). Transgenic tobacco plants expressing VHb exhibited enhanced growth, on average 80-100% more dry weight after 35 days of growth compared to wild-type controls. Furthermore, germination time is reduced from 6-8 days for wild-type tobacco to 3-4 days and the growth phase from germination to flowering was 3-5 days shorter for the VHb-expressing transgenes. Transgenic plants contained, on average, 30-40% more chlorophyll and 34% more nicotine than controls. VHb expression also resulted in an altered distribution of secondary metabolites: In the trangenic tobacco plants anabasine content was decreased 80% relative to control plants. PMID:9062923

  8. Ionizing radiation and bacterial challenge alter splenic cytokine gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation increases susceptibility to bacterial infection. Exogenous proinflammatory cytokines can alter the response of mice to γradiation, but the role of endogenous inflammatory cytokines after bacterial infection in irradiated animals is not known. Gene expression of hematopoietic (GM-CSF) and proinflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) cytokines were examined in spleens of B6D2F1/J female mice after irradiation alone (1.0- and 7.0-Gy), and after irradiation followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae s.c. challenge 4 days postirradiation by using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Southern blot hybridization. At 4, 8, and 24 h after bacterial challenge in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice, GM-CSF mRNA increased (p<0.05). TNF-α mRNA in irradiated mice were slightly decreased, whereas after bacterial challenge, TNF-α mRNA elevated at 30 h in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice; at 4, and 8 h in 1.0-Gy-irradiated mice, and at 1 h in sham-irradiated mice (p<0.05). IL-6 mRNA displayed a biphasic response in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice, and, after bacterial challenge, in both irradiated mice (1.0- and 7.0-Gy) and sham-irradiated mice. IL-1β mRNA remained at or below normal for 8 h and increased at 24 h after bacterial challenge on day 4 in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice. These results indicate that sublethal gamma radiation alters the patterns of the hematopoietic and proinflammatory cytokine responses to bacterial challenge in vivo. Consequently, treatment protocols may need to take into account changes in cytokine gene responses to resolve infection after irradiation. (author)

  9. Does circumcision alter the periurethral uropathogenic bacterial flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Ahmad Laway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of periurethral bacterial flora in uncircumcised boys and to evaluate the effect of circumcision on alteration of periurethral uropathogenic bacterial flora. Materials and Methods: Pattern of periurethral bacterial flora before and after circumcision was studied prospectively in 124 boys. The results were analysed to compare change in bacterial colonisation before and after circumcision. Results: The age range was 6 weeks to 96 months. Most (94.3% of the boys had religious indication and 5.7% had medical indication for circumcision. E. coli, Proteus and Klebsiella were most common periurethral bacterial flora in uncircumcised subjects. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus and Staphylococcus aureus was most common periurethral bacterial flora in circumcised subjects. In 66.1% of circumcised subjects, no bacteria were grown from periurethral region. Conclusion: We conclude that presence of prepuce is associated with great quantity of periurethral bacteria, greater likelihood of the presence of high concentration of uropathogens and high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI. This study provides circumstantial evidence supporting the idea that early circumcision may be beneficial for prevention of UTI.

  10. BacHbpred: Support Vector Machine Methods for the Prediction of Bacterial Hemoglobin-Like Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, MuthuKrishnan; Puri, Munish; Dikshit, Kanak L; Lefevre, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The recent upsurge in microbial genome data has revealed that hemoglobin-like (HbL) proteins may be widely distributed among bacteria and that some organisms may carry more than one HbL encoding gene. However, the discovery of HbL proteins has been limited to a small number of bacteria only. This study describes the prediction of HbL proteins and their domain classification using a machine learning approach. Support vector machine (SVM) models were developed for predicting HbL proteins based upon amino acid composition (AC), dipeptide composition (DC), hybrid method (AC + DC), and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM). In addition, we introduce for the first time a new prediction method based on max to min amino acid residue (MM) profiles. The average accuracy, standard deviation (SD), false positive rate (FPR), confusion matrix, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) were analyzed. We also compared the performance of our proposed models in homology detection databases. The performance of the different approaches was estimated using fivefold cross-validation techniques. Prediction accuracy was further investigated through confusion matrix and ROC curve analysis. All experimental results indicate that the proposed BacHbpred can be a perspective predictor for determination of HbL related proteins. BacHbpred, a web tool, has been developed for HbL prediction. PMID:27034664

  11. Produced water exposure alters bacterial response to biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Amit; Lipus, Daniel; Bibby, Kyle

    2014-11-01

    Microbial activity during the holding and reuse of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing operations, termed produced water, may lead to issues with corrosion, sulfide release, and fouling. Biocides are applied to control biological activity, often with limited efficacy, which is typically attributed to chemical interactions with the produced water. However, it is unknown whether there is a biologically driven mechanism to biocide tolerance in produced water. Here, we demonstrate that produced water exposure results in an enhanced tolerance against the typically used biocide glutaraldehyde and increased susceptibility to the oxidative biocide hypochlorite in a native and a model bacteria and that this altered resistance is due to the salinity of the produced water. In addition, we elucidate the genetic response of the model organism Pseudomonas fluorescens to produced water exposure to provide a mechanistic interpretation of the altered biocide resistance. The RNA-seq data demonstrated the induction of genes involved in osmotic stress, energy production and conversion, membrane integrity, and protein transport following produced water exposure, which facilitates bacterial survival and alters biocide tolerance. Efforts to fundamentally understand biocide resistance mechanisms, which enable the optimization of biocide application, hold significant implications for greening of the fracturing process through encouraging produced water recycling. Specifically, these results suggest the necessity of optimizing biocide application at the level of individual shale plays, rather than historical experience, based upon produced water characteristics and salinity. PMID:25279933

  12. Proton NMR investigation of heme and surrounding proton in low-spin cyanide-ligated bacterial hemoglobin from Vitreoscilla

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏佑林; 吴季辉; 光寿红; 张海阳; 梁山; 施蕴渝

    2000-01-01

    1H NMR spectra of low-spin cyanide-ligated bacterial hemoglobin from Vitreoscilla (VtHb-CN) are reported. The assignments of the 1H NMR spectra of VtHb-CN have been made through MCOSY, NOESY, 1D TOE and SUPERWEFT experiments. Almost all resonance peaks of heme and ligated His85 are identified. The spin-lattice relaxation time T1’s and the variation relationships of chemical shifts of these peaks with temperature have been acquired, from which the distances between the measured protons and Fe3+, and the diamagnetic chemical shifts have been acquired, respectively. The ionization constants of pKa’s of ligated His85 are determined through pH titration of chemical shift, which is 4.95 for ligated His85 C2H proton. The lower pKa is attributed to the influence of the Fe3+ of carrying positive charge and the coordination of His85 and Fe3+ of heme.

  13. Hemoglobin (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemoglobin is the most important component of red blood cells. It is composed of a protein called ... exchanged for carbon dioxide. Abnormalities of an individual's hemoglobin value can indicate defects in the normal balance ...

  14. Altered Bacterial Profiles in Saliva from Adults with Caries Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, D; Fiehn, N-E; Nielsen, C H;

    2014-01-01

    salivarius) and three bacterial clusters (Streptococcus parasanguinis I and II and sp. clone BE024_ot057/411/721, Streptococcus parasanguinis I and II and sinensis_ot411/721/767, Streptococcus salivarius and sp. clone FO042_ot067/755) were present at significantly higher levels (adjusted p value ..., Megasphaera micronuciformis, Fusobacterium periodontium and Achromobacter xylosoxidans) and one bacterial cluster (Leptotrichia sp. clones C3MKM102 and GT018_ot417/462) were less frequently found in the caries group (adjusted p value Streptococcus...

  15. Experimental sulfate amendment alters peatland bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickman, R J S; Fulthorpe, R R; Coleman Wasik, J K; Engstrom, D R; Mitchell, C P J

    2016-10-01

    As part of a long-term, peatland-scale sulfate addition experiment, the impact of varying sulfate deposition on bacterial community responses was assessed using 16S tag encoded pyrosequencing. In three separate areas of the peatland, sulfate manipulations included an eight year quadrupling of atmospheric sulfate deposition (experimental), a 3-year recovery to background deposition following 5years of elevated deposition (recovery), and a control area. Peat concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg), a bioaccumulative neurotoxin, were measured, the production of which is attributable to a growing list of microorganisms, including many sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. The total bacterial and Deltaproteobacterial community structures in the experimental treatment differed significantly from those in the control and recovery treatments that were either indistinguishable or very similar to one another. Notably, the relatively rapid return (within three years) of bacterial community structure in the recovery treatment to a state similar to the control, demonstrates significant resilience of the peatland bacterial community to changes in atmospheric sulfate deposition. Changes in MeHg accumulation between sulfate treatments correlated with changes in the Deltaproteobacterial community, suggesting that sulfate may affect MeHg production through changes in the community structure of this group. PMID:27267720

  16. Nitrogen deposition alters soil chemical properties and bacterial communities in the Inner Mongolia grassland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ximei Zhang; Xingguo Han

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen deposition has dramatically altered biodiversity and ecosystem functioning on the earth; however,its effects on soil bacterial community and the underlying mechanisms of these effects have not been thoroughly examined.Changes in ecosystems caused by nitrogen deposition have traditionally been attributed to increased nitrogen content.In fact,nitrogen deposition not only leads to increased soil total N content,but also changes in the NH4+-N content,NO3--N content and pH,as well as changes in the heterogeneity of the four indexes.The soil indexes for these four factors,their heterogeneity and even the plant community might be routes through which nitrogen deposition alters the bacterial community.Here,we describe a 6-year nitrogen addition experiment conducted in a typical steppe ecosystem to investigate the ecological mechanism by which nitrogen deposition alters bacterial abundance,diversity and composition.We found that various characteristics of the bacterial community were explained by different environmental factors.Nitrogen deposition decreased bacterial abundance that is positively related to soil pH value.In addition,nitrogen addition decreased bacterial diversity,which is negatively related to soil total N content and positively related to soil NO3--N heterogeneity.Finally,nitrogen.addition altered bacterial composition that is significantly related to soil NH4+-N content.Although nitrogen deposition significantly altered plant biomass,diversity and composition,these characteristics of plant community did not have a significant impact on processes of nitrogen deposition that led to alterations in bacterial abundance,diversity and composition.Therefore,more sensitive molecular technologies should be adopted to detect the subtle shifts of microbial community structure induced by the changes of plant community upon nitrogen deposition.

  17. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  18. Biofilm growth alters regulation of conjugation by a bacterial pheromone

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Laura; Barnes, Aaron; Dunny, Gary; Chatterjee, Anushree; Hu, Wei-Shou; Yarwood, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Conjugation is an important mode of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, enhancing the spread of antibiotic resistance. In clinical settings, biofilms are likely locations for antibiotic resistance transfer events involving nosocomial pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis. Here we demonstrate that growth in biofilms alters the induction of conjugation by a sex pheromone in E. faecalis. Mathematical modeling suggested that a higher plasmid copy number in biofilm cells would enhance a switch...

  19. Bioturbating shrimp alter the structure and diversity of bacterial communities in coastal marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverock, Bonnie; Smith, Cindy J; Tait, Karen; Osborn, A Mark; Widdicombe, Steve; Gilbert, Jack A

    2010-12-01

    bacterial diversity in surface sediments and resulting in distinct bacterial communities even at depth within the burrow. In an area of high macrofaunal abundance, this could lead to alterations in the microbial transformations of important nutrients at the sediment-water interface. PMID:20596074

  20. Unexpected effects of the alteration of structure and stability of myoglobin and hemoglobin in ammonium-based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Indrani; Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2014-03-28

    The nature of solvent-biomolecule interactions is generally weak and non-specific. The addition of ionic liquids (ILs), which have emerged as a new class of solvents, strengthen the stability of some proteins whereas the same ILs weaken the stability of some other proteins. Although ILs are commonly used for the stabilization of biomolecules, the bimolecular interactions of their stabilization-destabilization is still an active subject of considerable interest and studies on this topic have been limited. To reveal the impact of ILs on the stability of proteins, a series of protic ILs possessing a tetra-alkyl ammonium cation [R4N](+) with a hydroxide [OH](-) anion were synthesized. In this study, we report the structural stability of heme proteins such as myoglobin (Mb) and hemoglobin (Hb) in a series of ammonium-based ILs such as tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide [(CH3)4N](+)[OH](-) (TMAH), tetraethyl ammonium hydroxide [(C2H5)4N](+)[OH](-) (TEAH), tetrapropyl ammonium hydroxide [(C3H7)4N](+)[OH](-) (TPAH) and tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide [(C4H9)4N](+)[OH](-) (TBAH) by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies. Our experimental results reveal that less viscous ILs carrying smaller alkyl chain such as TMAH are strong destabilizers of the heme proteins as compared to the ILs carrying bulkier alkyl chains which are more viscous ILs, such as TBAH. Therefore, our results demonstrate that the addition of these ILs to the heme proteins decreases their thermal stability allowing the protein to be in an unfolded state at lower temperatures. Further, we describe the molecular-structural interaction of the heme proteins with the ILs (molecule like a ligand) by the PatchDocking method. PMID:24501743

  1. Contribution of Escherichia coli Alpha-Hemolysin to Bacterial Virulence and to Intraperitoneal Alterations in Peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    May, Addison K; Gleason, Thomas G.; Sawyer, Robert G.; Pruett, Timothy L.

    2000-01-01

    Alpha-hemolysin (Hly) is a common exotoxin produced by Escherichia coli that enhances virulence in a number of clinical infections. The addition of hemolysin production to laboratory bacterial strains is known to increase the lethality of E. coli peritonitis. However, the mechanisms involved have not been determined and the contribution of hemolysin to the alterations in the host intraperitoneal environment and the leukocyte response is not known. Utilizing a rat peritonitis model, we show th...

  2. Fish hemoglobins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. de Souza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate hemoglobin, contained in erythrocytes, is a globular protein with a quaternary structure composed of 4 globin chains (2 alpha and 2 beta and a prosthetic group named heme bound to each one. Having myoglobin as an ancestor, hemoglobin acquired the capacity to respond to chemical stimuli that modulate its function according to tissue requirements for oxygen. Fish are generally submitted to spatial and temporal O2 variations and have developed anatomical, physiological and biochemical strategies to adapt to the changing environmental gas availability. Structurally, most fish hemoglobins are tetrameric; however, those from some species such as lamprey and hagfish dissociate, being monomeric when oxygenated and oligomeric when deoxygenated. Fish blood frequently possesses several hemoglobins; the primary origin of this finding lies in the polymorphism that occurs in the globin loci, an aspect that may occasionally confer advantages to its carriers or even be a harmless evolutionary remnant. On the other hand, the functional properties exhibit different behaviors, ranging from a total absence of responses to allosteric regulation to drastic ones, such as the Root effect.

  3. Serum free hemoglobin test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood hemoglobin; Serum hemoglobin ... Hemoglobin (Hb) is the main component of red blood cells. It is a protein that carries oxygen. ... people may contain up to 5 mg/dL hemoglobin. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different ...

  4. Hemoglobin C disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical hemoglobin C ... Hemoglobin C is an abnormal type of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. It is ... Americans. You are more likely to have hemoglobin C disease if someone in your family has had ...

  5. Effect of Variation in Copper Sources and Growth Conditions on the Copper Uptake by Bacterial Hemoglobin Gene (vgb Bearing E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled M. Khleifat

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the two plasmids, pUC8:16 and pUC9 in the cell grown on different carbon and nitrogen sources afforded comparable levels of copper uptake by Escherichia coli. Previously, no such investigations have been made, particularly using bacterial hemoglobin (VHb, carbon and nitrogen sources. It is clear from these results that the type of either carbon or nitrogen sources control the level of the copper uptake mechanisms. In case of VHb-expressing cells, glycerol and sucrose selectively enhanced the copper uptake as compared with non-VHb-expressing cells. In the case of wild type cells, carboxylic acid (succinic acid and tri-sodium citrate enhanced the copper uptake capacity over vgb-bearing and pUC9-bearing cells. For pUC9-bearing cells, the glucose and the rich media LB showed the highest copper uptake. In case of inorganic nitrogen sources, using Ammonium chloride, the level of copper was highest in the E. coli:pUC9 > E. coli:pUC8:16 > E. coli (wild type. Whereas with ammonium nitrate, the copper uptake was equal in the three strains. In case of organic nitrogen source (Trypton, the copper uptake was the following pUC9-bearing cells > wild type > VHb-expressing cells. Also, irrespective of the strain, carbon and nitrogen sources used, the three types of copper behave similarly. The optimum growth biomass and copper uptake was maximally obtained at the temperature 37 and 20±2°C, respectively indicating that the copper uptake is at least partially metabolically dependent process. Only at the hypoxic conditions, VHb enhanced the growth of the host cells as compared with the non-vgb strains.

  6. Deoxygenation alters bacterial diversity and community composition in the ocean’s largest oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J. Michael; Carolan, Molly T.

    2013-10-01

    Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) have a central role in biogeochemical cycles and are expanding as a consequence of climate change, yet how deoxygenation will affect the microbial communities that control these cycles is unclear. Here we sample across dissolved oxygen gradients in the oceans’ largest OMZ and show that bacterial richness displays a unimodal pattern with decreasing dissolved oxygen, reaching maximum values on the edge of the OMZ and decreasing within it. Rare groups on the OMZ margin are abundant at lower dissolved oxygen concentrations, including sulphur-cycling Chromatiales, for which 16S rRNA was amplified from extracted RNA. Microbial species distribution models accurately replicate community patterns based on multivariate environmental data, demonstrate likely changes in distributions and diversity in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, and highlight the sensitivity of key bacterial groups to deoxygenation. Through these mechanisms, OMZ expansion may alter microbial composition, competition, diversity and function, all of which have implications for biogeochemical cycling in OMZs.

  7. Bacterial chitinolytic communities respond to chitin and pH alteration in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielak, Anna; Cretoiu, Mariana; Semenov, Alexander; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; van Elsas, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Chitin amendment is a promising soil management strategy that may enhance the suppressiveness of soil toward plant pathogens. However, we understand very little of the effects of added chitin, including the putative successions that take place in the degradative process. We performed an experiment...... in moderately acid soil in which the level of chitin, next to the pH, was altered. Examination of chitinase activities revealed fast responses to the added crude chitin, with peaks of enzymatic activity occurring on day 7. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analyses of 16S r......RNA and chiA genes showed structural changes of the phylogenetically and functionally based bacterial communities following chitin addition and pH alteration. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated (i) that the diversity of chiA gene types in soil is enormous and (i) that different chiA gene types are selected...

  8. Bioaugmentation of Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B affects hydrogen production through altering indigenous bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Guo, Rongbo; Shi, Xiaoshuang; He, Shuai; Wang, Lin; Dai, Meng; Qiu, Yanling; Dang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-07-01

    Bioaugmentation can facilitate hydrogen production from complex organic substrates, but it still is unknown how indigenous microbial communities respond to the added bacteria. Here, using a Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B (named as LX-B) bioaugmentation experiments, the distribution of metabolites and the responses of indigenous bacterial communities were investigated via batch cultivation (BC) and repeated batch cultivation (RBC). In BC the LX-B/sludge ratio of 0.12 achieved substantial high hydrogen yield, which was over twice that of control. In RBC one-time bioaugmentation and repeated batch bioaugmentation of LX-B resulted in the hydrogen yield that was average 1.2-fold and 0.8-fold higher than that in control, respectively. This improved hydrogen production performance mainly benefited from a shift in composition of the indigenous bacterial community caused by LX-B bioaugmentation. The findings represented an important step in understanding the relationship between bioaugmentation, a shift in bacterial communities, and altered bioreactor performance. PMID:27023388

  9. Hemoglobin C disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical hemoglobin C ... Hemoglobin C is an abnormal type of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. It is a type of hemoglobinopathy. The disease is caused by a problem with ...

  10. Acetaldehyde adducts with hemoglobin.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, V.J.; Fantl, W J; Newman, C B; Sims, R V; Cerami, A.; Peterson, C M

    1981-01-01

    Clinical studies on the minor hemoglobins (hemoglobin A1a-c) have suggested that a novel adduct may form in people abusing alcohol. Such patients were found to have an elevated concentration of minor hemoglobins, but normal or subnormal amounts of glycosylated hemoglobin (hemoglobin A1c) as determined by radioimmunoassay, Acetaldehyde, a reactive metabolite of ethanol, was postulated to form adducts with hemoglobin A that change its chromatographic properties. At physiological concentrations,...

  11. Mathematical modeling of bacterial track-altering motors: Track cleaving through burnt-bridge ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtylla, Blerta; Keener, James P.

    2015-04-01

    The generation of directed movement of cellular components frequently requires the rectification of Brownian motion. Molecular motor enzymes that use ATP to walk on filamentous tracks are typically involved in cell transport, however, a track-altering motor can arise when an enzyme interacts with and alters its track. In Caulobacter crescentus and other bacteria, an active DNA partitioning (Par) apparatus is employed to segregate replicated chromosome regions to specific locations in dividing cells. The Par apparatus is composed of two proteins: ParA, an ATPase that can form polymeric structures on the nucleoid, and ParB, a protein that can bind and destabilize ParA structures. It has been proposed that the ParB-mediated alteration of ParA structures could be responsible for generating the directed movement of DNA during bacterial division. How precisely these actions are coordinated and translated into directed movement is not clear. In this paper we consider the C. crescentus segregation apparatus as an example of a track altering motor that operates using a so-called burnt-bridge mechanism. We develop and analyze mathematical models that examine how diffusion and ATP-hydrolysis-mediated monomer removal (or cleaving) can be combined to generate directed movement. Using a mean first passage approach, we analytically calculate the effective ParA track-cleaving velocities, effective diffusion coefficient, and other higher moments for the movement a ParB protein cluster that breaks monomers away at random locations on a single ParA track. Our model results indicate that cleaving velocities and effective diffusion constants are sensitive to ParB-induced ATP hydrolysis rates. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with stochastic simulation results.

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans bacterial pathogen resistant bus-4 mutants produce altered mucins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Parsons

    Full Text Available Caenorabditis elegans bus-4 glycosyltransferase mutants are resistant to infection by Microbacterium nematophilum, Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and have altered susceptibility to two Leucobacter species Verde1 and Verde2. Our objective in this study was to define the glycosylation changes leading to this phenotype to better understand how these changes lead to pathogen resistance. We performed MALDI-TOF MS, tandem MS and GC/MS experiments to reveal fine structural detail for the bus-4 N- and O-glycan pools. We observed dramatic changes in O-glycans and moderate ones in N-glycan pools compared to the parent strain. Ce core-I glycans, the nematode's mucin glycan equivalent, were doubled in abundance, halved in charge and bore shifts in terminal substitutions. The fucosyl O-glycans, Ce core-II and neutral fucosyl forms, were also increased in abundance as were fucosyl N-glycans. Quantitative expression analysis revealed that two mucins, let-653 and osm-8, were upregulated nearly 40 fold and also revealed was a dramatic increase in GDP-Man 4,6 dehydratease expression. We performed detailed lectin binding studies that showed changes in glycoconjugates in the surface coat, cuticle surface and intestine. The combined changes in cell surface glycoconjugate distribution, increased abundance and altered properties of mucin provide an environment where likely the above pathogens are not exposed to normal glycoconjugate dependent cues leading to barriers to these bacterial infections.

  13. A single natural nucleotide mutation alters bacterial pathogen host-tropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Melissa J.; Selva, Laura; Guinane, Caitriona M.; González-Muñoz, Beatriz M.; Tristan, Anne; Foster, Simon J; Fitzgerald, J. Ross; Penadés, José R.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of microbial pathogens to alter their host-tropism leading to epidemics in distinct host-species populations is a global public and veterinary health concern. In order to investigate the molecular basis of a bacterial host-switching event in a tractable host-species, we traced the evolutionary trajectory of the common rabbit clone of Staphylococcus aureus. We report that it evolved through a likely human-to-rabbit host jump over 40 years ago, and that only a single natural nucleotide mutation was required and sufficient to convert a human-specific S. aureus strain into one which could infect rabbits. Related mutations were identified at the same locus in other rabbit strains of distinct clonal origin, consistent with convergent evolution. This first report of a single mutation that was sufficient to alter the host-tropism of a micro-organism during its evolution highlights the capacity of some pathogens to readily expand into novel host-species populations. PMID:25685890

  14. Contribution of Escherichia coli alpha-hemolysin to bacterial virulence and to intraperitoneal alterations in peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, A K; Gleason, T G; Sawyer, R G; Pruett, T L

    2000-01-01

    Alpha-hemolysin (Hly) is a common exotoxin produced by Escherichia coli that enhances virulence in a number of clinical infections. The addition of hemolysin production to laboratory bacterial strains is known to increase the lethality of E. coli peritonitis. However, the mechanisms involved have not been determined and the contribution of hemolysin to the alterations in the host intraperitoneal environment and the leukocyte response is not known. Utilizing a rat peritonitis model, we show that wild-type hemolytic E. coli strains have a significant competitive advantage over nonhemolytic strains within the peritoneum. To examine the specific contribution of Hly to E. coli-induced virulence and alterations within the peritoneum, a mixed peritonitis model of E. coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and sterile fecal adjuvant was used. Three transformed E. coli strains were utilized: one strongly secretes active hemolysin (WAF 270), a second secretes active hemolysin but a reduced amount (WAF 260), and the third does not produce hemolysin (WAF 108). After an equal inoculum of each of the three strains, WAF 270 produced a markedly increased lethality and an increased recovery of both E. coli and B. fragilis from the host relative to the other strains. Changes in the intraperitoneal pH, degree of erythrocyte lysis, and recruitment and viability of leukocytes within the peritoneum following the induction of peritonitis differed significantly between the strongly hemolytic and nonhemolytic strains. Induction of peritonitis with WAF 270 caused a pronounced decrease in intraperitoneal pH, lysis of most of the intraperitoneal erythrocytes, and a marked decrease in recoverable viable leukocytes compared to WAF 108. Thus, hemolysin production by E. coli within the peritoneum may alter not only the host's ability to control the hemolytic strain itself but also other organisms. PMID:10603385

  15. Role of CCAA Nucleotide Repeats in Regulation of Hemoglobin and Hemoglobin-Haptoglobin Binding Protein Genes of Haemophilus influenzae

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zhen; Jin, Hongfan; Whitby, Paul W.; Morton, Daniel J.; Stull, Terrence L.

    1999-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae utilizes hemoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin as heme sources. The H. influenzae hemoglobin- and hemoglobin-haptoglobin binding protein genes, hgpA, hgpB, and hgpC, contain lengths of tetrameric CCAA repeats. Using an hgpA-lacZ translational gene fusion, we demonstrate phase-variable expression of lacZ associated with alteration in the length of the CCAA repeat region.

  16. Soil Fungal:Bacterial Ratios Are Linked to Altered Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ashish A.; Chowdhury, Somak; Schlager, Veronika; Oliver, Anna; Puissant, Jeremy; Vazquez, Perla G. M.; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin; Griffiths, Robert I.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Despite several lines of observational evidence, there is a lack of consensus on whether higher fungal:bacterial (F:B) ratios directly cause higher soil carbon (C) storage. We employed RNA sequencing, protein profiling and isotope tracer techniques to evaluate whether differing F:B ratios are associated with differences in C storage. A mesocosm 13C labeled foliar litter decomposition experiment was performed in two soils that were similar in their physico-chemical properties but differed in microbial community structure, specifically their F:B ratio (determined by PLFA analyses, RNA sequencing and protein profiling; all three corroborating each other). Following litter addition, we observed a consistent increase in abundance of fungal phyla; and greater increases in the fungal dominated soil; implicating the role of fungi in litter decomposition. Litter derived 13C in respired CO2 was consistently lower, and residual 13C in bulk SOM was higher in high F:B soil demonstrating greater C storage potential in the F:B dominated soil. We conclude that in this soil system, the increased abundance of fungi in both soils and the altered C cycling patterns in the F:B dominated soils highlight the significant role of fungi in litter decomposition and indicate that F:B ratios are linked to higher C storage potential. PMID:27555839

  17. Membrane permeability alteration of some bacterial clinical isolates by selected antihistaminics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa A El-Nakeeb

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Several antihistaminics possess antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria. However, the exact mechanism of such activity was unclear. Hence, the aim of this study is to investigate their mechanism of antibacterial activity especially their effect upon the permeability of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. The effects of azelastine, cetirizine, cyproheptadine and diphenhydramine were studied using Gram-positive and Gram-negative multiresistant clinical isolates. Leakage of 260 and 280 nm UV-absorbing materials was detected upon treatment with the tested antihistaminics; indicative of membrane alteration. Using an artificial membrane model, cholesterol-free negatively-charged unilamellar liposomes, confirmed the effect of antihistaminics upon the membrane permeability both by showing an apparent membrane damage as observed microscopically and by detection of leakage of preloaded dye from the liposomes colorimatrically. Moreover, examination of the ultrastructure of cells treated with azelastine and cetirizine under the transmission electron microscope substantiated the detected abnormalities in the cell wall and membrane. Furthermore, the effect of pretreating certain isolates for both short and long periods with selected antihistaminics was followed by the viable count technique. Increased vulnerability towards further exposure to azelastine was observed in cells pretreated with azelastine for 2 days and those pretreated with azelastine or cetrizine for 30 days.

  18. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  19. Phylogeny of Echinoderm Hemoglobins

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Ana B.; Herman, Joseph L; Elphick, Maurice R.; Kober, Kord M.; Janies, Daniel; Linchangco, Gregorio; Semmens, Dean C.; Bailly, Xavier; Vinogradov, Serge N.; Hoogewijs, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent genomic information has revealed that neuroglobin and cytoglobin are the two principal lineages of vertebrate hemoglobins, with the latter encompassing the familiar myoglobin and α-globin/β-globin tetramer hemoglobin, and several minor groups. In contrast, very little is known about hemoglobins in echinoderms, a phylum of exclusively marine organisms closely related to vertebrates, beyond the presence of coelomic hemoglobins in sea cucumbers and brittle stars. We identified ...

  20. Alteration of intracellular protein expressions as a key mechanism of the deterioration of bacterial denitrification caused by copper oxide nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Yinglong Su; Xiong Zheng; Yinguang Chen; Mu Li; Kun Liu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing production and utilization of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) result in the releases into the environment. However, the influence of CuO NPs on bacterial denitrification, one of the most important pathways to transform nitrate to dinitrogen in environment, has seldom been studied. Here we reported that CuO NPs caused a significant alteration of key protein expressions of a model denitrifier, Paracoccus denitrificans, leading to severe inhibition to denitrification. Total n...

  1. Hemoglobin D-Punjab: origin, distribution and laboratory diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lidiane de Souza Torres; Jéssika Viviani Okumura; Danilo Grünig Humberto da Silva; Claudia Regina Bonini-Domingos

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses hemoglobin D-Punjab, also known as hemoglobin D-Los Angeles, one of the most common hemoglobin variants worldwide. It is derived from a point mutation in the beta-globin gene (HBB: c.364G>C; rs33946267) prevalent in the Punjab region, North-western Indian. Hemoglobin D-Punjab can be inherited in heterozygosis with hemoglobin A causing no clinical or hematological alterations, or in homozygosis, the rarest form of inheritance, a condition that is commonly not related to c...

  2. Hemoglobin Variants in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Raymond A.

    1965-04-22

    Variability among mammalian hemoglobins was observed many years ago (35). The chemical basis for differences among hemoglobins from different species of mammals has been studied by several investigators (5, 11, 18, 48). As well as interspecies differences, hemoglobin variants are frequently found within a species of mammals (2, 3, 7, 16) The inheritance of these intraspecies variants can be studied, and pedigrees indicate that the type of hemoglobin synthesized in an individual is genetically controlled (20). Several of the variant human hemoglobins are f'unctionally deficient (7, 16). Such hemoglobin anomalies are of basic interest to man because of the vital role of hemoglobin for transporting oxygen to all tissues of the body.

  3. Alteration of Bacterial Antibiotic Sensitivity After Short-Term Exposure to Diagnostic Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Darvish, Leili; Abounajmi, Mohammad; Zarei, Samira; Zare, Tahereh; Taheri, Mohammad; Nematollahi, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background Many pathogenic bacteria show different levels of antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, a lot of hospital-acquired infections are caused by highly resistant or multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. According to WHO, patients with drug-resistant infections have higher morbidity and mortality. Moreover, patients infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics considerably consume more healthcare resources. Objectives In this study, we explored a physical method of converting drug-resistant bacteria to drug-sensitive ones. Materials and Methods This is an in vitro case-control study, performed at the Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Protection Research Center (INIRPRC), Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS), Shiraz, Iran in 2014. All experiments were carried out using Gram-negative bacteria Klebsiella pneumonia and E. coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus group A, isolated from hospitalized patients. The bacterial strains were obtained from the Persian Type Culture Collection, IROST, Iran (Klebsiella pneumonia PTCC 1290) and Bacteriology Department of Shahid Faghihi Teaching Hospital, Shiraz, Iran (E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus group A). The bacteria in culture plates were exposed to diagnostic ultrasound using a MyLab70XVG sonography system for 5 minutes. Then, the bacteria were cultured on Mueller-Hinton agar and incubated at 35°C for 18 hours. Finally, antibiotic susceptibility test was performed and the inhibition zone in both control and exposed groups were measured. Three replicate agar plates were used for each test and the inhibition zones of the plates were recorded. Results Compared with the results obtained from unexposed bacteria, statistically significant variations of sensitivity to antibiotics were found in some strains after short-term exposure. In particular, we found major differences (making antibiotic-resistant bacteria susceptible or vice versa) in the diameters of

  4. Soluble metals in residual oil fly ash alter innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses to bacterial infection in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soluble metals of the pollutant, residual oil fly ash (ROFA), have been shown to alter pulmonary bacterial clearance in rats. The goal of this study was to determine the potential effects on both the innate and adaptive lung immune responses after bacterial infection in rats pre-exposed to the soluble metals in ROFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally dosed (i.t.) at day 0 with ROFA (R-Total) (1.0 mg/100 g body weight), the soluble fraction of ROFA (R-Soluble), the soluble sample subject to a chelator (R-Chelex), or phosphate-buffered saline (Saline). On day 3, rats were administered an i.t. dose of 5 x 104 Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, bacterial pulmonary clearance was monitored and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on days 3 (pre-infection), 6, 8, and 10. A concentrated first fraction of lavage fluid was retained for analysis of lactate dehydrogenase and albumin to assess lung injury. BAL cell number, phenotype, and production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) were assessed, and a variety of cytokines were measured in the BAL fluid. Rats pre-treated with R-Soluble showed elevated lung injury/cytotoxicity and increased cellular influx into the lungs. R-Soluble-treatment also altered ROS, RNS, and cytokine levels, and caused a degree of macrophage and T cell inhibition. These effects of R-Soluble result in increased pulmonary bacterial burden after infection. The results suggest that soluble metals in ROFA increase lung injury and inflammation, and alter both innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses

  5. Chronic N-amended soils exhibit an altered bacterial community structure in Harvard Forest, MA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlapati, Swathi A; Minocha, Rakesh; Bhiravarasa, Premsai S; Tisa, Louis S; Thomas, William K; Minocha, Subhash C

    2013-02-01

    At the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA, the impact of 20 years of annual ammonium nitrate application to the mixed hardwood stand on soil bacterial communities was studied using 16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes was done using DNA extracted from 30 soil samples (three treatments × two horizons × five subplots) collected from untreated (control), low N-amended (50 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) and high N-amended (150 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) plots. A total of 1.3 million sequences were processed using qiime. Although Acidobacteria represented the most abundant phylum based on the number of sequences, Proteobacteria were the most diverse in terms of operational taxonomic units (OTUs). UniFrac analyses revealed that the bacterial communities differed significantly among soil horizons and treatments. Microsite variability among the five subplots was also evident. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of normalized OTU data followed by permutational manova further confirmed these observations. Richness indicators and indicator species analyses revealed higher bacterial diversity associated with N amendment. Differences in bacterial diversity and community composition associated with the N treatments were also observed at lower phylogenetic levels. Only 28-35% of the 6 936 total OTUs identified were common to three treatments, while the rest were specific to one treatment or common to two. PMID:22974374

  6. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, But Not Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichen; Xue, Chao; Song, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer (OF) regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF), chemical fertilizer (CF), organic–inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF), and OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA) of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen–fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments) significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with OF application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR vs. sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the α- and β- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil microbial community structure, but not total levels of

  7. Tamsulosin alters levofloxacin pharmacokinetics in prostates derived from rats with acute bacterial prostatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Dong Qin; Ming-Zhao Xiao; Yuan-Da Zhou; Jing Yang; Hai-Xia He; Yue He; Yang Zeng

    2013-01-01

    The combination of levofloxacin and α1 adrenergic antagonist treatment is the current preferred choice for both bacterial and non-bacterial prostatitis.The aim of this study is to explore the influence of α1 adrenergic antagonists on the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin using rat models with acute bacterial prostatitis (ABP) induced by direct injection with Escherichia coli(ATCC25922).A total of 96 model rats were randomly assigned into two groups:the experimental group (treated with both tamsulosin and levofloxacin,n=48) and the control group (treated with levofloxacin and solvents,n=48).Six rats from each group were euthanized to collect blood,liver,kidney and prostate samples at the time points of 0.125,0.25,0.5,1,2,4,8 and 12 h after drug administration.The levofloxacin concentrations were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC),and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the 3p97 software program.There were no obvious differences (P>0.05) between the experimental and control groups in the major pharmacokinetic parameters of levofloxacin,including the halftime (t1/2),time to peak (tpeak),clearance rate (CL),maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC0~12),in the plasma or in the hepatic and kidney tissues of the model rats.However,in the prostatic tissues,tamsulosin increased the Cmax,prolonged the t1/2 and decreased the CL of levofloxacin (P<0.05).These results indicate that tamsulosin may enhance the effect of levofloxacin in the treatment of bacterial prostatitis without changing the drug concentration in the liver and kidney.

  8. Producción endógena de alcohol en pacientes con cirrosis hepática, alteración motora y sobrecrecimiento bacteriano Endogenous ethanol production, alterations in gastrointestinal motility and bacterial overgrowth and cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ana María Madrid S; Carmen Hurtado H; Sara Gatica I; Inelia Chacón B; Ana Toyos D; Carlos Defilippi C

    2002-01-01

    Background: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth generates endogenous ethanol production both in experimental animals and humans. Patients with cirrhosis have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, but endogenous ethanol production has not been studied in them. Aim: To investigate endogenou ethanol production in patients with cirrhosis, altered intestinal motility and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Patients and methods: Eight patients with cirrhosis of different etiologies and altere...

  9. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; Hunt, A.; Fernandez, D.; Richter, E.; Shah, M.; Kilcoyne, M.; Joshi, L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hing, S.; Parra, M.; Dumaras, P.; Norwood, K.; Nickerson, C. A.; Bober, R.; Devich, J.; Ruggles, A.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  10. Phylogeny of Echinoderm Hemoglobins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Christensen

    Full Text Available Recent genomic information has revealed that neuroglobin and cytoglobin are the two principal lineages of vertebrate hemoglobins, with the latter encompassing the familiar myoglobin and α-globin/β-globin tetramer hemoglobin, and several minor groups. In contrast, very little is known about hemoglobins in echinoderms, a phylum of exclusively marine organisms closely related to vertebrates, beyond the presence of coelomic hemoglobins in sea cucumbers and brittle stars. We identified about 50 hemoglobins in sea urchin, starfish and sea cucumber genomes and transcriptomes, and used Bayesian inference to carry out a molecular phylogenetic analysis of their relationship to vertebrate sequences, specifically, to assess the hypothesis that the neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages are also present in echinoderms.The genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus encodes several hemoglobins, including a unique chimeric 14-domain globin, 2 androglobin isoforms and a unique single androglobin domain protein. Other strongylocentrotid genomes appear to have similar repertoires of globin genes. We carried out molecular phylogenetic analyses of 52 hemoglobins identified in sea urchin, brittle star and sea cucumber genomes and transcriptomes, using different multiple sequence alignment methods coupled with Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches. The results demonstrate that there are two major globin lineages in echinoderms, which are related to the vertebrate neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages. Furthermore, the brittle star and sea cucumber coelomic hemoglobins appear to have evolved independently from the cytoglobin lineage, similar to the evolution of erythroid oxygen binding globins in cyclostomes and vertebrates.The presence of echinoderm globins related to the vertebrate neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages suggests that the split between neuroglobins and cytoglobins occurred in the deuterostome ancestor shared by echinoderms and vertebrates.

  11. Long acting β2-agonist and corticosteroid restore airway glandular cell function altered by bacterial supernatant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawrocki-Raby Béatrice

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus releases virulence factors (VF that may impair the innate protective functions of airway cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether a long-acting β2 adrenergic receptor agonist (salmeterol hydroxynaphthoate, Sal combined with a corticosteroid (fluticasone propionate, FP was able to regulate ion content and cytokine expression by airway glandular cells after exposure to S. aureus supernatant. Methods A human airway glandular cell line was incubated with S. aureus supernatant for 1 h and then treated with the combination Sal/FP for 4 h. The expression of actin and CFTR proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Videomicroscopy was used to evaluate chloride secretion and X-ray microanalysis to measure the intracellular ion and water content. The pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Results When the cells were incubated with S. aureus supernatant and then with Sal/FP, the cellular localisation of CFTR was apical compared to the cytoplasmic localisation in cells incubated with S. aureus supernatant alone. The incubation of airway epithelial cells with S. aureus supernatant reduced by 66% the chloride efflux that was fully restored by Sal/FP treatment. We also observed that Sal/FP treatment induced the restoration of ion (Cl and S and water content within the intracellular secretory granules of airway glandular cells and reduced the bacterial supernatant-dependent increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL8 and TNFα. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that treatment with the combination of a corticosteroid and a long-acting β2 adrenergic receptor agonist after bacterial infection restores the airway glandular cell function. Abnormal mucus induced by defective ion transport during pulmonary infection could benefit from treatment with a combination of β2 adrenergic receptor agonist and glucocorticoid.

  12. Alteration of intracellular protein expressions as a key mechanism of the deterioration of bacterial denitrification caused by copper oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yinglong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun

    2015-10-01

    The increasing production and utilization of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) result in the releases into the environment. However, the influence of CuO NPs on bacterial denitrification, one of the most important pathways to transform nitrate to dinitrogen in environment, has seldom been studied. Here we reported that CuO NPs caused a significant alteration of key protein expressions of a model denitrifier, Paracoccus denitrificans, leading to severe inhibition to denitrification. Total nitrogen removal efficiency was decreased from 98.3% to 62.1% with the increase of CuO NPs from 0.05 to 0.25 mg/L. Cellular morphology and integrity studies indicated that nanoparticles entered the cells. The proteomic bioinformatics analysis showed that CuO NPs caused regulation of proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism, electron transfer and substance transport. The down-regulation of GtsB protein (responsible for glucose transport) decreased the production of NADH (electron donor for denitrification). Also, the expressions of key electron-transfer proteins (including NADH dehydrogenase and cytochrome) were suppressed by CuO NPs, which adversely affected electrons transfer for denitrification. Further investigation revealed that CuO NPs significantly inhibited the expressions and catalytic activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results provided a fundamental understanding of the negative influences of CuO NPs on bacterial denitrification.

  13. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  14. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y.; Manning, Sara A.; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J.; Samuels, Amanda N.; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role

  15. Pretreatment of Epithelial Cells with Rifaximin Alters Bacterial Attachment and Internalization Profiles▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric L.; Xue, Qiong; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Xu, Yi; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2010-01-01

    Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed semisynthetic antibiotic derivative of rifampin licensed for use in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea. Rifaximin reduces the symptoms of enteric infection, often without pathogen eradication and with limited effects on intestinal flora. Epithelial cells (HEp-2 [laryngeal], HCT-8 [ileocecal], A549 [lung], and HeLa [cervical]) were pretreated with rifaximin (or control antibiotics) prior to the addition of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC). EAEC adherence was significantly reduced following rifaximin pretreatment compared to pretreatment with rifampin or doxycycline for three of the four cell lines tested. The rifaximin-mediated changes to epithelial cells were explored further by testing the attachment and internalization of either Bacillus anthracis or Shigella sonnei into A549 or HeLa cells, respectively. The attachment and internalization of B. anthracis were significantly reduced following rifaximin pretreatment. In contrast, neither the attachment nor the internalization of S. sonnei was affected by rifaximin pretreatment of HeLa cells, suggesting that rifaximin-mediated modulation of host cell physiology affected bacteria utilizing distinct attachment/internalization mechanisms differently. In addition, rifaximin pretreatment of HEp-2 cells led to reduced concentrations of inflammatory cytokines from uninfected cells. The study provides evidence that rifaximin-mediated changes in epithelial cell physiology are associated with changes in bacterial attachment/internalization and reduced inflammatory cytokine release. PMID:19858255

  16. Acidic Conditions in the NHE2-/- Mouse Intestine Result in an Altered Mucosa-Associated Bacterial Population with Changes in Mucus Oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Engevik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms bacteria use to proliferate and alter the normal bacterial composition remain unknown. The ability to link changes in the intestinal micro-environment, such as ion composition and pH, to bacterial proliferation is clinically advantageous for diseases that involve an altered gut microbiota, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease, obesity and diabetes. In human and mouse intestine, the apical Na+/H+ exchangers NHE2 and NHE3 affect luminal Na+, water, and pH. Loss of NHE2 results in acidic luminal pH. Since acid resistance systems in gram-positive bacteria are well documented, we hypothesize that gram-positive bacteria would increase in representation in the acidic NHE2-/- intestine. Methods: Intestinal ion composition was measured by fame photometry and chloridometry and pH measured electrochemically. DNA extracted from intestinal flushes or from mucosal scrapings was analyzed by qRT-PCR to examine luminal and mucosa-associated bacterial populations. Epithelial mucus oligosaccharide patterns were examined by histology with FIT-C labeled lectins. Results: Although total luminal and mucosa-associated bacteria were unchanged in NHE2-/- intestine, gram-positive bacterial phyla were increased in the mucosa-associated bacterial population in a region-specific manner. The genera Clostridium and Lactobacillus were increased in the cecum and colon which corresponded to changes in NHE2-/- mucus oligosaccharide composition of mannose, N-acetyglucosamine, N-acetygalactosamine and galactose. Conclusions: Together these data indicate that changes in ion transport induce region-specific bacterial changes, which alter host mucus oligosaccharide patterns. These host-bacterial interactions provide a possible mechanism of niche-development and shed insight on how certain groups proliferate in changing environments and maintain their proliferation by altering the host.

  17. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  18. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  19. Impacts of Alterations of Organic Inputs on the Bacterial Community within the sediments of Wind Cave, South Dakota, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelius Marisa K.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind Cave (WICA in the Black Hills of South Dakota, like many mostly dry caves in temperate regions is an energy-starved system.The biotic communities that reside in these systems are low in diversity and simple in structure, and sensitive to changes in externalinputs of organic matter. Caves open to tourist traffic offer an opportunity to study the impacts of organic matter amendments in theform of human and rodent hair and dander, clothing lint, material from rodent activity (nesting materials and feces, and algal growthin and around artificial lighting. This study reports on the impacts of carbon amendments from humans and rodents on the bacterialand archaeal communities within the sediments of WICA from annual surveys and from a manipulative study that added lint (‘L’;cellulose plus rodent dander and rodent hair, rodent feces (‘F’, and a combination of both (‘LF’. The survey confirmed that bacterialbiomass was higher in regions of the cave with the highest rates of lint (hair and natural clothing fibers input. The manipulative studyfound that organic amendments in the forms of lint (L and rodent feces (F altered the WICA bacterial community structure in bothabundance and diversity, with the combined lint and feces (LF amendment having the most significant response. The high similarityof the LF and L communities suggests that the cave bacterial community is more carbon than nitrogen limited. The implication ofcave development to management practices is immediate and practical. Even small amounts of lint and organic matter foreign tocave bacteria significantly compromise the integrity of the endemic community resulting in the replacement of undescribed speciesby assemblages with at best, unknown impacts to natural cave features.

  20. Bacillus anthracis secretes proteins that mediate heme acquisition from hemoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W Maresso

    Full Text Available Acquisition of iron is necessary for the replication of nearly all bacterial pathogens; however, iron of vertebrate hosts is mostly sequestered by heme and bound to hemoglobin within red blood cells. In Bacillus anthracis, the spore-forming agent of anthrax, the mechanisms of iron scavenging from hemoglobin are unknown. We report here that B. anthracis secretes IsdX1 and IsdX2, two NEAT domain proteins, to remove heme from hemoglobin, thereby retrieving iron for bacterial growth. Unlike other Gram-positive bacteria, which rely on cell wall anchored Isd proteins for heme scavenging, B. anthracis seems to have also evolved NEAT domain proteins in the extracellular milieu and in the bacterial envelope to provide for the passage of heme.

  1. Antibiotic-induced dysbiosis alters host-bacterial interactions and leads to colonic sensory and motor changes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, M; Cerdà-Cuéllar, M; Martínez, V

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of the commensal microbiota (dysbiosis) seem to be a pathogenic component of functional gastrointestinal disorders, mainly irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and might participate in the secretomotor and sensory alterations observed in these patients.We determined if a state antibiotics-induced intestinal dysbiosis is able to modify colonic pain-related and motor responses and characterized the neuro-immune mechanisms implicated in mice. A 2-week antibiotics treatment induced a colonic dysbiosis (increments in Bacteroides spp, Clostridium coccoides and Lactobacillus spp and reduction in Bifidobacterium spp). Bacterial adherence was not affected. Dysbiosis was associated with increased levels of secretory-IgA, up-regulation of the antimicrobial lectin RegIIIγ, and toll-like receptors (TLR) 4 and 7 and down-regulation of the antimicrobial-peptide Resistin-Like Molecule-β and TLR5. Dysbiotic mice showed less goblet cells, without changes in the thickness of the mucus layer. Neither macroscopical nor microscopical signs of inflammation were observed. In dysbiotic mice, expression of the cannabinoid receptor 2 was up-regulated, while the cannabinoid 1 and the mu-opioid receptors were down-regulated. In antibiotic-treated mice, visceral pain-related responses elicited by intraperitoneal acetic acid or intracolonic capsaicin were significantly attenuated. Colonic contractility was enhanced during dysbiosis. Intestinal dysbiosis induce changes in the innate intestinal immune system and modulate the expression of pain-related sensory systems, an effect associated with a reduction in visceral pain-related responses. Commensal microbiota modulates gut neuro-immune sensory systems, leading to functional changes, at least as it relates to viscerosensitivity. Similar mechanisms might explain the beneficial effects of antibiotics or certain probiotics in the treatment of IBS. PMID:25531553

  2. Rice (Oryza) hemoglobins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a sin...

  3. Exposure to bacterial signals does not alter pea aphids' survival upon a second challenge or investment in production of winged offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas ter Braak

    Full Text Available Pea aphids have an obligate nutritional symbiosis with the bacteria Buchneraaphidicola and frequently also harbor one or more facultative symbionts. Aphids are also susceptible to bacterial pathogen infections, and it has been suggested that aphids have a limited immune response towards such pathogen infections compared to other, more well-studied insects. However, aphids do possess at least some of the genes known to be involved in bacterial immune responses in other insects, and immune-competent hemocytes. One possibility is that immune priming with microbial elicitors could stimulate immune protection against subsequent bacterial infections, as has been observed in several other insect systems. To address this hypothesis we challenged aphids with bacterial immune elicitors twenty-four hours prior to live bacterial pathogen infections and then compared their survival rates to aphids that were not pre-exposed to bacterial signals. Using two aphid genotypes, we found no evidence for immune protection conferred by immune priming during infections with either Serratia marcescens or with Escherichia coli. Immune priming was not altered by the presence of facultative, beneficial symbionts in the aphids. In the absence of inducible immune protection, aphids may allocate energy towards other defense traits, including production of offspring with wings that could escape deteriorating conditions. To test this, we monitored the ratio of winged to unwinged offspring produced by adult mothers of a single clone that had been exposed to bacterial immune elicitors, to live E. coli infections or to no challenge. We found no correlation between immune challenge and winged offspring production, suggesting that this mechanism of defense, which functions upon exposure to fungal pathogens, is not central to aphid responses to bacterial infections.

  4. Hemoglobin oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venous blood obtained from healthy donors and from patients suffering from breast cancer have been treated with acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) for different time. Moessbauer spectra of the packed red cells have been recorded and compared. The largest difference occurs after 50 min of treatment with APH where the patient samples show a broad spectral pattern indicating an advanced hemoglobin oxidation. These results may have some relevance in early cancer diagnosis

  5. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Chen, C. R.; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0-10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4+, TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire.

  6. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-pei; Chen, C R; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0-10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4(+), TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire. PMID:26787458

  7. Genomic organization and evolution of the Atlantic salmon hemoglobin repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Ruth B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of salmonids are considered pseudo-tetraploid undergoing reversion to a stable diploid state. Given the genome duplication and extensive biological data available for salmonids, they are excellent model organisms for studying comparative genomics, evolutionary processes, fates of duplicated genes and the genetic and physiological processes associated with complex behavioral phenotypes. The evolution of the tetrapod hemoglobin genes is well studied; however, little is known about the genomic organization and evolution of teleost hemoglobin genes, particularly those of salmonids. The Atlantic salmon serves as a representative salmonid species for genomics studies. Given the well documented role of hemoglobin in adaptation to varied environmental conditions as well as its use as a model protein for evolutionary analyses, an understanding of the genomic structure and organization of the Atlantic salmon α and β hemoglobin genes is of great interest. Results We identified four bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs comprising two hemoglobin gene clusters spanning the entire α and β hemoglobin gene repertoire of the Atlantic salmon genome. Their chromosomal locations were established using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis and linkage mapping, demonstrating that the two clusters are located on separate chromosomes. The BACs were sequenced and assembled into scaffolds, which were annotated for putatively functional and pseudogenized hemoglobin-like genes. This revealed that the tail-to-tail organization and alternating pattern of the α and β hemoglobin genes are well conserved in both clusters, as well as that the Atlantic salmon genome houses substantially more hemoglobin genes, including non-Bohr β globin genes, than the genomes of other teleosts that have been sequenced. Conclusions We suggest that the most parsimonious evolutionary path leading to the present organization of the Atlantic salmon

  8. Mechanisms of the adjuvant effect of hemoglobin in experimental peritonitis. VII. Hemoglobin does not inhibit clearance of Escherichia coli from the peritoneal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemoglobin has been shown to be a potent adjuvant in experimental Escherichia coli peritonitis, although a satisfactory mechanistic rationale is still obscure. Hemoglobin has been thought to impair intraperitoneal neutrophil function, delay clearance of bacteria from the peritoneal cavity by the normal absorptive mechanisms, or directly enhance bacterial growth. Using highly purified stroma-free hemoglobin (SFHgb), we have largely discounted any direct effect of hemoglobin on peritoneal white blood cell function. In the present study, we confirmed that uncontrolled proliferation of bacteria takes place in the presence of hemoglobin in the peritoneal cavity. Nonviable 5-iododeoxyuridine 125I-labelled bacteria were then used to directly study peritoneal clearance kinetics, eliminating the problem of bacterial growth. SFHgb had no influence on the removal of intraperitoneal bacteria. The rate of bloodstream appearance of radiolabel was similar with or without intraperitoneal SFHgb. Thus, SFHgb does not prevent clearance of bacteria from the peritoneal cavity by interfering with normal host clearance mechanisms. SFHgb may act as a bacterial growth adjuvant, either by serving as a bacterial nutrient or by suitably modifying the environment so that extensive bacterial proliferation can occur. The latter hypothesis appears to be an area in which investigation concerning the adjuvant effect of hemoglobin may prove most fruitful

  9. Expression of fully functional tetrameric human hemoglobin in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis genes encoding the human α- and β-globin polypeptides have been expressed from a single operon in Escherichia coli. The α- and β-globin polypeptides associate into soluble tetramers, incorporate heme, and accumulate to >5% of the total cellular protein. Purified recombinant hemoglobin has the correct stoichiometry of α- and β-globin chains and contains a full complement of heme. Each globin chain also contains an additional methionine as an extension to the amino terminus. The recombinant hemoglobin has a C4 reversed-phase HPLC profile essentially identical to that of human hemoglobin A0 and comigrates with hemoglobin A0 on SDS/PAGE. The visible spectrum and oxygen affinity are similar to that of native human hemoglobin A0. The authors have also expressed the α- and β-globin genes separately and found that the expression of the α-globin gene alone results in a marked decrease in the accumulation of α-globin in the cell. Separate expression of the β-globin gene results in high levels of insoluble β-globin. These observations suggest that the presence of α- and β-globin in the same cell stabilizes α-globin and aids the correct folding of β-globin. This system provides a simple method for expressing large quantities of recombinant hemoglobin and allows facile manipulation of the genes encoding hemoglobin to produce functionally altered forms of this protein

  10. Expression of fully functional tetrameric human hemoglobin in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, S.J.; Looker, D.L.; Roehrich, J.M.; Cozart, P.E.; Durfee, S.L.; Tedesco, J.L.; Stetler, G.L. (Somatogen, Inc., Broomfield, CO (United States))

    1990-11-01

    Synthesis genes encoding the human {alpha}- and {beta}-globin polypeptides have been expressed from a single operon in Escherichia coli. The {alpha}- and {beta}-globin polypeptides associate into soluble tetramers, incorporate heme, and accumulate to >5% of the total cellular protein. Purified recombinant hemoglobin has the correct stoichiometry of {alpha}- and {beta}-globin chains and contains a full complement of heme. Each globin chain also contains an additional methionine as an extension to the amino terminus. The recombinant hemoglobin has a C{sub 4} reversed-phase HPLC profile essentially identical to that of human hemoglobin A{sub 0} and comigrates with hemoglobin A{sub 0} on SDS/PAGE. The visible spectrum and oxygen affinity are similar to that of native human hemoglobin A{sub 0}. The authors have also expressed the {alpha}- and {beta}-globin genes separately and found that the expression of the {alpha}-globin gene alone results in a marked decrease in the accumulation of {alpha}-globin in the cell. Separate expression of the {beta}-globin gene results in high levels of insoluble {beta}-globin. These observations suggest that the presence of {alpha}- and {beta}-globin in the same cell stabilizes {alpha}-globin and aids the correct folding of {beta}-globin. This system provides a simple method for expressing large quantities of recombinant hemoglobin and allows facile manipulation of the genes encoding hemoglobin to produce functionally altered forms of this protein.

  11. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Chen, C. R.; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0–10 cm) was signific...

  12. The enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid alters brain and plasma phospholipid molecular species: further development of a rodent model of autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Raymond H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastrointestinal symptoms and altered blood phospholipid profiles have been reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Most of the phospholipid analyses have been conducted on the fatty acid composition of isolated phospholipid classes following hydrolysis. A paucity of information exists on how the intact phospholipid molecular species are altered in ASD. We applied ESI/MS to determine how brain and blood intact phospholipid species were altered during the induction of ASD-like behaviors in rats following intraventricular infusions with the enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid. Animals were infused daily for 8 days, locomotor activity assessed, and animals killed during the induced behaviors. Propionic acid infusions increased locomotor activity. Lipid analysis revealed treatment altered 21 brain and 30 blood phospholipid molecular species. Notable alterations were observed in the composition of brain SM, diacyl mono and polyunsaturated PC, PI, PS, PE, and plasmalogen PC and PE molecular species. These alterations suggest that the propionic acid rat model is a useful tool to study aberrations in lipid metabolism known to affect membrane fluidity, peroxisomal function, gap junction coupling capacity, signaling, and neuroinflammation, all of which may be associated with the pathogenesis of ASD.

  13. Temperature increases from 55 to 75 C in a two-phase biogas reactor result in fundamental alterations within the bacterial and archaeal community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademacher, Antje [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V. (ATB), Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Bioverfahrenstechnik; Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Technischen Umweltschutz; Nolte, Christine; Schoenberg, Mandy; Klocke, Michael [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V. (ATB), Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Bioverfahrenstechnik

    2012-10-15

    Agricultural biogas plants were operated in most cases below their optimal performance. An increase in the fermentation temperature and a spatial separation of hydrolysis/acetogenesis and methanogenesis are known strategies in improving and stabilizing biogas production. In this study, the dynamic variability of the bacterial and archaeal community was monitored within a two-phase leach bed biogas reactor supplied with rye silage and straw during a stepwise temperature increase from 55 to 75 C within the leach bed reactor (LBR), using TRFLP analyses. To identify the terminal restriction fragments that were obtained, bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed. Above 65 C, the bacterial community structure changed from being Clostridiales-dominated toward being dominated by members of the Bacteroidales, Clostridiales, and Thermotogales orders. Simultaneously, several changes occurred, including a decrease in the total cell count, degradation rate, and biogas yield along with alterations in the intermediate production. A bioaugmentation with compost at 70 C led to slight improvements in the reactor performance; these did not persist at 75 C. However, the archaeal community within the downstream anaerobic filter reactor (AF), operated constantly at 55 C, altered by the temperature increase in the LBR. At an LBR temperature of 55 C, members of the Methanobacteriales order were prevalent in the AF, whereas at higher LBR temperatures Methanosarcinales prevailed. Altogether, the best performance of this two-phase reactor was achieved at an LBR temperature of below 65 C, which indicates that this temperature range has a favorable effect on the microbial community responsible for the production of biogas. (orig.)

  14. NF-κB Inhibition after Cecal Ligation and Puncture Reduces Sepsis-Associated Lung Injury without Altering Bacterial Host Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since the NF-κB pathway regulates both inflammation and host defense, it is uncertain whether interventions targeting NF-κB would be beneficial in sepsis. Based on the kinetics of the innate immune response, we postulated that selective NF-κB inhibition during a defined time period after the onset of sepsis would reduce acute lung injury without compromising bacterial host defense. Methods. Mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. An NF-κB inhibitor, BMS-345541 (50 µg/g mice, was administered by peroral gavage beginning 2 hours after CLP and repeated at 6 hour intervals for 2 additional doses. Results. Mice treated with BMS-345541 after CLP showed reduced neutrophilic alveolitis and lower levels of KC in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared to mice treated with CLP+vehicle. In addition, mice treated with CLP+BMS had minimal histological evidence of lung injury and normal wet-dry ratios, indicating protection from acute lung injury. Treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor did not affect the ability of cultured macrophages to phagocytose bacteria and did not alter bacterial colony counts in blood, lung tissue, or peritoneal fluid at 24 hours after CLP. While BMS-345541 treatment did not alter mortality after CLP, our results showed a trend towards improved survival. Conclusion. Transiently blocking NF-κB activity after the onset of CLP-induced sepsis can effectively reduce acute lung injury in mice without compromising bacterial host defense or survival after CLP.

  15. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography

  16. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V., E-mail: LHWANG@WUSTL.EDU [Optical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  17. Localised IR spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    CERN Document Server

    Yarrow, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    IR absorption spectroscopy of hemoglobin was performed using an IR optical parametric oscillator laser and a commercial atomic force microscope in a novel experimental arrangement based on the use of a bottom-up excitation alignment. This experimental approach enables detection of protein samples with a resolution that is much higher than that of standard IR spectroscopy. Presented here are AFM based IR absorption spectra of micron sized hemoglobin features

  18. Salinity altered root distribution and increased diversity of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere soil of Jerusalem artichoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Hu, Jinxiang; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between roots and bacterial communities in halophytic species is poorly understood. Here, we used Jerusalem artichoke cultivar Nanyu 1 (NY-1) to characterise root distribution patterns and determine diversity and abundance of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil under variable salinity. Root growth was not inhibited within the salinity range 1.2 to 1.9 g salt/kg, but roots were mainly confined to 0-20 cm soil layer vertically and 0-30 cm horizontally from the plant centre. Root concentrations of K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and particularly Ca(2+) were relatively high under salinity stress. High salinity stress decreased soil invertase and catalase activity. Using a next-generation, Illumina-based sequencing approach, we determined higher diversity of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil at high than low salinity. More than 15,500 valid reads were obtained, and Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria predominated in all samples, accounting for >80% of the reads. On a genus level, 636 genera were common to the low and high salinity treatments at 0-5 cm and 5-10 cm depth. The abundance of Steroidobacter and Sphingomonas was significantly decreased by increasing salinity. Higher Shannon and Chao 1 indices with increasing severity of salt stress indicated that high salt stress increased diversity in the bacterial communities. PMID:26852800

  19. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carol L Fischer; Katherine S Walters; David R Drake; Deborah V Dawson; Derek R Blanchette; Kim A Brogden; Philip W Wertz

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria;however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  20. Salinity altered root distribution and increased diversity of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere soil of Jerusalem artichoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Hu, Jinxiang; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between roots and bacterial communities in halophytic species is poorly understood. Here, we used Jerusalem artichoke cultivar Nanyu 1 (NY-1) to characterise root distribution patterns and determine diversity and abundance of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil under variable salinity. Root growth was not inhibited within the salinity range 1.2 to 1.9 g salt/kg, but roots were mainly confined to 0–20 cm soil layer vertically and 0–30 cm horizontally from the plant centre. Root concentrations of K+, Na+, Mg2+ and particularly Ca2+ were relatively high under salinity stress. High salinity stress decreased soil invertase and catalase activity. Using a next-generation, Illumina-based sequencing approach, we determined higher diversity of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil at high than low salinity. More than 15,500 valid reads were obtained, and Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria predominated in all samples, accounting for >80% of the reads. On a genus level, 636 genera were common to the low and high salinity treatments at 0–5 cm and 5–10 cm depth. The abundance of Steroidobacter and Sphingomonas was significantly decreased by increasing salinity. Higher Shannon and Chao 1 indices with increasing severity of salt stress indicated that high salt stress increased diversity in the bacterial communities. PMID:26852800

  1. Plasmid-encoded tetracycline efflux pump protein alters bacterial stress responses and ecological fitness of Acinetobacter oleivorans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyerim Hong

    Full Text Available Acquisition of the extracellular tetracycline (TC resistance plasmid pAST2 affected host gene expression and phenotype in the oil-degrading soil bacterium, Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1. Whole-transcriptome profiling of DR1 cells harboring pAST2 revealed that all the plasmid genes were highly expressed under TC conditions, and the expression levels of many host chromosomal genes were modulated by the presence of pAST2. The host energy burden imposed by replication of pAST2 led to (i lowered ATP concentrations, (ii downregulated expression of many genes involved in cellular growth, and (iii reduced growth rate. Interestingly, some phenotypes were restored by deleting the plasmid-encoded efflux pump gene tetH, suggesting that the membrane integrity changes resulting from the incorporation of efflux pump proteins also resulted in altered host response under the tested conditions. Alteration of membrane integrity by tetH deletion was shown by measuring permeability of fluorescent probe and membrane hydrophobicity. The presence of the plasmid conferred peroxide and superoxide resistance to cells, but only peroxide resistance was diminished by tetH gene deletion, suggesting that the plasmid-encoded membrane-bound efflux pump protein provided peroxide resistance. The downregulation of fimbriae-related genes presumably led to reduced swimming motility, but this phenotype was recovered by tetH gene deletion. Our data suggest that not only the plasmid replication burden, but also its encoded efflux pump protein altered host chromosomal gene expression and phenotype, which also alters the ecological fitness of the host in the environment.

  2. Placental morphology at different maternal hemoglobin levels: a histopathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the histopathological parameters of the placenta like weight, infarct and syncytial knots, at different maternal hemoglobin levels, in both qualitative and quantitative manner. Study design: Descriptive study Place and Duration of Study: Army Medical College, National University of Sciences and Technology in collaboration with Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from December 2011 to November 2012. Patients and Methods: A total of 75 placentas were included, that were collected from full term mothers at the time of childbirth. Placental weight was taken without umbilical cord and gross placental infarcts were noted. Samples of placental tissue were taken and stained by haematoxylin and eosin (H and E). Microscopic study was done to evaluate placental infarcts and syncytial knots. Results: Mean placental weight at normal and low maternal hemoglobin was 581.67 ± 83.97g and 482.58 ± 104.74g respectively. Gross placental infarcts were found in all cases having low maternal hemoglobin concentration (60% cases). Syncytial knots were found in all placentas but they were considerably more at decreasing levels of maternal hemoglobin (19.79 ± 5.22). Conclusion: The present study showed decrease in placental weight, increase in placental infarcts and syncytial knot hyperplasia at low maternal hemoglobin concentration, displaying adaptive alterations. (author)

  3. Production and characterization of alkaline protease from hemoglobin-degrading Bacillus pumilus NJM4 to produce fermented blood meal

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Dawei; Qu, Jiao; Chang, Peiwei; Tao, Yanhua; Yang, Deji

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research was to isolate the hemoglobin-degrading bacterial strain to produce fermented blood meal and to characterize the protease produced by this strain. The strain NJM4, a kind of hemoglobin-degrading bacterial strain, was isolated by blood agar plates from slaughterhouse and identified as a Bacillus pumilus by physiological, biochemical, and morphological characteristics and by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacillus pumilus NJM4 could degrade hemoglobin up to 85% in 36 h under ...

  4. Bacterial vaginosis, alterations in vaginal flora and HIV genital shedding among HIV-1-infected women in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Kirkcaldy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We investigated whether abnormal vaginal flora, including bacterial vaginosis (BV, are associated with detection of cervical HIV-1 RNA among HIV-infected women in Mozambique. Methods. We obtained clinical data and vaginal specimens from HIV-infected women registering for their first visit at one of two HIV care clinics in Mozambique. We compared women with detectable cervical HIV viral load (≥40 copies/ml with women with undetectable cervical HIV. Results. We enrolled 106 women. Women with abnormal vaginal flora (intermediate Nugent scores, 4 - 6 were more likely to have detectable cervical HIV RNA then women with normal vaginal flora (adjusted odds ratio 7.2 (95% confidence interval 1.8 - 29.1, adjusted for CD4 count. Women with BV had a non-significantly higher likelihood of detectable cervical HIV than women with normal flora. Conclusions. Abnormal vaginal flora were significantly associated with cervical HIV expression. Further research is needed to confirm this relationship.

  5. Water-limiting conditions alter the structure and biofilm-forming ability of bacterial multispecies communities in the alfalfa rhizosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Bogino

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities that adhere to biotic or abiotic surfaces and are enclosed in a protective matrix of extracellular compounds. An important advantage of the biofilm lifestyle for soil bacteria (rhizobacteria is protection against water deprivation (desiccation or osmotic effect. The rhizosphere is a crucial microhabitat for ecological, interactive, and agricultural production processes. The composition and functions of bacterial biofilms in soil microniches are poorly understood. We studied multibacterial communities established as biofilm-like structures in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa (alfalfa exposed to 3 experimental conditions of water limitation. The whole biofilm-forming ability (WBFA for rhizospheric communities exposed to desiccation was higher than that of communities exposed to saline or nonstressful conditions. A culture-dependent ribotyping analysis indicated that communities exposed to desiccation or saline conditions were more diverse than those under the nonstressful condition. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected strains showed that the rhizospheric communities consisted primarily of members of the Actinobacteria and α- and γ-Proteobacteria, regardless of the water-limiting condition. Our findings contribute to improved understanding of the effects of environmental stress factors on plant-bacteria interaction processes and have potential application to agricultural management practices.

  6. Nanoscale zerovalent iron alters soil bacterial community structure and inhibits chloroaromatic biodegradation potential in Aroclor 1242-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) has potential for the remediation of organochlorine-contaminated environments. Environmental safety concerns associated with in situ deployment of nZVI include potential negative impacts on indigenous microbes whose biodegradative functions could contribute to contaminant remediation. With respect to a two-step polychlorinated biphenyl remediation scenario comprising nZVI dechlorination followed by aerobic biodegradation, we examined the effect of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-coated nZVI (mean diameter = 12.5 nm) applied at 10 g nZVI kg−1 to Aroclor-1242 contaminated and uncontaminated soil over 28 days. nZVI had a limited effect on Aroclor congener profiles, but, either directly or indirectly via changes to soil physico-chemical conditions (pH, Eh), nZVI addition caused perturbation to soil bacterial community composition, and reduced the activity of chloroaromatic mineralizing microorganisms. We conclude that nZVI addition has the potential to inhibit microbial functions that could be important for PCB remediation strategies combining nZVI treatment and biodegradation. Highlights: ► Impact of nano-sized zerovalent iron on microbes was investigated in soil microcosms. ► Zerovalent iron had short-lived effects on redox potential and Aroclor dechlorination. ► Microbial populations also showed short-lived perturbations in their size. ► The activity of chloroaromatic degrading microbes did not recover within 28 days. ► Zerovalent iron application inhibits ensuing PCB bioremediative microbial functions. - nZVI inhibits microbial functions of potential importance for remediation strategies combining nZVI treatment and biodegradation.

  7. Acetyltransferase and human hemoglobin acetylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A minor component of human fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) is acetylated at the amino-terminus of the γ-globin chains. A similar minor component of Hb F is formed during translation of cord blood mRNA in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. The acetylation appeared to be enzymatic. This system contains an acetyltransferase capable of acetylating histones and hemoglobins. The enzyme, partially purified by histone-Sepharose affinity chromatography was capable of incorporating labeled acetyl- group from 1-[14C-acetyl]-CoA into both human Hb F0 and HB A0, but at a lower rate than for histones. Characterization of the labeled products indicated that the α-chains of both hemoglobins were being acetylated presumably at a lysyl-residue, but in the case of Hb F0 the amino-terminus of the γ-globin chains was acetylated as well. While histone-Sepharose bound more than 95% of the enzyme, Sepharose linked Hb F0, γ-globin chains, and Hb Bart's bound 14, 5, and 12% of the activity, respectively. Enzyme bound to these resins was not any more active on the hemoglobins than was the enzyme bound to the histone-Sepharose. The histone-Sepharose was also used to detect the enzyme in human cord blood red cells separated by dextran 40 density gradient centrifugation. Activity was found mostly in the young cells, and was directly related to the number of reticulocytes present in any one fraction

  8. Characteristic emission in glutaraldehyde polymerized hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemoglobin with different modifications has been investigated using spectroscopic techniques. A new emission at around 371 nm has been observed under excitation of 305 nm from glutaraldehyde polymerized human hemoglobin. Intensity and peak position of the emission are dependent on both oxidation state and ligand environment and the emission has been identified from the hemoglobin oligomer.

  9. Manipulation of hemoglobin expression affects Arabidopsis shoot organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaping; Elhiti, Mohamed; Hebelstrup, Kim H; Hill, Robert D; Stasolla, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Over the past few years non-symbiotic plant hemoglobins have been described in a variety of plant species where they fulfill several functions ranging from detoxification processes to basic aspects of plant growth and post-embryonic development. To date no information is available on the role of hemoglobins during in vitro morphogenesis. Shoot organogenesis was induced in Arabidopsis lines constitutively expressing class 1, 2 and 3 hemoglobins (GLB1, 2 and 3) and lines in which the respective genes were either downregulated by RNAi (GLB1) or knocked out (GLB2 and GLB3). The process was executed by culturing root explants on an initial auxin-rich callus induction medium (CIM) followed by a transfer onto a cytokinin-containing shoot induction medium (SIM). While the repression of GLB2 inhibited organogenesis the over-expression of GLB1 or GLB2 enhanced the number of shoots produced in culture, and altered the transcript levels of genes participating in cytokinin perception and signalling. The up-regulation of GLB1 or GLB2 activated CKI1 and AHK3, genes encoding cytokinin receptors and affected the transcript levels of cytokinin responsive regulators (ARRs). The expression of Type-A ARRs (ARR4, 5, 7, 15, and 16), feed-back repressors of the cytokinin pathway, was repressed in both hemoglobin over-expressors whereas that of several Type-B ARRs (ARR2, 12, and 13), transcription activators of cytokinin-responsive genes, was induced. Such changes enhanced the sensitivity of the root explants to cytokinin allowing the 35S::GLB1 and 35S::GLB2 lines to produce shoots at low cytokinin concentrations which did not promote organogenesis in the WT line. These results show that manipulation of hemoglobin can modify shoot organogenesis in Arabidopsis and possibly in those systems partially or completely unresponsive to applications of exogenous cytokinins. PMID:21741261

  10. Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low level of iron, folate , vitamin B12 , or vitamin B6 Other chronic illness, such as rheumatoid arthritis HIGHER ... Transfusion reaction - hemolytic Type 1 diabetes Vitamin B12 Vitamin B6 Update Date 2/24/2014 Updated by: Todd ...

  11. Altered expression of the CCN genes in the lungs of mice in response to cigarette smoke exposure and viral and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueugnon, Fabien; Thibault, Virginie C; Kearley, Jennifer; Petit-Courty, Agnès; Vallet, Amandine; Guillon, Antoine; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Humbles, Alison A; Courty, Yves

    2016-07-15

    The CCN proteins are key signaling and regulatory molecules involved in many biological functions and contribute to malignant and non-malignant lung diseases. Despite the high morbidity and mortality of the lung respiratory infectious diseases, there is very little data related to the expression of the CCNs during infection. We investigated in mice the pulmonary mRNA expression levels of five CCNs (1 to 5) in response to influenza A virus (IAV) and bacterial agents (Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA)). IAV, NTHi, LPS or LTA were instilled intranasally into mice. Mice were also exposed for 4days or 8weeks to cigarette smoke alone or prior infection to IAV in order to determine if CS modifies the CCN response to a viral infection. All challenges induced a robust inflammation. The mRNA expression of CCN1, CCN2 and CCN3 was decreased after short exposure to CS whereas prolonged exposure altered the expression of CCN1, CCN3 and CCN4. Influenza A virus infection increased CCN1, 2, 4 and 5 mRNA levels but expression of CCN3 was significantly decreased. Acute CS exposure prior infection had little effect on the expression of CCN genes but prolonged exposure abolished the IAV-dependent induction. Treatment with LPS or LTA and infection with NTHi revealed that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria rapidly modulate the expression of the CCN genes. Our findings reveal that several triggers of lung inflammation influence differently the CCN genes. CCN3 deserves special attention since its mRNA expression is decreased by all the triggers studied. PMID:27080955

  12. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  13. Hemoglobin and heme scavenger receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2010-01-01

    Heme, the functional group of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other hemoproteins, is a highly toxic substance when it appears in the extracellular milieu. To circumvent potential harmful effects of heme from hemoproteins released during physiological or pathological cell damage (such as hemolysis and......-binding haptoglobin and the receptor CD163, and b) the heme-binding hemopexin and the receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/CD91. Apart from the disclosure of the molecular basis for these important heme scavenging systems by identifying the functional link between the carrier proteins and the...

  14. Nanoscale spectroscopy and imaging of hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Yarrow, Fiona; Rice, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Sub diffraction limited infrared absorption imaging of hemoglobin was performed by coupling IR optics with an atomic force microscope. Comparisons between the AFM topography and IR absorption images of micron sized hemoglobin features are presented, along with nanoscale IR spectroscopic analysis of the metalloprotein.

  15. Led Astray by Hemoglobin A1c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jean; Diesburg-Stanwood, Amy; Bodor, Geza; Rasouli, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (A1c) is used frequently to diagnose and treat diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is important be aware of factors that may interfere with the accuracy of A1c measurements. This is a case of a rare hemoglobin variant that falsely elevated a nondiabetic patient’s A1c level and led to a misdiagnosis of diabetes. A 67-year-old male presented to endocrine clinic for further management after he was diagnosed with diabetes based on an elevated A1c of 10.7%, which is approximately equivalent to an average blood glucose of 260 mg/dL. Multiple repeat A1c levels remained >10%, but his home fasting and random glucose monitoring ranged from 92 to 130 mg/dL. Hemoglobin electrophoresis and subsequent genetic analysis diagnosed the patient with hemoglobin Wayne, a rare hemoglobin variant. This variant falsely elevates A1c levels when A1c is measured using cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. When the boronate affinity method was applied instead, the patient’s A1c level was actually 4.7%. Though hemoglobin Wayne is clinically silent, this patient was erroneously diagnosed with diabetes and started on an antiglycemic medication. Due to this misdiagnosis, the patient was at risk of escalation in his “diabetes management” and hypoglycemia. Therefore, it is important that providers are aware of factors that may result in hemoglobin A1c inaccuracy including hemoglobin variants. PMID:26848480

  16. Differences in fungal and bacterial physiology alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling: synthesizing effects of microbial community structure using the Fungi and Bacteria (FAB) model. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C. V.; Waring, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    Most biogeochemical models of soil carbon and nitrogen cycling include a simplified representation of the soil microbial community as a single pool, despite good evidence that shifts in the composition or relative abundance of microbial taxa can affect process rates. Incorporating a more realistic depiction of the microbial community in these models may increase their predictive accuracy, but this must be balanced against the feasibility of modeling the enormous diversity present in soil. We propose that explicitly including two major microbial functional groups with distinct physiologies, fungi and bacteria, will improve model predictions. To this end, we created the fungi and bacteria (FAB) model, building off previous enzyme-driven biogeochemical models that explicitly represent microbial physiology. We compared this model to a complementary biogeochemical model that does not include microbial community structure (';single-pool'). We also performed a cross-ecosystem meta-analysis of fungi-to-bacteria ratios to determine if model predictions of community structure matched empirical data. There were large differences in process rates and pool sizes between the single-pool and FAB models. In the FAB model, inorganic N pools were reduced by 5-95% depending on the soil C:N ratio due to bacterial immobilization of fungal mineralization products. This nitrogen subsidy also increased microbial biomass at some C:N ratios. Although there were changes in some components of respiration, particularly overflow respiration, there was no net effect of community structure on total respiration fluxes. The FAB model predicted a breakpoint in the relationship between the ratio of fungi to bacteria and soil C:N, after which the fungi-to-bacteria ratio should begin to increase. Break-point analysis of the meta-analysis data set revealed a consistent pattern and matched the slope of the change in F:B with soil C:N, but not the precise breakpoint. We argue that including microbial

  17. Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myeloma (Video) Multiple Myeloma Additional Content Medical News Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases By Alan E. ... Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Thalassemias Hemoglobin C, S- ...

  18. Nadir Hemoglobin Levels after Discontinuation of Epoetin in Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo, Jose A.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Meyer, Klemens B.; Weiner, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: In hemodialysis patients, both hemoglobin variability and targeting normalization of hemoglobin may have adverse consequences. There are few data on epoetin management in patients achieving high hemoglobin levels.

  19. Increasing addition of autochthonous to allochthonous carbon in nutrient-rich aquatic systems stimulates carbon consumption but does not alter bacterial community composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Attermeyer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations – mainly of terrestrial origin – are increasing worldwide in inland waters. The biodegradability of the DOC varies depending on quantity and chemical quality. Heterotrophic bacteria are the main consumers of DOC and thus determine DOC temporal dynamics and availability for higher trophic levels. It is therefore crucial to understand the processes controlling the bacterial turnover of additional allochthonous and autochthonous DOC in aquatic systems. Our aim was to study bacterial carbon (C turnover with respect to DOC quantity and chemical quality using both allochthonous and autochthonous DOC sources. We incubated a natural bacterial community with allochthonous C (13C-labeled beech leachate and increased concentrations and pulses (intermittent occurrence of organic matter input of autochthonous C (algae lysate. We then determined bacterial carbon consumption, activities, and community composition together with the carbon flow through bacteria using stable C isotopes. The chemical analysis of single sources revealed differences in aromaticity and fractions of low and high molecular weight substances (LMWS and HMWS, respectively between allochthonous and autochthonous C sources. In parallel to these differences in chemical composition, we observed a higher availability of allochthonous C as evidenced by increased DOC consumption and bacterial growth efficiencies (BGE when solely allochthonous C was provided. In treatments with mixed sources, rising concentrations of added autochthonous DOC resulted in a further, significant increase in bacterial DOC consumption from 52 to 68% when nutrients were not limiting. This rise was accompanied by a decrease in the humic substances (HS fraction and an increase in bacterial biomass. Stable C isotope analyses of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA and respired dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC supported a preferential assimilation of autochthonous C and respiration

  20. Complete amino acid sequence of globin chains and biological activity of fragmented crocodile hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srihongthong, Saowaluck; Pakdeesuwan, Anawat; Daduang, Sakda; Araki, Tomohiro; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-08-01

    Hemoglobin, α-chain, β-chain and fragmented hemoglobin of Crocodylus siamensis demonstrated both antibacterial and antioxidant activities. Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the hemoglobin did not depend on the heme structure but could result from the compositions of amino acid residues and structures present in their primary structure. Furthermore, thirteen purified active peptides were obtained by RP-HPLC analyses, corresponding to fragments in the α-globin chain and the β-globin chain which are mostly located at the N-terminal and C-terminal parts. These active peptides operate on the bacterial cell membrane. The globin chains of Crocodylus siamensis showed similar amino acids to the sequences of Crocodylus niloticus. The novel amino acid substitutions of α-chain and β-chain are not associated with the heme binding site or the bicarbonate ion binding site, but could be important through their interactions with membranes of bacteria. PMID:22648692

  1. Interaction of Human Hemoglobin with Methotrexate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, M.; Gradinaru, R.

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on the interaction between methotrexate and human hemoglobin using steady-state ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence quenching methods. Fluorescence quenching was found to be valuable in assessing drug binding to hemoglobin. The quenching of methotrexate is slightly smaller than the quenching observed with related analogs (dihydrofolate and tetrahydrofolate). The quenching studies were performed at four different temperatures and various pH values. The number of binding sites for tryptophan is ~1. Parameter-dependent assays revealed that electrostatic forces play an essential role in the methotrexate-hemoglobin interaction. Furthermore, the complex was easily eluted using gel filtration chromatography.

  2. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  3. An unprecedented alteration in mode of action of IsCT resulting its translocation into bacterial cytoplasm and inhibition of macromolecular syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Jitendra K; Kathuria, Manoj; Kumar, Amit; Mitra, Kalyan; Ghosh, Jimut K

    2015-01-01

    IsCT, a 13-residue, non-cell-selective antimicrobial peptide is comprised of mostly hydrophobic residues and lesser cationic residues. Assuming that placement of an additional positive charge in the non-polar face of IsCT could reduce its hydrophobic interaction, resulting in its reduction of cytotoxicity, an analog, I9K-IsCT was designed. Two more analogs, namely, E7K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT, were designed to investigate the impact of positive charges in the polar face as well as polar and non-polar faces at a time. These amino acid substitutions resulted in a significant enhancement of therapeutic potential of IsCT. IsCT and E7K-IsCT seem to target bacterial membrane for their anti-bacterial activity. However, I9K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT inhibited nucleic acid and protein syntheses in tested E. coli without perturbing its membrane. This was further supported by the observation that NBD-IsCT localized onto bacterial membrane while NBD-labeled I9K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT translocated into bacterial cytoplasm. Interestingly, IsCT and E7K-IsCT were significantly helical while I9K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT were mostly unstructured with no helix content in presence of mammalian and bacterial membrane-mimetic lipid vesicles. Altogether, the results identify two novel cell-selective analogs of IsCT with new prototype amino acid sequences that can translocate into bacterial cytoplasm without any helical structure and inhibit macromolecular syntheses. PMID:25773522

  4. Moessbauer study of hemoglobin of diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hemoglobins from normal adults (Gly-Hb 5%), people infected with diabetes (Gly-Hb 10%) and serious diabetics (Gly-Hb 15%) were investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy at liquid nitrogen temperature. All the experimental spectra of hemoglobin are composed of three doublets corresponding to oxy-hemoglobin (Oxy-Hb), deoxy-hemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) and low-spin hemo-chrome (Ls-Hemo) respectively. It is found that Oxy-Hb is decreasing but Deoxy-hb increasing for diabetes. Experimental results also indicate that the line-width of Moessbauer spectra of Oxy-Hb for diabetics is narrower than that for normal adults, showing that while Fe on Oxy-Hb exists in pile-up of some similar states for normal adults, but it becomes in single state for serious diabetes

  5. Stabilized hemoglobins as acellular resuscitative fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, L C; Green, A; Noga, B; Cerny, E R

    1992-01-01

    This study reports some recent work dealing with the stabilization of the tetramers of hemoglobin. It is shown that by using a variety of diacids, it is possible to increase the P50 above that of stroma free hemoglobin. In order to lengthen the retention times in the circulatory system, the stabilized hemoglobins were complexed with both hydroxyethyl starch polymers and polyol tetronic polymers. The resulting hemoglobin-polymer compounds were then freeze-dried. It was possible to reconstitute the powder by the addition of physiological saline when needed. The methods presented here appear to be appear to be as effective as using pyridoxal phosphate but at a fraction of the cost. PMID:1391448

  6. Optical Marking of Alcohol Induced Hemoglobin Modification

    CERN Document Server

    Vlokh, R; Moroz, O; Nastishin, Yu; Dudok, K; Dudok, T; Grinchishin, N; Nechiporenko, I; Hul, A

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that conformational modifications of Hb induced by ethanol consumption can be visualized in optical spectra studying oxygenation kinetics of hemoglobin or mixing hemoglobin with Cibacron blue dye. Better dye affinity of blood proteins extracted from alcoholised rats with respect to those from non-alcoholised ones confirms that ethanol and its metabolites induce structural pathologies in blood protein molecules. The detected changes for the case of the posterity of intoxicated animals may be explained as a post-translation modification, as well as a disturbance of the structure and function of tissue cellular gene mechanism for the blood creation. It is established that alcohol intake during first four months leads to the decrease of fractional weight of oxyhemoglobin and to the increase of methemoglobin amount in blood. Further alcohol consumption is accompanied by recovering of the normal level of hemoglobin derivatives in blood. Normalization of the fractional weight of hemoglobin derivati...

  7. Low hemoglobin deferral in blood donors

    OpenAIRE

    Mast, Alan E.

    2013-01-01

    Low hemoglobin deferral occurs in about 10% of attempted whole blood donations and commonly is a consequence of iron deficiency anemia. Pre-menopausal women often have iron deficiency anemia caused by menstruation and pregnancy and have low hemoglobin deferral on their first donation attempt. Frequent donors also develop iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia because blood donation removes a large amount of iron from the donor and the 56-day minimum inter-donation interval for donors in t...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  9. 21 CFR 864.5620 - Automated hemoglobin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated hemoglobin system. 864.5620 Section 864....5620 Automated hemoglobin system. (a) Identification. An automated hemoglobin system is a fully... hemoglobin content of human blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  10. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470... Hemoglobin immunological test system. (a) Indentification. A hemoglobin immunological test system is a device... hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) in blood, urine, plasma, or other body...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  12. Sensitivity of Routine Tests for Urine Protein to Hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Barbara S.; Lumsden, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of canine hemoglobin were added to aliquots of urine and saline to determine the relative sensitivity of several hemoglobin and protein detection methods including commercial reagent strips and sulfosalicylic acid. The hemoglobin detection pads of the reagent strips were 50 times more sensitive than the protein detection pads, indicating the presence of hemoglobin at a concentration of 0.001 g/L whereas the protein pads did not react positively unless the hemoglobin ...

  13. Within-host evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward iron acquisition from hemoglobin in polymicrobial CF infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær;

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens require iron to survive and colonize a human host but their access to free iron is often limited by iron-withholding process where free iron is bound by proteins such as hemoglobin. Although most pathogens have developed tactics to acquire iron from host proteins, little is...

  14. Effects of altered groundwater chemistry upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial attachment during transport within an organically contaminated sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Barber, L.B.; Aiken, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a dilute (ionic strength = 5 ?? 10-3 M) plume of treated sewage, with elevated levels (3.9 mg/L) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial transport through an iron-laden, quartz sand aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) were evaluated using sets of replicate, static minicolumns. Compared with uncontaminated groundwater, the plume chemistry diminished bacterial attachment under mildly acidic (pH 5.0-6.5) in-situ conditions, in spite of the 5-fold increase in ionic strength and substantively enhanced attachment under more alkaline conditions. The effects of the hydrophobic neutral and total fractions of the plume DOC; modest concentrations of fulvic and humic acids (1.5 mg/L); linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) (25 mg/L); Imbentin (200 ??g/L), a model nonionic surfactant; sulfate (28 mg/L); and calcium (20 mg/L) varied sharply in response to relatively small changes in pH, although the plume constituents collectively decreased the pH-dependency of bacterial attachment. LAS and other hydrophobic neutrals (collectively representing only ???3% of the plume DOC) had a disproportionately large effect upon bacterial attachment, as did the elevated concentrations of sulfate within the plume. The findings further suggest that the roles of organic plume constituents in transport or bacteria through acidic aquifer sediments can be very different than would be predicted from column studies performed at circumneutral pH and that the inorganic constituents within the plume cannot be ignored.

  15. Seasonal influence on hematologic values and hemoglobin electrophoresis in Brazilian boa constrictor amarali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Carla C; Silva, Luis F N; Ramos, Paulo R R; Takahira, Regina K

    2006-12-01

    As ectothermic animals, snakes depend exclusively on the environment for proper temperature maintenance, which may greatly influence their activity. Twenty-five adult Boa constrictor amarali snakes maintained in captivity were used to determine the influence of seasons on their hematologic values and electrophoretic profile of hemoglobin. A complete blood cell count (CBC) and examination for hemoparasites were performed in the summer and winter of 2004. Hemoglobin was stored for later electrophoresis. Significant differences (P < 0.05) were obtained in RBC, WBC, lymphocyte, thrombocyte, and monocyte counts, demonstrating the importance of the period of the year in the interpretation of reference values in these animals. Two snakes were detected with blood parasites (Hepatozoon sp.) in the winter and four in the summer, although it appears that their presence did not cause any significant alterations in the CBC. The electrophoretic analysis of the samples demonstrated two-four hemoglobin bands in this species. PMID:17315433

  16. Hemoglobin, ferritin and thyroid profile in women with chronic telogen effluvium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayashankar C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Results: One hundred patients with a mean age of 29 years, of which 35% in the age group 18-25 years participated in the study. Prevalence of CTE was high (91% in the age group 18-40 years. Most of the women (71% presented with complaints of hair loss, within 12 months of occurrence. Hemoglobin levels were found to be significantly low in 66%, low serum ferritin in 76%, and hypothyroidism in 24% of patients. Out of the 66 women with altered blood hemoglobin levels, 72.7% has significant stress levels and 60.4% of them were working women. Ten patients had significantly low serum ferritin levels of < 40 and #956;g/L, in spite of having normal hemoglobin levels. Nine patients had low serum ferritin and low thyroid levels. As many as eight patients had lower than normal levels of all the three markers. Conclusions: A significant number of patients had low hemoglobin, serum ferritin and thyroid levels, confirming a strong association of anemic conditions with CTE. Therefore, hemoglobin level, serum ferritin and thyroid levels need to be determined in CTE patients. Stress also plays a significant role in the causation of hair loss in women. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(1.000: 152-155

  17. Early administration of probiotics alters bacterial colonization and limits diet-induced gut dysfunction and severity of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siggers, Richard H; Siggers, Jayda; Boye, Mette; Thymann, Thomas; Mølbak, Lars; Leser, Thomas; Jensen, Bent B; Sangild, Per T

    2008-08-01

    Following preterm birth, bacterial colonization and enteral formula feeding predispose neonates to gut dysfunction and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a serious gastrointestinal inflammatory disease. We hypothesized that administration of probiotics would beneficially influence early bacterial colonization, thereby reducing the susceptibility to formula-induced gut atrophy, dysfunction, and NEC. Caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were provided total parenteral nutrition (1.5 d) followed by enteral feeding (2 d) with porcine colostrum (COLOS; n = 5), formula (FORM; n = 9), or formula with probiotics (FORM-P; Bifidobacterium animalis and Lactobacillus: L. acidophilus, L. casei, L. pentosus, L. plantarum; n = 13). Clinical NEC scores were reduced (P < 0.05) in FORM-P (2.0 +/- 0.2) and COLOS groups (1.7 +/- 0.5) compared with FORM pigs (3.4 +/- 0.6). Lower NEC scores were associated with elevated intestinal weight, mucosa proportion, villus height, RNA integrity, and brush border aminopeptidase A and N activities, and lower gastric organic acid concentration in the FORM-P and COLOS groups (P < 0.05). Diversity of the mucosa-associated bacteria in the distal small intestine was similar among formula-fed pigs, yet the abundance of specific bacterial groups differed between FORM-P and FORM pigs. FORM-P pigs had lower colonization density of a potential pathogen, Clostridium perfringens, and had commensal Lactobacillus bacteria more closely associated with enterocytes along the villus-crypt axis relative to FORM pigs. These results suggest that probiotic administration immediately after birth promotes the colonization of a beneficial commensal microbiota capable of limiting the formula-induced mucosal atrophy, dysfunction, and pathogen load in preterm neonates, thereby reducing the incidence and severity of NEC. PMID:18641188

  18. New lactic acid bacterial strains from traditional Mongolian fermented milk products have altered adhesion to porcine gastric mucin depending on the carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Seishi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Moriya, Naoko; Takenaka, Akio; Suzuki, Chise

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of lactic acid bacteria to the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is a major property of probiotics. Here, we examined the ability of 21 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented milk products in Mongolia to adhere to porcine gastric mucin in vitro. Higher attachment was observed with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains 6-8 and 8-1 than with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (positive control). Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain 7-1 adhered to mucin as effectively as did strain GG. Heat inactivation decreased the adhesive ability of strains 6-8 and 8-1 but did not affect strain 7-1. The adhesion of strains 6-8, 7-1 and 8-1 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with periodate and trypsin, indicating that proteinaceous and carbohydrate-like cell surface compounds are involved in the adhesion of these strains. The adhesion of strain 7-1 was affected by the type of carbohydrate present in the growth medium, being higher with fructose than with lactose, galactose or xylose as the carbon source. The sugar content of 7-1 cells grown on various carbohydrates was negatively correlated with its adhesive ability. We provide new probiotic candidate strains and new information regarding carbohydrate preference that influences lactic acid bacterial adhesion to mucin. PMID:25186082

  19. Nitrosyl hemoglobins: EPR above 80 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EPR spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin and myoglobin in different conditions (native, denatured and lyophilized), as well as of hematin-NO were obtained in the temperature range of 80 K-280 K. There is a substantial and reversible.decrease of the areas of the EPR spectra of all the hemoglobin samples above 150 K. The interpretation of the results implies the existence of two conformational states in thermal equilibrium only one of which is EPR detectable. Thermodynamical parameters are determined for the hexa and penta-coordinated cases. (author). 25 refs, 3 figs

  20. Nitrosyl hemoglobins: EPR above 80 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wajnberg, E.; Bemski, G.; El-Jaick, L.J.; Alves, O.C.

    1995-03-01

    The EPR spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin and myoglobin in different conditions (native, denatured and lyophilized), as well as of hematin-NO were obtained in the temperature range of 80 K-280 K. There is a substantial and reversible.decrease of the areas of the EPR spectra of all the hemoglobin samples above 150 K. The interpretation of the results implies the existence of two conformational states in thermal equilibrium only one of which is EPR detectable. Thermodynamical parameters are determined for the hexa and penta-coordinated cases. (author). 25 refs, 3 figs.

  1. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Heme Biosynthetic Mutants Utilize Heme and Hemoglobin as a Heme Source but Fail To Grow within Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Paul C; Thomas, Christopher E.; Elkins, Christopher; Clary, Susan; Sparling, P F

    1998-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens, including pathogenic neisseriae, can use heme as an iron source for growth. To study heme utilization by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, two heme biosynthetic mutants were constructed, one with a mutation in hemH (the gene encoding ferrochelatase) and one with a mutation in hemA (the gene encoding γ-glutamyl tRNA reductase). The hemH mutant failed to grow without an exogenous supply of heme or hemoglobin, whereas the hemA mutant failed to grow unless heme, hemoglobin, or heme...

  2. Myeloid cell sirtuin-1 expression does not alter host immune responses to Gram-negative endotoxemia or Gram-positive bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Crotty Alexander

    Full Text Available The role of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1 in innate immunity, and in particular the influence of SIRT1 on antimicrobial defense against infection, has yet to be reported but is important to define since SIRT1 inhibitors are being investigated as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer, Huntington's disease, and autoimmune diseases. Given the therapeutic potential of SIRT1 suppression, we sought to characterize the role of SIRT1 in host defense. Utilizing both pharmacologic methods and a genetic knockout, we demonstrate that SIRT1 expression has little influence on macrophage and neutrophil antimicrobial functions. Myeloid SIRT1 expression does not change mortality in gram-negative toxin-induced shock or gram-positive bacteremia, suggesting that therapeutic suppression of SIRT1 may be done safely without suppression of myeloid cell-specific immune responses to severe bacterial infections.

  3. The ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase UCH-L1 promotes bacterial invasion by altering the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basseres, Eugene; Coppotelli, Giuseppe; Pfirrmann, Thorsten;

    2010-01-01

    Invasion of eukaryotic target cells by pathogenic bacteria requires extensive remodelling of the membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Here we show that the remodelling process is regulated by the ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase UCH-L1 that promotes the invasion of epithelial cells by Listeria monocyto...... findings highlight a previously unrecognized involvement of the ubiquitin cycle in bacterial entry. UCH-L1 is highly expressed in malignant cells that may therefore be particularly susceptible to invasion by bacteria-based drug delivery systems.......Invasion of eukaryotic target cells by pathogenic bacteria requires extensive remodelling of the membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Here we show that the remodelling process is regulated by the ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase UCH-L1 that promotes the invasion of epithelial cells by Listeria...

  4. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Gardner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs. Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry.

  5. Unrecognized hemoglobin SE disease as microcytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Avery; Cooper, Barry; Guileyardo, Joseph; Mora, Adan

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin SE disease was first described during the 1950s as a relatively benign microcytosis, but increasing prevalence has revealed a predisposition towards vasoocclusive sickling. Recognition of SE hemoglobinopathies’ potential complications is crucial so medical measures can be utilized to avoid multiorgan injury.

  6. Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S- ... Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S- ...

  7. Alpha chain hemoglobins with electrophoretic mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcilene Rezende Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize alpha-chain variant hemoglobins with electric mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program. METHODS: βS allele and alpha-thalassemia deletions were investigated in 14 children who had undefined hemoglobin at birth and an electrophoretic profile similar to that of hemoglobin S when they were six months old. Gene sequencing and restriction enzymes (DdeI, BsaJI, NlaIV, Bsu36I and TaqI were used to identify hemoglobins. Clinical and hematological data were obtained from children who attended scheduled medical visits. RESULTS: The following alpha chain variants were found: seven children with hemoglobin Hasharon [alpha2 47(CE5 Asp>His, HbA2:c.142G>C], all associated with alpha-thalassemia, five with hemoglobin Ottawa [alpha1 15(A13 Gly>Arg, HBA1:c.46G>C], one with hemoglobin St Luke's [alpha1 95(G2 Pro>Arg, HBA1:c.287C>G] and another one with hemoglobin Etobicoke [alpha212 84(F5 Ser>Arg, HBA212:c.255C>G]. Two associations with hemoglobin S were found: one with hemoglobin Ottawa and one with hemoglobin St Luke's. The mutation underlying hemoglobin Etobicoke was located in a hybrid α212 allele in one child. There was no evidence of clinically relevant hemoglobins detected in this study. CONCLUSION: Apparently these are the first cases of hemoglobin Ottawa, St Luke's, Etobicoke and the α212 gene described in Brazil. The hemoglobins detected in this study may lead to false diagnosis of sickle cell trait or sickle cell disease when only isoelectric focusing is used in neonatal screening. Additional tests are necessary for the correct identification of hemoglobin variants.

  8. Experimental drought reduces the transfer of recently fixed plant carbon to soil microbes and alters the bacterial community composition in a mountain meadow

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchslueger, Lucia; Bahn, Michael; Fritz, Karina; Hasibeder, Roland; Richter, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Drought affects plants and soil microorganisms, but it is still not clear how it alters the carbon (C) transfer at the plant–microbial interface. Here, we tested direct and indirect effects of drought on soil microbes and microbial turnover of recent plant-derived C in a mountain meadow. Microbial community composition was assessed using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs); the allocation of recent plant-derived C to microbial groups was analysed by pulse-labelling of canopy sections with 13CO2 ...

  9. Computation of Plasma Hemoglobin Nitric Oxide Scavenging in Hemolytic Anemias

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffers, Anne; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    Intravascular hemoglobin limits the amount of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) available for vasodilation. Cell-free hemoglobin scavenges NO more efficiently than red blood cell encapsulated hemoglobin. Hemolysis has recently been suggested to contribute to endothelial dysfunction based on a mechanism of NO scavenging by cell-free hemoglobin. Although experimental evidence for this phenomenon has been presented, support from a theoretical approach has, until now, been missing. Indeed, du...

  10. Rate of Nitric Oxide Scavenging by hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Azarov, Ivan; He, Xiaojun; Jeffers, Anne; Basu, Swati; Ucer, Burak; Hantgan, Roy R.; Levy, Andrew; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-free hemoglobin, released from the red cell, may play a major role in regulating the bioavailability of nitric oxide. The abundant serum protein haptoglobin, rapidly binds to free hemoglobin forming a stable complex accelerating its clearance. The haptoglobin gene is polymorphic with two classes of alleles denoted 1 and 2. We have previously demonstrated that the haptoglobin 1 protein-hemoglobin complex is cleared twice as fast as the haptoglobin 2 protein-hemoglobin complex. In this rep...

  11. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864.7415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455... assay. (a) Identification. A fetal hemoglobin assay is a device that is used to determine the presence... hemoglobin present. The assay may be used to detect fetal red cells in the maternal circulation or to...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. 864.7470 Section 864.7470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A glycosylated hemoglobin assay is a device used to...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7400 - Hemoglobin A2 assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin A2 assay. 864.7400 Section 864.7400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... assay. (a) Identification. A hemoglobin A2 assay is a device used to determine the hemoglobin A2...

  16. Self-Assembly of a Functional Triple Protein: Hemoglobin-Avidin-Hemoglobin via Biotin-Avidin Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Serena; Kluger, Ronald

    2016-05-24

    Hypertension resulting from vasoconstriction in clinical trials of cross-linked tetrameric (α2β2) human hemoglobins implicates the extravasation of the hemoglobins into endothelia where they scavenge nitric oxide (NO), which is the signal for relaxation of the surrounding smooth muscle. Thus, we sought an efficient route to create a larger species that avoids extravasation while maintaining the oxygenation function of hemoglobin. Selectively formed cysteine-linked biotin conjugates of hemoglobin undergo self-assembly with avidin into a stable triple protein, hemoglobin-avidin-hemoglobin (HbAvHb), which binds and releases oxygen with moderate affinity and cooperativity. The triple protein is likely to be stabilized by interactions of each constituent hemoglobin (pI 6.9) with the oppositely charged avidin (pI 10.5) as well as the strong association of the biotin moieties on hemoglobin with avidin. PMID:27126305

  17. Insulin-induced lipid binding to hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA NIKETIC

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Under hypoglycemic conditions, concomitant hyperinsulinism causes an apparent modification of hemoglobin (Hb which is manifested by its aggregation (Niketi} et al., Clin. Chim. Acta 197 (1991 47. In the present work the causes and mechanisms underlying this Hb modification were studied. Hemoglobin isolated from normal erythrocytes incubated with insulin was analyzed by applying 31P-spectrometry and lipid extraction and analysis. To study the dynamics of the plasma membrane during hyperinsulinism, a fluorescent lipid-analog was applied. In the presence of insulin, phosphatidylserine (PS, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and cholesterol were found to bind to Hb. Lipid binding resulted in Hb aggregation, a condition that can be reproduced when phospholipids are incubated with Hb in vitro. Using a fluorescent lipid-analog, it was also shown that exposing erythrocytes to supraphysiological concentrations of insulin in vitro resulted in the internalization of lipids. The results presented in this work may have relevance to cases of diabetes mellitus and hypoglycemia.

  18. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Chunhai Fan; Shiping Song; Haiping Wu; Lihua Wang; Xiaofang Hu; Runguang Sun; Bo Zhou

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb) and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN) on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated...

  19. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated Polymers

  20. Functional behavior of tortoise hemoglobin Geochelone denticulata

    OpenAIRE

    TORSONI M. A.; STOPPA G. R.; A. Turra; OGO S. H.

    2002-01-01

    The hemolysate from Geochelone denticulata contains two main hemoglobin components, as shown by ion exchange chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Electrophoresis under dissociating conditions showed three types of globin chains. The apparent molecular mass, as determined by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200, was compatible with tetrameric Hb, which was unable to polymerize. The G. denticulata Hb has a P50 value of 9.56 mm Hg at pH 7.4. The Hb oxygenation appears to be ...

  1. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsheye, Idowu; Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Solovieff, Nadia; Ngo, Duyen; Baldwin, Clinton T; Sebastiani, Paola; Chui, David H K; Steinberg, Martin H

    2011-07-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the major genetic modulator of the hematologic and clinical features of sickle cell disease, an effect mediated by its exclusion from the sickle hemoglobin polymer. Fetal hemoglobin genes are genetically regulated, and the level of HbF and its distribution among sickle erythrocytes is highly variable. Some patients with sickle cell disease have exceptionally high levels of HbF that are associated with the Senegal and Saudi-Indian haplotype of the HBB-like gene cluster; some patients with different haplotypes can have similarly high HbF. In these patients, high HbF is associated with generally milder but not asymptomatic disease. Studying these persons might provide additional insights into HbF gene regulation. HbF appears to benefit some complications of disease more than others. This might be related to the premature destruction of erythrocytes that do not contain HbF, even though the total HbF concentration is high. Recent insights into HbF regulation have spurred new efforts to induce high HbF levels in sickle cell disease beyond those achievable with the current limited repertory of HbF inducers. PMID:21490337

  2. Hemoglobin profiles of siblings of thalassemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Riza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies are the most common inherited disorders in many areas of the world, including South East Asia. The siblings of thalassemia major is a group of high risk to carry the gene of thalassemia. Determining the carrier is useful for early treatment planning and prevention to the next child. Objective To determine carrier status among siblings of thalassemia patients using a capillary electrophoresis system. Methods A cross-sectional study on the siblings of thalassemia major patients was performed from January 2011 to February 2012 at Dr. Moewardi Hospital. Complete blood counts were performed in the siblings. Subjects with mean corpuscular volume (MCV <80 fl and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH <27 pg were subjected to analize hemoglobin fraction by capillary electrophoresis. Results Of the 26 subjects, there were 12 males and 14 females. The mean age was 9.38 (SD 6.8 years (range 1 to 29 years. From the siblings, 10 were identified as normal, 5 were identified as ß thalassemia carriers and 5 were hemoglobin E (HbE carriers. Six siblings were diagnosed with ß thalassemia/ HbE. Conclusion There are high occurrence of the two common types of thalassemia carriers (ß and HbE in our small group of subjects who had a family history of thalassemia. Most of the siblings of thalassemia had low MCV and MCH. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:70-3.].

  3. Effect of guanidine hydrochloride and buffers of various pH on irradiated preparations of human hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn·HCl) and buffers of various pH on irradiated human hemoglobin (Hb) was studied. The hemoglobin denaturation course was monitored by alterations in the Soret band absorbance after conversion to the form of methemoglobin (MetHb). It was found that irradiated Hb preparations modified by the action of water radiolysis products are heterogeneous in resistance to the action of Gdn·HCl and hydrogen ions and apart from the fraction of lowered stability (more rapidly denaturing) contain molecules of segmented stability. (author)

  4. Protein-Based Blood Substitutes: Recent Attempts at Controlling Pro-Oxidant Reactivity with and Beyond Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Silaghi-Dumitrescu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed here are recent attempts to produce protein-based artificial oxygen carriers (“blood substitutes”. Most of these involve chemical or physical modifications on hemoglobin, although a recent line of research using hemerythrin instead of hemoglobin is also described. The focus is set on the extent to which these modifications alter the redox reactivity of the proteins, and on ways in which this can be done systematically and purposefully, within the framework of a working hypothesis where redox side-reactions hold an important role in the physiological outcome of experimental transfusions with artificial oxygen carriers.

  5. A Moessbauer study of hemoglobin in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 57Fe Moessbauer spectra of concentrated hemoglobin (Hb) of normal subjects and six patients with Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) were studied at 300deg K and 77 K. PNH is a very rate autoimmune hematological disease. The possibility of structural alterations of Hb induced by, or as part of the altered PNH-red cell membrane was the objective of this study. The Moessbauer parameters of the Hb of the normal subjects, both at 300 K and at 77 K, are identical to values previously reported. The PNH-Hb spectra show clear differences. They are wider and more asymmetric. At 77 K, an extra doublet grows in with an isomer shift of 0.425 mm/sec. and a quadrupolar splitting of 1.951 mm/sec. The other two doublets have δ's and ΔQ's slightly, but significantly, different from the corresponding values for normal Hb. These results are rationalized in terms of a population of Hb molecules with structures varying very slightly in a narrow range. The spread in structures manifests itself in a wider and more asymmetric Moessbauer spectrum. (orig.)

  6. The interaction of alcohol radicals with human hemoglobin. Pt. 1. Spectral properties of hemoglobin in the visible range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous deoxyhemoglobin solutions (2 mg/ml) were gamma-irradiated by a 60Co source in the presence of methanol, ethanol, 1-butanol and t-butanol under N2O or argon. The effects of the interaction of the particular alcohol radical species with hemoglobin were determined according to the detected spectral alterations in the visible range. The amounts of stable final products in the form of methemoglobin (MetHb) and the sum of hemichromes and cholehemichromes (Hemichr) were estimated in irradiated preparations. For preparations irradiated under N2O, the radiation yield for MetHb formation was three-fold lower in the presence of ethanol and 1-butanol [G(MetHb) = 0.33[ compared with preparations irradiated in the presence of t-butanol or without alcohol [G(MetHb) = 1.00[. The yield of hemichromes and cholehemichromes in preparations irradiated under N2O increased in the order: ethanol (G = 0.38), 1-butanol (B = 0.52), t-butanol (G = 0.59), and in the absence of alcohol (G 0.72). The high effectivity of t-butanol radicals for iron oxidation and Hb destruction is apparently due to their oxidative properties, compared with the other radicals. It was also shown that ethanol radicals reduce MetHb 10 times more effectively [G(Fe(II)) = 2.5[ compared with t-butanol radicals [G(Fe(II)) = 0.24[. For samples irradiated under argon all the observed changes were similar, regardless of the presence of alcohols. This effect can be attributed to reconstruction reactions of Hb molecules in the presence of both oxidizing (OH or t-but.) and reducing agents (e-aq). The following sequence of effectivities of water radiolysis products and secondary alcohol radicals for hemoglobin destruction has been identified: meth., eth. → 1-but. → e-aq → t-but. → .OH. (orig.)

  7. A new hemoglobin gene from soybean: a role for hemoglobin in all plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, C R; Jensen, E O; LLewellyn, D J; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated a new hemoglobin gene from soybean. It is expressed in cotyledons, stems of seedlings, roots, young leaves, and in some cells in the nodules that are associated with the nitrogen-fixing Bradyrhizobium symbiont. This contrasts with the expression of the leghemoglobins, which are...... active only in the infected cells of the nodules. The deduced protein sequence of the new gene shows only 58% similarity to one of the soybean leghemoglobins, but 85-87% similarity to hemoglobins from the nonlegumes Parasponia, Casuarina, and barley. The pattern of expression and the gene sequence...

  8. Hemoglobin binding activity and hemoglobin-binding protein of prevotella nigrescens

    OpenAIRE

    Miyashita M; Oishi S; Kiso A; Kikuchi Y; Ueda O; Hirai K; Shibata Y; Fujimura S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Prevotella nigrescens, lacking siderophores was found to bind to the hemoproteins. The binding was observed also in the envelope which was prepared by sonication of the cell. The binding occurred in the pH-dependent manner; the binding was observed below neutral pHs of the incubation mixtures but only slightly observed in the neutral and alkaline pHs. Furthermore, hemoglobin bound to the envelope was dissociated at high pHs buffers. Maximum amounts of hemoglobin bound to 1 mg envelop...

  9. Ability of Vibrio vulnificus to obtain iron from hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes.

    OpenAIRE

    Zakaria-Meehan, Z; Massad, G; Simpson, L M; Travis, J C; Oliver, J D

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that the normal serum protein, haptoglobin (Hp), serves a bacteriostatic role by binding free hemoglobin (Hm), thus making heme iron unavailable for bacterial growth. Previous studies showed that, unlike Escherichia coli, Vibrio vulnificus was able to overcome this Hp-blocking effect. We report here a study on the iron-withholding property of the three major human Hp phenotypes, Hp 1, 2, and 2-1. Results of experiments with human serum showed that V. vulnificus C7184 was...

  10. Phenazine Production in The Presence of Heavy Metals in Recombinant Erwinia herbicola Bearing the Hemoglobin Gene

    OpenAIRE

    KAHRAMAN, Hüseyin; Emel AYTAN; GİRAY KURT, Aslı; Duygu ÖZCAN

    2014-01-01

    In this study, from Vitreoscilla sp. recombinant strains were obtained from cloned bacterial hemoglobin (VHb) gene (vgb) Eh [pUC8:15] and its wild-type strain Erwinia herbicola phenazine production in the presence of heavy metals were investigated. Time-dependent production of phenazine in the wild bacteria not shows a significant change. In generally, at the end of 96 hours in the presence of Pb in terms of production of wild-type bacteria phenazine 2.91 μg/ml of recombinant bacteria is to ...

  11. Methods for examination of antigenicity of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To choose and establish the methods for examination of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin in order to offer the reference for evaluating the antigenicity of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin against human. Methods: Antigenicity of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin was examined for hypersensitivity, cell-mediated immunity reaction, humoral immunity reaction and cross-reaction of antigen. Results: The rabbit and guinea pig did not give rise to hypersensitivity. In immunized rabbits, the level of serum total IgG was normal, but the level of serum specific IgG was high. The examination of B lymphocytes showed that there was no significant difference (P>0.05) in comparison with control. Cross-reaction of antigen proved that bovine hemoglobin had cross-reaction with human hemoglobin. Suggesting that they may be homologous, the level of the serum specific antibody is high in the immunized animal. According to the immunology theories, the polymerized hemoglobin has antigenicity. (authors)

  12. Hemichrome formation during hemoglobin Zurich denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)spectrum of hemoglobin Zurich, after oxidation, storage and heating, showed several absorption derives in the high field region (g ≅ 2) which are indicative of hemichrome formation. Characteristic visible spectra of hemichromes were observed for oxidized Hb Zurich and for its spontaneous precipitate. The proportional increase of EPR signals at g ≅ 2 and decrease at g = 6.37, the constant ratio of absorbance at 540 nm to 280 nm during heating, and the similarity of this ratio for spontaneously precipitated HbA and for Hb Zurich indicate that heme is not lost during the first steps of Hb Zurich denaturation. (author)

  13. [Structural anomalies of dog hemoglobin after ionizing irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhomlinov, B F; Savich, A V; Shal'no, M I; Starikovich, L S; Dudok, E P

    1981-01-01

    Heterogeneity of dog hemoglobin is established with application of chromatographic analysis. Ionizing radiation (4 Grey) induces no changes in the ratio of hemoglobin components. The comparative dactylographical analysis of the hemoglobin components in norm and in different periods after irradiation revealed differences in responses to tryptophan in peptide T-25. The changes found are connected with disturbances in the structure of the DNA molecule as well as with modification of the protein molecule under conditions of radiation injury. PMID:7324186

  14. Temperature-dependent enthalpy of oxygenation in Antarctic fish hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, A.; Wells, R.M.G.; Weber, Roy E.

    1997-01-01

    (logP(50) vs 1/T) of D. mawsoni hemoglobin indicates that the enthalpy of oxygenation (slope of the plot) is temperature dependent and that at high temperatures oxygen-binding becomes less exothermic. Nearly linear relationships were found in the hemoglobins of the other two species. The data were...... literature data for the enthalpy of oxygenation in Antarctic fish hemoglobins derives from the use of the nonintegrated (linearized) form of the van't Hoff equation over different temperature ranges. The general assumption that a low heat of oxygenation in hemoglobins from polar animals represents an...

  15. Relationship of Baseline Hemoglobin Level with Serum Ferritin, Postphlebotomy Hemoglobin Changes, and Phlebotomy Requirements among HFE C282Y Homozygotes

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Ali Mousavi; Faiza Mahmood; Astrid Aandahl; Teresa Risopatron Knutsen; Abid Hussain Llohn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to examine whether baseline hemoglobin levels in C282Y-homozygous patients are related to the degree of serum ferritin (SF) elevation and whether patients with different baseline hemoglobin have different phlebotomy requirements. Methods. A total of 196 patients (124 males and 72 females) who had undergone therapeutic phlebotomy and had SF and both pre- and posttreatment hemoglobin values were included in the study. Results. Bivariate correlation analysis suggested that b...

  16. hgpB, a Gene Encoding a Second Haemophilus influenzae Hemoglobin- and Hemoglobin-Haptoglobin-Binding Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zhen; Jin, Hongfan; Morton, Daniel J.; Stull, Terrence L.

    1998-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae requires heme for growth and can utilize both hemoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin as heme sources. We previously identified a hemoglobin- and hemoglobin-haptoglobin-binding protein, HgpA, in H. influenzae HI689. Mutation of hgpA did not affect binding or utilization of either heme source. The hgpA mutant exhibited loss of a 120-kDa protein and increased expression of a 115-kDa protein. These data suggested that at least one other gene product is involved in binding of...

  17. Possibility of improvement of hemoglobin properties as biosensors' detection element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, A. S.; Vardapetyan, H. R.; Tiratsuyan, S. G.; Hovhannisyan, A. A.

    2010-04-01

    Biosensors are finding numerous applications in clinical diagnosis, drug discovery, biotechnology, environmental monitoring and etc. Hemoglobin (Hb), a natural heme containing protein, exhibits enzymatic activity towards hydrogen peroxide, which is possible to improve by altering the heme orientation and/or changing the microenvironment in the vicinity of the heme sites. It was shown that hypericin (HY), a naphthodianthrone from Hipericum perforatum and a potent photosensitizer, interacts with Hb and causes conformational changes of the protein. These results were gained both in dark and under visible light exposure by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was shown that photodynamic influence of HY leads to Hb absorption decrease at Soret band, depending on HY concentration and irradiation doze. Excitation of Hb/HY complexes leads to reduction of some emission peaks, correlating with the concentration of HY, incubation and irradiation time. The incubation and irradiation of complexes leads to an increase in electrophoretic mobility of Hb and its peroxidase activity. Under the HY influence Hb properties as a hydrogen peroxide detector could be improved and an effective determination of peroxide formation could be achieved. This makes Hb an attractive 'recognition' element for construction of third-generation biosensors.

  18. Conformational changes in hemoglobin triggered by changing the iron charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the hemoglobin conformational changes induced by changing the iron charge have been studied and compared with Myoglobin. Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to follow the change of the iron conformation. In order to compare the conformational relaxation of hemoglobin and myoglobin, and to study a possible influence of the quaternary structure, an intermediate metastable state of hemoglobin has been created by low temperature X-ray irradiation of methemoglobin. The irradiation reduces the Fe(III) of the heme groups to Fe(II) Low Spin, where the water is still bound on the sixth coordination. Heating cycles performed at temperatures from 140 K to 200 K allow the molecules to overcome an activation energy barrier and to relax into a stable conformation such as deoxy-hemoglobin or carboxy-hemoglobin, if CO is present. Slightly different structures (conformational substates) reveal themselves as a distribution of energy barriers (ΔG). The distribution of the activation energy, for the decay of the Fe(II) Low Spin intermediate, has been fitted with a Gaussian. For comparison, published myoglobin data were re-analysed in the same way. The average energy value at characteristic temperature is very similar in case of myoglobin and hemoglobin. The larger Gaussian energy distribution for myoglobin with respect to hemoglobin shows that more conformational substates are available. This may be caused by a larger area exposed to water. In hemoglobin, part of the surface of the chains is not water accessible due to the quaternary structure.

  19. Degradation of native human hemoglobin following hemolysis by Prevotella loescheii.

    OpenAIRE

    Zwickel, J; Weiss, E I; Schejter, A

    1992-01-01

    Prevotella loescheii PK1295 can grow on native hemoglobin as a source of heme. Supernatants of P. loescheii cultures hemolysed human erythrocytes and degraded native hemoglobin. These combined activities may provide heme (or iron) for the growth of P. loescheii and other dental plaque bacteria.

  20. Molecular evolution of hemoglobins of Antarctic fishes (Notothenioidei)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, W.T.; Beintema, J.J; D Avino, R.; Tamburrini, M.; di Prisco, G.

    1997-01-01

    Amino acid sequences of alpha- and beta-chains of human hemoglobin and of hemoglobins of coelacanth and 24 teleost fish species, including 11 antarctic and two temperate Notothenioidei, were analyzed using maximum parsimony. Trees were derived for the alpha- and beta-chains separately and for tandem

  1. Effect of Multiple Mutations in the Hemoglobin- and Hemoglobin-Haptoglobin-Binding Proteins, HgpA, HgpB, and HgpC, of Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, Daniel J.; Whitby, Paul W.; Jin, Hongfan; Ren, Zhen; Stull, Terrence L.

    1999-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae requires heme for growth and can utilize hemoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin as heme sources. We previously identified two hemoglobin- and hemoglobin-haptoglobin-binding proteins, HgpA and HgpB, in H. influenzae HI689. Insertional mutation of hgpA and hgpB, either singly or together, did not abrogate the ability to utilize or bind either hemoglobin or the hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex. A hemoglobin affinity purification method was used to isolate a protein of approxi...

  2. In vivo volume and hemoglobin dynamics of human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Malka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human red blood cells (RBCs lose ∼30% of their volume and ∼20% of their hemoglobin (Hb content during their ∼100-day lifespan in the bloodstream. These observations are well-documented, but the mechanisms for these volume and hemoglobin loss events are not clear. RBCs shed hemoglobin-containing vesicles during their life in the circulation, and this process is thought to dominate the changes in the RBC physical characteristics occurring during maturation. We combine theory with single-cell measurements to investigate the impact of vesiculation on the reduction in volume, Hb mass, and membrane. We show that vesicle shedding alone is sufficient to explain membrane losses but not volume or Hb losses. We use dry mass measurements of human RBCs to validate the models and to propose that additional unknown mechanisms control volume and Hb reduction and are responsible for ∼90% of the observed reduction. RBC population characteristics are used in the clinic to monitor and diagnose a wide range of conditions including malnutrition, inflammation, and cancer. Quantitative characterization of cellular maturation processes may help in the early detection of clinical conditions where maturation patterns are altered.

  3. Low frequency vibrational modes of oxygenated myoglobin, hemoglobins, and modified derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyarajah, S; Proniewicz, L M; Bronder, H; Kincaid, J R

    1994-12-01

    The low frequency resonance Raman spectra of the dioxygen adducts of myoglobin, hemoglobin, its isolated subunits, mesoheme-substituted hemoglobin, and several deuteriated heme derivatives are reported. The observed oxygen isotopic shifts are used to assign the iron-oxygen stretching (approximately 570 cm-1) and the heretofore unobserved delta (Fe-O-O) bending (approximately 420 cm-1) modes. Although the delta (Fe-O-O) is not enhanced in the case of oxymyoglobin, it is observed for all the hemoglobin derivatives, its exact frequency being relatively invariable among the derivatives. The lack of sensitivity to H2O/D2O buffer exchange is consistent with our previous interpretation of H2O/D2O-induced shifts of v(O-O) in the resonance Raman spectra of dioxygen adducts of cobalt-substituted heme proteins; namely, that those shifts are associated with alterations in vibrational coupling of v(O-O) with internal modes of proximal histidyl imidazole rather than to steric or electronic effects of H/D exchange at the active site. No evidence is obtained for enhancement of the v(Fe-N) stretching frequency of the linkage between the heme iron and the imidazole group of the proximal histidine. PMID:7983043

  4. Oxidized Hemoglobin Is an Endogenous Proinflammatory Agonist That Targets Vascular Endothelial Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Gabriela; Jeney, Viktoria; Chora, Ângelo; Larsen, Rasmus; Balla, Jozsef; Soares, Miguel P.

    2009-01-01

    Several pathologic conditions are associated with hemolysis, i.e. release of ferrous (Fe(II)) hemoglobin from red blood cells. Oxidation of cell-free hemoglobin produces (Fe(III)) methemoglobin. More extensive oxidation produces (Fe(III)/Fe(IV)O) ferryl hemoglobin. Both cell-free methemoglobin and ferryl hemoglobin are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of hemolytic disorders. We show hereby that ferryl hemoglobin, but not hemoglobin or methemoglobin, acts as a potent proinflammatory a...

  5. Hemoglobin E: a common hemoglobinopathy among children of Southeast Asian origin.

    OpenAIRE

    Katsanis, E; Luke, K. H.; Hsu, E; Yates, J R

    1987-01-01

    With the recent immigration of Southeast Asians to Canada, hemoglobin E has become a frequent diagnosis. The clinical and hematologic findings in 42 children (mean age 4.3 years) with hemoglobin E are presented. There were 33 heterozygotes (having hemoglobin E trait), 6 homozygotes (having hemoglobin EE) and 3 double heterozygotes (having hemoglobin E-beta-thalassemia). The heterozygotes had low-normal hemoglobin levels and mean corpuscular volumes; coexisting iron deficiency, present in 62% ...

  6. Hemoglobin of mice with radiation-induced mutations at the hemoglobin loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical analyses were done on the abnormal hemoglobins of the five (101 x SEC)F1 offspring of X- irradiated adult SEC mice to determine which hemoglobin genes were expressed in each hemoglobin variant. Three offspring of irradiated SEC males did not express either of the two kinds of α-chains normally found in all SEC mice. The deficient α-chain synthesis caused these mice to exhibit an α-thalassemia similar to human α-thalassemia. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show that many erythrocytes of mice with α-thalassemia have bizarre shapes; e.g. many erythrocytes appeared flattened or had thorny projections (acanthocytes). One mutant with a tandem duplication of a segment of chromosome 7 (site of locus determining β-chain structure) produced twice as much SEC as 101 β-chain polypeptides. One mutant that probably arose by non-disjunction of chromosome 7's in its unirradiated 101 mother and loss of chromosome 7 from the gamete of its irradiated SEC father did not express the SEC β-chain gene. (author)

  7. Interference of the Hope Hemoglobin With Hemoglobin A1c Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Chanda, Dalia; Gain, Mithun; Krishnan, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is now considered to be the marker of choice in diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus, based on the results of certain landmark clinical trials. Herein, we report the case of a 52-year-old ethnic Southeast Asian Indian man with impaired glucose tolerance whose glycated hemoglobin (ie, HbA1c) levels, as measured via Bio-Rad D10 high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Roche Tina-quant immunoassay were 47.8% and 44.0%, respectively. No variant hemoglobin (Hb) peak was observed via the D10 chromatogram. We assayed the patient specimen on the Sebia MINICAP capillary electrophoresis platform; the HbA1c level was 6.8%, with a large variant Hb peak of 42.0%. This finding suggested the possible presence of the heterozygous Hb Hope, which can result in spuriously elevated HbA1c results on HPLC and turbidimetric immunoassays. Although the capillary electrophoresis system was able to identify the variant, the A1c results should not be considered accurate due to overlapping of the variant and adult Hb peaks on the electrophoretogram reading. Hb Hope is usually clinically silent but can present such analytical challenges. Through this case study, we critically discuss the limitations of various HbA1c assay methods, highlighting the fact that laboratory professionals need to be aware of occurrences of Hb Hope, to help ensure patient safety. PMID:26199262

  8. Hemoglobin-oxygen equilibrium at different hemoglobin and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, G; Celantano, F; Cortili, G; D'Angelo, E; Cazzaniga, A; Radford, E P

    1977-01-01

    Hemoglobin-oxygen equilibrium curves at constant pH, ionic strength, and temperature were determined (a) on 2,3-DPG-free solutions at various hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, (b) on solutions at various Hb concentrations but constant 2,3-DPG/Hb molar ratio, (c) on solutions at constant hemoglobin concentration but various 2,3-DPG/Hb molar ratios, and (d) on hemolysates at various Hb concentrations. Under all conditions the shape of the equilibrium curve was the same (n = 2.62 +/- 0.04, 33 experiments). Half-saturation pressure (P 1/2) did not change with increasing Hb concentration in case (a), whereas P 1/2 was linearly related to Hb concentration in case (b). In case (c) at 200 g/l Hb, P 1/2 increased sharply as 2,3-DPG/Hb molar ratio increased up to 0.4 but changed little as the ratio was further increased up to 1.5. This behavior is very different from that observed in diluted (5 g/l) solutions. P 1/2 of the hemolysates was also linearly related to Hb concentration but the slope was about twice that for case (b). These results cannot be explained by linked function theory or by a dimer-tetramer equilibrium. It is suggested that intermolecular interactions in the presence of organic phosphates may be responsible for the observed changes in Hb affinity for oxygen. PMID:909950

  9. Hemoglobin (Hb) Val de Marne (Hb Footscray) in Brazil: the first case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, J V; Shimauti, E L T; Silva, D G H; Torres, L S; Belini-Junior, E; Oliveira, R G; Patussi, E V; Herrero, J C M; Bonini-Domingos, C R

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) variants involving alpha-chains are less common in the global population than Hb variants resulting from beta-chain alterations. Generally, alpha-chain Hb variants are caused by point mutations affecting alpha-1 and/or alpha-2 genes of the alpha-globin cluster (HBA1 and HBA2). In Brazil, the most prevalent alpha-chain Hb variant is Hb Hasharon. In this study, we present the first case of an Hb Val de Marne variant in the Americas, specifically in Brazil. PMID:27421014

  10. Molecular characterization of hemoglobin from the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankeln, Thomas; Klawitter, Sabine; Krämer, Melanie; Burmester, Thorsten

    2006-07-01

    Due to the prevailing importance of the tracheal system for insect respiration, hemoglobins had been considered rare exceptions in this arthropod subphylum. Here we report the identification, cloning and expression analysis of a true hemoglobin gene in the honeybee Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera). The deduced amino acid sequence covers 171 residues (19.5kDa) and harbors all globin-typical features, including the proximal and the distal histidines. The protein has no signal peptide for transmembrane transport and was predicted to localize in the cytoplasm. The honeybee hemoglobin gene shows an ancient structure, with introns in positions B12.2 and G7.0, while most other insect globins have divergent intron positions. In situ hybridization studies showed that hemoglobin expression in the honeybee is mainly associated with the tracheal system. We also observe hemoglobin expression in the Malpighi tubes and testis. We further demonstrated that hemoglobins occur in other insect orders (Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera), suggesting that such genes belong to the standard repertoire of an insect genome. Phylogenetic analyses show that globins evolved along with the accepted insect systematics, with a remarkable diversification within the Diptera. Although insect hemoglobins may be in fact involved in oxygen metabolism, it remains uncertain whether they carry out a myoglobin-like function in oxygen storage and delivery. PMID:16698031

  11. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  12. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  13. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  14. Symbiotic and nonsymbiotic hemoglobin genes of Casuarina glauca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen-Lyon, K; Jensen, Erik Østergaard; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo; Marcker, K A; Peacock, WJ; Dennis, ES

    1995-01-01

    Casuarina glauca has a gene encoding hemoglobin (cashb-nonsym). This gene is expressed in a number of plant tissues. Casuarina also has a second family of hemoglobin genes (cashb-sym) expressed at a high level in the nodules that Casuarina forms in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the actinomycete...... Casuarina gene. The finding that the nonsymbiotic Casuarina gene is also correctly expressed in L. corniculatus suggests to us that a comparable non-symbiotic hemoglobin gene will be found in legume species. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Feb...

  15. Receptor targeting of hemoglobin mediated by the haptoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2009-01-01

    Haptoglobin, the haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor CD163, and the heme oxygenase-1 are proteins with a well-established function in the clearance and metabolism of "free" hemoglobin released during intravascular hemolysis. This scavenging system counteracts the potentially harmful oxidative and NO......-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles playing a crucial role in the innate immunity against certain trypanosome parasites. Recent studies have elucidated this fairly sophisticated immune defense mechanism that takes advantage of a trypanosomal haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor evolved to supply the parasite with heme...

  16. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhle, Ülkü; Kükner, Şahap

    2003-01-01

    Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva, generally characterized by irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing and discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis may be distinguished from other types of conjunctivitis by the presence of yellow–white mucopurulent discharge. It is the most common form of ocular infection all around the world. Staphylococcus species are the most common bacterial pathogenes, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus i...

  17. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  18. Glycosylated hemoglobin and hyperbaric oxygen coverage denials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, A D; Worth, E R; Weaver, L K

    2015-01-01

    Some Medicaid and Medicare fiscal intermediaries are denying hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients if the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 7.0%. We performed multiple PubMed searches for any diabetic wound healing clinical trial that documented HbA1c and had a wound healing endpoint. We scrutinized 30 peer-reviewed clinical trials, representing more than 4,400 patients. The average HbA1c from the intervention side of the studies was 8.6% (7.2% - 9.9%) and the control/sham side was 8.3% (6.0% - 10.6%). Twelve studies made a direct attempt to link HbA1c and wound healing. Four retrospective studies and one prospective cohort study assert that lower HbA1c favors wound healing, but review of the studies reveal design flaws that invalidate these conclusions. In total, 25 studies showed no direct correlation between HbA1c levels and wound healing. There was no randomized controlled trial (RCT) data demonstrating that HbA1c controlled by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Frequently, patients lack optimal blood glucose control when they have a limb-threatening DFU. The evidence supports that denying hyperbaric oxygen to those with HbA1c > 7.0% is unfounded. PMID:26152104

  19. Functional behavior of tortoise hemoglobin Geochelone denticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsoni, M A; Stoppa, G R; Turra, A; Ogo, S H

    2002-11-01

    The hemolysate from Geochelone denticulata contains two main hemoglobin components, as shown by ion exchange chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Electrophoresis under dissociating conditions showed three types of globin chains. The apparent molecular mass, as determined by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200, was compatible with tetrameric Hb, which was unable to polymerize. The G. denticulata Hb has a P50 value of 9.56 mm Hg at pH 7.4. The Hb oxygenation appears to be under the control of organic phosphates and hydrogen ion since it is strongly affected by those species. In the presence ATP or IHP the P50 values increased to 29.51 mm Hg and 54.95 mm Hg, respectively, at pH 7.4. The n50 was generally lower than 1.5 in stripped Hb, suggesting a dissociation of tetramers. In the presence of organic phosphates n50 values increased to approximately 2.5. The Bohr effect was evident in oxygen equilibrium experiments. The hematocrit (32%) and Hb concentration (5.7 mM as heme) of G. denticulata blood were substantially larger than those of G. carbonaria, but the methemoglobin levels were similar in both species, approximately 1%. Thus, the oxygen capacity of blood appears to be higher in G. denticulata than in G. carbonaria, particularly considering the functional properties of their Hbs, which would guarantee the survival of animals. PMID:12659022

  20. Lower versus Higher Hemoglobin Threshold for Transfusion in Septic Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wernerman, Jan; Guttormsen, Anne B; Karlsson, Sari; Johansson, Pär I; Aneman, Anders; Vang, Marianne L; Winding, Robert; Nebrich, Lars; Nibro, Helle L; Rasmussen, Bodil S; Lauridsen, Johnny R M; Nielsen, Jane S; Oldner, Anders; Pettilä, Ville; Cronhjort, Maria B; Andersen, Lasse H; Pedersen, Ulf G; Reiter, Nanna; Wiis, Jørgen; White, Jonathan O; Russell, Lene; Thornberg, Klaus J; Hjortrup, Peter B; Müller, Rasmus G; Møller, Morten H; Steensen, Morten; Tjäder, Inga; Kilsand, Kristina; Odeberg-Wernerman, Suzanne; Sjøbø, Brit; Bundgaard, Helle; Thyø, Maria A; Lodahl, David; Mærkedahl, Rikke; Albeck, Carsten; Illum, Dorte; Kruse, Mary; Winkel, Per; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusions are frequently given to patients with septic shock. However, the benefits and harms of different hemoglobin thresholds for transfusion have not been established. METHODS: In this multicenter, parallel-group trial, we randomly assigned patients in the intensive care...... unit (ICU) who had septic shock and a hemoglobin concentration of 9 g per deciliter or less to receive 1 unit of leukoreduced red cells when the hemoglobin level was 7 g per deciliter or less (lower threshold) or when the level was 9 g per deciliter or less (higher threshold) during the ICU stay. The...... were similar in the two intervention groups. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with septic shock, mortality at 90 days and rates of ischemic events and use of life support were similar among those assigned to blood transfusion at a higher hemoglobin threshold and those assigned to blood transfusion at a...

  1. Low Modulus Biomimetic Microgel Particles with High Loading of Hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, KAI; Merkel, Timothy J.; Pandya, Ashish; Napier, Mary E.; Luft, J. Christopher; Daniel, Will; Sheiko, Sergei; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    We synthesized extremely deformable red blood cell-like microgel particles and loaded them with bovine hemoglobin (Hb) to potentiate oxygen transport. With similar shape and size as red blood cells (RBCs), the particles were fabricated using the PRINT® (Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates) technique. Low crosslinking of the hydrogel resulted in very low mesh density for these particles, allowing passive diffusion of hemoglobin throughout the particles. Hb was secured in the particle...

  2. Free-radical production and oxidative reactions of hemoglobin.

    OpenAIRE

    Winterbourn, C C

    1985-01-01

    Mechanisms of autoxidation of hemoglobin, and its reactions with H2O2, O2-, and oxidizing or reducing xenobiotics are discussed. Reactive intermediates of such reactions can include drug free radicals, H2O2, and O2-, as well as peroxidatively active ferrylhemoglobin and methemoglobin-H2O2. The contributions of these species to hemoglobin denaturation and drug-induced hemolysis, and the actions of various protective agents, are considered.

  3. EPR studies of cooperative binding of Cu (II) to hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of the relative affinities of the two pairs of hemoglobin copper sites by monitoring the EPR spectra of the complexes formed by the reaction of copper with deoxyhemoglobin is reported. A model in which two sites are assumed to accept copper ions in a noncooperative way is not able to predict the experimental results. Thus it is conclude that the binding of these ions to hemoglobin is a cooperative phenomenon. (Author)

  4. Hemoglobin concentrations and associated factors in adolescentes from Recife, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Elisângela Barros Soares Mendonça; Lilian Ferreira Muniz; Ilma Kruze Grande de Arruda; Alcides da Silva Diniz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of anemia and associated factors in adolescents from the city of Recife in Pernambuco state. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study, involving a random sample of 256 adolescents of both genders, aged 13 to 18, whose hemoglobin concentrations were evaluated, along with their nutritional status and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: The prevalence of inadequate hemoglobin concentrations was 10.2% [CI95%=6.7-14.5], reaching levels cons...

  5. An Effector of Hemoglobin Structure: The Guanosine 3', 5'-Triphosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed; Imani, Saber; Soufian, Safieh; Panahi, Yunes; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Arefi, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    The effect of guanosine 3', 5'-triphosphate (GTP) on the hemoglobin structure was studied by UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, and cyclic voltammetry. UV-visible absorption spectra showed an increase in absorbance in the regions of 420 nm and 280 nm. Fluorescence spectra showed that the Trp fluorescence intensity increased upon excitation at 280 nm, when guanosine 3', 5'-triphosphate concentration was increased in hemoglobin solution. Along with the increase...

  6. Melanin and Hemoglobin Identification for Skin Disease Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhao; Zerubia, Josiane

    2013-01-01

    International audience This paper proposes a novel method to extract melanin and hemoglobin concentrations of human skin, using bilateral decomposition with the knowledge of a multiple layered skin model and absorbance characteristics of major chromophores. Different from state-of-art approaches, the proposed method enables to address highlight and strong shading usually existing in skin color images captured under uncontrolled environment. The derived melanin and hemoglobin indices, direc...

  7. HEMOGLOBIN STATUS OBSERVED IN WOMEN OF AMRAVATI (MS) INDIA BY USING ANOVA TEST

    OpenAIRE

    Tantarpale V T,; Raksheskar A. Gracy

    2012-01-01

    In the present study examined the hemoglobin status in women of Amravati region and its statistical analysis by using ANOVA test. Total 298 women were tested for hemoglobin status. The one way ANOVA test was used to compare population groups, and analyzed hemoglobin %. The normal values of hemoglobin % were not observed in any age groups of total survey of women of Amravati region.

  8. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  9. Reaction of tobacco smoke aldehydes with human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberman, H D; San George, R C

    1988-01-01

    Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, isobutyraldehyde, and acrolein, all of which are constituents of tobacco smoke, were reacted in 5 mM concentration with the purified major fraction of normal adult human hemoglobin (hemoglobin Ao) in 1 mM concentration. A cigarette smoke condensate, diluted to contain 5 mM total aldehydes, was also reacted with 1 mM hemoglobin Ao. Cationic exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed that the products formed from simple aliphatic aldehydes, with the exception of formaldehyde, were analogues of those formed from acetaldehyde, earlier shown by us to be imidazolidinone derivatives, that is, cyclic addition products of the N-terminal aminoamide function of alpha and beta chains. Formaldehyde and acrolein produced a heterogeneous mixture of derivatives including cross-linked hemoglobin dimers. The greater proportion of modified hemoglobins produced by condensate aldehydes resembled those formed from acetaldehyde, the most abundant aldehyde in the condensate. A smaller fraction consisted of cross-linked hemoglobin dimers, presumably due to the action of formaldehyde. Mass spectrometric and HPLC analyses of the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones precipitated from the condensate documented the presence of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, furfural, and methylfurfural. The toxicity of aldehydes is briefly discussed in the context of the findings of this study. PMID:3236330

  10. IsdB-dependent Hemoglobin Binding Is Required for Acquisition of Heme by Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Pishchany, Gleb; Sheldon, Jessica R.; Dickson, Claire F.; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Read, Timothy D.; Gell, David A; Heinrichs, David E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality. As with most bacteria, S. aureus requires iron to cause disease, and it can acquire iron from host hemoglobin. The current model for staphylococcal hemoglobin-iron acquisition proposes that S. aureus binds hemoglobin through the surface-exposed hemoglobin receptor IsdB. IsdB removes heme from bound hemoglobin and transfers this cofactor to other proteins of the Isd system, which import and de...

  11. Broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy assessment of hemorrhage- and hemoglobin-based blood substitute resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari; Tromberg, Bruce J; Mukai, David; Kreuter, Kelly; Saltzman, Darin; Patino, Renee; Goldberg, Robert; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) are solutions of cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) that have been developed for replacement or augmentation of blood transfusion. It is important to monitor in vivo tissue hemoglobin content, total tissue hemoglobin [THb], oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations ([OHb], [RHb]), and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2=[OHb]/[THb]×100%) to evaluate effectiveness of HBOC transfusion. We designed and constructed a broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) prototype...

  12. Comparison of Hemoglobin Transmition Spectrums of Healthy Persons and Patients with Schizophrenia Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Vlokh R.; Marsel L.; Vlokh I.; Moroz O.; Dudok K.

    2002-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to the study of human hemoglobin transmission spectrums that were divided into four groups: hemoglobin of healthy persons, patients with schizophrenia, persons and people with and without the prodrome of schizophrenia that are in genetic susceptibility with patients. The change of absorption spectrums of hemoglobin of these groups was determined. The shifting of transmission minimums of the hemoglobin that correspond to electronic transitions in the hemoglobin mol...

  13. No difference in portal and hepatic venous bacterial DNA in patients with cirrhosis undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt insertion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Christian; Karlsen, Stine; Grønbæk, Henning; Nielsen, Dennis T; Frevert, Susanne Christiansen; Clemmesen, Jens Otto; Møller, Søren; Jensen, Jørgen S; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial translocation (BT) with immune activation may lead to hemodynamical alterations and poor outcomes in patients with cirrhosis.......Bacterial translocation (BT) with immune activation may lead to hemodynamical alterations and poor outcomes in patients with cirrhosis....

  14. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  15. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  16. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  17. Propanil-induced methemoglobinemia and hemoglobin binding in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Administration of [ring-U-14C]propanil (3,4-dichloropropionanilide) to male Sprague-Dawley rats (30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, ip) increased the formation of methemoglobin at the two highest doses. Following a propanil dose of 100 mg/kg, methemoglobin formation attained a maximum level of 5% by 1.5 hr and declined to normal levels (approximately 2.5%) by 12 hr. Hemoglobin binding attained a maximum level of 50 pmol/mg protein by 12 hr, and remained constant for 24 hr. Following a propanil dose of 300 mg/kg, methemoglobin formation attained a maximum level of 24% by 4.5 hr, and declined to a level of 5% by 24 hr. Hemoglobin binding attained a maximum level of 425 pmol/mg protein by 12 hr, and remained constant for 24 hr. Hemoglobin binding was also detected at the lowest propanil dose (10 pmol/mg protein) even though methemoglobin formation was not observed. HPLC analysis of alkaline-treated hemoglobin from propanil-treated rats indicated the presence of one radiolabeled compound with the same HPLC retention time as 3,4-dichloraniline. These data are consistent with the concept that propanil is converted to N-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline in the liver. Subsequently, this metabolite enters the erythrocyte and is oxidized by hemoglobin to 3,4-dichloronitrosobenzene with concomitant conversion of oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin. The 3,4-dichloronitrosobenzene binds to cysteine residues on hemoglobin as the corresponding sulfinic acid amide adduct. These data suggest that human exposure to propanil may be monitored in the absence of observable toxicity by the analysis of propanil metabolites bound to hemoglobin

  18. Stress significantly increases mortality following a secondary bacterial respiratory infection

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson Paul D; Aich Palok; Stookey Joseph; Popowych Yurij; Potter Andrew; Babiuk Lorne; Griebel Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A variety of mechanisms contribute to the viral-bacterial synergy which results in fatal secondary bacterial respiratory infections. Epidemiological investigations have implicated physical and psychological stressors as factors contributing to the incidence and severity of respiratory infections and psychological stress alters host responses to experimental viral respiratory infections. The effect of stress on secondary bacterial respiratory infections has not, however, been investig...

  19. S1 nuclease analysis of α-globin gene expression in preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease after transfer to mouse erythroleukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The loss of α-globin gene transcriptional activity rarely occurs as an acquired abnormality during the evolution of myeloproliferative disease or preleukemia. To test whether the mutation responsible for the loss of α-globin gene expression (hemoglobin H disease) in these patients is linked with the α-globin genes on chromosome 16, the authors transferred chromosome 16 from preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease to mouse erythroleukemia cells and measured the transcriptional activity of the human α-globin genes. After transfer to mouse erythroleukemia cells, the expression of human α-globin genes from the peripheral blood or marrow cells of preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease was similar to that of human α-globin genes transferred to mouse erythroleukemia cells from normal donors. These data showed that factor(s) in the mouse erythroleukemia cell can genetically complement the α-globin gene defect in these preleukemia patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease and suggest that altered expression of a gene in trans to the α-globin gene may be responsible for the acquisition of hemoglobin H disease in these patients

  20. Blood hemoglobin level and treatment outcome of early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, M.; Sindlinger, F. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Radiological Univ. Clinic, Freiburg (Germany); Ikenberg, H. [Dept. of Gynecology and Obstretics, Gynecological Univ. Clinic, Freiburg (Germany); Gerds, T.; Schumacher, M. [Inst. for Medical Biometry and Medical Informatics, Univ. Freiburg (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: to determine whether the blood hemoglobin concentration correlates with the prognosis of patients with early breast cancer and, if so, whether this is restricted to treatment modality. Patients and methods: data were collected retrospectively from patients with early breast cancer (T1,2 NO-2 MO) who underwent either breast-conserving surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (BCS-RT; n = 96) or a modified radical mastectomy (MRM; n = 194). The effect of preoperative blood hemoglobin level, nodal status, histological grading and hormone receptor status on disease-free survival was determined for both treatment modalities using a cox regression model and visualized by kaplan-meier plots. Results: the blood hemoglobin concentration significantly correlated with disease-free survival of patients receiving BCS-RT (relative risk [RR]: 0.67 per g/dl; p = 0.007). This was independent of other known risk factors for breast cancer patients, as determined by multivariate analysis. By contrast, the blood hemoglobin level had no prognostic significance when patients were treated with MRM. Conclusion: blood hemoglobin concentration seems to affect the prognosis of patients with early breast cancer when a treatment schedule that includes radiotherapy is applied. Reduced radiosensitivity due to diminished tumor oxygenation may be the underlying cause. Confirmative trials and studies intended to elucidate the underlying mechanism are warranted. (orig.)

  1. The refractive index of human hemoglobin in the visible range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because the refractive index of hemoglobin in the visible range is sensitive to the hemoglobin concentration, optical investigations of hemoglobin are important for medical diagnostics and treatment. Direct measurements of the refractive index are, however, challenging; few such measurements have previously been reported, especially in a wide wavelength range. We directly measured the refractive index of human deoxygenated and oxygenated hemoglobin for nine wavelengths between 400 and 700 nm for the hemoglobin concentrations up to 140 g l-1. This paper analyzes the results and suggests a set of model functions to calculate the refractive index depending on the concentration. At all wavelengths, the measured values of the refractive index depended on the concentration linearly. Analyzing the slope of the lines, we determined the specific refraction increments, derived a set of model functions for the refractive index depending on the concentration, and compared our results with those available in the literature. Based on the model functions, we further calculated the refractive index at the physiological concentration within the erythrocytes of 320 g l-1. The results can be used to calculate the refractive index in the visible range for arbitrary concentrations provided that the refractive indices depend on the concentration linearly.

  2. The refractive index of human hemoglobin in the visible range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhernovaya, O; Tuchin, V [International Research-Educational Center of Optical Technologies for Industry and Medicine ' Photonics' , Saratov State University, 83 Astrakhanskaya str., 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Sydoruk, O [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, South Kensington Campus, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Douplik, A, E-mail: alexandre.douplik@aot.uni-erlangen.de [Medical Photonics Engineering Group, Chair of Photonic Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Paul-Gordan-Strasse 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-07-07

    Because the refractive index of hemoglobin in the visible range is sensitive to the hemoglobin concentration, optical investigations of hemoglobin are important for medical diagnostics and treatment. Direct measurements of the refractive index are, however, challenging; few such measurements have previously been reported, especially in a wide wavelength range. We directly measured the refractive index of human deoxygenated and oxygenated hemoglobin for nine wavelengths between 400 and 700 nm for the hemoglobin concentrations up to 140 g l{sup -1}. This paper analyzes the results and suggests a set of model functions to calculate the refractive index depending on the concentration. At all wavelengths, the measured values of the refractive index depended on the concentration linearly. Analyzing the slope of the lines, we determined the specific refraction increments, derived a set of model functions for the refractive index depending on the concentration, and compared our results with those available in the literature. Based on the model functions, we further calculated the refractive index at the physiological concentration within the erythrocytes of 320 g l{sup -1}. The results can be used to calculate the refractive index in the visible range for arbitrary concentrations provided that the refractive indices depend on the concentration linearly.

  3. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  4. Role of crevice in the occurrence of hemoglobin in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, García A V; Friedman, S M; Cabrini, R L; Costa, O R

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of the gingival-periodontal component in the presence of blood in saliva. We studied a population of 184 adult patients composed of 101 totally edentulous patients with no oral mucosa lesions and 83 dentulous patients with clinically healthy gums. Saliva samples obtained by spontaneous salivation were collected in sterile containers. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of each of the samples was performed. 67% of the dentulous patients tested positive for hemoglobin in saliva. None of the patients in the totally edentulous group exhibited hemoglobin in saliva. These data suggest that the periodontal condition is an essential factor for the presence of hemoglobin in saliva. PMID:15214311

  5. Hemoglobin is essential for normal growth of Arabidopsis organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Hunt, Peter; Dennis, Elizabeth; Jensen, Susie Bjerregaard; Jensen, Erik Østergaard

    2006-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the class I hemoglobin AHb1 is transiently expressed in the hydathodes of leaves and in floral buds from young inflorescences. Nitric oxide (NO) accumulates to high levels in these organs when AHb1 is silenced, indicating an important role in metabolizing NO. AHb1-silenced...... lines are viable but show a mutant phenotype affecting the regions where AHb1 is expressed. Arabidopsis lines with an insertional knockout or overexpression of AHb2, a class II 3-on-3 hemoglobin, were generated. Seedlings overexpressing AHb2 show enhanced survival of hypoxic stress. The AHb2 knockout...... lines develop normally. However, when AHb2 knockout is combined with AHb1 silencing, seedlings die at an early vegetative stage suggesting that the two 3-on-3 hemoglobins, AHb1 and AHb2, together play an essential role for normal development of Arabidopsis seedlings. In conclusion, these results...

  6. Comparison of the binding of the dyes Sudan II and Sudan IV to bovine hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudan dyes are widely used in industry, and sometimes illegally used as food additives despite their potential toxicity. In this work, the interactions of Sudan II and Sudan IV with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) were investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, resonance light scattering (RLS), UV–vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular modeling techniques. Binding of Sudan dyes to BHb could cause static quenching of the fluorescence, indicating changes in the microenvironment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues. The binding constants estimated for Sudan II and IV were 1.84×104 L mol−1 and 2.54×104 L mol−1, respectively, at 293 K (20 °C). Each protein molecule bound one Sudan molecule approximately. Sudan II and IV were held at the hydrophobic cavity of BHb mainly by hydrophobic interaction. The decrease of α-helix and the increase of β-sheet seen in the CD spectra revealed a conformational alteration of the protein. From all the results, we conclude that Sudan IV has a stronger impact on the structure and function of BHb than that of Sudan II. -- Highlights: • Spectroscopic results show interaction details of Sudan II and IV with BHb. • The interaction of BHb with Sudan dyes is spontaneous with a 1:1 stoichiometry. • Sudan II and IV are located at the hydrophobic cavity of the BHb, and form complexes via hydrophobic interaction. • A stronger influence of bovine hemoglobin is caused by Sudan IV than that of Sudan II

  7. Prevention and Management of Bacterial Infections in Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil K. Taneja; Radha K Dhiman

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis of liver are at risk of developing serious bacterial infections due to altered immune defenses. Despite the widespread use of broad spectrum antibiotics, bacterial infection is responsible for up to a quarter of the deaths of patients with liver disease. Cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleed have a considerably higher incidence of bacterial infections particularly spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. High index of suspicion is required to identify infections at ...

  8. Correlation of serum leptin with levels of hemoglobin in hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafieian-Kopaei Mahmoud

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To examine the association of serum leptin level with anemia in hemodialysis, we investigated 36 patients (males: 21, diabetics: 11 under regular hemodialysis. For patients, complete blood counts, iron profile, serum leptin, and adequacy of hemodialysis were assessed. In this study a significant correlation of serum leptin with level of hemoglobin and body mass index was detected. An association between serum leptin and total iron binding capacity was observed. No correlation of serum ferritin with leptin level was seen. Our findings attest previous findings showing that greater serum leptin levels are associated with greater hemoglobin levels.

  9. Effect of gamma irradiation on infrared spectra of rat hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes in i.r. spectra of hemoglobin of rats exposed to γ radiation at dose levels of 2, 4 and 8 Gy were studied. The displacement of amides (amide 1 and amide 11) bands towards lower hemoglobin fluctuation frequencies was noticed. The shifts were noticed at bands 1655 cm-1 and 1535 cm-1 respectively. Data were taken at different times periods from 0 to 21 days after exposure to radiation. The optical density of the exposed cases decreased in comparison with the control group. (Author)

  10. Hemoglobin is Expressed in Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaskaran, Manoj; Chen, Haifeng; Chen, Zhongmong; Liu, Lin

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobin is the main oxygen carrying heme protein in erythrocytes. In an effort to study the differential gene expression of alveolar epithelial type I and type II cells using DNA microarray technique, we found that the mRNAs of hemoglobin α- and β-chains were expressed in type II cells, but not in type I cells. The microarray data were confirmed by RT-PCR. The mRNA expression of both chains decreased when type II cells trans-differentiated into type I-like cells. Immunocyto/histochemistry ...

  11. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Anant D. Patil

    2014-01-01

    Altered gastrointestinal (GI) motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to...

  12. Effect of some high consumption spices on hemoglobin glycation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G H Naderi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of glycation products is major factor responsible in complications of diabetes. Worldwide trend is toward the use of natural additives in reducing the complications of diseases. Therefore, there is a growing interest in natural antiglycation found in plants. Herbs and spices are one of the most important targets to search for natural antiglycation from the point of view of safety. This study investigated the ability of some of the spices to inhibit glycation process in a hemoglobin/glucose model system and compared their potency with each other. For this subject the best concentration and time to incubate glucose with hemoglobin was investigated. Then the glycosylation degree of hemoglobin in the presence of extracts by the three concentrations 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml was measured colorimetrically at 520 nm. Results represent that some of extracts such as wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper have inhibitory effects on hemoglobin glycation. But some of the extracts such as anise and saffron have not only inhibitory effects but also aggravated this event and have proglycation properties. In accordance with the results obtained we can conclude that wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper especially wild caraway extracts are potent antiglycation agents, which can be of great value in the preventive glycation-associated complications in diabetes.

  13. Effect of some high consumption spices on hemoglobin glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, G H; Dinani, Narges J; Asgary, S; Taher, M; Nikkhoo, N; Boshtam, M

    2014-01-01

    Formation of glycation products is major factor responsible in complications of diabetes. Worldwide trend is toward the use of natural additives in reducing the complications of diseases. Therefore, there is a growing interest in natural antiglycation found in plants. Herbs and spices are one of the most important targets to search for natural antiglycation from the point of view of safety. This study investigated the ability of some of the spices to inhibit glycation process in a hemoglobin/glucose model system and compared their potency with each other. For this subject the best concentration and time to incubate glucose with hemoglobin was investigated. Then the glycosylation degree of hemoglobin in the presence of extracts by the three concentrations 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml was measured colorimetrically at 520 nm. Results represent that some of extracts such as wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper have inhibitory effects on hemoglobin glycation. But some of the extracts such as anise and saffron have not only inhibitory effects but also aggravated this event and have proglycation properties. In accordance with the results obtained we can conclude that wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper especially wild caraway extracts are potent antiglycation agents, which can be of great value in the preventive glycation-associated complications in diabetes. PMID:25593391

  14. Hemoglobin, Growth, and Attention of Infants in Southern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubuchon-Endsley, Nicki L.; Grant, Stephanie L.; Berhanu, Getenesh; Thomas, David G.; Schrader, Sarah E.; Eldridge, Devon; Kennedy, Tay; Hambidge, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Male and female infants from rural Ethiopia were tested to investigate relations among hemoglobin (Hb), anthropometry, and attention. A longitudinal design was used to examine differences in attention performance from 6 (M = 24.9 weeks, n = 89) to 9 months of age (M = 40.6 weeks, n = 85), differences hypothesized to be related to changes in iron…

  15. Ultrasonic processing for recovery of chicken erythrocyte hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemoglobin from chicken blood has been shown to be a good substitute for synthetic polymeric flocculants. One stage of processing the blood entails breaking open the cells and releasing the cytoplasmic contents; in the present study, we investigate the use of ultrasonic processing at this stage. Was...

  16. The Relationship Between Hemoglobin Level and Intellectual Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Nancy

    In a study to learn whether or not poor nutrition, as indicated by low hemoglobin levels, affects intelligence and behavior, 113 Head Start children in Missoula, Montana took part. Group testing with the Lorge Thorndike Intelligence Test and individual testing with the Wechsler and Primary Scale of Intelligence or Wechsler Intelligence Scale for…

  17. Glycated Hemoglobin Measurement and Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gao, Pei; Khan, Hassan; Butterworth, Adam S.; Wormser, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Thompson, Alex; Sarwar, Nadeem; Willeit, Peter; Ridker, Paul M.; Barr, Elizabeth L. M.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Psaty, Bruce M.; Brenner, Hermann; Balkau, Beverley; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Daimon, Makoto; Willeit, Johann; Njolstad, Inger; Nissinen, Aulikki; Brunner, Eric J.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Price, Jackie F.; Sundstrom, Johan; Knuiman, Matthew W.; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Verschuren, W. M. M.; Wald, Nicholas; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Whincup, Peter H.; Ford, Ian; Goldbourt, Uri; Gomez-de-la-Camara, Agustin; Gallacher, John; Simons, Leon A.; Rosengren, Annika; Sutherland, Susan E.; Bjorkelund, Cecilia; Blazer, Dan G.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Onat, Altan; Ibanez, Alejandro Marin; Casiglia, Edoardo; Jukema, J. Wouter; Simpson, Lara M.; Giampaoli, Simona; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Selmer, Randi; Wennberg, Patrik; Kauhanen, Jussi; Salonen, Jukka T.; Dankner, Rachel; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Kavousi, Maryam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Evans, Denis; Wallace, Robert B.; Cushman, Mary; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Umans, Jason G.; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Hidaeki; Sato, Shinichi; Gillum, Richard F.; Folsom, Aaron R.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Moons, Karel G.; Griffin, Simon J.; Sattar, Naveed; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Thompson, Simon G.; Danesh, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The value of measuring levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) for the prediction of first cardiovascular events is uncertain. OBJECTIVE To determine whether adding information on HbA(1c) values to conventional cardiovascular risk factors is associated with improvement in prediction of ca

  18. Glycated Hemoglobin Measurement and Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gao, Pei; Khan, Hassan;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The value of measuring levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) for the prediction of first cardiovascular events is uncertain. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether adding information on HbA1c values to conventional cardiovascular risk factors is associated with improvement in prediction of c...

  19. A new colorimetric method for the estimation of glycosylated hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, S S; Pattabiraman, T N

    1981-02-01

    A new colorimetric method, based on the phenol sulphuric acid reaction of carbohydrates, is described for the determination of glycosylated hemoglobin. Hemolyzates were treated with 1 mol/l oxalic acid in 2 mol/l Hcl for 4 h at 100 degrees C, the protein was precipitated with trichloroacetic acid, and the free sugars and hydroxymethyl furfural in the protein free supernatant were treated with phenol and sulphuric acid to form the color. The new method is compared to the thiobarbituric acid method and the ion-exchange chromatographic method for the estimation of glycosylated hemoglobin in normals and diabetics. The increase in glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients as estimated by the phenol-sulphuric acid method was more significant (P less than 0.001) than the increase observed by the thiobarbituric acid method (P less than 0.01). The correlation between the phenol-sulphuric acid method and the column method was better (r = 0.91) than the correlation between the thiobarbituric acid method and the column method (r = 0.84). No significant correlation between fasting and postprandial blood sugar level and glycosylated hemoglobin level as determined by the two colorimetric methods was observed in diabetic patients. PMID:7226519

  20. Eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation mediates fetal hemoglobin induction through a post-transcriptional mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Cynthia K.; Lowrey, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing eIF2α phosphorylation increases fetal hemoglobin in human primary erythroid progenitors via a post-transcriptional mechanism.Combining pharmacologic agents that use transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms additively induces fetal hemoglobin.

  1. Deer mouse hemoglobin exhibits a lowered oxygen affinity owing to mobility of the E helix

    OpenAIRE

    Inoguchi, Noriko; Oshlo, Jake R.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Weber, Roy E.; Fago, Angela; Storz, Jay F.; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    The deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, exhibits altitude-associated variation in hemoglobin oxygen affinity. To examine the structural basis of this functional variation, the structure of the hemoglobin has been solved.

  2. Altered myoelectric activity in the experimental blind loop syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Justus, P G; Fernandez, A; Martin, J.L.; King, C E; Toskes, P P; Mathias, J R

    1983-01-01

    Nutrient malabsorption and diarrhea are characteristic of the blind loop syndrome. Alterations in motility have been implicated as a cause of bacterial overgrowth, but the possibility that altered motility may result from alterations in the flora has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to characterize the myoelectric activity of the small intestine in the blind loop rat model. Eight groups of rats were studied: rats with self-filling blind loops, which develop bacterial overgrowt...

  3. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; DeRousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R.; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P. Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-01-01

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried “nanomicroparticle” vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the form...

  4. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Bures, Jiri Cyrany, Darina Kohoutova, Miroslav Förstl, Stanislav Rejchrt, Jaroslav Kvetina, Viktor Vorisek, Marcela Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestina...

  5. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Bures, J.; Cyrany, J.; Kohoutova, D.; Förstl, M.; Rejchrt, S.; Kvetina, J.; Vorisek, V.; Kopacova, M.

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestina...

  6. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  7. Hubungan Asupan Makan Dengan Kadar Hemoglobin Pada Mahasiswa Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Sumatera Utara

    OpenAIRE

    M, Alegra Rifani

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin is protein that serves as oxygen carrier which if the levels are abnormal can reduce productivity of someone. Nutrition for hemoglobin formation derived from food intake. Disturbances in food intake often cause problems, including metabolic disorders of hemoglobin (Syahrir, et al., 2013). One specimen to see nutritional status is blood. Therefore, researchers wanted to determine the relationship of food intake with hemoglobin levels. Research uses analytic observational study wi...

  8. The subunit structure of the extracellular hemoglobin of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. The hemoglobin of Biomphalaria glabrata was purified to homogeneity by a two step purification protocol using a gel filtration column (Superose 6 HR/Pharmacia ) followed by an anion exchange chromatography (MONO-Q Sepharose/Pharmacia). The dissociation products were analysed by a 5 - 15 % Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis containing Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS-PAGE) giving a band of 270 K Daltons and a band of 180 K Daltons after reduction with β-mercaptoethanol. The same profile was obtained in a 3.5 % Agarose gel electrophoresis containing SDS (SDS-AGE) showing additional bands of higher molecular weight. These bands were proposed to be monomers, dimers and trimers and, after reduction in a Bidimensional SDS-AGE, the proposed monomers and dimers were decomposed in two and four bands that were interpreted as 1 - 4 chains. The hemoglobin was digested by four different proteases ( Thrombin, Trypsin, Chymotrypsin and Subtilisin ) showing several equivalent fragments with molecular weights multiples of its minimum molecular weight ( 17.7 K Daltons). The circular dichroism spectrum of the protein showed a characteristic high α-helix content. We proposed that this hemoglobin is a pentamer of approx. 360 K Daltons subunits each formed by two 180 K Daltons chains linked in pairs by disulfide bridges and each of these chains comprises ten Heme binding domains. These data were compared to other Planorbidae extracellular hemoglobins. Up to now, the quaternary structure of this hemoglobin (shape and disposition of the subunits) is unknown. It is intended to elucidate its structure by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering in Brazilian National Laboratory of Synchrotron Light (LNLS). (author)

  9. 21 CFR 864.8165 - Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit....8165 Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement. (a) Identification. A calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement is a device that approximates whole blood, red blood cells, or...

  10. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Hemoglobin... discuss blood donor hemoglobin and hematocrit qualification standards in the United States, its impact...

  11. Plant hemoglobins: Important players at the crossroads between oxygen and nitric oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Hebelstrup, Kim; Mur, Luis A J;

    2011-01-01

    Plant hemoglobins constitute a diverse group of hemeproteins and evolutionarily belong to three different classes. Class 1 hemoglobins possess an extremely high affinity to oxygen and their main function consists in scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) at very low oxygen levels. Class 2 hemoglobins have...

  12. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  13. MR Imaging-derived Oxygen-Hemoglobin Dissociation Curves and Fetal-Placental Oxygen-Hemoglobin Affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Reut; Golani, Ofra; Akselrod-Ballin, Ayelet; Cohen, Yonni; Biton, Inbal; Garbow, Joel R; Neeman, Michal

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To generate magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-derived, oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curves and to map fetal-placental oxygen-hemoglobin affinity in pregnant mice noninvasively by combining blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) T2* and oxygen-weighted T1 contrast mechanisms under different respiration challenges. Materials and Methods All procedures were approved by the Weizmann Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Pregnant mice were analyzed with MR imaging at 9.4 T on embryonic days 14.5 (eight dams and 58 fetuses; imprinting control region ICR strain) and 17.5 (21 dams and 158 fetuses) under respiration challenges ranging from hyperoxia to hypoxia (10 levels of oxygenation, 100%-10%; total imaging time, 100 minutes). A shorter protocol with normoxia to hyperoxia was also performed (five levels of oxygenation, 20%-100%; total imaging time, 60 minutes). Fast spin-echo anatomic images were obtained, followed by sequential acquisition of three-dimensional gradient-echo T2*- and T1-weighted images. Automated registration was applied to align regions of interest of the entire placenta, fetal liver, and maternal liver. Results were compared by using a two-tailed unpaired Student t test. R1 and R2* values were derived for each tissue. MR imaging-based oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curves were constructed by nonlinear least square fitting of 1 minus the change in R2*divided by R2*at baseline as a function of R1 to a sigmoid-shaped curve. The apparent P50 (oxygen tension at which hemoglobin is 50% saturated) value was derived from the curves, calculated as the R1 scaled value (x) at which the change in R2* divided by R2*at baseline scaled (y) equals 0.5. Results The apparent P50 values were significantly lower in fetal liver than in maternal liver for both gestation stages (day 14.5: 21% ± 5 [P = .04] and day 17.5: 41% ± 7 [P MR imaging-based oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curves with a shorter protocol that excluded the hypoxic periods was demonstrated

  14. Study of Hemoglobin in Vegetarian and Non-Vegetarian Diet in Obese Women with risk of cardiac Problem in Lucknow city

    OpenAIRE

    shyam vinay sharma; sciddhartha koonwar; virendra atam; Uma Singh; Patel, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hemoglobin level and pattern of food intake is closely associated with risk of cardiovascular diseases. The cardiovascular diseases are primarily may be due to altered lipid profile which is depend on type and pattern of food intake. Association of vegetarian and non-vegetarianisms in obese women is controversial. Method: The study was conducted on vegetarianism and non-vegetarianism obese female. A total of 55 subjects were enrolled (35 cases and 20 control) for the study. The ...

  15. Soft X-ray microscopy analysis of cell volume and hemoglobin content in erythrocytes infected with asexual and sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Hanssen, Eric; Knoechel, Christian; Dearnley, Megan; Dixon, Matthew W. A.; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Tilley, Leann

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the most virulent agent of human malaria, undergoes both asexual cycling and sexual differentiation inside erythrocytes. As the intraerythrocytic parasite develops it increases in size and alters the permeability of the host cell plasma membrane. An intriguing question is: how is the integrity of the host erythrocyte maintained during the intraerythrocytic cycle? We have used water window cryo X-ray tomography to determine cell morphology and hemoglobin content at diffe...

  16. Role of hemoglobin from blood clam Scapharca kagoshimensis beyond oxygen transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Zhao, Jun; Jing, Zhao; Zhang, Yanan; Shi, Ying; Fan, Tingjun

    2015-05-01

    The evolutionary race between hosts and pathogens has led to a variety of adaptations. Little is known about the immunological role of hemoglobin (Hb) in antimicrobial immune responses. Results showed that a 31.2 kDa monodimer Hb (skHbI) and a 57.8 kDa heterotetramer Hb (skHbII) from the blood clam, Scapharca kagoshimensis, had phenoloxidase (PO)-like activities and antimicrobial activities. Both were found capable of oxidizing l-DOPA, catechol and hydroquinone. Their PO-like activities were visibly greatly inhibited by oxidase inhibitors, EDTA, and divalent metal ions, and greatly enhanced by isopropanol and Fe(2+), indicating that they have the properties of a metalloenzyme and a catecholase-type PO as well. They also showed obvious anti-bacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria but not against either gram-negative bacteria nor fungi. The anti-bacterial activities levels were a result of the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of superoxide anions. These results indicate that skHbI and skHbII, not only function as iron-containing oxygen carriers, but also exert anti-bacterial activities and catecholase-type oxidizing activities. The fact that skHbII exerts high level of PO-like activity indicates different roles in the innate immunodefense system. These results may improve understanding of the multiple functions of invertebrate Hbs beyond serving as oxygen carriers and may provide insight into how the fundamental and universal mode of the innate immune system has persisted in respiratory proteins throughout the course of evolution. PMID:25700784

  17. Evaluation of non cyanide methods for hemoglobin estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya B Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hemoglobincyanide method (HiCN method for measuring hemoglobin is used extensively worldwide; its advantages are the ready availability of a stable and internationally accepted reference standard calibrator. However, its use may create a problem, as the waste disposal of large volumes of reagent containing cyanide constitutes a potential toxic hazard. Aims and Objective: As an alternative to drabkin`s method of Hb estimation, we attempted to estimate hemoglobin by other non-cyanide methods: alkaline hematin detergent (AHD-575 using Triton X-100 as lyser and alkaline- borax method using quarternary ammonium detergents as lyser. Materials and Methods: The hemoglobin (Hb results on 200 samples of varying Hb concentrations obtained by these two cyanide free methods were compared with a cyanmethemoglobin method on a colorimeter which is light emitting diode (LED based. Hemoglobin was also estimated in one hundred blood donors and 25 blood samples of infants and compared by these methods. Statistical analysis used was Pearson`s correlation coefficient. Results: The response of the non cyanide method is linear for serially diluted blood samples over the Hb concentration range from 3gm/dl -20 gm/dl. The non cyanide methods has a precision of + 0.25g/dl (coefficient of variation= (2.34% and is suitable for use with fixed wavelength or with colorimeters at wavelength- 530 nm and 580 nm. Correlation of these two methods was excellent (r=0.98. The evaluation has shown it to be as reliable and reproducible as HiCN for measuring hemoglobin at all concentrations. The reagents used in non cyanide methods are non-biohazardous and did not affect the reliability of data determination and also the cost was less than HiCN method. Conclusions: Thus, non cyanide methods of Hb estimation offer possibility of safe and quality Hb estimation and should prove useful for routine laboratory use. Non cyanide methods is easily incorporated in hemobloginometers

  18. Improvements in or relating to antibodies active against human hemoglobin Asub(1C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for preparing an antibody against human hemoglobin Asub(1c) which is substantially free of cross-reactivity against the human hemoglobins A0, Asub(1a) and Asub(1b). The antibodies are collected from cats, goats or sheep following injections of purified hemoglobin Asub(1c) antigen since these animals do not naturally produce hemoglobin Asub(1c). A radioimmunoassay method is also described whereby these antibodies are used to determine the quantity of hemoglobin Asub(1c) in blood samples. This is a useful technique in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. (U.K.)

  19. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  20. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua hemoglobin genes: multiplicity and polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamperl A Kurt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemoglobin (Hb polymorphism, assessed by protein gel electrophoresis, has been used almost exclusively to characterize the genetic structure of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua populations and to establish correlations with phenotypic traits such as Hb oxygen binding capacity, temperature tolerance and growth characteristics. The genetic system used to explain the results of gel electrophoresis entails the presence of one polymorphic locus with two major alleles (HbI-1; HbI-2. However, vertebrates have more than one gene encoding Hbs and recent studies have reported that more than one Hb gene is present in Atlantic cod. These observations prompted us to re-evaluate the number of Hb genes expressed in Atlantic cod, and to perform an in depth search for polymorphisms that might produce relevant phenotypes for breeding programs. Results Analysis of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs led to the identification of nine distinct Hb transcripts; four corresponding to the α Hb gene family and five to the β Hb gene family. To gain insights about the Hb genes encoding these transcripts, genomic sequence data was generated from heterozygous (HbI-1/2 parents and fifteen progeny; five of each HbI type, i.e., HbI-1/1, HbI-1/2 and HbI-2/2. β Hb genes displayed more polymorphism than α Hb genes. Two major allele types (β1A and β1B that differ by two linked non-synonymous substitutions (Met55Val and Lys62Ala were found in the β1 Hb gene, and the distribution of these β1A and β1B alleles among individuals was congruent with that of the HbI-1 and HbI-2 alleles determined by protein gel electrophoresis. RT-PCR and Q-PCR analysis of the nine Hb genes indicates that all genes are expressed in adult fish, but their level of expression varies greatly; higher expression of almost all Hb genes was found in individuals displaying the HbI-2/2 electrophoretic type. Conclusion This study indicates that more Hb genes are present and expressed in adult

  1. Oxygenation properties of hemoglobin from the turtle Geochelone carbonaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsoni, M A; Ogo, S H

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen-binding properties of hemoglobin (Hb) from the adult terrestrial turtle Geochelone carbonaria are described. Turtle hemoglobins have a low intrinsic oxygen affinity and a low sensitivity to an endogenous cofactor (ATP) usually present at high concentrations in the reptile erythrocytes. The amplitude of the Bohr effect for O2 binding was virtually the same in the absence and presence of saturating ATP concentrations (delta logP50/delta pH, about -0.60) and increased in the total hemolysate (-0.83). The large Bohr effect found in G. carbonaria Hb may be important for O2 delivery to the tissue. The degree of cooperativity displayed by Hb for O2 binding ranged between 1.5 and 2.0 in stripped solution and total hemolysate. These observations suggest that stability of the low affinity conformation, which needs to be confirmed by additional experiments. PMID:8728839

  2. Hemoglobin concentrations and associated factors in adolescentes from Recife, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Barros Soares Mendonça

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of anemia and associated factors in adolescents from the city of Recife in Pernambuco state. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study, involving a random sample of 256 adolescents of both genders, aged 13 to 18, whose hemoglobin concentrations were evaluated, along with their nutritional status and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: The prevalence of inadequate hemoglobin concentrations was 10.2% [CI95%=6.7-14.5], reaching levels considered as mild anemia (9 g/dL 0.05, nor with socioeconomic or demographic characteristics (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: Although the prevalence of anemia was low and classified as a mild health problem, preventive nutrition education involving the dissemination of healthy eating habits in schools and encouraging the consumption of iron-rich foods are strongly recommended.

  3. Liposomes surface conjugated with human hemoglobin target delivery to macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ning; Palmer, Andre F.

    2011-01-01

    Current strategies to deliver therapeutic molecules to specific cell and tissue types rely on conjugation of antibodies and other targeting ligands directly to the therapeutic molecule itself or its carrier. This work describes a novel strategy to deliver therapeutic molecules into macrophages that takes advantage of the native hemoglobin (Hb) scavenging activity of plasma haptoglobin (Hp) and the subsequent uptake of the Hb-Hp complex into macrophages via CD163 receptor mediated endocytosis....

  4. Initial studies of hypoxic radioprotection by deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial studies were performed to examine the potential of perfused dextran-hemoglobin to protect pig skin or mouse bone marrow cells against radiation damage. Some protection was indicated in both systems. In the pig skin a protection factor of 1.5 was observed for moist desquamation, and 2.0 for necrosis. These results suggest the possibility of using blood substitutes to induce tissue hypoxia for therapeutic purposes

  5. Allylation of Intraerythrocytic Hemoglobin by Raw Garlic Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaventura, Joseph; Rodriguez, Eva N.; Beyley, Veronica; Vega, Irving E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that deoxygenated human red blood cells (RBCs) converted garlic-derived polysulfides into hydrogen sulfide, which in turn produced vasorelaxation in aortic ring preparations. The vasoactivity was proposed to occur via glucose- and thiol-dependent acellular reactions. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of garlic extracts with human deoxygenated RBCs and its effect on intracellular hemoglobin molecules. The results showed that garlic extract covalent...

  6. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a predictor of iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ni Made Rini Suari; Ketut Ariawati; Nyoman Adiputra

    2015-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common form of anemia in developing countries, such as Indonesia. Iron deficiency anemia in children is a serious problem because it affects their growth and development. Early detection of IDA and subsequent treatment in childhood may prevent future health problems. Objective To assess the use of reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) to detect IDA in children aged 6-60 months. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study to measure ...

  7. Multimeric hemoglobin of the Australian brine shrimp Parartemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M; Matthews, C M; Trotman, C N

    2001-04-01

    The hemoglobin molecule of the commercially important brine shrimp Artemia sp. has been used extensively as a model for the study of molecular evolution. It consists of nine globin domains joined by short linker sequences, and these domains are believed to have originated through a series of duplications from an original globin gene. In addition, in Artemia, two different polymers of hemoglobin, called C and T, are found which differ by 11.7% at the amino acid level and are believed to have diverged about 60 MYA. This provides a set of data of 18 globin domain sequences that have evolved in the same organism. The pattern of amino acid substitution between these two polymers is unusual, with pairs of equivalent domains displaying differences of up to 2.7-fold in total amino acid substitution. Such differences would reflect a similar range of molecular-clock rates in what appear to be duplicate, structurally equivalent domains. In order to provide a reference outgroup, we sequenced the cDNA for a nine-domain hemoglobin (P) from another genus of brine shrimp, Parartemia zietziana, which differs morphologically and ecologically from Artemia and is endemic to Australia. Parartemia produces only one hundredth the amount of hemoglobin that Artemia produces and does not upregulate production in response to low oxygen partial pressure. Comparison of the globin domains at the amino acid and DNA levels suggests that the Artemia globin T gene has accumulated substitutions differently from the Parartemia P and Artemia C globin genes. We discuss the questions of accelerated evolution after duplication and possible functions for the Parartemia globin. PMID:11264409

  8. Reference intervals for acetylated fetal hemoglobin in healthy newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Paleari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The acetylated fetal hemoglobin (AcHbF derives from an enzyme-mediated post-translational modification occurring on the N-terminal glycine residues of γ-chains. At present, no established data are available on reference intervals for AcHbF in newborns. A total of 92 healthy infants, with gestational age between 37 and 41 weeks were selected for the establishment of AcHbF reference intervals. Blood samples were collected by heel pricking, when collecting routine neonatal screening, and the hemoglobin pattern was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. AcHbF results were then normalized for HbF content in order to account for differences in hemoglobin switch. No difference was found in AcHbF values between genders (P=0.858. AcHbF results were as follow: 12.8±0.8% (mean±standard deviation, reference interval: 11.3-14.3%. This finding could facilitate further studies aimed to assess the possible use of AcHbF, for instance as a possible fetal metabolic biomarker during pregnancy.

  9. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a predictor of iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Rini Suari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is the most common form of anemia in developing countries, such as Indonesia. Iron deficiency anemia in children is a serious problem because it affects their growth and development. Early detection of IDA and subsequent treatment in childhood may prevent future health problems. Objective To assess the use of reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr to detect IDA in children aged 6-60 months. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study to measure the sensitivity and specificity of CHr compared to serum ferritin which is considered to be the gold standard for IDA diagnosis. The study was conducted from September 2011 to March 2013 in children aged 6-60 months who visited the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic, Sanglah Hospital, and Puskesmas II in West Denpasar. Data analysis was performed by 2x2 table. The results were assessed by area under the curve (AUC and receiver operating characteristic (ROC. Results Of 121 children underwent blood testing during the study period, 69 children were excluded because they did not have hypochromic microcytic anemia, leaving 52 subjects eligible for the study. The prevalence of IDA in this study was 31%. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr ≤ 23.1 pg had 88% (95%CI 71 to 100% sensitivity and 25% (95%CI 11 to 39% specificity. Conclusion Reticulocyte hemoglobin content < 23.1 pg may be a good predictor of IDA. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:171-5.].

  10. Characterization of trypsin-derived peptides acrylamide-adducted hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even though there are a number of sources for human exposure to acrylamide, reliable biomarkers of exposure are not available. In an effort to develop such a biomarker, the authors are characterizing peptides derived from trypsin digests of acrylamide-adducted hemoglobin. For this, radiolabeled acrylamide was incubated with this, radiolabeled acrylamide was incubated with purified human hemoglobin (Ao) and decomposition products removed by dialysis. When the adducted hemoglobin was separated by reverse-phase HPLC, radioactivity eluted with the α and β subunits, suggesting covalent binding. Digestion of individual subunits with trypsin followed by reverse phase HPLC, indicated that most of the radioactivity associated with the α subunit co-eluted with a single peptide. Similar results were observed for the β subunit except that significant amounts of radioactivity eluted with the solvent front, suggesting that radioactivity was released by trypsin digestion. Currently, these preparation are under further characterization by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. This approach will aid in the identification of the adducted will aid in the identification of the adducted peptide and subsequent preparation of an acrylamide-specific antibody

  11. Evolutionary and Functional Relationships in the Truncated Hemoglobin Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Juan P; Radusky, Leandro; Boechi, Leonardo; Estrin, Darío A; Ten Have, Arjen; Martí, Marcelo A

    2016-01-01

    Predicting function from sequence is an important goal in current biological research, and although, broad functional assignment is possible when a protein is assigned to a family, predicting functional specificity with accuracy is not straightforward. If function is provided by key structural properties and the relevant properties can be computed using the sequence as the starting point, it should in principle be possible to predict function in detail. The truncated hemoglobin family presents an interesting benchmark study due to their ubiquity, sequence diversity in the context of a conserved fold and the number of characterized members. Their functions are tightly related to O2 affinity and reactivity, as determined by the association and dissociation rate constants, both of which can be predicted and analyzed using in-silico based tools. In the present work we have applied a strategy, which combines homology modeling with molecular based energy calculations, to predict and analyze function of all known truncated hemoglobins in an evolutionary context. Our results show that truncated hemoglobins present conserved family features, but that its structure is flexible enough to allow the switch from high to low affinity in a few evolutionary steps. Most proteins display moderate to high oxygen affinities and multiple ligand migration paths, which, besides some minor trends, show heterogeneous distributions throughout the phylogenetic tree, again suggesting fast functional adaptation. Our data not only deepens our comprehension of the structural basis governing ligand affinity, but they also highlight some interesting functional evolutionary trends. PMID:26788940

  12. Hemoglobinas AS/alfa talassemia: importância diagnóstica Hemoglobins AS/alpha thalassemia: diagnostic importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Tomé-Alves

    2000-12-01

    , the Sickle Cell beta Thalassemia syndromes, and Hemoglobinopathies in which hemoglobin S is in association with another abnormal hemoglobin, such as hemoglobin S/C. The Sickle Cell trait (hemoglobin AS associated with Alpha Thalassemia presents alterations in the red blood cells morphology, usually absent in the heterozygous for this hemoglobin variant. The interaction between hemoglobin S and alpha Thalassemia has been described as one of the factors responsible for the improvement in the clinical picture of homozygous of hemoglobin S (Sickle Cell Anemia, decreasing the number of episodes of pain. The genetic mechanisms of this influence are evaluated using molecular analyses of the human globin genes. With the objective of verifying the presence of alpha Thalassemia in heterozygous of hemoglobin S, with anemia, sent to the Laboratory of Hemoglobins, Department of Biology, UNESP, São José do Rio Preto, SP, we analyzed 1002 blood samples with Sickle Cell trait, in the period from 1990 to 1998. The samples were picked with EDTA 5% as anticoagulant, after previous authorization of the carriers. Appropriated counseling and management requires definitive diagnosis. For the laboratorial diagnosis the blood samples were submitted to electrophoretic procedures in alkaline and acid pH and cytological evaluation of hemoglobin H. The electrophoretic procedures confirmed the presence of hemoglobin AS. The cytological evaluation evidenced the presence of alpha Thalassemia. Of this total analyzed, 16(1,59% blood samples presented the association between hemoglobin AS and alpha Thalassemia and two individuals belonged of the same family. Our results addressed us to suggest to the routine laboratories, that is important to accomplish the research of alpha Thalassemia among the Sickle Cell trait, with anemia, to verify the interaction with alpha Thalassemia, supplying to the carriers a important information on its hematological profile, genetic pattern of hemoglobinopathies and the

  13. Molten globule of hemoglobin proceeds into aggregates and advanced glycated end products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Iram

    Full Text Available Conformational alterations of bovine hemoglobin (Hb upon sequential addition of glyoxal over a range of 0-90% v/v were investigated. At 20% v/v glyoxal, molten globule (MG state of Hb was observed by altered tryptophan fluorescence, high ANS binding, existence of intact heme, native-like secondary structure as depicted by far-UV circular dichroism (CD and ATR-FTIR spectra as well as loss in tertiary structure as confirmed by near-UV CD spectra. In addition, size exclusion chromatography analysis depicted that MG state at 20% v/v glyoxal corresponded to expanded pre-dissociated dimers. Aggregates of Hb were detected at 70% v/v glyoxal. These aggregates of Hb had altered tryptophan environment, low ANS binding, exposed heme, increased β-sheet secondary structure, loss in tertiary structure, enhanced thioflavin T (ThT fluorescence and red shifted Congo Red (CR absorbance. On incubating Hb with 30% v/v glyoxal for 0-20 days, advanced glycation end products (AGEs were detected on day 20. These AGEs were characterised by enhanced tryptophan fluorescence at 450 nm, exposure of heme, increase in intermolecular β-sheets, enhanced ThT fluorescence and red shift in CR absorbance. Comet assay revealed aggregates and AGEs to be genotoxic in nature. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the amorphous structure of aggregates and branched fibrils of AGEs. The transformation of α-helix to β-sheet usually alters the normal protein to amyloidogenic resulting in a variety of protein conformational disorders such as diabetes, prion and Huntington's.

  14. Glycated hemoglobin and its spinoffs: Cardiovascular disease markers or risk factors?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jumana; Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major complication of diabetes, increasing the risk of cardiovascular related morbidities and mortalities. The hallmark of diabetes is hyperglycemia which duration is best predicted by elevated glycated haemoglobin A1C(Hb A1C) levels. Diabetic complications are usually attributed to oxidative stress associated with glycation of major structural and functional proteins. This non-enzymatic glycation of long lived proteins such as collagen, albumin, fibrinogen, liver enzymes and globulins result in the formation of early and advanced glycation end products(AGEs) associated with the production of myriads of free radicles and oxidants that have detrimental effects leading to diabetic complications. AGEs have been extensively discussed in the literature as etiological factors in the advancement of atherogenic events. Mechanisms described include the effects of glycation on protein structure and function that lead to defective receptor binding, impairment of immune system and enzyme function and alteration of basement membrane structural integrity. Hemoglobin(Hb) is a major circulating protein susceptible to glycation. Glycated Hb, namely Hb A1 C is used as a useful tool in the diagnosis of diabetes progression. Many studies have shown strong positive associations between elevated Hb A1 C levels and existing cardiovascular disease and major risk factors. Also, several studies presented Hb A1 C as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. In spite of extensive reports on positive associations, limited evidence is available considering the role of glycated Hb in the etiology of atherosclerosis. This editorial highlights potential mechanisms by which glycated hemoglobin may contribute, as a causative factor, to the progression of atherosclerosis in diabetics.

  15. Comparison of the binding of the dyes Sudan II and Sudan IV to bovine hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haoyu; Xia, Qing; Liu, Rutao, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn

    2014-04-15

    Sudan dyes are widely used in industry, and sometimes illegally used as food additives despite their potential toxicity. In this work, the interactions of Sudan II and Sudan IV with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) were investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, resonance light scattering (RLS), UV–vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular modeling techniques. Binding of Sudan dyes to BHb could cause static quenching of the fluorescence, indicating changes in the microenvironment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues. The binding constants estimated for Sudan II and IV were 1.84×10{sup 4} L mol{sup −1} and 2.54×10{sup 4} L mol{sup −1}, respectively, at 293 K (20 °C). Each protein molecule bound one Sudan molecule approximately. Sudan II and IV were held at the hydrophobic cavity of BHb mainly by hydrophobic interaction. The decrease of α-helix and the increase of β-sheet seen in the CD spectra revealed a conformational alteration of the protein. From all the results, we conclude that Sudan IV has a stronger impact on the structure and function of BHb than that of Sudan II. -- Highlights: • Spectroscopic results show interaction details of Sudan II and IV with BHb. • The interaction of BHb with Sudan dyes is spontaneous with a 1:1 stoichiometry. • Sudan II and IV are located at the hydrophobic cavity of the BHb, and form complexes via hydrophobic interaction. • A stronger influence of bovine hemoglobin is caused by Sudan IV than that of Sudan II.

  16. Hemoglobin interactions with αB crystallin: a direct test of sensitivity to protein instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler J W Clark

    Full Text Available As a small stress response protein, human αB crystallin, detects protein destabilization that can alter structure and function to cause self assembly of fibrils or aggregates in diseases of aging. The sensitivity of αB crystallin to protein instability was evaluated using wild-type hemoglobin (HbA and hemoglobin S (HbS, the glutamate-6-valine mutant that forms elongated, filamentous aggregates in sickling red blood cells. The progressive thermal unfolding and aggregation of HbA and HbS in solution at 37°C, 50°C and 55°C was measured as increased light scattering. UV circular dichroism (UVCD was used to evaluate conformational changes in HbA and HbS with time at the selected temperatures. The changes in interactions between αB crystallin and HbA or HbS with temperature were analyzed using differential centrifugation and SDS PAGE at 37°C, 50°C and 55°C. After only 5 minutes at the selected temperatures, differences in the aggregation or conformation of HbA and HbS were not observed, but αB crystallin bound approximately 6% and 25% more HbS than HbA at 37°C, and 50°C respectively. The results confirmed (a the remarkable sensitivity of αB crystallin to structural instabilities at the very earliest stages of thermal unfolding and (b an ability to distinguish the self assembling mutant form of HbS from the wild type HbA in solution.

  17. Current hemoglobin levels are more predictive of disease progression than hemoglobin measured at baseline in patients receiving antiretroviral treatment for HIV type 1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalska, Justyna D; Mocroft, Amanda; Blaxhult, Anders; Colebunders, Robert; van Lunzen, Jan; Podlekareva, Daria; Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Machala, Ladislav; Yust, Israel; Benfield, Thomas; NN, NN

    2007-01-01

    The role of hemoglobin levels as an independent prognostic marker of progression to AIDS and/or death in HIV-infected patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) was investigated. A total of 2,579 patients from the EuroSIDA cohort with hemoglobin, CD4 cell count, and HIV RNA viral...

  18. Contribution of a mutational hot spot to hemoglobin adaptation in high-altitude Andean house wrens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, Spencer C; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki; Weber, Roy E; Fago, Angela; Benham, Phred M; Chavez, Andrea N; Cheviron, Zachary A; Storz, Jay F; Witt, Christopher C

    2015-11-10

    A key question in evolutionary genetics is why certain mutations or certain types of mutation make disproportionate contributions to adaptive phenotypic evolution. In principle, the preferential fixation of particular mutations could stem directly from variation in the underlying rate of mutation to function-altering alleles. However, the influence of mutation bias on the genetic architecture of phenotypic evolution is difficult to evaluate because data on rates of mutation to function-altering alleles are seldom available. Here, we report the discovery that a single point mutation at a highly mutable site in the β(A)-globin gene has contributed to an evolutionary change in hemoglobin (Hb) function in high-altitude Andean house wrens (Troglodytes aedon). Results of experiments on native Hb variants and engineered, recombinant Hb mutants demonstrate that a nonsynonymous mutation at a CpG dinucleotide in the β(A)-globin gene is responsible for an evolved difference in Hb-O2 affinity between high- and low-altitude house wren populations. Moreover, patterns of genomic differentiation between high- and low-altitude populations suggest that altitudinal differentiation in allele frequencies at the causal amino acid polymorphism reflects a history of spatially varying selection. The experimental results highlight the influence of mutation rate on the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution by demonstrating that a large-effect allele at a highly mutable CpG site has promoted physiological differentiation in blood O2 transport capacity between house wren populations that are native to different elevations. PMID:26460028

  19. Hemoglobin redux: combining neutron and X-ray diffraction with mass spectrometry to analyse the quaternary state of oxidized hemoglobins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueser, Timothy C., E-mail: timothy.mueser@utoledo.edu; Griffith, Wendell P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Kovalevsky, Andrey Y. [Bioscience Division, MS M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Guo, Jingshu; Seaver, Sean [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Langan, Paul [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Bioscience Division, MS M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hanson, B. Leif [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of cyanomethemoglobin are being used to evaluate the structural waters within the dimer–dimer interface involved in quaternary-state transitions. Improvements in neutron diffraction instrumentation are affording the opportunity to re-examine the structures of vertebrate hemoglobins and to interrogate proton and solvent position changes between the different quaternary states of the protein. For hemoglobins of unknown primary sequence, structural studies of cyanomethemoglobin (CNmetHb) are being used to help to resolve sequence ambiguity in the mass spectra. These studies have also provided additional structural evidence for the involvement of oxidized hemoglobin in the process of erythrocyte senescence. X-ray crystal studies of Tibetan snow leopard CNmetHb have shown that this protein crystallizes in the B state, a structure with a more open dyad, which possibly has relevance to RBC band 3 protein binding and erythrocyte senescence. R-state equine CNmetHb crystal studies elaborate the solvent differences in the switch and hinge region compared with a human deoxyhemoglobin T-state neutron structure. Lastly, comparison of histidine protonation between the T and R state should enumerate the Bohr-effect protons.

  20. Hemoglobin redux: combining neutron and X-ray diffraction with mass spectrometry to analyse the quaternary state of oxidized hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Timothy C; Griffith, Wendell P; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Guo, Jingshu; Seaver, Sean; Langan, Paul; Hanson, B Leif

    2010-11-01

    Improvements in neutron diffraction instrumentation are affording the opportunity to re-examine the structures of vertebrate hemoglobins and to interrogate proton and solvent position changes between the different quaternary states of the protein. For hemoglobins of unknown primary sequence, structural studies of cyanomethemoglobin (CNmetHb) are being used to help to resolve sequence ambiguity in the mass spectra. These studies have also provided additional structural evidence for the involvement of oxidized hemoglobin in the process of erythrocyte senescence. X-ray crystal studies of Tibetan snow leopard CNmetHb have shown that this protein crystallizes in the B state, a structure with a more open dyad, which possibly has relevance to RBC band 3 protein binding and erythrocyte senescence. R-state equine CNmetHb crystal studies elaborate the solvent differences in the switch and hinge region compared with a human deoxyhemoglobin T-state neutron structure. Lastly, comparison of histidine protonation between the T and R state should enumerate the Bohr-effect protons. PMID:21041946

  1. Hemoglobin redux: combining neutron and X-ray diffraction with mass spectrometry to analyse the quaternary state of oxidized hemoglobins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of cyanomethemoglobin are being used to evaluate the structural waters within the dimer–dimer interface involved in quaternary-state transitions. Improvements in neutron diffraction instrumentation are affording the opportunity to re-examine the structures of vertebrate hemoglobins and to interrogate proton and solvent position changes between the different quaternary states of the protein. For hemoglobins of unknown primary sequence, structural studies of cyanomethemoglobin (CNmetHb) are being used to help to resolve sequence ambiguity in the mass spectra. These studies have also provided additional structural evidence for the involvement of oxidized hemoglobin in the process of erythrocyte senescence. X-ray crystal studies of Tibetan snow leopard CNmetHb have shown that this protein crystallizes in the B state, a structure with a more open dyad, which possibly has relevance to RBC band 3 protein binding and erythrocyte senescence. R-state equine CNmetHb crystal studies elaborate the solvent differences in the switch and hinge region compared with a human deoxyhemoglobin T-state neutron structure. Lastly, comparison of histidine protonation between the T and R state should enumerate the Bohr-effect protons

  2. Biosorption of lead by e. coli strains expressingvitreoscilla hemoglobin: isotherm modeling with two-and three-parameter models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aljundi, Isam H. [Chemical Engineering Department, Mutah University, Al-Karak (Jordan); Khleifat, Khaled M. [Biology Department, Mutah University, Al-Karak (Jordan)

    2010-06-15

    Biosorption is presented as an alternative choice to traditional physicochemical means for removing toxic metals from groundwater and wastewaters. Removal of lead (Pb) from solutions was studied using Escherichia coli (parental) and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb)-expressing E. coli (transformed) cells. Pb biosorption was increased in bacterial hemoglobin-expressing E. coli cells grown in Luria broth B containing different concentrations of Pb{sup 2+}. The maximum Pb{sup 2+} biosorption of transformed and parental cells was determined to be 612 and 370 {mu}g Pb/g biomass, respectively. The inhibitory effect of Pb{sup 2+} on the parental strain was determined at 10 ppm. However, in transformed cells, Pb{sup 2+} was lethal at 100 ppm. The optimum aeration required for the transformed cells was lower than that for the parental strain on a growth yield basis. A linear correlation was established between the biosorption and uptake amounts. The biosorption process was analyzed using two-parameter (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin) and three-parameter models (Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Toth). The chi-square test was used to compare these models. It was demonstrated that the three-parameter model is better in describing biosorption equilibria a, white the Sips equation showed the best description for both types of cells. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  4. Knock-out of SO1377 gene, which encodes the member of a conserved hypothetical bacterial protein family COG2268, results in alteration of iron metabolism, increased spontaneous mutation and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingeman Dawn M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative, gram-negative bacterium capable of coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to a wide range of electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate and metals, and has potential for bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated sites. The complete 5-Mb genome of S. oneidensis MR-1 was sequenced and standard sequence-comparison methods revealed approximately 42% of the MR-1 genome encodes proteins of unknown function. Defining the functions of hypothetical proteins is a great challenge and may need a systems approach. In this study, by using integrated approaches including whole genomic microarray and proteomics, we examined knockout effects of the gene encoding SO1377 (gi24372955, a member of the conserved, hypothetical, bacterial protein family COG2268 (Clusters of Orthologous Group in bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, under various physiological conditions. Results Compared with the wild-type strain, growth assays showed that the deletion mutant had a decreased growth rate when cultured aerobically, but not affected under anaerobic conditions. Whole-genome expression (RNA and protein profiles revealed numerous gene and protein expression changes relative to the wild-type control, including some involved in iron metabolism, oxidative damage protection and respiratory electron transfer, e. g. complex IV of the respiration chain. Although total intracellular iron levels remained unchanged, whole-cell electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR demonstrated that the level of free iron in mutant cells was 3 times less than that of the wild-type strain. Siderophore excretion in the mutant also decreased in iron-depleted medium. The mutant was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and gave rise to 100 times more colonies resistant to gentamicin or kanamycin. Conclusion Our results showed that the knock-out of SO1377 gene had pleiotropic effects and suggested that SO1377 may play a role in iron

  5. Lessons from Anaplasma phagocytophilum: Chromatin Remodeling by Bacterial Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens can alter global host gene expression via histone modifications and chromatin remodeling in order to subvert host responses, including those involved with innate immunity, allowing for bacterial survival. Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum express effector proteins that modify host histones and chromatin structure. A. phagocytophilum modulates granulocyte respiratory burst in part by dampening transcription of se...

  6. Benefits of delayed fetal hemoglobin (HbF) switching in sickle cell disease (SCD): a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack-Mabien, Ardie V; Imran, Hamayun

    2013-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autosomal recessive hemoglobinopathy with significant morbidity and mortality. Complications include: vasoocclusive pain crisis, bacterial infection, cerebral vascular accident, acute chest syndrome, and chronic lung and kidney disease. Among many other factors affecting the severity of sickle cell disease, synthesis of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) emerged as an important prognostic factor and has long been recognized to decrease disease severity. This report discusses the attenuated clinical course of a child who continued to produce HbF well beyond the reported age of fetal switching. We further discuss the underlying genetic aspects of HbF production and review the pertinent literature. PMID:23588330

  7. Study of Hemoglobin in Vegetarian and Non-Vegetarian Diet in Obese Women with risk of cardiac Problem in Lucknow city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shyam vinay sharma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hemoglobin level and pattern of food intake is closely associated with risk of cardiovascular diseases. The cardiovascular diseases are primarily may be due to altered lipid profile which is depend on type and pattern of food intake. Association of vegetarian and non-vegetarianisms in obese women is controversial. Method: The study was conducted on vegetarianism and non-vegetarianism obese female. A total of 55 subjects were enrolled (35 cases and 20 control for the study. The Anthropometric measurements viz. height, weight, BMI and WHR, BP, were taken and hemoglobin level (Hg % was assessed in vegetarian and non-vegetarianism obese women. Results: Our results showed that hemoglobin level (Hg % in non-vegetarianism obese women was (12.35±1.083 high than vegetarian (9.036±1.002 obese women. The blood pressure systolic and diastolic was higher in the non-vegetarian obese women than vegetarians obese female. There were no significant difference was found in heart rate in both groups i.e. vegetarianism and non-vegetarianism obese female. The Blood pressure systolic and diastolic was (127.63± 20.16 and 79.23±10.78 and (128.71± 23.14 and 83.26±9.23 in Vegetarian Non-vegetarian respectively. Discussion: Thus Hemoglobin Level (Hg % of non-vegetarianism were high in obese women than vegetarian. Due to Some nutrients intake, hemoglobin level was better in non-vegetarians than vegetarians. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(2.000: 169-172

  8. Characterization of Spbhp-37, a Hemoglobin-Binding Protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Espejel, María E.; Rodríguez, Mario A.; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Ríos-Castro, Emmanuel; Olivares-Trejo, José de Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive microorganism that is the cause of bacterial pneumonia, sinusitis and otitis media. This human pathogen also can cause invasive diseases such as meningitis, bacteremia and septicemia. Hemoglobin (Hb) and haem can support the growth and viability of S. pneumoniae as sole iron sources. Unfortunately, the acquisition mechanism of Hb and haem in this bacterium has been poorly studied. Previously we identified two proteins of 37 and 22 kDa as putative Hb- and haem-binding proteins (Spbhp-37 and Spbhp-22, respectively). The sequence of Spbhp-37 protein was database annotated as lipoprotein without any function or localization. Here it was immunolocalized in the surface cell by transmission electron microscopy using specific antibodies produced against the recombinant protein. The expression of Spbhp-37 was increased when bacteria were grown in media culture supplied with Hb. In addition, the affinity of Sphbp-37 for Hb was determined. Thus, in this work we are presenting new findings that attempt to explain the mechanism involved in iron acquisition of this pathogen. In the future these results could help to develop new therapy targets in order to avoid the secondary effects caused by the traditional therapies. PMID:27200302

  9. Molecular imaging of hemoglobin using ground state recovery pump-probe optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Brian E.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2007-02-01

    We have undertaken an effort to further develop ground state recovery Pump-Probe Optical Coherence Tomograpy (gsrPPOCT) to specifically target and measure 3-D images of hemoglobin concentration with the goals of mapping tissue vasculature, total hemoglobin, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation. As a first step toward those goals we have measured the gsrPPOCT signal from the hemoglobin in the filament arteries of a zebra danio fish. We have further processed the resulting signal to extract a qualitative map of the hemoglobin concentration. We have also demonstrated the potential to use ground state recovery times to differentiate between two chromophores which may prove to be an effective tool for differentiating between oxy and deoxy hemoglobin.

  10. Long-term variation in hemoglobin concentration in nestling great tits Parus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliński, Adam; Bańbura, Mirosława; Glądalski, Michał; Markowski, Marcin; Skwarska, Joanna; Wawrzyniak, Jarosław; Zieliński, Piotr; Cyżewska, Iwona; Bańbura, Jerzy

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have previously proposed that blood hemoglobin concentration in nestling passerines is a reliable index of individual condition and nutritional state. In this paper we present results concerning variation in hemoglobin concentration in the blood of ca. 14-day-old nestling great tits Parus major in central Poland in an 11-year-long period, 2003-2013, in two distinct habitat types: urban park and deciduous forest. The most important findings of the study were: (i) variation in hemoglobin concentration was consistent within broods, (ii) hemoglobin concentration of nestlings varied markedly across years, (iii) hemoglobin concentration was significantly higher in the forest study site which is richer in terms of food abundance during the short period of tits breeding season and (iv) high hemoglobin level was a predictor of nestling survival from hatching to fledging. PMID:25770667

  11. Mass Spectra and Ion Collision Cross Sections of Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yang; Terrier, Peran; Douglas, D. J.

    2011-02-01

    Mass spectra of commercially obtained hemoglobin (Hb) show higher levels of monomer and dimer ions, heme-deficient dimer ions, and apo-monomer ions than hemoglobin freshly prepared from blood. This has previously been attributed to oxidation of commercial Hb. Further, it has been reported that that dimer ions from commercial bovine Hb have lower collision cross sections than low charge state monomer ions. To investigate these effects further, we have recorded mass spectra of fresh human Hb, commercial human and bovine Hb, fresh human Hb oxidized with H2O2, lyophilized fresh human Hb, fresh human Hb both lyophilized and chemically oxidized, and commercial human Hb oxidized with H2O2. Masses of α-monomer ions of all hemoglobins agree with the masses expected from the sequences within 3 Da or better. Mass spectra of the β chains of commercial Hb and oxidized fresh human Hb show a peak or shoulder on the high mass side, consistent with oxidation of the protein. Both commercial proteins and oxidized fresh human Hb produce heme-deficient dimers with masses 32 Da greater than expected and higher levels of monomer and dimer ions than fresh Hb. Lyophilization or oxidation of Hb both produce higher levels of monomer and dimer ions in mass spectra. Fresh human Hb, commercial human Hb, commercial bovine Hb, and oxidized commercial human Hb all give dimer ions with cross sections greater than monomer ions. Thus, neither oxidation of Hb or the difference in sequence between human and bovine Hb make substantial differences to cross sections of ions.

  12. Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Hemoglobin on Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Lescuyer, Pierre; Clerici, Lorella; Tsybin, Yury O.; Hartmer, Ralf; Meyer, Markus; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Scherl, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A mass spectrometry-based assay combining the specificity of selected reaction monitoring and the protein ion activation capabilities of electron transfer dissociation was developed and employed for the rapid identification of hemoglobin variants from whole blood without previous proteolytic cleavage. The analysis was performed in a robust ion trap mass spectrometer operating at nominal mass accuracy and resolution. Subtle differences in globin sequences, resulting with mass shifts of about one Da, can be unambiguously identified. These results suggest that mass spectrometry analysis of entire proteins using electron transfer dissociation can be employed on clinical samples in a workflow compatible with diagnostic applications.

  13. Free Heme and the Polymerization of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Uzunova, Veselina V.; Pan, Weichun; Galkin, Oleg; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    In search of novel control parameters for the polymerization of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS), the primary pathogenic event of sickle cell anemia, we explore the role of free heme, which may be excessively released in sickle erythrocytes. We show that the concentration of free heme in HbS solutions typically used in the laboratory is 0.02–0.04 mole heme/mole HbS. We show that dialysis of small molecules out of HbS solutions arrests HbS polymerization. The addition of 100–260 μM of free heme to...

  14. Moessbauer studies of hemoglobin in high altitude polycythemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Moessbauer spectra have been measured in erythrocytes from normal adults and the patients with high altitude polycythemia (HAPC). The results indicated that two subspectra ''a'' and ''b'', corresponding to oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin respectively, were present in all blood samples, and a third subspectrum ''c'' was found to exist in almost all samples from the patients. The parameters of the third subspectra ''c1'' in most samples from the patients were similar to those of carbon monoxyhemoglobin. The components were considered to be the denatured hemoglobin in RBCs (red blood cells). Together with clinical analysis, a possible mechanism of HAPC has been discussed. (orig.)

  15. Balanced globin protein expression and heme biosynthesis improve production of human hemoglobin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lifang; Martínez, José L.; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Due to limitations associated with whole blood for transfusions (antigen compatibility, transmission of infections, supply and storage), the use of cell-free hemoglobin as an oxygen carrier substitute has been in the center of research interest for decades. Human hemoglobin has previously been synthesized in yeast, however the challenge is to balance the expression of the two different globin subunits, as well as the supply of the prosthetic heme required for obtaining the active hemoglobin (...

  16. Oxidative stress in preeclampsia and the role of free fetal hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson, Stefan R.; Nääv, Åsa; Erlandsson, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of pregnancy complications and affects 3-7% of pregnant women. This review summarizes the current knowledge of a new potential etiology of the disease, with a special focus on hemoglobin-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, we also suggest hemoglobin as a potential target for therapy. Gene and protein profiling studies have shown increased expression and accumulation of free fetal hemoglobin in the preeclamptic placenta. Predominantly due to oxidative damage ...

  17. Quantitative analysis of composition, structure and features of hemoglobin under the influence of radiation in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The literature data on the changes in composition, structure and properties of hemoglobin under the influence of ionizing radiation in vivo are reviewed. The algorithm of calculation of damaged hemoglobin molecule percentage is proposed. Four main realizations of radiation-chemical damage are considered. By the algorithm the estimation of the damaged molecules percentage resulted from the exposure to 10 Gy is given. Hemoglobin radiation damage is considered as one of the most important mechanisms triggering radiation sickness. 11 refs

  18. Hemoglobin Concentration and Pregnancy Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mark McEvoy; Chusak Okascharoen; Ammarin Thakkinstian; John Attia; Boonying Siribumrungwong; Bunyarit Sukrat; Chumpon Wilasrusmee

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of hemoglobin effect on the pregnancy outcomes. Methods. We searched MEDLINE and SCOPUS from January 1, 1990 to April 10, 2011. Observational studies addressing association between hemoglobin and adverse pregnancy outcomes were selected. Two reviewers independently extracted data. A mixed logistic regression was applied to assess the effects of hemoglobin on preterm birth, low birth weight, and small for gestational age. Results. Sev...

  19. The intrathecal CD163-haptoglobin–hemoglobin scavenging system in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Galea, James; Cruickshank, Garth; Teeling, Jessica L.; Boche, Delphine; Garland, Patrick; Perry, V. Hugh; Galea, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia resulting from extracellular hemoglobin is an important determinant of outcome in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Hemoglobin is scavenged by the CD163-haptoglobin system in the circulation, but little is known about this scavenging pathway in the human CNS. The components of this system were analyzed in normal cerebrospinal fluid and after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The intrathecal presence of the CD163-haptoglobin–hemoglobin scavenging system was unequivocally demonstrated. ...

  20. Hemoglobin binding of arylamines and nitroarenes: molecular dosimetry and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbioni, G

    1994-01-01

    N-Oxidation and nitroreduction to yield N-hydroxyarylamines are metabolic steps that are crucial for the genotoxic properties of aromatic amines and nitroarenes, respectively. N-Hydroxyarylamines can form adducts with DNA, tissue proteins, and the blood proteins albumin and hemoglobin in a dose-dependent manner. The determination of hemoglobin adducts is a useful tool for biomonitoring exposed populations. We have established the hemoglobin binding index (HBI) [(mmole compound/mole Hb)/(mmole...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Some Surprising Aspects of the Equilibrium between Hemoglobin, Carbon Monoxide, and Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senozan, N. M.; Devore, J. A.

    1996-08-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning and some aspects of the equilibrium between carbon monoxide, oxygen, and hemoglobin are discussed within the framework of Haldane's laws. The effect of CO on respiration is analyzed quantitatively using oxygen dissociation curves of hemoglobin in presence of carboxyhemoglobin. The analysis shows that the adverse cardiovascular consequences of chronic CO exposure are unlikely to be due to reduced O2 transport capability of hemoglobin.

  2. Lower Hemoglobin Correlates with Larger Stroke Volumes in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly, W. Taylor; Wu, Ona; Arsava, E. Murat; Garg, Priya; Ji, Ruijun; Vangel, Mark; Singhal, Aneesh B; Ay, Hakan; Sorensen, A. Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin tetramers are the major oxygen-carrying molecules within the blood. We hypothesized that a lower hemoglobin level and its reduced oxygen-carrying capacity would associate with larger infarction in acute ischemic stroke patients. Methods We studied 135 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke and perfusion brain MRI. We explored the association of admission hemoglobin with initial infarct volumes on acute images and the volume of infarct expansion on follow-up imag...

  3. Association of lower hemoglobin level and neuropathology in community-dwelling older persons

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Raj C.; Schneider, Julie A.; Leurgans, Sue; Bennett, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Lower hemoglobin levels have been associated with cognitive decline in older persons. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between lower hemoglobin levels and common, age-related neuropathologies associated with cognitive decline. Hemoglobin and neuropathology measures were available in 113 deceased, community-dwelling, older adults participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a prospective, observational, clinical pathology study of aging. The mean hemoglobi...

  4. Bacterial strategies of resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Fu, Chih-Iung; Otto, Michael

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a key component of the host's innate immune system, targeting invasive and colonizing bacteria. For successful survival and colonization of the host, bacteria have a series of mechanisms to interfere with AMP activity, and AMP resistance is intimately connected with the virulence potential of bacterial pathogens. In particular, because AMPs are considered as potential novel antimicrobial drugs, it is vital to understand bacterial AMP resistance mechanisms. This review gives a comparative overview of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strategies of resistance to various AMPs, such as repulsion or sequestration by bacterial surface structures, alteration of membrane charge or fluidity, degradation and removal by efflux pumps.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160595

  5. The temperature dependence of refractive index of hemoglobin at the wavelengths 930 and 1100 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareva, Ekaterina N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the refractive index of hemoglobin was measured at different temperatures within a physiological range and above that is characteristic to light-blood interaction at laser therapy. Measurements were carried out using the multi-wavelength Abbe refractometer (Atago, Japan). The refractive index was measured at two NIR wavelengths of 930 nm and 1100 nm. Samples of hemoglobin solutions with concentration of 80, 120 and 160 g/l were investigated. The temperature was varied between 25 and 55 °C. It was shown that the dependence of the refractive index of hemoglobin is nonlinear with temperature, which may be associated with changes in molecular structure of hemoglobin.

  6. Megalin and cubilin are endocytic receptors involved in renal clearance of hemoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gburek, Jakub; Verroust, Pierre J; Willnow, Thomas E; Fyfe, John C; Nowacki, Wojciech; Jacobsen, Christian; Moestrup, Søren K; Christensen, Erik I

    2002-01-01

    affect the uptake. By use of immunohistochemistry, it was demonstrated that uptake of hemoglobin in proximal tubules of rat, mouse, and dog kidneys occurs under physiologic conditions. Studies on normal and megalin knockout mouse kidney sections showed that megalin is responsible for physiologic...... clearance of hemoglobin. Labeling intensities in kidneys from normal and cubilin-malexpressing dogs were similar, which suggests that, in the normal state, the role of cubilin in uptake of hemoglobin is rather limited. However, cubilin is likely to assist hemoglobin endocytosis in settings of hemoglobinuria...

  7. A tri state mechanism for oxygen release in fish hemoglobin: Using Barbus sharpeyi as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Dayer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin is a porphyrin containing protein with an a2b2 tetrameric structure and like other porphyrin compounds shows spectral behavior of species specific characteristics. Researchers tend to relate bands in the hemoglobin spectra to certain structural and/or functional features. Given the fact that hemoglobin is the main oxygen carrier in animals functioning through the Oxy«Deoxy equilibrium, the determination of oxy and deoxy conformations of hemoglobins of different animals may shed light on their oxygen binding properties. Absorption spectra at 280 and 373nm have been widely used to quantitate the formation of hemoglobin deoxy conformation. In the present work, however, we used an optical density ratio of OD373/OD280 as an index for deoxy formation. This ratio was determined for Barbus sharpeyi and human hemoglobins at different SDS concentrations, pH levels and temperatures to compare them from a structure-function point of view. Our data showed that under low concentrations of SDS (Barbus sharpeyi hemoglobin folds in a tri-state pattern while human hemoglobin folds through a two-state phenomenon. This finding indicates that in contrast to those of other non aquatic animals, the hemoglobin of Barbus sharpeyi has a loosely folded tetrameric structure with remarkably more oxygen affinity

  8. Immunocytochemical mapping of the hemoglobin biosynthesis site in amphibian erythroid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianciarullo, A M; Beçak, W; Soares, M J

    1999-06-01

    During the past 25 years, several studies have attempted to determine the site of integration of the heme and the four globin chains in vertebrate erythroid cells that is important in the formation of the hemoglobin molecule. Mitochondrion-like organelles or hemosomes were pointed out as responsible for this task. We performed several experiments to investigate this hypothesis. The intracellular distribution of hemoglobin in amphibian erythroid cells was detected by post-embedding immuno-electron microscopy, using a polyclonal anti-human hemoglobin-proteinA-gold complex. Hemoglobin mapping showed an intense labeling in the cell cytoplasm, but none in cytoplasmic structures such as endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, mitochondrion-like organelles, Golgi complex, ribosomes or ferruginous inclusions. The mitochondrial fraction obtained according to the protocol described for some authors, showed by ultrastructural examination that this fraction has a heterogeneous content, also composed by microvesicles rich in cytoplasmic hemoglobin, an artifact generated by mechanical action during cell fractionation. Thus, when this fraction is lysed and its content submitted to electrophoresis, hemoglobin bands would be found inevitably, causing false-positive results, erroneously attributed to hemoglobin content of mitochondrion-like organelles. Our data do not confirm the hypothesis that the final hemoglobin biosynthesis occurs inside mitochondrion-like organelles. They suggest that the hemoglobin molecule be assembled in the erythrocyte cytoplasm outside of mitochondria or hemosomes. PMID:10481306

  9. Oxidative stress in preeclampsia and the role of free fetal hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Rocco Hansson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a leading cause of pregnancy complications and affects 3–7 % of pregnant women. This review summarizes the current knowledge of a new potential etiology of the disease, with a special focus on hemoglobin-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, we also suggest hemoglobin as a potential target for therapy. Gene and protein profiling studies have shown increased expression and accumulation of free fetal hemoglobin in the preeclamptic placenta. Predominantly due to oxidative damage to the placental barrier, fetal hemoglobin leaks over to the maternal circulation. Free hemoglobin and its metabolites are toxic in several ways; a ferrous hemoglobin (Fe2+ binds strongly to the vasodilator nitric oxide and reduces the availability of free nitric oxide, which results in vasoconstriction, b hemoglobin (Fe2+ with bound oxygen spontaneously generates free oxygen radicals and c the heme groups create an inflammatory response by inducing activation of neutrophils and cytokine production. The endogenous protein α1-microglobulin, with radical and heme binding properties, has shown both ex vivo and in vivo to have the ability to counteract free hemoglobin-induced placental and kidney damage. Oxidative stress in general, and more specifically fetal hemoglobin-induced oxidative stress, could play a key role in the pathology of preeclampsia seen both in the placenta and ultimately in the maternal endothelium.

  10. Hypoxia adaptation and hemoglobin mutation in Tibetan chick embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU; Xiao; LI; Ning; LIAN; Linsheng; YAN; Dawei; ZHANG; Hao

    2005-01-01

    Tibetan chick lives at high altitudes between 2600 and 4200 m with a high hatchability and low land breeds survive rarely with a hatchability of 3.0% under hypoxia of simulated 4200 m. Under hypoxia of whole 21 d, the hatchability of Tibetan chick and Recessive White Feather broiler differed with a greatest disparity from day 4 to 11 and also significantly in other stages except from day 1 to 3. Hypoxia in each stage did not reduce significantly survival rate of this stage except hatchability. These two results indicated that the hypoxia in the early stage had an adverse effect on the later stage. All exons encoding chick hemoglobins were sequenced to analyze gene polymorphism. The functional mutation Met-32(B13)-Leu, related with hypoxia, was found in αD globin chain and the mutation frequency increased with increased altitude. In addition, under hypoxic conditions, the population with higher mutation frequency had a higher hatchability. The automated homology model building was carried out using crystal structure coordinates of chick HbD. The results indicated that the substitution Met-32(B13)-Leu provides a more hydrophobic environment which leads to higher stability of heme and oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. The occurrence of the mutation Met-32(B13)-Leu is related to the origin of Tibetan chick.

  11. Biphasic oxidation of oxy-hemoglobin in bloodstains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf H Bremmer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In forensic science, age determination of bloodstains can be crucial in reconstructing crimes. Upon exiting the body, bloodstains transit from bright red to dark brown, which is attributed to oxidation of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO(2 to met-hemoglobin (met-Hb and hemichrome (HC. The fractions of HbO(2, met-Hb and HC in a bloodstain can be used for age determination of bloodstains. In this study, we further analyze the conversion of HbO(2 to met-Hb and HC, and determine the effect of temperature and humidity on the conversion rates. METHODOLOGY: The fractions of HbO(2, met-Hb and HC in a bloodstain, as determined by quantitative analysis of optical reflectance spectra (450-800 nm, were measured as function of age, temperature and humidity. Additionally, Optical Coherence Tomography around 1300 nm was used to confirm quantitative spectral analysis approach. CONCLUSIONS: The oxidation rate of HbO(2 in bloodstains is biphasic. At first, the oxidation of HbO(2 is rapid, but slows down after a few hours. These oxidation rates are strongly temperature dependent. However, the oxidation of HbO(2 seems to be independent of humidity, whereas the transition of met-Hb into HC strongly depends on humidity. Knowledge of these decay rates is indispensable for translating laboratory results into forensic practice, and to enable bloodstain age determination on the crime scene.

  12. Optical mammography: bilateral breast symmetry in hemoglobin saturation maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Pamela G; Sassaroli, Angelo; Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Kalli, Sirishma; Makim, Shital S; Graham, Roger A; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    We present a study of the bilateral symmetry of human breast hemoglobin saturation maps measured with a broadband optical mammography instrument. We have imaged 21 patients with unilateral breast cancer, 32 patients with unilateral benign lesions, and 27 healthy patients. An image registration process was applied to the bilateral hemoglobin saturation (SO 2 SO2 ) images by assigning each pixel to the low, middle, or high range of SO 2 SO2 values, where the thresholds for the categories were the 15th and 85th percentiles of the individual saturation range. The Dice coefficient, which is a measure of similarity, was calculated for each patient’s pair of right and left breast SO 2 SO2 images. The invasive cancer patients were found to have an average Dice coefficient value of 0.55±0.07 0.55±0.07 , which was significantly lower than the benign and healthy groups (0.61±0.11 0.61±0.11 and 0.62±0.12 0.62±0.12 , respectively). Although differences were seen in a group analysis, the healthy patient Dice coefficients spanned a wide range, limiting the diagnostic capabilities of this SO 2 SO2 symmetry analysis on an individual basis. Our results suggest that for assessing the SO 2 SO2 contrast of breast lesions, it may be better to select a reference tissue in the ipsilateral rather than the contralateral breast. PMID:26849841

  13. Hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahdi; Najafi; David; Faraoni

    2015-01-01

    Although red blood cells(RBCs) transfusion is sometimes associated with adverse reactions,anemia could also lead to increased morbidity and mortality in highrisk patients. For these reasons,the definition of perioperative strategies that aims to detect and treat preoperative anemia,prevent excessive blood loss,and define "optimal" transfusion algorithms is crucial. Although the treatment with preoperative iron and erythropoietin has been recommended in some specific conditions,several controversies exist regarding the benefit-to-risk balance associated with these treatments. Further studies are needed to better define the indications,dosage,and route of administration for preoperative iron with or without erythropoietin supplementation. Although restrictive transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery have been shown to effectively reduce the incidence and the amount of RBCs transfusion without increase in side effects,some high-risk patients(e.g.,symptomatic acute coronary syndrome) could benefit from higher hemoglobin concentrations. Despite all efforts made last decade,a significant amount of work remains to be done to improve hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  14. Screening for Structural Hemoglobin Variants in Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Santos Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Brazil was the country that received the largest number of Africans during the time of colonization, and Bahia was the Brazilian state that received the largest number of slaves from Africa. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the coverage of the newborn screening program for sickle cell disease in the Recôncavo Baiano region of the state of Bahia, and to show the frequency of the subjects with hemoglobin variants in the 2006–2009 period. Blood samples from neonates in twelve cities in the Recôncavo Baiano region were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. A total of 16,402 children were born in this period, 14,773 of which underwent newborn screening. In this period 1416 children were born carrying hemoglobin variants HbS and HbC. Forty-seven patients—20 HbSS genotype and 27 HbSC genotype—were diagnosed in eleven of the twelve cities surveyed. The proportion of children born with sickle cell disease in the Recôncavo Baiano region was 1/314, which was higher than the 1/650 rate for the state of Bahia. The data presented in this study confirm the high frequency of sickle cell disease in Recôncavo Baiano, demonstrating the need to create a referral center for the care of patients with sickle cell diseases in the region.

  15. Structure of Greyhound hemoglobin: origin of high oxygen affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Veer S; Zaldívar-López, Sara; Harris, David R; Couto, C Guillermo; Wang, Peng G; Palmer, Andre F

    2011-05-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of Greyhound hemoglobin (GrHb) determined to 1.9 Å resolution. GrHb was found to crystallize with an α₁β₁ dimer in the asymmetric unit and belongs to the R2 state. Oxygen-affinity measurements combined with the fact that GrHb crystallizes in the R2 state despite the high-salt conditions used for crystallization strongly indicate that GrHb can serve as a model high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin (Hb) for higher mammals, especially humans. Structural analysis of GrHb and its comparison with the R2-state of human Hb revealed several regions that can potentially contribute to the high oxygen affinity of GrHb and serve to rationalize the additional stability of the R2-state of GrHb. A previously well studied hydrophobic cluster of bar-headed goose Hb near α119 was also incorporated in the comparison between GrHb and human Hb. Finally, a structural comparison with generic dog Hb and maned wolf Hb was conducted, revealing that in contrast to GrHb these structures belong to the R state of Hb and raising the intriguing possibility of an additional allosteric factor co-purifying with GrHb that can modulate its quaternary structure. PMID:21543841

  16. Association of markers of bacterial translocation with immune activation in decompensated cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Hobolth, Lise;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial translocation (BT) may cause infections, in particular, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). In the absence of overt infection, BT may further stimulate the immune system and contribute to haemodynamic alterations and complications. Bacterial DNA (bDNA) is claimed to be a...

  17. Electronic Spin Tunneling in the Binding of Carbon - to Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstman, Bernard Scott

    1981-11-01

    A non-adiabatic quantum tunneling process is investigated as the mechanism for effecting the electronic spin change of the hemoglobin's iron upon the binding of carbon monoxide. As the carbon monoxide approaches there is a spin state change in the Fe('2+) from S = 2 to S = 0. The Born -Oppenheimer approximation can be used to separate the recombination of the CO to the iron in the heme at low temperatures into a nuclear tunneling and an electronic tunneling. Based upon the spin change of the Fe as well as the size of the tunneling matrix element and the energy splitting of the two states in the transition region, we assume the reaction to be a non-adiabatic electronic Landau-Zener state to state tunneling. The tunneling involves a spin change of the Fe and thus a spin-orbit interaction is used as the perturbation that couples the S = 2 and S = 0 manifolds. Since the matrix element for the transition is due to spin-orbit coupling the size of the matrix element can be changed, and hence the tunneling rate, by changing the spin magnetic sublevel of the initially CO unbound Fe. This is accomplished by applying a strong magnetic field of approximately 100 000 gauss which will tend to align the Fe spin at low enough temperature. The L vector will be affected only slightly by the external magnetic field since the Zeeman effect on the orbital levels is much smaller (10('-2)) than that of the internal crystal field of the molecule. Hence the crystal field of the heme determines the L quantization axis in each local heme coordinate system. Thus in a random oriented distribution of hemes frozen in place we expect faster CO recombination for those hemes who have their L vector aligned in the direction of the magnetic field than for those hemes whose L vector is perpendicular to the magnetic field. Hemoglobin has a strong absorption band at 436 nm when CO is bound. This absorption is also orientation dependent for the absorption is predominantly for light polarized in the plane

  18. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of nail infection is often caused by a bacterial infection but may also be caused by herpes, a ... to a type of yeast called Candida , or bacterial infection, and this may lead to abnormal nail growth. ...

  19. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  20. Effects of lead shot ingestion on delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, hemoglobin concentration, and serum chemistry in bald eagles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Pattee, O.H.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Mulhern, B.

    1981-01-01

    Lead shot ingestion by bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is considered to be widespread and has been implicated in the death of eagles in nature. It was recently demonstrated under experimental conditions that ingestion of as few as 10 lead shot resulted in death within 12 to 20 days. In the present study hematological responses to lead toxicity including red blood cell ALAD activity, hemoglobin concentration and 23 different blood serum chemistries were examined in five captive bald eagles that were unsuitable for rehabilitation and release. Eagles were dosed by force-feeding with 10 lead shot; they were redosed if regurgitation occurred. Red blood cell ALAD activity was inhibited by nearly 80% within 24 hours when mean blood lead concentration had increased to 0.8 parts per million (ppm). By the end of 1 week there was a significant decrease (20-25%) in hematocrit and hemoglobin, and the mean blood lead concentration was over 3 ppm. Within as little as 1-2 weeks after dosing, significant elevations in serum creatinine and serum alanine aminotransferase occurred, as well as a significant decrease in the ratio of serum aspartic aminotransferase to serum alanine aminotransferase. The mean blood lead concentration was over 5 ppm by the end of 2 weeks. These changes in serum chemistry may be indicative of kidney and liver alterations.

  1. Effect of Epoetin Alfa Dose Changes on Hemoglobin and Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients with Hemoglobin Levels Persistently below 11 g/dL

    OpenAIRE

    Bradbury, Brian D.; Danese, Mark D.; Gleeson, Michelle; Critchlow, Cathy W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The mortality risk associated with attempting to raise hemoglobin (Hb) levels by increasing Epoetin alfa (EPO) doses in hemodialysis patients with persistently low Hb remains poorly understood.

  2. Hemoglobin oxygen affinity in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Böning

    Full Text Available In patients with cystic fibrosis lung damages cause arterial hypoxia. As a typical compensatory reaction one might expect changes in oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. Therefore position (standard half saturation pressure P50st and slope (Hill's n of the O2 dissociation curve as well as the Bohr coefficients (BC for CO2 and lactic acid were determined in blood of 14 adult patients (8 males, 6 females and 14 healthy controls (6 males, 8 females. While Hill's n amounted to approximately 2.6 in all subjects, P50st was slightly increased by 1 mmHg in both patient groups (controls male 26.7 ± 0.2, controls female 27.0 ± 0.1, patients male 27.7 ± 0.5, patients female 28.0 ± 0.3 mmHg; mean and standard error, overall p<0.01. Main cause was a rise of 1-2 µmol/g hemoglobin in erythrocytic 2,3-biphosphoglycerate concentration. One patient only, clearly identified as an outlier and with the mutation G551D, showed a reduction of both P50st (24.5 mmHg and [2,3-biphosphoglycerate] (9.8 µmol/g hemoglobin. There were no differences in BCCO2, but small sex differences in the BC for lactic acid in the controls which were not detectable in the patients. Causes for the right shift of the O2 dissociation curve might be hypoxic stimulation of erythrocytic glycolysis and an increased red cell turnover both causing increased [2,3-biphosphoglycerate]. However, for situations with additional hypercapnia as observed in exercising patients a left shift seems to be a more favourable adaptation in cystic fibrosis. Additionally when in vivo PO2 values were corrected to the standard conditions they mostly lay left of the in vitro O2 dissociation curve in both patients and controls. This hints to unknown fugitive factors influencing oxygen affinity.

  3. A retrospective cohort study of blood hemoglobin levels in blood donors and competitive rowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P.I.; Ullum, H.; Jensen, K.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    .3% of the females demonstrated values above the recommended limit for athletic competition. Thus, the prevalence of a high hemoglobin value was greater in the rowers, of both gender, than in the candidate blood donors (P<0.0001). The data demonstrate that high hemoglobin levels in blood are seen...... regularly in normal people and especially in competition athletes Udgivelsesdato: 2009/2...

  4. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  5. Prognostic value of hemoglobin concentration in radiotherapy for cancer of supraglottic larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the estimation of correlations between hemoglobin concentration either before or after radiotherapy and local tumor control probability for laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 847 cases of laryngeal supraglottic squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation alone was performed using maximum likelihood estimations, and step-wise logistic regression. All patients were in good initial performance status (Karnofsky index >70). The minimum follow-up time was 3 years. Results: Logistic regression showed that the hemoglobin concentration after radiotherapy is an important prognostic factor. There was a very strong correlation between hemoglobin concentration and tumor local control probability. Hemoglobin concentration at the beginning of radiotherapy does not correlate with treatment outcome, but any decrease of hemoglobin during therapy is a strong prognostic factor for treatment failure. Conclusions: Although regression models with many variables may be instable, the present results suggest that hemoglobin concentration after treatment is at least as important as overall treatment time. It was not possible to find out whether the low concentration of hemoglobin is an independent cause of low TCP or whether it reflects other mechanisms that may influence both hemoglobin level and the TCP

  6. Iron bioavailability of maize hemoglobin in a Caco-2 cell culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize is an important staple crop in many parts of the world but has low iron bioavailability, in part due to its high phytate content. Hemoglobin is a form of iron that is highly bioavailable and its bioavailability is not inhibited by phytate. We hypothesize that maize hemoglobin is a highly bioav...

  7. Hemoglobin Targets and Blood Transfusions in Hemodialysis Patients without Symptomatic Cardiac Disease Receiving Erythropoietin Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Robert N.; Curtis, Bryan M.; Parfrey, Patrick S.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Optimal hemoglobin targets for chronic kidney disease patients receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents remain controversial. The effects of different hemoglobin targets on blood transfusion requirements have not been well characterized, despite their relevance to clinical decision-making.

  8. Placental expression profiling in preeclampsia: local overproduction of hemoglobin may drive pathological changes

    OpenAIRE

    Centlow, Magnus; Carninci, Piero; Nemeth, Krisztian; Mezey, Eva; Brownstein, Michael; Hansson, Stefan R.

    2007-01-01

    Using microarrays made with cDNAs from subtracted placental libraries, we show increased hemoglobin production in the preeclamptic placenta. Heme and hemoglobin may cause endothelial damage and inflammation and drive pathological changes in the placenta if they are released there.

  9. Using the Cascade Model to Improve Antenatal Screening for the Hemoglobin Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah; Papadopoulos, Irena; Kelly, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The inherited hemoglobin disorders constitute a major public health problem. Facilitators (experienced hemoglobin counselors) were trained to deliver knowledge and skills to "frontline" practitioners to enable them to support parents during antenatal screening via a cascade (train-the-trainer) model. Objectives of evaluation were to…

  10. Effect of laser radiation on physicochemical and functional properties of human hemoglobin in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irzhak, LI; Zotova, EA; Mamaeva, SA

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to laser radiation increases pH and isoelectric point of human hemoglobin solution, improves the acid-base properties, increases affinity for oxygen, and decreases the Bohr effect in comparison with intact hemoglobin. The mechanisms underlying these changes are discussed.

  11. The impact of hemoglobin levels on patient and graft survival in renal transplant recipients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Jason

    2008-08-27

    It remains unclear whether low hemoglobin levels are associated with increased mortality or graft loss after renal transplantation. This study assessed the relationship of hemoglobin levels with patient and graft survival in 3859 patients with functioning renal transplants more than 6-months posttransplantation.

  12. A retrospective cohort study of blood hemoglobin levels in blood donors and competitive rowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P. I.; Ullum, H.; Jensen, Kurt;

    2009-01-01

    .3% of the females demonstrated values above the recommended limit for athletic competition. Thus, the prevalence of a high hemoglobin value was greater in the rowers, of both gender, than in the candidate blood donors (P<0.0001). The data demonstrate that high hemoglobin levels in blood are seen...

  13. Molecular Cloning and Sequencing of Hemoglobin-Beta Gene of Channel Catfish, Ictalurus Punctatus Rafinesque

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Hemoglobin-y gene of channel catfish , lctalurus punctatus, was cloned and sequenced . Total RNA from head kidneys was isolated, reverse transcribed and amplified . The sequence of the channel catfish hemoglobin-y gene consists of 600 nucleotides . Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals one o...

  14. Contribution of electron paramagnetic resonance to the studies of hemoglobin: the nitrosylhemoglobin system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the initial work of Ingram Electron Paramagnetic Resonance contributed considerably to research in hemoglobins. Now, 40 years later some of the results of the application of EPR to nitrosyl hemoglobin (HbNO), are reviewed as an example of the diversity of information which this technique can provide are reviewed. (author). 34 refs, 7 figs

  15. Hemoglobin as an important prognostic factor in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to examine a possible association of hemoglobin with clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Seventy-five patients with Stage IB to IVA disease who were treated with CCRT were reviewed retrospectively. The mean age was 49.8 years. In the treatment, standard radiotherapy was performed accompanied by concomitant chemotherapy using cisplatin. Pre-treatment hemoglobin was defined as the earliest hemoglobin level prior to the initiation of treatment. Weekly nadir hemoglobin levels throughout treatment were averaged and used as average weekly nadir hemoglobin during treatment (AWNHg). The mean follow-up time was 28.6 months. The mean pre-treatment hemoglobin of 11.6 g/dL was significantly reduced to the mean AWNHg of 9.9 g/dL. The levels of pre-treatment hemoglobin and AWNHg were significantly associated with tumor response to treatment. The 5-year cumulative disease-free survival and overall survival rates for all 75 patients were 67.8% and 75.3%, respectively. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that AWNHg (≥9.0 versus <9.0 g/dL) was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (p=0.038), but pre-treatment hemoglobin was not a significant factor. AWNHg was one of the most powerful independent predictors of overall survival in patients undergoing CCRT for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. (author)

  16. Fetal hemoglobin reactivation in baboon and man: a short perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, D; DeSimone, J; Heller, P

    1993-01-01

    Present concepts of the mechanism of reactivation of synthesis of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) in the adult under conditions of erythropoietic stress are briefly reviewed. Since HbF can be considered an effective natural antisickling agent, the reactivation of its synthesis in patients with sickle cell anemia as a desirable therapeutic goal has been extensively explored since the discovery in 1982 that 5-azacytidine increases HbF levels in the baboon. Hydroxyurea (HU) has become the most widely used agent, although its effectiveness in increasing HbF levels and the number of F cells is highly variable. Recent investigations are cited showing that other agents such as butyrate, and the addition of recombinant hemopoietic growth factors, such as erythropoietin and stem cell factor, especially in combination with HU, offer important therapeutic possibilities. Transacting nuclear proteins are briefly discussed as possibly having a future role in the efforts of stimulating gamma-chain synthesis. PMID:7677951

  17. Glycosylated Hemoglobin: The Importance in Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Yavari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is a major public health problem with high and increasing prevalence, morbidity and mortality. The association between diabetes and microvascular and macrovascular complications is well known besides, tight glycemic control is a necessity. HbA1C has clinically been used since 1980s as a gold standard for monitoring glycemic control and predicting of diabetic complications. The present review article was prepared by computerized sources of literature searches 2000 - 2009.The history of Hemoglobin A1C, its assay techniques, optimal A1C targets, its reliability in control of diabetic complications, limitations of test results and its importance in control of diabetes patients and their complications are discussed.

  18. Hemoglobin-catalyzed fluorometric method for the determination of glutathione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Lin; Li, Hua; Wang, Yi; Gou, Rong; Guo, Yuanyuan; Fang, Yudong; Chen, Fengmei

    2016-01-01

    A new spectrofluorometric method for the determination of glutathione based on the reaction catalyzed by hemoglobin was reported. The reaction product gave a highly fluorescent intensity with the excitation and emission wavelengths of 320.0 nm and 413.0 nm, respectively. The optimum experimental conditions were investigated. Results showed that low concentration glutathione enhanced the fluorescence intensity significantly. The line ranges were 1.0 × 10-6-1.0 × 10-5 mol L-1 of glutathione and 6.0 × 10-10 mol L-1-1.0 × 10-8 mol L-1, respectively. The detection limit was calculated to be 1.1 × 10-11 mol L-1. The recovery test by the standard addition method gave values in the range of 90.78%-102.20%. This method was used for the determination of glutathione in synthetic and real samples with satisfactory results.

  19. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storz, Jay F.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki;

    2015-01-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer- dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking for...... snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying - and -type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2) the...... oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis...

  20. Moessbauer studies of hemoglobin in erythrocytes exposed to neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemiec, Katarzyna; Kaczmarska, Magdalena; Buczkowski, Mateusz [AGH University, Faculty of Physics and Computer Science, Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics (Poland); Fornal, Maria [Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University, Department of Internal Medicine and Gerontology (Poland); Pohorecki, Wladyslaw [AGH University, Faculty of Energy and Fuels (Poland); Matlak, Krzysztof; Korecki, Jozef [AGH University, Faculty of Physics and Computer Science, Department of Solid State Physics (Poland); Grodzicki, Tomasz [Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University, Department of Internal Medicine and Gerontology (Poland); Burda, Kvetoslava, E-mail: kvetoslava.burda@fis.agh.edu.pl [AGH University, Faculty of Physics and Computer Science, Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics (Poland)

    2012-03-15

    We studied radiation effects on the stability of various states of hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBC) irradiated with a very low dose of neutron rays, 50 {mu}Gy. We investigated RBCs isolated from blood of healthy donors. Moessbauer spectroscopy was applied to monitor different forms of Hb. Our results show, for the first time, that oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (DeoxyHb) are two Hb forms sensitive to such a low neutron radiation. Both Hbs change into a new Hb form (Hb{sub irr}). Additionally, OxyHb transfers into HbOH/H{sub 2}O, which under our experimental conditions is resistant to the action of neutron rays.

  1. Low modulus biomimetic microgel particles with high loading of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Merkel, Timothy J; Pandya, Ashish; Napier, Mary E; Luft, J Christopher; Daniel, Will; Sheiko, Sergei; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2012-09-10

    We synthesized extremely deformable red blood cell-like microgel particles and loaded them with bovine hemoglobin (Hb) to potentiate oxygen transport. With similar shape and size as red blood cells (RBCs), the particles were fabricated using the PRINT (particle replication in nonwetting templates) technique. Low cross-linking of the hydrogel resulted in very low mesh density for these particles, allowing passive diffusion of hemoglobin throughout the particles. Hb was secured in the particles through covalent conjugation of the lysine groups of Hb to carboxyl groups in the particles via EDC/NHS coupling. Confocal microscopy of particles bound to fluorescent dye-labeled Hb confirmed the uniform distribution of Hb throughout the particle interior, as opposed to the surface conjugation only. High loading ratios, up to 5 times the amount of Hb to polymer by weight, were obtained without a significant effect on particle stability and shape, though particle diameter decreased slightly with Hb conjugation. Analysis of the protein by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the secondary structure of Hb was unperturbed by conjugation to the particles. Methemoglobin in the particles could be maintained at a low level and the loaded Hb could still bind oxygen, as studied by UV-vis spectroscopy. Hb-loaded particles with moderate loading ratios demonstrated excellent deformability in microfluidic devices, easily deforming to pass through restricted pores half as wide as the diameter of the particles. The suspension of concentrated particles with a Hb concentration of 5.2 g/dL showed comparable viscosity to that of mouse blood, and the particles remained intact even after being sheared at a constant high rate (1000 1/s) for 10 min. Armed with the ability to control size, shape, deformability, and loading of Hb into RBC mimics, we will discuss the implications for artificial blood. PMID:22852860

  2. Pathophysiological consequences of hemolysis. Role of cell-free hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Misztal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abundant hemolysis is associated with a number of inherent and acquired diseases including sickle-cell disease (SCD, polycythemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH and drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Despite different etiopathology of hemolytic diseases, many concomitant symptoms are comparable and include e.g. hypertension, hemoglobinuria and hypercoagulation state. Studies in the last years have shown a growing list of mechanisms lying at the basis of those symptoms, in particular irreversible reaction between cell-free hemoglobin (Hb and nitric oxide (NO – endogenous vasorelaxant and anti-thrombotic agent. Saturation of protective physiological cell-free Hb-scavenging mechanisms results in accumulation of Hb in plasma and hemoglobinemia. Extensive hemoglobinemia subsequently leads to hemoglobinuria, which may cause kidney damage and development of Fanconi syndrome. A severe problem in patients with SCD and PNH is pulmonary and systemic hypertension. It may lead to circulation failure, including stroke, and it is related to abolition of NO bioavailability for vascular smooth muscle cells. Thrombotic events are the major cause of death in SCD and PNH. It ensues from lack of platelet inhibition evoked by Hb-mediated NO scavenging. A serious complication that affects patients with excessive hemolysis is erectile dysfunction. Also direct cytotoxic, prooxidant and proinflammatory effects of cell-free hemoglobin and heme compose the clinical picture of hemolytic diseases. The pathophysiological role of plasma Hb, mechanisms of its elimination, and direct and indirect (via NO scavenging deleterious effects of cell-free Hb are presented in detail in this review. Understanding the critical role of hemolysis and cell-free Hb is important in the perspective of treating patients with hemolytic diseases and to design new effective therapies in future.

  3. Hemoglobin cut-off values in healthy Turkish infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmet Arvas; Emel Gür; DurmuşDoğan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anemia is a widespread public health problem associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This study was undertaken to determine the cut-off value of hemoglobin for infant anemia. Methods: A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out at well-baby clinics of a tertiary care hospital. A total of 1484 healthy infants aged between 4 to 24 months were included in the study. The relationship of hemoglobin (Hb) levels with mother age, birth weight, weight gain rate, feeding, and gender was evaluated. Results: The Hb levels were assessed in four age groups (4 months, 6 months, 9-12 months, and 15-24 months) and the cut-off values of Hb were determined. Hb cut-off values (5th percentile for age) were detected as 97 g/L and 93 g/L at 4 months and 6 months, respectively. In older infants, the 5th percentile was 90.5 g/L and 93.4 g/L at 9-12 months and 15-24 months, respectively. The two values were lower than the World Health Organization criteria for anemia, which could partly due to the lack of information on iron status in our population. However, this difference highlights the need for further studies on normal Hb levels in healthy infants in developing countries. Hb levels of females were higher in all age groups; however, a statistically significant difference was found in gender in only 6 month-old infants. No statistically significant difference was found among Hb levels, mother's age, birth weight, weight gain rate, and nutritional status. Conclusion: Hb cut-off values in infants should be re-evaluated and be compatible with growth and development of children in that community.

  4. Hemoglobin and the origins of the concept of allosterism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, J T

    1980-02-01

    Bohr, Hasselbalch, and Krogh (1904) observed both what we now call the cooperative homotropic character of the binding of oxygen by hemoglobin and the heterotropic control exerted by CO2 in diminishing the oxygen affinity. Ten years later Christiansen, Douglas, and Haldane discovered the converse effect of oxygenation in diminishing CO2 uptake. It was then generally believed that hemoglobin contains only a single heme: A. V. Hill, to explain cooperative phenomena, postulated reversible aggregation of these monomer units (1910). After 1924, Adair and Svedberg independently showed that the molecule contained four hemes, and Adair's intermediate compound hypothesis, with four binding constants suitably chosen, could formally explain cooperative binding. Pauling proposed a simple model, involving only two constants, that fitted available data well. Haurowitz's demonstration that crystal structure changed on oxygenation (1938) gave the first evidence clearly pointing to a conformation change; in 1951 Wyman and Allen elaborated the idea in thermodynamic terms, and Perutz's crystallographic studies later revealed in molecular detail the nature of the change associated with ligand binding. The important heterotropic interactions that influence the binding of oxygen, necessarily with reciprocal interactions between oxygen binding and the uptake of the heterotropic ligands, are of three kinds: 1) proton binding by the "Bohr groups," 2) direct binding of CO2 as carbamate, and 3) binding of organic phosphate anions, such as diphosphoglycerate. The last of these, although fully as important as the first two, was not discovered for about half a century after the early work. Some major discoverers in the unraveling of these complicated relations were D. D. Van Slyke, F. J. W. Roughton, Linus Pauling, J. Wyman, and later Ruth and Reinhold Benesch, L. Rossi-Bernardi, and J. V. Kilmartin. All these, and numerous others, contributed to our understanding of both homogropic and

  5. HmbR outer membrane receptors of pathogenic Neisseria spp.: iron-regulated, hemoglobin-binding proteins with a high level of primary structure conservation.

    OpenAIRE

    Stojiljkovic, I; Larson, J.; Hwa, V; Anic, S; So, M

    1996-01-01

    We have recently cloned and characterized the hemoglobin receptor gene from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C. N. meningitidis cells expressing HmbR protein were able to bind biotinylated hemoglobin, and the binding was specifically inhibited by unlabeled hemoglobin and not heme. The HmbR-mediated hemoglobin binding activity of N. meningitidis cells was shown to be iron regulated. The presence of hemoglobin but not heme in the growth medium stimulated HmbR-mediated hemoglobin binding activit...

  6. Hot atom labeling of myoglobin and hemoglobin and biophysical studies of oxygen and CO binding to carp hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human Hb, the monomeric Hb of Glycera dibranchiata and horse Mb were modified by replacement of the protoheme with 2,4-dibromodeuteroheme. Following neutron capture by 79Br and 81Br, the locations of radioactive Br were determined. Although human Hb had approximately four times the mass and volume of the other proteins, about 9% of the activated Br was inserted into each of the three globins. These results suggest that the insertion is short-range (within 15 angstrom) and that this method could be used to label target sites in various proteins and other biological structures. Carp Hb's containing proto-, meso-, deutero- and dibromoheme were prepared. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for oxygen and CO binding were determined at Ph 6 (+IHP) (T-state, low-affinity protein) and Ph 9 (R-state, high-affinity protein). Parameters for the binding of oxygen and CO were related to the properties of the four hemes to estimate the inductive and steric factors in the ligation process. The results suggest that the steric factors are more important for the T-state than for the R-state. The T-state carp Hbs were very readily oxidized. Two new procedures were developed for the rapid determination of oxygen equilibrium isotherms for the T-state carp Hbs. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for ligation of oxygen and CO with the isolated carp α-chains were determined. Carp α-chains are the only hemoglobin chains isolated to date that can be classified as T-state. The secondary thermodynamic parameter (δH degrees) was found to be essential for classifying hemoglobins as T- or R-state

  7. Effect of antimalarial drug primaquine and its derivatives on the ionization potential of hemoglobin: A QM/MM study

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Haining; Ding, Yuanqing; Walker, Larry A.; Doerksen, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    We used quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations to test if antimalarial primaquine (PQ) and its derivatives aid the conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin by binding to hemoglobin and merely lowering hemoglobin’s ionization potential (IP). Our results showed that PQ and its derivatives do not significantly lower the hemoglobin IP, disproving the hypothesis.

  8. Change in Hemoglobin Levels due to Anesthesia in Mice: An Important Confounder in Studies on Hematopoietic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, Anita; Hojman, Pernille; Gehl, Julie

    2009-01-01

    -over study, we have compared hemoglobin levels in two groups of mice: anesthetized versus non-anesthetized and found significant decrease in hemoglobin levels in the anesthetized group (p < 0.05) unrelated to which group received the anesthesia. The mean hemoglobin levels after intraperitoneal administration...

  9. Enteral nutrient solutions. Limiting bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paauw, J D; Fagerman, K E; McCamish, M A; Dean, R E

    1984-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of enteral nutrient solutions ( ENS ) in FFcess of food product standards is known to occur in the hospital setting. The large amounts of bacteria often given with ENS have been shown to create a reservoir for nosocomial infections, and nonpathogenic bacteria have been implicated. Patient tolerance is dependent on immune status and the bacterial load delivered to the gut. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bacterial growth-sustaining properties of various ENS and to devise methods to limit bacterial growth. Five commercial products were prepared under sterile conditions. After inoculation with approximately 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm3 of Enterobacter cloacae, each solution was hung at room temperature for 24 hours with samples drawn at fixed intervals and plated for bacterial counts. Bacterial growth rates in Ensure, Travasorb , and Vital were markedly higher than those in Precision and Vivonex. Vivonex was noted to contain potassium sorbate (KS) used as a fungistatic agent. Recent studies have identified KS as a broad-spectrum bacteriostatic food preservative that is federally approved for this use. KS (0.03%) was added to Travasorb inoculated with 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm(3) of E. cloacae. The bacterial growth rate was reduced by 75 per cent, and the final count of 2-3 X 10(4) organisms/ml was within the federally regulated limit for milk. This study suggests that initial inoculum, growth rate, and hang time can be altered to provide a significant reduction in final bacterial counts in ENS . PMID:6428286

  10. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    -vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial......Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  11. Gas transfer system in Alvinella pompejana (Annelida polychaeta, Terebellida): functional properties of intracellular and extracellular hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourdez, S; Lallier, F H; De Cian, M C; Green, B N; Weber, R E; Toulmond, A

    2000-01-01

    Alvinella pompejana is a tubicolous polychaete that dwells in the hottest part of the hydrothermal vent ecosystem in a highly variable mixture of vent (350 degrees C, anoxic, CO(2)- and sulfide-rich) and deep-sea (2 degrees C, mildly hypoxic) waters. This species has developed distinct-and specifically respiratory-adaptations to this challenging environment. An internal gas exchange system has recently been described, along with the report of an intracellular coelomic hemoglobin, in addition to the previously known extracellular vascular hemoglobin. This article reports the structure of coelomic hemoglobin and the functional properties of both hemoglobins in order to assess possible oxygen transfer. Coelomocytes contain a unique monomeric hemoglobin with a molecular weight of 14,810+/-1.5 Da, as determined by mass spectrometry. The functional properties of both hemoglobins are unexpectedly very similar under the same conditions of pH (6.1-8.2) and temperature (10 degrees -40 degrees C). The oxygen affinity of both proteins is relatively high (P50=0.66 Torr at 20 degrees C and pH 7), which facilitates oxygen uptake from the hypoxic environment. A strong Bohr effect (Phi ranging from -0.8 to -1.0) allows the release of oxygen to acidic tissues. Such similar properties imply a possible bidirectional transfer of oxygen between the two hemoglobins in the perioesophagal pouch, a mechanism that could moderate environmental variations of oxygen concentration and maintain brain oxygenation. PMID:10893176

  12. Abnormal hemoglobin phenotypes in carriers of mild anemia in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamaro, P J A; Bonini-Domingos, C R

    2010-01-01

    We looked for abnormal hemoglobins in blood samples sent for diagnosis of anemia. Identification of the hemoglobins was made using electrophoretic, chromatographic and molecular procedures. The 2020 blood samples were of patients from various regions of Brazil and from some other Latin American countries. Among the abnormal hemoglobins that we found, 3.5% are known to be rare, while 51% had an electrophoretic profile similar to that of Hb S at alkaline pH. Differentiation was possible only by combining electrophoretic and chromatographic methods. Hb Hasharon, an alpha globin chain mutant, was the most frequently found variant hemoglobin; it accounted for 14.3% of the abnormal DNA samples. The other abnormal hemoglobin phenotypes displayed distinct electrophoretic profiles; most of them migrated faster than Hb A. The frequencies of the different abnormal hemoglobin profiles that we found reflect the miscegenation of the Latin American population and indicate the importance of hemoglobin studies using various methods in combination for accurate diagnosis and appropriate counseling of carriers and their families. PMID:20309827

  13. Heterogeneity of the hemoglobin of the Ohrid trout (Salmo L. typicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepreganova, B; Wilson, J B; Webber, B B; Kjovkareska, B; Efremov, G D; Huisman, T H

    1992-08-01

    We have analyzed the hemoglobins of five individual trout from the Ohrid Lake (Salmo L. typicus) by electrophoretic methods, by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and by limited structural analyses. The two major classes of hemoglobin are type I (35% of total) and type IV (65%). Type IV is the major oxygen-transporting hemoglobin; it consists of three types of beta chain (in about equal quantities) and three types of alpha chain (one major and two minor types). Several structural differences have been observed between these three beta (IV) chains and between the three alpha (IV) chains, suggesting a complex genetic system governing the synthesis of these proteins. Moreover, a few amino acid substitutions occur at positions involved in contacts between chains, which suggests that differences in oxygen affinity may exist between these various type IV hemoglobins. Type I hemoglobin is less complex because it contains one type of beta chain and two alpha chains; the latter two differ in numerous positions, suggesting duplications of the alpha (I)-globin gene. The alpha and beta chains of type I hemoglobin differ considerably from the alpha and beta chains of type IV hemoglobin, indicating the existence of alpha (I)- and beta (I)-globin genes separate from the alpha (IV)- and beta (IV)-globin genes. PMID:1445182

  14. Effect of the N-terminal residues on the quaternary dynamics of human adult hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shanyan; Mizuno, Misao; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-05-01

    The protein dynamics of human hemoglobin following ligand photolysis was studied by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. The time-resolved spectra of two kinds of recombinant hemoglobin expressed in Escherichia coli, normal recombinant hemoglobin and the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant, were compared with those of human adult hemoglobin (HbA) purified from blood. A frequency shift of the iron-histidine stretching [ν(Fe-His)] band was observed in the time-resolved spectra of all three hemoglobin samples, indicative of tertiary and quaternary changes in the protein following photolysis. The spectral changes of the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant were distinct from those of HbA in the tens of microseconds region, whereas the spectral changes of normal recombinant hemoglobin were similar to those of HbA isolated from blood. These results demonstrated that a structural change in the N-termini is involved in the second step of the quaternary structure change of hemoglobin. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the allosteric pathway of HbA.

  15. NO dioxygenase activity in hemoglobins is ubiquitous in vitro, but limited by reduction in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit J Smagghe

    Full Text Available Genomics has produced hundreds of new hemoglobin sequences with examples in nearly every living organism. Structural and biochemical characterizations of many recombinant proteins reveal reactions, like oxygen binding and NO dioxygenation, that appear general to the hemoglobin superfamily regardless of whether they are related to physiological function. Despite considerable attention to "hexacoordinate" hemoglobins, which are found in nearly every plant and animal, no clear physiological role(s has been assigned to them in any species. One popular and relevant hypothesis for their function is protection against NO. Here we have tested a comprehensive representation of hexacoordinate hemoglobins from plants (rice hemoglobin, animals (neuroglobin and cytoglobin, and bacteria (Synechocystis hemoglobin for their abilities to scavenge NO compared to myoglobin. Our experiments include in vitro comparisons of NO dioxygenation, ferric NO binding, NO-induced reduction, NO scavenging with an artificial reduction system, and the ability to substitute for a known NO scavenger (flavohemoglobin in E. coli. We conclude that none of these tests reveal any distinguishing predisposition toward a role in NO scavenging for the hxHbs, but that any hemoglobin could likely serve this role in the presence of a mechanism for heme iron re-reduction. Hence, future research to test the role of Hbs in NO scavenging would benefit more from the identification of cognate reductases than from in vitro analysis of NO and O(2 binding.

  16. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  17. FRET imaging of hemoglobin concentration in Plasmodium falciparum-infected red cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Esposito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During its intraerythrocytic asexual reproduction cycle Plasmodium falciparum consumes up to 80% of the host cell hemoglobin, in large excess over its metabolic needs. A model of the homeostasis of falciparum-infected red blood cells suggested an explanation based on the need to reduce the colloid-osmotic pressure within the host cell to prevent its premature lysis. Critical for this hypothesis was that the hemoglobin concentration within the host cell be progressively reduced from the trophozoite stage onwards. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The experiments reported here were designed to test this hypothesis by direct measurements of the hemoglobin concentration in live, infected red cells. We developed a novel, non-invasive method to quantify the hemoglobin concentration in single cells, based on Förster resonance energy transfer between hemoglobin molecules and the fluorophore calcein. Fluorescence lifetime imaging allowed the quantitative mapping of the hemoglobin concentration within the cells. The average fluorescence lifetimes of uninfected cohorts was 270+/-30 ps (mean+/-SD; N = 45. In the cytoplasm of infected cells the fluorescence lifetime of calcein ranged from 290+/-20 ps for cells with ring stage parasites to 590+/-13 ps and 1050+/-60 ps for cells with young trophozoites and late stage trophozoite/early schizonts, respectively. This was equivalent to reductions in hemoglobin concentration spanning the range from 7.3 to 2.3 mM, in line with the model predictions. An unexpected ancillary finding was the existence of a microdomain under the host cell membrane with reduced calcein quenching by hemoglobin in cells with mature trophozoite stage parasites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results support the predictions of the colloid-osmotic hypothesis and provide a better understanding of the homeostasis of malaria-infected red cells. In addition, they revealed the existence of a distinct peripheral microdomain in the host

  18. A single hemoglobin gene in Myrica gale retains both symbiotic and non-symbiotic specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heckmann, Anne B.; Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Larsen, Knud;

    2006-01-01

    Here, a hemoglobin gene from the nitrogen-fixing actinorhizal plant Myrica gale was isolated, cloned and sequenced. The gene (MgHb) was a class I hemoglobin with strong sequence homology to non-symbiotic hemoglobin genes. MgHb is highly expressed in symbiotic root nodules, but transcripts and...... protein were also detected in leaves of M. gale. In Arabidopsis thaliana the MgHb promoter, linked to a beta-glucuronidase coding region, directed expression in the vascular tissue, in shoot meristem and at root branch point--a pattern very similar to the combined expression pattern of the two non...

  19. Hemoglobin Q-Iran detected in family members from Northern Iran: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Khorshidi Mohammad; Roshan Payam; Bayat Nooshin; Mahdavi Mohammad; Najmabadi Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Hemoglobin Q-Iran (α75Asp→His) is an important member of the hemoglobin Q family, molecularly characterized by the replacement of aspartic acid by histidine. The first report of hemoglobin Q-Iran and the nomenclature of this hemoglobinopathy dates back to 1970. Iran is known as a country with a high prevalence of α- and β-thalassemia and different types of hemoglobinopathy. Many of these variants are yet to be identified as the practice of molecular laboratory techniques...

  20. Investigation of Hemoglobin/Gold Nanoparticle Heterolayer on Micro-Gap for Electrochemical Biosensor Application

    OpenAIRE

    Taek Lee; Tae-Hyung Kim; Jinho Yoon; Yong-Ho Chung; Ji Young Lee; Jeong-Woo Choi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we fabricated a hemoglobin/gold nanoparticle (Hb/GNP) heterolayer immobilized on the Au micro-gap to confirm H2O2 detection with a signal-enhancement effect. The hemoglobin which contained the heme group catalyzed the reduction of H2O2. To facilitate the electron transfer between hemoglobin and Au micro-gap electrode, a gold nanoparticle was introduced. The Au micro-gap electrode that has gap size of 5 µm was fabricated by conventional photolithographic technique to loca...

  1. Long Range Correlation of Hydrophilicity and Flexibility Along the Hemoglobin Chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within this study, we reveal the long range correlation concerning hydrophilicity and flexibility along sequences of hemoglobins belonging to different organisms and we compare them with the long range correlations properties obtained for other protein families. For all hemoglobins considered, we investigate two discrete spatial series: the hydrophilicity and flexibility respectively. We apply the nonlinear analysis methods to analyze the two spatial series by calculating the spectral coefficient β, the scaling exponent α and Hurst exponent H. The obtained values for the mentioned coefficients suggest long range correlation within the analyzed sequences of hemoglobins in good agreement with those obtained for the calcium binding proteins and hydrolases.

  2. Maternal HIV status affects the infant hemoglobin level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feleke, Berhanu Elfu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Children, especially infants, are highly vulnerable to iron-deficiency anemia because of their rapid growth of the brain and the rest of the body. The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in infants born from HIV-positive mothers and HIV-negative mothers and to identify the determinants of iron-deficiency anemia in infants. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in Bahir Dar city. Simple random sampling technique was used to select the study participants. Mothers were interviewed; blood samples were collected from mothers and infants to measure the hemoglobin level and anthropometric indicators were obtained from the infants using world health organization standards. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate the prevalence of infantile anemia. Binary logistic regression and multiple linear regressions were used to identify the determinants of infant anemia. A total of 1459 infants born from HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers were included. The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in infants born from HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers was 41.9% (95% CI: 39–44). Infantile iron-deficiency anemia was associated with maternal HIV infection (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.54 [95% CI: 1.65–3.9]), stunting (AOR 3.46 [95% CI: 2.41–4.97]), low income (AOR 2.72 [95% CI: 2–3.73]), maternal malaria during pregnancy (AOR 1.81 [95% CI: 1.33–2.47]), use of cow milk before 6 month (AOR 1.82 [95% CI: 1.35–2.45]), residence (AOR 0.09 [95% CI: 0.06–0.13]), history of cough or fever 7 days preceding the survey (AOR 2.71 [95% CI: 1.99–3.69]), maternal hemoglobin (B 0.65 [95% CI: 0.61–0.68]), educational status of mother (B 0.22 [95% CI: 0.2–0.23]), age of the mother (B –0.03 [95% CI: –0.03, –0.02]), and family size (B –0.14 [95% CI: –0.18,–0.11]). PMID:27495044

  3. Shuffling bacterial metabolomes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomason, Brendan; Read, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has a far more significant role than gene duplication in bacterial evolution. This has recently been illustrated by work demonstrating the importance of HGT in the emergence of bacterial metabolic networks, with horizontally acquired genes being placed in peripheral pathways at the outer branches of the networks.

  4. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  5. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... become valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  6. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  7. Ligand and interfacial dynamics in a homodimeric hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prashant Kumar; Meuwly, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The structural dynamics of dimeric hemoglobin (HbI) from Scapharca inaequivalvis in different ligand-binding states is studied from atomistic simulations on the μs time scale. The intermediates are between the fully ligand-bound (R) and ligand-free (T) states. Tertiary structural changes, such as rotation of the side chain of Phe97, breaking of the Lys96–heme salt bridge, and the Fe–Fe separation, are characterized and the water dynamics along the R-T transition is analyzed. All these properties for the intermediates are bracketed by those determined experimentally for the fully ligand-bound and ligand-free proteins, respectively. The dynamics of the two monomers is asymmetric on the 100 ns timescale. Several spontaneous rotations of the Phe97 side chain are observed which suggest a typical time scale of 50–100 ns for this process. Ligand migration pathways include regions between the B/G and C/G helices and, if observed, take place in the 100 ns time scale. PMID:26958581

  8. Importance of hemoglobin concentration to exercise: acute manipulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, José A L; Lundby, Carsten; Koskolou, Maria;

    2006-01-01

    An acute reduction of blood hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), even when the circulating blood volume is maintained, results in lower (.)V(O(2)(max) and endurance performance, due to the reduction of the oxygen carrying capacity of blood. Conversely, an increase of [Hb] is associated with enhanced ...... maximal exercise capacity or (.)V(O(2)(max) during exercise in acute hypoxia. Likewise, reducing [Hb] in altitude-acclimatized humans to pre-acclimatization values has no effect on (.)V(O(2)(max) during exercise in hypoxia....... (.)V(O(2)(max) and endurance capacity, that is also proportional to the increase in the oxygen carrying capacity of blood. The effects on endurance capacity appear more pronounced and prolonged than on (.)V(O(2)(max). During submaximal exercise, there is a tight coupling between O(2) demand and O(2......) delivery, such that if [Hb] is acutely decreased muscle blood flow is increased proportionally and vice versa. During maximal exercise with either a small or a large muscle mass, neither peak cardiac output nor peak leg blood flow are affected by reduced [Hb]. An acute increase of [Hb] has no effect on...

  9. Dual targeted poplar ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase interacts with hemoglobin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Kastaniotis, Alexander J; Parkash, Vimal; Sundström, Robin; Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Nymalm, Yvonne; Blokhina, Olga; Kukkola, Eija; Fagerstedt, Kurt V; Salminen, Tiina A; Läärä, Esa; Bülow, Leif; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Kallio, Pauli T; Häggman, Hely

    2016-06-01

    Previous reports have connected non-symbiotic and truncated hemoglobins (Hbs) to metabolism of nitric oxide (NO), an important signalling molecule involved in wood formation. We have studied the capability of poplar (Populus tremula×tremuloides) Hbs PttHb1 and PttTrHb proteins alone or with a flavin-protein reductase to relieve NO cytotoxicity in living cells. Complementation tests in a Hb-deficient, NO-sensitive yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Δyhb1 mutant showed that neither PttHb1 nor PttTrHb alone protected cells against NO. To study the ability of Hbs to interact with a reductase, ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase PtthFNR was characterized by sequencing and proteomics. To date, by far the greatest number of the known dual-targeted plant proteins are directed to chloroplasts and mitochondria. We discovered a novel variant of hFNR that lacks the plastid presequence and resides in cytosol. The coexpression of PttHb1 and PtthFNR partially restored NO resistance of the yeast Δyhb1 mutant, whereas PttTrHb coexpressed with PtthFNR failed to rescue growth. YFP fusion proteins confirmed the interaction between PttHb1 and PtthFNR in plant cells. The structural modelling results indicate that PttHb1 and PtthFNR are able to interact as NO dioxygenase. This is the first report on dual targeting of central plant enzyme FNR to plastids and cytosol. PMID:27095407

  10. Neuronal Hemoglobin Expression and Its Relevance to Multiple Sclerosis Neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nolan; Alkhayer, Kholoud; Clements, Robert; Singhal, Naveen; Gregory, Roger; Azzam, Sausan; Li, Shuo; Freeman, Ernest; McDonough, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by demyelination and progressive neurological disability. Previous studies have reported defects to mitochondria in MS including decreased expression of nuclear encoded electron transport chain subunit genes and inhibition of respiratory complexes. We previously reported increased levels of the hemoglobin β subunit (Hbb) in mitochondrial fractions isolated from postmortem MS cortex compared to controls. In the present study, we performed immunohistochemistry to determine the distribution of Hbb in postmortem MS cortex and identified proteins which interact with Hbb by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We found that Hbb was enriched in pyramidal neurons in internal layers of the cortex and interacts with subunits of ATP synthase, histones, and a histone lysine demethylase. We also found that Hbb is present in the nucleus and that expression of Hbb in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells increased trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4me3), a histone mark that regulates cellular metabolism. These data suggest that Hbb may be a part of a mechanism linking neuronal energetics with epigenetic changes to histones in the nucleus and may provide neuroprotection in MS by supporting neuronal metabolism. PMID:26809286

  11. Negative cooperativity in Root-effect hemoglobins: role of heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Heinz; Nadja, Hellmann

    2007-10-01

    In some animals, the oxygen transport capacity of blood decreases when pH is lowered, yielding oxygen binding curves with Hill-coefficients smaller than unity. This so-called Root effect is observed in several fishes and is important for creating large oxygen partial pressures locally, for example in the swim bladder. While there is general agreement on the physiological advantages of this effect, its molecular basis remains ambiguous. Various studies show that isoforms of hemoglobins usually are present in the hemolymph, when the Root effect is observed. Here, we show that in such a case the mixture of these isoforms can exhibit apparent negative cooperativity, although each component taken separately can be described by the MWC model. In other cases, isolated isoforms exhibit true negative cooperativity. The well established MWC model describes many cooperative phenomena of enzymes and respiratory proteins but is not capable of describing negative cooperativity. In order to model negative cooperativity within a single molecular species a decoupling model might be employed, as pointed out previously. However, simulations show that it is not mandatory to have species with negative cooperativity, in order to obtain the binding curves typically seen for whole blood. These two aspects of the Root effect will be discussed on the basis of data from the literature. PMID:21672870

  12. Effects of rutin on the redox reactions of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Ding, Yun; Yang, Zhen; Gao, Pingzhang

    2016-08-01

    Flavonoids are widely used to attenuate oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the influence of rutin (quercetin-3-rhamnosylglucoside) on hemoglobin (Hb)- dependent redox reactions, i.e. oxidative stability of Hb and its cytotoxic ferryl intermediate. It was found that rutin induced generation of H2O2, which in turn oxidized Hb rapidly. Meanwhile, rutin exhibited anti-oxidant effect by effectively reducing ferryl intermediate back to ferric Hb at physiological pH. In comparison with quercetin, rutin had stronger capability on reducing ferryl species while lesser pro-oxidant effect on H2O2 generation, thus it exhibited more protective effect on H2O2-induced Hb oxidation. Circular dichroism spectrum showed no significant change in the secondary structure of Hb after flavonoid addition, while molecular docking revealed different binding modes of quercetin and rutin with Hb. These results might provide new insights into the potential nutritional and physiological implications of rutin and quercetin with redox active heme proteins regarding their ani- and pro-oxidant effects. PMID:27126166

  13. Water-Mediated Energy Dynamics in a Homodimeric Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, David M

    2016-05-01

    We examine energy dynamics in the unliganded and liganded states of the homodimeric hemoglobin from Scapharca inaequivalvis (HbI), which exhibits cooperativity mediated by the cluster of water molecules at the interface upon ligand binding and dissociation. We construct and analyze a dynamic network in which nodes representing the residues, hemes, and water cluster are connected by edges that represent energy transport times, as well as a nonbonded network (NBN) indicating regions that respond rapidly to local strain within the protein via nonbonded interactions. One of the two largest NBNs includes the Lys30-Asp89 salt bridge critical for stabilizing the dimer. The other includes the hemes and surrounding residues, as well as, in the unliganded state, the cluster of water molecules between the globules. Energy transport in the protein appears to be controlled by the Lys30-Asp89 salt bridge critical for stabilizing the dimer, as well as the interface water cluster in the unliganded state. Possible connections between energy transport dynamics in response to local strain identified here and allosteric transitions in HbI are discussed. PMID:27065192

  14. Variant subunit specificity in the quaternary structure of Artemia hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Matthews, Charles M; Trotman, Clive N A

    2002-08-01

    The brine shrimp Artemia has three extracellular hemoglobins (Hbs) that are developmentally expressed and exhibit distinct oxygen-binding characteristics (Heip, Moens, and Kondo 1978; Heip et al. 1978 ). These Hbs are composed of two polymers, each of which comprises nine covalently linked globin domains. Although the cDNA sequences of two nine-domain globins from Artemia have been published, there is evidence for the existence of further expressed globin genes (Manning, Trotman, and Tate 1990 ). In the present study extensive analysis at the cDNA and genomic levels was performed in order to determine the globin gene copy number in Artemia. Sequence and Southern analysis suggest that four Hb polymers (T1, T2, C1, and C2) are expressed in Artemia. In addition, there is also at least one globin pseudogene. Protein sequencing of the native Hbs revealed that there are limitations on which two polymers can associate. The composition of the Hbs has been determined to be: Hb I, C1C2; Hb II, C1T2; and Hb III, T1T2. These pairings allow the levels of the three Artemia Hbs to be regulated independently by polymer expression alone, therefore explaining the previously inconsistent developmental and hypoxia-induced expression patterns. PMID:12140240

  15. Hemoglobin E prevalence in malaria-endemic villages in Myanmar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win,Ne

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The population of Myanmar comprises 8 major indigenous races (Bamar, Kayin, Kachin, Shan, Rakhine, Mon, Chin, and Kayah. The Bamar reside in the 7 central divisions of the country, and the others reside in the 7 peripheral states that border neighboring countries, including China, Laos, and Thailand in the east and India and Bangladesh in the west. Both malaria and HbE are endemic in Myanmar, although the actual prevalence of the latter in the different indigenous races is not yet known. Hemoglobin electrophoresis was performed in 4 malaria-endemic villages, each having a different predominating indigenous race. The overall prevalence of HbE was 11.4% (52/456 villagers, ranging from 2-6% in the Kayin-predominant villages to 13.1-24.4% in the Bamar-predominant villages. Although the overall HbE prevalence in the villages studied was not significantly different from that of the general Myanmar population, this study strongly documented the influence of racial differences on the prevalence of HbE in Myanmar. To prevent and control severe thalassemia syndromes in Myanmar, extensive prevalence studies of the country?s indigenous races are suggested.

  16. Differential sensitivity of Chironomus and human hemoglobin to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Panicker, Lata; Mohole, Madhura; Sawant, Sangeeta; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2016-08-01

    Chironomus ramosus is known to tolerate high doses of gamma radiation exposure. Larvae of this insect possess more than 95% of hemoglobin (Hb) in its circulatory hemolymph. This is a comparative study to see effect of gamma radiation on Hb of Chironomus and humans, two evolutionarily diverse organisms one having extracellular and the other intracellular Hb respectively. Stability and integrity of Chironomus and human Hb to gamma radiation was compared using biophysical techniques like Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry and CD spectroscopy after exposure of whole larvae, larval hemolymph, human peripheral blood, purified Chironomus and human Hb. Sequence- and structure-based bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the sequence and structural similarities or differences in the heme pockets of respective Hbs. Resistivity of Chironomus Hb to gamma radiation is remarkably higher than human Hb. Human Hb exhibited loss of heme iron at a relatively low dose of gamma radiation exposure as compared to Chironomus Hb. Unlike human Hb, the heme pocket of Chironomus Hb is rich in aromatic amino acids. Higher hydophobicity around heme pocket confers stability of Chironomus Hb compared to human Hb. Previously reported gamma radiation tolerance of Chironomus can be largely attributed to its evolutionarily ancient form of extracellular Hb as evident from the present study. PMID:27237970

  17. Sobrecrecimiento bacteriano intestinal: An update Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Quera P; Eamonn MM Quigley; Ana María Madrid S

    2005-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is characterized by nutrient malabsorption, associated with an excessive number of bacteria in the proximal small intestine. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth presents several difficulties and limitations, and as yet there is not a widespread agreement on the best diagnostic test. SIBO occurs when there are alterations in intestinal anatomy, gastrointestinal motility, or a lack of gastric acid secretion. The true association betw...

  18. Low Pore Connectivity Increases Bacterial Diversity in Soil▿

    OpenAIRE

    Carson, Jennifer K.; Gonzalez-Quiñones, Vanesa; Murphy, Daniel V.; Hinz, Christoph; Shaw, Jeremy A.; Gleeson, Deirdre B.

    2010-01-01

    One of soil microbiology's most intriguing puzzles is how so many different bacterial species can coexist in small volumes of soil when competition theory predicts that less competitive species should decline and eventually disappear. We provide evidence supporting the theory that low pore connectivity caused by low water potential (and therefore low water content) increases the diversity of a complex bacterial community in soil. We altered the pore connectivity of a soil by decreasing water ...

  19. Hijacking of eukaryotic functions by intracellular bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Ana; García del Portillo, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved as a group of microorganisms endowed with weapons to hijack many biological processes of eukaryotic cells. This review discusses how these pathogens perturb diverse host cell functions, such as cytoskeleton dynamics and organelle vesicular trafficking. Alteration of the cytoskeleton is discussed in the context of the bacterial entry process (invasion), which occurs either by activation of membrane-located host receptors ("zipper" mechani...

  20. A study on the structures of hemoglobin of diabetic patients by EXAFS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemoglobin was the carrier of oxygen in blood circulation. For the patients with diabetes mellitus the enhancement of glycidate hemoglobin in blood causes the decrease of oxygen transmission function. The local atomic structures of iron in hemoglobin were determined by EXAFS techniques. The relationship between diabetes mellitus and hemoglobin structures was observed. The blood samples were taken from normal people, slight and serious diabetic patients. The results show that the coordination number of iron atoms and Fe-O bond length were almost the same for the three samples. However, for the samples of serious diabetic patients the Fe-N bond length increases by about 0.002 nm, the possible reasons were the increase of deoxyhemoglobin contents in their blood

  1. COMPARISON OF FRUCTOSAMINE AND GLYCOSYLATED HEMOGLOBIN IN A NON-INSULIN DEPENDENT DIABETIC POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amini

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to determine the clinical value of frnctosamine assay for monitoring type II diabetic patients, correlation of frnctosamine with glycosylated hemoglobin was studied. 100 patients with type II diabetes mcllitus were compared with 100 normal subjects. Fasting blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, albumin and frnctosamine were measured in alt subjects. In the diabetic patients, a significant correlation was observed between fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (r = 0.64, p < 0.01 and scrum frnctosamine (r = 0.7, P < 0.01. Tlicrc was also a significant correlation between glycosylated hemoglobin and scrum frtictosmine (r = .94, I'<0.01. Frnctosamine, assay can be used as an index of diabetes control.

  2. Diode laser irradiation of rat blood and its effect on hemoglobin and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood was exposed to diode laser irradiation of wavelength 830 nm and maximum powe of 31.4 MW, with exposure times 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes. Hemoglobin IR spectra and X-ray crystallography, plasma Na+, K+, Ca++. cholesterol concentrations and viscosity were measured. There were changes in hemoglobin amide groups as well as changes in the X-ray in hemoglobin structure. Decreases in both Na concentration and plasma viscosity occurred at 15 and 30 minutes of laser exposure. On increasing time to 45 and 60 minutes, the Na concentration and viscosity were increased. K, Ca and cholesterol concentration were decreased linearly with time. Na / K ratio was increased also with time of exposure. The results have been indicated that the diode laser affect the secondary structure of hemoglobin, membranes structures and plasma

  3. Estimation of glycated hemoglobin by 2,6-dimethylphenol: Sulphuric acid conventional method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallya, H M; Pattabiraman, T N

    2001-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin levels in hemolysate of normal and diabetic patients were determined by the 2,6-dimethylphenol:57.5% sulphuric acid conventional method and the values were 0.39±025 and 0.69±0.21 moles of hydroxymethylfurfural(HMF)/mole of globin, respectively. The mean increase in glycated hemoglobin values in diabetics (1.8fold) was highly significant (pphenol:sulphuric acid method. The values obtained by former method were about 1.2-1.4 times the values by the phenol:sulphuric acid method. This study indicates that conventional 2,6-dimethylphenol: 57.5% sulphuric acid method is more sensitive for the estimation of glycated hemoglobin than any other method based on the same principle. It is less time consuming, reliable and hence can be employed for the routine laboratory estimation of glycated hemoglobin for the assessment of glycemic control. PMID:23105290

  4. Bacterial communities of two ubiquitous Great Barrier Reef corals reveals both site- and species-specificity of common bacterial associates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Charlotte E Kvennefors

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral-associated bacteria are increasingly considered to be important in coral health, and altered bacterial community structures have been linked to both coral disease and bleaching. Despite this, assessments of bacterial communities on corals rarely apply sufficient replication to adequately describe the natural variability. Replicated data such as these are crucial in determining potential roles of bacteria on coral. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE of the V3 region of the 16S ribosomal DNA was used in a highly replicated approach to analyse bacterial communities on both healthy and diseased corals. Although site-specific variations in the bacterial communities of healthy corals were present, host species-specific bacterial associates within a distinct cluster of gamma-proteobacteria could be identified, which are potentially linked to coral health. Corals affected by "White Syndrome" (WS underwent pronounced changes in their bacterial communities in comparison to healthy colonies. However, the community structure and bacterial ribotypes identified in diseased corals did not support the previously suggested theory of a bacterial pathogen as the causative agent of the syndrome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to employ large numbers of replicated samples to assess the bacterial communities of healthy and diseased corals, and the first culture-independent assessment of bacterial communities on WS affected Acroporid corals on the GBR. Results indicate that a minimum of 6 replicate samples are required in order to draw inferences on species, spatial or health-related changes in community composition, as a set of clearly distinct bacterial community profiles exist in healthy corals. Coral bacterial communities may be both site and species specific. Furthermore, a cluster of gamma-proteobacterial ribotypes may represent a group of specific common coral and marine

  5. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; Derousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-03-25

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried "nanomicroparticle" vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the former provides alignment of the principal nanodimension particle axes with the direction of airflow. Particles formed with this combination of nano- and micrometer-scale dimensions possess a greater ability to aerosolize than particles of standard spherical isotropic shape and of similar geometric diameter. Here, we demonstrate effective application of this biomaterial by using the live attenuated tuberculosis vaccine bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Prepared as a spray-dried nanomicroparticle aerosol, BCG vaccine exhibited high-efficiency delivery and peripheral lung targeting capacity from a low-cost and technically simple delivery system. Aerosol delivery of the BCG nanomicroparticle to normal guinea pigs subsequently challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis significantly reduced bacterial burden and lung pathology both relative to untreated animals and to control animals immunized with the standard parenteral BCG. PMID:18344320

  6. Hypoxia and anoxia effects on alcohol dehydrogenase activity and hemoglobin content in Chironomus riparius Meigen, 1804

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Grazioli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic effects of low oxygen content on alcohol-dehydrogenase (ADH activity and hemoglobin (Hb concentration were investigated in IV-instar larvae of Chironomus riparius (Diptera: Chironomidae from an Italian stream. Two series of short-term (48 h experiments were carried out: exposure to (1 progressive hypoxia (95 to 5% of oxygen saturation and (2 anoxia (at <5% of oxygen saturation. In (1, Hb amount increased with increasing oxygen depletion up to a critical value of oxygenation (about 70% of oxygen saturation. Below this percentage, the Hb amount declined to values comparable with those present in the control. The respiration rate (R remained almost constant at oxygen saturation >50% and decreased significantly only after 48 h of treatment (= <5% of oxygen saturation reaching values <100 mmolO2 gAFDW-1 h-1. ADH activity showed two phases of growth, within the first 14 h and over 18 h of exposure. Overall, we inferred that i Hb might function as short-term oxygen storage, enabling animals to delay the on-set of anaerobiosis; and ii alcoholic fermentation co-occurs for a short time with aerobic respiration, becoming the prevalent metabolic pathway below 5% of oxygen saturation (<1 mg L-1. These considerations were supported also by results from anoxia exposure (2. In such condition, larvae were visibly stressed, becoming immobile after few minutes of incubation, and ADH reached higher values than in the hypoxia treatment (2.03±0.15 UADH mg prot-1. Overall, this study showed a shift from aerobic to anaerobic activity in C. riparius larvae exposed to poorly oxygenated water with an associated alteration of ADH activity and the Hb amount. Such metabolites might be valid candidate biomarkers for the environmental monitoring of running waters.

  7. UV-sensitivity of hemoglobin dimers in free state and in valency hybrids modification by serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes of oxygen-binding activity of hemoglobin dimers modified by the therapeutical doses of UV-light and serotonin in free state and in valency hybrids are analysed. The prior role of photodissociation to dimers at the UV-radiation action on heme-protein molecules has been shown. It has been observed that the complex between hemoglobin serotonin is formed in fields of αβ-dimers contacts

  8. Moessbauer and positron annihilation studies of structural modifications of hemoglobin in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural modifications of human adult oxyhemoglobin in concentrated solution were studied by Moessbauer and positron life-time spectroscopies. The effects of non-sterile degradation and irradiation by γ-rays were compared by both techniques. It was found that positron annihilation parameters were sensitive to the structural modifications of hemoglobin molecules in solution and could be related with the conformational states of hemoglobin. (author)15 refs.; 3 tabs

  9. Association of hemoglobin concentration and mortality in critically ill patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Sekhon, Mypinder S; McLean, Nielson; Henderson, William R.; Chittock, Dean R; Griesdale, Donald EG

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The critical care management of traumatic brain injury focuses on preventing secondary ischemic injury. Cerebral oxygen delivery is dependent upon the cerebral perfusion pressure and the oxygen content of blood, which is principally determined by hemoglobin. Despite its importance to the cerebral oxygen delivery, the precise hemoglobin concentration to provide adequate oxygen delivery to injured neuronal tissue in TBI patients is controversial with limited evidence to provide tra...

  10. STUDY OF HEMOGLOBIN LEVELS IN PREGNANT WOMEN AND ITS VARIOUS EFFECTS ON PREGNANCY OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: When maternal anemia is diagnosed before mid-pregnancy, it has been associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery. High maternal hemoglobin is associated with fetal growth restriction. Several epidemiologic studies have shown that high fetal hemoglobin is associated with lower birth weight and increased incidence of IUGR and intrauterine death. MATERIAL AND METHODS: It was a prospective observational study. All pregnant women attending antenatal clinic with first visit before 18 weeks of gestation were included in the study. Hemoglobin levels were done on women at the first visit to antenatal clinic and also in the third trimester between 34-36 weeks. Outcome criteria were birth weight of neonate, gestational age at delivery, maternal weight gain in pregnancy, development of PIH, IUGR, IUD and preterm labor. RESULTS: Increased weight gain in pregnancy was associated with increase in mean birth weight r=0.23 (P value 0.672. Increase in the hemoglobin concentration was associated with increase in birth weight r=0.36 (P value 0.49. It was observed that high hemoglobin concentration in pregnancy was associated with more length of gestation but it was not significant r=0.31 (P value 0.50. CONCLUSION: During early pregnancy normal hemoglobin concentrations were associated with higher birth weights. Weight gain in pregnancy was associated with lower hemoglobin concentrations at term and higher birth weights. The best outcomes of pregnancy were observed in women who had normal hemoglobin concentrations at the onset of pregnancy and who became anemic at term, presumably due to physiologic hemodilution.

  11. Estimation of glycated hemoglobin by 2,6-dimethylphenol: Sulphuric acid conventional method

    OpenAIRE

    Mallya, H. M.; Pattabiraman, T. N.

    2001-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin levels in hemolysate of normal and diabetic patients were determined by the 2,6-dimethylphenol:57.5% sulphuric acid conventional method and the values were 0.39±025 and 0.69±0.21 moles of hydroxymethylfurfural(HMF)/mole of globin, respectively. The mean increase in glycated hemoglobin values in diabetics (1.8fold) was highly significant (p

  12. Body Temperature-Related Structural Transitions of Monotremal and Human Hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Digel, I.; Maggakis-Kelemen, Ch.; Zerlin, K. F.; Linder, Pt.; Kasischke, N.; Kayser, P.; Porst, D; Temiz Artmann, A.; Artmann, G. M.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, temperature-related structural changes were investigated in human, duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, body temperature Tb = 31–33°C), and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus, body temperature Tb = 32–33°C) hemoglobin using circular dichroism spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The average hydrodynamic radius (Rh) and fractional (normalized) change in the ellipticity (Fobs) at 222 ± 2 nm of hemoglobin were measured. The temperature was varied stepwise from 25°C t...

  13. Dissolved oxygen sensing using an optical fibre long period grating coated with hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, M.; James, S. W.; Tatam, R. P.

    2015-09-01

    A method for the preparation of a sensor consisting of an optical fibre long period grating coated with human hemoglobin is described. The utility of this sensor in detecting dissolved oxygen in phosphate buffered saline solution, by the conversion of the coated hemoglobin from deoxyhemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin, is described. The sensor shows good repeatability with a %CV of less than 1% for oxygenated and deoxygenated states and no drift or hysteresis with repeated cycling.

  14. Sensitivity of Hemoglobin Concentration on Optical Probe Positioning in Image-guided Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Subhadra; Carpenter, Colin; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-modality image-guided near infrared spectroscopy provides volume-based quantification of total hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water and scatter in various tissue types in-vivo. The accuracy of these parameters depends on the location of the imaging probe and its distance from the tumor. In a numerical study, we have performed simulation to analyze this effect in a breast-specific imaging domain. Results show that the accuracy of total hemoglobin decreases by 25% for every centimeter awa...

  15. Association of Body Mass Index with Hemoglobin Concentration and Iron Parameters in Iranian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Akram Ghadiri-Anari; Narjes Nazemian; Hassan-Ali Vahedian-Ardakani

    2014-01-01

    Background. Studies have reported that obesity has an adverse effect on iron metabolism. Obesity is characterized by chronic, low-grade, systemic inflammation and anemia of chronic disease with elevated serum ferritin and decreased level of serum iron, transferrin saturation, and hemoglobin. Therefore, we examined the association of body mass index with hemoglobin concentration and iron parameters in this study. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Yazd to assess the relation ...

  16. Changes in hemoglobin concentration during chemoradiation of locally advanced head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Despite multimodality treatment strategies of locally advanced head and neck cancers long-term results leave much to be desired. There is evidence that oxygenation status of head and neck tumors is directly influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. The aim of this study was to verify changes in the hemoglobin level during combined radio-chemotherapy of locally advanced head and neck tumors. Patients and methods: Sixty-eight patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer had primary or adjuvant radiotherapy with doses of 60 to 74 Gy in combination with cisplatin (±5-FU) or carboplatin chemotherapy in the first and fifth week of treatment. Hemoglobin levels were analyzed before and at the end of radiotherapy. Results: In 41% of all patients the initial hemoglobin concentration was below normal levels. The mean hemoglobin values in all patients dropped significantly from 12.9±1.7 g/dl before to 11.6±1.6 g/dl at the end of treatment. In 12 cases (18%) allogeneic erythrocytes had to be transfused during treatment. At the end of treatment 76% of all patients had anemic hemoglobin levels. In the groups of patients with cisplatin and carboplatin chemotherapy a significant decrease in hemoglobin levels was seen without meaningful statistical difference between these 2 groups. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer a high initial rate of anemia was registered (41%): This rate was nearly doubled during chemoradiation (76%). Since several studies have shown a correlation between hemoglobin levels and local tumor control, there is evidence, that this group might benefit from correcting anemia before combined radio-chemotherapy. (orig.)

  17. Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buckley, Julliette M

    2012-02-03

    LPS tolerance has been the focus of extensive scientific and clinical research over the last several decades in an attempt to elucidate the sequence of changes that occur at a molecular level in tolerized cells. Tolerance to components of gram-positive bacterial cell walls such as bacterial lipoprotein and lipoteichoic acid is a much lesser studied, although equally important, phenomenon. This review will focus on cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components and examines the alterations in cell surface receptor expression, changes in intracellular signaling, gene expression and cytokine production, and the phenomenon of cross-tolerance.

  18. Hemoglobin cleavage site-specificity of the Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases falcipain-2 and falcipain-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Subramanian

    Full Text Available The Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 degrade host hemoglobin to provide free amino acids for parasite protein synthesis. Hemoglobin hydrolysis has been described as an ordered process initiated by aspartic proteases, but cysteine protease inhibitors completely block the process, suggesting that cysteine proteases can also initiate hemoglobin hydrolysis. To characterize the specific roles of falcipains, we used three approaches. First, using random P(1 - P(4 amino acid substrate libraries, falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 demonstrated strong preference for cleavage sites with Leu at the P(2 position. Second, with overlapping peptides spanning alpha and beta globin and proteolysis-dependent (18O labeling, hydrolysis was seen at many cleavage sites. Third, with intact hemoglobin, numerous cleavage products were identified. Our results suggest that hemoglobin hydrolysis by malaria parasites is not a highly ordered process, but rather proceeds with rapid cleavage by falcipains at multiple sites. However, falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 show strong specificity for P(2 Leu in small peptide substrates, in agreement with the specificity in optimized small molecule inhibitors that was identified previously. These results are consistent with a principal role of falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 in the hydrolysis of hemoglobin by P. falciparum and with the possibility of developing small molecule inhibitors with optimized specificity as antimalarial agents.

  19. Influence of peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration on the result of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the influence of peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration on the radiotherapy result of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: From January 1989 to December 1998, 304 patients with pathologically confirmed NPC received radical radiation. There were 209 males and 95 females. The ages ranged from 16 to 77 years with a median of 42. All patients were irradiated by 60Co or 6 MV external beam with a total dose of 64 - 76 Gy for the primary tumor and 46 - 77 Gy for the cervical lymph nodes. The peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration for all patients was measured before, during and after radiotherapy. These patients were divided into three groups according to the peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration before radiotherapy: anemia ( 160 g/L), and into two groups according to the change in the peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration during radiotherapy as increased and decreased groups. Results: All patients were followed with a follow-up rate of 90.5%. The peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration had a significant effect on the survival of NPC patients. Its decrease or increase during radiotherapy affected the survival and local control rates of NPC patients. Conclusions: The change of peripheral hemoglobin concentration affecting the oxygen content in the blood, can influence the local control and survival rates of NPC patients. Increase results in higher survival

  20. A spectroscopic study on the interaction between gold nanoparticles and hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The interaction was studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. ► Gold nanoparticles quench the fluorescence emission of hemoglobin solution. ► The binding and thermodynamic constants were calculated. ► Major impact: electrochemical applications of the complex onto a substrate. -- Abstract: The interaction between horse hemoglobin and gold nanoparticles was studied using optical spectroscopy. UV–vis and fluorescence spectra show that a spontaneous binding process occurred between hemoglobin and gold nanoparticles. The Soret band of hemoglobin in the presence of gold nanoparticles does not show significant changes, which proves that the protein retained its biological function. A shift to longer wavelengths appears in the plasmonic band of gold nanoparticles upon the attachment of hemoglobin molecules. Gold nanoparticles quench the fluorescence emission of tryptophan residues in the structure of hemoglobin. The Stern–Volmer quenching constant, the binding constant and the number of binding sites were also calculated. Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding was mainly due to hydrophobic interactions.

  1. Investigation of Hemoglobin/Gold Nanoparticle Heterolayer on Micro-Gap for Electrochemical Biosensor Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Yoon, Jinho; Chung, Yong-Ho; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we fabricated a hemoglobin/gold nanoparticle (Hb/GNP) heterolayer immobilized on the Au micro-gap to confirm H2O2 detection with a signal-enhancement effect. The hemoglobin which contained the heme group catalyzed the reduction of H2O2. To facilitate the electron transfer between hemoglobin and Au micro-gap electrode, a gold nanoparticle was introduced. The Au micro-gap electrode that has gap size of 5 µm was fabricated by conventional photolithographic technique to locate working and counter electrodes oppositely in a single chip for the signal sensitivity and reliability. The hemoglobin was self-assembled onto the Au surface via chemical linker 6-mercaptohexanoic acid (6-MHA). Then, the gold nanoparticles were adsorbed onto hemoglobin/6-MHA heterolayers by the layer-by-layer (LbL) method. The fabrication of the Hb/GNP heterolayer was confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The redox property and H2O2 detection of Hb/GNP on the micro-gap electrode was investigated by a cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiment. Taken together, the present results show that the electrochemical signal-enhancement effect of a hemoglobin/nanoparticle heterolayer was well confirmed on the micro-scale electrode for biosensor applications. PMID:27171089

  2. Profile of hemoglobin D trait in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuphan K. Dolai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb D Punjab is one of the most commonly observed abnormal hemoglobinopathy worldwide. There was no systematic large published study to investigate the characteristic of Hb D Punjab trait in India. This study was conducted in school and college students, newly married couples and pregnant women after proper counseling in the rural areas of West Bengal state in eastern India. Complete blood count was done by Sysmax Automated Hematology Analyzer KX 21 (Sysmex Corp., Kobe, Japan and thalassemia testing was done using high-performance liquid chromatography (Variant TM - Bio-Rad Lab., Hercules, CA, USA. A total of 46,139 individuals were screened for hemoglobinopathies. Hb D trait was found in 0.35%. Hypochromia rather than microcytosis is consistent finding in Hb D trait. Anisocytosis is absent in Hb D trait. In almost all (99.37% cases, Hb D is within 40% of total hemoglobin. This data is likely to be helpful for screening of hemoglobinopathy in resource poor setting.  血红蛋白(Hb D Punjab是全球最普遍的异常血红蛋白病之一。在印度,之前并没有研究D型特征血红蛋白病的大型出版物。本研究在印度东部的西孟加拉邦的农村地区进行,研究对象是接受过相关咨询后的在校生,大学生,新婚夫妇和孕妇。完整的血细胞计数由日本神户市Sysmex公司的KX21自动化血液分析仪完成,血液测试由美国加州赫拉克勒斯Variant-Bio-Rad实验室通过高效液相色谱法完成。总计46139人被筛查,D型特征血红蛋白病的发现率为0.35%。血红蛋白过少而非小红细胞症,是D型特征血红蛋白病的主要症状。红细胞大小不均没有在D型特征血红蛋白病中被检测出。在所有的情况中(99.37%),D型特征血红蛋白占所有血红蛋白总数的40%。这些数据有利于在资源匮乏地区对血红蛋白病的筛查。

  3. Increased hemoglobin O2 affinity protects during acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Ozlem; Cabrales, Pedro

    2012-08-01

    Acclimatization to hypoxia requires time to complete the adaptation mechanisms that influence oxygen (O(2)) transport and O(2) utilization. Although decreasing hemoglobin (Hb) O(2) affinity would favor the release of O(2) to the tissues, increasing Hb O(2) affinity would augment arterial O(2) saturation during hypoxia. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that pharmacologically increasing the Hb O(2) affinity will augment O(2) transport during severe hypoxia (10 and 5% inspired O(2)) compared with normal Hb O(2) affinity. RBC Hb O(2) affinity was increased by infusion of 20 mg/kg of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF). Control animals received only the vehicle. The effects of increasing Hb O(2) affinity were studied in the hamster window chamber model, in terms of systemic and microvascular hemodynamics and partial pressures of O(2) (Po(2)). Pimonidazole binding to hypoxic areas of mice heart and brain was also studied. 5HMF decreased the Po(2) at which the Hb is 50% saturated with O(2) by 12.6 mmHg. During 10 and 5% O(2) hypoxia, 5HMF increased arterial blood O(2) saturation by 35 and 48% from the vehicle group, respectively. During 5% O(2) hypoxia, blood pressure and heart rate were 58 and 30% higher for 5HMF compared with the vehicle. In addition, 5HMF preserved microvascular blood flow, whereas blood flow decreased to 40% of baseline in the vehicle group. Consequently, perivascular Po(2) was three times higher in the 5HMF group compared with the control group at 5% O(2) hypoxia. 5HMF also reduced heart and brain hypoxic areas in mice. Therefore, increased Hb O(2) affinity resulted in hemodynamics and oxygenation benefits during severe hypoxia. This acute acclimatization process may have implications in survival during severe environmental hypoxia when logistic constraints prevent chronic acclimatization. PMID:22636677

  4. The Pathophysiology of Extracellular Hemoglobin Associated with Enhanced Oxidative Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Rifkind

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb continuously undergoes autoxidation producing superoxide which dismutates into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and is a potential source for subsequent oxidative reactions. Autoxidation is most pronounced under hypoxic conditions in the microcirculation and for unstable dimers formed at reduced Hb concentrations. In the red blood cell (RBC, oxidative reactions are inhibited by an extensive antioxidant system. For extracellular Hb, whether from hemolysis of RBCs and/or the infusion of Hb-based blood substitutes, the oxidative reactions are not completely neutralized by the available antioxidant system. Un-neutralized H2O2 oxidizes ferrous and ferric Hbs to Fe(IV-ferrylHb and oxyferrylHb, respectively. FerrylHb further reacts with H2O2 producing heme degradation products and free iron. OxyferrylHb, in addition to Fe(IV contains a free radical that can undergo additional oxidative reactions. Fe(IIIHb produced during Hb autoxidation also readily releases heme, an additional source for oxidative stress. These oxidation products are a potential source for oxidative reactions in the plasma, but to a greater extent when the lower molecular weight Hb dimers enter cells and tissues. Heme and oxyferryl have been shown to have a proinflammatory effect further increasing their potential for oxidative stress. These oxidative reactions contribute to a number of pathological situations including atherosclerosis, kidney malfunction, sickle cell disease and malaria. The toxic effects of extracellular Hb are of particular concern for increased hemolysis due to hemolytic anemia. Hemolysis is further exacerbated in various diseases and their treatments. Blood transfusions are required whenever there is an appreciable decrease in RBCs due to hemolysis or blood loss. It is, therefore, essential that transfused blood, whether stored RBCs or blood obtained by an Autologous Blood Recovery System from the patient, does not further increase extracellular Hb.

  5. Relative role of heme nitrosylation and β-cysteine 93 nitrosation in the transport and metabolism of nitric oxide by hemoglobin in the human circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Ognibene, Frederick P.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Nichols, James S.; Pease-Fye, Margaret E.; Shelhamer, James H.; Schechter, Alan N.

    2000-01-01

    To quantify the reactions of nitric oxide (NO) with hemoglobin under physiological conditions and to test models of NO transport on hemoglobin, we have developed an assay to measure NO–hemoglobin reaction products in normal volunteers, under basal conditions and during NO inhalation. NO inhalation markedly raised total nitrosylated hemoglobin levels, with a significant arterial–venous gradient, supporting a role for hemoglobin in the transport and delivery of NO. The predominant species accou...

  6. Cloning and Characterization of a Caesalpinoid (Chamaecrista fasciculate) Hemoglobin: The Structural Transition from a Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobin to a Leghemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) and leghemoglobins (Lbs) are plant proteins that can reversibly bind O2 and other ligands. The nsHbs are hexacoordinate and appear to modulate cellular concentrations of NO and maintain energy levels under hypoxic conditions. The Lbs are pentacoordinate and facilita...

  7. Bone density and hemoglobin levels in older persons: results from the InCHIANTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, Matteo; Pahor, Marco; Lauretani, Fulvio; Penninx, Brenda W H J; Bartali, Benedetta; Russo, Roberto; Cherubini, Antonio; Woodman, Richard; Bandinelli, Stefania; Guralnik, Jack M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2005-06-01

    Hypoxemia has been recognized as a risk factor for bone loss. The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship of bone mass and density measures with anemia and hemoglobin levels in a large sample of older community-dwelling persons. The study is based on data from 950 participants enrolled in the "Invecchiare in Chianti" (Aging in the Chianti area, InCHIANTI) study. All the analyses were performed considering continuous hemoglobin levels as well as the dichotomous anemia variable (defined according to WHO criteria as hemoglobin < 12 g/dl in women and < 13 g/dl in men). A peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT) scan of the right calf was performed in all participants to evaluate total bone density, trabecular bone density, cortical bone density, and the ratio between cortical and total bone area. Linear regression analyses were used to assess the multivariate relationship of pQCT bone measures with anemia and hemoglobin levels after adjustment for demographics, chronic conditions, muscle strength and biological variables. Participants were 75.0 (SD 6.9) years old. In our sample, 101 participants (10.6%) were anemic. In women, coefficients from adjusted linear regression analyses evaluating the association between pQCT bone measures (per SD increase) and hemoglobin levels/anemia showed significant associations of anemia with total bone density (beta = -0.335, SE = 0.163; P = 0.04) and cortical bone density (beta = -0.428, SE = 0.160; P = 0.008). Relationships with borderline significance were found for the associations of anemia with trabecular bone density and the ratio between cortical and total bone area. Significant associations were found between hemoglobin levels and trabecular bone density (beta = 0.112, SE = 0.049; P = 0.02), total bone density (beta = 0.101, SE = 0.046; P = 0.03), cortical bone density (beta = 0.100, SE = 0.046; P = 0.03) and the ratio between cortical bone and total area (beta = 0.092, SE = 0.045; P = 0

  8. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  9. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  10. Improved biomass and protein production in solid-state cultures of an Aspergillus sojae strain harboring the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Lugo, Rodrigo; Madrigal, Marvin; Yelemane, Vikas; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2015-11-01

    The biotechnological value of Aspergillus sojae ATCC 20235 (A. sojae) for production of pectinases in solid-state fermentation (SSF) has been demonstrated recently. However, a common drawback of fungal solid-state cultures is the poor diffusion of oxygen into the fungi that limits its growth and biological productivity. The bacterial Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) has favored the metabolism and productivities of various bacterial and yeast strains besides alleviating hypoxic conditions of its native host, but the use of VHb in filamentous fungi still remains poor explored. Based on the known effects of VHb, this study assessed its applicability to improve A. sojae performance in SSF. The VHb gene (vgb) under control of the constitutive Aspergillus nidulants gpdA promoter was introduced into the genome of A. sojae by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Successful fungal transformants were identified by fluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. In solid-state cultures, the content of protease, exo-polygalacturonase (exo-PG), and exo-polymethylgalacturonase (exo-PMG) of the transformed fungus (A. sojae vgb+) improved were 26, 60, and 44 % higher, respectively, in comparison to its parental strain (A. sojae wt). Similarly, biomass content was also 1.3 times higher in the transformant strain. No significant difference was observed in endo-polygalacturonase (endo-PG) content between both fungal strains, suggesting dissimilar effects of VHb towards different enzymatic productions. Overall, our results show that biomass, protease, and exo-pectinase content of A. sojae in SSF can be improved by transformation with VHb. PMID:26224427

  11. Calibrating bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ochman, Howard; Elwyn, Susannah; Moran, Nancy A

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to calibrate bacterial evolution have relied on the assumption that rates of molecular sequence divergence in bacteria are similar to those of higher eukaryotes, or to those of the few bacterial taxa for which ancestors can be reliably dated from ecological or geological evidence. Despite similarities in the substitution rates estimated for some lineages, comparisons of the relative rates of evolution at different classes of nucleotide sites indicate no basis for their universal appl...

  12. Hemoglobin Q-Iran detected in family members from Northern Iran: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorshidi Mohammad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemoglobin Q-Iran (α75Asp→His is an important member of the hemoglobin Q family, molecularly characterized by the replacement of aspartic acid by histidine. The first report of hemoglobin Q-Iran and the nomenclature of this hemoglobinopathy dates back to 1970. Iran is known as a country with a high prevalence of α- and β-thalassemia and different types of hemoglobinopathy. Many of these variants are yet to be identified as the practice of molecular laboratory techniques is limited in this part of the world. Applying such molecular methods, we report the first hemoglobin Q-Iran cases in Northern Iran. Case presentation An unusual band was detected in an isoelectric focusing test and cellulose acetate electrophoresis of a sample from a 22-year-old Iranian man from Mazandaran Province. Capillary zone electrophoresis analysis identified this band as hemoglobin Q. A similar band was also detected in his mother's electrophoresis (38 years, Iranian ethnicity. The cases underwent molecular investigation and the presence of a hemoglobin Q-Iran mutation was confirmed by the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction method. Direct conventional sequencing revealed a single guanine to cytosine missense mutation (c.226G > C; GAC >CAC at codon 75 in the α-globin gene in both cases. Conclusion The wide spectrum and high frequency of nondeletional α-globin mutations in Mazandaran Province is remarkable and seem to differ considerably from what has been found in Mediterranean populations. This short communication reports the first cases of patients with hemoglobin Q found in that region.

  13. Hemoglobin E Disorders in South Gujarat – A Study of 35 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B M Jha, Bhavna Gamit, Jitendra Patel, Kunal J Prajapati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Among the inherited disorders of blood, hemoglobinopathies and thalassemia constitute a major bulk of non-communicable genetic disease in India. Most commonly found abnormal hemoglobins in India are hemoglobin S (Hb S, hemoglobin E (Hb E and hemoglobin D (Hb D. The distribution of Hb E (?2?226Glu?Lys is mostly restricted to north-eastern India and it is relatively rare in rest of the country. Identification of this disorder is immensely important epidemiologically and aid in prevention of more serious hemoglobin disorder. Aims:Thepurpose of the study is to highlight importance of identification of Hb E disorders and prevention of doubly heterozygous state for Hb E and ?-thalassemia which may be falsely characterized clinically by thalassemia major. Material and Method:This study is a part of the work done under Sickle Cell Anemia Control Programme, under which samples are tested for various routine as well as specific tests such as dithionite tube turbidity test (DTT Test, hemoglobin electrophoresis and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC to diagnose Sickle cell disorders along with other hemoglobinopathies. Result and Conclusion: Total 70308 cases were analyzed during the period ofJune 2007 to October 2011 out of these 35 cases of Hb E variant were identified. Among these 29 cases of Hb E trait, 1 case of Hb E disease and 5 cases of Hb E ?-thalassemia were identified. Hb E trait and Hb E disease were asymptomatic while 5 cases of Hb E ?-thalassemia were suffering from haemolytic anemia. Detection of this asymptomatic abnormal hemoglobin will help in the prevention of more serious doubly heterozygous hemoglobinopathy.

  14. Extraction of Phospholipids from Human Erythrocyte Membranes by Hemoglobin Oxidation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunauer, Linda S; Chen, James Y; Koontz, M Zachary; Davis, Kathryn K; O'Brien, Laura E; Wright, Emily M; Huestis, Wray H

    2016-06-01

    This investigation examines oxidation conditions under which hemoglobin extracts membrane phospholipid from erythrocytes and model membranes. In erythrocytes made echinocytic with exogenous phospholipid, addition of hemoglobin oxidized with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or Vitamin C (conditions that result in the formation of significant quantities of choleglobin), but not ferricyanide (which produces predominantly methemoglobin), induced dose-dependent shape reversion to less echinocytic forms, consistent with extraction of phospholipids from the exofacial side of the membrane. Erythrocytes preloaded with radiolabeled phosphatidylcholine or NBD-labeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid, exhibited greatest extraction of radiolabel or fluorescence signal with exogenous hemoglobin oxidized via H2O2 or Vitamin C, but not ferricyanide. However, with NBD-phosphatidylserine (a preferential inner monolayer intercalator), significantly less extraction of labeled lipid occurred with oxidized hemoglobin prepared under all three oxidizing conditions. In dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes containing radiolabeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylethanolamine, subsequent addition of hemoglobin oxidized with H2O2 or Vitamin C extracted radiolabeled lipid with significantly greater efficiency than ferricyanide-treated hemoglobin, with enhanced extraction detectable at levels approaching physiological plasma oxidant concentrations. Radiolabeled lipid extraction was comparable for phospholipids containing saturated acyl chains between 12 and 18 carbons but diminished significantly for oleoyl-containing phospholipids. Hemoglobin dimerization occurred at very low levels with H2O2 treatment, and even lower levels with Vitamin C treatment, and thus did not correlate to the high efficiency and consistent levels of lipid extraction observed with these treatments. These findings indicate that choleglobin extracts lipids from cell

  15. Cohabitation in the intestine: interactions between helminth parasites, bacterial microbiota and host immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Lisa A.; Finlay, B. Brett; Rick M Maizels

    2015-01-01

    Both intestinal helminth parasites and certain bacterial microbiota species have been credited with strong immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies have reported that the presence of helminth infection alters the composition of the bacterial intestinal microbiota, and conversely that the presence and composition of the bacterial microbiota affects helminth colonisation and persistence within mammalian hosts. This article reviews recent findings on these reciprocal relationships, in both human...

  16. Bacterial Flora Changes in Conjunctiva of Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Type I Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chao; Fei, Yuda; Qin, Yali; Luo, Dan; Yang, Shufei; Kou, Xinyun; Zi, Yingxin; Deng, Tingting; Jin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background The microbiota of both humans and animals plays an important role in their health and the development of disease. Therefore, the bacterial flora of the conjunctiva may also be associated with some diseases. However, there are no reports on the alteration of bacterial flora in conjunctiva of diabetic rats in the literature. Therefore, we investigated the changes in bacterial flora in bulbar conjunctiva of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type I diabetes. Methods A high dose of...

  17. Modulation of Post-Antibiotic Bacterial Community Reassembly and Host Response by Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Erb Downward, John R.; Falkowski, Nicole R.; Mason, Katie L.; Ryan Muraglia; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Candida albicans into cefoperazone-treated mice results in changes in bacterial community reassembly. Our objective was to use high-throughput sequencing to characterize at much greater depth the specific changes in the bacterial microbiome. The colonization of C. albicans significantly altered bacterial community reassembly that was evident at multiple taxonomic levels of resolution. There were marked changes in the levels of Bacteriodetes and Lactobacillaceae. Lachnospir...

  18. Post-splenectomy infections in chronic schistosomiasis as a consequence of bacterial translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Kedma de Magalhães Lima; Melissa Negro-Dellacqua; Victor Emmanuell Fernandes Apolônio dos Santos; Célia Maria Machado Barbosa de Castro

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : Bacterial translocation is the invasion of indigenous intestinal bacteria through the gut mucosa to normally sterile tissues and internal organs. Schistosomiasis may cause alterations in the immune system and damage to the intestines, portal system and mesenteric lymph nodes. This study investigated bacterial translocation and alterations in the intestinal microbiota and mucosa in schistosomiasis and splenectomized mice. METHODS : Forty female 35-day-old Swiss Webster mice were...

  19. Dynamin like protein 1 participated in the hemoglobin uptake pathway of Plasmodium falciparum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hong-chang; GAO Yu-hui; ZHONG Xiang; WANG Heng

    2009-01-01

    Background During the blood stage of malaria infection, parasites internalize in the host red blood cells and degrade massive amounts of hemoglobin for their development. Although the morphology of the parasite's hemoglobin uptake pathway has been clearly observed, little has been known about its molecular mechanisms. Methods The recombinant proteins from Plasmodium falciparum, dynamin like protein 1 (PfDYN1) and 2 (PfDYN2) GTPase domain, were expressed in E .coli and showed GTPase activity. By using a dynamin inhibitor, dynasore, we demonstrated the involvement of PfDYN1 in the hemoglobin uptake pathway. Results The GTPase activity of the two recombinant proteins was inhibited by dynasore in vitro. Treatment of parasite cultures with 80 μmol/L dynasore at the ring and early trophozoite stage resulted in substantial inhibition of parasite growth and in an obvious decline of hemoglobin quantum. Furthermore, reduced intraceliular hemozoin accumulation and decreased uptake of the FITC-dextran were also observed, together with distinctive changes in the ultrastructure of parasites after the dynasore treatment. Conclusions Our results show that PfDYN1 plays an important role in the hemoglobin uptake pathway of P. Falciparum and suggest its possibility of being a novel target for malaria chemotherapy.

  20. Study of the interaction between bovine hemoglobin and analogs of biphenyldicarboxylate by spectrofluorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiyong, E-mail: wangry@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Yin, Yujing [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Ruiqiang [The First Afficiated Hospiatal of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Xie, Yuanzhe; Ge, Baoyu; Li, Zhigang; Li, Zhen; Shi, Jie [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Chang, Junbiao, E-mail: changjunbiao@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2013-12-15

    The interaction between bovine hemoglobin and analogs of Biphenyldicarboxylate was investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, ultraviolet–vis absorbance, resonance light-scattering spectra and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra at pH 7.40. The quenching mechanism and binding constants were determined by the quenching of bovine hemoglobin fluorescence in presence of analogs. Results showed that the nature of the quenching was of static type. Both the van der Waals and hydrogen bonding played a major role in stabilizing the complex. The distance between donor and acceptors was obtained to be 2.11–2.25 nm according to Förster's theory. The influence of analogs on the conformation of bovine hemoglobin was investigated. -- Highlights: • The interactions between bovine hemoglobin and analogs of DDB have been investigated. • Results reveal that DDB has the strongest affinity for hemoglobin among four compounds. • The van der Waals and hydrogen bonding play major role in the binding process. • The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects has been investigated.

  1. Study of the interaction between bovine hemoglobin and analogs of biphenyldicarboxylate by spectrofluorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between bovine hemoglobin and analogs of Biphenyldicarboxylate was investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, ultraviolet–vis absorbance, resonance light-scattering spectra and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra at pH 7.40. The quenching mechanism and binding constants were determined by the quenching of bovine hemoglobin fluorescence in presence of analogs. Results showed that the nature of the quenching was of static type. Both the van der Waals and hydrogen bonding played a major role in stabilizing the complex. The distance between donor and acceptors was obtained to be 2.11–2.25 nm according to Förster's theory. The influence of analogs on the conformation of bovine hemoglobin was investigated. -- Highlights: • The interactions between bovine hemoglobin and analogs of DDB have been investigated. • Results reveal that DDB has the strongest affinity for hemoglobin among four compounds. • The van der Waals and hydrogen bonding play major role in the binding process. • The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects has been investigated

  2. Preparation of Cu(2+)-mediated magnetic imprinted polymers for the selective sorption of bovine hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruixia; Cui, Xihui; Hao, Yi; He, Gaiyan; Zhang, Min; Tang, Yuhai

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a novel Cu(2+)-mediated core-shell bovine hemoglobin imprinted superparamagnetic polymers were synthesized. First, carboxyl group directly-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles were produced by a facile one-pot hydrothermal method. Next, copper ions were introduced to chelate with carboxyl groups and further bonded with template bovine hemoglobin as co-functional monomer. Then, functional monomers 3-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane and octyltrimethoxysilane were adopted to form the thin polymer layers. Finally, after removal of the templates, the imprinting shells with specific recognition cavities for bovine hemoglobin were obtained on Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The resultant molecularly imprinted polymers have high adsorption capacity and satisfactory selectivity for bovine hemoglobin with the help of copper ions. The obtained magnetic nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The measurements demonstrated that the as-synthesized nanomaterials exhibited good dispersion, high crystallinity, and satisfactory superparamagnetic properties. The feasibility of this method was further confirmed by using the imprinted nanomaterials to specifically extract bovine hemoglobin from real bovine blood samples. PMID:26838380

  3. Clinical Significance of Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content in the Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Karagülle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia (IDA and to compare it with other conventional iron parameters. METHODS: A total of 32 female patients with IDA (serum hemoglobin 120 g/L and serum ferritin <20 ng/mL were enrolled. RESULTS: CHr was 24.95±3.92 pg in female patients with IDA and 29.93±2.96 pg in female patients with iron deficiency. CHr showed a significant positive correlation with hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, serum iron, and transferrin saturation and a significant negative correlation with transferrin and total iron-binding capacity. The cut-off value of CHr for detecting IDA was 29 pg. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that CHr is a useful parameter that can be confidently used in the diagnosis of IDA, and a CHr cut-off value of 29 pg predicts IDA.

  4. Correlation of glycosylated hemoglobin with microalbuminuria to predict renal damage in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipsha Kriplani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular screening of levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and microalbuminuria, diabetic nephropathy can be prevented. The aim was to assess and compare the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, microalbuminuria and serum creatinine in type 2 diabetic patients divided in groups of those on default antidiabetic treatment compared with those on regular antidiabetic treatment and to assess its correlation in type 2 of diabetic nephropathy. Methods: Two hundred diabetic patients above 40 years of age and 200 age matched control subjects with levels of glycosylated hemoglobin < 6.5% and on regular antiglycemic therapy were selected. Fasting plasma sugar was estimated by the glucose oxidase (GOD - glucose peroxidase (POD. Glycosylated hemoglobin and microalbuminuria level was measured by the immunoturbidimetric method and serum creatinine estimation was done by the Jaffe's kinetic method. p value was drawn using the student's paired t-test. Results: There is a strong correlation between the increase in the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin with the corresponding rise in the levels of microalbuminuria and serum creatinine. Conclusion: Periodic surveillance of the levels of microalbuminuria should be carried out in the type 2 diabetic patients to prevent further damage by early detection of diabetic nephropathy. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 2014-2019

  5. Stress significantly increases mortality following a secondary bacterial respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodgson Paul D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A variety of mechanisms contribute to the viral-bacterial synergy which results in fatal secondary bacterial respiratory infections. Epidemiological investigations have implicated physical and psychological stressors as factors contributing to the incidence and severity of respiratory infections and psychological stress alters host responses to experimental viral respiratory infections. The effect of stress on secondary bacterial respiratory infections has not, however, been investigated. A natural model of secondary bacterial respiratory infection in naive calves was used to determine if weaning and maternal separation (WMS significantly altered mortality when compared to calves pre-adapted (PA to this psychological stressor. Following weaning, calves were challenged with Mannheimia haemolytica four days after a primary bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1 respiratory infection. Mortality doubled in WMS calves when compared to calves pre-adapted to weaning for two weeks prior to the viral respiratory infection. Similar results were observed in two independent experiments and fatal viral-bacterial synergy did not extend beyond the time of viral shedding. Virus shedding did not differ significantly between treatment groups but innate immune responses during viral infection, including IFN-γ secretion, the acute-phase inflammatory response, CD14 expression, and LPS-induced TNFα production, were significantly greater in WMS versus PA calves. These observations demonstrate that weaning and maternal separation at the time of a primary BHV-1 respiratory infection increased innate immune responses that correlated significantly with mortality following a secondary bacterial respiratory infection.

  6. Effects of different osmolarities on bacterial biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa Nessner Kavamura; Itamar Soares de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation depends on several factors. The influence of different osmolarities on bacterial biofilm formation was studied. Two strains (Enterobacter sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp.) exhibited the most remarkable alterations. Biofilm formation is an important trait and its use has been associated to the protection of organisms against environmental stresses.

  7. Bacterial tactic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, J P

    1999-01-01

    Many, if not most, bacterial species swim. The synthesis and operation of the flagellum, the most complex organelle of a bacterium, takes a significant percentage of cellular energy, particularly in the nutrient limited environments in which many motile species are found. It is obvious that motility accords cells a survival advantage over non-motile mutants under normal, poorly mixed conditions and is an important determinant in the development of many associations between bacteria and other organisms, whether as pathogens or symbionts and in colonization of niches and the development of biofilms. This survival advantage is the result of sensory control of swimming behaviour. Although too small to sense a gradient along the length of the cell, and unable to swim great distances because of buffetting by Brownian motion and the curvature resulting from a rotating flagellum, bacteria can bias their random swimming direction towards a more favourable environment. The favourable environment will vary from species to species and there is now evidence that in many species this can change depending on the current physiological growth state of the cell. In general, bacteria sense changes in a range of nutrients and toxins, compounds altering electron transport, acceptors or donors into the electron transport chain, pH, temperature and even the magnetic field of the Earth. The sensory signals are balanced, and may be balanced with other sensory pathways such as quorum sensing, to identify the optimum current environment. The central sensory pathway in this process is common to most bacteria and most effectors. The environmental change is sensed by a sensory protein. In most species examined this is a transmembrane protein, sensing the external environment, but there is increasing evidence for additional cytoplasmic receptors in many species. All receptors, whether sensing sugars, amino acids or oxygen, share a cytoplasmic signalling domain that controls the activity of a

  8. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  9. Comparative and quantitative determination of total hemoglobin concentration in normal and psoriatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cyanmethaemoglobin technique is now recommended as the standard method by International Committee for Standardization in Hematology and British Standards Institution 1966. The hemoglobin is treated with reagent containing potassium ferricyanide, Potassium cyanide and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The ferricyanide forms methamoglobin which is converted to cyanmethaemoglobin by the cyanide. The average values of hemoglobin, percent determined from the blood samples of normal and psoriatic (n=44) males and (n=35) females were 15.0, 12.7, 13.6 and 11.2 g/100ml. The decrease in hemoglobin concentration could be due to anemia resulting during the cell proliferation epidermis in inflammatory state and Keratolytic disorder which take place in psoriasis. (author)

  10. The effect of gamma-rays on the hemoglobin of whole-body irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the UV-visible absorption spectrum of mouse hemoglobin as a result of whole body irradiation were studied. White albino adult mice were exposed to a Cs-137 γ-source at a dose rate of 47.5 Gy/h to different absorbed dose values ranging from 1 to 8 Gy. Blood specimens were taken 24 h after irradiation. The UV-visible absorption spectra of hemoglobin of irradiated and control mice were measured in the wavelength range from 200 to 700 nm. The obtained results showed significant changes in the bands measured at 340 nm, in the Soret band measured at 410 nm, also, the α- and β-bands measured at 537 and 572 nm showed significant decrease in intensity with the absorbed dose increase. The absorbance measured at 630 nm showed no significant changes. The radiation effect on the animal hemoglobin was discussed on the basis of the obtained results. (Author)

  11. A new method for detecting hemoglobin directly in whole blood using photon attenuation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the proposed work is focused on measuring iron concentration directly in whole blood as tool for estimating hemoglobin and anemic conditions in patients across the world. The investigated method depends on theory of photon attenuation through transmission of low energy in whole blood sample. The mathematical expressions for calculating hemoglobin and iron deficit on blood using photon attenuation are derived. Calculations are carried out for estimating concentration of iron in blood samples taken from children, adults and old patients and therefore measuring their hemoglobin and iron deficit from normal values. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficient values were obtained using the XCOM program. A high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry based on high purity germanium detector was employed to measure attenuation of strongly collimated monoenergetic gamma beam through blood samples. (author)

  12. Normal reference value of hemoglobin of young women and geographical factors in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GEMiao

    2003-01-01

    A research is conducted on the relationship between the normal reference value of 20,475 examples of hemoglobin of young women and five geographical factors in 208 areas in China, the normal reference value is determined by the hemoglobincyanide method. It is found that the correlation of geographical factors and the normal reference value of hemoglobin of young women are quite significant (F=142.81). By using the method of multiple linear regression analysis, one regression equation is inferred. If geographical values are obtained in some areas, the normal reference value of hemoglobin of young women of this area can be reckoned by using the regression equation. Furthermore, depending on the geographical factors, China can be divided into six regions:Oinghai-Tibet (Qingzang) Plateau. Southwest. Northwest. Southeast. North and Northeast China.

  13. Hemoglobin is associated with retinal vascular fractals in type 1 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Hodgson, Lauren A B; Kawasaki, Ryo;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Retinal vascular fractal dimension, a measure of the density of the retinal vasculature, has been suggested as a marker of systemic microvascular disorders in diabetes. As hemoglobin concentration is tightly related to vascular physiology and hypoxia, the hypothesis was that hemoglobin...... concentration would be associated with retinal vascular fractals in a relevant population. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study of 204 long-term type 1 diabetes patients from a population-based cohort, retinal digital photos were captured and graded for fractal dimension (Df) by International Retinal Imaging...... Software - Fractal (IRIS-Fractal). Df was calculated from a disc-centered retinal photo from the right eye. Hemoglobin concentrations were measured using routine equipment. RESULTS: Of 175 patients with gradable images, median age was 57.7 years and median duration of diabetes was 42 years. Median retinal...

  14. Expression of NO scavenging hemoglobin is involved in the timing of bolting in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Jensen, Erik Østergaard

    2008-01-01

    -symbiotic hemoglobin gene, GLB2, in Arabidopsis thaliana. Lines with GLB1 silencing had a significant delay of bolting and after bolting, shoots reverted to the rosette vegetative phase by formation of aerial rosettes at lateral meristems. Lines with overexpression of GLB1 or GLB2 bolted earlier than wild type plants....... By germinating the lines in a medium containing the nitric oxide (NO) donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), it was demonstrated that both GLB1 and GLB2 promote bolting by antagonizing the effect of NO, suggesting that non-symbiotic plant hemoglobin controls bolting by scavenging the floral transition...... with an optimum at low concentrations. It was observed that overexpression of either GLB1 or GLB2 shifts the optimum for NO growth stimulation to a higher concentration. In conclusion, we have found that expression of NO scavenging plant hemoglobin is involved in the control of bolting in Arabidopsis....

  15. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squiers, John J; Edwards, Anthony G; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient's peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  16. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria.......Biofilm resilience poses major challenges to the development of novel antimicrobial agents. Biofilm bacteria can be considered small groups of “Special Forces” capable of infiltrating the host and destroying important components of the cellular defense system with the aim of crippling the host...

  17. Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair in Mitral Regurgitation Reduces Cell-Free Hemoglobin and Improves Endothelial Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Rammos

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction is predictive for cardiovascular events and may be caused by decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO. NO is scavenged by cell-free hemoglobin with reduction of bioavailable NO up to 70% subsequently deteriorating vascular function. While patients with mitral regurgitation (MR suffer from an impaired prognosis, mechanisms relating to coexistent vascular dysfunctions have not been described yet. Therapy of MR using a percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR approach has been shown to lead to significant clinical benefits. We here sought to investigate the role of endothelial function in MR and the potential impact of PMVR.Twenty-seven patients with moderate-to-severe MR treated with the MitraClip® device were enrolled in an open-label single-center observational study. Patients underwent clinical assessment, conventional echocardiography, and determination of endothelial function by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD of the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasound at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. Patients with MR demonstrated decompartmentalized hemoglobin and reduced endothelial function (cell-free plasma hemoglobin in heme 28.9±3.8 μM, FMD 3.9±0.9%. Three months post-procedure, PMVR improved ejection fraction (from 41±3% to 46±3%, p = 0.03 and NYHA functional class (from 3.0±0.1 to 1.9±1.7, p<0.001. PMVR was associated with a decrease in cell free plasma hemoglobin (22.3±2.4 μM, p = 0.02 and improved endothelial functions (FMD 4.8±1.0%, p<0.0001.We demonstrate here that plasma from patients with MR contains significant amounts of cell-free hemoglobin, which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. PMVR therapy is associated with an improved hemoglobin decompartmentalization and vascular function.

  18. Characterization of the hemoglobins of the neonatal brushtailed possum Trichosurus vulpecula (Kerr): evidence for a highly cooperative, aggregated isoform of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henty, Kristen; Wells, Rufus M G; Brittain, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    The red blood cells of the neonatal brushtailed possum exhibit unusually strong cooperativity at high levels of oxygen saturation (n=5.4) which appear to arise from a concentration dependent aggregation of one of the neonatal hemoglobin isoforms. Red blood cells from neonatal pouched young exhibit a Bohr factor of -0.36. Stripped hemolysate is sensitive to added 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) (apparent binding constant K=35 micromol L(-1)) and ATP (K=180 micromol L(-1)), but is largely insensitive towards chloride ions. Five isoforms of non-adult hemoglobin were identified using isoelectric focusing. Mass spectrometry indicated that two early isoforms contain alpha chains identical to the adult alpha chain. The remaining three isoforms are composed of identical alpha type and beta type gene products, but differ in their isoelectric points due to differential post-translational modification. PMID:18420437

  19. Hemoglobin Neapolis, beta 126(H4)Val----Gly: a novel beta-chain variant associated with a mild beta-thalassemia phenotype and displaying anomalous stability features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, L; Lacerra, G; Camardella, L; De Angioletti, M; Fioretti, G; Maglione, G; de Bonis, C; Guarino, E; Viola, A; Cutolo, R

    1991-12-01

    A novel beta-chain, beta 126(H4)Val----Gly, electrophoretically silent, was detected by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography in three unrelated families from Naples (Southern Italy) and accounted for about 30% of the total beta-chains. The amino acid substitution was detected by HPLC fingerprint. The eight heterozygous patients showed hematologic and biosynthetic alterations of mild beta-thalassemia type. The hemoglobin variant showed abnormal stability features. It was unstable in the heat stability and isopropanol precipitation tests, but did not cause a hemolytic syndrome in vivo and was stable in a time-course experiment of biosynthesis in vitro. DNA polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing of the mutated gene from 135 nt upstream of the cap site to 106 nt downstream of the polyadenylation site showed only the beta 126 GTG----GGG mutation, which was confirmed in the other patients by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. The mutation was found to be associated with a type II beta-globin framework and restriction fragment length polymorphism haplotype V. The novel variant was named hemoglobin Neapolis. PMID:1954392

  20. Plasma electrophoretic profiles and hemoglobin binding protein reference intervals in the eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) and influences of age, sex, season, and location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Jennifer E; Byrd, John; Cray, Carolyn; Allender, Matthew C

    2014-12-01

    Evaluation of plasma electrophoretic profiles and acute phase protein concentrations may play a valuable role in health assessment of reptiles; however, little is known about reference intervals in free-ranging eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina). The purpose of this study was to establish reference intervals of protein electrophoretic profiles and hemoglobin binding protein ([HBP] as determined by a haptoglobin assay) in free-ranging eastern box turtles and to assess any possible correlations between varying age class (adults vs. juvenile), sex (male, female, or unknown), season (spring, summer, or fall), or location (Tennessee vs. Illinois). Blood samples were obtained from 324 eastern box turtles from 2010 to 2012 at three sites in Illinois and one site in Tennessee, USA. Significant differences were observed with total protein (sex, season, state, Illinois location), albumin (age class, season, state, Illinois location), α-1 globulins (sex, season, Illinois location), α-2 globulins (sex, season, state, Illinois location), β globulins (age class, sex, season, state, Illinois location), γ globulins (sex, season state, Illinois location), and hemoglobin binding protein (age class, sex, state, Illinois location). The use of electrophoretic profiles and acute phase proteins is a relatively new concept in reptilian medicine, and this study allowed for establishment of references intervals in the eastern box turtle and emphasized differences that occured based on age, sex, season, and location. Future research in this area can now build on these data to determine changes in population health over time or alterations due to specific environmental or disease threats. PMID:25632671

  1. Binding of fluorescent acridine dyes acridine orange and 9-aminoacridine to hemoglobin: Elucidation of their molecular recognition by spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular modeling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2016-06-01

    The molecular interaction between hemoglobin (HHb), the major human heme protein, and the acridine dyes acridine orange (AO) and 9-aminoacridine (9AA) was studied by various spectroscopic, calorimetric and molecular modeling techniques. The dyes formed stable ground state complex with HHb as revealed from spectroscopic data. Temperature dependent fluorescence data showed the strength of the dye-protein complexation to be inversely proportional to temperature and the fluorescence quenching was static in nature. The binding-induced conformational change in the protein was investigated using circular dichroism, synchronous fluorescence, 3D fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy results. Circular dichroism data also quantified the α-helicity change in hemoglobin due to the binding of acridine dyes. Calorimetric studies revealed the binding to be endothermic in nature for both AO and 9AA, though the latter had higher affinity, and this was also observed from spectroscopic data. The binding of both dyes was entropy driven. pH dependent fluorescence studies revealed the existence of electrostatic interaction between the protein and dye molecules. Molecular modeling studies specified the binding site and the non-covalent interactions involved in the association. Overall, the results revealed that a small change in the acridine chromophore leads to remarkable alteration in the structural and thermodynamic aspects of binding to HHb. PMID:27077554

  2. IS HEMOGLOBIN E GENE WIDELY SPREAD IN THE STATE OF MADHYA PRADESH IN CENTRAL INDIA? EVIDENCE FROM FIVE TYPICAL FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Balgir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Red cell inherited hemoglobin anomalies are commonly encountered in the central region of India. These cause a public health concern due to high degree of morbidity, mortality, and fetal loss in the backward, underprivileged, and vulnerable people. Purpose: To report five typical families of hemoglobin E disorders identified for the first time in the state of Madhya Pradesh from central India. Methods: Out of a total of 445 couples/families (excluding the present study with 1526 persons (848 males and 678 females referred from a tertiary hospital in central India for investigations of anemia/hemoglobinopathies during the period from March 2010 to February 2014, we came across five typical rare couples/families of hemoglobin E disorders worthy of detailed investigations. Laboratory investigations were carried out following the standard procedures after cross checking for quality control from time to time. Results: For the first time, we have encountered nine cases of heterozygous hemoglobin E trait, two members with hemoglobin E-β-thalassemia (double heterozygosity, two cases of sickle cell-hemoglobin E disease (double heterozygosity, and none with homozygous hemoglobin E. Cases  of hemoglobin E trait, hemoglobin E-β-thalassemia, sickle cell-β-thalassemia and sickle cell-E disease showed moderate to severe anemia, and target cells, and reduced values of red cell indices like RBC, Hb level, HCT, MCV, MCH and MCHC, representing abnormal hematological profile and clinical manifestations before blood transfusion. Conclusions: Double heterozygosity for hemoglobinopathies such as occurrence of β-thalassemia mutation with structurally abnormal hemoglobins (Hb S and Hb E is a rare entity, but occurs with severe clinical manifestations only in those areas or communities where these are highly prevalent, testifying the migrations and genetic admixture. Distribution of hemoglobin E and β-thalassemia in different districts of Madhya Pradesh

  3. Hemoglobin levels and anemia evaluation during pregnancy in the highlands of Tibet: a hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaoyan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemia is regarded as a major risk factor for unfavorable pregnancy outcomes, but there have been no previous studies describing the pattern of hemoglobin concentration during pregnancy in Tibet and the relationship between altitude and Hb concentration in the pregnant women living in Tibet still has not been clearly established. The main objectives of this study were to study the hemoglobin levels and prevalence of anemia among pregnant women living in the highlands of Tibet and to evaluate potential associations of hemoglobin and anemia with women's characteristics. Methods The hospital-based study was conducted in 380 pregnant women. Their blood samples were tested and related sociodemographic information was collected. Multiple linear regression model and multiple logistic regression model were used to assess the association of pregnant women's characteristics with hemoglobin level and the occurrence of anemia. Centers for Disease Control (CDC, Dirren et al. and Dallman et al. methods were used to adjust the hemoglobin measurements based on altitude for estimating the prevalence of anemia. Results The mean hemoglobin concentration was 127.6 g/L (range: 55.0-190.0 g/L. Prevalence rate of anemia in this study was 70.0%, 77.9% and 41.3%, respectively for three altitude-correction methods for hemoglobin (CDC method, Dirren et al. method, and Dallman et al. method. Gestational age, ethnicity, residence and income were significantly associated with the hemoglobin concentration and prevalence of anemia in the study population. Specially, the hemoglobin concentration of pregnant women decreased with increase in gestational age. Conclusion The hemoglobin level was low and prevalence rate of anemia was high among pregnant women in Lhasa, Tibet. Gestational age, ethnicity, residence and income were found to be significantly associated with the hemoglobin level and the occurrence of anemia in the study population.

  4. Coupling of tertiary and quaternary changes in human hemoglobin: A 1D and 2D NMR study of hemoglobin Saint Mande (βN102Y)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemoglobin Saint Mande (βN102Y) is a low-affinity mutant with the substitution site situated in the quaternary-sensitive α1β2 interface. In adult hemoglobin the Asn102β contributes to the stability of the liganded (R) state, forming a hydrogen bond with Asp94α. The quaternary and tertiary perturbations subsequent to the Tyr for Asn substitution in monocarboxylated hemoglobin Saint Mande have been investigated by one-and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Analysis of the one-dinensional NMR spectra of the liganded and unliganded samples in 1H2O provides evidence that both R and T quaternary structures of Hb Saint Mande are different from the corresponding ones in HbA. In the monocarboxylated form of the mutant hemoglobin, at acid pH, the authors have observed the disappearance of an R-type hydrogen bond and the appearance of a new one whose proton resonates like a deoxy T marker. Using two-dimensional NMR methods and on the basis of previous results on the monocarboxylated HbA, they have obtained a significant number of resonance assignments in the spectra of monocarboxylated Hb Saint Mande at pH 5.6 in the presence or absence of a strong allosteric effector, inositol hexaphosphate. This enabled us to characterize the tertiary conformational changes triggered by the quaternary-state modification. The observed structural variations are confined within the heme pocket regions but concern both the α and β subunits

  5. A field study of ovine bacterial meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P R; Sargison, N D; Penny, C D; Pirie, R S

    1994-08-13

    Bacterial meningoencephalitis most commonly affected lambs two to four weeks old (median three weeks, range three days to six months) with clinical signs of episcleral congestion, lack of suck reflex, weakness, altered gait and depression extending to stupor, but hyperaesthesia to auditory and tactile stimuli. Opisthotonos was observed during the agonal stages of the disease. Analysis of lumbosacral cerebrospinal fluid revealed a highly significant increase in protein concentration (P sheep, control measures should ensure an adequate transfer of passive antibody, repeated treatments of the navel, and hygienic conditions in the lambing and rearing environments. PMID:7985344

  6. Pengaruh Pemberian Suplemen Vitamin B12 Terhadap Serum Vitamin B12 dan Hemoglobin Anak Prasekolah

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Zulhaida; . Hardinsyah; Syarief, Hidayat; Jalal, Fasli; Muhilal

    2010-01-01

    This research aimed to analyze prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency and anemia, and effects of vitamin B12 suplement on vitamin B12 serum and hemoglobin of preschool children. A randomized controlled trial of 32 preschool children (4-6 year) for 6 months was appliad. Subjects divided in to 2 groups, treatment group (received 10 μg vitamin B12 syrup daily) and control group (placebo). Consentration of vitamin B12 serum and hemoglobin of children was measured before and after their intervent...

  7. Hemoglobin as an independent prognostic factor in the radiotherapy of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic value of baseline hemoglobin levels before radiotherapy in patients with head and neck tumors. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study with a median follow-up of 43 months, we analyzed the results of 214 patients irradiated for head and neck cancer between January 1, 1990 and January 1, 1998 (180 men and 34 women; median age 58 years). The treatment concept consisted in adjuvant radiotherapy in 58 patients, 77 patients received definitive radiochemotherapy, 42 patients definitive radiotherapy, and 37 patients reirradiation for in-field recurrence. Baseline hemoglobin values were divided in four groups of the same patient number (quartiles). Several known prognostic factors like sex, tumor stage, histologic grading, performance status, and treatment scheme were analyzed for their influence on overall and event-free survival and correlated with pretreatment hemoglobin values (Kaplan-Meier method). In addition, univariate und multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out to evaluate the effect of baseline hemoglobin on response rates. Results: The median survival (event-free survival) of all patients amounted to 15 months (10 months). 25%, 50%, and 75% of patients had hemoglobin values < 11.2 g/dl, < 12.7 g/dl, and < 13.9 g/dl, respectively. In the univariate analysis, the following variables were significant prognostic factors for overall/event-free survival (log-rank test): treatment concept (p < 0.001/ p < 0.001), tumor stage (p < 0.001/p < 0.001), general condition (p < 0.001/p < 0.001), and pretreatment hemoglobin (p = 0.014/p = 0.05). Multivariate analysis (Cox) proved these parameters to be independent of each other. In addition, response rate after radiation showed a strong association between hemoglobin and local control probability (p = 0.02). Conclusion: In this retrospective analysis, baseline hemoglobin level was shown to be an independent significant prognostic factor in

  8. Balanced globin protein expression and heme biosynthesis improve production of human hemoglobin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lifang; Martínez, José L.; Liu, Zihe;

    2014-01-01

    synthesized in yeast, however the challenge is to balance the expression of the two different globin subunits, as well as the supply of the prosthetic heme required for obtaining the active hemoglobin (α2β2). In this work we evaluated the expression of different combinations of α and β peptides and combined...... this with metabolic engineering of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Through evaluation of several different strategies we showed that engineering the biosynthesis pathway can substantially increase the heme level in yeast cells, and this resulted in a significant enhancement of human hemoglobin...

  9. Enhancement of Salinity Tolerance during Rice Seed Germination by Presoaking with Hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng Xu; Bing Hu; Ziyi He; Fei Ma; Jianfei Feng; Wenbiao Shen; Jie Yang

    2011-01-01

    Salinity stress is an important environmental constraint limiting the productivity of many crops worldwide. In this report, experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of seed presoaking by bovine hemoglobin, an inducer of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), on salinity tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The results showed that different concentrations of the hemoglobin (0.01, 0.05, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 g/L) differentially alleviated the inhibition of rice seed germination and thereafter se...

  10. Isotope effects in the non enzymic glucation of hemoglobin catalyzed by phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of hemoglobin, mainly at the N-terminal valine, with glucose exhibits identical rates in protium and deuterium oxides, both for the buffer-independent rate and for the first-order rate in phosphate buffer. Under the conditions employed, imine formation is relatively rapid and events in the course of the Amadori rearrangement must limit the rate. A very-slow, phosphate-induced reorganization of hemoglobin-glucose imine may be the most likely candidate for the rate-limiting step. (author)

  11. Hemoglobin E hemoglobinopathy in an adult from Assam with unusual presentation: A Diagnostic dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Sunitha S. Kiran; Saraswathy Aithal; Charalingappa S Belagavi

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin E (HbE) is estimated to affect at least one million people around the world. Carrier frequency of hemoglobin E/β-thalassemia (HbE/β-thalassemia) is highest in Southeast Asia, reaching as high as 60% in parts of Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia. In the Indian subcontinent, highest frequency is observed in The Northeast regions, but relatively rare in rest of the country. Increasing migration of population from highly affected areas is resulting in rising prevalence in The South and othe...

  12. Phase Separation and Crystallization of Hemoglobin C in Transgenic Mouse and Human Erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Canterino, Joseph E.; Galkin, Oleg; Vekilov, Peter G; Hirsch, Rhoda Elison

    2008-01-01

    Individuals expressing hemoglobin C (β6 Glu→Lys) present red blood cells (RBC) with intraerythrocytic crystals that form when hemoglobin (Hb) is oxygenated. Our earlier in vitro liquid-liquid (L-L) phase separation studies demonstrated that liganded HbC exhibits a stronger net intermolecular attraction with a longer range than liganded HbS or HbA, and that L-L phase separation preceded and enhanced crystallization. We now present evidence for the role of phase separation in HbC crystallizatio...

  13. Estimation of glycated hemoglobin sample in sodium fluoride vacutainer: A better option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawna Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c nowadays used as a prognostic and diagnostic marker for glycaemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus. For estimation of HbA1c, preferred sample type is whole blood collected in vacutainer containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA as anticoagulant. Sodium fluoride tubes can also be used as an alternative for estimation of HbA1c. Hence, by using fluoride vacutainer we can analyze both blood sugar and glycated hemoglobin. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 336-338

  14. Treatment of β-Thalassemia/Hemoglobin E with Antioxidant Cocktails Results in Decreased Oxidative Stress, Increased Hemoglobin Concentration, and Improvement of the Hypercoagulable State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orn-uma Yanpanitch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the antioxidant treatment for thalassemia have reported variable outcomes. However, treatment of thalassemia with a combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic antioxidants and an iron chelator has not been studied. This study investigated the effects of antioxidant cocktails for the treatment of β-thalassemia/hemoglobin E (HbE, which is the most common form of β-thalassemia in Southeast Asia. Sixty patients were divided into two groups receiving N-acetylcysteine, deferiprone, and either curcuminoids (CUR or vitamin E (Vit-E, and their hematological parameters, iron load, oxidative stress, and blood coagulation potential were evaluated. Patients were classified as responders if they showed the improvements of the markers of iron load and oxidative stress, otherwise as nonresponders. During treatment, the responders in both groups had significantly decreased iron load, oxidative stress, and coagulation potential and significantly increased antioxidant capacity and hemoglobin concentration. The significantly maximum increase (P<0.01 in hemoglobin concentration was 11% at month 4 in CUR group responders and 10% at month 10 in Vit-E group responders. In conclusion, the two antioxidant cocktails can improve anemia, iron overload, oxidative stress, and hypercoagulable state in β-thalassemia/HbE.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray structural studies of hemoglobin A2 and hemoglobin E, isolated from the blood samples of β-thalassemic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemoglobin A2 (α2δ2), a minor (2-3%) component of circulating red blood cells, acts as an anti-sickling agent and its elevated concentration in β-thalassemia is a useful clinical diagnostic. In β-thalassemia major, where there is a failure of β-chain production, HbA2 acts as the predominant oxygen deliverer. Hemoglobin E, is another common abnormal hemoglobin, caused by splice site mutation in exon 1 of β globin gene, when combines with β-thalassemia, causes severe microcytic anemia. The purification, crystallization, and preliminary structural studies of HbA2 and HbE are reported here. HbA2 and HbE are purified by cation exchange column chromatography in presence of KCN from the blood samples of individuals suffering from β-thalassemia minor and Eβ-thalassemia. X-ray diffraction data of HbA2 and HbE were collected upto 2.1 and 1.73 A, respectively. HbA2 crystallized in space group P21 with unit cell parameters a=54.33 A, b=83.73 A, c=62.87 A, and β=99.80 degree sign whereas HbE crystallized in space group P212121 with unit cell parameters a=60.89 A, b=95.81 A, and c=99.08 A. Asymmetric unit in each case contains one Hb tetramer in R2 state

  16. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  17. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or scraped, the injury should be washed with soap and water and covered with a sterile bandage. Petrolatum may be applied to open areas to keep the tissue moist and to try to prevent bacterial invasion. Doctors recommend that people do not use ...

  18. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  19. Hemoglobin E and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in the Chittagong Hill Districts of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Kerry L; Ahmed, Sabeena; Rahman, Hafizur; Prue, Chai S; Khyang, Jacob; Ram, Malathi; Haq, M Zahirul; Chowdhury, Ashish; Akter, Jasmin; Glass, Gregory E; Shields, Timothy; Nyunt, Myaing M; Khan, Wasif A; Sack, David A; Sullivan, David J

    2015-08-01

    Hemoglobin E is largely confined to south and southeast Asia. The association between hemoglobin E (HbE) and malaria is less clear than that of hemoglobin S and C. As part of a malaria study in the Chittagong Hill Districts of Bangladesh, an initial random sample of 202 individuals showed that 39% and 49% of Marma and Khyang ethnic groups, respectively, were positive for either heterozygous or homozygous hemoglobin E. In this group, 6.4% were also found to be severely deficient and 35% mildly deficient for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). In a separate Plasmodium falciparum malaria case-uninfected control study, the odds of having homozygous hemoglobin E (HbEE) compared with normal hemoglobin (HbAA) were higher among malaria cases detected by passive surveillance than age and location matched uninfected controls (odds ratio [OR] = 5.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07-46.93). The odds of heterozygous hemoglobin E (HbAE) compared with HbAA were similar between malaria cases and uninfected controls (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.42-1.19). No association by hemoglobin type was found in the initial parasite density or the proportion parasite negative after 2 days of artemether/lumefantrine treatment. HbEE, but not HbAE status was associated with increased passive case detection of malaria. PMID:26101273

  20. Steady state hemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume in homozygous sickle cell disease patients in Lagos, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Akinbami, Akinsegun; Dosunmu, Adedoyin; Adediran, Adewumi; Oshinaike, Olajumoke; Phillip, Adebola; Vincent, Osunkalu; Olanrewaju, Arogundade; Oluwaseun, Adelekan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder of hemoglobin causing myriad of pathology including anemia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the baseline values of steady state hemoglobin and packed cell volume as a guide to managing the early recognition of hemolytic crises in sickle cell anemia.

  1. Effect of water and ethanol radicals on the protein part of human hemoglobin. Pt. 2. Damage to amino acid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is devoted to the effect of interactions of water and ethanol radicals with human hemoglobin (Hb) amino acid residues. The OH radicals caused the greatest destruction of human hemoglobin amino acid residues. Among them the most sensitive to irradiation were cysteine tryptophan and histidine residues. (author). 11 refs, 2 tabs

  2. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and changes in cerebral blood flow : The Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease-Magnetic Resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Pieternella H.; Muller, Majon; Vincken, Koen L.; Westerink, Jan; Mali, Willem P. T. M.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Doevendans, PAFM

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin and hematocrit are important determinants of blood viscosity and arterial oxygen content and may therefore influence cerebral blood flow (CBF). We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations of hemoglobin and hematocrit with CBF in 569 patients with manifest arterial disease (me

  3. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Anant D

    2014-05-01

    Altered gastrointestinal (GI) motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO. PMID:24944923

  4. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant D Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered gastrointestinal (GI motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO.

  5. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  6. Evolutionary transitions in bacterial symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs, Joel L.; Skophammer, Ryan G.; Regus, John U.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse bacterial lineages form beneficial infections with eukaryotic hosts. The origins, evolution, and breakdown of these mutualisms represent important evolutionary transitions. To examine these key events, we synthesize data from diverse interactions between bacteria and eukaryote hosts. Five evolutionary transitions are investigated, including the origins of bacterial associations with eukaryotes, the origins and subsequent stable maintenance of bacterial mutualism with hosts, the captur...

  7. Molecular oxygen migration through the xenon docking sites of human hemoglobin in the R-state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeshkevich, Sergei V; Gilevich, Syargey N; Parkhats, Marina V; Dzhagarov, Boris M

    2016-09-01

    A nanosecond laser flash-photolysis technique was used to study bimolecular and geminate molecular oxygen (O2) rebinding to tetrameric human hemoglobin and its isolated α and β chains in buffer solutions equilibrated with 1atm of air and up to 25atm of xenon. Xenon binding to the isolated α chains and to the α subunits within tetrameric hemoglobin was found to cause a decrease in the efficiency of O2 escape by a factor of ~1.30 and 3.3, respectively. A kinetic model for O2 dissociation, rebinding, and migration through two alternative pathways in the hemoglobin subunits was introduced and discussed. It was shown that, in the isolated α chains and α subunits within tetrameric hemoglobin, nearly one- and two-third escaping molecules of O2 leave the protein via xenon docking sites, respectively. The present experimental data support the idea that O2 molecule escapes from the β subunits mainly through the His(E7) gate, and show unambiguously that, in the α subunits, in addition to the direct E7 channel, there is at least one alternative escape route leading to the exterior via the xenon docking sites. PMID:27288155

  8. HIV and other predictors of serum folate, serum ferritin, and hemoglobin in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Gomo, E; Kæstel, Pernille;

    2001-01-01

    Harare, Zimbabwe, who were receiving prenatal care. The statistical effects of age, season, gestational age, gravidity, HIV-1 infection, malaria parasitemia, and serum alpha1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) on serum folate, serum ferritin (log10 transformed), and hemoglobin were estimated by using multiple linear...... regression analyses. RESULTS: Serum folate (x: 11.4 micromol/L) was 0.52-nmol/L (95% CI: 0.04, 1.0) lower in HIV-infected women than in uninfected women and 0.65-nmol/L (0.014, 1.28) lower in weeks 25-35 than in weeks 22-25. Serum ferritin (geometric x: 11.6 microg/L) was 0.93 times (0.86, 0.99) lower in HIV...... predictor of serum folate, serum ferritin, and hemoglobin. HIV infection was associated with a 12.9-g/L (8.9, 16.8) lower hemoglobin concentration in women with nondepleted iron stores but low serum retinol and a 7-8-g/L lower hemoglobin concentration in women with other combinations of serum ferritin and...

  9. Recombinant human erythropoietin and hemoglobin concentration at operation and during the postoperative period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Boesby, S; Wolff, B;

    1999-01-01

    In a double-blind placebo-controlled study we investigated the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO), on the perioperative hemoglobin concentration and the use of blood transfusions in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery with a preoperative hemoglobin level hemoglobin concentration was 7.8 (5. 3-9.2) mmol/L in the erythropoietin group and 7.2 (4.6-8.5) mmol/L in the placebo group (p < 0.05). On postoperative days 3 and 7 the values were 7.2 (5.3-8.2) and 7.5 (5.......4-9.4) mmol/L, respectively, in the erythropoietin group compared to 6.7 (5.2-7.8) and 6.9 (5.1-8.6) mmol/L in the placebo group (p < 0.01). At discharge the hemoglobin concentration was 7.8 (5.9-8.8) mmol/L in the erythropoietin group and 7.2 (5.4-8.6) mmol/L in the placebo group (p < 0.002). The blood loss...

  10. Effect of thiol reagents on functional properties and heme oxidation in the hemoglobin of Geochelone carbonaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsoni, M A; Viana, R I; Barros, B F; Stoppa, G; Cesquini, M; Ogo, S H

    1996-10-01

    The reaction of thiol reagents with G. carbonaria hemoglobin was studied, and the oxygen equilibrium and kinetic of oxidation of derivatives determined. The oxygen affinity and kinetic of oxidation of hemoglobin derivatives were modified to various extents depending on the nature of thiol reagents used. Diamide yielded approximately 80% polymeric hemoglobin, although the oxidation kinetic, and the functional properties, were practically invariant (T1/2 = 10.0 min.; P50 = 5.0 mm Hg at pH 7.4; alkaline Bohr effect = -0.64). Iodoacetamide did not modify the electrophoretic pattern significantly, although all the free SH groups of hemoglobin were alkylated. A P50 of 2.5 mmHg at pH 7.4 and the Bohr effect of -0.15 were obtained; the T1/2 of about 6.4 min. was shorter than that for un-modified Hb. Similar T1/2 were obtained for Hb treated with oxidized glutathione, which produced polymeric Hb and glutathionyl-Hb. The oxygen binding characteristics showed that both of Hb derivatives, glutathionyl-Hb and polymeric Hb, maintain the capacity to transport the gas. PMID:8896757

  11. FORMATION OF HEMOGLOBIN AND ALBUMIN ADDUCTS OF BENZENE OXIDE IN MOUSE, RAT, AND HUMAN BLOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the formation and disposition of benzene oxide (BO), the initial metabolite arising from oxidation of benzene by cytochrome P450. In this study, reactions of BO with hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) were investigated in blood from B6C3F1 mice, F344 rats, ...

  12. FORMATION OF NITRO MUSK ADDUCTS OF RAINBOW TROUT HEMOGLOBIN FOR POTENTIAL USE AS BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The high use of nitro musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK) as fragrances, and their persistence and bioaccumulation potential make them ubiquitous environmental contaminants. The 4-amino-MX (AMX) and 2-amino-MK (AMK) metabolites have been detected in trout fish hemoglobin (Hb) s...

  13. High altitude and hemoglobin function in the vultures Gyps rueppelli and Aegypius monachus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.; Hiebl, Inge; Braunitzer, Gerhard

    1988-01-01

    Functional characteristics of the stripped composite hemoglobins (Hbs) of lhevultures Gyps rueppellii and Aegypills monachus that can fly at extremely high altitudes, and of component Hbs of G. rueppellii are reported, in relation to influences of pH, temperalure and inositol hexaphosphate. G. ru...

  14. Substitutions in woolly mammoth hemoglobin confer biochemical properties adaptive for cold tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Kevin L.; Roberts, Jason E.E.; Watson, Laura N.;

    2010-01-01

    on the chimeric β/δ-globin subunit of mammoth hemoglobin that provide a unique solution to this problem and thereby minimize energetically costly heat loss. This biochemical specialization may have been involved in the exploitation of high-latitude environments by this African-derived elephantid lineage during...

  15. [The molecular mechanism of interaction of trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) binding to rat hemoglobin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Wen-Wen; Jin, Hui-Fang; Bao, Ling-Ling; Naranmandura, Hua; Qin, Ying-Jie; Li, Chun-Hui

    2014-05-01

    In our previous work, we found that trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) have high affinity binding to cysteine residue 13 of rat hemoglobin. However, it is still unknown why arsenic intermediate metabolite DMA(III) has high binding affinity for Cysl3 but not for other cysteine residues 93, 140, 111 and 125. In order to better understand the molecular mechanism of DMA(III) with rat hemoglobin, we have done current study. So, SD rats were divided into control and arsenic-treated groups randomly. Arsenic species in lysate of red blood cells were analyzed by HPLC-ICP-MS, and then determined by a hybrid quadrupole TOF MS. In addition, trivalent DMA(III) binds to different cysteine residues in rat hemoglobin alpha and beta chains were also simulated by Molecular Docking. Only Cys13 in alpha chain is able to bind to DMA(III) from the experiment results. Cys13 of alpha chain in rat hemoglobin is a specific binding site for DMA(III), and we found that amino acids compose pockets structure and surround Cys13 (but not other cysteine residues), make DMA(III) much easy to bind cysteine 13. Taken together, the DMA(III) specific binding to Cys13 is related to spatial structure of Cys13. PMID:25151739

  16. Role of Hemoglobin and Serum Iron in Oral Submucous Fibrosis: A Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegde Karthik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral submucous fibrosis is a chronic, insidious oral mucosal condition affecting the most parts of the oral cavity with high malignant transformation rate triggered by areca nut chewing, nutritional deficiencies, immunologic processes, and genetic predisposition. OSF causes significant hematological abnormalities resulting in anemia and a decrease in serum iron levels. Aim. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemoglobin and serum iron levels among patients with oral submucous fibrosis and to compare the values with healthy subjects. Materials and Methods. In this hospital-based study 30 diagnosed patients of OSMF and 15 healthy individuals were included, and the values of hemoglobin and serum iron levels were estimated using Sahli’s and Ferrene methods. Results. OSMF patients showed significantly lower levels of hemoglobin and serum iron when compared with the healthy subjects. Conclusion. The findings of the study emphasizes on the assessment of hemoglobin and serum iron for patients with oral submucous fibrosis. Also iron therapy should be instituted concomitantly with the initial diagnosis which helps to cease the further progression of the condition. Further extensive studies are indicated to understand the correlation between OSMF and iron deficiency.

  17. ATP-induced temperature independence of hemoglobin-O2 affinity in heterothermic billfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.; Campbell, Kevin L.; Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2010-01-01

      The inverse relationship between temperature and hemoglobin-O2 affinity resulting from the exothermic nature of heme oxygenation favors O2 unloading from blood to warm, metabolically active tissues. However, this temperature sensitivity is maladaptive, and commonly countered in regional heterot...

  18. "Live High-Train High" increases hemoglobin mass in Olympic swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian; Lundby, Carsten; Jørgensen, Susanne;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study tested whether 3-4 weeks of classical "Live High-Train High" (LHTH) altitude training increases swim-specific VO2max through increased hemoglobin mass (Hbmass). METHODS: Ten swimmers lived and trained for more than 3 weeks between 2,130 and 3,094 m of altitude, and a control g...

  19. A mathematical model relating cortical oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin flows and volumes to neural activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Nathan R.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Suh, Minah; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. To describe a toolkit of components for mathematical models of the relationship between cortical neural activity and space-resolved and time-resolved flows and volumes of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin motivated by optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI). Approach. Both blood flow and blood volume and both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are accounted for. Flow and volume are described by including analogies to both resistive and capacitive electrical circuit elements. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are described by generalization of Kirchhoff's laws based on well-mixed compartments. Main results. Mathematical models built from this toolkit are able to reproduce experimental single-stimulus OISI results that are described in papers from other research groups and are able to describe the response to multiple-stimuli experiments as a sublinear superposition of responses to the individual stimuli. Significance. The same assembly of tools from the toolkit but with different parameter values is able to describe effects that are considered distinctive, such as the presence or absence of an initial decrease in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, indicating that the differences might be due to unique parameter values in a subject rather than different fundamental mechanisms.

  20. Engineering the oxygen sensing regulation results in an enhanced recombinant human hemoglobin production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez, José L.; Liu, Lifang; Petranovic, Dina;

    2015-01-01

    Efficient production of appropriate oxygen carriers for transfusions (blood substitutes or artificial blood) has been pursued for many decades, and to date several strategies have been used, from synthetic polymers to cell-free hemoglobin carriers. The recent advances in the field of metabolic en...

  1. Using the NCBI Genome Databases to Compare the Genes for Human & Chimpanzee Beta Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The beta hemoglobin protein is identical in humans and chimpanzees. In this tutorial, students see that even though the proteins are identical, the genes that code for them are not. There are many more differences in the introns than in the exons, which indicates that coding regions of DNA are more highly conserved than non-coding regions.

  2. Electron transfer reactions, cyanide and O2 binding of truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Esther; Larsson, Jonas T.; McLean, Kirsty J.;

    2013-01-01

    The truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis (trHb-Bs) possesses a surprisingly high affinity for oxygen and resistance to (auto)oxidation; its physiological role in the bacterium is not understood and may be connected with its very special redox and ligand binding reactions. Electron transfer...

  3. High temperature unfolding of a truncated hemoglobin by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ravi Datta; Kanwal, Rajnee; Lynn, Andrew M; Singh, Prerna; Pasha, Syed Tazeen; Fatma, Tasneem; Jawaid, Safdar

    2013-09-01

    Heme containing proteins are associated with peroxidase activity. The proteins like hemoglobin, myoglobins, cytochrome c and micro-peroxidase other than peroxidases have been shown to exhibit weak peroxidase-like activity. This weak peroxidase-like activity in hemoglobin-like molecules is due to heme moiety. We conducted molecular dynamics (MD) studies to decipher the unfolding path of Ba-Glb (a truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus anthracis) and the role of heme moiety to its unfolding path. The similar unfolding path is also observed in vitro by UV/VIS spectroscopy. The data confirmed that the unfolding of Ba-Glb follows a three state process with a meta-stable (intermediate) state between the native and unfolded conformations. The present study is supported by several unfolding parameters like root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD), dictionary of protein secondary structure (DSSP), and free energy landscape. Understanding the structure of hemoglobin like proteins in unicellular dreaded pathogens like B. anthracis will pave way for newer drug discovery targets and in the disease management of anthrax. PMID:23839248

  4. Body temperature-related structural transitions of monotremal and human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digel, I; Maggakis-Kelemen, Ch; Zerlin, K F; Linder, Pt; Kasischke, N; Kayser, P; Porst, D; Temiz Artmann, A; Artmann, G M

    2006-10-15

    In this study, temperature-related structural changes were investigated in human, duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, body temperature T(b) = 31-33 degrees C), and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus, body temperature T(b) = 32-33 degrees C) hemoglobin using circular dichroism spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The average hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) and fractional (normalized) change in the ellipticity (F(obs)) at 222 +/- 2 nm of hemoglobin were measured. The temperature was varied stepwise from 25 degrees C to 45 degrees C. The existence of a structural transition of human hemoglobin at the critical temperature T(c) between 36-37 degrees C was previously shown by micropipette aspiration experiments, viscosimetry, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Based on light-scattering measurements, this study proves the onset of molecular aggregation at T(c). In two different monotremal hemoglobins (echidna and platypus), the critical transition temperatures were found between 32-33 degrees C, which are close to the species' body temperature T(b). The data suggest that the correlation of the structural transition's critical temperature T(c) and the species' body temperature T(b) is not mere coincidence but, instead, is a more widespread structural phenomenon possibly including many other proteins. PMID:16844747

  5. Hemoglobin mass and intravascular volume kinetics during and after exposure to 3,454-m altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, C; Cathomen, A; Hug, M; Keiser, S; Lundby, A K; Hilty, M P; Goetze, J P; Rasmussen, P; Lundby, C

    2015-01-01

    High altitude (HA) exposure facilitates a rapid contraction of plasma volume (PV) and a slower occurring expansion of hemoglobin mass (Hbmass). The kinetics of the Hbmass expansion has never been examined by multiple repeated measurements, and this was our primary study aim. The second aim was to...

  6. Hemoglobin induces monocyte recruitment and CD163-macrophage polarization in abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Lindholt, Jes S;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased hemoglobin (Hb) accumulation was reported in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). CD163 is a macrophage receptor involved in tissue Hb clearance, however its role in AAA has not been reported. We investigated the role of Hb on monocyte recruitment and differentiation towards C...

  7. Hemoglobin adducts of epoxybutene in workers occupationally exposed to 1,3-butadiene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Begemann, P.; Šrám, Radim; Neumann, H. G.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 74, - (2001), s. 680-687. ISSN 0340-5761 Grant ostatní: EU(XC) CIPA-CT93-0228 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : biomonitoring * hemoglobin adducts Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 1.558, year: 2001

  8. Hemoglobin polymorphism in Hampshire Down sheep herd/ Polimorfismo de hemoglobina em rebanho de ovinos Hampshire Down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Manduca Trapp

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine the types of hemoglobin in Hampshire Down crossbreed sheep, and verify that this locus is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There have been collected 46 blood samples of healthy Hampshire Down crossbreed sheep. These samples were used to separate the hemoglobin per electrophoresis. The electrophoresis of the hemoglobin revealed a slow band characterized as hemoglobin A (HbAA, a fast band characterized as hemoglobin B (HbBB and two bands in the heterozygous hemoglobin A and B (HbAB. The HbAB type was the most frequently one, followed by hemoglobin A (HbAA and B (HbBB. The genotypic frequency of individuals BB, AB and AA were 36,95; 54,35 and 8,70% respectively. The allelic frequency of A and B were respectively 35,87% and 64,13%.. The qui square test (?2 = 0.859 and p = 0.6509 confirmed that the tested locus is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.O presente trabalho teve como objetivo determinar os tipos de hemoglobinas em ovinos Hampshire Down e verificar se este locus encontra-se em equilíbrio de Hardy-Weinberg. Foram coletadas 46 amostras de sangue de ovinos Hampshire Down, considerados clinicamente sadios. Estas amostras foram utilizadas para a separação das hemoglobinas por eletroforese. A eletroforese das hemoglobinas revelou uma banda lenta caracterizada como hemoglobina B (HbBB, uma banda rápida caracterizada como hemoglobina A (HbAA e duas bandas no heterozigoto para hemoglobinas A e B (HbAB. A variante HbAB foi a mais freqüentemente encontrada, seguida pela hemoglobina A (HbAA e B (HbBB. A freqüência genotípica dos indivíduos BB, AB e AA foram 36,95; 54,35 e 8,70% respectivamente. A freqüência alélica de A e B foram respectivamente 35,87% e 64,13%. Pelo teste do qui-quadrado realizado (?2 = 0,859 e p=0,6509 confirmou-se que o locus testado está em equilíbrio de Hardy-Weinberg.

  9. Hemopressins and other hemoglobin-derived peptides in mouse brain: Comparison between brain, blood, and heart peptidome and regulation in Cpefat/fat mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gelman, Julia S.; Sironi, Juan; Castro, Leandro M.; Ferro, Emer S.; Fricker, Lloyd D.

    2010-01-01

    Many hemoglobin-derived peptides are present in mouse brain, and several of these have bioactive properties including the hemopressins, a related series of peptides that bind to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Although hemoglobin is a major component of red blood cells, it is also present in neurons and glia. To examine whether the hemoglobin-derived peptides in brain are similar to those present in blood and heart, we used a peptidomics approach involving mass spectrometry. Many hemoglobin-derive...

  10. Analysis of Haptoglobin and Hemoglobin-Haptoglobin Interactions with the Neisseria meningitidis TonB-Dependent Receptor HpuAB by Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Rohde, Kyle H.; Dyer, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis expresses a two-component TonB-dependent receptor, HpuAB, which mediates heme-iron (Hm-Fe) acquisition from hemoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes. Due to genetic polymorphisms in the human haptoglobin gene, haptoglobin (and hemoglobin-haptoglobin) exists as three structurally distinct phenotypes. In this study, we examined the influence of the haptoglobin phenotype on the interactions of HpuAB with apo-haptoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin. Growth assays conf...

  11. Erythropoietin, ferritin, haptoglobin, hemoglobin and transferrin receptor in metabolic syndrome: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hämäläinen Päivi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased ferritin concentrations are associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS. The association between ferritin as well as hemoglobin level and individual MetS components is unclear. Erythropoietin levels in subjects with MetS have not been determined previously. The aim of this study was to compare serum erythropoietin, ferritin, haptoglobin, hemoglobin, and transferrin receptor (sTFR levels between subjects with and without MetS and subjects with individual MetS components. Methods A population based cross-sectional study of 766 Caucasian, middle-aged subjects (341 men and 425 women from five age groups born in Pieksämäki, Finland who were invited to a health check-up in 2004 with no exclusion criteria. Laboratory analyzes of blood samples collected in 2004 were done during year 2010. MetS was defined by National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Results 159 (53% men and 170 (40% women of study population met MetS criteria. Hemoglobin and ferritin levels as well as erythropoietin and haptoglobin levels were higher in subjects with MetS (p  Conclusion Subjects with MetS have elevated hemoglobin, ferritin, erythropoietin and haptoglobin concentrations. Higher hemoglobin levels are related to all components of MetS. Higher ferritin levels associate with TG, abdominal obesity, elevated glucose or low high density cholesterol. Haptoglobin levels associate with blood pressure or elevated glucose. However, erythropoietin levels are related only with abdominal obesity. Higher serum erythropoietin concentrations may suggest underlying adipose tissue hypoxemia in MetS.

  12. The Folate-Vitamin B12 Interaction, Low Hemoglobin, and the Mortality Risk from Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jin-Young; Min, Kyoung-Bok

    2016-03-21

    Abnormal hemoglobin levels are a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the mechanism underlying these associations is elusive, inadequate micronutrients, particularly folate and vitamin B12, may increase the risk for anemia, cognitive impairment, and AD. In this study, we investigated whether the nutritional status of folate and vitamin B12 is involved in the association between low hemoglobin levels and the risk of AD mortality. Data were obtained from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the NHANES (1999-2006) Linked Mortality File. A total of 4,688 participants aged ≥60 years with available baseline data were included in this study. We categorized three groups based on the quartiles of folate and vitamin B12 as follows: Group I (low folate and vitamin B12); Group II (high folate and low vitamin B12 or low folate and high vitamin B12); and Group III (high folate and vitamin B12). Of 4,688 participants, 49 subjects died due to AD. After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, education, smoking history, body mass index, the presence of diabetes or hypertension, and dietary intake of iron, significant increases in the AD mortality were observed in Quartile1 for hemoglobin (HR: 8.4, 95% CI: 1.4-50.8), and the overall risk of AD mortality was significantly reduced with increases in the quartile of hemoglobin (p for trend = 0.0200), in subjects with low levels of both folate and vitamin B12 at baseline. This association did not exist in subjects with at least one high level of folate and vitamin B12. Our finding shows the relationship between folate and vitamin B12 levels with respect to the association between hemoglobin levels and AD mortality. PMID:27003215

  13. Challenges in HbA1c Analysis and Reporting in Patients with Variant Hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, T A; Sheme, Z A; Sultana, G S; Sultana, B; Mishu, F A; Khan, N Z; Sarkar, B C; Muttalib, M A; Khan, S A; Choudhury, S; Mahtab, H

    2016-04-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a well-established indicator of mean glycemia. The presence of genetic variants of hemoglobin can profoundly affect the accuracy of HbA1c measurements. Variants of hemoglobin especially Hemoglobin E (HbE) is prevalent in South East Asia including Bangladesh. The objective of our study is to compare the HbA1c values measured on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Turbidimetric Inhibition Immunoassay (TINIA) in diabetic patients with variant hemoglobins including HbE. A total of 7595 diabetic patients receiving treatment at BIRDEM General Hospital were analyzed for HbA1c results within a period of two months from December 2013 to January 2014. Seventy two cases out of 7595 (0.95%) had either undetectable or below normal HbA1c levels (males-33 and females-39; ratio = 0.82:1) by HPLC method. In 34(0.45%) cases, HbA1c value was undetectable by HPLC method but was in the reportable range by TINIA method. In the other 38 (0.55%) cases, HbA1c levels were below the reportable range (levels, [Mean bias -5.2(-9.3 to 1.0), 95% CI] but agreed very well [mean bias -0.21 (-0.84 to 0.42), y=1.1037+0.776X; r2=0.30, pblood sugar levels of all the 72 cases correlated strongly with TINIA method (r2 =0.75, plevel is essential. MCV of 80fl or below may serve as a rough guide to select samples that require analysis by TINIA method. Moreover, HPLC may be a convenient and inexpensive tool for screening of hemoglobinopathies especially among diabetic population in Bangladesh. It may therefore be helpful in improving management of complications related to both anaemia and iron overload. PMID:27277356

  14. Microalbuminuria and low hemoglobin as risk factors for the occurrence and increasing severity of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Ajoy Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of urinary microalbuminuria and hemoglobin concentration on the occurrence and severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR, clinically significant macular edema (CSME and hard exudate formation. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study carried out over a period of 2 years, type 2 diabetic patients seeking ocular evaluation for DR were assessed for presence and severity of DR, presence of hard exudates and CSME. Retinal findings were correlated to severity of microalbuminuria, hemoglobin concentration and other systemic risk factors using linear regression analysis. Results: Three hundred and six patients were included in the study. DR of any grade was seen in 132 (43% patients, hard exudate formation in 93/306 (30.4% patients, CSME in 50/306 (16.3% patients and proliferative DR in 26/306 (8.5% patients. Duration of diabetes (P < 0.001, microalbuminuria (P < 0.001 and low hemoglobin (P = 0.001 were found to be highly significant risk factors for the development and increasing severity of DR as well as for CSME and hard exudate formation. Conclusion: Microalbuminuria and low hemoglobin are strong predictors for DR, CSME and hard exudate formation in type 2 diabetics even after correcting for duration of diabetes and other systemic risk factors. Although not directly involved in the pathogenesis, microalbuminuria can help in identifying patients at risk for more severe diabetic eye disease. Microalbuminuria warrants intensive monitoring of both retinal and renal status. The hemoglobin levels should be monitored regularly in diabetic patients to detect and treat anemia, thereby reducing one risk factor for DR.

  15. [Bacterial diseases of rape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, O M; Mel'nychuk, M D; Dankevych, L A; Patyka, V P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial destruction of the culture was described and its agents identified in the spring and winter rape crops. Typical symptoms are the following: browning of stem tissue and its mucilagization, chlorosis of leaves, yellowing and beginning of soft rot in the place of leaf stalks affixion to stems, loss of pigmentation (violet). Pathogenic properties of the collection strains and morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties of the agents of rape's bacterial diseases isolated by the authors have been investigated. It was found that all the isolates selected by the authors are highly or moderately aggressive towards different varieties of rape. According to the complex of phenotypic properties 44% of the total number of isolates selected by the authors are related to representatives of the genus Pseudomonas, 37% - to Xanthomonas and 19% - to Pectobacterium. PMID:23293826

  16. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell...... cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  17. Supramolecular bacterial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    For nearly over a decade, a wide variety of dynamic and responsive supramolecular architectures have been investigated and developed to address biological systems. Since the non-covalent interactions between individual molecular components in such architectures are similar to the interactions found in living systems, it was possible to integrate chemically-synthesized and naturally-occurring components to create platforms with interesting bioactive properties. Bacterial cells and recombinant ...

  18. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references

  19. Identification of bacterial taxa in archaeological waterlogged wood

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Palla; Giovanna Barresi; Enza Di Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic and molecular techniques described in this study are aimed at understanding the degradation processes of the anatomical structure of submerged archaeological wood, correlating it to the degradation induced by bacteria. The SEM micrographs showed alterations of the wooden structure due to bacterial colonization, as well as the presence of pyrite framboids. The difficulty of extracting bacterial DNA from wooden fragments belonging to submerged finds is well-known, due to the pre...

  20. BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS, RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTION AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Reddy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available DEFINITIONS : The term Bacterial Vaginosis is used to describe the condition of a patient complaining of fishy odor, sticky mucopurulent discharge from vagi na adherent to vulva and secretions staining the fomites. The patient is frustrated and not getting a cure for so many a months from the medical practitioners. Finally women who attend to sexually transmitted disease clinic to get a complete cure. The pati ents prone to get Bacterial vaginosis: ( 1 Couple using Condom lubricated with Nanoxynol - 9 a spermicidal, bactericidal destroys the Doderline bacilli ( H 2 O 2 producing lactobacilli a commensal in the vagina which maintain the acid pH in the vagina to preve nt bacterial vaginosis an ascending retrograde infection from perineum and anus. ( 2 perverted sex activities like cunnilingus and both homo and het e ro sexual active couple acquire to get bacterial vaginosis. ( 3 Saline douching of the vagina alters the pH as alkaline and facilitates bacterial vaginosis. ( 4 Tampooing or napkins kept for long duration without knowing the consequences of menstrual bleeding as a culture media for bacterial vaginosis to occur as a retrograde infection

  1. Pathogenic alteration in severe burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yang; Xie, Bing; Ben, DaoFeng; Lv, KaiYang; Zhu, ShiHui; Lu, Wei; Tang, HongTai; Cheng, DaSheng; Ma, Bing; Wang, GuangYi; Xiao, ShiChu; Wang, GuangQing; Xia, ZhaoFan

    2012-02-01

    The present study aims to define the trend of time related changes with local bacterial alteration of bacterial resistance in severe burns in our burn center during a 12-year period. Retrospective analysis of microbiological results on severely burned wounds between 1998 and 2009 was carried out. A study of 3615 microbial isolates was performed. Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated pathogen (38.2%) followed by A. baumannii (16.2%), Streptococcus viridans (11.4%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.4%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS, 9.2%). The species ratios of S. aureus and A. baumannii increased significantly from 1st to 8th week of hospitalization, while those of Streptococcus viridans, P. aeruginosa and coagulase-negative staphylococci decreased during the same period. Bacterial resistance rates were compared between the periods 1998-2003 and 2004-2009. Vancomycin remained as the most sensitive antibiotic in S. aureus including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). It was very likely that the majority of infections caused by Streptococcus viridans, P. aeruginosa and coagulase-negative staphylococci occurred in the early stage of burn course and the majority of infections caused by A. baumannii occurred 4 weeks after admission. The use of different antibiotics was probably the major contributor to these trends. PMID:22100426

  2. Correlation Between Blood Lead Level and Hemoglobin Level in Mitrovica Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutllovci-Zogaj, Drita; Krasniqi, Selvete; Elezaj, Isa; Ramadani, Naser; Gjergji, Tahire; Zogaj, Dukagjin; Kutllovci, Arben; Jaka, Arbëresha; Ukëhaxhaj, Antigona; Gashi, Sanije; Bince, Ergyl

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Lead toxicity is a serious health threat, especially in developing countries due to environmental pollution. It was thus aimed to investigate correlation between blood lead level and concentration level of hemoglobin in the blood of children involved in research. Material and methods: The research included 250 children of which 31(12.4%) kindergarten children, 166 (66.4%) of primary school pupils in Mitrovica and 53(21.2%) of primary school pupils in Shtime as control group. From the 250 children included in the survey 129 or 51.6% were female children and 48.4% male children. Children were selected randomly, while tests for concentration of Pb and blood hemoglobin were done at the National Institute of Public Health. Results: The average value of blood lead level of Mitrovica pupils was 2.4 µg/dL (SD±1.9µg/dL), range 0.5 to 16.3µg/dL. The average value of blood lead level of Shtime pupils was 2.3µg/dL (SD±0.7µg/dL), range 1.2 to 5.2 µg/dL with no statistical difference (P = 0.191). The average value of blood lead level in kindergarten children of Mitrovica was 3.8µg/dL (SD±1.3µg/dL), range 2.2 to 7.7µg/dL with significant difference between the average values of blood lead levels of pupils and kindergarten children of Mitrovica (P <0.0001). The average value of hemoglobin in the pupils of Mitrovica was 14.0g/dL(SD± 3.7g/dL), range 9.4 to 25.6 g/dL. The average value of hemoglobin to pupils of Shtime was 11.4g/dl(SD±0.8 g/dl), range 9.2 to 13.0 g/dl with significant difference between mean values of hemoglobin pupils of Mitrovica and Shtime (U ‘= 6440.0, P <0.0001). With Spearman correlation is found significant correlation of a medium scale (r = -0.305, df = 248, p <0.0001) between blood lead levels and hemoglobin level in the blood. PMID:25568564

  3. EFEK PROGRAM PEMBERIAN "TABURIA" TERHADAP KADAR HEMOGLOBIN BALITA PADA KELUARGA MISKIN DI JAKARTA UTARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas Basuni Jahari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Effect of "Taburia" Intervention Program on Hemoglobin Concentration Among Children Under-Five Years of Poor Families In North Jakarta.Background: Anemia is one of the main nutritional problems in Indonesia. Anemia in children under fives years will have an impact on growth and mental development. In an effort to improve the nutritional status of infants, especially in poor families, the Japan Funds for Poverty Reduction (JFPR in collaboration with the Center for Nutrition and Food, Ministry of Health, Bogor, making multi-vitamin ingredients and micro nutrients called as TABURIA.Objectives: To study the influence of hemoglobin levels on child under fives years of poor families.Methods: Design of the study was Evaluation Before and After Treatment (Pre-Post Evaluation. This research was conducted in 9 urban villages in 3 Public health centers in North Jakarta City. The numbers of samples were 540 children aged 6-59 months from poor families. Tabuaria was distributed by a cadre posyandu to all children under fives years (5000 children in the research area. The data analyzed included: hemoglobin levels, economic social family, compliance and child morbidity. Data were analyzed by descriptive to determine changes in status of anemia and haemoglobin levels before and after intervention.Results: Most of children under fives years (87.8% to receive and consume Taburia. The average Hb levels increased from 10.5 mg/dl in baseline data to 12.0 mg/dl at endline evaluation. The proportion of anemia (Hb <11 mg/dl decreased significantly from 62.3% (baseline to 24.7%(endline-evaluation.Conclusion: Taburia be accepted by the majority of children under fives and can increase hemoglobin levels of children under fives.Recommendation: Taburia can increase the hemoglobin levels of children under fives years, but if would be implemented as national program, it should be study in others regions (pilot areas to explore the appropriateness Taburia distribution model in

  4. Correlation of pretreatment hemoglobin and platelet counts with clinicopathological features in colorectal cancer in Saudi population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyad F Al-Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In Saudi Arabia, colorectal cancers (CRCs are registered as the second most common cancers. However, no data has been reported about correlation of the severity of the anemia and pretreatment platelets level with clinicopathological features of CRCs. We aimed to evaluate the association between pretreatment hemoglobin and platelets level and the clinicopathological features of CRC patients in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: Between September 2005 and November 2011, One hundred and fifty-four confirmed CRC patients underwent thorough physical examination, blood investigations, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS, and computed tomography (CT for staging before surgery. Findings of physical assessment, EUS, CT, and pathological specimens were correlated with pretreatment hemoglobin and platelets levels the Pearson-Kendall tau correlative coefficients. Results: The mean age of cohort was 56.6 years (range: 26-89. Left-sided CRC were predominant (97 patients; 63%. Mean size of primary tumor was 6 cms (1-18 SD ± 3.55. Mean values of hemoglobin, red blood cells, hematocrit, white blood cells, and platelets were 11.9 SD ± 2.3, 35.5 SD ± 5.7, 4.43 × 10 6 /mL SD ± 0.6, 7.67 10 6 /mL SD ± 2.44, and 343 × 10 3 /mL SD ± 164.4, respectively. Pretreatment hemoglobin was inversely correlated with primary tumor size (R: 0.71, R2: 1.55, P = 0.0001 and nodal status (R: 0.02, R2: 0.05, P = 0.01. Right-sided CRC had significantly low pretreatment hemoglobin levels ( P = 0.001. Interestingly, pretreatment thrombocytosis was seen only in right-sided CRC (P = 0.0001. Conclusion: Pretreatment anemia and thrombocytosis were found mainly in right-sided CRCs and advanced primary and nodal stages. Pretreatment hemoglobin and thrombocytosis can be considered as useful prognostic markers in CRC patients.

  5. Hemoglobin Evanston (alpha 14 Trp----Arg). An unstable alpha-chain variant expressed as alpha-thalassemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Honig, G R; M. Shamsuddin; Vida, L N; Mompoint, M; Valcourt, E; Bowie, L J; Jones, E. C.; Powers, P A; Spritz, R A; Guis, M

    1984-01-01

    A new hematologic syndrome with phenotypic features of mild Hb H disease was identified in three children from two unrelated black American families. Erythrocytes from each of these children contained Hb H (beta 4) and Hb Barts (gamma 4), as well as a slowly migrating hemoglobin fraction that made up 7-10% of the total hemoglobin. The parents of the affected children all showed mild thalassemia-like changes, with one of the parents in each family also expressing the variant hemoglobin; in the...

  6. Alteration of Blood Parameters and Histoarchitecture of Liver and Kidney of Silver Barb after Chronic Exposure to Quinalphos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golam Mohammod Mostakim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinalphos (QP is commonly used for pest control in the agricultural fields surrounding freshwater reservoirs. This study was conducted to evaluate the chronic toxicity of this pesticide on blood parameters and some organs of silver barb, Barbonymus gonionotus. Fish were exposed to two sublethal concentrations, 0.47 ppm and 0.94 ppm, of QP for a period of 28 days. All the blood parameters (red blood cell, hematocrit, and hemoglobin and blood glucose except for white blood cells decreased with increasing concentration of toxicant and become significantly lower (p<0.05 at higher concentration when compared with control. The derived hematological indices of mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were equally altered compared to control. Histoarchitectural changes of liver and kidney were observed after exposure to the QP. Hypertrophy of hepatocytes, mild to severe necrosis, ruptured central vein, and vacuolation were observed in the liver of treated groups. Highly degenerated kidney tubules and hematopoietic tissue, degeneration of renal corpuscle, vacuolization, and necrosis were evident in the kidney of treated groups. In conclusion, chronic exposure to QP at sublethal concentrations induced hematological and histological alterations in silver barb and offers a simple tool to evaluate toxicity derived alterations.

  7. Influence of microorganisms on the alteration of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under specific conditions, microorganisms may enhance the alteration process of basaltic glass. However bacterial activity in the near field of a glass container would be possible only in environmental conditions provide nutrients and energetic substrates for bacterial growth. Depending of these conditions, microorganisms can: - modify the pH or the medium, - consume or produce soluble organic acids. To qualify the long term behaviour of glass, in presence of microorganisms, a qualitative and quantitative estimation of microbial activity potentialities and their consequences is needed. This must be achieved in studying the availability of the chemical species in the environment. (authors)

  8. Leaky gut and the liver: A role for bacterial translocation in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaron Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Gut flora and bacterial translocation (BT) play important roles in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease,including cirrhosis and its complications.Intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased bacterial translocation of gut flora from the intestinal lumen predispose patients to bacterial infections,major complications and also play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disorders.Levels of bacterial lipopolysaccharide,a component of gram-negative bacteria,are increased in the portal and/or systemic circulation in several types of chronic liver disease.Impaired gut epithelial integrity due to alterations in tight junction proteins may be the pathological mechanism underlying bacterial translocation.Preclinical and clinical studies over the last decade have suggested a role for BT in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).Bacterial overgrowth,immune dysfunction,alteration of the luminal factors,and altered intestinal permeability are all involved in the pathogenesis of NASH and its complications.A better understanding of the cell-specific recognition and intracellular signaling events involved in sensing gut-derived microbes will help in the development of means to achieve an optimal balance in the gut-liver axis and ameliorate liver diseases.These may suggest new targets for potential therapeutic interventions for the treatment of NASH.Here,we review some of the mechanisms connecting BT and NASH and potential therapeutic developments.

  9. Bacterial-induced cell reprogramming to stem cell-like cells: new premise in host-pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, Samuel; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens employ a myriad of strategies to alter host tissue cell functions for bacterial advantage during infection. Recent advances revealed a fusion of infection biology with stem cell biology by demonstrating developmental reprogramming of lineage committed host glial cells to progenitor/stem cell-like cells by an intracellular bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Acquisition of migratory and immunomodulatory properties of such reprogrammed cells provides an added advantage ...

  10. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    This PhD project was carried out as part of the Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) project, funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant number 2104-08-0012). The environment is contaminated with various xenobiotic compounds e.g. pesticides......D student, to construct fungal-bacterial consortia in order to potentially stimulate pesticide degradation thereby increasing the chance of successful bioaugmentation. The results of the project are reported in three article manuscripts, included in this thesis. In manuscript I, the mineralization of 2...

  11. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte; Kruse, Torben; Nordström, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  12. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  13. Microbial colonization and alteration of basaltic glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Einen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have been reported to be associated with the alteration of the glassy margin of seafloor pillow basalts (Thorseth et al., 2001, 2003; Lysnes et al., 2004. The amount of iron and other biological important elements present in basalts and the vast abundance of basaltic glass in the earth's crust, make glass alteration an important process in global element cycling. To gain further insight into microbial communities associated with glass alteration, five microcosm experiments mimicking seafloor conditions were inoculated with seafloor basalt and incubated for one year. Mineral precipitations, microbial attachment to the glass and glass alteration were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the bacterial community composition was fingerprinted by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE in combination with sequencing. SEM analysis revealed a microbial community with low morphological diversity of mainly biofilm associated and prosthecate microorganisms. Approximately 30 nm thick alteration rims developed on the glass in all microcosms after one year of incubation; this however was also seen in non inoculated controls. Calcium carbonate precipitates showed parallel, columnar and filamentous crystallization habits in the microcosms as well as in the sterile controls. DGGE analysis showed an alteration in bacterial community profiles in the five different microcosms, as a response to the different energy and redox regimes and time. In all microcosms a reduction in number of DGGE bands, in combination with an increase in cell abundance were recorded during the experiment. Sequence analysis showed that the microcosms were dominated by four groups of organisms with phylogenetic affiliation to four taxa: The Rhodospirillaceae, a family containing phototrophic marine organisms, in which some members are capable of heterotrophic growth in darkness and N2 fixation; the family Hyphomicrobiaceae, a group

  14. Microbial colonization and alteration of basaltic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einen, J.; Kruber, C.; Øvreås, L.; Thorseth, I. H.; Torsvik, T.

    2006-03-01

    Microorganisms have been reported to be associated with the alteration of the glassy margin of seafloor pillow basalts (Thorseth et al., 2001, 2003; Lysnes et al., 2004). The amount of iron and other biological important elements present in basalts and the vast abundance of basaltic glass in the earth's crust, make glass alteration an important process in global element cycling. To gain further insight into microbial communities associated with glass alteration, five microcosm experiments mimicking seafloor conditions were inoculated with seafloor basalt and incubated for one year. Mineral precipitations, microbial attachment to the glass and glass alteration were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the bacterial community composition was fingerprinted by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in combination with sequencing. SEM analysis revealed a microbial community with low morphological diversity of mainly biofilm associated and prosthecate microorganisms. Approximately 30 nm thick alteration rims developed on the glass in all microcosms after one year of incubation; this however was also seen in non inoculated controls. Calcium carbonate precipitates showed parallel, columnar and filamentous crystallization habits in the microcosms as well as in the sterile controls. DGGE analysis showed an alteration in bacterial community profiles in the five different microcosms, as a response to the different energy and redox regimes and time. In all microcosms a reduction in number of DGGE bands, in combination with an increase in cell abundance were recorded during the experiment. Sequence analysis showed that the microcosms were dominated by four groups of organisms with phylogenetic affiliation to four taxa: The Rhodospirillaceae, a family containing phototrophic marine organisms, in which some members are capable of heterotrophic growth in darkness and N2 fixation; the family Hyphomicrobiaceae, a group of prosthecate oligotrophic

  15. Influence of microorganisms on the alteration of glasses; Influence des microorganismes sur l'alteration des verres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besnainou, B.; Libert, M.F. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets

    1997-07-01

    Under specific conditions, microorganisms may enhance the alteration process of basaltic glass. However bacterial activity in the near field of a glass container would be possible only in environmental conditions provide nutrients and energetic substrates for bacterial growth. Depending of these conditions, microorganisms can: - modify the pH or the medium, - consume or produce soluble organic acids. To qualify the long term behaviour of glass, in presence of microorganisms, a qualitative and quantitative estimation of microbial activity potentialities and their consequences is needed. This must be achieved in studying the availability of the chemical species in the environment. (authors)

  16. Highly sensitive voltammetric biosensor for nitric oxide based on its high affinity with hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although heme protein-based, amperometric nitric oxide (NO) biosensors have been well documented in previous studies, most have been conducted in anaerobic conditions. Herein we report a novel hemoglobin-based NO biosensor that is not only very sensitive but also usable in air. The heme protein was entrapped in a sodium montmorillonite film, which was immobilized at a pyrolytic graphite electrode surface. Film-entrapped hemoglobin can directly exchange electrons with the electrode, and this process has proven to favor the catalytic reduction of oxygen. In addition, NO induced a cathodic potential shift of the catalytic reduction peak of oxygen. This potential shift was proportional to the logarithm of NO concentration ranging from 4.0 x 10-11 to 5.0 x 10-6 mol/L. The detection limit has been estimated to be 20 pM, approximately four orders lower than previously reported amperometric detectors

  17. Low hemoglobin levels during normovolemia are associated with electrocardiographic changes in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Bertram; Pipa, Gordon; Kertscho, Harry; Lauscher, Patrick; Ehrlich, Joachim; Habler, Oliver; Zacharowski, Kai; Meier, Jens

    2011-04-01

    We studied whether low hemoglobin concentrations during normovolemia change the myocardial electrical current (electrocardiogram) in a pig model. Normovolemic anemia was achieved by stepwise replacing blood with colloids (hydroxyethyl starch 6%). We measured the length of the PQ-, QT-, QTc, and the ST interval as well as the amplitude of the Q wave and T wave at hemoglobin concentrations of 9.5, 8.0, 5.5, 3.8, and 3.3 g·dL. Normovolemic anemia is accompanied by a gradual prolongation of the QT and QTc interval and a reduction in the amplitude of the T wave. The QRS complex is partly diminished in amplitude. Results were verified performing a time-frequency analysis on single heartbeats. During severe anemia and normovolemia, electrocardiographic changes can be detected. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate whether these changes indicate myocardial hypoxia. PMID:20856175

  18. Polymerization of modified diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin (DCLHb) with 1,6-bismaleimic-hexane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Donglai; Wang, Pei; Chen, Chen; Guo, Song; Wang, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the size of hemoglobin (Hb) by polymerization offers the benefits of reduced renal clearance and increased duration in the vascular circulation. With this goal, diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin (DCLHb) was modified in order to keep one thiol group on the surface and then polymerized with 1,6-bismaleimic-hexane (1,6-BMH) to increase the molecular weight. The HPLC results indicated that approximate 20% dimers to tetramers of DCLHb desired were achieved after the polymerization. It was also demonstrated that the oxygen-carrying capacity of the products was similar to natural heme. The present study is expected to improve the efficacy of the DCLHb as an oxygen therapeutic agent. PMID:26838092

  19. Spectroscope and molecular model identify the behavior of doxorubicin-SPION binding to bovine hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihong; Liu, Rutao

    2015-08-01

    To provide reference for the bio-safety evaluation of doxorubicin-loaded SPION, the interaction of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) with the drug delivery was investigated by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling calculation. Multi-spectroscopic results indicated that DOX-SPION unfolded the conformation of BHb, decreased the content of α-helix from 38.89% to 35.08%, which verified the changes of protein's secondary structure quantificationally. Stern-Volmer analysis and molecular model showed there were two static interaction modes corresponding to the two reaction steps: DOX first immobilized on the particle adhered to the external region of BHb, leading to the increasing exposure of chromophore group, rendering particles to bond to the original hemoglobin central cavity (Site 2) in sequence. They finally generated a stable bioconjugate via hydrogen bonds. This work indicated that the drug delivery has deleterious effects on the frame conformation of BHb, affecting its physiological function. PMID:26033525

  20. [FECAL NONINVASIVE TESTS (CALPROTECTIN, TRANSFERRIN, HEMOGLOBIN) IN COMPLEX DIAGNOSIS OF DISEASES OF INTESTINES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livzan, M A; Lyalukova, E A; Nechaeva, G; Osipenko, M F; Dolgih, T I

    2015-01-01

    A research objective was the assessment of informational content of fecal noninvasive tests (calprotectin, transferrin, hemoglobin) in complex diagnosis of diseases of intestines. Open kogortny research by method of a cross cut included 52 patients (middle age - 38,6 years) with IBS-like symptoms (abdominal pain or discomfort, change of frequency and/or character of a chair). Sensitivity of dough on calprotectin for diagnosis of organic pathology of intestines made (89%), for dough on calprotectin and hemoglobin - also 89%. At patients at incomplete compliance of clinical signs to diagnostic criteria of IBS and lack of endoscopic signs of damage of a large intestine research on fecal biomarkers allows to increase efficiency of diagnostics. PMID:26281175