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Sample records for bacterial hemoglobin alters

  1. Aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with normal and altered glycated hemoglobin levels in two regions in Brazil

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    Natalia Pimentel Moreno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with regard to the management of diabetes, assessed using glycated hemoglobin levels. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using conjunctival smears of diabetic patients from both sexes and with different ages, residing in two different Brazilian cities (Sorocaba and Rio Branco. A control group of non-diabetic patients was also included. The diabetic patients were considered to have controlled diabetes when their glycated hemoglobin level was ≤7% and blood glucose level was ≤126 mg/dL. Patients with non-controlled diabetes were those with glycated hemoglobin levels >7% and blood glucose levels >126 mg/dL. The samples obtained were inoculated in Brain-Heart Infusion broth and in culture media for aerobic bacteria (blood and chocolate agars; bacterial growth was evaluated in a microbiology laboratory. Results: A total of 120 eyes of 120 patients were included in the present study. The percentage of cultures in which bacterial growth was observed was greater in diabetic patients, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.103. There was a greater trend toward bacterial growth in the conjunctiva of diabetic patients with altered fasting blood glucose. There was no difference in the frequency of bacterial growth on the conjunctiva between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. In Sorocaba, conjunctival bacterial growth was similar to that observed in Rio Branco. The microorganism most frequently detected in the present study was Staphylococcus epidermidis, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. Conclusion: There was no difference between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. The microorganisms found were similar to those found in studies investigating the conjunctival bacterial flora of diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  2. Mutational analysis of hemoglobin binding and heme utilization by a bacterial hemoglobin receptor.

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    Fusco, W G; Choudhary, N R; Council, S E; Collins, E J; Leduc, I

    2013-07-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most living organisms. To acquire iron from their environment, Gram-negative bacteria use TonB-dependent transporters that bind host proteins at the bacterial surface and transport iron or heme to the periplasm via the Ton machinery. TonB-dependent transporters are barrel-shaped outer membrane proteins with 22 transmembrane domains, 11 surface-exposed loops, and a plug domain that occludes the pore. To identify key residues of TonB-dependent transporters involved in hemoglobin binding and heme transport and thereby locate putative protective epitopes, the hemoglobin receptor of Haemophilus ducreyi HgbA was used as a model of iron/heme acquisition from hemoglobin. Although all extracellular loops of HgbA are required by H. ducreyi to use hemoglobin as a source of iron/heme, we previously demonstrated that hemoglobin binding by HgbA only involves loops 5 and 7. Using deletion, substitution, and site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to differentiate hemoglobin binding and heme acquisition by HgbA. Deletion or substitution of the GYEAYNRQWWA region of loop 5 and alanine replacement of selected histidines affected hemoglobin binding by HgbA. Conversely, mutation of the phenylalanine in the loop 7 FRAP domain or substitution of the NRQWWA motif of loop 5 significantly abrogated utilization of heme from hemoglobin. Our findings show that hemoglobin binding and heme utilization by a bacterial hemoglobin receptor involve specific motifs of HgbA.

  3. Membrane alterations in irreversibly sickled cells: hemoglobin--membrane interaction.

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    Lessin, L S; Kurantsin-Mills, J; Wallas, C; Weems, H

    1978-01-01

    Irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs) are sickle erythrocytes which retain bipolar elongated shapes despite reoxygenation and owe their biophysical abnormalities to acquired membrane alterations. Freeze-etched membranes both of ISCs produced in vitro and ISCs isolated in vivo reveal microbodies fixed to the internal (PS) surface which obscure spectrin filaments. Intramembranous particles (IMPs) on the intramembrane (PF) surface aggregate over regions of subsurface microbodies. Electron microscopy of diaminobenzidine-treated of ISC ghosts show the microbodies to contain hemoglobin and/or hemoglobin derivatives. Scanning electron microscopy and freeze-etching demonstrate that membrane--hemoglobin S interaction in ISCs enhances the membrane loss by microspherulation. Membrane-bound hemoglobin is five times greater in in vivo ISCs than non-ISCs, and increases during ISC production, parallelling depletion of adenosine triphosphate. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of ISC membranes shows the presence of high-molecular-weight heteropolymers in the pre--band 1 region, a decrease in band 4.1 and an increase in bands 7, 8, and globin. The role of cross-linked membrane protein polymers in the generation of ISCs is discussed and is synthesized in terms of a unified concept for the determinants of the genesis of ISCs.

  4. Hemoglobin derivatives

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003371.htm Hemoglobin derivatives To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemoglobin derivatives are altered forms of hemoglobin . Hemoglobin is ...

  5. Phylogenetic Relationships of 3/3 and 2/2 Hemoglobins in Archaeplastida Genomes to Bacterial and Other Eukaryote Hemoglobins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serge N. Vinogradov; Iván Fernández; David Hoogewijs; Raúl Arredondo-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Land plants and algae form a supergroup, the Archaeplastida, believed to be monophyletic. We report the results of an analysis of the phylogeny of putative globins in the currently available genomes to bacterial and other eu-karyote hemoglobins (Hbs). Archaeplastida genomes have 3/3 and 2/2 Hbs, with the land plant genomes having group 2 2/2 Hbs, except for the unexpected occurrence of two group 1 2/2 Hbs in Ricinus communis. Bayesian analysis shows that plant 3/3 Hbs are related to vertebrate neuroglobins and bacterial flavohemoglobins (FHbs). We sought to define the bacterial groups, whose ancestors shared the precursors of Archaeplastida Hbs, via Bayesian and neighbor-joining anal-yses based on COBALTalignment of representative sets of bacterial 3/3 FHb-like globins and group 1 and 2 2/2 Hbs with the corresponding Archaeplastida Hbs. The results suggest that the Archaeplastida 3/3 and group 1 2/2 Hbs could have orig-inated from the horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) that accompanied the two generally accepted endosymbioses of a pro-teobacterium and a cyanobacterium with a eukaryote ancestor. In contrast, the origin of the group 2 2/2 Hbs unexpectedly appears to involve HGT from a bacterium ancestral to Chloroflexi, Deinococcales, Bacilli, and Actinomycetes. Furthermore,although intron positions and phases are mostly conserved among the land plant 3/3 and 2/2 globin genes, introns are absent in the algal 3/3 genes and intron positions and phases are highly variable in their 2/2 genes. Thus, introns are irrelevant to globin evolution in Archaeplastida.

  6. Structural alterations of hemoglobin and myoglobin by glyoxal: a comparative study.

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    Banerjee, Sauradipta; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2014-05-01

    Glyoxal, a highly reactive oxoaldehyde, increases in diabetic condition. It reacts with different proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Here we have studied the structural alterations as well as the sites and nature of amino acid modifications of two heme proteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin on incubation with glyoxal for seven days at 25°C. In comparison with normal hemoglobin (HbA0), glyoxal-treated hemoglobin (GHbA0) exhibits decreased absorbance around 280 nm, reduced intrinsic fluorescence and lower surface hydrophobicity. However, glyoxal-treated myoglobin (GMb) exhibits the opposite effects in these respects when compared to normal myoglobin (Mb). Glyoxal increases the thermal stability of hemoglobin, while it decreases the stability of myoglobin. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry reveals modifications of Arg-31α, Arg-40β and Arg-104β of hemoglobin by glyoxal to hydroimidazolone adducts. On the other hand, glyoxal modifies Lys-133 and Lys-145 to carboxymethyllysine and Arg-31 to hydroimidazolone adducts in myoglobin. Thus the same oxoaldehyde exerts different effects on hemoglobin and myoglobin and may be associated with different structural properties of the proteins.

  7. Recombinant bacterial hemoglobin alters metabolism of Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Gerald; Diano, Audrey; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is used extensively for the production of enzymes and organic acids. A major problem in industrial fermentations with this fungus is to ensure sufficient supply of oxygen required for respiratory metabolism of the fungus. In case of oxygen limitation...... behind the strong gpdA promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. Analysis of secreted metabolites, oxygen uptake, CO2 evolution and biomass formation points towards a relief of stress in the mutant expressing VHB when it is exposed to oxygen limitation. Our findings therefore point to an interesting strategy...

  8. Does circumcision alter the periurethral uropathogenic bacterial flora

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    Mushtaq Ahmad Laway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of periurethral bacterial flora in uncircumcised boys and to evaluate the effect of circumcision on alteration of periurethral uropathogenic bacterial flora. Materials and Methods: Pattern of periurethral bacterial flora before and after circumcision was studied prospectively in 124 boys. The results were analysed to compare change in bacterial colonisation before and after circumcision. Results: The age range was 6 weeks to 96 months. Most (94.3% of the boys had religious indication and 5.7% had medical indication for circumcision. E. coli, Proteus and Klebsiella were most common periurethral bacterial flora in uncircumcised subjects. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus and Staphylococcus aureus was most common periurethral bacterial flora in circumcised subjects. In 66.1% of circumcised subjects, no bacteria were grown from periurethral region. Conclusion: We conclude that presence of prepuce is associated with great quantity of periurethral bacteria, greater likelihood of the presence of high concentration of uropathogens and high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI. This study provides circumstantial evidence supporting the idea that early circumcision may be beneficial for prevention of UTI.

  9. Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology

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    Jeremiah A. Henning

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant traits, such as root and leaf area, influence how plants interact with their environment and the diverse microbiota living within plants can influence plant morphology and physiology. Here, we explored how three bacterial strains isolated from the Populus root microbiome, influenced plant phenotype. We chose three bacterial strains that differed in predicted metabolic capabilities, plant hormone production and metabolism, and secondary metabolite synthesis. We inoculated each bacterial strain on a single genotype of Populus trichocarpa and measured the response of plant growth related traits (root:shoot, biomass production, root and leaf growth rates and physiological traits (chlorophyll content, net photosynthesis, net photosynthesis at saturating light–Asat, and saturating CO2–Amax. Overall, we found that bacterial root endophyte infection increased root growth rate up to 184% and leaf growth rate up to 137% relative to non-inoculated control plants, evidence that plants respond to bacteria by modifying morphology. However, endophyte inoculation had no influence on total plant biomass and photosynthetic traits (net photosynthesis, chlorophyll content. In sum, bacterial inoculation did not significantly increase plant carbon fixation and biomass, but their presence altered where and how carbon was being allocated in the plant host.

  10. Enhanced production of ε-caprolactone by coexpression of bacterial hemoglobin gene in recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

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    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-12-28

    Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only the efficient regeneration of NADPH but also a sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to a 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions.

  11. Alteration of the α1β2/α2β1 subunit interface contributes to the increased hemoglobin-oxygen affinity of high-altitude deer mice

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    Inoguchi, Noriko; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Baba, Seiki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Storz, Jay F.; Moriyama, Hideaki; Permyakov, Eugene A.

    2017-03-31

    Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) that are native to high altitudes in the Rocky Mountains have evolved hemoglobins with an increased oxygen-binding affinity relative to those of lowland conspecifics. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms responsible for the evolved increase in hemoglobin-oxygen affinity, the crystal structure of the highland hemoglobin variant was solved and compared with the previously reported structure for the lowland variant. Highland hemoglobin yielded at least two crystal types, in which the longest axes were 507 and 230 Å. Using the smaller unit cell crystal, the structure was solved at 2.2 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained two tetrameric hemoglobin molecules. The analyses revealed that αPro50 in the highland hemoglobin variant promoted a stable interaction between αHis45 and heme that was not seen in the αHis50 lowland variant. The αPro50 mutation also altered the nature of atomic contacts at the α1β2/α2β1 intersubunit interfaces. These results demonstrate how affinity-altering changes in intersubunit interactions can be produced by mutations at structurally remote sites.

  12. BacHbpred: Support Vector Machine Methods for the Prediction of Bacterial Hemoglobin-Like Proteins

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    MuthuKrishnan Selvaraj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent upsurge in microbial genome data has revealed that hemoglobin-like (HbL proteins may be widely distributed among bacteria and that some organisms may carry more than one HbL encoding gene. However, the discovery of HbL proteins has been limited to a small number of bacteria only. This study describes the prediction of HbL proteins and their domain classification using a machine learning approach. Support vector machine (SVM models were developed for predicting HbL proteins based upon amino acid composition (AC, dipeptide composition (DC, hybrid method (AC + DC, and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM. In addition, we introduce for the first time a new prediction method based on max to min amino acid residue (MM profiles. The average accuracy, standard deviation (SD, false positive rate (FPR, confusion matrix, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC were analyzed. We also compared the performance of our proposed models in homology detection databases. The performance of the different approaches was estimated using fivefold cross-validation techniques. Prediction accuracy was further investigated through confusion matrix and ROC curve analysis. All experimental results indicate that the proposed BacHbpred can be a perspective predictor for determination of HbL related proteins. BacHbpred, a web tool, has been developed for HbL prediction.

  13. Altered metabolism of copper, zinc, and magnesium is associated with increased levels of glycated hemoglobin in patients with diabetes mellitus.

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    Viktorínová, Alena; Toserová, Eva; Krizko, Marián; Duracková, Zdenka

    2009-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with the alterations in the metabolism of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and magnesium (Mg). The aim of the present study was to investigate plasma levels of these elements in patients with DM and in healthy subjects. Association between glycated hemoglobin and levels of metals was also evaluated. We studied 36 subjects with DM (type 1, 11; type 2, 25) and 34 healthy subjects matched for age, sex, and duration of diabetes. Plasma concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Mg were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. An imbalance in the levels of studied metals was observed in both type 1 and type 2 DM. We found higher levels of Cu (P diabetic complications.

  14. Proton NMR investigation of heme and surrounding proton in low-spin cyanide-ligated bacterial hemoglobin from Vitreoscilla

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    夏佑林; 吴季辉; 光寿红; 张海阳; 梁山; 施蕴渝

    2000-01-01

    1H NMR spectra of low-spin cyanide-ligated bacterial hemoglobin from Vitreoscilla (VtHb-CN) are reported. The assignments of the 1H NMR spectra of VtHb-CN have been made through MCOSY, NOESY, 1D TOE and SUPERWEFT experiments. Almost all resonance peaks of heme and ligated His85 are identified. The spin-lattice relaxation time T1’s and the variation relationships of chemical shifts of these peaks with temperature have been acquired, from which the distances between the measured protons and Fe3+, and the diamagnetic chemical shifts have been acquired, respectively. The ionization constants of pKa’s of ligated His85 are determined through pH titration of chemical shift, which is 4.95 for ligated His85 C2H proton. The lower pKa is attributed to the influence of the Fe3+ of carrying positive charge and the coordination of His85 and Fe3+ of heme.

  15. Altered Bacterial Profiles in Saliva from Adults with Caries Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, D; Fiehn, N-E; Nielsen, C H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to learn whether presence of caries in an adult population was associated with a salivary bacterial profile different from that of individuals without untreated caries. Stimulated saliva samples from 621 participants of the Danish Health Examination Survey were analyzed...... using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray technology. Samples from 174 individuals with dental caries and 447 from a control cohort were compared using frequency and levels of identified bacterial taxa/clusters as endpoints. Differences at taxon/cluster level were analyzed using Mann......-Whitney's test with Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple comparisons. Principal component analysis was used to visualize bacterial community profiles. A reduced bacterial diversity was observed in samples from subjects with dental caries. Five bacterial taxa (Veillonella parvula, Veillonella atypica...

  16. THE RENAL HANDLING OF HEMOGLOBIN

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    Bunn, H. Franklin; Esham, William T.; Bull, Robert W.

    1969-01-01

    The glomerular filtration of hemoglobin (α2β2) was studied under conditions in which its dissociation into αβ dimers was experimentally altered. Rats receiving hemoglobin treated with the sulfhydryl reagent bis(N-maleimidomethyl) ether (BME) showed a much lower renal excretion and prolonged plasma survival as compared with animals injected with untreated hemoglobin. Plasma disappearance was also prolonged in dogs receiving BME hemoglobin. Gel filtration data indicated that under physiological conditions, BME hemoglobin had impaired subunit dissociation. In addition, BME hemoglobin showed a very high oxygen affinity and a decreased rate of auto-oxidation. Glomerular filtration was enhanced under conditions which favor the dissociation of hemoglobin into dimers. Cat hemoglobin, which forms subunits much more extensively than canine hemoglobin, was excreted more readily by the rat kidney. The renal uptake of 59Fe hemoglobin injected intra-arterially into rabbits varied inversely with the concentration of the injected dose. PMID:5778789

  17. Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, Jeremiah A.; Weston, David J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant traits, such as root and leaf area, influence how plants interact with their environment and the diverse microbiota living within plants can influence plant morphology and physiology. Here, we explored how three bacterial strains isolated from the Populus root microbiome, influenced plant...... phenotype. We chose three bacterial strains that differed in predicted metabolic capabilities, plant hormone production and metabolism, and secondary metabolite synthesis. We inoculated each bacterial strain on a single genotype of Populus trichocarpa and measured the response of plant growth related traits...... (root:shoot, biomass production, root and leaf growth rates) and physiological traits (chlorophyll content, net photosynthesis, net photosynthesis at saturating light-Asat, and saturating CO2-Amax). Overall, we found that bacterial root endophyte infection increased root growth rate up to 184% and leaf...

  18. Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, Jeremiah A.; Weston, David J.; Pelletier, Dale A.;

    2016-01-01

    (root:shoot, biomass production, root and leaf growth rates) and physiological traits (chlorophyll content, net photosynthesis, net photosynthesis at saturating light-Asat, and saturating CO2-Amax). Overall, we found that bacterial root endophyte infection increased root growth rate up to 184% and leaf...

  19. Nitrogen deposition alters soil chemical properties and bacterial communities in the Inner Mongolia grassland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ximei Zhang; Xingguo Han

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen deposition has dramatically altered biodiversity and ecosystem functioning on the earth; however,its effects on soil bacterial community and the underlying mechanisms of these effects have not been thoroughly examined.Changes in ecosystems caused by nitrogen deposition have traditionally been attributed to increased nitrogen content.In fact,nitrogen deposition not only leads to increased soil total N content,but also changes in the NH4+-N content,NO3--N content and pH,as well as changes in the heterogeneity of the four indexes.The soil indexes for these four factors,their heterogeneity and even the plant community might be routes through which nitrogen deposition alters the bacterial community.Here,we describe a 6-year nitrogen addition experiment conducted in a typical steppe ecosystem to investigate the ecological mechanism by which nitrogen deposition alters bacterial abundance,diversity and composition.We found that various characteristics of the bacterial community were explained by different environmental factors.Nitrogen deposition decreased bacterial abundance that is positively related to soil pH value.In addition,nitrogen addition decreased bacterial diversity,which is negatively related to soil total N content and positively related to soil NO3--N heterogeneity.Finally,nitrogen.addition altered bacterial composition that is significantly related to soil NH4+-N content.Although nitrogen deposition significantly altered plant biomass,diversity and composition,these characteristics of plant community did not have a significant impact on processes of nitrogen deposition that led to alterations in bacterial abundance,diversity and composition.Therefore,more sensitive molecular technologies should be adopted to detect the subtle shifts of microbial community structure induced by the changes of plant community upon nitrogen deposition.

  20. Hemoglobin (image)

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    Hemoglobin is the most important component of red blood cells. It is composed of a protein called ... exchanged for carbon dioxide. Abnormalities of an individual's hemoglobin value can indicate defects in the normal balance ...

  1. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

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    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-09

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.

  2. Altered motility and duration of bacterial overgrowth in experimental blind loop syndrome.

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    Justus, P G; Mcherron, L E; Ward, T T

    1984-07-01

    To better understand the pathogenesis of the increased motility previously described in the blind loop rat, we studied the relationship between duration of bacterial overgrowth and both myoelectric activity and bacterial flora in this model. Myoelectric studies and quantitative bacterial cultures were performed on self-filling and self-emptying (control) blind loop rats one, two, and three weeks postoperatively. All self-filling blind loop rats had greater random action potential activity and higher frequencies of migrating action potential complexes than controls (P less than 0.05). One-week self-filling blind loop rats had a higher frequency of migrating action potential complexes (P less than 0.05) and a higher ratio of counts of Escherichia coli to Bacteroides species (P less than 0.05) than the two- or three-week self-filling blind loop groups. Thus, qualitative changes in myoelectric activity occur during the development of bacterial overgrowth in the blind loop rat which may reflect evolving alterations in the bacterial flora.

  3. Gyramides prevent bacterial growth by inhibiting DNA gyrase and altering chromosome topology.

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    Rajendram, Manohary; Hurley, Katherine A; Foss, Marie H; Thornton, Kelsey M; Moore, Jared T; Shaw, Jared T; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-06-20

    Antibiotics targeting DNA gyrase have been a clinical success story for the past half-century, and the emergence of bacterial resistance has fueled the search for new gyrase inhibitors. In this paper we demonstrate that a new class of gyrase inhibitors, the gyramides, are bacteriostatic agents that competitively inhibit the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli gyrase and produce supercoiled DNA in vivo. E. coli cells treated with gyramide A have abnormally localized, condensed chromosomes that blocks DNA replication and interrupts chromosome segregation. The resulting alterations in DNA topology inhibit cell division through a mechanism that involves the SOS pathway. Importantly, gyramide A is a specific inhibitor of gyrase and does not inhibit the closely related E. coli enzyme topoisomerase IV. E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to gyramide A do not display cross-resistance to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin. The results demonstrate that the gyramides prevent bacterial growth by a mechanism in which the topological state of chromosomes is altered and halts DNA replication and segregation. The specificity and activity of the gyramides for inhibiting gyrase makes these compounds important chemical tools for studying the mechanism of gyrase and the connection between DNA topology and bacterial cell division.

  4. Supplemental dietary inulin of variable chain lengths alters intestinal bacterial populations in young pigs.

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    Patterson, Jannine K; Yasuda, Koji; Welch, Ross M; Miller, Dennis D; Lei, Xin Gen

    2010-12-01

    Previously, we showed that supplementation of diets with short-chain inulin (P95), long-chain inulin (HP), and a 50:50 mixture of both (Synergy 1) improved body iron status and altered expression of the genes involved in iron homeostasis and inflammation in young pigs. However, the effects of these 3 types of inulin on intestinal bacteria remain unknown. Applying terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, we determined the abundances of luminal and adherent bacterial populations from 6 segments of the small and large intestines of pigs (n = 4 for each group) fed an iron-deficient basal diet (BD) or the BD supplemented with 4% of P95, Synergy 1, or HP for 5 wk. Compared with BD, all 3 types of inulin enhanced (P inulin on bacterial populations in the lumen contents were found. Meanwhile, all 3 types of inulin suppressed the less desirable bacteria Clostridium spp. and members of the Enterobacteriaceae in the lumen and mucosa of various gut segments. Our findings suggest that the ability of dietary inulin to alter intestinal bacterial populations may partially account for its iron bioavailability-promoting effect and possibly other health benefits.

  5. Deoxygenation alters bacterial diversity and community composition in the ocean's largest oxygen minimum zone.

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    Beman, J Michael; Carolan, Molly T

    2013-01-01

    Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) have a central role in biogeochemical cycles and are expanding as a consequence of climate change, yet how deoxygenation will affect the microbial communities that control these cycles is unclear. Here we sample across dissolved oxygen gradients in the oceans' largest OMZ and show that bacterial richness displays a unimodal pattern with decreasing dissolved oxygen, reaching maximum values on the edge of the OMZ and decreasing within it. Rare groups on the OMZ margin are abundant at lower dissolved oxygen concentrations, including sulphur-cycling Chromatiales, for which 16S rRNA was amplified from extracted RNA. Microbial species distribution models accurately replicate community patterns based on multivariate environmental data, demonstrate likely changes in distributions and diversity in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, and highlight the sensitivity of key bacterial groups to deoxygenation. Through these mechanisms, OMZ expansion may alter microbial composition, competition, diversity and function, all of which have implications for biogeochemical cycling in OMZs.

  6. Interaction of p-benzoquinone with hemoglobin in smoker’s blood causes alteration of structure and loss of oxygen binding capacity

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    Arunava Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS is an important source of morbidity and early mortality worldwide. Besides causing various life-threatening diseases, CS is also known to cause hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia would induce early aging and premature death. Continuation of smoking during pregnancy is a known risk for the unborn child. Although carbon monoxide (CO is considered to be a cause of hypoxia, the effect of other component(s of CS on hypoxia is not known. Here we show by immunoblots and mass spectra analyses that in smoker’s blood p-benzoquinone (p-BQ derived from CS forms covalent adducts with cysteine 93 residues in both the β chains of hemoglobin (Hb producing Hb-p-BQ adducts. UV–vis spectra and CD spectra analyses show that upon complexation with p-BQ the structure of Hb is altered. Compared to nonsmoker’s Hb, the content of α-helix decreased significantly in smoker’s Hb (p = 0.0224. p-BQ also induces aggregation of smoker’s Hb as demonstrated by SDS-PAGE, dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. Alteration of Hb structure in smoker’s blood is accompanied by reduced oxygen binding capacity. Our results provide the first proof that p-BQ is a cause of hypoxia in smokers. We also show that although both p-BQ and CO are responsible for causing hypoxia in smokers, exposure to CO further affects the function over and above that produced by Hb-p-BQ adduct.

  7. Hemoglobin electrophoresis

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    ... 12. Read More A1C test Anemia Hemoglobin Hemolytic anemia Sickle cell anemia Thalassemia Review Date 1/31/2016 Updated by: ... Anemia Blood Count Tests Blood Disorders Newborn Screening Sickle Cell Anemia Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  8. Fish hemoglobins

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    P.C. de Souza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate hemoglobin, contained in erythrocytes, is a globular protein with a quaternary structure composed of 4 globin chains (2 alpha and 2 beta and a prosthetic group named heme bound to each one. Having myoglobin as an ancestor, hemoglobin acquired the capacity to respond to chemical stimuli that modulate its function according to tissue requirements for oxygen. Fish are generally submitted to spatial and temporal O2 variations and have developed anatomical, physiological and biochemical strategies to adapt to the changing environmental gas availability. Structurally, most fish hemoglobins are tetrameric; however, those from some species such as lamprey and hagfish dissociate, being monomeric when oxygenated and oligomeric when deoxygenated. Fish blood frequently possesses several hemoglobins; the primary origin of this finding lies in the polymorphism that occurs in the globin loci, an aspect that may occasionally confer advantages to its carriers or even be a harmless evolutionary remnant. On the other hand, the functional properties exhibit different behaviors, ranging from a total absence of responses to allosteric regulation to drastic ones, such as the Root effect.

  9. Intravenous lipopolysaccharide challenge alters ruminal bacterial microbiota and disrupts ruminal metabolism in dairy cattle.

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    Jing, Longhui; Zhang, Ruiyang; Liu, Yujie; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2014-07-28

    In the present study, three primiparous lactating Holstein cows (260-285 d in lactation) were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design to assess the effects of three doses (0.0, 0.4 and 0.8 μg/kg body weight) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli 0111:B4) on changes in ruminal microbiota and ruminal fermentation. Ruminal pH was linearly decreased (Pinfusion linearly decreased (Phay and soyabean meal in the rumen, but did not affect (P>0.10) the gene expression of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and monocarboxylic acid transporter-1, -2 and -4. A plot of principal coordinate analysis based on unweighted UniFrac values and analysis of molecular variance revealed that the structure of ruminal bacterial communities in the control was distinct from that of the ruminal microbiota in the cattle exposed to LPS. At the phylum level, when compared with the control group, LPS infusion in the tested cows linearly increased (P< 0.05) the abundance of Firmicutes, and linearly decreased (P< 0.05) the percentage of Bacteroidetes, Tenericutes, Spirochaetes, Chlorobi and Lentisphaerae. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that intravenously LPS challenge altered the ruminal bacterial microbiota and fermentation profiles. The present data suggest that systemic LPS could alter ruminal environment and ruminal microbiota composition, leading to a general decrease in fermentative activity.

  10. Bacterial chitinolytic communities respond to chitin and pH alteration in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielak, Anna M; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Semenov, Alexander V; Sørensen, Søren J; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Chitin amendment is a promising soil management strategy that may enhance the suppressiveness of soil toward plant pathogens. However, we understand very little of the effects of added chitin, including the putative successions that take place in the degradative process. We performed an experiment in moderately acid soil in which the level of chitin, next to the pH, was altered. Examination of chitinase activities revealed fast responses to the added crude chitin, with peaks of enzymatic activity occurring on day 7. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analyses of 16S rRNA and chiA genes showed structural changes of the phylogenetically and functionally based bacterial communities following chitin addition and pH alteration. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated (i) that the diversity of chiA gene types in soil is enormous and (i) that different chiA gene types are selected by the addition of chitin at different prevailing soil pH values. Interestingly, a major role of Gram-negative bacteria versus a minor one of Actinobacteria in the immediate response to the added chitin (based on 16S rRNA gene abundance and chiA gene types) was indicated. The results of this study enhance our understanding of the response of the soil bacterial communities to chitin and are of use for both the understanding of soil suppressiveness and the possible mining of soil for novel enzymes.

  11. Bioaugmentation of Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B affects hydrogen production through altering indigenous bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Guo, Rongbo; Shi, Xiaoshuang; He, Shuai; Wang, Lin; Dai, Meng; Qiu, Yanling; Dang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-07-01

    Bioaugmentation can facilitate hydrogen production from complex organic substrates, but it still is unknown how indigenous microbial communities respond to the added bacteria. Here, using a Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B (named as LX-B) bioaugmentation experiments, the distribution of metabolites and the responses of indigenous bacterial communities were investigated via batch cultivation (BC) and repeated batch cultivation (RBC). In BC the LX-B/sludge ratio of 0.12 achieved substantial high hydrogen yield, which was over twice that of control. In RBC one-time bioaugmentation and repeated batch bioaugmentation of LX-B resulted in the hydrogen yield that was average 1.2-fold and 0.8-fold higher than that in control, respectively. This improved hydrogen production performance mainly benefited from a shift in composition of the indigenous bacterial community caused by LX-B bioaugmentation. The findings represented an important step in understanding the relationship between bioaugmentation, a shift in bacterial communities, and altered bioreactor performance.

  12. Soil fungal:bacterial ratios are linked to altered carbon cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish A. Malik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite several lines of observational evidence, there is a lack of consensus on whether higher fungal:bacterial (F:B ratios directly cause higher soil carbon (C storage. We employed RNA sequencing, protein profiling and isotope tracer techniques to evaluate whether differing F:B ratios are associated with differences in C storage. A mesocosm 13C labeled foliar litter decomposition experiment was performed in two soils that were similar in their physico-chemical properties but differed in microbial community structure, specifically their F:B ratio (determined by PLFA analyses, RNA sequencing and protein profiling; all three corroborating each other. Following litter addition, we observed a consistent increase in abundance of fungal phyla; and greater increases in the fungal dominated soil; implicating the role of fungi in litter decomposition. Litter derived 13C in respired CO2 was consistently lower, and residual 13C in bulk SOM was higher in high F:B soil demonstrating greater C storage potential in the fungal:bacterial dominated soil. We conclude that in this soil system, the increased abundance of fungi in both soils and the altered C cycling patterns in the fungal:bacterial dominated soils highlight the significant role of fungi in litter decomposition and indicate that F:B ratios are linked to higher C storage potential.

  13. Hemoglobin C disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical hemoglobin C ... Hemoglobin C is an abnormal type of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. It is ... Americans. You are more likely to have hemoglobin C disease if someone in your family has had ...

  14. THE BIOCHEMISTRY OF VITREOSCILLA HEMOGLOBIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C. Stark

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The hemoglobin (VHb from Vitreoscilla was the first bacterial hemoglobin discovered. Its structure and function have been extensively investigated, and engineering of a wide variety of heterologous organisms to express VHb has been performed to increase their growth and productivity. This strategy has shown promise in applications as far-ranging as the production of antibiotics and petrochemical replacements by microorganisms to increasing stress tolerance in plants. These applications of “VHb technology” have generally been of the “black box” variety, wherein the endpoint studied is an increase in the levels of a certain product or improved growth and survival. Their eventual optimization, however, will require a thorough understanding of the various functions and activities of VHb, and how VHb expression ripples to affect metabolism more generally. Here we review the current knowledge of these topics. VHb's functions all involve oxygen binding (and often delivery in one way or another. Several biochemical and structure-function studies have provided an insight into the molecular details of this binding and delivery. VHb activities are varied. They include supply of oxygen to oxygenases and the respiratory chain, particularly under low oxygen conditions; oxygen sensing and modulation of transcription factor activity; and detoxification of NO, and seem to require interactions of VHb with “partner proteins”. VHb expression affects the levels of ATP and NADH, although not enormously. VHb expression may affect the level of many compounds of intermediary metabolism, and, apparently, alters the levels of expression of many genes. Thus, the metabolic changes in organisms engineered to express VHb are likely to be numerous and complicated.

  15. Mathematical modeling of bacterial track-altering motors: Track cleaving through burnt-bridge ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtylla, Blerta; Keener, James P.

    2015-04-01

    The generation of directed movement of cellular components frequently requires the rectification of Brownian motion. Molecular motor enzymes that use ATP to walk on filamentous tracks are typically involved in cell transport, however, a track-altering motor can arise when an enzyme interacts with and alters its track. In Caulobacter crescentus and other bacteria, an active DNA partitioning (Par) apparatus is employed to segregate replicated chromosome regions to specific locations in dividing cells. The Par apparatus is composed of two proteins: ParA, an ATPase that can form polymeric structures on the nucleoid, and ParB, a protein that can bind and destabilize ParA structures. It has been proposed that the ParB-mediated alteration of ParA structures could be responsible for generating the directed movement of DNA during bacterial division. How precisely these actions are coordinated and translated into directed movement is not clear. In this paper we consider the C. crescentus segregation apparatus as an example of a track altering motor that operates using a so-called burnt-bridge mechanism. We develop and analyze mathematical models that examine how diffusion and ATP-hydrolysis-mediated monomer removal (or cleaving) can be combined to generate directed movement. Using a mean first passage approach, we analytically calculate the effective ParA track-cleaving velocities, effective diffusion coefficient, and other higher moments for the movement a ParB protein cluster that breaks monomers away at random locations on a single ParA track. Our model results indicate that cleaving velocities and effective diffusion constants are sensitive to ParB-induced ATP hydrolysis rates. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with stochastic simulation results.

  16. Engineering the oxygen sensing regulation results in an enhanced recombinant human hemoglobin production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, José L; Liu, Lifang; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Efficient production of appropriate oxygen carriers for transfusions (blood substitutes or artificial blood) has been pursued for many decades, and to date several strategies have been used, from synthetic polymers to cell-free hemoglobin carriers. The recent advances in the field of metabolic engineering also allowed the generation of different genetically modified organisms for the production of recombinant human hemoglobin. Several studies have showed very promising results using the bacterium Escherichia coli as a production platform, reporting hemoglobin titers above 5% of the total cell protein content. However, there are still certain limitations regarding the protein stability and functionality of the recombinant hemoglobin produced in bacterial systems. In order to overcome these limitations, yeast systems have been proposed as the eukaryal alternative. We recently reported the generation of a set of plasmids to produce functional human hemoglobin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with final titers of active hemoglobin exceeding 4% of the total cell protein. In this study, we propose a strategy for further engineering S. cerevisiae by altering the oxygen sensing pathway by deleting the transcription factor HAP1, which resulted in an increase of the final recombinant active hemoglobin titer exceeding 7% of the total cellular protein.

  17. Soil bacterial community composition altered by increased nutrient availability in Arctic tundra soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro eKoyama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The pool of soil organic carbon (SOC in the Arctic is disproportionally large compared to those in other biomes. This large quantity of SOC accumulated over millennia due to slow rates of decomposition relative to net primary productivity. Decomposition is constrained by low temperatures and nutrient concentrations, which limit soil microbial activity. We investigated how nutrients limit bacterial and fungal biomass and community composition in organic and mineral soils within moist acidic tussock tundra ecosystems. We sampled two experimental arrays of moist acidic tussock tundra that included fertilized and non-fertilized control plots. One array included plots that had been fertilized annually since 1989 and the other since 2006. Fertilization significantly altered overall bacterial community composition and reduced evenness, to a greater degree in organic than mineral soils, and in the 1989 compared to the 2006 site. The relative abundance of copiotrophic α-proteobacteria and β-proteobacteria was higher in fertilized than control soils, and oligotrophic Acidobacteria were less abundant in fertilized than control soils at the 1989 site. Fungal community composition was less sensitive to increased nutrient availability, and fungal responses to fertilization were not consistent between soil horizons and sites. We detected two ectomycorrhizal genera, Russula and Cortinarius spp., associated with shrubs. Their relative abundance was not affected by fertilization despite increased dominance of their host plants in the fertilized plots. Our results indicate that fertilization, which has been commonly used to simulate warming in Arctic tundra, has limited applicability for investigating fungal dynamics under warming.

  18. Bacterial chitinolytic communities respond to chitin and pH alteration in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielak, Anna; Cretoiu, Mariana; Semenov, Alexander;

    2013-01-01

    in moderately acid soil in which the level of chitin, next to the pH, was altered. Examination of chitinase activities revealed fast responses to the added crude chitin, with peaks of enzymatic activity occurring on day 7. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analyses of 16S rRNA and chi......A genes showed structural changes of the phylogenetically and functionally based bacterial communities following chitin addition and pH alteration. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated (i) that the diversity of chiA gene types in soil is enormous and (i) that different chiA gene types are selected...... by the addition of chitin at different prevailing soil pH values. Interestingly, a major role of Gram-negative bacteria versus a minor one of Actinobacteria in the immediate response to the added chitin (based on 16S rRNA gene abundance and chiA gene types) was indicated. The results of this study enhance our...

  19. Altering the thermal resistance of foodborne bacterial pathogens with an eggshell membrane waste by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, A L; Sheldon, B W

    2001-04-01

    Eggshells from egg-breaking operations are a significant waste disposal problem. Thus, the development of value-added by-products from this waste would be welcomed by the industry. The ability of extracted eggshell membranes containing, several bacteriolytic enzymes (i.e., lysozyme and beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase) or other membrane components to alter the thermal resistance of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial pathogens was evaluated. Mid-log phase cells of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EC), Listeria monocytogenes Scott A (LM), and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) were suspended in 100 ml of 0.1% peptone water (pH 6.9, 10(7-8) CFU/ml) containing either 0 (control) or 10 g of an eggshell membrane extract and incubated at 37 degrees C for 45 min. Following exposure, membrane-free samples (1.5 ml) were heated in a 56 degrees C (LM, SA), 54 degrees C (SE, ST), or 52 degrees C (EC) water bath from 0 to 14 min in sealed glass reaction vials (12 by 32 mm), and the survivors were recovered on brain heart infusion agar. Population reductions ranging from 27.6% (SA) to 99.8% (LM) (ST, 43.8%; SE, 47.5%; EC, 71.8%) were observed for cells treated for 45 min with extracted membrane, as compared to controls. D-value reductions ranging from 0 (LM) to 87.2% (SE) (SA, 36.7%; EC, 83.3%; ST, 86.3%) were observed when membrane-treated cells were subsequently heat inactivated. The effects of exposure pH, time, temperature, and organic load on membrane activity were also evaluated with Salmonella Typhimurium. Exposure pH (5.0 versus 6.9), time (15 versus 45 min), and temperature (4 degrees C versus 37 degrees C) did not significantly reduce the impact of eggshell membranes on D-values. However, the presence of organic matter (0.1% peptone water versus skim milk) significantly reduced the thermal resistance-reducing capacity of the membranes. These preliminary findings provide information on the potential use of extracted eggshell

  20. The renal handling of hemoglobin. I. Glomerular filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, H F; Esham, W T; Bull, R W

    1969-05-01

    The glomerular filtration of hemoglobin (alpha(2)beta(2)) was studied under conditions in which its dissociation into alphabeta dimers was experimentally altered. Rats receiving hemoglobin treated with the sulfhydryl reagent bis(N-maleimidomethyl) ether (BME) showed a much lower renal excretion and prolonged plasma survival as compared with animals injected with untreated hemoglobin. Plasma disappearance was also prolonged in dogs receiving BME hemoglobin. Gel filtration data indicated that under physiological conditions, BME hemoglobin had impaired subunit dissociation. In addition, BME hemoglobin showed a very high oxygen affinity and a decreased rate of auto-oxidation. Glomerular filtration was enhanced under conditions which favor the dissociation of hemoglobin into dimers. Cat hemoglobin, which forms subunits much more extensively than canine hemoglobin, was excreted more readily by the rat kidney. The renal uptake of (59)Fe hemoglobin injected intra-arterially into rabbits varied inversely with the concentration of the injected dose.

  1. AI-2 biosynthesis module in a magnetic nanofactory alters bacterial response via localized synthesis and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rohan; Bentley, William E

    2009-02-01

    Nanofactories are nano-dimensioned and comprised of modules serving various functions that alter the response of targeted cells when deployed by locally synthesizing and delivering cargo to the surfaces of the targeted cells. In its basic form, a nanofactory consists of a minimum of two functional modules: a cell capture module and a synthesis module. In this work, magnetic nanofactories that alter the response of targeted bacteria by the localized synthesis and delivery of the "universal" bacterial quorum sensing signal molecule autoinducer AI-2 are demonstrated. The magnetic nanofactories consist of a cell capture module (chitosan-mag nanoparticles) and an AI-2 biosynthesis module that contains both AI-2 biosynthetic enzymes Pfs and LuxS on a fusion protein (His-LuxS-Pfs-Tyr, HLPT) assembled together. HLPT is hypothesized to be more efficient than its constituent enzymes (used separately) at conversion of the substrate SAH to product AI-2 on account of the proximity of the two enzymes within the fusion protein. HLPT is demonstrated to be more active than the constituent enzymes, Pfs and LuxS, over a wide range of experimental conditions. The magnetic nanofactories (containing bound HLPT) are also demonstrated to be more active than free, unbound HLPT. They are also shown to elicit an increased response in targeted Escherichia coli cells, due to the localized synthesis and delivery of AI-2, when compared to the response produced by the addition of AI-2 directly to the cells. Studies investigating the universality of AI-2 and unraveling AI-2 based quorum sensing in bacteria using magnetic nanofactories are envisioned. The prospects of using such multi-modular nanofactories in developing the next generation of antimicrobials based on intercepting and interrupting quorum sensing based signaling are discussed.

  2. Hemoglobin variants: biochemical properties and clinical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Christopher S; Dickson, Claire F; Gell, David A; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2013-03-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples.

  3. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  4. Short-term failure of IUD removal to alter bacterial flora in a patient with chronic anaerobic endometritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monif, G R

    1986-10-01

    A patient with cytological and clinical evidence of IUD-associated anaerobic endometritis was studied with quantitative and qualitative bacteriological techniques. With the exception of elimination of Actinomyces israelii from the deep endocervical/endometrial culture, IUD removal induced minimal qualitative changes in the bacterial flora of the endocervical/endometrial sample during the 35 days the patient was monitored. The interposition of menstruation did not significantly alter either the quantitative or qualitative interrelationship of the bacteria present.

  5. Mercury alters the bacterial community structure and diversity in soil even at concentrations lower than the guideline values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Khandaker Rayhan; Subashchandrabose, Suresh Ramraj; Krishnan, Kannan; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of inorganic mercury (Hg) on bacterial community and diversity in different soils. Three soils-neutral, alkaline and acidic-were spiked with six different concentrations of Hg ranging from 0 to 200 mg kg(-1) and aged for 90 days. At the end of the ageing period, 18 samples from three different soils were investigated for bacterial community structure and soil physicochemical properties. Illumina MiSeq-based 16s ribosomal RNA (rRNA) amplicon sequencing revealed the alteration in the bacterial community between un-spiked control soils and Hg-spiked soils. Among the bacterial groups, Actinobacteria (22.65%) were the most abundant phyla in all samples followed by Proteobacteria (21.95%), Bacteroidetes (4.15%), Firmicutes (2.9%) and Acidobacteria (2.04%). However, the largest group showing increased abundance with higher Hg doses was the unclassified group (45.86%), followed by Proteobacteria. Mercury had a considerable negative impact on key soil functional bacteria such as ammonium oxidizers and nitrifiers. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that among the measured soil properties, Hg had a major influence on bacterial community structure. Furthermore, nonlinear regression analysis confirmed that Hg significantly decreased soil bacterial alpha diversity in lower organic carbon containing neutral and alkaline soils, whereas in acidic soil with higher organic carbon there was no significant correlation. EC20 values obtained by a nonlinear regression analysis indicated that Hg significantly decreased soil bacterial diversity in concentrations lower than several guideline values.

  6. Reactions of arsine with hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatlelid, K.M.; Brailsford, C.; Carter, D.E. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-02-09

    The mechanism of arsine (AsH{sub 3}) induced hemolysis was studied in vitro using isolated red blood cells (RBCs) from the rat or dog. AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis of dog red blood cells was completely blocked by carbon monoxide (CO) preincubation and was reduced by pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) compared to incubations in air. Since CO and O{sub 2} bind to heme and also reduced hemolysis, these results suggested a reaction between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin in the hemeligand binding pocket or with the heme iron. Further, sodium nitrite induction of methemoglobin (metHb) to 85% and 34% of total Hb in otherwise intact RBCs resulted in 56% and 16% decreases in hemolysis, respectively, after incubation for 4 h. This provided additional evidence for the involvement of hemoglobin in the AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis mechanism. Reactions between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin were studied in solutions of purified dog hemoglobin. Spectrophotometric studies of the reaction of AsH{sub 3} with various purified hemoglobin species revealed that AsH{sub 3} reacted with HbO{sub 2} to produce metHb and, eventually, degraded Hb characterized by gross precipitation of the protein. AsH{sub 3} did not alter the spectrum of deoxyHb and did not cause degradation of metHb in oxygen, but bound to and reduced metHb in the absence of oxygen. These data indicate that a reaction of AsH{sub 3} with oxygenated hemoglobin, HbO{sub 2}, may lead to hemolysis, but there are reactions between AsH{sub 3} and metHb that may not be directly involved in the hemolytic process. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Specificity for human hemoglobin enhances Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchany, Gleb; McCoy, Amanda L.; Torres, Victor J.; Krause, Jens C.; Crowe, James E.; Fabry, Mary E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron is required for bacterial proliferation and Staphylococcus aureus steals this metal from host hemoglobin during invasive infections. This process involves hemoglobin binding to the cell wall of S. aureus, heme extraction, passage through the cell envelope, and degradation to release free iron. Herein we demonstrate an enhanced ability of S. aureus to bind hemoglobin derived from humans as compared to other mammals. Increased specificity for human hemoglobin (hHb) translates into an improved ability to acquire iron and is entirely dependent on the staphylococcal hemoglobin receptor IsdB. This feature affects host-pathogen interaction as demonstrated by the increased susceptibility of hHb expressing mice to systemic staphylococcal infection. Interestingly, enhanced utilization of human hemoglobin is not a uniform property of all bacterial pathogens. These results suggest a step in the evolution of S. aureus to better colonize the human host and establish hHb expressing mice as a model of S. aureus pathogenesis. PMID:21147468

  8. Transgenic tobacco revealing altered bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere during early plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreote, Fernando D; Mendes, Rodrigo; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Rossetto, Priscilla B; Labate, Carlos A; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline A; van Elsas, Jan Dirck; Azevedo, João L; Araújo, Welington L

    2008-05-01

    The rhizosphere constitutes a complex niche that may be exploited by a wide variety of bacteria. Bacterium-plant interactions in this niche can be influenced by factors such as the expression of heterologous genes in the plant. The objective of this work was to describe the bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere and rhizoplane regions of tobacco plants, and to compare communities from transgenic tobacco lines (CAB1, CAB2 and TRP) with those found in wild-type (WT) plants. Samples were collected at two stages of plant development, the vegetative and flowering stages (1 and 3 months after germination). The diversity of the culturable microbial community was assessed by isolation and further characterization of isolates by amplified ribosomal RNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA) and 16S rRNA sequencing. These analyses revealed the presence of fairly common rhizosphere organisms with the main groups Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacilli. Analysis of the total bacterial communities using PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) revealed that shifts in bacterial communities occurred during early plant development, but the reestablishment of original community structure was observed over time. The effects were smaller in rhizosphere than in rhizoplane samples, where selection of specific bacterial groups by the different plant lines was demonstrated. Clustering patterns and principal components analysis (PCA) were used to distinguish the plant lines according to the fingerprint of their associated bacterial communities. Bands differentially detected in plant lines were found to be affiliated with the genera Pantoea, Bacillus and Burkholderia in WT, CAB and TRP plants, respectively. The data revealed that, although rhizosphere/rhizoplane microbial communities can be affected by the cultivation of transgenic plants, soil resilience may be able to restore the original bacterial diversity after one cycle of plant

  9. AltitudeOmics: rapid hemoglobin mass alterations with early acclimatization to and de-acclimatization from 5260 m in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Benjamin J; Wachsmuth, Nadine B; Schmidt, Walter F; Byrnes, William C; Julian, Colleen G; Lovering, Andrew T; Subudhi, Andrew W; Roach, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    It is classically thought that increases in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass) take several weeks to develop upon ascent to high altitude and are lost gradually following descent. However, the early time course of these erythropoietic adaptations has not been thoroughly investigated and data are lacking at elevations greater than 5000 m, where the hypoxic stimulus is dramatically increased. As part of the AltitudeOmics project, we examined Hbmass in healthy men and women at sea level (SL) and 5260 m following 1, 7, and 16 days of high altitude exposure (ALT1/ALT7/ALT16). Subjects were also studied upon return to 5260 m following descent to 1525 m for either 7 or 21 days. Compared to SL, absolute Hbmass was not different at ALT1 but increased by 3.7 ± 5.8% (mean ± SD; n = 20; pcell destruction. Our novel findings demonstrate that Hbmass increases within 7 days of ascent to 5260 m but that the altitude-induced Hbmass adaptation is lost within 7 days of descent to 1525 m. The rapid time course of these adaptations contrasts with the classical dogma, suggesting the need to further examine mechanisms responsible for Hbmass adaptations in response to severe hypoxia.

  10. Comparative study of the effect of BPA and its selected analogues on hemoglobin oxidation, morphological alterations and hemolytic changes in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maćczak, Aneta; Bukowska, Bożena; Michałowicz, Jaromir

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to provoke many deleterious impacts on human health, and thus it is now successively substituted by BPA analogues, whose effects have been poorly investigated. Up to now, only one study has been realized to assess the effect of BPA on human erythrocytes, which showed its significant hemolytic and oxidative potential. Moreover, no study has been conducted to evaluate the effect of BPA analogues on red blood cells. The purpose of the present study was to compare the impact of BPA and its selected analogues such as bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) on hemolytic and morphological changes and hemoglobin oxidation (methemoglobin formation) of human erythrocytes. The erythrocytes were incubated with different bisphenols concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 500μg/ml for 1, 4 and 24h. The compounds examined caused hemolysis in human erythrocytes with BPAF exhibiting the strongest effect. All bisphenols examined caused methemoglobin formation with BPA inducing the strongest oxidative potential. Flow cytometry analysis showed that all bisphenols (excluding BPS) induced significant changes in erythrocytes size. Changes in red blood cells shape were conducted using phase contrast microscopy. It was noticed that BPA and BPAF induced echinocytosis, BPF caused stomatocytosis, while BPS did not provoke significant changes in shape of red blood cells. Generally, the results showed that BPS, which is the main substituent of bisphenol A in polymers and thermal paper production, exhibited significantly lower disturbance of erythrocyte functions than BPA.

  11. Transgenic tobacco revealing altered bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere during early plant development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, Fernando D.; Mendes, Rodrigo; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Rossetto, Priscilla B.; Labate, Carlos A.; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline A.; van Elsas, Jan Dirck; Azevedo, Joao L.; Araujo, Welington L.

    2008-01-01

    The rhizosphere constitutes a complex niche that may be exploited by a wide variety of bacteria. Bacterium-plant interactions in this niche can be influenced by factors such as the expression of heterologous genes in the plant. The objective of this work was to describe the bacterial communities ass

  12. Chronic N-amended soils exhibit an altered bacterial community structure in Harvard Forest, MA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlapati, Swathi A; Minocha, Rakesh; Bhiravarasa, Premsai S; Tisa, Louis S; Thomas, William K; Minocha, Subhash C

    2013-02-01

    At the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA, the impact of 20 years of annual ammonium nitrate application to the mixed hardwood stand on soil bacterial communities was studied using 16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes was done using DNA extracted from 30 soil samples (three treatments × two horizons × five subplots) collected from untreated (control), low N-amended (50 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) and high N-amended (150 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) plots. A total of 1.3 million sequences were processed using qiime. Although Acidobacteria represented the most abundant phylum based on the number of sequences, Proteobacteria were the most diverse in terms of operational taxonomic units (OTUs). UniFrac analyses revealed that the bacterial communities differed significantly among soil horizons and treatments. Microsite variability among the five subplots was also evident. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of normalized OTU data followed by permutational manova further confirmed these observations. Richness indicators and indicator species analyses revealed higher bacterial diversity associated with N amendment. Differences in bacterial diversity and community composition associated with the N treatments were also observed at lower phylogenetic levels. Only 28-35% of the 6 936 total OTUs identified were common to three treatments, while the rest were specific to one treatment or common to two.

  13. Hemoglobin Variants in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Raymond A.

    1965-04-22

    Variability among mammalian hemoglobins was observed many years ago (35). The chemical basis for differences among hemoglobins from different species of mammals has been studied by several investigators (5, 11, 18, 48). As well as interspecies differences, hemoglobin variants are frequently found within a species of mammals (2, 3, 7, 16) The inheritance of these intraspecies variants can be studied, and pedigrees indicate that the type of hemoglobin synthesized in an individual is genetically controlled (20). Several of the variant human hemoglobins are f'unctionally deficient (7, 16). Such hemoglobin anomalies are of basic interest to man because of the vital role of hemoglobin for transporting oxygen to all tissues of the body.

  14. Grain-rich diets altered the colonic fermentation and mucosa-associated bacterial communities and induced mucosal injuries in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Huimin; Liu, Junhua; Feng, Panfei; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2016-02-04

    Remarkably little information is available about the impact of high-grain (HG) feeding on colonic mucosa-associated bacteria and mucosal morphology. In the present study, 12 male goats were randomly assigned to either a hay diet (n = 6) or an HG diet (65% grain; n = 6) to characterise the changes in the composition of the bacterial community in colonic mucosa and the mucosal morphology of the colon. The results showed that HG feeding decreased the colonic pH and increased the concentrations of total short chain fatty acids and lipopolysaccharides in colonic digesta. The principal coordinate analysis results showed that the HG diet altered the colonic mucosal bacterial communities, with an increase in the abundance of genus Blautia and a decrease in the abundance of genera Bacillus, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus. The HG-fed goats showed sloughing of the surface layer epithelium, intercellular tight junction erosion, cell mitochondrial damage, and upregulation of the relative mRNA expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ in colonic mucosa. Collectively, our data indicate that HG feeding induced changes in colonic mucosal morphology and cytokines expression that might be caused by excessive fermentation and dramatic shifts in the bacterial populations in the colon.

  15. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, but Not Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichen Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF, chemical fertilizer (CF, organic-inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF and organic fertilizer (OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen–fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with organic fertilizer application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR versus sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the Alpha- and Beta- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil

  16. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, But Not Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichen; Xue, Chao; Song, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer (OF) regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF), chemical fertilizer (CF), organic-inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF), and OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA) of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments) significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with OF application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR vs. sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the α- and β- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil microbial community structure, but not total levels of alpha

  17. Alteration of bacterial communities and organic matter in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) supplied with soil and organic fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocali, Stefano; Galeffi, Carlo; Perrin, Elena; Florio, Alessandro; Migliore, Melania; Canganella, Francesco; Bianconi, Giovanna; Di Mattia, Elena; Dell'Abate, Maria Teresa; Fani, Renato; Benedetti, Anna

    2013-02-01

    The alteration of the organic matter (OM) and the composition of bacterial community in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) supplied with soil (S) and a composted organic fertilizer (A) was examined at the beginning and at the end of 3 weeks of incubation under current-producing as well as no-current-producing conditions. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed a significant alteration of the microbial community structure in MFCs generating electricity as compared with no-current-producing MFCs. The genetic diversity of cultivable bacterial communities was assessed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of 106 bacterial isolates obtained by using both generic and elective media. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of the more representative RAPD groups indicated that over 50.4% of the isolates from MFCs fed with S were Proteobacteria, 25.1% Firmicutes, and 24.5% Actinobacteria, whereas in MFCs supplied with A 100% of the dominant species belonged to γ-Proteobacteria. The chemical analysis performed by fractioning the OM and using thermal analysis showed that the amount of total organic carbon contained in the soluble phase of the electrochemically active chambers significantly decreased as compared to the no-current-producing systems, whereas the OM of the solid phase became more humified and aromatic along with electricity generation, suggesting a significant stimulation of a humification process of the OM. These findings demonstrated that electroactive bacteria are commonly present in aerobic organic substrates such as soil or a fertilizer and that MFCs could represent a powerful tool for exploring the mineralization and humification processes of the soil OM.

  18. Soil bacterial community and functional shifts in response to altered snowpack in moist acidic tundra of northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Michael P.; Poretsky, Rachel S.; Welker, Jeffrey M.; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.

    2016-09-01

    functional potential was inferred using ancestral state reconstruction to approximate functional gene abundance, revealing a decreased abundance of genes required for soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in the organic layers of the deep snow accumulation zones. These results suggest that predicted climate change scenarios may result in altered soil bacterial community structure and function, and indicate a reduction in decomposition potential, alleviated temperature limitations on extracellular enzymatic efficiency, or both. The fate of stored C in Arctic soils ultimately depends on the balance between these mechanisms.

  19. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival.

  20. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; Hunt, A.; Fernandez, D.; Richter, E.; Shah, M.; Kilcoyne, M.; Joshi, L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hing, S.; Parra, M.; Dumaras, P.; Norwood, K.; Nickerson, C. A.; Bober, R.; Devich, J.; Ruggles, A.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  1. Altering the growth conditions of Gluconacetobacter xylinus to maximize the yield of bacterial cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruka, Dianne R; Simon, George P; Dean, Katherine M

    2012-06-20

    An extensive matrix of different growth conditions including media, incubation time, inoculum volume, surface area and media volume were investigated in order to maximize the yield of bacterial cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which will be used as reinforcement material to produce fully biodegradable composites. Crystallinity was shown to be controllable depending on the media and conditions employed. Samples with significant difference in crystallinity in a range from 50% to 95% were produced. Through experimental design, the yield of cellulose was maximized; primarily this involved reactor surface area design, optimized media and the use of mannitol being the highest cellulose-producing carbon source. Increasing the volume of the media did achieve a higher cellulose yield, however this increase was not found to be cost or time effective.

  2. Long acting β2-agonist and corticosteroid restore airway glandular cell function altered by bacterial supernatant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawrocki-Raby Béatrice

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus releases virulence factors (VF that may impair the innate protective functions of airway cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether a long-acting β2 adrenergic receptor agonist (salmeterol hydroxynaphthoate, Sal combined with a corticosteroid (fluticasone propionate, FP was able to regulate ion content and cytokine expression by airway glandular cells after exposure to S. aureus supernatant. Methods A human airway glandular cell line was incubated with S. aureus supernatant for 1 h and then treated with the combination Sal/FP for 4 h. The expression of actin and CFTR proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Videomicroscopy was used to evaluate chloride secretion and X-ray microanalysis to measure the intracellular ion and water content. The pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Results When the cells were incubated with S. aureus supernatant and then with Sal/FP, the cellular localisation of CFTR was apical compared to the cytoplasmic localisation in cells incubated with S. aureus supernatant alone. The incubation of airway epithelial cells with S. aureus supernatant reduced by 66% the chloride efflux that was fully restored by Sal/FP treatment. We also observed that Sal/FP treatment induced the restoration of ion (Cl and S and water content within the intracellular secretory granules of airway glandular cells and reduced the bacterial supernatant-dependent increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL8 and TNFα. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that treatment with the combination of a corticosteroid and a long-acting β2 adrenergic receptor agonist after bacterial infection restores the airway glandular cell function. Abnormal mucus induced by defective ion transport during pulmonary infection could benefit from treatment with a combination of β2 adrenergic receptor agonist and glucocorticoid.

  3. Hemoglobin E disease and glycosylated hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Niharika Yedla; Mohammad Shafi Kuchay; Ambrish Mithal

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) is a routinely measured parameter to monitor long-term glycemic control in people with diabetes mellitus. The presence of hemoglobin (Hb) variants can affect the accuracy of HbA1C methods. Hb E variant is the most common Hb variant in South-east Asia and North-east India. In the presence of Hb E, HbA1C may not be detectable by ion-exchange chromatography (high-pressure liquid chromatography), but may be estimated by immunoassay technique and boronate affinity c...

  4. Protecting the herd: the remarkable effectiveness of the bacterial meningitis polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines in altering transmission dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David S

    2011-01-01

    Interrupting human-to-human transmission of the agents (Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae) of bacterial meningitis by new capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (PPCVs) has proven to be a remarkable (and unanticipated) contributor to vaccine effectiveness. Herd immunity accounts for ∼50% of the protection by meningococcal serogroup C PPCVs, pneumococcal PPCV7, and H. influenzae b PPCVs. Nasopharyngeal carriage can be reduced ≥75% for vaccine serotypes; the decrease in carriage is correlated with disease reduction in unvaccinated individuals, and the impact of herd immunity lasts for years. Based on these data, models for using herd immunity in vaccine-based prevention strategies are underway for control of meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the immunologic basis of herd immunity and impact on microbial biology need more study, protecting the unvaccinated by altering pathogen transmission dynamics is a powerful effect of PPCVs and increasingly important in vaccine introduction, implementation, and evaluation strategies.

  5. Five-week dietary exposure to dry diets alters the faecal bacterial populations in the domestic cat (Felis catus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Emma N; Kittelmann, Sandra; Henderson, Gemma; Young, Wayne; Roy, Nicole C; Thomas, David G

    2011-10-01

    The effects of wet (canned) or dry (kibbled) diets on faecal bacterial populations in the cat were investigated in eight domestic short-haired cats (four males and four females; averaging 6 years of age and 3.4 kg) in a nested design. The cats were fed ad libitum a commercially available wet diet (moisture 82.0 %, crude protein 51.7 %, fat 28.9 %, carbohydrate (CHO) 8.9 % and ash 10.6 % DM) for 5 weeks. On the fifth week, individual feed intakes and faecal outputs were determined. Fresh faecal samples were collected twice daily, mixed for homogeneity, subsampled and stored at - 85 °C until analysis. The cats were then switched to a commercially available dry diet (moisture 8.5 %, crude protein 33.0 %, fat 11.0 %, CHO 49.4 % and ash 6.6 % DM) for 5 weeks, and fresh faeces were sampled as described previously. Energy intake tended to be higher in cats fed dry diets (P 0.05). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA genes amplified from DNA extracted from faeces was performed. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analysis of bacterial community profiles using Pearson's correlation revealed diet-specific clustering when the same cats were fed on either a dry or a wet diet (dissimilarity between the groups, 88.6 %; P Pelomonas and Fusobacteriaceae were influenced by a short-term change in diet format. This suggests that 5-week dietary exposure is sufficient to alter gastrointestinal microflora.

  6. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  7. Does the appearance of drug resistance during therapy alter bacterial susceptibility to opsonophagocytosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, C G

    1996-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are common causes of infection in patients undergoing chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Their ability to survive intracellularly within peritoneal macrophages and to persist within the peritoneum during antibiotic therapy has led to the development of drug resistance during treatment. Strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and Staphytococcus haemolyticus (SH) have been isolated from patients with CAPD during treatment with ciprofloxacin. The respective MIC values pre-and post-therapy were SE-0.25 and 128 mg/L and SH-0.50 and 64 mg/L. The susceptibility of each isolate to opsonophagocytosis was measured in vitro using isolated polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) derived from fresh human blood donations. The bacteria were radiolabelled during growth, opsonised in either 1 or 10% serum and their uptake measured No differences were seen between the pre- and post therapy isolates when using 10% serum as opsonic source (18 vs. 21%); with 1% serum the corresponding values were lower (5 and 8% respectively). Similarly their ability to generate a respiratory burst as measured by chemiluminescence (CL) in the phagocytic cells was not diminished in the strains which had developed resistance to ciprofloxacin. The mean CL response to the strains isolated at outset of therapy ranged from 0.35-0.45 cpsc, and to the resistant strains following therapy from 0.36-0.50 cpsc. It is clear from the present investigation that although the bacterial strain became at least 10 times more resistant to ciprofloxacin during therapy, no change in their susceptibility to phagocytosis occurred refuting the idea that the emergence of drug resistant strains during therapy results in "super-bugs" of greater virulence.

  8. Acidic Conditions in the NHE2-/- Mouse Intestine Result in an Altered Mucosa-Associated Bacterial Population with Changes in Mucus Oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Engevik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms bacteria use to proliferate and alter the normal bacterial composition remain unknown. The ability to link changes in the intestinal micro-environment, such as ion composition and pH, to bacterial proliferation is clinically advantageous for diseases that involve an altered gut microbiota, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease, obesity and diabetes. In human and mouse intestine, the apical Na+/H+ exchangers NHE2 and NHE3 affect luminal Na+, water, and pH. Loss of NHE2 results in acidic luminal pH. Since acid resistance systems in gram-positive bacteria are well documented, we hypothesize that gram-positive bacteria would increase in representation in the acidic NHE2-/- intestine. Methods: Intestinal ion composition was measured by fame photometry and chloridometry and pH measured electrochemically. DNA extracted from intestinal flushes or from mucosal scrapings was analyzed by qRT-PCR to examine luminal and mucosa-associated bacterial populations. Epithelial mucus oligosaccharide patterns were examined by histology with FIT-C labeled lectins. Results: Although total luminal and mucosa-associated bacteria were unchanged in NHE2-/- intestine, gram-positive bacterial phyla were increased in the mucosa-associated bacterial population in a region-specific manner. The genera Clostridium and Lactobacillus were increased in the cecum and colon which corresponded to changes in NHE2-/- mucus oligosaccharide composition of mannose, N-acetyglucosamine, N-acetygalactosamine and galactose. Conclusions: Together these data indicate that changes in ion transport induce region-specific bacterial changes, which alter host mucus oligosaccharide patterns. These host-bacterial interactions provide a possible mechanism of niche-development and shed insight on how certain groups proliferate in changing environments and maintain their proliferation by altering the host.

  9. Hemoglobin parameters from diffuse reflectance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourant, Judith R.; Marina, Oana C.; Hebert, Tiffany M.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Smith, Harriet O.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Tissue vasculature is altered when cancer develops. Consequently, noninvasive methods of monitoring blood vessel size, density, and oxygenation would be valuable. Simple spectroscopy employing fiber optic probes to measure backscattering can potentially determine hemoglobin parameters. However, heterogeneity of blood distribution, the dependence of the tissue-volume-sampled on scattering and absorption, and the potential compression of tissue all hinder the accurate determination of hemoglobin parameters. We address each of these issues. A simple derivation of a correction factor for the absorption coefficient, μa, is presented. This correction factor depends not only on the vessel size, as others have shown, but also on the density of blood vessels. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the dependence of an effective pathlength of light through tissue which is parameterized as a ninth-order polynomial function of μa. The hemoglobin bands of backscattering spectra of cervical tissue are fit using these expressions to obtain effective blood vessel size and density, tissue hemoglobin concentration, and oxygenation. Hemoglobin concentration and vessel density were found to depend on the pressure applied during in vivo acquisition of the spectra. It is also shown that determined vessel size depends on the blood hemoglobin concentration used. PMID:24671524

  10. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  11. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  12. Impacts of Alterations of Organic Inputs on the Bacterial Community within the sediments of Wind Cave, South Dakota, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelius Marisa K.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind Cave (WICA in the Black Hills of South Dakota, like many mostly dry caves in temperate regions is an energy-starved system.The biotic communities that reside in these systems are low in diversity and simple in structure, and sensitive to changes in externalinputs of organic matter. Caves open to tourist traffic offer an opportunity to study the impacts of organic matter amendments in theform of human and rodent hair and dander, clothing lint, material from rodent activity (nesting materials and feces, and algal growthin and around artificial lighting. This study reports on the impacts of carbon amendments from humans and rodents on the bacterialand archaeal communities within the sediments of WICA from annual surveys and from a manipulative study that added lint (‘L’;cellulose plus rodent dander and rodent hair, rodent feces (‘F’, and a combination of both (‘LF’. The survey confirmed that bacterialbiomass was higher in regions of the cave with the highest rates of lint (hair and natural clothing fibers input. The manipulative studyfound that organic amendments in the forms of lint (L and rodent feces (F altered the WICA bacterial community structure in bothabundance and diversity, with the combined lint and feces (LF amendment having the most significant response. The high similarityof the LF and L communities suggests that the cave bacterial community is more carbon than nitrogen limited. The implication ofcave development to management practices is immediate and practical. Even small amounts of lint and organic matter foreign tocave bacteria significantly compromise the integrity of the endemic community resulting in the replacement of undescribed speciesby assemblages with at best, unknown impacts to natural cave features.

  13. Hemoglobin E disease and glycosylated hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharika Yedla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C is a routinely measured parameter to monitor long-term glycemic control in people with diabetes mellitus. The presence of hemoglobin (Hb variants can affect the accuracy of HbA1C methods. Hb E variant is the most common Hb variant in South-east Asia and North-east India. In the presence of Hb E, HbA1C may not be detectable by ion-exchange chromatography (high-pressure liquid chromatography, but may be estimated by immunoassay technique and boronate affinity chromatography. However, the result may be underestimated when correlated with plasma glucose and serum fructosamine levels. Clinicians should be aware of this limitation of HbA1C estimation in patients with Hb E and other Hb variants.

  14. Phylogeny of Echinoderm Hemoglobins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Christensen

    Full Text Available Recent genomic information has revealed that neuroglobin and cytoglobin are the two principal lineages of vertebrate hemoglobins, with the latter encompassing the familiar myoglobin and α-globin/β-globin tetramer hemoglobin, and several minor groups. In contrast, very little is known about hemoglobins in echinoderms, a phylum of exclusively marine organisms closely related to vertebrates, beyond the presence of coelomic hemoglobins in sea cucumbers and brittle stars. We identified about 50 hemoglobins in sea urchin, starfish and sea cucumber genomes and transcriptomes, and used Bayesian inference to carry out a molecular phylogenetic analysis of their relationship to vertebrate sequences, specifically, to assess the hypothesis that the neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages are also present in echinoderms.The genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus encodes several hemoglobins, including a unique chimeric 14-domain globin, 2 androglobin isoforms and a unique single androglobin domain protein. Other strongylocentrotid genomes appear to have similar repertoires of globin genes. We carried out molecular phylogenetic analyses of 52 hemoglobins identified in sea urchin, brittle star and sea cucumber genomes and transcriptomes, using different multiple sequence alignment methods coupled with Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches. The results demonstrate that there are two major globin lineages in echinoderms, which are related to the vertebrate neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages. Furthermore, the brittle star and sea cucumber coelomic hemoglobins appear to have evolved independently from the cytoglobin lineage, similar to the evolution of erythroid oxygen binding globins in cyclostomes and vertebrates.The presence of echinoderm globins related to the vertebrate neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages suggests that the split between neuroglobins and cytoglobins occurred in the deuterostome ancestor shared by echinoderms and vertebrates.

  15. Induction of nano pore in Agrobacterial hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Mojtaba Tousheh; Giti Emtiazi; Peyman Derikvand

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A variety of oxygen-transport and -binding proteins exist in organisms including bacteria, protozoans, and fungi all have hemoglobin-like proteins. In addition to dealing with transport and sensing of oxygen, they may also deal with NO2, CO2, sulfide compounds, and even O2 scavenging in environments. Also they detoxified chlorinated materials like P450 enzymes and peroxidases and use as a detector of nitrate and hydrogen peroxide. Pore-forming bacterial globins are interested fo...

  16. Induction of nano pore in Agrobacterial hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Tousheh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A variety of oxygen-transport and -binding proteins exist in organisms including bacteria, protozoans, and fungi all have hemoglobin-like proteins. In addition to dealing with transport and sensing of oxygen, they may also deal with NO2, CO2, sulfide compounds, and even O2 scavenging in environments. Also they detoxified chlorinated materials like P450 enzymes and peroxidases and use as a detector of nitrate and hydrogen peroxide. Pore-forming bacterial globins are interested for filtration. Materials and methods: Although there are data for bacterial toxin as a filter, here we used Agrobacterial hem to induce nano pore in the heme structure using point mutation. Results: Investigations showed that three amino acids leucine 76, alanine 83 and histidine 80 are important for pore formation in Agrobacterium hemoglobin. A point mutation on leucine 76 to glycine, histidine 80 to asparagine and alanine 83 to lysine step by step led to create the nano pore 0.7- 0.8 nm in the globin. Discussion and conclusion: These mutations in bacterial hemoglobin increase the stability when mutation is with it’s at pH7. This mutation decreases the aliphatic index however increase the stability index.

  17. Exposure to bacterial signals does not alter pea aphids' survival upon a second challenge or investment in production of winged offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas ter Braak

    Full Text Available Pea aphids have an obligate nutritional symbiosis with the bacteria Buchneraaphidicola and frequently also harbor one or more facultative symbionts. Aphids are also susceptible to bacterial pathogen infections, and it has been suggested that aphids have a limited immune response towards such pathogen infections compared to other, more well-studied insects. However, aphids do possess at least some of the genes known to be involved in bacterial immune responses in other insects, and immune-competent hemocytes. One possibility is that immune priming with microbial elicitors could stimulate immune protection against subsequent bacterial infections, as has been observed in several other insect systems. To address this hypothesis we challenged aphids with bacterial immune elicitors twenty-four hours prior to live bacterial pathogen infections and then compared their survival rates to aphids that were not pre-exposed to bacterial signals. Using two aphid genotypes, we found no evidence for immune protection conferred by immune priming during infections with either Serratia marcescens or with Escherichia coli. Immune priming was not altered by the presence of facultative, beneficial symbionts in the aphids. In the absence of inducible immune protection, aphids may allocate energy towards other defense traits, including production of offspring with wings that could escape deteriorating conditions. To test this, we monitored the ratio of winged to unwinged offspring produced by adult mothers of a single clone that had been exposed to bacterial immune elicitors, to live E. coli infections or to no challenge. We found no correlation between immune challenge and winged offspring production, suggesting that this mechanism of defense, which functions upon exposure to fungal pathogens, is not central to aphid responses to bacterial infections.

  18. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Chen, C. R.; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0–10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4+, TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire.

  19. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-pei; Chen, C R; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-20

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0-10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4(+), TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire.

  20. Rice (Oryza) hemoglobins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a sin...

  1. Hemoglobin interacting proteins and implications of spectrin hemoglobin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Avik; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-10-14

    In this report we have analyzed interacting partners of hemoglobin inside erythrocyte and sought possible implications of hemoglobin-spectrin interaction. Our list of identified cytosolic hemoglobin interacting proteins includes redox regulators like peroxiredoxin-2, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1, flavin reductase and chaperones like HSP70, α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein. Others include metabolic enzymes like carbonic anhydrase-1, selenium binding protein-1, purine nucleoside phosphorylase and nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Additionally, various membrane proteins like α and β spectrin, ankyrin, band3, protein4.1, actin and glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase have been shown to interact with hemoglobin. Our result indicates that major membrane skeleton protein spectrin, that also has a chaperone like activity, helps to fold the unstable alpha-globin chains in vitro. Taken together our results could provide insight into a protein network evolved around hemoglobin molecule inside erythrocyte that may add a new perspective in understanding the hemoglobin function and homeostasis.

  2. The enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid alters brain and plasma phospholipid molecular species: further development of a rodent model of autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Raymond H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastrointestinal symptoms and altered blood phospholipid profiles have been reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Most of the phospholipid analyses have been conducted on the fatty acid composition of isolated phospholipid classes following hydrolysis. A paucity of information exists on how the intact phospholipid molecular species are altered in ASD. We applied ESI/MS to determine how brain and blood intact phospholipid species were altered during the induction of ASD-like behaviors in rats following intraventricular infusions with the enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid. Animals were infused daily for 8 days, locomotor activity assessed, and animals killed during the induced behaviors. Propionic acid infusions increased locomotor activity. Lipid analysis revealed treatment altered 21 brain and 30 blood phospholipid molecular species. Notable alterations were observed in the composition of brain SM, diacyl mono and polyunsaturated PC, PI, PS, PE, and plasmalogen PC and PE molecular species. These alterations suggest that the propionic acid rat model is a useful tool to study aberrations in lipid metabolism known to affect membrane fluidity, peroxisomal function, gap junction coupling capacity, signaling, and neuroinflammation, all of which may be associated with the pathogenesis of ASD.

  3. Antimicrobial properties of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, Preethi; Abraham, Jayanthi

    2012-12-01

    Hemoglobin consists of a heme containing component and a globin unit. It exists as a tetramer with 2 α subunits and 2 β subunits in adults and with 2 α subunits and 2 γ chains in infants. On proteolytic cleavage, hemoglobin breaks down to produce many biologically active compounds, among which are hemocidins, those which exhibit antimicrobial property. The generation of these peptides does not depend on the blood group, Rhesus factor, age and sex of the healthy donors. The microbicidal activity has been observed against a variety of gram positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and against filamentous fungi, yeast and even certain parasites. The discovery of hemocidins opens a new field for research into the details of the peptides acting as second line of defence in boosting the innate immune system of the organisms.

  4. Hemoglobin oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, S.; Ortalli, I.; Pedrazzi, G. [University of Parma, Istituto di Scienze Fisiche, INFM-Udr Parma (Italy); Passeri, G. [University of Parma, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Scienze Biomediche (Italy); Piccolo, P. [University of Parma, Istituto di Clinica chirurgica Generale, Toracica e Vascolare (Italy)

    2000-07-15

    Venous blood obtained from healthy donors and from patients suffering from breast cancer have been treated with acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) for different time. Moessbauer spectra of the packed red cells have been recorded and compared. The largest difference occurs after 50 min of treatment with APH where the patient samples show a broad spectral pattern indicating an advanced hemoglobin oxidation. These results may have some relevance in early cancer diagnosis.

  5. Hemoglobin Drift after Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Timothy J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Kilic, Arman; Haggerty, Kara A.; Frank, Steven M.; Savage, William J.; Whitman, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent literature suggests that a restrictive approach to red blood cell transfusions is associated with improved outcomes in cardiac surgery (CS) patients. Even in the absence of bleeding, intravascular fluid shifts cause hemoglobin levels to drift postoperatively, possibly confounding the decision to transfuse. We undertook this study to define the natural progression of hemoglobin levels in postoperative CS patients. Methods We included all CS patients from 10/10-03/11 who did not receive a postoperative transfusion. Primary stratification was by intraoperative transfusion status. Change in hemoglobin was evaluated relative to the initial postoperative hemoglobin. Maximal drift was defined as the maximum minus the minimum hemoglobin for a given hospitalization. Final drift was defined as the difference between initial and discharge hemoglobin. Results Our final cohort included 199 patients, 71(36%) received an intraoperative transfusion while 128(64%) did not. The average initial and final hemoglobin for all patients were 11.0±1.4g/dL and 9.9±1.3g/dL, respectively, an final drift of 1.1±1.4g/dL. The maximal drift was 1.8±1.1g/dL and was similar regardless of intraoperative transfusion status(p=0.9). Although all patients’ hemoglobin initially dropped, 79% of patients reached a nadir and experienced a mean recovery of 0.7±0.7g/dL by discharge. On multivariable analysis, increasing CPB time was significantly associated with total hemoglobin drift(Coefficient/hour: 0.3[0.1–0.5]g/dL, p=0.02). Conclusions In this first report of hemoglobin drift following CS, although all postoperative patients experienced downward hemoglobin drift, 79% of patients exhibited hemoglobin recovery prior to discharge. Physicians should consider the eventual upward hemoglobin drift prior to administering red cell transfusions. PMID:22609121

  6. Genomic organization and evolution of the Atlantic salmon hemoglobin repertoire

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    Phillips Ruth B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of salmonids are considered pseudo-tetraploid undergoing reversion to a stable diploid state. Given the genome duplication and extensive biological data available for salmonids, they are excellent model organisms for studying comparative genomics, evolutionary processes, fates of duplicated genes and the genetic and physiological processes associated with complex behavioral phenotypes. The evolution of the tetrapod hemoglobin genes is well studied; however, little is known about the genomic organization and evolution of teleost hemoglobin genes, particularly those of salmonids. The Atlantic salmon serves as a representative salmonid species for genomics studies. Given the well documented role of hemoglobin in adaptation to varied environmental conditions as well as its use as a model protein for evolutionary analyses, an understanding of the genomic structure and organization of the Atlantic salmon α and β hemoglobin genes is of great interest. Results We identified four bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs comprising two hemoglobin gene clusters spanning the entire α and β hemoglobin gene repertoire of the Atlantic salmon genome. Their chromosomal locations were established using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis and linkage mapping, demonstrating that the two clusters are located on separate chromosomes. The BACs were sequenced and assembled into scaffolds, which were annotated for putatively functional and pseudogenized hemoglobin-like genes. This revealed that the tail-to-tail organization and alternating pattern of the α and β hemoglobin genes are well conserved in both clusters, as well as that the Atlantic salmon genome houses substantially more hemoglobin genes, including non-Bohr β globin genes, than the genomes of other teleosts that have been sequenced. Conclusions We suggest that the most parsimonious evolutionary path leading to the present organization of the Atlantic salmon

  7. The alteration and investigation of c-peptide, glycosylated hemoglobin and sensitive C-reactive protein test of gestational diabetes mellitus%妊娠糖尿病患者C-P、HbAlc和hs-CRP的改变及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢则金; 王厚照; 黄璐; 黄幼芳

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨C肽(C-P)、糖化血红蛋白(HbAlc)和超敏C反应蛋白(hs-CRP)在妊娠糖尿病诊断中的临床意义.方法 对正常对照组36例、正常妊娠组50例及妊娠糖尿病组56例采用生化和化学发光免疫方法进行hs-CRP、HbAlc、C-P的测定.结果 妊娠糖尿病组hs-CRP、HbAlc和C-P结果与正常妊娠组相比均明显增高(P<0.01);C-P对妊娠糖尿病诊断的特异性高于HbAlc(P<0.05);阳性预测值为91.42%,也明显高于HbAlc(P<0.05);两者联合检测的结果中,联合检测的特异性和阳性预测值分别为98.84%和96.77%,明显高于两者单独检测的结果(Phemoglobin and sensitive C -reactive protein test in diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitns.Methods: 36 cases health control, 56 cases of gestational diabetes mellitus and 50 cases of normal pregnant women were selected.C - peptide, glycosylated hemoglobin and sensitive C - reactive protein test were measured by biochemical and chemiluminescence immunoassay methods.Results: Compared with the control and the normal pregnant group,the values of glycosylated hemoglobin, C - peptide and sensitive C - reactive protein were higher apparently in the gestational diabetes mellitus group ( P <0.01 ).The specificity of c -peptide were significantly higher than glycosylated hemoglobin in the gestational diabetes mellitus; The specificity and the positive (98.84%and 96.77% ) predictive value of combined detection of aglycosylated hemoglobin and c - peptide were significantly higher than Single detection ( P <0.05 ).Conclusions: There were high value of c - peptide, glycosylated hemoglobin and sensitive C -reactive protein test in diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus; Combined detection of C - peptide, glycosylated

  8. Significant alteration of soil bacterial communities and organic carbon decomposition by different long-term fertilization management conditions of extremely low-productivity arable soil in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Guishan; Ran, Wei; Wang, Boren; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2016-06-01

    Different fertilization managements of red soil, a kind of Ferralic Cambisol, strongly affected the soil properties and associated microbial communities. The association of the soil microbial community and functionality with long-term fertilization management in the unique low-productivity red soil ecosystem is important for both soil microbial ecology and agricultural production. Here, 454 pyrosequencing analysis of 16S recombinant ribonucleic acid genes and GeoChip4-NimbleGen-based functional gene analysis were used to study the soil bacterial community composition and functional genes involved in soil organic carbon degradation. Long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization-induced soil acidification and fertility decline and significantly altered the soil bacterial community, whereas long-term organic fertilization and fallow management improved the soil quality and maintained the bacterial diversity. Short-term quicklime remediation of the acidified soils did not change the bacterial communities. Organic fertilization and fallow management supported eutrophic ecosystems, in which copiotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. However, long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization treatments supported oligotrophic ecosystems, in which oligotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of recalcitrant-C-degrading genes but a lower intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. Quicklime application increased the relative abundance of copiotrophic taxa and crop production, although these effects were utterly inadequate. This study provides insights into the interaction of soil bacterial communities, soil functionality and long-term fertilization management in the red soil ecosystem; these insights are important for improving the fertility of unique low-productivity red soil.

  9. Zinc source and concentration altered physiological responses of beef heifers during a combined viral-bacterial respiratory challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three treatments were evaluated in feedlot heifers to determine the effects of zinc supplementation on the immune response to a combined viral-bacterial respiratory disease challenge. Thirty-two beef heifers (255+/-15 kg) were subjected to a 30d period of Zn depletion, then randomly assigned to one ...

  10. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-09-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  11. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carol L Fischer; Katherine S Walters; David R Drake; Deborah V Dawson; Derek R Blanchette; Kim A Brogden; Philip W Wertz

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria;however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  12. Salinity altered root distribution and increased diversity of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere soil of Jerusalem artichoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Hu, Jinxiang; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between roots and bacterial communities in halophytic species is poorly understood. Here, we used Jerusalem artichoke cultivar Nanyu 1 (NY-1) to characterise root distribution patterns and determine diversity and abundance of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil under variable salinity. Root growth was not inhibited within the salinity range 1.2 to 1.9 g salt/kg, but roots were mainly confined to 0–20 cm soil layer vertically and 0–30 cm horizontally from the plant centre. Root concentrations of K+, Na+, Mg2+ and particularly Ca2+ were relatively high under salinity stress. High salinity stress decreased soil invertase and catalase activity. Using a next-generation, Illumina-based sequencing approach, we determined higher diversity of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil at high than low salinity. More than 15,500 valid reads were obtained, and Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria predominated in all samples, accounting for >80% of the reads. On a genus level, 636 genera were common to the low and high salinity treatments at 0–5 cm and 5–10 cm depth. The abundance of Steroidobacter and Sphingomonas was significantly decreased by increasing salinity. Higher Shannon and Chao 1 indices with increasing severity of salt stress indicated that high salt stress increased diversity in the bacterial communities.

  13. The ATRX cDNA is prone to bacterial IS10 element insertions that alter its structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-García, David; Griffiths, Lyra M; Dyer, Michael A; Bernstein, Emily; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-like chromatin-remodeling protein ATRX has emerged as a key factor in the regulation of α-globin gene expression, incorporation of histone variants into the chromatin template and, more recently, as a frequently mutated gene across a wide spectrum of cancers. Therefore, the availability of a functional ATRX cDNA for expression studies is a valuable tool for the scientific community. We have identified two independent transposon insertions of a bacterial IS10 element into exon 8 of ATRX isoform 2 coding sequence in two different plasmids derived from a single source. We demonstrate that these insertion events are common and there is an insertion hotspot within the ATRX cDNA. Such IS10 insertions produce a truncated form of ATRX, which significantly compromises its nuclear localization. In turn, we describe ways to prevent IS10 insertion during propagation and cloning of ATRX-containing vectors, including optimal growth conditions, bacterial strains, and suggested sequencing strategies. Finally, we have generated an insertion-free plasmid that is available to the community for expression studies of ATRX.

  14. Reduction of rainbow trout spleen size by splenectomy does not alter resistance against bacterial cold water disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Gregory D; Marancik, David P; Zwollo, Patty; Kaattari, Stephen L

    2015-03-01

    In lower vertebrates, the contribution of the spleen to anti-bacterial immunity is poorly understood. We have previously reported a phenotypic and genetic correlation between resistance to Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) and spleen somatic index (spleen weight normalized to body weight, SI). Fish families with larger pre-challenge SI values were found to have greater BCWD survival (resistance) following intraperitoneal injection of a lethal dose of F. psychrophilum. Since the mammalian spleen is known to be crucial for capture and destruction of encapsulated bacteria, we tested the hypothesis that reduction of spleen size, by surgical splenectomy, should reduce the survival advantage of the larger-spleen, disease-resistant fish. Experiments were performed using two separate lines of fish that had previously been selected either based on BCWD survival (resistant and susceptible), or selected based on spleen size (high and low SI). Following 65 to 81 days post-surgical recovery, fish were challenged with F. psychrophilum and mortality monitored for a minimum of 21 days. No significant difference in the relative survival was detected between splenectomized or sham-operated groups, while SI of splenectomized fish was reduced to an average of 8-12% of control animals. A positive correlation was observed between the SI, measured at the time of splenectomy, and time-to-death post-challenge. In summary, these experiments argue that larger spleen size alone is not sufficient for greater BCWD resistance, but rather it is an indirect indicator of immunological status.

  15. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery.

  16. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura De Simone

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in

  17. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Maura; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  18. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andrew M.; Jesus, Eliane C.; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C.; Silva, Israel T.; Nunes, Diana N.; Setubal, João C.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4–V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  19. Tissue-associated bacterial alterations in rectal carcinoma patients revealed by 16S rRNA community profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Maltez Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group. High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4-V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified

  20. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V., E-mail: LHWANG@WUSTL.EDU [Optical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  1. More Refined Experiments with Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Phillippe

    1985-01-01

    Discusses materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained for experiments designed to make a numerical stepwise study of the oxygenation of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other oxygen carriers. (JN)

  2. Effects of Iron Supplementation and Activity on Serum Iron Depletion and Hemoglobin Levels in Female Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooter, G. Rankin; Mowbray, Kathy W.

    1978-01-01

    Research revealed that a four-month basketball training program did not significantly alter serum iron, total iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, and percent saturation levels in female basketball athletes. (JD)

  3. Localised IR spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    CERN Document Server

    Yarrow, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    IR absorption spectroscopy of hemoglobin was performed using an IR optical parametric oscillator laser and a commercial atomic force microscope in a novel experimental arrangement based on the use of a bottom-up excitation alignment. This experimental approach enables detection of protein samples with a resolution that is much higher than that of standard IR spectroscopy. Presented here are AFM based IR absorption spectra of micron sized hemoglobin features

  4. Microbiota and metabolite profiling reveal specific alterations in bacterial community structure and environment in the cystic fibrosis airway during exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Kate B; Alston, Mark; An, Shi-Qi; O'Connell, Oisin J; McCarthy, Yvonne; Swarbreck, David; Febrer, Melanie; Dow, J Maxwell; Plant, Barry J; Ryan, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    Chronic polymicrobial infections of the lung are the foremost cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The composition of the microbial flora of the airway alters considerably during infection, particularly during patient exacerbation. An understanding of which organisms are growing, their environment and their behaviour in the airway is of importance for designing antibiotic treatment regimes and for patient prognosis. To this end, we have analysed sputum samples taken from separate cohorts of CF and non-CF subjects for metabolites and in parallel, and we have examined both isolated DNA and RNA for the presence of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts by high-throughput sequencing of amplicon or cDNA libraries. This analysis revealed that although the population size of all dominant orders of bacteria as measured by DNA- and RNA- based methods are similar, greater discrepancies are seen with less prevalent organisms, some of which we associated with CF for the first time. Additionally, we identified a strong relationship between the abundance of specific anaerobes and fluctuations in several metabolites including lactate and putrescine during patient exacerbation. This study has hence identified organisms whose occurrence within the CF microbiome has been hitherto unreported and has revealed potential metabolic biomarkers for exacerbation.

  5. Microbiota and metabolite profiling reveal specific alterations in bacterial community structure and environment in the cystic fibrosis airway during exacerbation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate B Twomey

    Full Text Available Chronic polymicrobial infections of the lung are the foremost cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. The composition of the microbial flora of the airway alters considerably during infection, particularly during patient exacerbation. An understanding of which organisms are growing, their environment and their behaviour in the airway is of importance for designing antibiotic treatment regimes and for patient prognosis. To this end, we have analysed sputum samples taken from separate cohorts of CF and non-CF subjects for metabolites and in parallel, and we have examined both isolated DNA and RNA for the presence of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts by high-throughput sequencing of amplicon or cDNA libraries. This analysis revealed that although the population size of all dominant orders of bacteria as measured by DNA- and RNA- based methods are similar, greater discrepancies are seen with less prevalent organisms, some of which we associated with CF for the first time. Additionally, we identified a strong relationship between the abundance of specific anaerobes and fluctuations in several metabolites including lactate and putrescine during patient exacerbation. This study has hence identified organisms whose occurrence within the CF microbiome has been hitherto unreported and has revealed potential metabolic biomarkers for exacerbation.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Fragments Released upon Bacterial Contact with the Human Lung Mucosa Alter the Neutrophil Response to Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordo, Julia M.; Arcos, Jesús; Kelley, Holden V.; Diangelo, Lauren; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Youngmin, Ellie; Wewers, Mark D.; Wang, Shu-Hua; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the World Health Organization reported that one person dies of tuberculosis (TB) every 21 s. A host environment that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) finds during its route of infection is the lung mucosa bathing the alveolar space located in the deepest regions of the lungs. We published that human lung mucosa, or alveolar lining fluid (ALF), contains an array of hydrolytic enzymes that can significantly alter the M.tb surface during infection by cleaving off parts of its cell wall. This interaction results in two different outcomes: modifications on the M.tb cell wall surface and release of M.tb cell wall fragments into the environment. Typically, one of the first host immune cells at the site of M.tb infection is the neutrophil. Neutrophils can mount an extracellular and intracellular innate immune response to M.tb during infection. We hypothesized that exposure of neutrophils to ALF-induced M.tb released cell wall fragments would prime neutrophils to control M.tb infection better. Our results show that ALF fragments activate neutrophils leading to an increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative radicals. However, neutrophil exposure to these fragments reduces production of chemoattractants (i.e., interleukin-8), and degranulation, with the subsequent reduction of myeloperoxidase release, and does not induce cytotoxicity. Unexpectedly, these ALF fragment-derived modulations in neutrophil activity do not further, either positively or negatively, contribute to the intracellular control of M.tb growth during infection. However, secreted products from neutrophils primed with ALF fragments are capable of regulating the activity of resting macrophages. These results indicate that ALF-induced M.tb fragments could further contribute to the control of M.tb growth and local killing by resident neutrophils by switching on the total oxidative response and limiting migration of neutrophils to the infection site. PMID:28373877

  7. Insights into Hemoglobin Assembly through in Vivo Mutagenesis of α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L.; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A.; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2012-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO2 subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO2 autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO2 subunits. PMID:22287545

  8. Insights into hemoglobin assembly through in vivo mutagenesis of α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2012-03-30

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO(2) subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO(2) autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO(2) subunits.

  9. [Hemoglobins, XLVIII: the primary structure of hemoglobin of the Indian elephant (Elephas maximus, Proboscidea): beta 2 = Asn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunitzer, G; Jelkmann, W; Stangl, A; Schrank, B; Krombach, C

    1982-07-01

    The primary structure of the hemoglobin of the Indian Elephant (Elephas maximus) is given. The sequence was determined automatically in a sequenator. By homologous comparison with adult human HbA, the alpha-chains differ by 24 exchanges and the beta-chains by 27 exchanges. Furthermore, we report p(O2)50 values with regard to altered contact sites with 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate in Indian elephant hemoglobin. Our findings explain the low p(O2)50 and the reduced interaction with 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate. Elephant hemoglobin has, like that of the Llama, only five phosphate binding sites. In addition, we have made an attempt to relate these results to aspects of respiratory physiology. Some implications of these biochemical and physiological results, concerning the Second Punic War and Hannibal's Alp transition, are given.

  10. Artificially inserting a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Marek's disease virus (MDV) alters expression of nearby MDV genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taejoong; Mays, Jody; Fadly, Aly; Silva, Robert F

    2011-06-01

    Researchers reported that co-cultivating the JM/102W strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV) with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in an REV long terminal repeat (LTR) being inserted into the internal repeat short (IRS) region of JM/102W. When the resulting recombinant virus was serially passed in cell culture, the initial LTR was duplicated and a second LTR spontaneously appeared in the terminal repeat short (TRS) region of the MDV genome. The virus, designated RM1, was significantly attenuated but still induced severe bursal and thymic atrophy (Isfort et al. PNAS 89:991-995). To determine whether the altered phenotype was due solely to the LTR, we cloned the LTR from the RM1 IRS region and inserted it into the IRS region of a very virulent bacterial artificial clone (BAC) of the Md5 strain of MDV, which we designated rMd5-RM1-LTR. During blind passage in duck embryo fibroblast cultures, the initial LTR in the rMd5-RM1-LTR was also duplicated, with LTRs appearing in both IRS and TRS regions of the MDV genome. The inserted LTR sequences and transcripts associated with the MDV open reading frames MDV085, MDV086, SORF2, US1, and US10 were molecularly characterized. The parental Md5 BAC contains a family of transcripts of 3, 2, and 1 kb that all terminate at the end of the US10 gene. The rMd5-RM1-LTR and RM1 viruses both express an additional 4 kb transcript that originates in the LTR and also terminates after US10. Collectively, the data suggest that our engineered rMd5-RM1-LTR virus very closely resembles the RM1 virus in its structure and transcription patterns.

  11. Access to a syllabus of human hemoglobin variants (1996) via the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, R C; Chui, D H; Riemer, C R; Miller, W; Carver, M F; Molchanova, T P; Efremov, G D; Huisman, T H

    1998-03-01

    Information on mutations in human hemoglobin is important in many efforts, including understanding the pathophysiology of hemoglobin diseases, developing therapies, elucidating the dynamics of sequence alterations inhuman populations, and dissecting the details of protein structure/function relationships. Currently, information is available on a large number of mutations and variants, but is distributed among thousands of papers. In an effort to organize this voluminous data set, two Syllabi have been prepared compiling succinct information on human hemoglobin abnormalities. In both of these, each entry provides amino acid and/or DNA sequence alterations, hematological and clinical data, methodology used for characterization, ethnic distribution, and functional properties and stability of the hemoglobin, together with appropriate literature references. A Syllabus of Human Hemoglobin Variants (1996) describes 693 abnormal hemoglobins resulting from alterations in the alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-globin chains, including special abnormalities such as double mutations, hybrid chains, elongated chains, deletions, and insertions. We have converted this resource to an electronic form that is accessible via the World Wide Web at the Globin Gene Server (http://globin.cse.psu.edu). Hyperlinks are provided from each entry in the tables of variants to the corresponding full description. In addition, a simple query interface allows the user to find all entries containing a designated word or phrase. We are in the process of converting A Syllabus of Thalassemia Mutations (1997) to a similar electronic format.

  12. Early Administration of Probiotics Alters Bacterial Colonization and Limits Diet-Induced Gut Dysfunction and Severity of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggers, Richard H.; Siggers, Jayda; Boye, Mette

    2008-01-01

    Following preterm birth, bacterial colonization and interal formula feeding predispose neonates to gut dysfunction and necrotizing enterocilitis (NEC), a serious gastrointestinal inflammatory disease. We hypothesized that administration of probiotics would beneficially influence early bacterial c...... (FORM-P, Bifidobacterium animalis and Lactobacillus: L. acidophilus, L. casei, L. pentosus, L. planterum; (n=13). Clinical NEC scores were reduced (P...

  13. Within-host evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward iron acquisition from hemoglobin in polymicrobial CF infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær;

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens require iron to survive and colonize a human host but their access to free iron is often limited by iron-withholding process where free iron is bound by proteins such as hemoglobin. Although most pathogens have developed tactics to acquire iron from host proteins, little is kn...

  14. Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities ...

  15. Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure of the right side of the heart ( cor pulmonale ) Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Scarring or ... chronic disease Aplastic anemia Bleeding CBC blood test Cor pulmonale Diabetes Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia Erythropoietin test ...

  16. Hemoglobin variant (hemoglobin Aalborg) mimicking interstitial pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panou, Vasiliki; Jensen, Peter-Diedrich Mathias; Pedersen, Jan Freddy; Thomsen, Lars Pilegaard; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin Aalborg is a moderately unstable hemoglobin variant with no affiliation to serious hematological abnormality or major clinical symptoms under normal circumstances. Our index person was a healthy woman of 58, not previously diagnosed with hemoglobinopathy Aalborg, who developed acute respiratory failure after a routine cholecystectomy. Initially she was suspected of idiopathic interstitial lung disease, yet a series of tests uncovered various abnormal physiological parameters and set the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy Aalborg. This led us to examine a group of the index person's relatives known with hemoglobinopathy Aalborg in order to study whether the same physiological abnormalities would be reencountered. They were all subjected to spirometry and body plethysmography, six-minute walking test, pulse oximetry, and arterial blood gas samples before and after the walking test. The entire study population presented the same physiological anomalies: reduction in diffusion capacity, and abnormalities in P(a)O2 and p50 values; the latter could not be presented by the arterial blood gas analyzer; furthermore there was concordance between pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas samples regarding saturation. These data suggest that, based upon the above mentioned anomalies in physiological parameters, the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy Aalborg should be considered.

  17. Hemoglobin Variant (Hemoglobin Aalborg Mimicking Interstitial Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Panou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin Aalborg is a moderately unstable hemoglobin variant with no affiliation to serious hematological abnormality or major clinical symptoms under normal circumstances. Our index person was a healthy woman of 58, not previously diagnosed with hemoglobinopathy Aalborg, who developed acute respiratory failure after a routine cholecystectomy. Initially she was suspected of idiopathic interstitial lung disease, yet a series of tests uncovered various abnormal physiological parameters and set the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy Aalborg. This led us to examine a group of the index person’s relatives known with hemoglobinopathy Aalborg in order to study whether the same physiological abnormalities would be reencountered. They were all subjected to spirometry and body plethysmography, six-minute walking test, pulse oximetry, and arterial blood gas samples before and after the walking test. The entire study population presented the same physiological anomalies: reduction in diffusion capacity, and abnormalities in PaO2 and p50 values; the latter could not be presented by the arterial blood gas analyzer; furthermore there was concordance between pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas samples regarding saturation. These data suggest that, based upon the above mentioned anomalies in physiological parameters, the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy Aalborg should be considered.

  18. Effects of thyroid status on glycated hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Bhattacharjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c can be altered in different conditions. We hypothesize that HbA1c levels may change due to altered thyroid status, possibly due to changes in red blood cell (RBC turnover. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of altered thyroid status on HbA1c levels in individuals without diabetes, with overt hyper- and hypo-thyroidism, and if present, whether such changes in HbA1c are reversed after achieving euthyroid state. Methods: Euglycemic individuals with overt hypo- or hyper-thyroidism were selected. Age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Baseline HbA1c and reticulocyte counts (for estimation of RBC turnover were estimated in all the patients and compared. Thereafter, stable euthyroidism was achieved in a randomly selected subgroup and HbA1c and reticulocyte count was reassessed. HbA1c values and reticulocyte counts were compared with baseline in both the groups. Results: Hb A1c in patients initially selected was found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid group. HbA1c values in hyperthyroid patients were not significantly different from controls. HbA1c reduction and rise in reticulocyte count were significant in hypothyroid group following treatment without significant change in glucose level. Hb A1c did not change significantly following treatment in hyperthyroid group. The reticulocyte count, however, decreased significantly. Conclusion: Baseline HbA1c levels were found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid patients, which reduced significantly after achievement of euthyroidism without any change in glucose levels. Significant baseline or posttreatment change was not observed in hyperthyroid patients. Our study suggests that we should be cautious while interpreting HbA1c data in patients with hypothyroidism.

  19. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  20. Led Astray by Hemoglobin A1c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Chen MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin A1c (A1c is used frequently to diagnose and treat diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is important be aware of factors that may interfere with the accuracy of A1c measurements. This is a case of a rare hemoglobin variant that falsely elevated a nondiabetic patient’s A1c level and led to a misdiagnosis of diabetes. A 67-year-old male presented to endocrine clinic for further management after he was diagnosed with diabetes based on an elevated A1c of 10.7%, which is approximately equivalent to an average blood glucose of 260 mg/dL. Multiple repeat A1c levels remained >10%, but his home fasting and random glucose monitoring ranged from 92 to 130 mg/dL. Hemoglobin electrophoresis and subsequent genetic analysis diagnosed the patient with hemoglobin Wayne, a rare hemoglobin variant. This variant falsely elevates A1c levels when A1c is measured using cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. When the boronate affinity method was applied instead, the patient’s A1c level was actually 4.7%. Though hemoglobin Wayne is clinically silent, this patient was erroneously diagnosed with diabetes and started on an antiglycemic medication. Due to this misdiagnosis, the patient was at risk of escalation in his “diabetes management” and hypoglycemia. Therefore, it is important that providers are aware of factors that may result in hemoglobin A1c inaccuracy including hemoglobin variants.

  1. Determination of Human Hemoglobin Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Atef M M; Ibrahim, Fatma A A; Abd El-Latif, Noha A; Aziz, Samir W; Abdelmottaleb Moussa, Sherif A; Elalfy, Mohsen S

    2015-01-01

    The levels of the inactive hemoglobin (Hb) pigments [such as methemoglobin (metHb), carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) and sulfohemoglobin (SHb)] and the active Hb [in the oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) form] as well as the blood Hb concentration in healthy non pregnant female volunteers were determined using a newly developed multi-component spectrophotometric method. The results of this method revealed values of SHb% in the range (0.0727-0.370%), metHb% (0.43-1.0%), HbCO% (0.4-1.52%) and oxyHb% (97.06-98.62%). Furthermore, the results of this method revealed values of blood Hb concentration in the range (12.608-15.777 g/dL). The method is highly sensitive, accurate and reproducible.

  2. Artifically inserting a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Marek's disease virus (MDV) alters expression of nearby MDV genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) was inserted into the very virulent Marek’s disease virus (MDV) Md5 bacterial artificial chromosome clone. The insertion site was nearly identical to the REV LTR that was naturally inserted into the JM/102W strain of MDV fo...

  3. Nadir Hemoglobin Levels after Discontinuation of Epoetin in Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo, Jose A.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Meyer, Klemens B.; Weiner, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: In hemodialysis patients, both hemoglobin variability and targeting normalization of hemoglobin may have adverse consequences. There are few data on epoetin management in patients achieving high hemoglobin levels.

  4. Ex vivo proteomics of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176 reveal that FabG affects fatty acid composition to alter bacterial growth fitness in the chicken gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Keiko; Murakami, Satoshi; Tachibana, Masato; Kurazono, Hisao; Makino, Sou-Ichi; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Igimi, Shizunobu

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the leading causes of foodborne gastrointestinal illness worldwide. Here we performed ex vivo proteomic analysis of C. jejuni 81-176 in chicken, a main reservoir for human infection. At 0, 1 and 4 weeks post-infection (p.i.) with the GFP-expressing 81-176 strain, inocula were recovered from chicken ceca by cell sorting using flow cytometry. iTRAQ-coupled 2D-LC-MS/MS analyses that detected 55 C. jejuni proteins, among which either 3 (FabG, HydB, CJJ81176_0876) or 7 (MscS, CetB, FlhF, PurH, PglJ, LpxC, Icd) proteins exhibited >1.4-fold-increased expression at 1 or 4 week(s) p.i. compared with those at 0 weeks p.i., respectively. Deletion of the fabG gene clearly decreased the proportion of bacterial unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and chicken colonization. The UFA proportion of the parental strain was not altered when grown at 42 °C. These findings suggest that FabG might play a pivotal role in UFA production, linked to bacterial adaptation in the poultry host. To our knowledge, this is the first example of ex vivo C. jejuni proteomics, in which fatty acid metabolism might affect bacterial adaptation to the chicken host.

  5. A member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides is produced in the upper airway of the chinchilla and its mRNA expression is altered by common viral and bacterial co-pathogens of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivary, Glen; Ray, William C; Bevins, Charles L; Munson, Robert S; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2007-03-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a component of the innate immune system, play a major role in defense of mucosal surfaces against a wide spectrum of microorganisms such as viral and bacterial co-pathogens of the polymicrobial disease otitis media (OM). To further understand the role of AMPs in OM, we cloned a cDNA encoding a cathelicidin homolog (cCRAMP) from upper respiratory tract (URT) mucosae of the chinchilla, the predominant host used to model experimental OM. Recombinant cCRAMP exhibited alpha-helical secondary structure and killed the three main bacterial pathogens of OM. In situ hybridization showed cCRAMP mRNA production in epithelium of the chinchilla Eustachian tube and RT-PCR was used to amplify cCRAMP mRNA from several other tissues of the chinchilla URT. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of chinchilla middle ear epithelial cells (CMEEs) incubated with either viral (influenza A virus, adenovirus, or RSV) or bacterial (nontypeable H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, or S. pneumoniae) pathogens associated with OM demonstrated distinct microbe-specific patterns of altered expression. Collectively, these data showed that viruses and bacteria modulate AMP messages in the URT, which likely contributes to the disease course of OM.

  6. Effects of altered groundwater chemistry upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial attachment during transport within an organically contaminated sandy aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ronald W; Metge, David W; Barber, L B; Aiken, George R

    2010-02-01

    The effects of a dilute (ionic strength=5x10(-3)M) plume of treated sewage, with elevated levels (3.9 mg/L) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial transport through an iron-laden, quartz sand aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) were evaluated using sets of replicate, static minicolumns. Compared with uncontaminated groundwater, the plume chemistry diminished bacterial attachment under mildly acidic (pH 5.0-6.5) in-situ conditions, in spite of the 5-fold increase in ionic strength and substantively enhanced attachment under more alkaline conditions. The effects of the hydrophobic neutral and total fractions of the plume DOC; modest concentrations of fulvic and humic acids (1.5 mg/L); linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) (25 mg/L); Imbentin (200 microg/L), a model nonionic surfactant; sulfate (28 mg/L); and calcium (20 mg/L) varied sharply in response to relatively small changes in pH, although the plume constituents collectively decreased the pH-dependency of bacterial attachment. LAS and other hydrophobic neutrals (collectively representing only approximately 3% of the plume DOC) had a disproportionately large effect upon bacterial attachment, as did the elevated concentrations of sulfate within the plume. The findings further suggest that the roles of organic plume constituents in transport or bacteria through acidic aquifer sediments can be very different than would be predicted from column studies performed at circumneutral pH and that the inorganic constituents within the plume cannot be ignored.

  7. Proteolytic degradation by cathepsin D of glycated hemoglobin from diabetes patients gives rise to hemorphin-7 peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, Delphine; Piot, Jean-Marie; Fruitier-Arnaudin, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    Previous studies showed a significantly reduced level of hemorphins in the serum of diabetes patients. In order to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms responsible for this anomaly, the influence of hemoglobin glycation on hemorphin generation was studied. The glycation of hemoglobin occurs in the blood of diabetes patients and this could modify its enzymatic digestion and the resulting proteolytic products. Several samples of hemoglobin were obtained from the blood of type 1 diabetes patients (n=8) and normal healthy control subjects (n=2). The glycated hemoglobin samples were classified on the basis of their HbA1c values expressed as a percentage of total hemoglobin. Four solutions of glycated hemoglobin characterized by HbA1c values of 6%, 9.1%, 10.7% and 12.1% were treated with cathepsin D and the hemorphins obtained following the proteolysis were compared to controls. It was found that hemorphins were produced whatever the level of glycation of hemoglobin and also that the degree of glycation had no effect on the quantity of hemorphins released. Thus the alteration of hemoglobin does not seem to be the essential reason for the decrease in hemorphin concentrations in the sera of diabetic patients.

  8. Characterization of Drosophila hemoglobin. Evidence for hemoglobin-mediated respiration in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankeln, Thomas; Jaenicke, Viviane; Kiger, Laurent; Dewilde, Sylvia; Ungerechts, Guy; Schmidt, Marc; Urban, Joachim; Marden, Michael C; Moens, Luc; Burmester, Thorsten

    2002-08-09

    In contrast to previous assumptions, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster possesses hemoglobin. This respiratory protein forms a monomer of about 17 kDa that is not exported into the hemolymph. Recombinant Drosophila hemoglobin displays a typical hexacoordinated deoxy spectrum and binds oxygen with an affinity of 0.12 torr. Four different hemoglobin transcripts have been identified, which are generated by two distinct promoters of the hemoglobin (glob1) gene but are identical in their coding regions. Putative binding sites for hypoxia-regulated transcription factors have been identified in the gene. Hemoglobin synthesis in Drosophila is mainly associated with the tracheal system and the fat body. This suggests that oxygen supply in insects may be more complex than thought previously and may depend on hemoglobin-mediated oxygen transport and storage in addition to simple diffusion.

  9. Nanobiotechnology for hemoglobin-based blood substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T M S

    2009-04-01

    Nanobiotechnology is the assembling of biological molecules into nanodimension complexes. This has been used for the preparation of polyhemoglobin formed by the assembling of hemoglobin molecules into a soluble nanodimension complex. New generations of this approach include the nanobiotechnological assembly of hemoglobin, catalase, and superoxide dismutase into a soluble nanodimension complex. This acts as an oxygen carrier and an antioxidant for those conditions with potential for ischemiareperfusion injuries. Another recent novel approach is the assembling of hemoglobin and fibrinogen into a soluble nanodimension polyhemoglobin-fibrinogen complex that acts as an oxygen carrier with platelet-like activity. This is potentially useful in cases of extensive blood loss requiring massive replacement using blood substitutes, resulting in the need for the replacement of platelets and clotting factors. A further step is the preparation of nanodimension artificial red blood cells that contain hemoglobin and all the enzymes present in red blood cells.

  10. Undetectable Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitani, Noriyuki; Taguchi, Akihiko; Sakuragi, Shizu; Matsui, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Shinohara, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    We encountered two cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) with undetectable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) level at diagnosis. Hemolytic anemia improved by administration of prednisolone (PSL) and HbA1C became measurable after response.

  11. Optical Marking of Alcohol Induced Hemoglobin Modification

    CERN Document Server

    Vlokh, R; Moroz, O; Nastishin, Yu; Dudok, K; Dudok, T; Grinchishin, N; Nechiporenko, I; Hul, A

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that conformational modifications of Hb induced by ethanol consumption can be visualized in optical spectra studying oxygenation kinetics of hemoglobin or mixing hemoglobin with Cibacron blue dye. Better dye affinity of blood proteins extracted from alcoholised rats with respect to those from non-alcoholised ones confirms that ethanol and its metabolites induce structural pathologies in blood protein molecules. The detected changes for the case of the posterity of intoxicated animals may be explained as a post-translation modification, as well as a disturbance of the structure and function of tissue cellular gene mechanism for the blood creation. It is established that alcohol intake during first four months leads to the decrease of fractional weight of oxyhemoglobin and to the increase of methemoglobin amount in blood. Further alcohol consumption is accompanied by recovering of the normal level of hemoglobin derivatives in blood. Normalization of the fractional weight of hemoglobin derivati...

  12. Role of Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitoring in Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-25

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2015-0002 Role of Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitoring in Trauma Betty J. Tsuei, MD; Dennis J. Hanseman, PhD...W. Gerlach, USAF, MC U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Center for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills March 2015...August 2012 – August 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitoring in Trauma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-12-2-6B14 5b

  13. Noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring: how accurate is enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Mark J; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Morey, Timothy E

    2013-10-01

    Evaluating the accuracy of medical devices has traditionally been a blend of statistical analyses, at times without contextualizing the clinical application. There have been a number of recent publications on the accuracy of a continuous noninvasive hemoglobin measurement device, the Masimo Radical-7 Pulse Co-oximeter, focusing on the traditional statistical metrics of bias and precision. In this review, which contains material presented at the Innovations and Applications of Monitoring Perfusion, Oxygenation, and Ventilation (IAMPOV) Symposium at Yale University in 2012, we critically investigated these metrics as applied to the new technology, exploring what is required of a noninvasive hemoglobin monitor and whether the conventional statistics adequately answer our questions about clinical accuracy. We discuss the glucose error grid, well known in the glucose monitoring literature, and describe an analogous version for hemoglobin monitoring. This hemoglobin error grid can be used to evaluate the required clinical accuracy (±g/dL) of a hemoglobin measurement device to provide more conclusive evidence on whether to transfuse an individual patient. The important decision to transfuse a patient usually requires both an accurate hemoglobin measurement and a physiologic reason to elect transfusion. It is our opinion that the published accuracy data of the Masimo Radical-7 is not good enough to make the transfusion decision.

  14. Alterations of the phylloepiphytic bacterial community associated with interactions of Escherichia coli O157:H7 during storage of packaged spinach at refrigeration temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Velasco, Gabriela; Davis, Marjorie; Boyer, Renee R; Williams, Robert C; Ponder, Monica A

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of packaging and storage temperature on the spinach phylloepiphytic bacterial community and fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Freshly harvested spinach was rinsed and/or disinfected, packaged and stored under typical retail conditions (4 degrees C) or under temperature abuse conditions (10 degrees C) for a period of 15 days. The final population size of culturable epiphytic bacteria after 15 days of storage was not affected by the temperature of storage or the presence of E. coli O157:H7. However, analysis of the bacterial community using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16s rDNA revealed changes with time of storage and the presence of E. coli O157:H7. Excision and sequencing of prominent DGGE bands identified that the majority of sequences belonged to the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Alphaprotebacteria. After 10 days of storage at 4 degrees C or 10 degrees C the population became more dominated by psychrotrophic bacteria. Removal of the epiphytic bacteria resulted in significant increases in numbers of E coli O157:H7 at 10 degrees C and was associated with decreased expression of E. coli O157:H7 virulence (stxA, curli, eaeA) and stress response (rpoS, sodB) genes. In conclusion, storage temperature and time of storage of packaged spinach affected the diversity of the epiphytic spinach microbiota which influenced the growth, establishment, physiology and potentially virulence of E. coli O157:H7.

  15. New lactic acid bacterial strains from traditional Mongolian fermented milk products have altered adhesion to porcine gastric mucin depending on the carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Seishi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Moriya, Naoko; Takenaka, Akio; Suzuki, Chise

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of lactic acid bacteria to the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is a major property of probiotics. Here, we examined the ability of 21 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented milk products in Mongolia to adhere to porcine gastric mucin in vitro. Higher attachment was observed with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains 6-8 and 8-1 than with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (positive control). Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain 7-1 adhered to mucin as effectively as did strain GG. Heat inactivation decreased the adhesive ability of strains 6-8 and 8-1 but did not affect strain 7-1. The adhesion of strains 6-8, 7-1 and 8-1 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with periodate and trypsin, indicating that proteinaceous and carbohydrate-like cell surface compounds are involved in the adhesion of these strains. The adhesion of strain 7-1 was affected by the type of carbohydrate present in the growth medium, being higher with fructose than with lactose, galactose or xylose as the carbon source. The sugar content of 7-1 cells grown on various carbohydrates was negatively correlated with its adhesive ability. We provide new probiotic candidate strains and new information regarding carbohydrate preference that influences lactic acid bacterial adhesion to mucin.

  16. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. 864.7470 Section... Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A glycosylated hemoglobin assay is a device used to measure the glycosylated hemoglobins (A1a, A1b, and A1c) in a patient's blood by a column...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7400 - Hemoglobin A2 assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin A2 assay. 864.7400 Section 864.7400...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7400 Hemoglobin A2 assay. (a) Identification. A hemoglobin A2 assay is a device used to determine the hemoglobin A2...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  20. 21 CFR 864.5620 - Automated hemoglobin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated hemoglobin system. 864.5620 Section 864....5620 Automated hemoglobin system. (a) Identification. An automated hemoglobin system is a fully... hemoglobin content of human blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  1. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  2. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470... Hemoglobin immunological test system. (a) Indentification. A hemoglobin immunological test system is a device... hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) in blood, urine, plasma, or other body...

  3. Tangential flow filtration of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Andre F; Sun, Guoyong; Harris, David R

    2009-01-01

    Bovine and human hemoglobin (bHb and hHb, respectively) was purified from bovine and human red blood cells via tangential flow filtration (TFF) in four successive stages. TFF is a fast and simple method to purify Hb from RBCs using filtration through hollow fiber (HF) membranes. Most of the Hb was retained in stage III (100 kDa HF membrane) and displayed methemoglobin levels less than 1%, yielding final concentrations of 318 and 300 mg/mL for bHb and hHb, respectively. Purified Hb exhibited much lower endotoxin levels than their respective RBCs. The purity of Hb was initially assessed via SDS-PAGE, and showed tiny impurity bands for the stage III retentate. The oxygen affinity (P(50)) and cooperativity coefficient (n) were regressed from the measured oxygen-RBC/Hb equilibrium curves of RBCs and purified Hb. These results suggest that TFF yielded oxygen affinities of bHb and hHb that are comparable to values in the literature. LC-MS was used to measure the molecular weight of the alpha (alpha) and beta (beta) globin chains of purified Hb. No impurity peaks were present in the HPLC chromatograms of purified Hb. The mass of the molecular ions corresponding to the alpha and beta globin chains agreed well with the calculated theoretical mass of the alpha- and beta- globin chains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HPLC-grade Hb can be generated via TFF. In general, this method can be more broadly applied to purify Hb from any source of RBCs. This work is significant, since it outlines a simple method for generating Hb for synthesis and/or formulation of Hb-based oxygen carriers.

  4. Myeloid Cell Sirtuin-1 Expression Does Not Alter Host Immune Responses to Gram-Negative Endotoxemia or Gram-Positive Bacterial Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Marsh, Brenda J.; Timmer, Anjuli M.; Lin, Ann E.; Zainabadi, Kayvan; Czopik, Agnieszka; Guarente, Leonard; Nizet, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The role of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) in innate immunity, and in particular the influence of SIRT1 on antimicrobial defense against infection, has yet to be reported but is important to define since SIRT1 inhibitors are being investigated as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer, Huntington’s disease, and autoimmune diseases. Given the therapeutic potential of SIRT1 suppression, we sought to characterize the role of SIRT1 in host defense. Utilizing both pharmacologic methods and a genetic knockout, we demonstrate that SIRT1 expression has little influence on macrophage and neutrophil antimicrobial functions. Myeloid SIRT1 expression does not change mortality in gram-negative toxin-induced shock or gram-positive bacteremia, suggesting that therapeutic suppression of SIRT1 may be done safely without suppression of myeloid cell-specific immune responses to severe bacterial infections. PMID:24386389

  5. Myeloid cell sirtuin-1 expression does not alter host immune responses to Gram-negative endotoxemia or Gram-positive bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Crotty Alexander

    Full Text Available The role of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1 in innate immunity, and in particular the influence of SIRT1 on antimicrobial defense against infection, has yet to be reported but is important to define since SIRT1 inhibitors are being investigated as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer, Huntington's disease, and autoimmune diseases. Given the therapeutic potential of SIRT1 suppression, we sought to characterize the role of SIRT1 in host defense. Utilizing both pharmacologic methods and a genetic knockout, we demonstrate that SIRT1 expression has little influence on macrophage and neutrophil antimicrobial functions. Myeloid SIRT1 expression does not change mortality in gram-negative toxin-induced shock or gram-positive bacteremia, suggesting that therapeutic suppression of SIRT1 may be done safely without suppression of myeloid cell-specific immune responses to severe bacterial infections.

  6. Polyethylene Glycol Camouflaged Earthworm Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moges, Selamawit; Nacharaju, Parimala; Roche, Camille; Dantsker, David; Palmer, Andre; Friedman, Joel M.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 21 million components of blood and whole blood and transfused annually in the United States, while on average only 13.6 million units of blood are donated. As the demand for Red Blood Cells (RBCs) continues to increase due to the aging population, this deficit will be more significant. Despite decades of research to develop hemoglobin (Hb) based oxygen (O2) carriers (HBOCs) as RBC substitutes, there are no products approved for clinical use. Lumbricus terrestris erythrocruorin (LtEc) is the large acellular O2 carrying protein complex found in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. LtEc is an extremely stable protein complex, resistant to autoxidation, and capable of transporting O2 to tissue when transfused into mammals. These characteristics render LtEc a promising candidate for the development of the next generation HBOCs. LtEc has a short half-life in circulation, limiting its application as a bridge over days, until blood became available. Conjugation with polyethylene glycol (PEG-LtEc) can extend LtEc circulation time. This study explores PEG-LtEc pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. To study PEG-LtEc pharmacokinetics, hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber were subjected to a 40% exchange transfusion with 10 g/dL PEG-LtEc or LtEc and followed for 48 hours. To study the vascular response of PEG-LtEc, hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber received multiple infusions of 10 g/dL PEG-LtEc or LtEc solution to increase plasma LtEc concentration to 0.5, then 1.0, and 1.5 g/dL, while monitoring the animals’ systemic and microcirculatory parameters. Results confirm that PEGylation of LtEc increases its circulation time, extending the half-life to 70 hours, 4 times longer than that of unPEGylated LtEc. However, PEGylation increased the rate of LtEc oxidation in vivo. Vascular analysis verified that PEG-LtEc showed the absence of microvascular vasoconstriction or systemic hypertension. The molecular size of PEG-LtEc did not change the

  7. Multispectroscopic and calorimetric studies on the binding of the food colorant tartrazine with human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-11-15

    Interaction of the food colorant tartrazine with human hemoglobin was studied using multispectroscopic and microcalorimetric techniques to gain insights into the binding mechanism and thereby the toxicity aspects. Hemoglobin spectrum showed hypochromic changes in the presence of tartrazine. Quenching of the fluorescence of hemoglobin occurred and the quenching mechanism was through a static mode as revealed from temperature dependent and time-resolved fluorescence studies. According to the FRET theory the distance between β-Trp37 of hemoglobin and bound tartrazine was evaluated to be 3.44nm. Synchronous fluorescence studies showed that tartrazine binding led to alteration of the microenvironment around the tryptophans more in comparison to tyrosines. 3D fluorescence and FTIR data provided evidence for conformational changes in the protein on binding. Circular dichroism studies revealed that the binding led to significant loss in the helicity of hemoglobin. The esterase activity assay further complemented the circular dichroism data. Microcalorimetric study using isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the binding to be exothermic and driven largely by positive entropic contribution. Dissection of the Gibbs energy change proposed the protein-dye complexation to be dominated by non-polyelectrolytic forces. Negative heat capacity change also corroborated the involvement of hydrophobic forces in the binding process.

  8. Therapeutic Depletion of Iron Stores Is Not Associated with a Reduced Hemoglobin Mass in a Hemochromatosis Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Nina; Pottgiesser, Torben; Birkner, Philipp; Deibert, Peter; Ahlgrim, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hereditary hemochromatosis features a dysregulated iron absorption leading to iron overload and organ damage. The regulation of total hemoglobin mass during depletion of iron deposits by therapeutic phlebotomy has not been studied. Case Presentation The initial ferritin level of the 52-year-old male subject was 1,276 μg/l. Despite successful depletion of iron stores (ferritinmin: 53 μg/l) through phlebotomies, total hemoglobin mass stabilized at the pretherapy level. However, regeneration of total hemoglobin mass was accelerated (up to 10.8 g/day). Conclusion In this hemochromatosis patient, the total hemoglobin mass was not altered in the long term, but regeneration was accelerated, possibly due to elevated body iron content. PMID:27721733

  9. Hemoglobin oxidative stress in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rovere, F; Granata, A; Broccio, M; Zirilli, A; Broccio, G

    1995-01-01

    The role played by free radicals in carcinogenesis and their relationships with antioxidant pool and cancer have already been shown. Free radicals induce increased membrane permeability through membrane lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and histamine release from mast cells. Free radicals also cause oxyhemoglobin oxidative stress which increases methemoglobin and hemichromes. For this reason, we studied the in vitro formation of methemoglobin at 0' and 90', dosed following the HPLC method, after oxidative stress of blood by means of acetylphenylhydrazine in 40 subjects with cancer and 40 healthy donors. The results showed that methemoglobin formation was highly significant in tumors as compared to controls (P < 0.0001). The statistical analyses we carried out showed that metHb formation is not affected by age, sex, smoking habit, red blood cell number, Hb, Ht or tumor staging. This makes us believe that free radicals alter erythrocyte membrane permeability and predenaturate oxyhemoglobin so that erythrocyte membrane becomes more susceptible to new oxidative stress. This caused the abnormal response we found. Our results clearly underline the role played by free radicals in tumorous disease and provide a successful and easy method to detect early, even in a pre-clinical stage, the presence of tumorous alterations in the human body.

  10. Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of a very virulent Marek's disease virus alters its pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Jody K; Silva, Robert F; Kim, Taejoong; Fadly, Aly

    2012-01-01

    Co-cultivation of the JM/102W strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV) with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in the generation of a recombinant MDV containing the REV long terminal repeat (LTR) named the RM1 strain of MDV, a strain that was highly attenuated for oncogenicity but induced severe bursal and thymic atrophy. We hypothesize that the phenotypic changes were solely due to the LTR insertion. Furthermore, we hypothesize that insertion of REV LTR into an analogous location in a different MDV would result in a similar phenotypic change. To test these hypotheses, we inserted the REV LTR into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of a very virulent strain of MDV, Md5, and designated the virus rMd5-RM1-LTR. The rMd5-RM1-LTR virus and the rMd5 virus were passaged in duck embryo fibroblast cells for up to 40 passages before pathogenicity studies. Susceptible chickens were inoculated intra-abdominally at hatch with the viruses rMd5-RM1-LTR, rMd5 BAC parental virus, wild-type strain Md5, or strain RM1 of MDV. The rMd5-RM1-LTR virus was attenuated at cell culture passage 40, whereas the rMd5 BAC without RM1 LTR retained its pathogenicity at cell culture passage 40. Using polymerase chain analysis, the RM1 LTR insert was detected in MDV isolated from buffy coat cells collected from chickens inoculated with rMd5-RM1-LTR, but only at 1 week post inoculation. The data suggest that the presence of the RM1 LTR insert within MDV genome for 1 week post inoculation with virus at hatch is sufficient to cause a reduction in pathogenicity of strain Md5 of MDV.

  11. Altered protozoan and bacterial communities and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in monensin-treated wastewater from a dairy lagoon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbarao V Ravva

    Full Text Available Surviving predation is a fitness trait of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EcO157 that provides ample time for the pathogen to be transported from reservoirs (e.g. dairies and feedlots to farm produce grown in proximity. Ionophore dietary supplements that inhibit rumen protozoa may provide such a selective advantage for EcO157 to proliferate in lagoons as the pathogen is released along with the undigested supplement as manure washings. This study evaluated the fate of an outbreak strain of EcO157, protozoan and bacterial communities in wastewater treated with monensin. Although total protozoa and native bacteria were unaffected by monensin, the time for 90% decrease in EcO157 increased from 0.8 to 5.1 days. 18S and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of wastewater samples revealed that monensin eliminated almost all colpodean and oligohymenophorean ciliates, probably facilitating the extended survival of EcO157. Total protozoan numbers remained high in treated wastewater as monensin enriched 94% of protozoan sequences undetected with untreated wastewater. Monensin stimulated 30-fold increases in Cyrtohymena citrina, a spirotrichean ciliate, and also biflagellate bicosoecids and cercozoans. Sequences of gram-negative Proteobacteria increased from 1% to 46% with monensin, but gram-positive Firmicutes decreased from 93% to 46%. It is noteworthy that EcO157 numbers increased significantly (P<0.01 in Sonneborn medium containing monensin, probably due to monensin-inhibited growth of Vorticella microstoma (P<0.05, a ciliate isolated from wastewater. We conclude that dietary monensin inhibits ciliate protozoa that feed on EcO157. Feed supplements or other methods that enrich these protozoa in cattle manure could be a novel strategy to control the environmental dissemination of EcO157 from dairies to produce production environments.

  12. Altered protozoan and bacterial communities and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in monensin-treated wastewater from a dairy lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravva, Subbarao V; Sarreal, Chester Z; Mandrell, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Surviving predation is a fitness trait of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EcO157) that provides ample time for the pathogen to be transported from reservoirs (e.g. dairies and feedlots) to farm produce grown in proximity. Ionophore dietary supplements that inhibit rumen protozoa may provide such a selective advantage for EcO157 to proliferate in lagoons as the pathogen is released along with the undigested supplement as manure washings. This study evaluated the fate of an outbreak strain of EcO157, protozoan and bacterial communities in wastewater treated with monensin. Although total protozoa and native bacteria were unaffected by monensin, the time for 90% decrease in EcO157 increased from 0.8 to 5.1 days. 18S and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of wastewater samples revealed that monensin eliminated almost all colpodean and oligohymenophorean ciliates, probably facilitating the extended survival of EcO157. Total protozoan numbers remained high in treated wastewater as monensin enriched 94% of protozoan sequences undetected with untreated wastewater. Monensin stimulated 30-fold increases in Cyrtohymena citrina, a spirotrichean ciliate, and also biflagellate bicosoecids and cercozoans. Sequences of gram-negative Proteobacteria increased from 1% to 46% with monensin, but gram-positive Firmicutes decreased from 93% to 46%. It is noteworthy that EcO157 numbers increased significantly (PVorticella microstoma (P<0.05), a ciliate isolated from wastewater. We conclude that dietary monensin inhibits ciliate protozoa that feed on EcO157. Feed supplements or other methods that enrich these protozoa in cattle manure could be a novel strategy to control the environmental dissemination of EcO157 from dairies to produce production environments.

  13. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Liang, Zhong; Agrahari, Garima; Lee, Shaun W; Donahue, Deborah L; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-01-01

    The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS)/responder (CovR) two-component operon (CovRS) regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS) genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448), containing wild-type (WT) CovRS (5448/CovR+S+), or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  14. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Mayfield

    Full Text Available The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS/responder (CovR two-component operon (CovRS regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448, containing wild-type (WT CovRS (5448/CovR+S+, or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  15. Comparative Plasma Protein Profiling of Hemoglobin H Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonlak Leecharoenkiat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available HbH and HbH-constant spring (HbH-CS are the most common forms of α-thalassemia detected in the Thai population. The accumulation of excess β globin chains in these diseases results in increased red cell hemolysis, and patients with HbH-CS normally have a more severe clinical presentation than patients with HbH disease. This study aimed to detect alterations in the expression of plasma proteins of HbH and HbH-CS patients as compared to normal plasma. Platelet poor plasma was separated from HbH and HbH-CS and normal subjects and differential plasma proteins were detected using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified using LC/MS/MS. A total of 14 differentially expressed proteins were detected of which 5 proteins were upregulated and 9 were downregulated. Most of the differentially expressed proteins are liver secreted proteins involved in hemolysis, oxidative stress response, and hemoglobin degradation. Seven proteins were found to be differentially expressed between HbH and HbH-CS. Levels of haptoglobin, a hemoglobin scavenging protein, were significantly increased in HbH patients as compared to HbH-CS patients. The identification of differentially expressed proteins may lead to a better understanding of the biological events underlying the clinical presentation of HbH and HbH-CS patients and can have application as hemolytic markers or severity predictors.

  16. Nitrosyl hemoglobins: EPR above 80 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wajnberg, E.; Bemski, G.; El-Jaick, L.J.; Alves, O.C.

    1995-03-01

    The EPR spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin and myoglobin in different conditions (native, denatured and lyophilized), as well as of hematin-NO were obtained in the temperature range of 80 K-280 K. There is a substantial and reversible.decrease of the areas of the EPR spectra of all the hemoglobin samples above 150 K. The interpretation of the results implies the existence of two conformational states in thermal equilibrium only one of which is EPR detectable. Thermodynamical parameters are determined for the hexa and penta-coordinated cases. (author). 25 refs, 3 figs.

  17. Mutations in the EDR1 Gene Alter the Response of Arabidopsis thaliana to Phytophthora infestans and the Bacterial PAMPs flg22 and elf18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Katrin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Naumann, Kai; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Weigel, Detlef; Scheel, Dierk; Rosahl, Sabine; Westphal, Lore

    2015-02-01

    Mechanistically, nonhost resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against the oomycete Phytophthora infestans is not well understood. Besides PEN2 and PEN3, which contribute to penetration resistance, no further components have been identified so far. In an ethylmethane sulphonate-mutant screen, we mutagenized pen2-1 and screened for mutants with an altered response to infection by P. infestans. One of the mutants obtained, enhanced response to Phytophthora infestans6 (erp6), was analyzed. Whole-genome sequencing of erp6 revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism in the coding region of the kinase domain of At1g08720, which encodes the putative MAPKKK ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1). We demonstrate that three independent lines with knock-out alleles of edr1 mount an enhanced response to P. infestans inoculation, mediated by increased salicylic acid signaling and callose deposition. Moreover, we show that the single amino acid substitution in erp6 causes the loss of in vitro autophosphorylation activity of EDR1. Furthermore, growth inhibition experiments suggest a so-far-unknown involvement of EDR1 in the response to the pathogen-associated molecular patterns flg22 and elf18. We conclude that EDR1 contributes to the defense response of A. thaliana against P. infestans. Our data position EDR1 as a negative regulator in postinvasive nonhost resistance.

  18. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Gardner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs. Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry.

  19. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hemoglobin A1c test to determine if your child's diabetes management plan needs to be adjusted. Typically the ... the risk of developing long-term complications of diabetes, which can include ... needed for this test. Having your child wear a T-shirt or short-sleeved shirt ...

  20. Insulin-induced lipid binding to hemoglobin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomasevic, N; Klappe, K; Hoekstra, D; Niketic, [No Value; Nikolic, M.

    2003-01-01

    Under hypoglycemic conditions, concomitant hyperinsulinism causes an apparent modification of hemoglobin (Hb) which is manifested by its a aggregation (Niketic et al.. Clin. Chim. Acia 197 (1991) 47). In the present work the causes and mechanisms underlying this Hb modification were Studied. Hemoglo

  1. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrates at high altitude are subjected to hypoxic conditions that challenge aerobic metabolism. O2 transport from the respiratory surfaces to tissues requires matching between the O2 loading and unloading tensions and theO2-affinity of blood, which is an integrated function of hemoglobin......, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude....

  2. Kadar Hemoglobin dan Kecerdasan Intelektual Anak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Kusmiyati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kualitas sumber daya manusia dipengaruhi oleh inteligensi anak. Skor kecerdasan intelektual yang tidak menetap pada usia tertentu dapat berubah karena faktor genetik, gizi, dan lingkungan. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui hubungan kadar hemoglobin dengan kecerdasan intelektual anak. Penelitian observasional dengan desain potong lintang ini dilakukan pada populasi siswa kelas VI Sekolah Dasar Negeri Giwangan Yogyakarta, tahun 2013. Penarikan sampel dilakukan dengan metode simple random sampling terhadap 37 sampel siswa. Instrumen untuk mengukur kecerdasan intelektual dengan Cultural Fair Intelligence Quotient Test yang dirancang untuk meminimalkan pengaruh kultural dengan memperhatikan prosedur evaluasi, instruksi, konten isi, dan respons peserta. Tes dilakukan oleh Biro Psikologi Universitas Ahmad Dahlan Yogyakarta, kadar hemoglobin diukur menggunakan Portable Hemoglobin Digital Analyzer Easy Touch secara digital.Variabel luar indeks massa tubuh diukur langsung menggunakan parameter tinggi badan dan berat badan. Analisis menggunakan uji regresi linier. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan indeks massa tubuh tidak berhubungan dengan kecerdasan intelektual (nilai p = 0,052. Anemia berhubungan cukup dengan kecerdasan anak (r = 0,491 dan berpola positif, semakin tinggi kadar hemoglobin semakin tinggi kecerdasan intelektual anak. Nilai koefisien determinasi 0,241 menerangkan bahwa 24,1% variasi anemia cukup baik untuk menjelaskan variabel kecerdasan intelektual. Ada hubungan antara kadar hemoglobin dengan kecerdasan intelektual (nilai p = 0,002. Quality of human resources is influenced by the child’s intelligent. Intelligence Quotient (IQ score will not settle at a certain age and can change due to genetic factors, nutrition, and the environment. The objective is known relationship of anemia with IQ to child. Method of observational study with cross sectional design. Population are students of class VI elementary school of Giwangan Yogyakarta in

  3. Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S- ... Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S- ...

  4. Phenotypic expression of hemoglobins A₂, E and F in various hemoglobin E related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-ung, Nattaya; Srivorakun, Hataichanok; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Yamsri, Supawadee; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Supan

    2012-01-15

    Study on the phenotypic expression of hemoglobin (Hb) A(2) and Hb E in Hb E disorders has been difficult due to the co-separation of Hb A(2) and Hb E in most Hb analysis assays. Because these two Hbs are separated on capillary electrophoresis, we studied phenotypic expression of Hbs A(2), E and F in various Hb E disorders using this system. This was done on 362 subjects with several Hb E disorders including heterozygous Hb E, homozygous Hb E, β-thalassemia/Hb E, δβ-thalassemia/Hb E, and Hb Lepore/Hb E and those of these disorders with several forms of α-thalassemia. Normal controls showed Hb A(2) of 2.7 ± 0.3%. Heterozygous Hb E and homozygous Hb E had elevated Hb A(2) i.e. 3.8 ± 0.3% and 4.8 ± 0.5%, respectively. Further elevations were observed for β(0)-thalassemia/Hb E (6.1 ± 1.9%) and β(+)-thalassemia/Hb E (7.1 ± 1.2%). Interestingly, no elevation of Hb A(2) was found in the δβ-thalassemia/Hb E, and Hb Lepore/Hb E (2.3 ± 0.3%) but higher Hb F levels were noted which could be useful diagnostic markers. The levels of Hb E were variable. Co-inheritance of these Hb E disorders with α-thalassemia were associated with lower outputs of Hb E and Hb F but the levels of Hb A(2) were not altered. Different phenotypic expression of Hb A(2), Hb E and Hb F could help in differential diagnosis of these Hb E related disorders commonly encountered in the regions where access to molecular techniques is limited.

  5. Alpha chain hemoglobins with electrophoretic mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcilene Rezende Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize alpha-chain variant hemoglobins with electric mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program. METHODS: βS allele and alpha-thalassemia deletions were investigated in 14 children who had undefined hemoglobin at birth and an electrophoretic profile similar to that of hemoglobin S when they were six months old. Gene sequencing and restriction enzymes (DdeI, BsaJI, NlaIV, Bsu36I and TaqI were used to identify hemoglobins. Clinical and hematological data were obtained from children who attended scheduled medical visits. RESULTS: The following alpha chain variants were found: seven children with hemoglobin Hasharon [alpha2 47(CE5 Asp>His, HbA2:c.142G>C], all associated with alpha-thalassemia, five with hemoglobin Ottawa [alpha1 15(A13 Gly>Arg, HBA1:c.46G>C], one with hemoglobin St Luke's [alpha1 95(G2 Pro>Arg, HBA1:c.287C>G] and another one with hemoglobin Etobicoke [alpha212 84(F5 Ser>Arg, HBA212:c.255C>G]. Two associations with hemoglobin S were found: one with hemoglobin Ottawa and one with hemoglobin St Luke's. The mutation underlying hemoglobin Etobicoke was located in a hybrid α212 allele in one child. There was no evidence of clinically relevant hemoglobins detected in this study. CONCLUSION: Apparently these are the first cases of hemoglobin Ottawa, St Luke's, Etobicoke and the α212 gene described in Brazil. The hemoglobins detected in this study may lead to false diagnosis of sickle cell trait or sickle cell disease when only isoelectric focusing is used in neonatal screening. Additional tests are necessary for the correct identification of hemoglobin variants.

  6. A new hemoglobin gene from soybean: a role for hemoglobin in all plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, C R; Jensen, E O; LLewellyn, D J;

    1996-01-01

    indicate that this new gene is a nonsymbiotic legume hemoglobin. The finding of this gene in legumes and similar genes in other species strengthens our previous suggestion that genomes of all plants contain hemoglobin genes. The specialized leghemoglobin gene family may have arisen from a preexisting......We have isolated a new hemoglobin gene from soybean. It is expressed in cotyledons, stems of seedlings, roots, young leaves, and in some cells in the nodules that are associated with the nitrogen-fixing Bradyrhizobium symbiont. This contrasts with the expression of the leghemoglobins, which...... are active only in the infected cells of the nodules. The deduced protein sequence of the new gene shows only 58% similarity to one of the soybean leghemoglobins, but 85-87% similarity to hemoglobins from the nonlegumes Parasponia, Casuarina, and barley. The pattern of expression and the gene sequence...

  7. Truncated hemoglobins in actinorhizal nodules of Datisca glomerata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlowski, K.; Jacobsen, K.R.; Alloisio, N.; Denison, R.F.; Klein, M.; Tjepkema, J.D.; Winzer, T.; Sirrenberg, A.; Guan, C.; Berry, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Three types of hemoglobins exist in higher plants, symbiotic, non-symbiotic, and truncated hemoglobins. Symbiotic (class II) hemoglobins play a role in oxygen supply to intracellular nitrogen-fixing symbionts in legume root nodules, and in one case ( Parasponia Sp.), a non-symbiotic (class I) hemogl

  8. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  9. Lyophilized bovine hemoglobin as a possible reference material for the determination of hemoglobin derivatives in human blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, BHA; Buursma, A; Ernst, RAJ; Maas, AHJ; Zijlstra, WG

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the suitability of a lyophilized bovine hemoglobin (LBH) preparation containing various fractions of oxyhemoglobin (O(2)Hb), carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), and methemoglobin (MetHb) for quality assessment in multicomponent analysis (MCA) of hemoglobin derivatives. It was demonstrated that

  10. Bioimaging techniques for subcellular localization of plant hemoglobins and measurement of hemoglobin-dependent nitric oxide scavenging in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebelstrup, Kim H; Østergaard-Jensen, Erik; Hill, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    Plant hemoglobins are ubiquitous in all plant families. They are expressed at low levels in specific tissues. Several studies have established that plant hemoglobins are scavengers of nitric oxide (NO) and that varying the endogenous level of hemoglobin in plant cells negatively modulates bioactivity of NO generated under hypoxic conditions or during cellular signaling. Earlier methods for determination of hemoglobin-dependent scavenging in planta were based on measuring activity in whole plants or organs. Plant hemoglobins do not contain specific organelle localization signals; however, earlier reports on plant hemoglobin have demonstrated either cytosolic or nuclear localization, depending on the method or cell type investigated. We have developed two bioimaging techniques: one for visualization of hemoglobin-catalyzed scavenging of NO in specific cells and another for visualization of subcellular localization of green fluorescent protein-tagged plant hemoglobins in transformed Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

  11. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues > Conditions > Sexually Transmitted > Bacterial Vaginosis Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bacterial Vaginosis Page Content Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in sexually active teenaged girls . It appears to be caused by ...

  12. Hemoglobin expression in rat experimental granulation tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miretta Tommila; Christoffer Stark; Anne Jokilammi; Ville Peltonen; Risto Penttinen; Erika Ekholm

    2011-01-01

    The general opinion that hemoglobin is only a carrier protein for oxygen and carbon dioxide has been challenged by several recent studies showing hemoglobin expression in other cells than those of the erythroid series, for example, in macrophages. We discovered β-globin expression in rat experimental granulation tissue induced by subcutaneously implanted cellulose sponges. Closer investigation revealed also α-globin expression. The first peak of the biphasic globin expression noticed during granulation tissue formation correlated with the invasion of monocytes/macrophages, whereas the second one seemed to be connected to the appearance of hematopoietic progenitors. Data presented in this study indicate globin expression both in macrophages and in immature erythroid cells as validated by erythroid-specific markers.

  13. Insulin-induced lipid binding to hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA NIKETIC

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Under hypoglycemic conditions, concomitant hyperinsulinism causes an apparent modification of hemoglobin (Hb which is manifested by its aggregation (Niketi} et al., Clin. Chim. Acta 197 (1991 47. In the present work the causes and mechanisms underlying this Hb modification were studied. Hemoglobin isolated from normal erythrocytes incubated with insulin was analyzed by applying 31P-spectrometry and lipid extraction and analysis. To study the dynamics of the plasma membrane during hyperinsulinism, a fluorescent lipid-analog was applied. In the presence of insulin, phosphatidylserine (PS, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and cholesterol were found to bind to Hb. Lipid binding resulted in Hb aggregation, a condition that can be reproduced when phospholipids are incubated with Hb in vitro. Using a fluorescent lipid-analog, it was also shown that exposing erythrocytes to supraphysiological concentrations of insulin in vitro resulted in the internalization of lipids. The results presented in this work may have relevance to cases of diabetes mellitus and hypoglycemia.

  14. [Abnormal hemoglobins in Negroid Ecuadorian populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, N O; Guevara Espinoza, A; Guderian, R H

    1989-02-01

    The prevalence of hemoglobinopathies was determined in the black race located in two distinct geographical areas in Ecuador; in the coastal province of Esmeraldas, particularly the Santiago basin (Rio Cayapas and Rio Onzoles) and in the province of Imbabura, particularly in the intermoutain valley, Valle de Chota. A total of 2038 blood samples were analyzed, 1734 in Esmeraldas and 304 in Inbabura, of which 23.2% (473 individuals) were found to be carriers of abnormal hemoglobins, 25.4% (441) in Esmeraldas and 10.5% (32) in Imbabura. The abnormal hemoglobins found in Esmeraldas were Hb AS (19.2%), Hb AC (5.0%), Hb SS (0.6%) and Hb SC (0.5%) while in Imbabura only Hb AS (9.5%) and Hb AC (0.9%) were found. The factors that could influence the difference in prevalence found in the two geographical areas are discussed.

  15. Free heme and sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunova, Veselina V.

    This work investigates further the mechanism of one of the most interesting of the protein self-assembly systems---the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and the role of free heme in it. Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is the primary event in the pathology of a chronic hemolytic condition called sickle cell anemia with complex pathogenesis, unexplained variability and symptomatic treatment. Auto-oxidation develops in hemoglobin solutions exposed to room temperature and causes release of ferriheme. The composition of such solutions is investigated by mass spectrometry. Heme dimers whose amount corresponds to the initial amounts of heme released from the protein are followed. Differences in the dimer peak height are established for hemoglobin variants A, S and C and depending on the exposure duration. The effects of free heme on polymerization kinetics are studied. Growth rates and two characteristic parameters of nucleation are measured for stored Hb S. After dialysis of polymerizing solutions, no spherulites are detected at moderately high supersaturation and prolonged exposure times. The addition of 0.16-0.26 mM amounts of heme to dialyzed solutions leads to restoration of polymerization. The measured kinetic parameters have higher values compared to the ones before dialysis. The amount of heme in non-dialyzed aged solution is characterized using spectrophotometry. Three methods are used: difference in absorbance of dialyzed and non-dialyzed solutions, characteristic absorbance of heme-albumin complex and absorbance of non-dialyzed solutions with added potassium cyanide. The various approaches suggest the presence of 0.12 to 0.18 mM of free ferriheme in such solutions. Open questions are whether the same amounts of free heme are present in vivo and whether the same mechanism operates intracellulary. If the answer to those questions is positive, then removal of free heme from erythrocytes can influence their readiness to sickle.

  16. Serum ferritin levels in hemoglobin H disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanello, R; Melis, M A; Paglietti, E; Cornacchia, G; de Virgiliis, S; Cao, A

    1983-01-01

    This study shows that hemoglobin H disease patients aged between 0.5 and 44 years, usually (27 out of 30) have normal serum ferritin levels according to age. This reconfirms that in this disease there are usually normal iron stores. However, in a few patients (3 out of 30) increased levels were found. This may be due to inappropriate iron medication, transfusions or associated idiopathic hereditary hemocromatosis gene.

  17. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated Polymers

  18. Hemoglobin profiles of siblings of thalassemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Riza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies are the most common inherited disorders in many areas of the world, including South East Asia. The siblings of thalassemia major is a group of high risk to carry the gene of thalassemia. Determining the carrier is useful for early treatment planning and prevention to the next child. Objective To determine carrier status among siblings of thalassemia patients using a capillary electrophoresis system. Methods A cross-sectional study on the siblings of thalassemia major patients was performed from January 2011 to February 2012 at Dr. Moewardi Hospital. Complete blood counts were performed in the siblings. Subjects with mean corpuscular volume (MCV <80 fl and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH <27 pg were subjected to analize hemoglobin fraction by capillary electrophoresis. Results Of the 26 subjects, there were 12 males and 14 females. The mean age was 9.38 (SD 6.8 years (range 1 to 29 years. From the siblings, 10 were identified as normal, 5 were identified as ß thalassemia carriers and 5 were hemoglobin E (HbE carriers. Six siblings were diagnosed with ß thalassemia/ HbE. Conclusion There are high occurrence of the two common types of thalassemia carriers (ß and HbE in our small group of subjects who had a family history of thalassemia. Most of the siblings of thalassemia had low MCV and MCH. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:70-3.].

  19. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsheye, Idowu; Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Solovieff, Nadia; Ngo, Duyen; Baldwin, Clinton T; Sebastiani, Paola; Chui, David H K; Steinberg, Martin H

    2011-07-07

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the major genetic modulator of the hematologic and clinical features of sickle cell disease, an effect mediated by its exclusion from the sickle hemoglobin polymer. Fetal hemoglobin genes are genetically regulated, and the level of HbF and its distribution among sickle erythrocytes is highly variable. Some patients with sickle cell disease have exceptionally high levels of HbF that are associated with the Senegal and Saudi-Indian haplotype of the HBB-like gene cluster; some patients with different haplotypes can have similarly high HbF. In these patients, high HbF is associated with generally milder but not asymptomatic disease. Studying these persons might provide additional insights into HbF gene regulation. HbF appears to benefit some complications of disease more than others. This might be related to the premature destruction of erythrocytes that do not contain HbF, even though the total HbF concentration is high. Recent insights into HbF regulation have spurred new efforts to induce high HbF levels in sickle cell disease beyond those achievable with the current limited repertory of HbF inducers.

  20. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  1. Diagnóstico laboratorial de hemoglobinas semelhantes à HbS Laboratorial diagnosis for hemoglobin like HbS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Juliana Antoniazzo Zamaro

    2002-01-01

    interative forms with hemoglobin S by electrophoretic procedures on different pH, citologic anlysis and specific biochemical tests. The applyed analitical procedures result in a guide for the routine laboratories with laboratories with laboratorial diagnostic procedure for these hemoglobin alterations. Thus, we contributed to a better knowledge about genetic variability at the hemoglobins in our population, helping on the clinical attendance and genetic conseling of hemoglobinopathies with relation to physiological alterations.

  2. Interaction of thyroid hormone and hemoglobin: nature of the interaction and effect of hemoglobin on thyroid hormone radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.J.; Yoshida, K.; Schoenl, M.

    1980-05-01

    Gel filtration of human erythrocyte (RBC) lysate incubated with labeled thyroxine (Tu) or triiodothyronine (Tt) revealed co-elution of a major iodothyronine-binding fraction (R-2) and hemoglobin. Solutions of purified human hemoglobin and Tt also showed co-elution of hormone and hemoglobin. Because hematin and protoporphyrin were shown to bind labeled Tt, the oxygen-binding site on hemoglobin was excluded as the site of iodothyronine-hemoglobin interaction. Analysis of hormone binding by heme and globin moieties showed Tt binding to be limited to the heme fraction. Addition of excess unlabeled Tt to hemoglobin or heme incubated with labeled Tt indicated 75% to 90% of hormone binding was poorly dissociable. These observations suggested that the presence of hemoglobin in RBC lysate or in serum could influence the measurement of Tu and Tt by specific radioimmunoassay (RIA). Subsequent studies of the addition to serum of human hemoglobin revealed a significant reduction in Tt and Tu detectable by RIA in the presence of this protein. The effect was influenced by the concentration of hemoglobin and by duration and temperature of incubations of hemoglobin and serum prior to RIA.

  3. Hemoglobin allostery: new views on old players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miele, Adriana Erica; Bellelli, Andrea; Brunori, Maurizio

    2013-05-13

    Proteins are dynamic molecular machines whose structure and function are modulated by environmental perturbations and natural selection. Allosteric regulation, discovered in 1963 as a novel molecular mechanism of enzymatic adaptation [Monod, Changeux & Jacob (1963). J. Mol. Biol.6, 306-329], seems to be the leit motiv of enzymes and metabolic pathways, enabling fine and quick responses toward external perturbations. Hemoglobin (Hb), the oxygen transporter of all vertebrates, has been for decades the paradigmatic system to test the validity of the conformational selection mechanism, the conceptual innovation introduced by Monod, Wyman and Changeux. We present hereby the results of a comparative analysis of structure, function and thermodynamics of two extensively investigated hemoglobins: human HbA and trout HbI. They represent a unique and challenging comparison to test the general validity of the stereochemical model proposed by Perutz. Indeed both proteins are ideal for the purpose being very similar yet very different. In fact, T-HbI is a low-ligand-affinity cooperative tetrameric Hb, insensitive to all allosteric effectors. This remarkable feature, besides being physiologically sound, supports the stereochemical model, given that the six residues identified in HbA as responsible for the Bohr and the 2,3-di-phosphoglycerate effects are all mutated. Comparison of the three-dimensional structures of HbA and T-HbI allows unveiling the molecular mechanism whereby the latter has a lower O2 affinity. Moreover, the energetic balance sheet shows that the salt bridges breaking upon allosteric quaternary transition are important yet insufficient to account for the free energy of heme-heme interactions in both hemoglobins.

  4. Hemoglobin screening: response of a Brazilian community to optional programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sérgio Ramalho

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency and the viability of three hemoglobin screening programs were investigated. They were offered on a voluntary basis to a Brazilian population and started with the analysis of blood donors, pregnant women and students. The hemoglobin screening was done through optional exams which included electrophoresis of hemoglobin and complementary hematological tests. A total of 13,670 people were tested over a period of 39 months and a total of 644 individuals with hereditary hemoglobin disorders were detected - 4.7% of the samples examined. The programs showed satisfactory indicators of viability and efficiency, expressed by the significative proportion of exams performed among the probands and their relatives.

  5. Properties of Hemoglobin Decolorized with a Histidine-Specific Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; de Roos, Andre; Schouten, Olaf; Zheng, Chaoya; Vink, Collin; Vonk, Brenda; Kliphuis, Annette; Schaap, Albert; Edens, Luppo

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the application of Aspergilloglutamic peptidase (AGP) on porcine hemoglobin decolorization. AGP from fungus Aspergillus niger is identified to possess a high preference towards the histidine residues. As histidine residues in hemoglobin are known to coordinate the heme group within the globin molecule, we therefore hypothesized that incubating hemoglobin with a histidine-specific protease would efficiently separate the non-heme peptides from the heme-enriched peptides with a minimum degree of hydrolysis. AGP-decolored porcine hemoglobin hydrolysates were assessed on their functional (for example, color, emulsification, foaming, and water binding) and sensory properties. The results were compared with commercially available blood-derived proteins (subtilisin-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates and plasma protein). It was observed that AGP is able to effectively decolor hemoglobin. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) increased less than 3% using AGP to achieve 90% color reduction of hemoglobin, whereas a DH increase of more than 20% is needed using subtilisin. The AGP-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates (AGP-Hb) possess good emulsification, foaming, and water binding properties, which are better or comparable with the plasma protein, and much better than the subtilisin-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates (subtilisin-Hb). The model canned meat with addition of AGP-Hb showed the highest value in hardness, springiness, and chewiness from the texture analysis. Furthermore, the canned meat with AGP-Hb was found to have a better sensory profile than the ones with addition of subtilisin-Hb and plasma protein.

  6. A review of variant hemoglobins interfering with hemoglobin A1c measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Randie R; Roberts, William L

    2009-05-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used routinely to monitor long-term glycemic control in people with diabetes mellitus, as HbA1c is related directly to risks for diabetic complications. The accuracy of HbA1c methods can be affected adversely by the presence of hemoglobin (Hb) variants or elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF). The effect of each variant or elevated HbF must be examined with each specific method. The most common Hb variants worldwide are HbS, HbE, HbC, and HbD. All of these Hb variants have single amino acid substitutions in the Hb beta chain. HbF is the major hemoglobin during intrauterine life; by the end of the first year, HbF falls to values close to adult levels of approximately 1%. However, elevated HbF levels can occur in certain pathologic conditions or with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. In a series of publications over the past several years, the effects of these four most common Hb variants and elevated HbF have been described. There are clinically significant interferences with some methods for each of these variants. A summary is given showing which methods are affected by the presence of the heterozygous variants S, E, C, and D and elevated HbF. Methods are divided by type (immunoassay, ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, boronate affinity, other) with an indication of whether the result is artificially increased or decreased by the presence of a Hb variant. Laboratorians should be aware of the limitations of their method with respect to these interferences.

  7. Stability of Blood Samples for Hemoglobin Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadira Valdés Fraser

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: the National Medical Genetics Center has conducted the prenatal screening for hemoglobinopathies in the province of Artemisa and the quality control of this program nationwide; reliability of the results is determined by the quality of the samples used. Objective: to describe the stability of whole blood samples using EDTAK2 and heparin as anticoagulants. Methods: a descriptive study of 100 samples of whole blood from pregnant women and their husbands was conducted at the National Medical Genetics Center. Hemoglobin electrophoresis with Hydrasis technology was performed using 10 % EDTAK2, 2.2 % and 5 % heparin, temperature at 4-8 0C and shelf-life of 7.15 and 30 days. Results: samples with EDTAK2 showed stability for a month with accuracy and repeatability in the electrophoresis runs. By using 5 % and 2.2 % heparin, problems were found in all periods analyzed. Conclusions: 10 % EDTAK2 anticoagulant is appropriate to ensure the reliability of the results in the screening for hemoglobinopathies. The results obtained in this study can be applied in all clinical, hematological and hemoglobin electrophoresis laboratories.

  8. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial gastroenteritis is present when bacteria cause an infection of the stomach and intestines ... has not been treated Many different types of bacteria can cause ... Campylobacter jejuni E coli Salmonella Shigella Staphylococcus ...

  9. Sickle cell syndrome. Association between hemoglobin S and β thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehuen P. Gasparini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell syndrome HbS/β thalassemia is an inheritable mendelian type disease where two affected alleles are simultaneously present, one from HbS (βS and the other from β thalassemia. That situation is mainly linked to individuals who share African and Mediterranean ancestors. The mutation responsible for HbS is a point mutation, whereas for β thalassemia, there are more than 200 mutations that cause different degrees of deficiency synthesis of β globin chain, which justifies the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of this syndrome. It is presented a clinical case of a young adult man with limited resources that consulted by longstanding bone pain. The patient presented anemia with a marked microcytosis. Hemoglobin electrophoresis was performed, an abnormal peak in position of HbS and high HbA2 fraction were detected. These last results indicated two possible molecular alterations simultaneously, for this reason the molecular study was performed looking for the most common β thalassemia mutations in our population and, the point mutation responsible for S hemoglobinopathy. Clinical data and biochemical laboratory allowed the diagnosis of sickle cell syndrome. The molecular study confirmed the syndrome carrying mutations IVS-I nt 110 G > A, responsible for β thalassemia and, codon 6 A > T (GAG → GTG: Glu → Val responsible for S hemoglobinophaty. Since it is a disease of high health impact, it is important to provide genetic counseling to the whole family.

  10. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... hemoglobin present. The assay may be used to detect fetal red cells in the maternal circulation or to detect... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7455 Fetal...

  11. Conformational changes in hemoglobin triggered by changing the iron charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, S., E-mail: simo@unipr.it [University of Parma, Departments of Public Health, INBB Parma (Italy); Achterhold, K. [Physik-Department E17 (Germany); Ortalli, I. [University of Parma, Departments of Public Health, INBB Parma (Italy); Parak, F. G. [Physik-Department E17 (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    In this work the hemoglobin conformational changes induced by changing the iron charge have been studied and compared with Myoglobin. Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to follow the change of the iron conformation. In order to compare the conformational relaxation of hemoglobin and myoglobin, and to study a possible influence of the quaternary structure, an intermediate metastable state of hemoglobin has been created by low temperature X-ray irradiation of methemoglobin. The irradiation reduces the Fe(III) of the heme groups to Fe(II) Low Spin, where the water is still bound on the sixth coordination. Heating cycles performed at temperatures from 140 K to 200 K allow the molecules to overcome an activation energy barrier and to relax into a stable conformation such as deoxy-hemoglobin or carboxy-hemoglobin, if CO is present. Slightly different structures (conformational substates) reveal themselves as a distribution of energy barriers ({Delta}G). The distribution of the activation energy, for the decay of the Fe(II) Low Spin intermediate, has been fitted with a Gaussian. For comparison, published myoglobin data were re-analysed in the same way. The average energy value at characteristic temperature is very similar in case of myoglobin and hemoglobin. The larger Gaussian energy distribution for myoglobin with respect to hemoglobin shows that more conformational substates are available. This may be caused by a larger area exposed to water. In hemoglobin, part of the surface of the chains is not water accessible due to the quaternary structure.

  12. Molecular evolution of hemoglobins of Antarctic fishes (Notothenioidei)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, W.T.; Beintema, J.J; D Avino, R.; Tamburrini, M.; di Prisco, G.

    1997-01-01

    Amino acid sequences of alpha- and beta-chains of human hemoglobin and of hemoglobins of coelacanth and 24 teleost fish species, including 11 antarctic and two temperate Notothenioidei, were analyzed using maximum parsimony. Trees were derived for the alpha- and beta-chains separately and for tandem

  13. Receptor targeting of hemoglobin mediated by the haptoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2009-01-01

    Haptoglobin, the haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor CD163, and the heme oxygenase-1 are proteins with a well-established function in the clearance and metabolism of "free" hemoglobin released during intravascular hemolysis. This scavenging system counteracts the potentially harmful oxidative and NO-...

  14. Combinatorics of giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanin, L G; Vinogradov, S N

    2000-01-01

    The paper discusses combinatorial and probabilistic models allowing to characterize various aspects of spacial symmetry and structural heterogeneity of the giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins (HBL Hb). Linker-dodecamer configurations of HBL are described for two and four linker types (occurring in the two most studied HBL Hb of Arenicola and Lumbricus, respectively), and the most probable configurations are found. It is shown that, for HBL with marked dodecamers, the number of 'normal-marked' pairs of dodecamers in homological position follows a binomial distribution. The group of symmetries of the dodecamer substructure of HBL is identified with the dihedral group D6. Under natural symmetry assumptions, the total dipole moment of the dodecamer substructure of HBL is shown to be zero. Biological implications of the mathematical findings are discussed.

  15. Effect of Multiple Mutations in the Hemoglobin- and Hemoglobin-Haptoglobin-Binding Proteins, HgpA, HgpB, and HgpC, of Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, Daniel J; Whitby, Paul W.; Jin, Hongfan; Ren, Zhen; Stull, Terrence L.

    1999-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae requires heme for growth and can utilize hemoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin as heme sources. We previously identified two hemoglobin- and hemoglobin-haptoglobin-binding proteins, HgpA and HgpB, in H. influenzae HI689. Insertional mutation of hgpA and hgpB, either singly or together, did not abrogate the ability to utilize or bind either hemoglobin or the hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex. A hemoglobin affinity purification method was used to isolate a protein of approxi...

  16. Bohr effect of hemoglobins: Accounting for differences in magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonjo, Kehinde O

    2015-09-01

    The basis of the difference in the Bohr effect of various hemoglobins has remained enigmatic for decades. Fourteen amino acid residues, identical in pairs and located at specific 'Bohr group positions' in human hemoglobin, are implicated in the Bohr effect. All 14 are present in mouse, 11 in dog, eight in pigeon and 13 in guinea pig hemoglobin. The Bohr data for human and mouse hemoglobin are identical: the 14 Bohr groups appear at identical positions in both molecules. The dog data are different from the human because three Bohr group positions are occupied by non-ionizable groups in dog hemoglobin; the pigeon data are vastly different from the human because six Bohr group positions are occupied by non-ionizable groups in pigeon hemoglobin. The guinea pig data are quite complex. Quantitative analyses showed that only the pigeon data could be fitted with the Wyman equation for the Bohr effect. We demonstrate that, apart from guinea pig hemoglobin, the difference between the Bohr effect of each of the other hemoglobins and of pigeon hemoglobin can be accounted for quantitatively on the basis of the occupation of some of their Bohr group positions by non-ionizable groups in pigeon hemoglobin. We attribute the anomalous guinea pig result to a new salt-bridge formed in its R2 quaternary structure between the terminal NH3(+) group of one β-chain and the COO(-) terminal group of the partner β-chain in the same molecule. The pKas of this NH3(+) group are 6.33 in the R2 and 4.59 in the T state.

  17. Interference of the Hope Hemoglobin With Hemoglobin A1c Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Chanda, Dalia; Gain, Mithun; Krishnan, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is now considered to be the marker of choice in diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus, based on the results of certain landmark clinical trials. Herein, we report the case of a 52-year-old ethnic Southeast Asian Indian man with impaired glucose tolerance whose glycated hemoglobin (ie, HbA1c) levels, as measured via Bio-Rad D10 high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Roche Tina-quant immunoassay were 47.8% and 44.0%, respectively. No variant hemoglobin (Hb) peak was observed via the D10 chromatogram. We assayed the patient specimen on the Sebia MINICAP capillary electrophoresis platform; the HbA1c level was 6.8%, with a large variant Hb peak of 42.0%. This finding suggested the possible presence of the heterozygous Hb Hope, which can result in spuriously elevated HbA1c results on HPLC and turbidimetric immunoassays. Although the capillary electrophoresis system was able to identify the variant, the A1c results should not be considered accurate due to overlapping of the variant and adult Hb peaks on the electrophoretogram reading. Hb Hope is usually clinically silent but can present such analytical challenges. Through this case study, we critically discuss the limitations of various HbA1c assay methods, highlighting the fact that laboratory professionals need to be aware of occurrences of Hb Hope, to help ensure patient safety.

  18. Instant Effects of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Wave on Hemoglobin in Single Living Intact Red Blood Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Can YAO; Xiao Kun LI; Yao Xiong HUANG

    2005-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the hemoglobin (Hb) in single living intact red blood cell (RBC), exposed in 900 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic wave (RF-EMW), was non-invasive,in situ, real-time measured by employing a highly sensitive fast multi-channel microspectrophotometer system. Both the absorption intensity and site of intracellular Hb were altered after RBCs were exposed in 900 MHz RF-EMW with power density at 5 mW/cm2. It was indicated that not only the concentration of Hb in living RBCs was decreased, but the molecular structure of Hb was changed by the RF-EMW action.

  19. Preparation of porcine hemoglobin microcapsules of chitosan-sodium alginate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHANG Jijuan; ZHAO Xinjuan; YU Yan

    2007-01-01

    Using an emulsification-gelation method,chitosansodium alginate-porcine hemoglobin microcapsules were prepared.Results show that these microcapsules have better forms and small granules with 1 μm size of the mean particle size.They possess a relatively narrow and normal Gaussian distribution.The loading efficiency of porcine hemoglobin (pHb) in microcapsules is more than 90%.The pHb released from microcapsules is extended for more than one month.Chitosan-sodium alginate-hemoglobin microcapsules are expected to become an artificial oxygen-carrying therapeutic agent with sustained release for intravenous injection.

  20. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  1. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  2. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  3. Polychelated cryogels: hemoglobin adsorption from human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Kadir

    2017-02-01

    The separation and purification methods are extremely important for the hemoglobin (Hb) which is a crucial biomolecule. The adsorption technique is popular among these methods and the cryogels have been used quite much due to their macropores and interconnected flow channels. In this study, the Hb adsorption onto the Cu(II) immobilized poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-glycidyl methacrylate), poly(HEMA-GMA)-Cu(II), cryogels was investigated under different conditions (pH, interaction time, initial Hb concentration, temperature and ionic strength) to optimize adsorption conditions. The swelling test, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), surface area (BET), elemental and ICP-OES analysis were performed for the characterization of cryogels. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) molecule was used as a Cu(II)-chelating ligand. The Hb adsorption capacity of cryogels was determined as 193.8 mg Hb/g cryogel. The isolation of Hb from human blood was also studied under optimum adsorption conditions determined and the Hb (124.5 mg/g cryogel) was isolated. The adsorption model was investigated in the light of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models and it was determined to be more appropriate to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model.

  4. Glycosylated hemoglobin and hyperbaric oxygen coverage denials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, A D; Worth, E R; Weaver, L K

    2015-01-01

    Some Medicaid and Medicare fiscal intermediaries are denying hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients if the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 7.0%. We performed multiple PubMed searches for any diabetic wound healing clinical trial that documented HbA1c and had a wound healing endpoint. We scrutinized 30 peer-reviewed clinical trials, representing more than 4,400 patients. The average HbA1c from the intervention side of the studies was 8.6% (7.2% - 9.9%) and the control/sham side was 8.3% (6.0% - 10.6%). Twelve studies made a direct attempt to link HbA1c and wound healing. Four retrospective studies and one prospective cohort study assert that lower HbA1c favors wound healing, but review of the studies reveal design flaws that invalidate these conclusions. In total, 25 studies showed no direct correlation between HbA1c levels and wound healing. There was no randomized controlled trial (RCT) data demonstrating that HbA1c 7.0% is unfounded.

  5. Hyperspectral imaging for dermal hemoglobin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Peter J.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    1999-10-01

    It has been shown previously that images collected at selected wavelengths in a sufficiently narrow bandwidth can be used to produce maps of the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in the dermis. A four-wavelength algorithm has been developed based on a two-layer model of the skin, in which the blood is contained in the lower layer (dermis), while the upper layer attenuates some of the reflection and adds a clutter term. In the present work, the algorithm is compared analytically to simpler algorithms using three wavelengths and based on a single-layer model. It is shown through Monte-Carlo models that, for typical skin, the single-layer model is adequate to analyze data from fiber-optical reflectance spectroscopy, but the two-layer model produces better results for imaging systems. Although the model does not address the full complexity of reflectance of a two-layer skin, it has proven to be sufficient to recover the oxygen saturation, and perhaps other medically relevant information. The algorithm is demonstrated on a suction blister, where the epidermis is removed to reveal the underlying dermis. Applications for this imaging modality exist in dermatology, in surgery, and in developing treatment plans for various diseases.

  6. MECHANISM OF THE OXIDATION OF HEMOGLOBIN BY COPPER (II COMPLXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. BAYATI

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available An outer sphere electron transfer mechanism by which human hemoglobin reduces the complexes of copper(II and, in turn, is oxidized to methemoglobin has been characterized. We have found that the rate of oxidation of hemoglobin is a function of pH, temperature, concentration of copper(II, and the environment of the hemoglobin. Prior to oxidation, copper(II complex binds to specific sites on the surface of the protein by losing one or more of its ligands, forming a ternary complex. This process is followed by electron transfer between the Cu(II and Fe(H with the Cu(II-deoxyhemoglobin being the active intermediate. The dominant factors which govern the rate of oxidation of hemoglobin by coppcr(I I complexes seem to be the stability constant of the Cu(II complexes and the overall redox potential of the ternary complex.

  7. Comparison of Hemoglobins from Various Subjects Living in Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RINI PUSPITANINGRUM

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to obtain the different characteristics of haemoglobin molecules in subjects under hypoxic condition, namely eel, catfish, suckermouth fish, green sea turtle using an electrophoresis technique. We used human umbilical cord blood and thalassemia patient blood, as well as a normal adult-human blood as controls. The proteins obtained after electrophoresis process were stained with two different colouring techniques, each based on different principles. Both staining techniques gave practically identical results. Subject that live in hypoxic condition has a different haemoglobin in comparison to the one found in adult human live in normal oxygen condition (normoxia. These hypoxia-adapted or -needed hemoglobin migrate slower than adult human hemoglobin from normoxia. This observation suggests that hemoglobin which is needed to live in hypoxic condition or environment is a different molecule. Whether this hemoglobin from hypoxic condition has a higher affinity to oxygen is not yet known.

  8. Astyanax scabripinnis (Pisces: Characidae hemoglobins: structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. LANDINI

    Full Text Available Electrophoretic patterns of hemoglobins, Root effect, Bohr effect in blood and stripped hemoglobin, Hb-O2 affinity GTP modulation of Astyanax scabripinnis (lambari, caught at three different altitudes in Ribeirão Grande, near Campos do Jordão (São Paulo, are described. All populations showed the same electrophoretic patterns: two cathodal components in starch gel. Normal Bohr effect values were found in these three populations both in blood (phi = -0,11 and stripped hemoglobin (phi = -0,12. Different blood O2 affinities collected in fish of these 3 populations were detected. GTP has a large influence on Hb-O2 binding properties in A. scabripinnis. Stripped hemoglobin shows small Root effect. The addition of triphosphated nucleotides increases this effect. GTP is more effective than ATP on enhancing Root effect. Oxygen availability in water can be the factor responsible for differences found in blood O2 affinity.

  9. Lower versus Higher Hemoglobin Threshold for Transfusion in Septic Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusions are frequently given to patients with septic shock. However, the benefits and harms of different hemoglobin thresholds for transfusion have not been established. METHODS: In this multicenter, parallel-group trial, we randomly assigned patients in the intensive care...... unit (ICU) who had septic shock and a hemoglobin concentration of 9 g per deciliter or less to receive 1 unit of leukoreduced red cells when the hemoglobin level was 7 g per deciliter or less (lower threshold) or when the level was 9 g per deciliter or less (higher threshold) during the ICU stay...... were similar in the two intervention groups. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with septic shock, mortality at 90 days and rates of ischemic events and use of life support were similar among those assigned to blood transfusion at a higher hemoglobin threshold and those assigned to blood transfusion...

  10. Hemoglobin Screening Independently Predicts All-Cause Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulks, Michael; Dolan, Vera F; Stout, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Objective .- Determine if the addition of hemoglobin testing improves risk prediction for life insurance applicants. Method .- Hemoglobin results for insurance applicants tested from 1993 to 2007, with vital status determined by Social Security Death Master File follow-up in 2011, were analyzed by age and sex with and without accounting for the contribution of other test results. Results .- Hemoglobin values ≤12.0 g/dL (and possibly ≤13.0 g/dL) in females age 50+ (but not age 15.0 g/dL (and possibly >14.0 g/dL) for all females and for hemoglobin values >16.0 g/dL for males. Conclusion .- Hemoglobin testing can add additional independent risk assessment to that obtained from other laboratory testing, BP and build in this relatively healthy insurance applicant population. Multiple studies support this finding at older ages, but data (and the prevalence of diseases impacting hemoglobin levels) are limited at younger ages.

  11. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists.

  12. Relative phase of oscillations of cerebral oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations during sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Michele L.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Bergethon, Peter R.; Fantini, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    We present a near-infrared spectroscopy study of the instantaneous phase difference between spontaneous oscillations of cerebral deoxy-hemoglobin and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations ([Hb] and [HbO], respectively) in the low-frequency range, namely 0.04-0.12 Hz. We report phase measurements during the transitions between different sleep stages in a whole-night study of a human subject. We have found that the phase difference between [Hb] and [HbO] low-frequency oscillations tends to be greater in deep sleep (by ~96° on average) and REM sleep (by ~77° on average) compared to the awake state. In particular, we have observed progressive phase increases as the subject transitions from awake conditions into non-REM sleep stages N1, N2, and N3. Corresponding phase decreases were recorded in the reversed transitions from sleep stages N3 to N2, and N2 to awake. These results illustrate the physiological information content of phase measurements of [Hb] and [HbO] oscillations that reflect the different cerebral hemodynamic conditions of the different sleep stages, and that can find broader applicability in a wide range of near-infrared spectroscopy brain studies.

  13. The primary structure of the hemoglobin of Malayan sun bear (Helarctos malayanus, Carnivora) and structural comparison to other hemoglobin sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, O; Braunitzer, G; Göltenboth, R

    1987-05-01

    The complete primary structure of the alpha- and beta-chains of the hemoglobin of Malayan Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus) is presented. After cleavage of the heme-protein link and chain separation by RP-HPLC, amino-acid sequences were determined by Edman degradation in liquid- and gas-phase sequenators. An interesting result of this work is the demonstration that the hemoglobin of Malayan Sun Bear is identical to the hemoglobins of Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) and Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus tibetanus). The paper gives an updated table of identical hemoglobin chains from different species. This paper may be considered as a compilation of work on the genetic relationship of Pandas.

  14. Identification of a haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex in the Alaskan Least Cisco (Coregonus sardinella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, S M; Boger, J K; Michael, V; Duffy, L K

    1992-01-01

    The hemoglobin and a hemoglobin binding protein have been characterized in the Arctic fish (Coregonus sardinella). The evolutionary significance of the hemoglobin and plasma protein differences between fish and mammals is still unresolved. Blood samples from the Alaskan Least Cisco were separated into plasma and hemoglobin fractions and the proteins in these fractions were analyzed both by alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis, by isolelectric focusing, and by capillary electrophoresis. Staining the plasma proteins gels with o-dianisidine revealed hemoglobin containing protein complexes. A hemoglobin-containing band was observed in hemolyzed plasma which did not migrate with free hemoglobin, and is believed to be hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex. Size exclusion chromatography further characterized the hemoglobin as disassociating freely into dimers, and hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex having a molecular weight greater then 200,000 daltons.

  15. Comparison of Hemoglobin Transmition Spectrums of Healthy Persons and Patients with Schizophrenia Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Vlokh R.; Marsel L.; Vlokh I.; Moroz O.; Dudok K.

    2002-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to the study of human hemoglobin transmission spectrums that were divided into four groups: hemoglobin of healthy persons, patients with schizophrenia, persons and people with and without the prodrome of schizophrenia that are in genetic susceptibility with patients. The change of absorption spectrums of hemoglobin of these groups was determined. The shifting of transmission minimums of the hemoglobin that correspond to electronic transitions in the hemoglobin mol...

  16. Plant hemoglobins: Important players at the crossroads between oxygen and nitric oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Hebelstrup, Kim; Mur, Luis A J

    2011-01-01

    Plant hemoglobins constitute a diverse group of hemeproteins and evolutionarily belong to three different classes. Class 1 hemoglobins possess an extremely high affinity to oxygen and their main function consists in scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) at very low oxygen levels. Class 2 hemoglobins have...... at high O2 concentrations. Depending on their physical properties, hemoglobins belong either to hexacoordinate non-symbiotic or pentacoordinate symbiotic groups. Plant hemoglobins are plausible targets for improving resistance to multiple stresses....

  17. Hemoglobin Wood beta97(FG4) His replaced by Leu. A new high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin associated with familial erythrocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketa, F; Huang, Y P; Libnoch, J A; Dessel, B H

    1975-08-19

    The characterization of hemoglobin Wood (beta97(FG4) His replaced by Leu), a high oxygen affinity hemoglobin with reduced Hill constant is described. The amino acid substitution occurs at the alpha1beta2 interface, in the same position as in hemoglobin Malmö (beta97(FG4) His replaced by Gln) and in an homologous position when compared with hemoglobins Chesapeake (alpha92(FG4) Arg replaced by Leu) and J. Capetown (alpha92(fg4) arg replaced by Gln).

  18. Feasibility of Electrospinning the Globular Proteins Hemoglobin and Myoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine P. Barnes

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Various concentrations of the globular protein hemoglobin were successfully electrospun to create micro-fibrous mats of varying physical and mechanical characteristics. The electrospinning parameters are reported. One concentration of myoglobin was electrospun into a mat for comparison to the hemoglobin mats. Scanning electron microscopy revealed ribbon-like morphologies for the hemoglobin and myoglobin structures. Mean fiber width and thickness for each mat electrospun from a different hemoglobin concentration increased from 2.68 ± 0.83 to 3.55 ± 1.49 μm and from 0.49 ± 0.08 to 0.99 ± 0.41 μm, respectively, for increasing hemoglobin solution concentrations (from 150 to 225 mg/mL. For calculations of surface area to volume ratio for the four different electrospun hemoglobin concentrations, there was a negative correlation (r = -0.84 with concentration; the surface area to volume ratio ranged between 0.50 ± 0.16 and 1.53 ± 0.24 m2/cm3. Also, there appears to be a positive correlation between electrospun hemoglobin concentration and porosity, which increased with increasing concentration from 69.5 to 83.3 %. Following cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, the mechanical properties of two constructs were evaluated via uniaxial tensile testing to demonstrate handling capability. Results indicated that increased cross-linking time produced stiffer structures, as peak stress and modulus increased while strain at break decreased when the mats were cross-linked for 30 minutes with glutaraldehyde versus the 20 minute cross-linking time.

  19. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  20. Membrane-associated sickle hemoglobin: a major determinant of sickle erythrocyte rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, E A; Mohandas, N

    1987-11-01

    Micropipette aspiration tests on single erythrocytes have previously shown that the static rigidity (membrane shear modulus) of oxygenated sickle cells increased with increasing hemoglobin concentration, whereas the rigidity of normal cells was independent of hemoglobin concentration. Moreover, it was observed that after mechanical extension, sickle cells exhibited persistent deformation more frequently and to a greater extent than normal cells. To ascertain if differences in association of normal and sickle hemoglobin with the membrane could account for these observations, we measured rheologic properties of normal membranes reconstituted with sickle hemoglobin and sickle membranes reconstituted with normal hemoglobin. The static rigidity of normal ghosts reloaded with sickle hemoglobin was higher than those of either normal ghosts reloaded with normal hemoglobin or native normal cells. On the other hand, the increased rigidity of native sickle cells decreased to near-normal values following reconstitution with normal hemoglobin. Furthermore, we observed that normal ghosts reconstituted with sickle hemoglobin exhibited persistent bumps after mechanical extension, but no bumps formed on normal ghosts reconstituted with normal hemoglobin. Moreover residual bumps were not produced on sickle cells reloaded with normal hemoglobin. Since mechanical characteristics peculiar to sickle cells could be induced in normal cells by incorporation of sickle hemoglobin, and since normal characteristics could be restored to sickle cells by incorporation of normal hemoglobin, we suggest that the interaction of sickle hemoglobin with the cell membrane is responsible for augmented static rigidity of oxygenated sickle erythrocytes.

  1. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  2. Hemoglobin is essential for normal growth of Arabidopsis organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Hunt, Peter; Dennis, Elizabeth;

    2006-01-01

    lines are viable but show a mutant phenotype affecting the regions where AHb1 is expressed. Arabidopsis lines with an insertional knockout or overexpression of AHb2, a class II 3-on-3 hemoglobin, were generated. Seedlings overexpressing AHb2 show enhanced survival of hypoxic stress. The AHb2 knockout...... lines develop normally. However, when AHb2 knockout is combined with AHb1 silencing, seedlings die at an early vegetative stage suggesting that the two 3-on-3 hemoglobins, AHb1 and AHb2, together play an essential role for normal development of Arabidopsis seedlings. In conclusion, these results...... suggests that 3-on-3 hemoglobins apart from a role in hypoxic stress play a general role under non-stressed conditions where they are essential for normal development by controlling the level of NO which tends to accumulate in floral buds and leaf hydathodes of plants...

  3. Nitric oxide in plants: the roles of ascorbate and hemoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Wang

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid and hemoglobins have been linked to nitric oxide metabolism in plants. It has been hypothesized that ascorbic acid directly reduces plant hemoglobin in support of NO scavenging, producing nitrate and monodehydroascorbate. In this scenario, monodehydroascorbate reductase uses NADH to reduce monodehydroascorbate back to ascorbate to sustain the cycle. To test this hypothesis, rates of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin reduction by ascorbate were measured directly, in the presence and absence of purified rice monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. Solution NO scavenging was also measured methodically in the presence and absence of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and monodehydroascorbate reductase, under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, in an effort to gauge the likelihood of these proteins affecting NO metabolism in plant tissues. Our results indicate that ascorbic acid slowly reduces rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin at a rate identical to myoglobin reduction. The product of the reaction is monodehydroascorbate, which can be efficiently reduced back to ascorbate in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. However, our NO scavenging results suggest that the direct reduction of plant hemoglobin by ascorbic acid is unlikely to serve as a significant factor in NO metabolism, even in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase. Finally, the possibility that the direct reaction of nitrite/nitrous acid and ascorbic acid produces NO was measured at various pH values mimicking hypoxic plant cells. Our results suggest that this reaction is a likely source of NO as the plant cell pH drops below 7, and as nitrite concentrations rise to mM levels during hypoxia.

  4. The bacterial microbiota in inflammatory lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffnagle, Gary B; Dickson, Robert P

    2015-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920s, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined.

  5. The Bacterial Microbiota in Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffnagle, Gary B.; Dickson, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920's, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined. PMID:26122174

  6. Correlation of serum leptin with levels of hemoglobin in hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafieian-Kopaei Mahmoud

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To examine the association of serum leptin level with anemia in hemodialysis, we investigated 36 patients (males: 21, diabetics: 11 under regular hemodialysis. For patients, complete blood counts, iron profile, serum leptin, and adequacy of hemodialysis were assessed. In this study a significant correlation of serum leptin with level of hemoglobin and body mass index was detected. An association between serum leptin and total iron binding capacity was observed. No correlation of serum ferritin with leptin level was seen. Our findings attest previous findings showing that greater serum leptin levels are associated with greater hemoglobin levels.

  7. Glycosylation of hemoglobin and plasma proteins in petrochemical plant workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrug, A.; Tomaszewski, L.

    1985-01-01

    The concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin and (plasma) proteins has been measured in 111 workers of 6 MZRiP departments in Plock and in 54 healthy people. In all subjects the mean concentrations of glycosylated hemoglobin and glycosylated plasma proteins have been in so called wide range of normal values. Significant shifts of glycosylated Hb concentrations have been found in two departments--those of ethylenederivatives and distillation. The concentration of glycosylated plasma proteins has been elevated only in workers of the Catalytic Processes Department.

  8. Effects of exposure of blood hemoglobin to nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodi, H.; Mohler, J.G.

    1985-08-01

    The effect of oxygen exposure on nitrosythemoglobin of whole human blood or its buffered solution has been determined. The amount of methemoglobin formed was determined by anaerobic modification of the Evelyn-Malloy method: 59% of the total hemoglobin of whole blood was oxidized to methemoglobin in the first 15 min of the oxygen exposure and 78% of the total hemoglobin was oxidized after 120 min of oxygen exposure. Similar results were obtained when nitrosylhemoglobin buffered solutions were exposed to the oxygen of the air. A comparison of the present in vitro results with these obtained by injecting nitric oxide into the rat peritoneal cavity and its implications are discussed.

  9. Epigenetics and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases.

  10. Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000687.htm Bacterial vaginosis - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... to back after you use the bathroom. Preventing Bacterial Vaginosis You can help prevent bacterial vaginosis by: Not ...

  11. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  12. α-Hemoglobin-stabilizing Protein (AHSP) Perturbs the Proximal Heme Pocket of Oxy-α-hemoglobin and Weakens the Iron-Oxygen Bond*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F.; Rich, Anne M.; D'Avigdor, William M. H.; Collins, Daniel A. T.; Lowry, Jason A.; Mollan, Todd L.; Khandros, Eugene; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Mackay, Joel P.; Lay, Peter A.; Gell, David A.

    2013-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin (αHb)-stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a molecular chaperone that assists hemoglobin assembly. AHSP induces changes in αHb heme coordination, but how these changes are facilitated by interactions at the αHb·AHSP interface is not well understood. To address this question we have used NMR, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and ligand binding measurements to probe αHb conformational changes induced by AHSP binding. NMR chemical shift analyses of free CO-αHb and CO-αHb·AHSP indicated that the seven helical elements of the native αHb structure are retained and that the heme Fe(II) remains coordinated to the proximal His-87 side chain. However, chemical shift differences revealed alterations of the F, G, and H helices and the heme pocket of CO-αHb bound to AHSP. Comparisons of iron-ligand geometry using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed that AHSP binding induces a small 0.03 Å lengthening of the Fe-O2 bond, explaining previous reports that AHSP decreases αHb O2 affinity roughly 4-fold and promotes autooxidation due primarily to a 3–4-fold increase in the rate of O2 dissociation. Pro-30 mutations diminished NMR chemical shift changes in the proximal heme pocket, restored normal O2 dissociation rate and equilibrium constants, and reduced O2-αHb autooxidation rates. Thus, the contacts mediated by Pro-30 in wild-type AHSP promote αHb autooxidation by introducing strain into the proximal heme pocket. As a chaperone, AHSP facilitates rapid assembly of αHb into Hb when βHb is abundant but diverts αHb to a redox resistant holding state when βHb is limiting. PMID:23696640

  13. α-Hemoglobin-stabilizing protein (AHSP) perturbs the proximal heme pocket of oxy-α-hemoglobin and weakens the iron-oxygen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F; Rich, Anne M; D'Avigdor, William M H; Collins, Daniel A T; Lowry, Jason A; Mollan, Todd L; Khandros, Eugene; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J; Mackay, Joel P; Lay, Peter A; Gell, David A

    2013-07-01

    α-Hemoglobin (αHb)-stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a molecular chaperone that assists hemoglobin assembly. AHSP induces changes in αHb heme coordination, but how these changes are facilitated by interactions at the αHb·AHSP interface is not well understood. To address this question we have used NMR, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and ligand binding measurements to probe αHb conformational changes induced by AHSP binding. NMR chemical shift analyses of free CO-αHb and CO-αHb·AHSP indicated that the seven helical elements of the native αHb structure are retained and that the heme Fe(II) remains coordinated to the proximal His-87 side chain. However, chemical shift differences revealed alterations of the F, G, and H helices and the heme pocket of CO-αHb bound to AHSP. Comparisons of iron-ligand geometry using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed that AHSP binding induces a small 0.03 Å lengthening of the Fe-O2 bond, explaining previous reports that AHSP decreases αHb O2 affinity roughly 4-fold and promotes autooxidation due primarily to a 3-4-fold increase in the rate of O2 dissociation. Pro-30 mutations diminished NMR chemical shift changes in the proximal heme pocket, restored normal O2 dissociation rate and equilibrium constants, and reduced O2-αHb autooxidation rates. Thus, the contacts mediated by Pro-30 in wild-type AHSP promote αHb autooxidation by introducing strain into the proximal heme pocket. As a chaperone, AHSP facilitates rapid assembly of αHb into Hb when βHb is abundant but diverts αHb to a redox resistant holding state when βHb is limiting.

  14. A hemoglobin A1C immunoassay method not affected by carbamylated hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A M; Tongate, C; Valdes, R

    1995-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) methods based on charge separation of Hb species are subject to interference from carbamylated Hb (carb Hb). Carb Hb adducts are formed via interaction of terminal amino groups of HbA with isocyanic acid, after the spontaneous dissociation of urea to cyanate. It is hypothesized that a new immunoassay method, using a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the N-terminus of the Hb beta-chain and its sugar moiety, should be refractory to cross-reactive interference from carb Hb. To test this hypothesis, Hb was carbamylated in vitro and co-migration of carb Hb assessed with HbA1C using an electrophoretic method. Densitometric scans - post sodium cyanate incubation and electrophoretic separation - showed a 5 to 7 fold elevation of the HbA1C peak only, while HbA1C values obtained using immunoassay were unaffected. Also assessed was carbamylation interference in vivo, and a positive proportional bias with the electrophoretic system (Y) was observed compared to the immunoassay system (X) (y = 1.2x - 0.21 percent). Others have shown that carb Hb may cause a clinically significant false elevation in patient HbA1C values, when methods based on charge separation of Hb species are used. It is our conclusion, however, that while carb Hb may play a role, the differences observed in this study are largely due to calibration.

  15. Postnatal Prediction of Gestational Age Using Newborn Fetal Hemoglobin Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumanan Wilson

    2017-02-01

    Discussion: The development of a point-of-care mechanism to allow widespread implementation of postnatal gestational age prediction tools that make use of hemoglobin or non-mass spectromietry-derived metabolites could serve areas where antenatal gestational age dating is not routinely available.

  16. Glycated Hemoglobin Measurement and Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gao, Pei; Khan, Hassan; Butterworth, Adam S.; Wormser, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Thompson, Alex; Sarwar, Nadeem; Willeit, Peter; Ridker, Paul M.; Barr, Elizabeth L. M.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Psaty, Bruce M.; Brenner, Hermann; Balkau, Beverley; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Daimon, Makoto; Willeit, Johann; Njolstad, Inger; Nissinen, Aulikki; Brunner, Eric J.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Price, Jackie F.; Sundstrom, Johan; Knuiman, Matthew W.; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Verschuren, W. M. M.; Wald, Nicholas; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Whincup, Peter H.; Ford, Ian; Goldbourt, Uri; Gomez-de-la-Camara, Agustin; Gallacher, John; Simons, Leon A.; Rosengren, Annika; Sutherland, Susan E.; Bjorkelund, Cecilia; Blazer, Dan G.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Onat, Altan; Ibanez, Alejandro Marin; Casiglia, Edoardo; Jukema, J. Wouter; Simpson, Lara M.; Giampaoli, Simona; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Selmer, Randi; Wennberg, Patrik; Kauhanen, Jussi; Salonen, Jukka T.; Dankner, Rachel; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Kavousi, Maryam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Evans, Denis; Wallace, Robert B.; Cushman, Mary; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Umans, Jason G.; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Hidaeki; Sato, Shinichi; Gillum, Richard F.; Folsom, Aaron R.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Moons, Karel G.; Griffin, Simon J.; Sattar, Naveed; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Thompson, Simon G.; Danesh, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The value of measuring levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) for the prediction of first cardiovascular events is uncertain. OBJECTIVE To determine whether adding information on HbA(1c) values to conventional cardiovascular risk factors is associated with improvement in prediction of ca

  17. Influence of hemoglobin on non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingying; Gong, Qiliang; Zou, Da; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    Since the abnormal metabolism of bilirubin could lead to diseases in the human body, especially the jaundice which is harmful to neonates. Traditional invasive measurements are difficult to be accepted by people because of pain and infection. Therefore, the real-time and non-invasive measurement of bilirubin is of great significance. However, the accuracy of currently transcutaneous bilirubinometry(TcB) is generally not high enough, and affected by many factors in the human skin, mostly by hemoglobin. In this talk, absorption spectra of hemoglobin and bilirubin have been collected and analyzed, then the Partial Least Squares (PLS) models have been built. By analyzing and comparing the Correlation and Root Mean Square Error of Prediction(RMSEP), the results show that the Correlation of bilirubin solution model is larger than that of the mixture solution added with hemoglobin, and its RMSEP value is smaller than that of mixture solution. Therefore, hemoglobin has influences on the non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing. In next step, it is necessary to investigate how to eliminate the influence.

  18. Nonenzymatic glycosylation of human hemoglobin at multiple sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, R.; McManus, M.; Garrick, L.; McDonald, M.J.; Bunn, H.F.

    1979-04-01

    The most abundant minor hemoglobin component of human hemolysate is Hb A1c, which has glucose bound to the N-terminus of the beta chain by a ketoamine linkage. Hb A1c is formed slowly and continuously throughout the 120 day lifespan of the red cell. It can be synthesized in vitro by incubating purified hemoglobin with 14C-glucose. Other minor components, Hb A1a1 and Hb A1a2 are adducts of sugar phosphates at the N-terminus of the beta chain. Hb A1b contains an unidentified nonphosphorylated sugar at the beta N-terminus. In addition, a significant portion of the major hemoglobin component (Hb Ao) is also glycosylated by a glucose ketoamine linkage at other sites on the molecule, including the N-terminus of the alpha chain and the epsilon-amino group of several lysine residues on both the alpha and the beta chains. The results indicate that the interaction of glucose and hemoglobin is rather nonspecific and suggests that other proteins are modified in a similar fashion.

  19. Hemoglobin, Growth, and Attention of Infants in Southern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubuchon-Endsley, Nicki L.; Grant, Stephanie L.; Berhanu, Getenesh; Thomas, David G.; Schrader, Sarah E.; Eldridge, Devon; Kennedy, Tay; Hambidge, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Male and female infants from rural Ethiopia were tested to investigate relations among hemoglobin (Hb), anthropometry, and attention. A longitudinal design was used to examine differences in attention performance from 6 (M = 24.9 weeks, n = 89) to 9 months of age (M = 40.6 weeks, n = 85), differences hypothesized to be related to changes in iron…

  20. Prediction models for hemoglobin deferral in whole blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Each year, a relevant proportion of the invited blood donors is eventually deferred from donation because of low hemoglobin (Hb) levels. Deferrals are meant to protect donors from developing iron deficiency anemia after a blood donation, however, they may increase the risk of donor lapse, even thoug

  1. Effect of some high consumption spices on hemoglobin glycation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G H Naderi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of glycation products is major factor responsible in complications of diabetes. Worldwide trend is toward the use of natural additives in reducing the complications of diseases. Therefore, there is a growing interest in natural antiglycation found in plants. Herbs and spices are one of the most important targets to search for natural antiglycation from the point of view of safety. This study investigated the ability of some of the spices to inhibit glycation process in a hemoglobin/glucose model system and compared their potency with each other. For this subject the best concentration and time to incubate glucose with hemoglobin was investigated. Then the glycosylation degree of hemoglobin in the presence of extracts by the three concentrations 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml was measured colorimetrically at 520 nm. Results represent that some of extracts such as wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper have inhibitory effects on hemoglobin glycation. But some of the extracts such as anise and saffron have not only inhibitory effects but also aggravated this event and have proglycation properties. In accordance with the results obtained we can conclude that wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper especially wild caraway extracts are potent antiglycation agents, which can be of great value in the preventive glycation-associated complications in diabetes.

  2. Effect of some high consumption spices on hemoglobin glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, G H; Dinani, Narges J; Asgary, S; Taher, M; Nikkhoo, N; Boshtam, M

    2014-01-01

    Formation of glycation products is major factor responsible in complications of diabetes. Worldwide trend is toward the use of natural additives in reducing the complications of diseases. Therefore, there is a growing interest in natural antiglycation found in plants. Herbs and spices are one of the most important targets to search for natural antiglycation from the point of view of safety. This study investigated the ability of some of the spices to inhibit glycation process in a hemoglobin/glucose model system and compared their potency with each other. For this subject the best concentration and time to incubate glucose with hemoglobin was investigated. Then the glycosylation degree of hemoglobin in the presence of extracts by the three concentrations 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml was measured colorimetrically at 520 nm. Results represent that some of extracts such as wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper have inhibitory effects on hemoglobin glycation. But some of the extracts such as anise and saffron have not only inhibitory effects but also aggravated this event and have proglycation properties. In accordance with the results obtained we can conclude that wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper especially wild caraway extracts are potent antiglycation agents, which can be of great value in the preventive glycation-associated complications in diabetes.

  3. Effect of glycation of hemoglobin on its interaction with trifluoperazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Manoj; Roy, Anjana; Bose, Tania; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2006-04-01

    Trifluoperazine (TFZ), a phenothiazine drug, penetrates into human erythrocytes and releases oxygen by interaction with hemoglobin. TFZ-induced oxygen release from hyperglycemic erythrocytes isolated from diabetic patients is considerably less compared to that from the cells of normoglycemic individuals. In diabetes mellitus, hemoglobin is significantly glycated by glucose. Non-glycated hemoglobin, HbA0 and its major glycated analog, HbA1c have been separated from the blood samples of diabetic patients. TFZ releases considerable amount of oxygen from HbA0, but very little from HbA1c. Spectrofluorimetric studies reveal that TFZ forms excited state complexes with both HbA0 and HbAlc. Titration of HbA0 with TFZ in a spectrophotometric study exhibits two isosbestic points. Similar experiment with HbAlc causes gradual loss of the Soret peak without appearance of any isosbestic point indicating a possibility of heme loss during interaction, which is also supported by gel filtration experiment and SDS-PAGE experiment followed by heme staining. The results suggest that drug action on hemoglobin is influenced by glycation-induced structural modification of the protein.

  4. The Relationship Between Hemoglobin Level and Intellectual Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Nancy

    In a study to learn whether or not poor nutrition, as indicated by low hemoglobin levels, affects intelligence and behavior, 113 Head Start children in Missoula, Montana took part. Group testing with the Lorge Thorndike Intelligence Test and individual testing with the Wechsler and Primary Scale of Intelligence or Wechsler Intelligence Scale for…

  5. Ultrasonic processing for recovery of chicken erythrocyte hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemoglobin from chicken blood has been shown to be a good substitute for synthetic polymeric flocculants. One stage of processing the blood entails breaking open the cells and releasing the cytoplasmic contents; in the present study, we investigate the use of ultrasonic processing at this stage. Was...

  6. Bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Carrión, Andrés

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial endocarditis (BE) is a disease resulting from the association of morphological alterations of the heart and bacteraemia originating from different sources that at times can be indiscernible (infectious endocarditis). It is classified on the basis of the morphological alteration involved, depending on the clinical manifestations and course of illness, which varies according to the causative microorganism and host conditions (for example, it is characteristic in I.V. drug users). The most common microorganisms involved are: Streptococcus viridans (55%), Staphylococcus aureus (30%), Enterococcus (6%) and HACEK bacteria (corresponding to the initials: Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella and Kingella), although on occasions it can also be caused by fungi. The oral microbiological flora plays a very important role in the aetiopathogenesis of BE, given that the condition may be of oral or dental origin. This paper will deal with the prevention of said bacteraemia. Prophylaxis will be undertaken using amoxicillin or clindamycin according to action protocols, with special emphasis placed on oral hygiene in patients with structural defects of the heart.

  7. Fasting serum glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin level in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R K; Nessa, A; Hossain, M A; Siddiqui, N I; Hussain, M A

    2014-04-01

    Obesity is a condition in which the body fat stores are increased to an extent which impairs health and leads to serious health consequences. The amount of body fat is difficult to measure directly, and is usually determined from an indirect measure - the body mass index (BMI). Increased BMI in obese persons is directly associated with an increase in metabolic disease, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. This Analytical cross sectional study was undertaken to assess the relation between obesity and glycemic control of body by measuring fasting serum glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin. This study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh from 1st July 2011 to 30th June 2012 on 120 equally divided male and female persons within the age range of 25 to 55 years. Age more than 55 years and less than 25 years and diagnosed case of Hypothyroidism, Cushing's syndrome, polycystic ovary, Antipsychotic drug user and regular steroid users were excluded. Non probability purposive type of sampling technique was used for selecting the study subjects. Measurement of body mass index was done as per procedure. Fasting serum glucose was estimated by glucose oxidase method and Glycosylated hemoglobin by Boronate Affinity method. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS (version 17.0). Data were expressed as Mean±SE and statistical significance of difference among the groups were calculated by unpaired student's 't' test and Pearson's correlation coefficient tests were done as applicable. The Mean±SE of fasting serum glucose was significant at 1% level (P value glycosylated hemoglobin level between control and study groups. But there was positive correlation within each group. Fasting serum glucose also showed a bit stronger positive correlation with BMI. Both obese male and female persons showed higher levels of fasting serum glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin. The observed positive correlation between BMI with fasting serum glucose and

  8. Comparable application of the OCT and Abbe refractometers for measurements of glycated hemoglobin portion in blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernovaya, Olga S.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2006-02-01

    It is known that glucose interacts with plasma proteins and hemoglobin in erythrocytes. Glycated (glycosylated) hemoglobin is the result of an irreversible non-enzymatic fixation of glucose on the beta chain of hemoglobin A. The amount of glycated hemoglobin depends on blood glucose concentration and reflects the mean glycemia of about the previous 2-3 months. Glycated hemoglobin is a useful marker for long-term glucose control in diabetic patients. Therefore, the search of quick and high sensitive methods for measurement of glycated hemoglobin portion in blood is important. This study is focused on the determination of refractive index of hemoglobin solution at different glucose concentrations. Measurements were performed using Abbe refractometer at 589 nm and optical coherence tomography (OCT) at 820 nm. The different amount of glucose (from 0 to 1000 mg/dl with a step 100 mg/dl) was added to hemoglobin solution. Theoretical values of refractive index of hemoglobin solutions with glucose were calculated supposing non-interacting hemoglobin and glucose molecules. There is a difference between measured and calculated values of refractive index. This difference is due to glucose binding to hemoglobin. It is shown that the refractive index measurements can be applied for the evaluation of glycated hemoglobin amount.

  9. Two-dimensional analysis of glycated hemoglobin heterogeneity in pediatric type 1 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempe, James M; McGehee, Amanda M; Chalew, Stuart A

    2013-11-15

    Interindividual and ethnic variation in glycated hemoglobin levels, unrelated to blood glucose variation, complicates the clinical use of glycated hemoglobin assays for the diagnosis and management of diabetes. Assessing the types and amounts of glycated hemoglobins present in erythrocytes could provide insight into the mechanism. Blood samples and self-monitored mean blood glucose (MBG) levels were obtained from 85 pediatric type 1 diabetes patients. Glycated hemoglobin levels were measured using three primary assays (boronate-affinity chromatography, capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF), and standardized DCA2000+ immunoassay) and a two-dimensional (2D) analytical system consisting of boronate-affinity chromatography followed by CIEF. The 2D system separated hemoglobin into five subfractions, four of which contained glycated hemoglobins. Glycated hemoglobin measurements were compared in patients with low, moderate, or high hemoglobin glycation index (HGI), a measure of glycated hemoglobin controlled for blood glucose variation. MBG was not significantly different between HGI groups. Glycated hemoglobin levels measured by all three primary assays and in all four glycated 2D subfractions were significantly different between HGI groups and highest in high HGI patients. These results show that interindividual variation in glycated hemoglobin levels was evident in diabetes patients with similar blood glucose levels regardless of which glycated hemoglobins were measured.

  10. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Hemoglobin... discuss blood donor hemoglobin and hematocrit qualification standards in the United States, its impact...

  11. 21 CFR 864.8165 - Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit....8165 Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement. (a) Identification. A calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement is a device that approximates whole blood, red blood cells, or...

  12. Hemoglobin levels in persons with depressive and/or anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lever-van Milligen, Bianca A.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Smit, Johannes H.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Both low and high hemoglobin levels lead to more physical diseases, and both are linked to mortality. Low hemoglobin, often classified as anemia, has also been linked to more depressive symptoms, but whether both hemoglobin extremes are associated with depressive disorder and potentially

  13. Knock-out of SO1377 gene, which encodes the member of a conserved hypothetical bacterial protein family COG2268, results in alteration of iron metabolism, increased spontaneous mutation and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingeman Dawn M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative, gram-negative bacterium capable of coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to a wide range of electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate and metals, and has potential for bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated sites. The complete 5-Mb genome of S. oneidensis MR-1 was sequenced and standard sequence-comparison methods revealed approximately 42% of the MR-1 genome encodes proteins of unknown function. Defining the functions of hypothetical proteins is a great challenge and may need a systems approach. In this study, by using integrated approaches including whole genomic microarray and proteomics, we examined knockout effects of the gene encoding SO1377 (gi24372955, a member of the conserved, hypothetical, bacterial protein family COG2268 (Clusters of Orthologous Group in bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, under various physiological conditions. Results Compared with the wild-type strain, growth assays showed that the deletion mutant had a decreased growth rate when cultured aerobically, but not affected under anaerobic conditions. Whole-genome expression (RNA and protein profiles revealed numerous gene and protein expression changes relative to the wild-type control, including some involved in iron metabolism, oxidative damage protection and respiratory electron transfer, e. g. complex IV of the respiration chain. Although total intracellular iron levels remained unchanged, whole-cell electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR demonstrated that the level of free iron in mutant cells was 3 times less than that of the wild-type strain. Siderophore excretion in the mutant also decreased in iron-depleted medium. The mutant was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and gave rise to 100 times more colonies resistant to gentamicin or kanamycin. Conclusion Our results showed that the knock-out of SO1377 gene had pleiotropic effects and suggested that SO1377 may play a role in iron

  14. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  15. Evaluation of non cyanide methods for hemoglobin estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya B Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hemoglobincyanide method (HiCN method for measuring hemoglobin is used extensively worldwide; its advantages are the ready availability of a stable and internationally accepted reference standard calibrator. However, its use may create a problem, as the waste disposal of large volumes of reagent containing cyanide constitutes a potential toxic hazard. Aims and Objective: As an alternative to drabkin`s method of Hb estimation, we attempted to estimate hemoglobin by other non-cyanide methods: alkaline hematin detergent (AHD-575 using Triton X-100 as lyser and alkaline- borax method using quarternary ammonium detergents as lyser. Materials and Methods: The hemoglobin (Hb results on 200 samples of varying Hb concentrations obtained by these two cyanide free methods were compared with a cyanmethemoglobin method on a colorimeter which is light emitting diode (LED based. Hemoglobin was also estimated in one hundred blood donors and 25 blood samples of infants and compared by these methods. Statistical analysis used was Pearson`s correlation coefficient. Results: The response of the non cyanide method is linear for serially diluted blood samples over the Hb concentration range from 3gm/dl -20 gm/dl. The non cyanide methods has a precision of + 0.25g/dl (coefficient of variation= (2.34% and is suitable for use with fixed wavelength or with colorimeters at wavelength- 530 nm and 580 nm. Correlation of these two methods was excellent (r=0.98. The evaluation has shown it to be as reliable and reproducible as HiCN for measuring hemoglobin at all concentrations. The reagents used in non cyanide methods are non-biohazardous and did not affect the reliability of data determination and also the cost was less than HiCN method. Conclusions: Thus, non cyanide methods of Hb estimation offer possibility of safe and quality Hb estimation and should prove useful for routine laboratory use. Non cyanide methods is easily incorporated in hemobloginometers

  16. Patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunpreet Singh Kahlon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Till now estimation of blood glucose is the highly effective method for diagnosing diabetes mellitus but it provides a short-term picture of control. More evidence is required to prove that plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels together gives a better estimate of glycemic control and compliance with treatment. Indian diabetes risk score (IDRS is a simplified screening tool for identifying undiagnosed diabetic subjects, requires minimum time, and effort and can help to considerably reduce the costs of screening. Objective : To study patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. To find out correlation between levels of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics and to calculate IDRS of the study population. Materials and Methods : A cross sectional study was conducted among 300 known diabetic patients attending outpatient department of a rural medical college in Haryana, India. Following standard procedures and protocols FPG and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured to find out a pattern of glycemic control in them after taking their written and informed consent. A correlation between the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose was also calculated. These patients were made to fill a performa and their demographic and clinical risk factors were noted and based on this, their IDRS was calculated. This was done to validate the IDRS in Indian rural population. Results : Fifty-two percent of the population had fasting plasma glucose level between 125-150 mg/dl, 21% had this level between 151-175 mg/dl. Thirteen percent of the study subjects had HbA1C between 6.5-7.5, more than half (57.3% had this value between 7.5-8.5, 12% and 18% had values between 8.5-9.5 and 9.5-10.5, respectively. Twelve percent of the participants had HbA1C level higher than 10.5. Correlation of fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1C was also studied and found that correlation coefficient came

  17. The PRE-Derived NMR Model of the 38.8-kDa Tri-Domain IsdH Protein from Staphylococcus aureus Suggests That It Adaptively Recognizes Human Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjodt, Megan; Macdonald, Ramsay; Spirig, Thomas; Chan, Albert H; Dickson, Claire F; Fabian, Marian; Olson, John S; Gell, David A; Clubb, Robert T

    2016-03-27

    Staphylococcus aureus is a medically important bacterial pathogen that, during infections, acquires iron from human hemoglobin (Hb). It uses two closely related iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins to capture and extract the oxidized form of heme (hemin) from Hb, IsdH and IsdB. Both receptors rapidly extract hemin using a conserved tri-domain unit consisting of two NEAT (near iron transporter) domains connected by a helical linker domain. To gain insight into the mechanism of extraction, we used NMR to investigate the structure and dynamics of the 38.8-kDa tri-domain IsdH protein (IsdH(N2N3), A326-D660 with a Y642A mutation that prevents hemin binding). The structure was modeled using long-range paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) distance restraints, dihedral angle, small-angle X-ray scattering, residual dipolar coupling and inter-domain NOE nuclear Overhauser effect data. The receptor adopts an extended conformation wherein the linker and N3 domains pack against each other via a hydrophobic interface. In contrast, the N2 domain contacts the linker domain via a hydrophilic interface and, based on NMR relaxation data, undergoes inter-domain motions enabling it to reorient with respect to the body of the protein. Ensemble calculations were used to estimate the range of N2 domain positions compatible with the PRE data. A comparison of the Hb-free and Hb-bound forms reveals that Hb binding alters the positioning of the N2 domain. We propose that binding occurs through a combination of conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms that may promote hemin release from Hb by altering the position of its F helix.

  18. Extracardiac manifestations of bacterial endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, J E

    1979-08-01

    Bacterial endocarditis is an elusive disease that challenges clinicians' diagnostic capabilities. Because it can present with various combinations of extravalvular signs and symptoms, the underlying primary disease can go unnoticed.A review of the various extracardiac manifestations of bacterial endocarditis suggests three main patterns by which the valvular infection can be obscured. (1) A major clinical event may be so dramatic that subtle evidence of endocarditis is overlooked. The rupture of a mycotic aneurysm may simulate a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a congenital aneurysm. (2) The symptoms of bacterial endocarditis may be constitutional complaints easily attributable to a routine, trivial illness. Symptoms of low-grade fever, myalgias, back pain and anorexia may mimic a viral syndrome. (3) Endocarditis poses a difficult diagnostic dilemma when it generates constellations of findings that are classic for other disorders. Complaints of arthritis and arthralgias accompanied by hematuria and antinuclear antibody may suggest systemic lupus erythematosus; a renal biopsy study showing diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis may support this diagnosis. The combination of fever, petechiae, altered mental status, thrombocytopenia, azotemia and anemia may promote the diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. When the protean guises of bacterial endocarditis create these clinical difficulties, errors in diagnosis occur and appropriate therapy is delayed. Keen awareness of the varied disease presentations will improve success in managing endocarditis by fostering rapid diagnosis and prompt therapy.

  19. Concurrent measurement of cellular turbidity and hemoglobin to evaluate the antioxidant activity of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellik, Yuva; Iguer-Ouada, Mokrane

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, a multitude of analytical methods for measuring antioxidant activity of plant extracts has been developed. However, when using methods to determine hemoglobin released from human erythrocytes treated with ginger extracts, we found hemoglobin concentrations were significantly higher than in untreated control samples. This suggests in the presence of antioxidants that measuring hemoglobin alone is not sufficient to determine hemolysis. We show concurrent measurement of erythrocyte concentration and hemoglobin is essential in such assays, and describe a new protocol based on simultaneous measurement of cellular turbidity and hemoglobin.

  20. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua hemoglobin genes: multiplicity and polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamperl A Kurt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemoglobin (Hb polymorphism, assessed by protein gel electrophoresis, has been used almost exclusively to characterize the genetic structure of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua populations and to establish correlations with phenotypic traits such as Hb oxygen binding capacity, temperature tolerance and growth characteristics. The genetic system used to explain the results of gel electrophoresis entails the presence of one polymorphic locus with two major alleles (HbI-1; HbI-2. However, vertebrates have more than one gene encoding Hbs and recent studies have reported that more than one Hb gene is present in Atlantic cod. These observations prompted us to re-evaluate the number of Hb genes expressed in Atlantic cod, and to perform an in depth search for polymorphisms that might produce relevant phenotypes for breeding programs. Results Analysis of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs led to the identification of nine distinct Hb transcripts; four corresponding to the α Hb gene family and five to the β Hb gene family. To gain insights about the Hb genes encoding these transcripts, genomic sequence data was generated from heterozygous (HbI-1/2 parents and fifteen progeny; five of each HbI type, i.e., HbI-1/1, HbI-1/2 and HbI-2/2. β Hb genes displayed more polymorphism than α Hb genes. Two major allele types (β1A and β1B that differ by two linked non-synonymous substitutions (Met55Val and Lys62Ala were found in the β1 Hb gene, and the distribution of these β1A and β1B alleles among individuals was congruent with that of the HbI-1 and HbI-2 alleles determined by protein gel electrophoresis. RT-PCR and Q-PCR analysis of the nine Hb genes indicates that all genes are expressed in adult fish, but their level of expression varies greatly; higher expression of almost all Hb genes was found in individuals displaying the HbI-2/2 electrophoretic type. Conclusion This study indicates that more Hb genes are present and expressed in adult

  1. First Reported Case of Proliferative Retinopathy in Hemoglobin SE Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Baciu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first case of proliferative sickle cell retinopathy in a patient with hemoglobin SE (Hb SE disease. Only a few dozen cases of Hb SE disease have been reported previously, and none had evidence of proliferative retinopathy. A 56-year-old African American man presented to our clinic for routine examination and was found to have sea-fan peripheral neovascularization bilaterally without maculopathy. Hemoglobin analysis revealed Hb SE heterozygosity. Sector laser photocoagulation to areas of nonperfusion in both eyes resulted in regression of the peripheral neovascularization over a period of 6 months. Although Hb SE disease is rare, the incidence of Hb SE disease is postulated to rise in the future. Awareness of its potential ocular complications is needed to appropriately refer these patients for screening.

  2. Hemoglobin concentrations and associated factors in adolescentes from Recife, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Barros Soares Mendonça

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of anemia and associated factors in adolescents from the city of Recife in Pernambuco state. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study, involving a random sample of 256 adolescents of both genders, aged 13 to 18, whose hemoglobin concentrations were evaluated, along with their nutritional status and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: The prevalence of inadequate hemoglobin concentrations was 10.2% [CI95%=6.7-14.5], reaching levels considered as mild anemia (9 g/dL 0.05, nor with socioeconomic or demographic characteristics (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: Although the prevalence of anemia was low and classified as a mild health problem, preventive nutrition education involving the dissemination of healthy eating habits in schools and encouraging the consumption of iron-rich foods are strongly recommended.

  3. IsdB-dependent hemoglobin binding is required for acquisition of heme by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchany, Gleb; Sheldon, Jessica R; Dickson, Claire F; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Read, Timothy D; Gell, David A; Heinrichs, David E; Skaar, Eric P

    2014-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality. As with most bacteria, S. aureus requires iron to cause disease, and it can acquire iron from host hemoglobin. The current model for staphylococcal hemoglobin-iron acquisition proposes that S. aureus binds hemoglobin through the surface-exposed hemoglobin receptor IsdB. IsdB removes heme from bound hemoglobin and transfers this cofactor to other proteins of the Isd system, which import and degrade heme to release iron in the cytoplasm. Here we demonstrate that the individual components of the Isd system are required for growth on low nanomolar concentrations of hemoglobin as a sole source of iron. An in-depth study of hemoglobin binding by IsdB revealed key residues that are required for hemoglobin binding. Further, we show that these residues are necessary for heme extraction from hemoglobin and growth on hemoglobin as a sole iron source. These processes are found to contribute to the pathogenicity of S. aureus in a murine model of infection. Together these results build on the model for Isd-mediated hemoglobin binding and heme-iron acquisition during the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection.

  4. Hemoglobin is present as a canonical α2β2 tetramer in dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Roberta; Zucchelli, Silvia; Codrich, Marta; Marcuzzi, Federica; Verde, Cinzia; Gustincich, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    Hemoglobin is the oxygen carrier in blood erythrocytes. Oxygen coordination is mediated by α2β2 tetrameric structure via binding of the ligand to the heme iron atom. This structure is essential for hemoglobin function in the blood. In the last few years, expression of hemoglobin has been found in atypical sites, including the brain. Transcripts for α and β chains of hemoglobin as well as hemoglobin immunoreactivity have been shown in mesencephalic A9 dopaminergic neurons, whose selective degeneration leads to Parkinson's disease. To gain further insights into the roles of hemoglobin in the brain, we examined its quaternary structure in dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that (i) in mouse dopaminergic cell line stably over-expressing α and β chains, hemoglobin exists as an α2β2 tetramer; (ii) similarly to the over-expressed protein, endogenous hemoglobin forms a tetramer of 64kDa; (iii) hemoglobin also forms high molecular weight insoluble aggregates; and (iv) endogenous hemoglobin retains its tetrameric structure in mouse mesencephalon in vivo. In conclusion, these results suggest that neuronal hemoglobin may be endowed with some of the biochemical activities and biological function associated to its role in erythroid cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins.

  5. MicroRNA-15a and -16-1 act via MYB to elevate fetal hemoglobin expression in human trisomy 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Menne, Tobias F; Šćepanović, Danilo; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Ji, Peng; Kim, Jinkuk; Thiru, Prathapan; Orkin, Stuart H; Lander, Eric S; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-01-25

    Many human aneuploidy syndromes have unique phenotypic consequences, but in most instances it is unclear whether these phenotypes are attributable to alterations in the dosage of specific genes. In human trisomy 13, there is delayed switching and persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) and elevation of embryonic hemoglobin in newborns. Using partial trisomy cases, we mapped this trait to chromosomal band 13q14; by examining the genes in this region, two microRNAs, miR-15a and -16-1, appear as top candidates for the elevated HbF levels. Indeed, increased expression of these microRNAs in primary human erythroid progenitor cells results in elevated fetal and embryonic hemoglobin gene expression. Moreover, we show that a direct target of these microRNAs, MYB, plays an important role in silencing the fetal and embryonic hemoglobin genes. Thus we demonstrate how the developmental regulation of a clinically important human trait can be better understood through the genetic and functional study of aneuploidy syndromes and suggest that miR-15a, -16-1, and MYB may be important therapeutic targets to increase HbF levels in patients with sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia.

  6. The T-to-R transformation in hemoglobin: a reevaluation.

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, R.; Rose, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between the T, R, and R2 quaternary forms of hemoglobin is examined by computational experiments. Contrary to previous suggestions, we propose that the R quaternary form may lie on the pathway from T to R2. This proposal is consistent with four independent observations. (i) Difference distance maps are used to identify those parts of the molecule that undergo conformational change upon oxygenation. The simplest interpretation of these maps brackets R between T and R2. (ii) Li...

  7. Temperature-dependent enthalpy of oxygenation in Antarctic fish hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, A.; Wells, R.M.G.; Weber, Roy E.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the oxygen-binding properties of the hemoglobins of three cold-adapted Antarctic fish species, Dissostichus mawsoni, Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Trematomus, sp., has been investigated under different pH values and buffer conditions. A clear non linear van't Hoff plot...... an adaptation to the low-temperature habitat needs to be revised. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Inc Udgivelsesdato: 1997/10...

  8. Optical Spectra of Hemoglobin Taken from Alcohol Dependent Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Dudok K.; Dudok T.; Vlokh I.; Vlokh R.

    2005-01-01

    Optical spectra of CNMetHb and CNMetHb-Coomassi G-250, taken from the blood of humans with alcohol dependence, are studied in the spectral range of 450–750nm. The shifts in the spectral absorption maxima of CNMetHb-Coomassi G-250 complexes are observed for the diseased persons with alcohol dependence. The obtained results show that the hemoglobin structure of alcohol dependent humans is changed.

  9. Effect of some high consumption spices on hemoglobin glycation

    OpenAIRE

    Naderi, G. H.; Narges J Dinani; S Asgary; M Taher; Nikkhoo, N.; Boshtam, M.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of glycation products is major factor responsible in complications of diabetes. Worldwide trend is toward the use of natural additives in reducing the complications of diseases. Therefore, there is a growing interest in natural antiglycation found in plants. Herbs and spices are one of the most important targets to search for natural antiglycation from the point of view of safety. This study investigated the ability of some of the spices to inhibit glycation process in a hemoglobin/...

  10. Reference intervals for acetylated fetal hemoglobin in healthy newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Paleari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The acetylated fetal hemoglobin (AcHbF derives from an enzyme-mediated post-translational modification occurring on the N-terminal glycine residues of γ-chains. At present, no established data are available on reference intervals for AcHbF in newborns. A total of 92 healthy infants, with gestational age between 37 and 41 weeks were selected for the establishment of AcHbF reference intervals. Blood samples were collected by heel pricking, when collecting routine neonatal screening, and the hemoglobin pattern was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. AcHbF results were then normalized for HbF content in order to account for differences in hemoglobin switch. No difference was found in AcHbF values between genders (P=0.858. AcHbF results were as follow: 12.8±0.8% (mean±standard deviation, reference interval: 11.3-14.3%. This finding could facilitate further studies aimed to assess the possible use of AcHbF, for instance as a possible fetal metabolic biomarker during pregnancy.

  11. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a predictor of iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Rini Suari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is the most common form of anemia in developing countries, such as Indonesia. Iron deficiency anemia in children is a serious problem because it affects their growth and development. Early detection of IDA and subsequent treatment in childhood may prevent future health problems.Objective To assess the use of reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr to detect IDA in children aged 6-60 months.Methods We performed a cross-sectional study to measure the sensitivity and specificity of CHr compared to serum ferritin which is considered to be the gold standard for IDA diagnosis. The study was conducted from September 2011 to March 2013 in children aged 6-60 months who visited the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic, Sanglah Hospital, and Puskesmas II in West Denpasar. Data analysis was performed by 2x2 table. The results were assessed by area under the curve (AUC and receiver operating characteristic (ROC.Results Of 121 children underwent blood testing during the study period, 69 children were excluded because they did not have hypochromic microcytic anemia, leaving 52 subjects eligible for the study. The prevalence of IDA in this study was 31%. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr ≤ 23.1 pg had 88% (95%CI 71 to 100% sensitivity and 25% (95%CI 11 to 39% specificity.Conclusion Reticulocyte hemoglobin content < 23.1 pg may be a good predictor of IDA.

  12. Fluorescence and reflectance properties of hemoglobin-pigmented skin disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanova, P.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.

    2007-06-01

    There has been growing interest in clinical application of laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) and reflectance spectroscopy (RS) to differentiate disease from normal surrounding tissue, including skin pathologies. Pigmented cutaneous lesions diagnosis plays important role in clinical practice, as malignant melanoma, which is characterized with greatest mortality from all skin cancer types, must be carefully discriminated form other colorized pathologies. The goals of this work were investigation of cutaneous hemoglobin-pigmented lesions (heamangioma, angiokeratoma, and fibroma) by the methods of LIAFS and RS. Spectra from healthy skin areas near to the lesion were detected to be used posteriori in analysis. Fluorescence and reflectance of cutaneous hemoglobin-pigmented lesions are used to develop criterion for differentiation from other pigmented pathologies. Origins of the spectral features obtained are discussed and determination of lesion types is achieved using selected spectral features. The spectral results, obtained were used to develop multispectral diagnostic algorithms based on the most prominent spectral features from the fluorescence and reflectance spectra of the lesions investigated. In comparison between normal skin and different cutaneous lesion types and between lesion types themselves sensitivities and specificities higher than 90 % were achieved. These results show a perspective possibility to differentiate hemoglobin-pigmented lesions from other pigmented pathologies using non-invasive and real time discrimination procedure.

  13. Methylglyoxal-induced modifications of hemoglobin: structural and functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Tania; Bhattacherjee, Abhishek; Banerjee, Sauradipta; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2013-01-15

    Methylglyoxal (MG) reacts with proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Although hemoglobin modification by MG is known, the modified protein is not yet characterized. We have studied the nature of AGE formed by MG on human hemoglobin (HbA(0)) and its effect on structure and function of the protein. After reaction of HbA(0) with MG, the modified protein (MG-Hb) was separated and its properties were compared with those of the unmodified protein HbA(0). As shown by MALDI-mass spectrometry, MG converted Arg-92α and Arg-104β to hydroimidazolones in MG-Hb. Compared to HbA(0), MG-Hb exhibited decreased absorbance around 280nm, reduced tryptophan fluorescence (excitation 285nm) and increased α-helix content. However, MG modification did not change the quaternary structure of the heme protein. MG-Hb appeared to be more thermolabile than HbA(0). The modified protein was found to be more effective than HbA(0) in H(2)O(2)-mediated iron release and oxidative damages involving Fenton reaction. MG-Hb exhibited less peroxidase activity and more esterase activity than HbA(0). MG-induced structural and functional changes of hemoglobin may enhance oxidative stress and associated complications, particularly in diabetes mellitus with increased level of MG.

  14. Pancreatic ascites hemoglobin contributes to the systemic response in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Upon hemolysis extracellular hemoglobin causes oxidative stress and cytotoxicity due to its peroxidase activity. Extracellular hemoglobin may release free hemin, which increases vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and adhesion molecule expression. Pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid is reddish and may contain extracellular hemoglobin. Our aim has been to determine the role of extracellular hemoglobin in the local and systemic inflammatory response during severe acute pancreatitis in rats. To this end we studied taurocholate-induced necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. First, extracellular hemoglobin in ascites and plasma was quantified and the hemolytic action of ascitic fluid was tested. Second, we assessed whether peritoneal lavage prevented the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma during pancreatitis. Third, hemoglobin was purified from rat erythrocytes and administered intraperitoneally to assess the local and systemic effects of ascitic-associated extracellular hemoglobin during acute pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin and hemin levels markedly increased in ascitic fluid and plasma during necrotizing pancreatitis. Peroxidase activity was very high in ascites. The peritoneal lavage abrogated the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma. The administration of extracellular hemoglobin enhanced ascites; dramatically increased abdominal fat necrosis; upregulated tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 gene expression; and decreased expression of interleukin-10 in abdominal adipose tissue during pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin enhanced the gene expression and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other hypoxia-inducible factor-related genes in the lung. Extracellular hemoglobin also increased myeloperoxidase activity in the lung. In conclusion, extracellular hemoglobin contributes to the inflammatory response in severe acute pancreatitis through abdominal fat necrosis and inflammation

  15. Molten globule of hemoglobin proceeds into aggregates and advanced glycated end products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Iram

    Full Text Available Conformational alterations of bovine hemoglobin (Hb upon sequential addition of glyoxal over a range of 0-90% v/v were investigated. At 20% v/v glyoxal, molten globule (MG state of Hb was observed by altered tryptophan fluorescence, high ANS binding, existence of intact heme, native-like secondary structure as depicted by far-UV circular dichroism (CD and ATR-FTIR spectra as well as loss in tertiary structure as confirmed by near-UV CD spectra. In addition, size exclusion chromatography analysis depicted that MG state at 20% v/v glyoxal corresponded to expanded pre-dissociated dimers. Aggregates of Hb were detected at 70% v/v glyoxal. These aggregates of Hb had altered tryptophan environment, low ANS binding, exposed heme, increased β-sheet secondary structure, loss in tertiary structure, enhanced thioflavin T (ThT fluorescence and red shifted Congo Red (CR absorbance. On incubating Hb with 30% v/v glyoxal for 0-20 days, advanced glycation end products (AGEs were detected on day 20. These AGEs were characterised by enhanced tryptophan fluorescence at 450 nm, exposure of heme, increase in intermolecular β-sheets, enhanced ThT fluorescence and red shift in CR absorbance. Comet assay revealed aggregates and AGEs to be genotoxic in nature. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the amorphous structure of aggregates and branched fibrils of AGEs. The transformation of α-helix to β-sheet usually alters the normal protein to amyloidogenic resulting in a variety of protein conformational disorders such as diabetes, prion and Huntington's.

  16. Hemoglobinas AS/alfa talassemia: importância diagnóstica Hemoglobins AS/alpha thalassemia: diagnostic importance

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    Renata Tomé-Alves

    2000-12-01

    , the Sickle Cell beta Thalassemia syndromes, and Hemoglobinopathies in which hemoglobin S is in association with another abnormal hemoglobin, such as hemoglobin S/C. The Sickle Cell trait (hemoglobin AS associated with Alpha Thalassemia presents alterations in the red blood cells morphology, usually absent in the heterozygous for this hemoglobin variant. The interaction between hemoglobin S and alpha Thalassemia has been described as one of the factors responsible for the improvement in the clinical picture of homozygous of hemoglobin S (Sickle Cell Anemia, decreasing the number of episodes of pain. The genetic mechanisms of this influence are evaluated using molecular analyses of the human globin genes. With the objective of verifying the presence of alpha Thalassemia in heterozygous of hemoglobin S, with anemia, sent to the Laboratory of Hemoglobins, Department of Biology, UNESP, São José do Rio Preto, SP, we analyzed 1002 blood samples with Sickle Cell trait, in the period from 1990 to 1998. The samples were picked with EDTA 5% as anticoagulant, after previous authorization of the carriers. Appropriated counseling and management requires definitive diagnosis. For the laboratorial diagnosis the blood samples were submitted to electrophoretic procedures in alkaline and acid pH and cytological evaluation of hemoglobin H. The electrophoretic procedures confirmed the presence of hemoglobin AS. The cytological evaluation evidenced the presence of alpha Thalassemia. Of this total analyzed, 16(1,59% blood samples presented the association between hemoglobin AS and alpha Thalassemia and two individuals belonged of the same family. Our results addressed us to suggest to the routine laboratories, that is important to accomplish the research of alpha Thalassemia among the Sickle Cell trait, with anemia, to verify the interaction with alpha Thalassemia, supplying to the carriers a important information on its hematological profile, genetic pattern of hemoglobinopathies and the

  17. Glycated hemoglobin and its spinoffs: Cardiovascular disease markers or risk factors?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jumana; Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major complication of diabetes, increasing the risk of cardiovascular related morbidities and mortalities. The hallmark of diabetes is hyperglycemia which duration is best predicted by elevated glycated haemoglobin A1C(Hb A1C) levels. Diabetic complications are usually attributed to oxidative stress associated with glycation of major structural and functional proteins. This non-enzymatic glycation of long lived proteins such as collagen, albumin, fibrinogen, liver enzymes and globulins result in the formation of early and advanced glycation end products(AGEs) associated with the production of myriads of free radicles and oxidants that have detrimental effects leading to diabetic complications. AGEs have been extensively discussed in the literature as etiological factors in the advancement of atherogenic events. Mechanisms described include the effects of glycation on protein structure and function that lead to defective receptor binding, impairment of immune system and enzyme function and alteration of basement membrane structural integrity. Hemoglobin(Hb) is a major circulating protein susceptible to glycation. Glycated Hb, namely Hb A1 C is used as a useful tool in the diagnosis of diabetes progression. Many studies have shown strong positive associations between elevated Hb A1 C levels and existing cardiovascular disease and major risk factors. Also, several studies presented Hb A1 C as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. In spite of extensive reports on positive associations, limited evidence is available considering the role of glycated Hb in the etiology of atherosclerosis. This editorial highlights potential mechanisms by which glycated hemoglobin may contribute, as a causative factor, to the progression of atherosclerosis in diabetics.

  18. Role of alpha-hemoglobin-stabilizing protein in normal erythropoiesis and beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mitchell J; Zhou, Suiping; Feng, Liang; Gell, David A; Mackay, Joel P; Shi, Yigong; Gow, Andrew J

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis is coordinated by homeostatic mechanisms to limit the accumulation of free alpha or beta subunits, which are cytotoxic. Alpha hemoglobin-stabilizing protein (AHSP) is an abundant erythroid protein that specifically binds free alphaHb, stabilizes its structure, and limits its ability to participate in chemical reactions that generate reactive oxygen species. Gene ablation studies in mice demonstrate that AHSP is required for normal erythropoiesis. AHSP-null erythrocytes are short-lived, contain Hb precipitates, and exhibit signs of oxidative damage. Loss of AHSP exacerbates beta-thalassemia in mice, indicating that altered AHSP expression or function could modify thalassemia phenotypes in humans, a topic that is beginning to be explored in clinical studies. We used biochemical, spectroscopic, and crystallographic methods to examine how AHSP stabilizes alphaHb. AHSP binds the G and H helices of alphaHb on a surface that largely overlaps with the alpha1-beta1 interface of HbA. This result explains previous findings that betaHb can competitively displace AHSP from alphaHb to form HbA tetramer. Remarkably, binding of AHSP to oxygenated alphaHb induces dramatic conformational changes and converts the heme-bound iron to an oxidized hemichrome state in which all six coordinate positions are occupied. This structure limits the reactivity of heme iron, providing a mechanism by which AHSP stabilizes alphaHb. These findings suggest a biochemical pathway through which AHSP might participate in normal Hb synthesis and modulate the severity of thalassemias. Moreover, understanding how AHSP stabilizes alphaHb provides a theoretical basis for new strategies to inhibit the damaging effects of free alphaHb that accumulates in beta-thalassemia.

  19. Hemoglobin interactions with αB crystallin: a direct test of sensitivity to protein instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler J W Clark

    Full Text Available As a small stress response protein, human αB crystallin, detects protein destabilization that can alter structure and function to cause self assembly of fibrils or aggregates in diseases of aging. The sensitivity of αB crystallin to protein instability was evaluated using wild-type hemoglobin (HbA and hemoglobin S (HbS, the glutamate-6-valine mutant that forms elongated, filamentous aggregates in sickling red blood cells. The progressive thermal unfolding and aggregation of HbA and HbS in solution at 37°C, 50°C and 55°C was measured as increased light scattering. UV circular dichroism (UVCD was used to evaluate conformational changes in HbA and HbS with time at the selected temperatures. The changes in interactions between αB crystallin and HbA or HbS with temperature were analyzed using differential centrifugation and SDS PAGE at 37°C, 50°C and 55°C. After only 5 minutes at the selected temperatures, differences in the aggregation or conformation of HbA and HbS were not observed, but αB crystallin bound approximately 6% and 25% more HbS than HbA at 37°C, and 50°C respectively. The results confirmed (a the remarkable sensitivity of αB crystallin to structural instabilities at the very earliest stages of thermal unfolding and (b an ability to distinguish the self assembling mutant form of HbS from the wild type HbA in solution.

  20. Glycated hemoglobin and its spinoffs: Cardiovascular disease markers or risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Jumana

    2015-08-26

    Atherosclerosis is a major complication of diabetes, increasing the risk of cardiovascular related morbidities and mortalities. The hallmark of diabetes is hyperglycemia which duration is best predicted by elevated glycated haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) levels. Diabetic complications are usually attributed to oxidative stress associated with glycation of major structural and functional proteins. This non-enzymatic glycation of long lived proteins such as collagen, albumin, fibrinogen, liver enzymes and globulins result in the formation of early and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) associated with the production of myriads of free radicles and oxidants that have detrimental effects leading to diabetic complications. AGEs have been extensively discussed in the literature as etiological factors in the advancement of atherogenic events. Mechanisms described include the effects of glycation on protein structure and function that lead to defective receptor binding, impairment of immune system and enzyme function and alteration of basement membrane structural integrity. Hemoglobin (Hb) is a major circulating protein susceptible to glycation. Glycated Hb, namely HbA1C is used as a useful tool in the diagnosis of diabetes progression. Many studies have shown strong positive associations between elevated HbA1C levels and existing cardiovascular disease and major risk factors. Also, several studies presented HbA1C as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. In spite of extensive reports on positive associations, limited evidence is available considering the role of glycated Hb in the etiology of atherosclerosis. This editorial highlights potential mechanisms by which glycated hemoglobin may contribute, as a causative factor, to the progression of atherosclerosis in diabetics.

  1. Comparison of the binding of the dyes Sudan II and Sudan IV to bovine hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haoyu; Xia, Qing; Liu, Rutao, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn

    2014-04-15

    Sudan dyes are widely used in industry, and sometimes illegally used as food additives despite their potential toxicity. In this work, the interactions of Sudan II and Sudan IV with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) were investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, resonance light scattering (RLS), UV–vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular modeling techniques. Binding of Sudan dyes to BHb could cause static quenching of the fluorescence, indicating changes in the microenvironment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues. The binding constants estimated for Sudan II and IV were 1.84×10{sup 4} L mol{sup −1} and 2.54×10{sup 4} L mol{sup −1}, respectively, at 293 K (20 °C). Each protein molecule bound one Sudan molecule approximately. Sudan II and IV were held at the hydrophobic cavity of BHb mainly by hydrophobic interaction. The decrease of α-helix and the increase of β-sheet seen in the CD spectra revealed a conformational alteration of the protein. From all the results, we conclude that Sudan IV has a stronger impact on the structure and function of BHb than that of Sudan II. -- Highlights: • Spectroscopic results show interaction details of Sudan II and IV with BHb. • The interaction of BHb with Sudan dyes is spontaneous with a 1:1 stoichiometry. • Sudan II and IV are located at the hydrophobic cavity of the BHb, and form complexes via hydrophobic interaction. • A stronger influence of bovine hemoglobin is caused by Sudan IV than that of Sudan II.

  2. Hemoglobin redux: combining neutron and X-ray diffraction with mass spectrometry to analyse the quaternary state of oxidized hemoglobins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueser, Timothy C., E-mail: timothy.mueser@utoledo.edu; Griffith, Wendell P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Kovalevsky, Andrey Y. [Bioscience Division, MS M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Guo, Jingshu; Seaver, Sean [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Langan, Paul [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Bioscience Division, MS M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hanson, B. Leif [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of cyanomethemoglobin are being used to evaluate the structural waters within the dimer–dimer interface involved in quaternary-state transitions. Improvements in neutron diffraction instrumentation are affording the opportunity to re-examine the structures of vertebrate hemoglobins and to interrogate proton and solvent position changes between the different quaternary states of the protein. For hemoglobins of unknown primary sequence, structural studies of cyanomethemoglobin (CNmetHb) are being used to help to resolve sequence ambiguity in the mass spectra. These studies have also provided additional structural evidence for the involvement of oxidized hemoglobin in the process of erythrocyte senescence. X-ray crystal studies of Tibetan snow leopard CNmetHb have shown that this protein crystallizes in the B state, a structure with a more open dyad, which possibly has relevance to RBC band 3 protein binding and erythrocyte senescence. R-state equine CNmetHb crystal studies elaborate the solvent differences in the switch and hinge region compared with a human deoxyhemoglobin T-state neutron structure. Lastly, comparison of histidine protonation between the T and R state should enumerate the Bohr-effect protons.

  3. Hemoglobin redux: combining neutron and X-ray diffraction with mass spectrometry to analyse the quaternary state of oxidized hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Timothy C; Griffith, Wendell P; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Guo, Jingshu; Seaver, Sean; Langan, Paul; Hanson, B Leif

    2010-11-01

    Improvements in neutron diffraction instrumentation are affording the opportunity to re-examine the structures of vertebrate hemoglobins and to interrogate proton and solvent position changes between the different quaternary states of the protein. For hemoglobins of unknown primary sequence, structural studies of cyanomethemoglobin (CNmetHb) are being used to help to resolve sequence ambiguity in the mass spectra. These studies have also provided additional structural evidence for the involvement of oxidized hemoglobin in the process of erythrocyte senescence. X-ray crystal studies of Tibetan snow leopard CNmetHb have shown that this protein crystallizes in the B state, a structure with a more open dyad, which possibly has relevance to RBC band 3 protein binding and erythrocyte senescence. R-state equine CNmetHb crystal studies elaborate the solvent differences in the switch and hinge region compared with a human deoxyhemoglobin T-state neutron structure. Lastly, comparison of histidine protonation between the T and R state should enumerate the Bohr-effect protons.

  4. Current hemoglobin levels are more predictive of disease progression than hemoglobin measured at baseline in patients receiving antiretroviral treatment for HIV type 1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalska, Justyna D; Mocroft, Amanda; Blaxhult, Anders;

    2007-01-01

    The role of hemoglobin levels as an independent prognostic marker of progression to AIDS and/or death in HIV-infected patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) was investigated. A total of 2,579 patients from the EuroSIDA cohort with hemoglobin, CD4 cell count, and HIV RNA viral...

  5. Clinical, hematological and genetic data of a cohort of children with hemoglobin SD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo do Val Rezende

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: The hemoglobin FSD is very uncommon in newborn screening programs for sickle cell disease. In the program of Minas Gerais, Brazil, the clinical course of children with hemoglobin SD was observed to be heterogeneous. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence (1999-2012 and to describe the natural history of a cohort of newborns with hemoglobin SD. METHODS: Isoelectric focusing was the primary method used in newborn screening. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and gene sequencing were used to identify mutant alleles and for haplotyping. Gap-polymerase chain reaction was used to detect alpha-thalassemia. RESULTS: Eleven cases of hemoglobin S/D-Punjab and eight of Hb S-Korle Bu were detected. Other variants with hemoglobin D mobility were not identified. All hemoglobin D-Punjab and hemoglobin Korle Bu alleles were associated with haplotype I. Among the children with hemoglobin S/D-Punjab, there were four with the ßS CAR haplotype, six with the Benin haplotype, and one atypical. Results of laboratory tests for hemoglobin S/D-Punjab and hemoglobin S-Korle Bu were: hemoglobin 8.0 and 12.3 g/dL (p-value <0.001, leukocyte count 13.9 × 109/L and 10.5 × 109/L (p-value = 0.003, reticulocytes 7.5% and 1.0% (p-value <0.001, hemoglobin F concentration 16.1% and 6.9% (p-value = 0.001 and oxygen saturation 91.9% and 97% (p-value = 0.002, respectively. Only hemoglobin S/D-Punjab children had acute pain crises and needed blood transfusions or hydroxyurea. Those with the Benin ßS haplotype had higher total hemoglobin and hemoglobin F concentrations compared to the CAR haplotype. Transcranial Doppler was normal in all children. CONCLUSION: The clinical course and blood cell counts of children with hemoglobin S/D-Punjab were very similar to those of hemoglobin SS children. In contrast, children with hemoglobin S-Korle Bu had clinical course and blood cell counts like children with the sickle

  6. Recombinant Escherichia coli strains with inducible Campylobacter jejuni single domain hemoglobin CHb expression exhibited improved cell growth in bioreactor culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available Maintaining an appropriate concentration of dissolved oxygen in aqueous solution is critical for efficient operation of a bioreactor, requiring sophisticated engineering design and a system of regulation to maximize oxygen transfer from the injected air bubbles to the cells. Bacterial hemoglobins are oxygen-binding proteins that transfer oxygen from the environment to metabolic processes and allow bacteria to grow even under microaerophilic conditions. To improve the oxygen utilization efficiency of cells and overcome the oxygen shortage in bioreactors, the gene coding for the Campylobacter jejuni single domain hemoglobin (CHb gene was artificially synthesized and functionally expressed under the control of inducible expression promoters PT7 and Pvgh in Escherichia coli. The effects of the recombinants PT7-CHb and Pvgh-CHb on cell growth were evaluated in aerobic shake flasks, anaerobic capped bottles and a 5-L bioreactor, and a pronounced improvement in cell biomass was observed for CHb-expressing cells. To determine the growth curves, CHb gene expression, and CHb oxygen-binding capacity of specific recombinants with different promoters, we determined the time course of CHb gene expression in the two recombinants by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and CO differential spectrum assays. Based on the growth patterns of the two recombinants in the bioreactor, we proposed different recombinant types with optimal performance under specific culture conditions.

  7. Biosorption of lead by e. coli strains expressingvitreoscilla hemoglobin: isotherm modeling with two-and three-parameter models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aljundi, Isam H. [Chemical Engineering Department, Mutah University, Al-Karak (Jordan); Khleifat, Khaled M. [Biology Department, Mutah University, Al-Karak (Jordan)

    2010-06-15

    Biosorption is presented as an alternative choice to traditional physicochemical means for removing toxic metals from groundwater and wastewaters. Removal of lead (Pb) from solutions was studied using Escherichia coli (parental) and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb)-expressing E. coli (transformed) cells. Pb biosorption was increased in bacterial hemoglobin-expressing E. coli cells grown in Luria broth B containing different concentrations of Pb{sup 2+}. The maximum Pb{sup 2+} biosorption of transformed and parental cells was determined to be 612 and 370 {mu}g Pb/g biomass, respectively. The inhibitory effect of Pb{sup 2+} on the parental strain was determined at 10 ppm. However, in transformed cells, Pb{sup 2+} was lethal at 100 ppm. The optimum aeration required for the transformed cells was lower than that for the parental strain on a growth yield basis. A linear correlation was established between the biosorption and uptake amounts. The biosorption process was analyzed using two-parameter (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin) and three-parameter models (Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Toth). The chi-square test was used to compare these models. It was demonstrated that the three-parameter model is better in describing biosorption equilibria a, white the Sips equation showed the best description for both types of cells. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Effects of carbon source and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) on the production of beta-galactosidase in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khleifat, Khaled M; Abboud, Muayad M; Al-Mustafa, Ahmed H; Al-Sharafa, Khalid Y

    2006-10-01

    At fixed concentration (0.5%), lactose and galactose acted as inducers while glucose and other tested carbon sugars showed repression effects on beta-galactosidase production in Enterobacter aerogenes strain. The expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene (vgb) in this bacterial strain managed to overcome the repression effects as well as improving the induction of beta-galactosidase formation by carbon sources. In parallel, the bacterial O(2) consumption was increased correspondingly to the vgb induction of beta-galactosidase synthesis. When Enterobacter aerogenes strains were grown at the incubation temperature 42 degrees C, about 5-fold higher enzyme productivity was obtained than with a similar incubation at 37 degrees C. The bacterial growth expressed as biomass yield had a different optimum temperature and was not influenced to the same extent by variations in the carbon sources. These data are discussed in terms of proposed enhancement in beta-galactosidase productivity by vgb expression as well as its significance to improve the technology of whey processing.

  9. Confirmation of Structural Variants of Hemoglobin Using Acid Gel in Hydrasis Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Pérez Rodríguez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The National Medical Genetics Center has conducted a research on the major hemoglobin abnormalities of clinical interest (HbS, HbC present in pregnant women in the province of Artemisa, using Hydrasis technology with alkaline agarose gels. The use of these gels does not allow distinguishing hemoglobin S from hemoglobin D or hemoglobin C from hemoglobin E, as these hemoglobins migrate in the same position. Objective: to assess the use of acid gel to differentiate haemoglobin D from haemoglobin E by their mobility in hemoglobin electrophoresis. Methods: a descriptive study was conducted using hemoglobin electrophoresis with Hydrasis technology to analyze 200 biological samples of whole blood from pregnant women and individuals with sicklemia or carrying the disease. The acceptance limits included a correlation of electrophoresis run in acid gel in relation to alkaline gel, b correct migration of the hemoglobin bands and c good interpretation of the results. Results: 98 % of the samples analyzed with acid gel showed correspondence with those obtained with alkaline gel. It was not possible to determine and confirm the hemoglobin variant in three samples. Conclusions: the use of acid gels in electrophoresis run with the Hydrasis technology provided results which confirm the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies.

  10. Characterization of Spbhp-37, a Hemoglobin-Binding Protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Espejel, María E; Rodríguez, Mario A; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Ríos-Castro, Emmanuel; Olivares-Trejo, José de Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive microorganism that is the cause of bacterial pneumonia, sinusitis and otitis media. This human pathogen also can cause invasive diseases such as meningitis, bacteremia and septicemia. Hemoglobin (Hb) and haem can support the growth and viability of S. pneumoniae as sole iron sources. Unfortunately, the acquisition mechanism of Hb and haem in this bacterium has been poorly studied. Previously we identified two proteins of 37 and 22 kDa as putative Hb- and haem-binding proteins (Spbhp-37 and Spbhp-22, respectively). The sequence of Spbhp-37 protein was database annotated as lipoprotein without any function or localization. Here it was immunolocalized in the surface cell by transmission electron microscopy using specific antibodies produced against the recombinant protein. The expression of Spbhp-37 was increased when bacteria were grown in media culture supplied with Hb. In addition, the affinity of Sphbp-37 for Hb was determined. Thus, in this work we are presenting new findings that attempt to explain the mechanism involved in iron acquisition of this pathogen. In the future these results could help to develop new therapy targets in order to avoid the secondary effects caused by the traditional therapies.

  11. Characterization of Spbhp-37, a Hemoglobin-Binding Protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Espejel, María E.; Rodríguez, Mario A.; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Ríos-Castro, Emmanuel; Olivares-Trejo, José de Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive microorganism that is the cause of bacterial pneumonia, sinusitis and otitis media. This human pathogen also can cause invasive diseases such as meningitis, bacteremia and septicemia. Hemoglobin (Hb) and haem can support the growth and viability of S. pneumoniae as sole iron sources. Unfortunately, the acquisition mechanism of Hb and haem in this bacterium has been poorly studied. Previously we identified two proteins of 37 and 22 kDa as putative Hb- and haem-binding proteins (Spbhp-37 and Spbhp-22, respectively). The sequence of Spbhp-37 protein was database annotated as lipoprotein without any function or localization. Here it was immunolocalized in the surface cell by transmission electron microscopy using specific antibodies produced against the recombinant protein. The expression of Spbhp-37 was increased when bacteria were grown in media culture supplied with Hb. In addition, the affinity of Sphbp-37 for Hb was determined. Thus, in this work we are presenting new findings that attempt to explain the mechanism involved in iron acquisition of this pathogen. In the future these results could help to develop new therapy targets in order to avoid the secondary effects caused by the traditional therapies. PMID:27200302

  12. Artificial citrate operon and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene enhanced mineral phosphate solubilizing ability of Enterobacter hormaechei DHRSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Kavita; Kumar, Chanchal; Archana, G; Kumar, G Naresh

    2014-10-01

    Mineral phosphate solubilization by bacteria is mediated through secretion of organic acids, among which citrate is one of the most effective. To overproduce citrate in bacterial systems, an artificial citrate operon comprising of genes encoding NADH-insensitive citrate synthase of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium sodium-dependent citrate transporter was constructed. In order to improve its mineral phosphate solubilizing (MPS) ability, the citrate operon was incorporated into E. hormaechei DHRSS. The artificial citrate operon transformant secreted 7.2 mM citric acid whereas in the native strain, it was undetectable. The transformant released 0.82 mM phosphate in flask studies in buffered medium containing rock phosphate as sole P source. In fermenter studies, similar phenotype was observed under aerobic conditions. However, under microaerobic conditions, no citrate was detected and P release was not observed. Therefore, an artificial citrate gene cluster containing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (vgb) gene under its native promoter, along with artificial citrate operon under constitutive tac promoter, was constructed and transformed into E. hormaechei DHRSS. This transformant secreted 9 mM citric acid under microaerobic conditions and released 1.0 mM P. Thus, incorporation of citrate operon along with vgb gene improves MPS ability of E. hormaechei DHRSS under buffered, microaerobic conditions mimicking rhizospheric environment.

  13. Study of Hemoglobin in Vegetarian and Non-Vegetarian Diet in Obese Women with risk of cardiac Problem in Lucknow city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shyam vinay sharma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hemoglobin level and pattern of food intake is closely associated with risk of cardiovascular diseases. The cardiovascular diseases are primarily may be due to altered lipid profile which is depend on type and pattern of food intake. Association of vegetarian and non-vegetarianisms in obese women is controversial. Method: The study was conducted on vegetarianism and non-vegetarianism obese female. A total of 55 subjects were enrolled (35 cases and 20 control for the study. The Anthropometric measurements viz. height, weight, BMI and WHR, BP, were taken and hemoglobin level (Hg % was assessed in vegetarian and non-vegetarianism obese women. Results: Our results showed that hemoglobin level (Hg % in non-vegetarianism obese women was (12.35±1.083 high than vegetarian (9.036±1.002 obese women. The blood pressure systolic and diastolic was higher in the non-vegetarian obese women than vegetarians obese female. There were no significant difference was found in heart rate in both groups i.e. vegetarianism and non-vegetarianism obese female. The Blood pressure systolic and diastolic was (127.63± 20.16 and 79.23±10.78 and (128.71± 23.14 and 83.26±9.23 in Vegetarian Non-vegetarian respectively. Discussion: Thus Hemoglobin Level (Hg % of non-vegetarianism were high in obese women than vegetarian. Due to Some nutrients intake, hemoglobin level was better in non-vegetarians than vegetarians. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(2.000: 169-172

  14. Mass Spectra and Ion Collision Cross Sections of Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yang; Terrier, Peran; Douglas, D. J.

    2011-02-01

    Mass spectra of commercially obtained hemoglobin (Hb) show higher levels of monomer and dimer ions, heme-deficient dimer ions, and apo-monomer ions than hemoglobin freshly prepared from blood. This has previously been attributed to oxidation of commercial Hb. Further, it has been reported that that dimer ions from commercial bovine Hb have lower collision cross sections than low charge state monomer ions. To investigate these effects further, we have recorded mass spectra of fresh human Hb, commercial human and bovine Hb, fresh human Hb oxidized with H2O2, lyophilized fresh human Hb, fresh human Hb both lyophilized and chemically oxidized, and commercial human Hb oxidized with H2O2. Masses of α-monomer ions of all hemoglobins agree with the masses expected from the sequences within 3 Da or better. Mass spectra of the β chains of commercial Hb and oxidized fresh human Hb show a peak or shoulder on the high mass side, consistent with oxidation of the protein. Both commercial proteins and oxidized fresh human Hb produce heme-deficient dimers with masses 32 Da greater than expected and higher levels of monomer and dimer ions than fresh Hb. Lyophilization or oxidation of Hb both produce higher levels of monomer and dimer ions in mass spectra. Fresh human Hb, commercial human Hb, commercial bovine Hb, and oxidized commercial human Hb all give dimer ions with cross sections greater than monomer ions. Thus, neither oxidation of Hb or the difference in sequence between human and bovine Hb make substantial differences to cross sections of ions.

  15. Early diagnosis of sepsis using serum hemoglobin subunit Beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hayoung; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Shin-Woo; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-02-01

    The development of new sepsis-specific biomarkers is mandatory to improve the detection and monitoring of the disease. Hemoglobin is the main oxygen and carbon dioxide carrier in cells of the erythroid lineage and is responsible for oxygen delivery to the respiring tissues of the body. Hemoglobin subunit beta (HBβ) is a component of a larger protein called hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to evaluate blood levels of HBβ in septic patients. A prospective study of 82 patients with sepsis was conducted. Furthermore, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Alternatively, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or C57BL/6 mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml to HUVECs or 10 mg/kg to mice). The data showed that LPS induced upregulation of the synthesis and secretion of HBβ in LPS-treated HUVECs and in LPS-injected and CLP mice. In patients admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis, circulating levels of HBβ were significantly high (sepsis, 64.93-114.76 ng/ml, n = 30; severe sepsis, 157.37-268.69 ng/ml, n = 22; septic shock, 309.98-427.03 ng/ml, n = 30) when compared to the levels of control donors (9.76-12.28 ng/ml, n = 21). Patients with septic shock had higher HBβ levels when compared to patients with severe sepsis. Furthermore, the HBβ levels in septic patients were higher than those in healthy volunteers. These results suggest that in septic patients, HBβ blood level is related to the severity of sepsis and may represent a novel endothelial cell dysfunction marker. Moreover, HBβ can be used as a biomarker to determine the severity of sepsis.

  16. Interaction of toxic azo dyes with heme protein: biophysical insights into the binding aspect of the food additive amaranth with human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2015-05-30

    A biophysical study on the interaction of the food colorant amaranth with hemoglobin was undertaken. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric studies proposed for an intimate binding interaction between the dye and the protein. The dye quenched the fluorescence of the protein remarkably and the mechanism of quenching was found to be static in nature. Synchronous fluorescence studies suggested that the polarity around the tryptophan residues was altered in the presence of amaranth whereas the polarity around tyrosine residues remained largely unaltered. 3D fluorescence, FTIR and circular dichroism results suggested that the binding reaction caused conformational changes in hemoglobin. The negative far-UV CD bands exhibited a significantly large decrease in magnitude in the presence of amaranth. From calorimetry studies it was established that the binding was driven by a large positive entropic contribution and a small but favorable enthalpy change.

  17. Long-term variation in hemoglobin concentration in nestling great tits Parus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliński, Adam; Bańbura, Mirosława; Glądalski, Michał; Markowski, Marcin; Skwarska, Joanna; Wawrzyniak, Jarosław; Zieliński, Piotr; Cyżewska, Iwona; Bańbura, Jerzy

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have previously proposed that blood hemoglobin concentration in nestling passerines is a reliable index of individual condition and nutritional state. In this paper we present results concerning variation in hemoglobin concentration in the blood of ca. 14-day-old nestling great tits Parus major in central Poland in an 11-year-long period, 2003-2013, in two distinct habitat types: urban park and deciduous forest. The most important findings of the study were: (i) variation in hemoglobin concentration was consistent within broods, (ii) hemoglobin concentration of nestlings varied markedly across years, (iii) hemoglobin concentration was significantly higher in the forest study site which is richer in terms of food abundance during the short period of tits breeding season and (iv) high hemoglobin level was a predictor of nestling survival from hatching to fledging.

  18. Hemoglobin A1c: Standardizacija “zlatnog standarda”

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) je u proteklih 30 godina primjene postao "zlatnim standardom" u kliničkom praćenju šećerne bolesti. Dobra kontrola glikemije, izražena kroz koncentraciju HbA1c ≤7%, danas je klinički normativ kroz koji se procjenjuje djelotvornost terapije i rizik pojave komplikacija šećerne bolesti i glavna tema komunikacije između dijabetologa i pacijenata. Raznovrsna i nestandardizirana metodologija, varijabilnost kemijskih entiteta nastalih glikacijom molekule hemoglobina i nepos...

  19. Fetal hemoglobin accumulation in vitro. Effect of adherent mononuclear cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Javid, J; Pettis, P K

    1983-01-01

    In clonal cultures of erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) obtained from blood, the accumulation of fetal and adult hemoglobins (Hb F and Hb A) was measured by radioligand immunoassay. Inclusion of adherent mononuclear cells in the culture promoted a striking increase in the relative amount of Hb F in each of 44 experiments with 14 donors. In two-thirds of the instances, this was accounted for by a selective increase in the absolute amount of Hb F. The differential effect on Hb F and Hb A ac...

  20. Deferiprone: structural and functional modulating agent of hemoglobin fructation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarahmady, Naghmeh; Heli, Hossein; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Karimian, K

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic complication arises from the presence of advanced glycation end products in different sites of the body. Great attention should be paid to recognizing anti-glycation compounds. Here, deferiprone as an oral iron chelator drug administrated in treatment of β-thalassemic patients was selected to find its effect on the fructation of hemoglobin (Hb). Our results indicated that deferiprone could prevent the AGE and carbonyl formation via inhibition of structural changes in the structure of Hb during the fructation process. Moreover, deferiprone can preserve peroxidase and esterase activities of fructated Hb similar to native Hb. Therefore, deferiprone can be introduced as an anti-glycation drug to prevent the AGE formation.

  1. Marine mesocosm bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Verena; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ayris, Paul; Kueppers, Ulrich; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald; Woerheide, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, wind-delivered volcanic ash may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation remain unknown. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. The effect of substrate properties on bacterial colonisation was tested by exposing five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash (Sakurajima, Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size, in controlled marine coral reef aquaria under low light conditions for six months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis of Similarity supported significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community with the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the

  2. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  3. Broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy assessment of hemorrhage- and hemoglobin-based blood substitute resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Mukai, David; Kreuter, Kelly; Saltzman, Darin; Patino, Renee; Goldberg, Robert; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-07-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) are solutions of cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) that have been developed for replacement or augmentation of blood transfusion. It is important to monitor in vivo tissue hemoglobin content, total tissue hemoglobin [THb], oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations ([OHb], [RHb]), and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2=[OHb]/[THb]×100%) to evaluate effectiveness of HBOC transfusion. We designed and constructed a broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) prototype system to measure bulk tissue absorption and scattering spectra between 650 and 1000 nm capable of accurately determining these tissue hemoglobin component concentrations in vivo. Our purpose was to assess the feasibility of using DOS to optically monitor tissue [OHb], [RHb], StO2, and total tissue hemoglobin concentration ([THb]=[OHb]+[RHb]) during HBOC infusion using a rabbit hypovolemic shock model. The DOS prototype probe was placed on the shaved inner thigh muscle of the hind leg to assess concentrations of [OHb], [RHb], [THb], as well as StO2. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in intubated New Zealand white rabbits (N=6) by withdrawing blood via a femoral arterial line to 20% blood loss (10-15 cc/kg). Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (Hb-200) 1:1 volume resuscitation was administered following the hemorrhage. These values were compared against traditional invasive measurements, serum hemoglobin concentration (sHGB), systemic blood pressure, heart rate, and blood gases. DOS revealed increases of [THb], [OHb], and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation after Hb-200 infusion, while blood total hemoglobin values continued did not increase; we speculate, due to hyperosmolality induced hemodilution. DOS enables noninvasive in vivo monitoring of tissue hemoglobin and oxygenation parameters during shock and volume expansion with HBOC and potentially enables the assessment of efficacy of resuscitation efforts using artificial blood substitutes.

  4. A tri state mechanism for oxygen release in fish hemoglobin: Using Barbus sharpeyi as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Dayer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin is a porphyrin containing protein with an a2b2 tetrameric structure and like other porphyrin compounds shows spectral behavior of species specific characteristics. Researchers tend to relate bands in the hemoglobin spectra to certain structural and/or functional features. Given the fact that hemoglobin is the main oxygen carrier in animals functioning through the Oxy«Deoxy equilibrium, the determination of oxy and deoxy conformations of hemoglobins of different animals may shed light on their oxygen binding properties. Absorption spectra at 280 and 373nm have been widely used to quantitate the formation of hemoglobin deoxy conformation. In the present work, however, we used an optical density ratio of OD373/OD280 as an index for deoxy formation. This ratio was determined for Barbus sharpeyi and human hemoglobins at different SDS concentrations, pH levels and temperatures to compare them from a structure-function point of view. Our data showed that under low concentrations of SDS (Barbus sharpeyi hemoglobin folds in a tri-state pattern while human hemoglobin folds through a two-state phenomenon. This finding indicates that in contrast to those of other non aquatic animals, the hemoglobin of Barbus sharpeyi has a loosely folded tetrameric structure with remarkably more oxygen affinity

  5. Aggregation of normal and sickle hemoglobin in high concentration phosphate buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejing; Ballas, Samir K; Hantgan, Roy R; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2004-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is caused by a mutant form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S, that polymerizes under hypoxic conditions. The extent and mechanism of polymerization are thus the subject of many studies of the pathophysiology of the disease and potential treatment strategies. To facilitate such studies, a model system using high concentration phosphate buffer (1.5 M-1.8 M) has been developed. To properly interpret results from studies using this model it is important to understand the similarities and differences in hemoglobin S polymerization in the model compared to polymerization under physiological conditions. In this article, we show that hemoglobin S and normal adult hemoglobin, hemoglobin A, aggregate in high concentration phosphate buffer even when the concentration of hemoglobin is below the solubility defined for polymerization. This phenomenon was not observed using 0.05 M phosphate buffer or in another model system we studied that uses dextran to enhance polymerization. We have used static light scattering, dynamic light scattering, and differential interference contrast microscopy to confirm aggregation of deoxygenated and oxygenated hemoglobins below their solubility and have shown that this aggregation is not observable using turbidity measurements, a common technique for assessing polymerization. We have also shown that the aggregation increases with increasing temperature in the range of 15 degrees -37 degrees C and that it increases as the concentration of phosphate increases. These studies contribute to the working knowledge of how to properly apply studies of hemoglobin S polymerization that are conducted using the high phosphate model.

  6. Vertigo and cerebral hemoglobin changes during unilateral caloric stimulation: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Masahiro; Haida, Munetaka; Igarashi, Makoto

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the present study using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is to evaluate the correlation of cerebral (parieto-temporal lobe) hemoglobin changes and vertiginous sensation during unilateral caloric stimulation. During the hot water (44 degrees C) stimulus, cerebral hemoglobin was increased bilaterally, but it was dominant ipsilaterally. During the unilateral cold water (30 degrees C) stimulus, cerebral hemoglobin was decreased on both sides, especially on the ipsilateral side. Vertigious sensation was strong in cases with marked left-right difference of cerebral hemoglobin changes. The usefulness of NIRS to investigate the relationship between peripheral vestibular organ and vestibular cortex was verified.

  7. Oxidative stress in preeclampsia and the role of free fetal hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Rocco Hansson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a leading cause of pregnancy complications and affects 3–7 % of pregnant women. This review summarizes the current knowledge of a new potential etiology of the disease, with a special focus on hemoglobin-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, we also suggest hemoglobin as a potential target for therapy. Gene and protein profiling studies have shown increased expression and accumulation of free fetal hemoglobin in the preeclamptic placenta. Predominantly due to oxidative damage to the placental barrier, fetal hemoglobin leaks over to the maternal circulation. Free hemoglobin and its metabolites are toxic in several ways; a ferrous hemoglobin (Fe2+ binds strongly to the vasodilator nitric oxide and reduces the availability of free nitric oxide, which results in vasoconstriction, b hemoglobin (Fe2+ with bound oxygen spontaneously generates free oxygen radicals and c the heme groups create an inflammatory response by inducing activation of neutrophils and cytokine production. The endogenous protein α1-microglobulin, with radical and heme binding properties, has shown both ex vivo and in vivo to have the ability to counteract free hemoglobin-induced placental and kidney damage. Oxidative stress in general, and more specifically fetal hemoglobin-induced oxidative stress, could play a key role in the pathology of preeclampsia seen both in the placenta and ultimately in the maternal endothelium.

  8. Hemoglobin induces colon cancer cell proliferation by release of reactive oxygen species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryung-Ah Lee; Hyun-Ah Kim; Bo-Young Kang; Kwang-Ho Kim

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study whether hemoglobin could amplify colon cancer cell proliferation via reactive oxygen species (ROS)production.METHODS: Colon cancer cell line HT-29 was grown in the conventional method using RPMI1640 media. The viability of the cells was measured using the colorimetric MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay after adding hemoglobin. We determined reactive oxygen species levels to be indicators of oxidative stress in HT 29 cell lines with and without hemoglobin and/or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5-DFUR) using fluorometric dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay.RESULTS: Cellular proliferation was increased with hemoglobin in a concentration-dependent manner. A significant increment on ROS levels was found in HT 29 cells following hemoglobin incubation. The cytotoxic effects of 5-FU and 5-DFUR were significantly blunted by administration of hemoglobin. There was a slight increase of peroxiredoxin 1, superoxide dismutase 1 concentration according to different hemoglobin concentrations.CONCLUSION: Hemoglobin has a cellular proliferative effect on HT-29 colon cancer cell line by production of ROS. Also, hemoglobin abates cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents such as 5-FU and 5-DFUR.

  9. The temperature dependence of refractive index of hemoglobin at the wavelengths 930 and 1100 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareva, Ekaterina N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the refractive index of hemoglobin was measured at different temperatures within a physiological range and above that is characteristic to light-blood interaction at laser therapy. Measurements were carried out using the multi-wavelength Abbe refractometer (Atago, Japan). The refractive index was measured at two NIR wavelengths of 930 nm and 1100 nm. Samples of hemoglobin solutions with concentration of 80, 120 and 160 g/l were investigated. The temperature was varied between 25 and 55 °C. It was shown that the dependence of the refractive index of hemoglobin is nonlinear with temperature, which may be associated with changes in molecular structure of hemoglobin.

  10. Structural and redox behavior of OxyVita, a zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin: comparison with natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, John P; Orlik, Kseniya; Orlig, Kseniya; Zito, Samantha L; Wollocko, Jacek; Wollocko, Hanna

    2010-04-01

    A zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin (OxyVita Hb) has been developed for application as an acellular therapeutic hemoglobin-based-oxygen-carrier (HBOC). For effective and safe oxygen binding, transport and delivery, an HBOC must meet essential molecular requirements related to its structural integrity and redox stability. OxyVita is a super polymer possessing an average M.wt. of 17 x 10(6) Da. Structural integrity was determined by unfolding studies of OxyVita in the presence of increasing concentrations of urea. The unfolding midpoints (D(1/2)) of different preparations of OxyVita (solution and powder forms) were compared to Lumbricus Hb (LtHb) and Arenicola Hb (ArHb), natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins, which are serving as models for an effective and safe acellular HBOC. Reduction studies of OxyVita Hb using endogenous reducing agents were also investigated. Results from these studies indicate that: 1) OxyVita Hb exhibits greater resistance to conformational change than either LtHb or ArHb in the reduced (oxyHb) state; and 2) the reduction of met OxyVita Hb to oxyHb occurs slowly in the presence of either ascorbic acid (70% reduction in 560 min.) or beta-NADH (40% reduction in 90 min.). These studies provide consistent evidence that OxyVita Hb possesses physiochemical properties that exhibit structural integrity and redox behavior necessary for functioning as an effective and safe HBOC within clinical applications. These results are in agreement with observations made by other investigators as to the reduction in heme-loss of OxyVita Hb, essential for the reversible binding/release of molecular oxygen within the circulatory system.

  11. Hypoxia adaptation and hemoglobin mutation in Tibetan chick embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU Xiao; LI Ning; LIAN Linsheng; YAN Dawei; ZHANG Hao; WU Changxin

    2005-01-01

    Tibetan chick lives at high altitudes between 2600 and 4200 m with a high hatchability and low land breeds survive rarely with a hatchability of 3.0% under hypoxia of simulated 4200 m. Under hypoxia of whole 21 d, the hatchability of Tibetan chick and Recessive White Feather broiler differed with a greatest disparity from day 4 to 11 and also significantly in other stages except from day 1 to 3. Hypoxia in each stage did not reduce significantly survival rate of this stage except hatchability. These two results indicated that the hypoxia in the early stage had an adverse effect on the later stage. All exons encoding chick hemoglobins were sequenced to analyze gene polymorphism. The functional mutation Met-32(B13)-Leu, related with hypoxia, was found in αD globin chain and the mutation frequency increased with increased altitude. In addition, under hypoxic conditions, the population with higher mutation frequency had a higher hatchability. The automated homology model building was carried out using crystal structure coordinates of chick HbD. The results indicated that the substitution Met-32(B13)-Leu provides a more hydrophobic environment which leads to higher stability of heme and oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. The occurrence of the mutation Met-32(B13)-Leu is related to the origin of Tibetan chick.

  12. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia: a glass half full?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Martin H; Chui, David H K; Dover, George J; Sebastiani, Paola; Alsultan, Abdulrahman

    2014-01-23

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) modulates the phenotype of sickle cell anemia by inhibiting deoxy sickle hemoglobin (HbS) polymerization. The blood concentration of HbF, or the number of cells with detectable HbF (F-cells), does not measure the amount of HbF/F-cell. Even patients with high HbF can have severe disease because HbF is unevenly distributed among F-cells, and some cells might have insufficient concentrations to inhibit HbS polymerization. With mean HbF levels of 5%, 10%, 20%, and 30%, the distribution of HbF/F-cell can greatly vary, even if the mean is constant. For example, with 20% HbF, as few as 1% and as many as 24% of cells can have polymer-inhibiting, or protective, levels of HbF of ∼10 pg; with lower HbF, few or no protected cells can be present. Only when the total HbF concentration is near 30% is it possible for the number of protected cells to approach 70%. Rather than the total number of F-cells or the concentration of HbF in the hemolysate, HbF/F-cell and the proportion of F-cells that have enough HbF to thwart HbS polymerization is the most critical predictor of the likelihood of severe sickle cell disease.

  13. Red blood cell lifespan, erythropoiesis and hemoglobin control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Anja; Uehlinger, Dominik E; Gotch, Frank; Kotanko, Peter; Levin, Nathan W

    2008-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and iron deficiency as causes of anemia in patients with limited renal function or end-stage renal disease are well addressed. The concomitant impairment of red blood cell (RBC) survival has been largely neglected. Properties of the uremic environment like inflammation, increased oxidative stress and uremic toxins seem to be responsible for the premature changes in RBC membrane and cytoskeleton. The exposure of antigenic sites and breakdown of the phosphatidylserine asymmetry promote RBC phagocytosis. While the individual response to treatment with EPO-stimulating agents (ESA) depends on both the RBC's lifespan and the production rate, uniform dosing algorithms do not meet that demand. The clinical use of mathematical models predicting ESA-induced changes in hematocrit might be greatly improved once independent estimates of RBC production rate and/or lifespan become available, thus making the concomitant estimation of both parameters unnecessary. Since heme breakdown by the hemoxygenase pathway results in carbon monoxide (CO) which is exhaled, a simple CO breath test has been used to calculate hemoglobin turnover and therefore RBC survival and lifespan. Future research will have to be done to validate and implement this method in patients with kidney failure. This will result in new insights into RBC kinetics in renal patients. Eventually, these findings are expected to improve our understanding of the hemoglobin variability in response to ESA.

  14. Biphasic oxidation of oxy-hemoglobin in bloodstains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf H Bremmer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In forensic science, age determination of bloodstains can be crucial in reconstructing crimes. Upon exiting the body, bloodstains transit from bright red to dark brown, which is attributed to oxidation of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO(2 to met-hemoglobin (met-Hb and hemichrome (HC. The fractions of HbO(2, met-Hb and HC in a bloodstain can be used for age determination of bloodstains. In this study, we further analyze the conversion of HbO(2 to met-Hb and HC, and determine the effect of temperature and humidity on the conversion rates. METHODOLOGY: The fractions of HbO(2, met-Hb and HC in a bloodstain, as determined by quantitative analysis of optical reflectance spectra (450-800 nm, were measured as function of age, temperature and humidity. Additionally, Optical Coherence Tomography around 1300 nm was used to confirm quantitative spectral analysis approach. CONCLUSIONS: The oxidation rate of HbO(2 in bloodstains is biphasic. At first, the oxidation of HbO(2 is rapid, but slows down after a few hours. These oxidation rates are strongly temperature dependent. However, the oxidation of HbO(2 seems to be independent of humidity, whereas the transition of met-Hb into HC strongly depends on humidity. Knowledge of these decay rates is indispensable for translating laboratory results into forensic practice, and to enable bloodstain age determination on the crime scene.

  15. Screening for Structural Hemoglobin Variants in Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Santos Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Brazil was the country that received the largest number of Africans during the time of colonization, and Bahia was the Brazilian state that received the largest number of slaves from Africa. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the coverage of the newborn screening program for sickle cell disease in the Recôncavo Baiano region of the state of Bahia, and to show the frequency of the subjects with hemoglobin variants in the 2006–2009 period. Blood samples from neonates in twelve cities in the Recôncavo Baiano region were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. A total of 16,402 children were born in this period, 14,773 of which underwent newborn screening. In this period 1416 children were born carrying hemoglobin variants HbS and HbC. Forty-seven patients—20 HbSS genotype and 27 HbSC genotype—were diagnosed in eleven of the twelve cities surveyed. The proportion of children born with sickle cell disease in the Recôncavo Baiano region was 1/314, which was higher than the 1/650 rate for the state of Bahia. The data presented in this study confirm the high frequency of sickle cell disease in Recôncavo Baiano, demonstrating the need to create a referral center for the care of patients with sickle cell diseases in the region.

  16. Thalassemia and Hemoglobin E in Southern Thai Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manit Nuinoon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia and hemoglobin E (Hb E are common in Thailand. Individuals with thalassemia trait usually have a normal hemoglobin concentration or mild anemia. Therefore, thalassemic individuals who have minimum acceptable Hb level may be accepted as blood donors. This study was aimed at determining the frequency of α-thalassemia 1 trait, β-thalassemia trait, and Hb E-related syndromes in Southern Thai blood donors. One hundred and sixteen voluntary blood donors, Southern Thailand origin, were recruited for thalassemia and Hb E screening by red blood cell indices/dichlorophenolindophenol precipitation test. β-Thalassemia and Hb E were then identified by high performance liquid chromatography and 4 common α-thalassemia deletions were characterized by a single tube-multiplex gap-polymerase chain reaction. Overall frequency of hemoglobinopathies was 12.9%, classified as follows: homozygous α-thalassemia 2 (1.7%, heterozygous α-thalassemia 1 (1.7%, heterozygous β-thalassemia without α-thalassemia (0.9%, heterozygous Hb E without α-thalassemia (5.2%, double heterozygotes for Hb E/α-thalassemia 1 (1.7%, homozygous Hb E without α-thalassemia (0.9%, and homozygous Hb E with heterozygous α-thalassemia 2 (0.9%. The usefulness of thalassemia screening is not only for receiving highly effective red blood cells in the recipients but also for encouraging the control and prevention program of thalassemia in blood donors.

  17. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  18. Autofluorescence characterization of advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneshwaran, Nadanathangam; Bijukumar, Gopalakrishnapillai; Karmakar, Nivedita; Anand, Sneh; Misra, Anoop

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the analysis of autofluorescence of advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin (Hb-AGE). Formed as a result of slow, spontaneous and non-enzymatic glycation reactions, Hb-AGE possesses a characteristic autofluorescence at 308/345 nm (lambda(ex)/lambda(em)). Even in the presence of heme as a quenching molecule, the surface presence of the glycated adduct gave rise to autofluorescence with the quantum yield of 0.19. The specificity of monoclonal antibody developed against common AGE structure with Hb-AGE was demonstrated using reduction in fluorescence polarization value due to increased molecular volume while binding. The formation of fluorescent adduct in hemoglobin in the advanced stage of glycation and the non-fluorescent HbA(1c) will be of major use in distinguishing and to know the past status of diabetes mellitus. While autofluorescence correlated highly with HbA(1c) value under in vivo condition (r = 0.85), it was moderate in the clinical samples (r = 0.55). The results suggest a non-linear relation between glycemia and glycation, indicating the application of Hb-AGE as a measure of susceptibility to glycation rather than glycation itself.

  19. Hemoglobin glycation rate constant in non-diabetic Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladyżyński, Piotr; Wójcicki, Jan M; Bąk, Marianna I; Sabalińska, Stanisława; Kawiak, Jerzy; Foltyński, Piotr; Krzymień, Janusz; Karnafel, Waldemar

    2011-11-01

    The objectives were as follows: (1) estimating mean value of the overall hemoglobin glycation rate constant (k); (2) analyzing inter-individual variability of k; (3) verifying ability of the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) formation model to predict changes of HbA1c during red blood cells cultivation in vitro and to reproduce the clinical data. The mean k estimated in a group of 10 non-diabetic subjects was equal to 1.257 ± 0.114 × 10(-9) L mmol(-1) s(-1). The mean k was not affected by a way of estimation of glycemia. The mean k differed less than 20% from values reported earlier and it was almost identical to the mean values calculated on basis of the selected published data. Analysis of variability of k suggests that inter-individual heterogeneity of HbA1c formation is limited or rare. The HbA1c mathematical model was able to predict changes of HbA1c in vitro resulting from different glucose levels and to reproduce a linear relationship of HbA1c and average glucose obtained in the A1C-Derived Average Glucose Study. This study demonstrates that the glycation model with the same k value might be used in majority of individuals as a tool supporting interpretation of HbA1c in different clinical situations.

  20. Glycated hemoglobin in camel: Minimal correlation with blood glucose level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazzi Mohammad D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose and glycated hemoglobin (Hb in the blood of camel (Camelus dromedarius and cow (Bos taurus were analyzed and compared with human values. Camel displayed high blood glucose concentration (9.7±2.8 mM but a low level of glycated-Hb (3.4± 0.23%.Cow blood samples did not show sufficient variations in glucose concentrations (5.7±0.73 mM or glycated Hb levels (3.2± 0.11% compared to human values. The low glycation of camel Hb at higher glucose concentrations suggest that certain factors protect the Hb from glycation at high glucose concentrations. Camel Hb also exhibited a higher electrophoretic mobility than normal hemoglobin of human or cow. Camel Hb migrated at a rate corresponding to that of human Hb-C. Bioinformatics tools were used to explore the biochemical basis for the difference in camel Hb migratory position and its apparent resistance to glycation.

  1. [Hemoglobin beta S haplotype in the Kebili region (southern Tunisia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikha, M; Fakhfakh, F; Mseddi, S; Gargouri, J; Ghali, L; Labiadh, Z; Harrabi, M; Souissi, T; Ayadi, H

    1998-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a monogenic hereditary disease characterized by a mutation in the beta globin gene. Five major haplotypes associated with the beta S mutation have been defined: Benin, Bantu, Senegalian, Camerounian, and Arabo-Indian. Previous studies in northern Tunisia showed that sickle cell anemia was of Benin origin in this region. Patients from the south of Tunisia, mainly from the Kebili region, were not previously concerned. In this study, we have determined the beta S haplotype and evaluated phenotypical expression of the disease in 14 patients from this latter region. The use of four restriction endonucleases having polymorphic sites in the beta globin gene showed that all patients had the Benin haplotype, confirming the Benin origin of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia. This haplotype is associated with an heterogeneous expression of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) with extremes varying from 2.4 to 16.3% and a mean expression rate of 8.16%, which is in accordance with literature data. In spite of the haplotype homogeneity in our patients, clinical heterogeneity was noted. A unique case of alpha-thalassemia could not explain this heterogeneity. In contrast, we found a certain correlation between fetal hemoglobin expression and clinical severity.

  2. Interaction of recombinant octameric hemoglobin with endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Caroline; Domingues-Hamdi, Élisa; Prin-Mathieu, Christine; Menu, Patrick; Baudin-Creuza, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) may generate oxidative stress, vasoconstriction and inflammation. To reduce these undesirable vasoactive properties, we increased hemoglobin (Hb) molecular size by genetic engineering with octameric Hb, recombinant (r) HbβG83C. We investigate the potential side effects of rHbβG83C on endothelial cells. The rHbβG83C has no impact on cell viability, and induces a huge repression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene transcription, a marker of vasomotion. No induction of Intermolecular-Adhesion Molecule 1 and E-selectin (inflammatory markers) transcription was seen. In the presence of rHbβG83C, the transcription of heme oxygenase-1 (oxidative stress marker) is weakly increased compared to the two other HBOCs (references) or Voluven (control). This genetically engineered octameric Hb, based on a human Hb βG83C mutant, leads to little impact at the level of endothelial cell inflammatory response and thus appears as an interesting molecule for HBOC development.

  3. Hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahdi; Najafi; David; Faraoni

    2015-01-01

    Although red blood cells(RBCs) transfusion is sometimes associated with adverse reactions,anemia could also lead to increased morbidity and mortality in highrisk patients. For these reasons,the definition of perioperative strategies that aims to detect and treat preoperative anemia,prevent excessive blood loss,and define "optimal" transfusion algorithms is crucial. Although the treatment with preoperative iron and erythropoietin has been recommended in some specific conditions,several controversies exist regarding the benefit-to-risk balance associated with these treatments. Further studies are needed to better define the indications,dosage,and route of administration for preoperative iron with or without erythropoietin supplementation. Although restrictive transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery have been shown to effectively reduce the incidence and the amount of RBCs transfusion without increase in side effects,some high-risk patients(e.g.,symptomatic acute coronary syndrome) could benefit from higher hemoglobin concentrations. Despite all efforts made last decade,a significant amount of work remains to be done to improve hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  4. Optical mammography: bilateral breast symmetry in hemoglobin saturation maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Pamela G.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Kalli, Sirishma; Makim, Shital S.; Graham, Roger A.; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    We present a study of the bilateral symmetry of human breast hemoglobin saturation maps measured with a broadband optical mammography instrument. We have imaged 21 patients with unilateral breast cancer, 32 patients with unilateral benign lesions, and 27 healthy patients. An image registration process was applied to the bilateral hemoglobin saturation (SO2) images by assigning each pixel to the low, middle, or high range of SO2 values, where the thresholds for the categories were the 15th and 85th percentiles of the individual saturation range. The Dice coefficient, which is a measure of similarity, was calculated for each patient's pair of right and left breast SO2 images. The invasive cancer patients were found to have an average Dice coefficient value of 0.55±0.07, which was significantly lower than the benign and healthy groups (0.61±0.11 and 0.62±0.12, respectively). Although differences were seen in a group analysis, the healthy patient Dice coefficients spanned a wide range, limiting the diagnostic capabilities of this SO2 symmetry analysis on an individual basis. Our results suggest that for assessing the SO2 contrast of breast lesions, it may be better to select a reference tissue in the ipsilateral rather than the contralateral breast.

  5. Tyrosine can protect against oxidative stress through ferryl hemoglobin reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; He, Yingjie; Chen, Chao; Tian, Rong; Xiao, Qiang; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2014-08-01

    The toxic mechanism of hemoglobin (Hb) under oxidative stress is linked to the formations of highly cytotoxic ferryl species and subsequently heme-to-protein cross-linked derivative of Hb (Hb-X). In this study, we have examined the effects of free tyrosine and its analogues (3-chlorotyrosine, phenylalanine) on the stability of ferryl hemoglobin and the formation of Hb-X. The results showed that free tyrosine (not phenylalanine, 10-500 μM) was an efficient reducing agent of ferryl species and also effective at preventing the formation of cytotoxic Hb-X. Meanwhile, the dimeric tyrosine was formed as the oxidation product of tyrosine during Hb redox reaction. Compared with free tyrosine, 3-chlorotyrosine, an oxidation product of tyrosine and a proposed biomarker for hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in vivo, exhibited stronger antioxidant properties in Hb-induced oxidative stress, which was consistent with its more efficient ability in the reduction of ferryl species. These results showed that the presence of tyrosine and its derivative in vivo and vitro could ameliorate oxidative damage through ferryl heme reduction. The antioxidant ability, therefore, may provide new insights into the nutritional and physiological significance of free tyrosine with redox active heme proteins-related oxidative stress.

  6. Detection and analysis of protofibrils and fibrils of hemoglobin: implications for the pathogenesis and cure of heme loss related maladies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iram, Afshin; Naeem, Aabgeena

    2013-05-01

    TFE induces structural alterations of proteins similar to the lipid environment of biological membranes, implicating these studies worthy of analyzing protein conformation in membranes such as red blood cells (RBCs). Heme loss occurs on rupturing of RBCs as found in diseases namely haemophilia, haemolytic anaemia, diabetes mellitus. TFE can be implied in discovering therapeutic targets, as it mimics the biological membrane environment. A global transition of hemoglobin (Hb) in presence of TFE was studied by using multi-methodological approach. The presence of partially folded state of Hb at 15% v/v TFE was confirmed by altered tryptophan environment, and retention of native-like secondary and tertiary structure. Molten globule state was observed at 20% v/v TFE as detected by increase tryptophan and high ANS fluorescence, slight alterations in Soret band relative to native. TFE on increasing concentration induced protofibrils at 25% v/v and fibrils at 45% v/v as depicted by altered tryptophan environment, heme loss, increase in non-native β-sheet secondary and tertiary structure, large hydrodynamic radii of heme-protein, high ANS, thioflavin T fluorescence and shift in Congo Red absorbance. Comet assay showed that protofibrils are cytotoxic to lymphocytes. SEM and XRD confirmed these aggregates to be fibrillar in nature.

  7. [Susceptibility of induced sickle in samples of heterozygous hemoglobin S patients (sickle cell trait) suffering diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Piedra, Pablo; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto Rafael; Ramos-Jiménez, Raúl; Presno-Bernal, José Miguel; Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin S is an abnormal protein that induces morphological changes in erythrocyte in low-oxygen conditions. In Mexico, it is reported that up to 13.7% of the population with mutation in one allele are considered asymptomatic (sickle cell trait). The sickle cell trait and diabetes mellitus are conditions that occur together in more than one million patients worldwide. Both diseases possibly produce microvascular changes in retinopathy and acute chest syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the induction of sickle cells in samples of diabetic patients with sickle cell trait to identify altered red cell parameters. We obtained samples of diabetic patients to determine hemoglobin A1c and S; furthermore, red blood cell biometrics data were analyzed. We found that older men with diabetes were susceptible to generate sickle cells and this correlated with reduced red blood cell count and an increase in media cell volume. In samples of women diabetes, there were no differences. We conclude that samples from patients with sickle cell trait and diabetes can cause sickle cells with high frequency in men, with lower red blood cells count and increased mean corpuscular volume as susceptibility parameters.

  8. Host Antimicrobial Peptides in Bacterial Homeostasis and Pathogenesis of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek R. Heimlich

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune responses function as a first line of host defense against the development of bacterial infection, and in some cases to preserve the sterility of privileged sites in the human host. Bacteria that enter these sites must counter host responses for colonization. From the host’s perspective, the innate immune system works expeditiously to minimize the bacterial threat before colonization and subsequent dysbiosis. The multifactorial nature of disease further challenges predictions of how each independent variable influences bacterial pathogenesis. From bacterial colonization to infection and through disease, the microenvironments of the host are in constant flux as bacterial and host factors contribute to changes at the host-pathogen interface, with the host attempting to eradicate bacteria and the bacteria fighting to maintain residency. A key component of this innate host response towards bacterial infection is the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. As an early component of the host response, AMPs modulate bacterial load and prevent establishment of infection. Under quiescent conditions, some AMPs are constitutively expressed by the epithelium. Bacterial infection can subsequently induce production of other AMPs in an effort to maintain sterility, or to restrict colonization. As demonstrated in various studies, the absence of a single AMP can influence pathogenesis, highlighting the importance of AMP concentration in maintaining homeostasis. Yet, AMPs can increase bacterial virulence through the co-opting of the peptides or alteration of bacterial virulence gene expression. Further, bacterial factors used to subvert AMPs can modify host microenvironments and alter colonization of the residential flora that principally maintain homeostasis. Thus, the dynamic interplay between host defense peptides and bacterial factors produced to quell peptide activity play a critical role in the progression and outcome of disease.

  9. A cis-proline in alpha-hemoglobin stabilizing protein directs the structural reorganization of alpha-hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, David A; Feng, Liang; Zhou, Suiping; Jeffrey, Philip D; Bendak, Katerina; Gow, Andrew; Weiss, Mitchell J; Shi, Yigong; Mackay, Joel P

    2009-10-23

    alpha-Hemoglobin (alphaHb) stabilizing protein (AHSP) is expressed in erythropoietic tissues as an accessory factor in hemoglobin synthesis. AHSP forms a specific complex with alphaHb and suppresses the heme-catalyzed evolution of reactive oxygen species by converting alphaHb to a conformation in which the heme is coordinated at both axial positions by histidine side chains (bis-histidyl coordination). Currently, the detailed mechanism by which AHSP induces structural changes in alphaHb has not been determined. Here, we present x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and mutagenesis data that identify, for the first time, the importance of an evolutionarily conserved proline, Pro(30), in loop 1 of AHSP. Mutation of Pro(30) to a variety of residue types results in reduced ability to convert alphaHb. In complex with alphaHb, AHSP Pro(30) adopts a cis-peptidyl conformation and makes contact with the N terminus of helix G in alphaHb. Mutations that stabilize the cis-peptidyl conformation of free AHSP, also enhance the alphaHb conversion activity. These findings suggest that AHSP loop 1 can transmit structural changes to the heme pocket of alphaHb, and, more generally, highlight the importance of cis-peptidyl prolyl residues in defining the conformation of regulatory protein loops.

  10. A cis-Proline in α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein Directs the Structural Reorganization of α-Hemoglobin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, David A.; Feng, Liang; Zhou, Suiping; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Bendak, Katerina; Gow, Andrew; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Shi, Yigong; Mackay, Joel P.

    2009-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin (αHb) stabilizing protein (AHSP) is expressed in erythropoietic tissues as an accessory factor in hemoglobin synthesis. AHSP forms a specific complex with αHb and suppresses the heme-catalyzed evolution of reactive oxygen species by converting αHb to a conformation in which the heme is coordinated at both axial positions by histidine side chains (bis-histidyl coordination). Currently, the detailed mechanism by which AHSP induces structural changes in αHb has not been determined. Here, we present x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and mutagenesis data that identify, for the first time, the importance of an evolutionarily conserved proline, Pro30, in loop 1 of AHSP. Mutation of Pro30 to a variety of residue types results in reduced ability to convert αHb. In complex with αHb, AHSP Pro30 adopts a cis-peptidyl conformation and makes contact with the N terminus of helix G in αHb. Mutations that stabilize the cis-peptidyl conformation of free AHSP, also enhance the αHb conversion activity. These findings suggest that AHSP loop 1 can transmit structural changes to the heme pocket of αHb, and, more generally, highlight the importance of cis-peptidyl prolyl residues in defining the conformation of regulatory protein loops. PMID:19706593

  11. Effects of Hemoglobin Variants on Hemoglobin A1c Values Measured Using a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-La-Iglesia, Silvia; Ropero, Paloma; Nogueira-Salgueiro, Patricia; Santana-Benitez, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is routinely used to monitor long-term glycemic control and for diagnosing diabetes mellitus. However, hemoglobin (Hb) gene variants/modifications can affect the accuracy of some methods. The potential effect of Hb variants on HbA1c measurements was investigated using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method compared with an immunoturbimetric assay. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels were measured in 42 371 blood samples. Samples producing abnormal chromatograms were further analyzed to characterize any Hb variants. Fructosamine levels were determined in place of HbA1c levels when unstable Hb variants were identified. Abnormal HPLC chromatograms were obtained for 160 of 42 371 samples. In 26 samples HbS was identified and HbA1c results correlated with FPG. In the remaining 134 samples HbD, Hb Louisville, Hb Las Palmas, Hb N-Baltimore, or Hb Porto Alegre were identified and HbA1c did not correlate with FPG. These samples were retested using an immunoturbidimetric assay and the majority of results were accurate; only 3 (with the unstable Hb Louisville trait) gave aberrant HbA1c results. Hb variants can affect determination of HbA1c levels with some methods. Laboratories should be aware of Hb variants occurring locally and choose an appropriate HbA1c testing method. PMID:25355712

  12. Peritonitis - spontaneous bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP); Ascites - peritonitis; Cirrhosis - peritonitis ... who are on peritoneal dialysis for kidney failure. Peritonitis may have other causes . These include infection from ...

  13. Hemoglobin oxygen affinity in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Böning

    Full Text Available In patients with cystic fibrosis lung damages cause arterial hypoxia. As a typical compensatory reaction one might expect changes in oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. Therefore position (standard half saturation pressure P50st and slope (Hill's n of the O2 dissociation curve as well as the Bohr coefficients (BC for CO2 and lactic acid were determined in blood of 14 adult patients (8 males, 6 females and 14 healthy controls (6 males, 8 females. While Hill's n amounted to approximately 2.6 in all subjects, P50st was slightly increased by 1 mmHg in both patient groups (controls male 26.7 ± 0.2, controls female 27.0 ± 0.1, patients male 27.7 ± 0.5, patients female 28.0 ± 0.3 mmHg; mean and standard error, overall p<0.01. Main cause was a rise of 1-2 µmol/g hemoglobin in erythrocytic 2,3-biphosphoglycerate concentration. One patient only, clearly identified as an outlier and with the mutation G551D, showed a reduction of both P50st (24.5 mmHg and [2,3-biphosphoglycerate] (9.8 µmol/g hemoglobin. There were no differences in BCCO2, but small sex differences in the BC for lactic acid in the controls which were not detectable in the patients. Causes for the right shift of the O2 dissociation curve might be hypoxic stimulation of erythrocytic glycolysis and an increased red cell turnover both causing increased [2,3-biphosphoglycerate]. However, for situations with additional hypercapnia as observed in exercising patients a left shift seems to be a more favourable adaptation in cystic fibrosis. Additionally when in vivo PO2 values were corrected to the standard conditions they mostly lay left of the in vitro O2 dissociation curve in both patients and controls. This hints to unknown fugitive factors influencing oxygen affinity.

  14. Reactivation of fetal hemoglobin in thalassemia and sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Eridani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable attention has been recently devoted to mechanisms involved in the perinatal hemoglobin switch, as it was long ago established that the survival of fetal hemoglobin (HbF production in significant amount can reduce the severity of the clinical course in severe disorders like β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD. For instance, when β-thalassemia is associated with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH the disease takes a mild course, labeled as thalassemia intermedia. The same clinical amelioration occurs for the association between HPFH and SCD. As for the mechanism of this effect, some information has been obtained from the study of natural mutations at the human β-globin locus in patients with increased HbF, like the Corfu thalassemia mutations. Important evidence came from the discovery that drugs capable of improving the clinical picture of SCD, like decitabine ad hydroxycarbamide, are acting through the reactivation, to some extent, of HbF synthesis. The study of the mechanism of action of these compounds was followed by the identification of some genetic determinants, which promote this event. In particular, among a few genetic factors involved in this process, the most relevant appears the BCL11A gene, which is now credited to be able to silence γ-globin genes in the perinatal period by interaction with several erythroid-specific transcription factors and is actually considered as a barrier to HbF reactivation by known HbF inducing agents. Epigenetics is also a player in the process, mainly through DNA demethylation. This is certified by the recent demonstration that hypomethylating agents such as 5-azacytidine and decitabine, the first compounds used for HbF induction by pharmacology, act as irreversible inhibitors of demethyltransferase enzymes. Great interest has also been raised by the finding that several micro-RNAs, which act as negative regulators of gene expression, have been implicated in the

  15. Differential expression of murine adult hemoglobins in early ontogeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wawrzyniak, C.J.; Lewis, S.E.; Popp, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A hemoglobin mutation is described that permits study of the expression of the two adult ..beta..-globin genes throughout fetal and postnatal development. Mice with a mutation at the Hbb/sup s/, ..beta..-globin locus, were used to study the relative levels of ..beta..-s2major and ..beta..-sminor globins specified by the mutant Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype during development. At 11.5 days of gestation ..beta..-sminor comprised over 80% and ..beta..-s2major under 20% of the adult beta-globin. The relative level of ..beta..-sminor decreased through fetal development; at birth ..beta..-sminor represented 33.7% of the ..beta..-globin. The adult values of 71.0% ..beta..-s2major and 29.0% ..beta..-sminor globin are expressed in mice six days after birth. Because the two ..beta..-globin genes are expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup 2s/ haplotype, both the ..beta..-smajor and ..beta..-sminor genes must be expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype. Expression of the ..beta..-sminor gene is elevated to 35.6% in Hbb/sup s2/ mice that have been bled repeatedly. Thus, the 5' ..beta..-s2major and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype and, presumably the 5' ..beta..-smajor and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype, are regulated independently and are homologous to the 5' ..beta..-dmajor and 3' ..beta..-dminor genes of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotype. Mice of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype are better than mice of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotytpe for studying the mechanisms of hemoglobin switching because the Hbb/sup s2/ each of the three embryonic and two adult hemoglobins can be separated by electrophoresis. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-02

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  17. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H.; Dejea, Christine M.; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T.; Santidrian, Antonio F.; Felding, Brunhilde H.; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A.; Pardoll, Drew M.; White, James R.; Patti, Gary J.; Sears, Cynthia L.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N1, N12-diacetylspermine in both biofilm positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N1, N12-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome, to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression. PMID:25959674

  18. Mapping of hemoglobin in erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukara, Katarina; Jovanić, Svetlana; Drvenica, Ivana T.; Stančić, Ana; Ilić, Vesna; Rabasović, Mihailo D.; Pantelić, Dejan; Jelenković, Branislav; Bugarski, Branko; Krmpot, Aleksandar J.

    2017-02-01

    The present study describes utilization of two photon excitation fluorescence (2PE) microscopy for visualization of the hemoglobin in human and porcine erythrocytes and their empty membranes (i.e., ghosts). High-quality, label- and fixation-free visualization of hemoglobin was achieved at excitation wavelength 730 nm by detecting visible autofluorescence. Localization in the suspension and spatial distribution (i.e., mapping) of residual hemoglobin in erythrocyte ghosts has been resolved by 2PE. Prior to the 2PE mapping, the presence of residual hemoglobin in the bulk suspension of erythrocyte ghosts was confirmed by cyanmethemoglobin assay. 2PE analysis revealed that the distribution of hemoglobin in intact erythrocytes follows the cells' shape. Two types of erythrocytes, human and porcine, characterized with discocyte and echinocyte morphology, respectively, showed significant differences in hemoglobin distribution. The 2PE images have revealed that despite an extensive washing out procedure after gradual hypotonic hemolysis, a certain amount of hemoglobin localized on the intracellular side always remains bound to the membrane and cannot be eliminated. The obtained results open the possibility to use 2PE microscopy to examine hemoglobin distribution in erythrocytes and estimate the purity level of erythrocyte ghosts in biotechnological processes.

  19. HIV and other predictors of serum folate, serum ferritin, and hemoglobin in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Gomo, E; Kæstel, Pernille;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Folate and iron status and hemoglobin concentrations are important to maternal and infant health. OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to identify predictors of serum folate, serum ferritin, and hemoglobin. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study of 1669 pregnant women (22-35 wk of gestation) in ...

  20. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  1. Using the Cascade Model to Improve Antenatal Screening for the Hemoglobin Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah; Papadopoulos, Irena; Kelly, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The inherited hemoglobin disorders constitute a major public health problem. Facilitators (experienced hemoglobin counselors) were trained to deliver knowledge and skills to "frontline" practitioners to enable them to support parents during antenatal screening via a cascade (train-the-trainer) model. Objectives of evaluation were to…

  2. Iron bioavailability of maize hemoglobin in a Caco-2 cell culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize is an important staple crop in many parts of the world but has low iron bioavailability, in part due to its high phytate content. Hemoglobin is a form of iron that is highly bioavailable and its bioavailability is not inhibited by phytate. We hypothesize that maize hemoglobin is a highly bioav...

  3. The impact of hemoglobin levels on patient and graft survival in renal transplant recipients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Jason

    2008-08-27

    It remains unclear whether low hemoglobin levels are associated with increased mortality or graft loss after renal transplantation. This study assessed the relationship of hemoglobin levels with patient and graft survival in 3859 patients with functioning renal transplants more than 6-months posttransplantation.

  4. Molecular Cloning and Sequencing of Hemoglobin-Beta Gene of Channel Catfish, Ictalurus Punctatus Rafinesque

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Hemoglobin-y gene of channel catfish , lctalurus punctatus, was cloned and sequenced . Total RNA from head kidneys was isolated, reverse transcribed and amplified . The sequence of the channel catfish hemoglobin-y gene consists of 600 nucleotides . Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals one o...

  5. Inhibition of pseudoperoxiadse activity of human red blood cell hemoglobin by methocarbamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Toofani, Sara; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Mollasalehi, Hamidreza; Bakhtiari Ziabari, Kourosh

    2017-01-01

    After red blood cells lysis, hemoglobin is released to blood circulation. Hemoglobin is carried in blood by binding to haptoglobin. In normal individuals, no free hemoglobin is observed in the blood, because most of the hemoglobin is in the form of haptoglobin complex. In some diseases that are accompanied by hemolysis, the amount of released hemoglobin is higher than its complementary haptoglobin. As a result, free hemoglobin appears in the blood, which is a toxic compound for these patients and may cause renal failure, hypertensive response and risk of atherogenesis. Free hemoglobin has been determined to have peroxidase activity and considered a pseudoenzyme. In this study, the effect of methocarbamol on the peroxidase activity of human hemoglobin was investigated. Our results showed that the drug inhibited the pseudoenzyme by un-competitive inhibition. Both Km and Vmax decreased by increasing the drug concentration. Ki and IC50 values were determined as 6 and 10mM, respectively. Docking results demonstrated that methocarbamol did not attach to heme group directly. A hydrogen bond linked NH2 of carbamate group of methocarbamol to the carboxyl group of Asp126 side chain. Two other hydrogen bonds could be also observed between hydroxyl group of the drug and Ser102 and Ser133 residues of the pseudoenzyme.

  6. Effect of laser radiation on physicochemical and functional properties of human hemoglobin in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irzhak, LI; Zotova, EA; Mamaeva, SA

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to laser radiation increases pH and isoelectric point of human hemoglobin solution, improves the acid-base properties, increases affinity for oxygen, and decreases the Bohr effect in comparison with intact hemoglobin. The mechanisms underlying these changes are discussed.

  7. Using the Cascade Model to Improve Antenatal Screening for the Hemoglobin Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah; Papadopoulos, Irena; Kelly, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The inherited hemoglobin disorders constitute a major public health problem. Facilitators (experienced hemoglobin counselors) were trained to deliver knowledge and skills to "frontline" practitioners to enable them to support parents during antenatal screening via a cascade (train-the-trainer) model. Objectives of…

  8. Nitrite attenuated hypochlorous acid-mediated heme degradation in hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Li, Jiayu; Ren, Xiaoming; Tian, Rong; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2015-08-05

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is elevated in many inflammatory diseases and causes the accumulation of free iron. Through the Fenton reaction, free iron has the ability to generate free radicals and subsequently is toxic. Recent studies have demonstrated that HOCl participates in heme destruction of hemoglobin (Hb) and free iron release. In this study, it was showed that nitrite (NO2(-)) could prevent HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction and free iron release. Also, NO2(-) prevented HOCl-mediated loss of Hb peroxidase activity. After the NO2(-)/HOCl treatment, Tyr 42 in α-chain was found to be nitrated in Hb, attenuating the electron transferring abilities of phenolic compounds. The protective effects of NO2(-) on HOCl-induced heme destruction were attributed to its reduction of ferryl Hb and/or direct scavenging of HOCl. Therefore, NO2(-) could show protective effects in some inflammatory diseases by preventing HOCl-mediated heme destruction of hemoproteins and free iron release.

  9. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D. M. Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R.; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T.; Srikanta, S. S.; Krishnaswamy, P. R.; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-02-01

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute.

  10. Glycated Hemoglobin Measurement and Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gao, Pei; Khan, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Analysis of individual-participant data available from 73 prospective studies involving 294,998 participants without a known history of diabetes mellitus or CVD at the baseline assessment. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Measures of risk......,840 incident fatal and nonfatal CVD outcomes (13,237 coronary heart disease and 7603 stroke outcomes) were recorded. In analyses adjusted for several conventional cardiovascular risk factors, there was an approximately J-shaped association between HbA1c values and CVD risk. The association between HbA1c values......IMPORTANCE: The value of measuring levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) for the prediction of first cardiovascular events is uncertain. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether adding information on HbA1c values to conventional cardiovascular risk factors is associated with improvement in prediction...

  11. Importance of hemoglobin concentration to exercise: acute manipulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, José A L; Lundby, Carsten; Koskolou, Maria;

    2006-01-01

    An acute reduction of blood hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), even when the circulating blood volume is maintained, results in lower (.)V(O(2)(max) and endurance performance, due to the reduction of the oxygen carrying capacity of blood. Conversely, an increase of [Hb] is associated with enhanced...... (.)V(O(2)(max) and endurance capacity, that is also proportional to the increase in the oxygen carrying capacity of blood. The effects on endurance capacity appear more pronounced and prolonged than on (.)V(O(2)(max). During submaximal exercise, there is a tight coupling between O(2) demand and O(2...... on maximal exercise capacity or (.)V(O(2)(max) during exercise in acute hypoxia. Likewise, reducing [Hb] in altitude-acclimatized humans to pre-acclimatization values has no effect on (.)V(O(2)(max) during exercise in hypoxia....

  12. Mass spectrometric identification of hemoglobin modifications induced by nitrosobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Francesco; Campanella, Luigi; Samperi, Roberto; Bachi, Angela

    2009-07-01

    Aniline and nitrobenzene (NB) are widely used industrial chemicals. Early effects of aniline toxicity include methemoglobin formation and damage to erythrocytes (Jenkins, F.P., 1972. The no-effect dose of anilne in human subjects and a comparison of aniline toxicity in man and rat. Food Cosmet. Toxicol. 10, 671-679; Bus, J.S., Popp, J.A., 1987. Perspectives on the mechanism of action of the splenic toxicity of aniline and structurally-related. Food Chem. Toxicol. 25, 619-627). In this report, we describe an analytical method, based on LC techniques and mass spectrometry, which could help in monitoring the exposure to aniline and NB. In particular, we describe and characterize the formation of specific adducts during an in vitro reaction of nitrosobenzene (NOB), the main metabolite of aniline and NB, and human hemoglobin.

  13. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D. M. Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R.; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T.; Srikanta, S. S.; Krishnaswamy, P. R.; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-01-01

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute. PMID:28169325

  14. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storz, Jay F.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer- dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking...... for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying - and -type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2......) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis...

  15. Glycosylated Hemoglobin: The Importance in Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Yavari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is a major public health problem with high and increasing prevalence, morbidity and mortality. The association between diabetes and microvascular and macrovascular complications is well known besides, tight glycemic control is a necessity. HbA1C has clinically been used since 1980s as a gold standard for monitoring glycemic control and predicting of diabetic complications. The present review article was prepared by computerized sources of literature searches 2000 - 2009.The history of Hemoglobin A1C, its assay techniques, optimal A1C targets, its reliability in control of diabetic complications, limitations of test results and its importance in control of diabetes patients and their complications are discussed.

  16. Effects of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers on Blood Coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimia Roghani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For many decades, Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs have been central in the development of resuscitation agents that might provide oxygen delivery in addition to simple volume expansion. Since 80% of the world population lives in areas where fresh blood products are not available, the application of these new solutions may prove to be highly beneficial (Kim and Greenburg 2006. Many improvements have been made to earlier generation HBOCs, but various concerns still remain, including coagulopathy, nitric oxide scavenging, platelet interference and decreased calcium concentration secondary to volume expansion (Jahr et al. 2013. This review will summarize the current challenges faced in developing HBOCs that may be used clinically, in order to guide future research efforts in the field.

  17. Fluorescence Spectra and Enzymatic Property of Hemoglobin as Mimetic Peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li De-jia; Li Hai-cheng; Zou Guo-lin

    2003-01-01

    Intrinsic fluorescence emission maxima of hemoglobin(Hb) was investigated in relation to peroxidase property of Hb. The peroxidase activity of Hb was based on its catalytic activity for oxidation of o-phenylenediamine by hydrogen peroxide. Hb was treated in the condition (temperature,ethanol and salt) that tetramer-dimer equilibrium of Hb is shifted to the dimer state and its fluorescence spectrum was measured. When Hb treated in temperature (60-70 ℃ ), ethanol concentration (60 %-70 % ) and NaCl concentration (2.5-3.0 mol/L), the fluorescence emission maxima of Hb shifted towards red wavelength and its activity decreased quickly.Experimental results revealed that the activity and stability of Hb as mimetic peroxidase was closely relative to the hydrophobic environment of active center of Hb, and when Hb (FeⅡ) converted into met Hb (FeⅢ ), its activity was 1. 6times as much as that of Hb.

  18. Hemoglobin Biocatalyst Polymerization of Aniline by UV- vis Spectraphotometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xing; CHEN Dong-ming; ZOU Guo-lin

    2005-01-01

    A biocatalytic route for the synthesis of a water soluble and conducting complex of polyaniline (PANI)/sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) is presented. Hemoglobin is used in SDS anion surfactant . The polymerization proceeded quickly to result in a homogeneous emeraldine-colored dispersion of PANI. Absorption spectra of PANI/SDS in the aqueous dis persions at various pH values confirms that the reversibility of dedoping and redoping process of PANI/SDS and shows that the transition from emeraldine salt to emeraldine base form occurred at about pH 10. 0-11.0 in this anionic micellar system. PANI/SDS in the organic solutions dedoped initially and redoped after 24 h.

  19. Expression and purification of recombinant hemoglobin in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Jiang, Xiaoben; Fago, Angela

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recombinant DNA technologies have played a pivotal role in the elucidation of structure-function relationships in hemoglobin (Hb) and other globin proteins. Here we describe the development of a plasmid expression system to synthesize recombinant Hbs in Escherichia coli, and we describe...... a protocol for expressing Hbs with low intrinsic solubilities. Since the alpha- and beta-chain Hbs of different species span a broad range of solubilities, experimental protocols that have been optimized for expressing recombinant human HbA may often prove unsuitable for the recombinant expression...... of wildtype and mutant Hbs of other species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a test case for our expression system, we produced recombinant Hbs of the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), a species that has been the subject of research on mechanisms of Hb adaptation to hypoxia. By experimentally assessing...

  20. Moessbauer studies of hemoglobin in erythrocytes exposed to neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemiec, Katarzyna; Kaczmarska, Magdalena; Buczkowski, Mateusz [AGH University, Faculty of Physics and Computer Science, Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics (Poland); Fornal, Maria [Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University, Department of Internal Medicine and Gerontology (Poland); Pohorecki, Wladyslaw [AGH University, Faculty of Energy and Fuels (Poland); Matlak, Krzysztof; Korecki, Jozef [AGH University, Faculty of Physics and Computer Science, Department of Solid State Physics (Poland); Grodzicki, Tomasz [Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University, Department of Internal Medicine and Gerontology (Poland); Burda, Kvetoslava, E-mail: kvetoslava.burda@fis.agh.edu.pl [AGH University, Faculty of Physics and Computer Science, Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics (Poland)

    2012-03-15

    We studied radiation effects on the stability of various states of hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBC) irradiated with a very low dose of neutron rays, 50 {mu}Gy. We investigated RBCs isolated from blood of healthy donors. Moessbauer spectroscopy was applied to monitor different forms of Hb. Our results show, for the first time, that oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (DeoxyHb) are two Hb forms sensitive to such a low neutron radiation. Both Hbs change into a new Hb form (Hb{sub irr}). Additionally, OxyHb transfers into HbOH/H{sub 2}O, which under our experimental conditions is resistant to the action of neutron rays.

  1. Targeting the Hemoglobin Scavenger receptor CD163 in Macrophages Highly Increases the Anti-inflammatory Potency of Dexamethasone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas H; Svendsen, Pia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids are potent anti-inflammatory drugs but serious side effects such as bone mobilization, muscle mass loss, immunosuppression, and metabolic alterations make glucocorticoid therapy a difficult balance. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids relies largely...... on the suppressed release of tumor-necrosis factor-α and other cytokines by macrophages at the sites of inflammation. We have now developed a new biodegradable anti-CD163 antibody-drug conjugate that specifically targets the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone to the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 in macrophages....... The conjugate, that in average contains four dexamethasone molecules per antibody, exhibits retained high functional affinity for CD163. In vitro studies in rat macrophages and in vivo studies of Lewis rats showed a strong anti-inflammatory effect of the conjugate measured as reduced lipopolysaccharide...

  2. Glycated Hemoglobin Levels in Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Nadelson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aim of this study is to determine if HbA1c levels are a reliable predictor of glycemic control in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Methods. 200 unique patients referred for liver transplantation at University of Tennessee/Methodist University Transplant Institute with a HbA1c result were included. Three glucose levels prior to the “measured” A1c (MA1c were input into an HbA1c calculator from the American Diabetes Association website to determine the “calculated” A1c (CA1c. The differences between MA1c and CA1c levels were computed. Patients were divided into three groups: group A, difference of 1.5. Results. 97 (49% patients had hemoglobin A1c of less than 5%. Discordance between calculated and measured HbA1c of >0.5% was seen in 47% (n=94. Higher level of discordance of greater than >1.5 was in 12% of patients (n=24. Hemoglobin was an independent predictor for higher discordance (odds ratio 0.77 95%, CI 0.60–0.99, and p value 0.04. HbA1c was an independent predictor of occurrence of HCC (OR 2.69 955, CI 1.38–5.43, and p value 0.008. Conclusion. HbA1c is not a reliable predictor of glycemic control in patients with decompensated cirrhosis, especially in those with severe anemia.

  3. Hemoglobin e syndromes: emerging diagnostic challenge in north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anjali; Marwah, Sadhna; Buxi, Gurdeep; Yadav, Rajbala

    2013-03-01

    Hemoglobin E (HbE) is one of the world's most common and important mutations. HbE disorders may be found in heterozygous (AE), homozygous (EE) and compound heterozygous state. It is important to distinguish HbE disorders diagnostically because of marked differences in clinical course among different genotypes. To find out whether RBC indices as obtained from automated cell counter can provide a clue to the diagnosis of HbE disease. This study was carried out in the Department of Clinical Pathology, PGIMER, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi. It included antenatal pregnant females brought for routine check-up as well as referred patients suspected of having hemoglobinopathies. High Performance liquid chromatography was used as a confirmatory test for identification of hemoglobinopathy. Total 20 cases of subtype homozygous HbE (3), HbE trait (12) and Eβ-thalassemia (5) were identified. Statistical analysis was done to find out correlation between levels of HBA2, HBF with RBC indices. (a) There was negative correlation between HbA2/E peak values and RBC indices (Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and Mean corpuscular hemoglobin) among all the three groups taken together. (b) There was positive correlation between HbA2/E and Red cell distribution width (RDW). (c) There was positive correlation between HbF values with MCV. The finding of positive correlation between HbA2/E and RDW may help in differentiating βthal (RDW normal) from HbE/βthal. In a patient with microcytic hypochromic blood picture and increased RDW, diagnosis of HbE/βthal should also be considered along with the more common Iron deficiency anemia. Thus, new insights into the knowledge of these diseases are important because they impart diagnostic challenges to all the experts involved in the treatment of anemic patients.

  4. Facile heme vinyl posttranslational modification in a hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preimesberger, Matthew R; Wenke, Belinda B; Gilevicius, Lukas; Pond, Matthew P; Lecomte, Juliette T J

    2013-05-21

    Iron-protoporphyrin IX, or b heme, is utilized as such by a large number of proteins and enzymes. In some cases, notably the c-type cytochromes, this group undergoes a posttranslational covalent attachment to the polypeptide chain, which adjusts the physicochemical properties of the holoprotein. The hemoglobin from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (GlbN), contrary to the archetypical hemoglobin, modifies its b heme covalently. The posttranslational modification links His117, a residue that does not coordinate the iron, to the porphyrin 2-vinyl substituent and forms a hybrid b/c heme. The reaction is an electrophilic addition that occurs spontaneously in the ferrous state of the protein. This apparently facile type of heme modification has been observed in only two cyanobacterial GlbNs. To explore the determinants of the reaction, we examined the behavior of Synechocystis GlbN variants containing a histidine at position 79, which is buried against the porphyrin 4-vinyl substituent. We found that L79H/H117A GlbN bound the heme weakly but nevertheless formed a cross-link between His79 Nε2 and the heme 4-Cα. In addition to this linkage, the single variant L79H GlbN also formed the native His117-2-Cα bond yielding an unprecedented bis-alkylated protein adduct. The ability to engineer the doubly modified protein indicates that the histidine-heme modification in GlbN is robust and could be engineered in different local environments. The rarity of the histidine linkage in natural proteins, despite the ease of reaction, is proposed to stem from multiple sources of negative selection.

  5. Hemoglobin cut-off values in healthy Turkish infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmet Arvas; Emel Gür; DurmuşDoğan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anemia is a widespread public health problem associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This study was undertaken to determine the cut-off value of hemoglobin for infant anemia. Methods: A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out at well-baby clinics of a tertiary care hospital. A total of 1484 healthy infants aged between 4 to 24 months were included in the study. The relationship of hemoglobin (Hb) levels with mother age, birth weight, weight gain rate, feeding, and gender was evaluated. Results: The Hb levels were assessed in four age groups (4 months, 6 months, 9-12 months, and 15-24 months) and the cut-off values of Hb were determined. Hb cut-off values (5th percentile for age) were detected as 97 g/L and 93 g/L at 4 months and 6 months, respectively. In older infants, the 5th percentile was 90.5 g/L and 93.4 g/L at 9-12 months and 15-24 months, respectively. The two values were lower than the World Health Organization criteria for anemia, which could partly due to the lack of information on iron status in our population. However, this difference highlights the need for further studies on normal Hb levels in healthy infants in developing countries. Hb levels of females were higher in all age groups; however, a statistically significant difference was found in gender in only 6 month-old infants. No statistically significant difference was found among Hb levels, mother's age, birth weight, weight gain rate, and nutritional status. Conclusion: Hb cut-off values in infants should be re-evaluated and be compatible with growth and development of children in that community.

  6. Megalin and cubilin are endocytic receptors involved in renal clearance of hemoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gburek, Jakub; Verroust, Pierre J; Willnow, Thomas E

    2002-01-01

    The kidney is the main site of hemoglobin clearance and degradation in conditions of severe hemolysis. Herein it is reported that megalin and cubilin, two epithelial endocytic receptors, mediate the uptake of hemoglobin in renal proximal tubules. Both receptors were purified by use of hemoglobin......-Sepharose affinity chromatography of solubilized renal brush-border membranes. Apparent dissociation constants of 1.7 microM for megalin and 4.1 microM for cubilin were determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. The binding was calcium dependent in both cases. Uptake of fluorescence-labeled hemoglobin by BN...... not affect the uptake. By use of immunohistochemistry, it was demonstrated that uptake of hemoglobin in proximal tubules of rat, mouse, and dog kidneys occurs under physiologic conditions. Studies on normal and megalin knockout mouse kidney sections showed that megalin is responsible for physiologic...

  7. Acid Denaturation Inducing Self-Assembly of Curcumin-Loaded Hemoglobin Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaikai Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin is a promising drug carrier but lacks extensive investigation. The chemical conjugation of hemoglobin and drugs is costly and complex, so we have developed curcumin-loaded hemoglobin nanoparticles (CCM-Hb-NPs via self-assembly for the first time. Using the acid-denaturing method, we avoid introducing denaturants and organic solvents. The nanoparticles are stable with uniform size. We have conducted a series of experiments to examine the interaction of hemoglobin and CCM, including hydrophobic characterization, SDS-PAGE. These experiments substantiate that this self-assembly process is mainly driven by hydrophobic forces. Our nanoparticles achieve much higher cell uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity than free CCM solution in vitro. The uptake inhibition experiments also demonstrate that our nanoparticles were incorporated via the classic clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. These results indicate that hemoglobin nanoparticles formed by self-assembly are a promising drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  8. Identification of hemoglobin variants by top-down mass spectrometry using selected diagnostic product ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Hartmer, Ralf; Jabs, Wolfgang; Beris, Photis; Clerici, Lorella; Stoermer, Carsten; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis; Tsybin, Yury O; Scherl, Alexander; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Hemoglobin disorder diagnosis is a complex procedure combining several analytical steps. Due to the lack of specificity of the currently used protein analysis methods, the identification of uncommon hemoglobin variants (proteoforms) can become a hard task to accomplish. The aim of this work was to develop a mass spectrometry-based approach to quickly identify mutated protein sequences within globin chain variants. To reach this goal, a top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry method was developed for hemoglobin β chain analysis. A diagnostic product ion list was established with a color code strategy allowing to quickly and specifically localize a mutation in the hemoglobin β chain sequence. The method was applied to the analysis of rare hemoglobin β chain variants and an (A)γ-β fusion protein. The results showed that the developed data analysis process allows fast and reliable interpretation of top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectra by nonexpert users in the clinical area.

  9. Phenotypic expression of HbO Indonesia in two Indian families and its interaction with sickle hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Das Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alpha globin chain variants are clinically significant since they directly influence the structure and function of the hemoglobin (Hb molecules they constitute, either in combination with normal beta globin chains or with variant beta chains, thereby altering the morbidity and mortality associated with the resultant hemoglobinopathies. We describe here two unrelated families from Madhya Pradesh who had a nondeletional alpha-chain variant, HbO Indonesia (CD116 G → A. Members of one of the two families also had coinheritance of sickle hemoglobin (HbS. Aims: The aim was to study the phenotype of HbO Indonesia and its interaction with HbS. Materials and Methods: Hb electrophoresis, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, covalent reverse dot blot hybridization, amplification refractory mutation system, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and direct gene sequencing were used to identify and characterize the variant Hbs. Results: The abnormal Hb moved in HbS region in Hb electrophoresis at alkaline pH but gave an abnormal peak in HPLC with a retention time (RT of 4.86–4.89 min. In two members of the family with coinheritance of HbS, it produced small additional abnormal Hb peaks (4.6% in heterozygous and 11.9% in homozygous member in HPLC with a longer RT (5.15–5.17 min possibly resulting from a combination of HbO Indonesia alpha chain with HbS beta chain. Conclusions: It appears that depending on the zygosity of HbS, HbO Indonesia would subtract a variable amount of HbS beta chain from the total pool, thereby potentially reducing the clinical severity of HbS disease. HbO Indonesia per se does not cause anemia or alter the red cell indices.

  10. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  11. Effect of hydroxyurea on G gamma chain fetal hemoglobin synthesis by sickle-cell disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyurea is used for sickle-cell disease patients in order to increase fetal hemoglobin synthesis and consequently decrease the severity of pain episodes. Fetal hemoglobin, which is formed by gamma-globin chains A and G, is present in a constant composition throughout fetal development: about 75% of Ggamma and 25% of Agamma. In contrast, adult red cells contain about 40% of Ggamma and 60% of Agamma. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of hydroxyurea induction on the gamma chain composition of fetal hemoglobin in 31 sickle-cell disease patients treated with hydroxyurea. The control group was composed of 30 sickle-cell disease patients not treated with hydroxyurea in clinical steady state. The patients were older than 13 years and were not matched for age. All patients were seen at Hemocentro/UNICAMP and Boldrini Infantile Center, Campinas, SP, Brazil. The levels of total hemoglobin were significantly higher in patients treated with hydroxyurea (mean ± SD, 9.6 ± 2.16 g/dl than in untreated patients (8.07 ± 0.91 g/dl. Fetal hemoglobin levels were also higher in treated patients (14.16 ± 8.31% than in untreated patients (8.8 ± 4.09%, as was the Ggamma/Agamma ratio (1.45 ± 0.78 vs 0.98 ± 0.4, P < 0.005. The increase in the Ggamma/Agamma ratio in patients treated with hydroxyurea suggests the prevalence of a pattern of fetal hemoglobin synthesis, whereas patients not treated with hydroxyurea maintain the adult pattern of fetal hemoglobin synthesis. Because no correlation was observed between the Ggamma/Agamma ratio and total hemoglobin or fetal hemoglobin levels, the increase in Ggamma chain synthesis may not imply a higher production of hemoglobin.

  12. Viral-bacterial interactions in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Tal; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2012-12-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a polymicrobial disease, which usually occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI). While respiratory viruses alone may cause viral AOM, they increase the risk of bacterial middle ear infection and worsen clinical outcomes of bacterial AOM. URI viruses alter Eustachian tube (ET) function via decreased mucociliary action, altered mucus secretion and increased expression of inflammatory mediators among other mechanisms. Transient reduction in protective functions of the ET allows colonizing bacteria of the nasopharynx to ascend into the middle ear and cause AOM. Advances in research help us to better understand the host responses to viral URI, the mechanisms of viral-bacterial interactions in the nasopharynx and the development of AOM. In this review, we present current knowledge regarding viral-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis and clinical course of AOM. We focus on the common respiratory viruses and their established role in AOM.

  13. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...... about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria...

  14. A disposable amperometric dual-sensor for the detection of hemoglobin and glycated hemoglobin in a finger prick blood sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong-Min; Kim, Dong-Min; Kim, Moo Hyun; Han, Jin-Yeong; Jung, Dong-Keun; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2017-05-15

    A disposable microfluidic amperometric dual-sensor was developed for the detection of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and total hemoglobin (Hb), separately, in a finger prick blood sample. The accurate level of total Hb was determined through the measurements of the cathodic currents of total Hb catalyzed by a toluidine blue O (TBO)-modified working electrode. Subsequently, after washing unbound Hb in the fluidic channel of dual sensor with PBS, the cathodic current by only HbA1C captured on aptamer was monitored using another aptamer/TBO-modified working electrode in the channel. To modify the sensor probe, poly(2,2´:5´,5″-terthiophene-3´-p-benzoic acid) and a multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite layer (pTBA@MWCNT) was electropolymerized on a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), followed by immobilization of TBO for the total Hb probe and aptamer/TBO for the HbA1C probe, respectively. The characterization of each sensor surface was performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental conditions affecting the analytical signal were optimized in terms of the amount of TBO, pH, temperature, binding time, applied potential, and the content ratio of monomer and MWCNT. The dynamic ranges of Hb and HbA1C were from 0.1 to 10µM and from 0.006 to 0.74µM, with detection limits of 82(±4.2)nM and 3.7(±0.8)nM, respectively. The reliability of the proposed microfluidic dual-sensor for a finger prick blood sample (1µL) was evaluated in parallel with a conventional method (HPLC) for point-of-care analysis.

  15. Structure of the Hemoglobin-IsdH Complex Reveals the Molecular Basis of Iron Capture by Staphylococcus aureus*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F.; Kumar, Kaavya Krishna; Jacques, David A.; Malmirchegini, G. Reza; Spirig, Thomas; Mackay, Joel P.; Clubb, Robert T.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Gell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening disease in humans. The S. aureus surface protein iron-regulated surface determinant H (IsdH) binds to mammalian hemoglobin (Hb) and extracts heme as a source of iron, which is an essential nutrient for the bacteria. However, the process of heme transfer from Hb is poorly understood. We have determined the structure of IsdH bound to human Hb by x-ray crystallography at 4.2 Å resolution, revealing the structural basis for heme transfer. One IsdH molecule is bound to each α and β Hb subunit, suggesting that the receptor acquires iron from both chains by a similar mechanism. Remarkably, two near iron transporter (NEAT) domains in IsdH perform very different functions. An N-terminal NEAT domain binds α/β globin through a site distant from the globin heme pocket and, via an intervening structural domain, positions the C-terminal heme-binding NEAT domain perfectly for heme transfer. These data, together with a 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal domain bound to Hb and small-angle x-ray scattering of free IsdH, reveal how multiple domains of IsdH cooperate to strip heme from Hb. Many bacterial pathogens obtain iron from human hemoglobin using proteins that contain multiple NEAT domains and other domains whose functions are poorly understood. Our results suggest that, rather than acting as isolated units, NEAT domains may be integrated into higher order architectures that employ multiple interaction interfaces to efficiently extract heme from host proteins. PMID:24425866

  16. Structure of the hemoglobin-IsdH complex reveals the molecular basis of iron capture by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F; Kumar, Kaavya Krishna; Jacques, David A; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Spirig, Thomas; Mackay, Joel P; Clubb, Robert T; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening disease in humans. The S. aureus surface protein iron-regulated surface determinant H (IsdH) binds to mammalian hemoglobin (Hb) and extracts heme as a source of iron, which is an essential nutrient for the bacteria. However, the process of heme transfer from Hb is poorly understood. We have determined the structure of IsdH bound to human Hb by x-ray crystallography at 4.2 Å resolution, revealing the structural basis for heme transfer. One IsdH molecule is bound to each α and β Hb subunit, suggesting that the receptor acquires iron from both chains by a similar mechanism. Remarkably, two near iron transporter (NEAT) domains in IsdH perform very different functions. An N-terminal NEAT domain binds α/β globin through a site distant from the globin heme pocket and, via an intervening structural domain, positions the C-terminal heme-binding NEAT domain perfectly for heme transfer. These data, together with a 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal domain bound to Hb and small-angle x-ray scattering of free IsdH, reveal how multiple domains of IsdH cooperate to strip heme from Hb. Many bacterial pathogens obtain iron from human hemoglobin using proteins that contain multiple NEAT domains and other domains whose functions are poorly understood. Our results suggest that, rather than acting as isolated units, NEAT domains may be integrated into higher order architectures that employ multiple interaction interfaces to efficiently extract heme from host proteins.

  17. Bacterial communities of two ubiquitous Great Barrier Reef corals reveals both site- and species-specificity of common bacterial associates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Charlotte E Kvennefors

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral-associated bacteria are increasingly considered to be important in coral health, and altered bacterial community structures have been linked to both coral disease and bleaching. Despite this, assessments of bacterial communities on corals rarely apply sufficient replication to adequately describe the natural variability. Replicated data such as these are crucial in determining potential roles of bacteria on coral. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE of the V3 region of the 16S ribosomal DNA was used in a highly replicated approach to analyse bacterial communities on both healthy and diseased corals. Although site-specific variations in the bacterial communities of healthy corals were present, host species-specific bacterial associates within a distinct cluster of gamma-proteobacteria could be identified, which are potentially linked to coral health. Corals affected by "White Syndrome" (WS underwent pronounced changes in their bacterial communities in comparison to healthy colonies. However, the community structure and bacterial ribotypes identified in diseased corals did not support the previously suggested theory of a bacterial pathogen as the causative agent of the syndrome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to employ large numbers of replicated samples to assess the bacterial communities of healthy and diseased corals, and the first culture-independent assessment of bacterial communities on WS affected Acroporid corals on the GBR. Results indicate that a minimum of 6 replicate samples are required in order to draw inferences on species, spatial or health-related changes in community composition, as a set of clearly distinct bacterial community profiles exist in healthy corals. Coral bacterial communities may be both site and species specific. Furthermore, a cluster of gamma-proteobacterial ribotypes may represent a group of specific common coral and marine

  18. Anti- and pro-oxidant effects of (+)-catechin on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Puqing; Yang, Qin; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme proteins as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Flavonoids have been widely used to ameliorate oxidative damage in vivo and in vitro, where the mechanism of this therapeutic action was usually dependent on their anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the influence of (+)-catechin, a polyphenol identified in tea, cocoa, and red wine, on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage. It was found that (+)-catechin had the capacities to act as a free radical scavenger and reducing agent to remove cytotoxic ferryl hemoglobin, demonstrating apparent anti-oxidant activities. However, the presence of (+)-catechin surprisingly promoted hemoglobin-induced protein oxidation, which was probably due to the ability of this anti-oxidant to rapidly trigger the oxidative degradation of normal hemoglobin. In addition, hemoglobin-H2O2-induced protein carbonyl formation was significantly enhanced by (+)-catechin at lower concentrations, while it was efficiently inhibited when higher concentrations were used. These novel results showed that the dietary intake and therapeutic use of catechins might possess pro-oxidant activity through aggravating hemoglobin-related oxidative damage. The dual effects on hemoglobin redox reactions may provide new insights into the physiological implications of tea extract and wine (catechins) with cellular heme proteins.

  19. Trichomonas vaginalis: the adhesins AP51 and AP65 bind heme and hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan, Shahed; Lee, B Craig; Garber, Gary E

    2009-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the cause of human trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Although acquisition of iron by binding to host hemoglobin through distinct receptor(s) has been described, no specific heme- or hemoglobin-binding site has been reported in this parasite. To determine the presence of hemoglobin-binding protein(s), membrane proteins were subjected to hemoglobin-affinity chromatography. Eluted proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE. Two protein bands of 48 and 63 kDa were detected. Competition assay with an excess amount of hemoglobin or hemin in hemoglobin-affinity chromatography could block the 63- and 48-kDa bands, respectively. Further analysis by mass spectrometry indicated that the 48- and 63-kDa proteins had identity with two T. vaginalis adhesins: AP51 and AP65, respectively. This study confirms the existence of multifunctional proteins in T. vaginalis, and suggested that AP51 and AP65, besides serving as adhesion molecules, could also act as heme- and hemoglobin-binding proteins.

  20. Correlation between Oxygen Saturation and Hemoglobin and Hematokrit Levels in Tetralogy of Fallot Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhatul Inayah Adiputri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels increase in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF but the oxygen saturation declines. Reduced hemoglobin in circulating blood as a parameter of cyanosis does not indicate rising hemoglobin due to the ‘not-working’ hemoglobins that affect the oxygen saturation. Increasing hematocrit is the result of secondary erythrocytosis caused by declining oxygen level in blood, which is related to the oxygen saturation. This study was conducted to find the correlation between oxygen saturation and hemoglobin and hematocrite levels in TOF patients. Methods: This study was undertaken at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital in the period of January 2011 to December 2012 using the cross-sectional analytic method with total sampling technique. Inclusion criteria were medical records of TOF patients diagnosed based on echocardiography that included data on oxygen saturation, hemoglobin, and hematocrite. Exclusion criteria was the history of red blood transfusion. Results: Thirty medical records of TOF patiens from Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung were included in this study. Due to skewed data distribution, Spearman correlation test was used to analyze the data. There was a significant negative correlation between oxygen saturation and hematocrit level (r= -0.412; p=0.024 and insignificant correlation between oxygen saturation and hemoglobin (r=-0.329; p= 0.076. Conclusions: There is a weak negative correlation between oxygen saturation and hematocrite levels

  1. Evaluation of a New Noninvasive Device in Determining Hemoglobin Levels in Emergency Department Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Knutson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Masimo Radical-7 Pulse CO-Oximeter is a medical device recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration that performs noninvasive oximetry and estimated venous or arterial hemoglobin measurements. A portable, noninvasive device that rapidly measures hemoglobin concentration could be useful in both austere and modern hospital settings. The objective of this study is to determine the degree of variation between the device’s estimated hemoglobin measurement and the actual venous hemoglobin concentration in undifferentiated emergency department (ED patients.Methods: We conducted a prospective, observational, cross-sectional study of adult patients presenting to the ED. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample of adult ED patients who required a complete blood count as part of their care in the ED. A simultaneous probe hemoglobin was obtained and recorded.Results: Bias between probe and laboratory hemoglobin measurements was _0.5 (95% confidence interval,_0.8 to_0.1 but this was not statistically significant from 0 (t 0.05,124¼0.20, P . 0.5. The limits of agreement were _4.7 and 3.8, beyond the clinically relevant standard of equivalency of 6 1 g/dL.Conclusion: These data suggest that noninvasive hemoglobin determination is not sufficiently accurate for emergency department use. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(3:283–286.

  2. Candidate sequence variants and fetal hemoglobin in children with sickle cell disease treated with hydroxyurea.

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    Nancy S Green

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fetal hemoglobin level is a heritable complex trait that strongly correlates swith the clinical severity of sickle cell disease. Only few genetic loci have been identified as robustly associated with fetal hemoglobin in patients with sickle cell disease, primarily adults. The sole approved pharmacologic therapy for this disease is hydroxyurea, with effects largely attributable to induction of fetal hemoglobin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a multi-site observational analysis of children with sickle cell disease, candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with baseline fetal hemoglobin levels in adult sickle cell disease were examined in children at baseline and induced by hydroxyurea therapy. For baseline levels, single marker analysis demonstrated significant association with BCL11A and the beta and epsilon globin loci (HBB and HBE, respectively, with an additive attributable variance from these loci of 23%. Among a subset of children on hydroxyurea, baseline fetal hemoglobin levels explained 33% of the variance in induced levels. The variant in HBE accounted for an additional 13% of the variance in induced levels, while variants in the HBB and BCL11A loci did not contribute beyond baseline levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings clarify the overlap between baseline and hydroxyurea-induced fetal hemoglobin levels in pediatric disease. Studies assessing influences of specific sequence variants in these and other genetic loci in larger populations and in unusual hydroxyurea responders are needed to further understand the maintenance and therapeutic induction of fetal hemoglobin in pediatric sickle cell disease.

  3. Increased glycation of hemoglobin in chronic renal failure: [corrected] potential role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Nambiar; Bobby, Zachariah; Sridhar, Magadi Gopalakrishna

    2008-04-01

    Among the various mechanisms proposed, the process of non-enzymatic glycation of proteins is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic complications associated with renal failure. The two traditional factors found to modulate the early glycation of proteins are the prevailing concentration of glucose and half life of the protein. Among the various proteins that are known to undergo nonenzymatic glycation in vivo, hemoglobin has been the most thoroughly investigated. Determination of glycated hemoglobin in diabetic patients is currently acknowledged as the most reliable indicator for assessment of retrospective glycemic control and the planning of clinical management. The clinical utility of glycated hemoglobin measurements, however, in renal failure is controversial, given the numerous earlier studies showing no correlation between glycated hemoglobin and other indicators of blood glucose control in uremic subjects. With few exceptions, previous studies have suggested that the concentration of glycated hemoglobin was increased in uremic patients. There is documented evidence that increased glycated hemoglobin levels are found in certain non-diabetic states. So it stands to reason that hyperglycemia, although clearly being the culprit in diabetes, does not provide the complete answer to the etiology of increased early glycated products in non-diabetic conditions including chronic renal failure. This article reviews available evidence supporting increased glycation of hemoglobin in patients with chronic renal failure. Potential mechanisms for this increase are examined with special emphasis on the potential role of oxidative stress.

  4. Effect of the N-terminal residues on the quaternary dynamics of human adult hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shanyan; Mizuno, Misao; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-05-01

    The protein dynamics of human hemoglobin following ligand photolysis was studied by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. The time-resolved spectra of two kinds of recombinant hemoglobin expressed in Escherichia coli, normal recombinant hemoglobin and the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant, were compared with those of human adult hemoglobin (HbA) purified from blood. A frequency shift of the iron-histidine stretching [ν(Fe-His)] band was observed in the time-resolved spectra of all three hemoglobin samples, indicative of tertiary and quaternary changes in the protein following photolysis. The spectral changes of the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant were distinct from those of HbA in the tens of microseconds region, whereas the spectral changes of normal recombinant hemoglobin were similar to those of HbA isolated from blood. These results demonstrated that a structural change in the N-termini is involved in the second step of the quaternary structure change of hemoglobin. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the allosteric pathway of HbA.

  5. Prevention and Management of Bacterial Infections in Cirrhosis

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    Sunil K. Taneja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cirrhosis of liver are at risk of developing serious bacterial infections due to altered immune defenses. Despite the widespread use of broad spectrum antibiotics, bacterial infection is responsible for up to a quarter of the deaths of patients with liver disease. Cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleed have a considerably higher incidence of bacterial infections particularly spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. High index of suspicion is required to identify infections at an early stage in the absence of classical signs and symptoms. Energetic use of antibacterial treatment and supportive care has decreased the morbidity and mortality over the years; however, use of antibiotics has to be judicious, as their indiscriminate use can lead to antibiotic resistance with potentially disastrous consequences. Preventive strategies are still in evolution and involve use of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and spontaneous bacterial infections and selective decontamination of the gut and oropharynx.

  6. Genomic and Transcriptomic Analyses of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Dudley, Edward G.; Wade, Joseph T.

    DNA microarrays (often interchangeably called DNA chips or DNA arrays) are among the most popular analytical tools for high-throughput comparative genomic and transcriptomic analyses of foodborne bacterial pathogens. A typical DNA microarray contains hundreds to millions of small DNA probes that are chemically attached (or "printed") onto the surface of a microscopic glass slide. Depending on the specific "printing" and probe synthesis technologies for different microarray platforms, such DNA probes can be PCR amplicons or in situ synthesized short oligonucleotides. DNA microarray technologies have revolutionized the way that we investigate the biology of foodborne bacterial pathogens. The major advantage of these technologies is that DNA microarrays allow comparison of subtle genomic or transcriptomic variations between two bacterial samples, such as genomic variations between two different bacterial strains or transcriptomic alterations of same bacterial strain under two different treatments. Some applications of comparative genomic hybridization microarrays and global gene expression microarrays have been covered in previous chapters of this book.

  7. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria....

  8. Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buckley, Julliette M

    2012-02-03

    LPS tolerance has been the focus of extensive scientific and clinical research over the last several decades in an attempt to elucidate the sequence of changes that occur at a molecular level in tolerized cells. Tolerance to components of gram-positive bacterial cell walls such as bacterial lipoprotein and lipoteichoic acid is a much lesser studied, although equally important, phenomenon. This review will focus on cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components and examines the alterations in cell surface receptor expression, changes in intracellular signaling, gene expression and cytokine production, and the phenomenon of cross-tolerance.

  9. Megalin and cubilin are endocytic receptors involved in renal clearance of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gburek, Jakub; Verroust, Pierre J; Willnow, Thomas E; Fyfe, John C; Nowacki, Wojciech; Jacobsen, Christian; Moestrup, Søren K; Christensen, Erik I

    2002-02-01

    The kidney is the main site of hemoglobin clearance and degradation in conditions of severe hemolysis. Herein it is reported that megalin and cubilin, two epithelial endocytic receptors, mediate the uptake of hemoglobin in renal proximal tubules. Both receptors were purified by use of hemoglobin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of solubilized renal brush-border membranes. Apparent dissociation constants of 1.7 microM for megalin and 4.1 microM for cubilin were determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. The binding was calcium dependent in both cases. Uptake of fluorescence-labeled hemoglobin by BN-16 cells was inhibited by anti-megalin and anti-cubilin antibodies as well as by receptor-associated protein, a chaperone for LDL-receptor family proteins. Partial inhibition by myoglobin was observed, whereas bovine serum albumin, intrinsic factor-cobalamin complexes, and beta2-microglobulin did not affect the uptake. By use of immunohistochemistry, it was demonstrated that uptake of hemoglobin in proximal tubules of rat, mouse, and dog kidneys occurs under physiologic conditions. Studies on normal and megalin knockout mouse kidney sections showed that megalin is responsible for physiologic clearance of hemoglobin. Labeling intensities in kidneys from normal and cubilin-malexpressing dogs were similar, which suggests that, in the normal state, the role of cubilin in uptake of hemoglobin is rather limited. However, cubilin is likely to assist hemoglobin endocytosis in settings of hemoglobinuria. In conclusion, the study provides a molecular explanation for long-standing observations of hemoglobin uptake in renal proximal tubules that involve the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin. The findings may prove to be essential for further research on the pathophysiology of hemoglobinuric acute renal failure and proteinuria-associated tubulointerstitial nephritis.

  10. FRET imaging of hemoglobin concentration in Plasmodium falciparum-infected red cells.

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    Alessandro Esposito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During its intraerythrocytic asexual reproduction cycle Plasmodium falciparum consumes up to 80% of the host cell hemoglobin, in large excess over its metabolic needs. A model of the homeostasis of falciparum-infected red blood cells suggested an explanation based on the need to reduce the colloid-osmotic pressure within the host cell to prevent its premature lysis. Critical for this hypothesis was that the hemoglobin concentration within the host cell be progressively reduced from the trophozoite stage onwards. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The experiments reported here were designed to test this hypothesis by direct measurements of the hemoglobin concentration in live, infected red cells. We developed a novel, non-invasive method to quantify the hemoglobin concentration in single cells, based on Förster resonance energy transfer between hemoglobin molecules and the fluorophore calcein. Fluorescence lifetime imaging allowed the quantitative mapping of the hemoglobin concentration within the cells. The average fluorescence lifetimes of uninfected cohorts was 270+/-30 ps (mean+/-SD; N = 45. In the cytoplasm of infected cells the fluorescence lifetime of calcein ranged from 290+/-20 ps for cells with ring stage parasites to 590+/-13 ps and 1050+/-60 ps for cells with young trophozoites and late stage trophozoite/early schizonts, respectively. This was equivalent to reductions in hemoglobin concentration spanning the range from 7.3 to 2.3 mM, in line with the model predictions. An unexpected ancillary finding was the existence of a microdomain under the host cell membrane with reduced calcein quenching by hemoglobin in cells with mature trophozoite stage parasites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results support the predictions of the colloid-osmotic hypothesis and provide a better understanding of the homeostasis of malaria-infected red cells. In addition, they revealed the existence of a distinct peripheral microdomain in the host

  11. Substitutions in woolly mammoth hemoglobin confer biochemical properties adaptive for cold tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Kevin L.; Roberts, Jason E.E.; Watson, Laura N.;

    2010-01-01

    We have genetically retrieved, resurrected and performed detailed structure-function analyses on authentic woolly mammoth hemoglobin to reveal for the first time both the evolutionary origins and the structural underpinnings of a key adaptive physiochemical trait in an extinct species. Hemoglobin...... on the chimeric β/δ-globin subunit of mammoth hemoglobin that provide a unique solution to this problem and thereby minimize energetically costly heat loss. This biochemical specialization may have been involved in the exploitation of high-latitude environments by this African-derived elephantid lineage during...

  12. Sea cucumber sibling species: polypeptide chain types and oxygen equilibrium of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwell, C

    1966-06-03

    The hemoglobin of the "thin" sibling species of Thyonella gemmata (phylum: Echinodermata; class: Holothuria) has three electrophoretically distinct polypeptide chains. In "stout" sibling species of T. gemmata there are only two chain types. These results account for the greater number of multiple hemoglobins in "thins" than in "stouts," as well as for differences in the amounts of some of the multiple hemoglobins when comparisons are mnade of hemolyzates of erythrocytes from the water vascular systemn and from the main body cavity of the "thin" but not the "stout" sibling species.

  13. Fluorescent analysis of interaction of flavonols with hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentchouk, V. V.; Bondaryuk, E. V.

    2007-09-01

    We have studied the fluorescent properties of flavonols (quercetin, fisetin, morin, rutin) with the aim of studying possible interaction with hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA). We observed an increase in the intensity of intrinsic fluorescence for all the flavonols except rutin in the presence of BSA. From the changes in the fluorescence spectra, we concluded that tautomeric forms are formed on interaction with hemoglobin. We determined the interconnection between the structure of related flavonols and their fluorescent properties on interaction with proteins, and we determined the binding constants for binding with BSA and hemoglobin.

  14. Expression of NO scavenging hemoglobin is involved in the timing of bolting in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Jensen, Erik Østergaard

    2008-01-01

    -symbiotic hemoglobin gene, GLB2, in Arabidopsis thaliana. Lines with GLB1 silencing had a significant delay of bolting and after bolting, shoots reverted to the rosette vegetative phase by formation of aerial rosettes at lateral meristems. Lines with overexpression of GLB1 or GLB2 bolted earlier than wild type plants...... molecule, NO. So far, NO scavenging has only been demonstrated for class 1 non-symbiotic hemoglobins. A direct assay in Arabidopsis leaf cells shows that GLB1 as well as the class 2 non-symbiotic hemoglobin, GLB2, scavenge NO in vivo. NO has also been demonstrated to be a growth stimulating signal...

  15. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  16. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  17. Bacterial surface adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  18. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  19. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing....... These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  20. Fourier transform Raman approach to structural correlation in hemoglobin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, B; Ramasamy, S; Mylrajan, M; Asokan, R; Manoharan, P T; Rifkind, J M

    1999-07-01

    In order to obtain information on the structural aspects of hemoglobin (Hb), Fourier transform Raman (FT-R) measurements on various ferrous, ferric derivatives and nickel reconstituted Hb (NiHb) has been made. FT-R spectra for these derivatives were obtained by laser excitation in the near infrared region (NIR) (1064 nm) whereby the wave-number region (600-1700 cm-1) related to both porphyrin ring modes and some globin modes were monitored. Comparison of various modes was made based on previous resonance Raman (RR) results. The wave-number shifts with respect to changes in oxidation state and spin state are very similar to those observed by RR. Additional bands at 1654, 1459, and 1003 cm-1 for deoxyHb and at 1656, 1454, and 1004 cm-1 for oxy Hb can be correlated to globin modes. The shift in the position of these bands for the binding of oxygen can be related to changes in conformation during the transformation. The presence of two distinct sites in NiHb could be monitored by the use of FT-R technique.

  1. Hemoglobin E prevalence in malaria-endemic villages in Myanmar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win,Ne

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The population of Myanmar comprises 8 major indigenous races (Bamar, Kayin, Kachin, Shan, Rakhine, Mon, Chin, and Kayah. The Bamar reside in the 7 central divisions of the country, and the others reside in the 7 peripheral states that border neighboring countries, including China, Laos, and Thailand in the east and India and Bangladesh in the west. Both malaria and HbE are endemic in Myanmar, although the actual prevalence of the latter in the different indigenous races is not yet known. Hemoglobin electrophoresis was performed in 4 malaria-endemic villages, each having a different predominating indigenous race. The overall prevalence of HbE was 11.4% (52/456 villagers, ranging from 2-6% in the Kayin-predominant villages to 13.1-24.4% in the Bamar-predominant villages. Although the overall HbE prevalence in the villages studied was not significantly different from that of the general Myanmar population, this study strongly documented the influence of racial differences on the prevalence of HbE in Myanmar. To prevent and control severe thalassemia syndromes in Myanmar, extensive prevalence studies of the country?s indigenous races are suggested.

  2. Extracellular hemoglobin: The case of a friend turned foe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Kweku Quaye

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb is a highly conserved molecule present in all life forms and functionally tied to the complexity of aerobic organisms on earth in utilizing oxygen from the atmosphere and delivering to cells and tissues. This primary function sustains the energy requirements of cells and maintains cellular homeostasis. Decades of intensive research has presented a paradigm shift that shows how the molecule also functions to facilitate smooth oxygen delivery through the cardiovascular system for cellular bioenergetic homeostasis and signaling for cell function and defense. These roles are particularly highlighted in the binding of Hb to gaseous molecules carbon dioxide (CO2, nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO, while also serving indirectly or directly as sources of these signaling molecules. The functional activities impacted by Hb outside of bioenergetics homeostasis, include fertilization, signaling functions, modulation of inflammatory responses for defense and cell viability. These activities are efficiently executed while Hb is sequestered safely within the confines of the red blood cell (rbc. Outside of rbc confines, Hb disaggregates and becomes a danger molecule to cell survival. In these perpectives, Hb function is broadly dichotomous, either a friend in its natural environment providing and facilitating the means for cell function or foe when dislocated from its habitat under stress or pathological condition disrupting cell function. The review presents insights into how this dichotomy in function manifests.

  3. Purification of hemoglobin by tangential flow filtration with diafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Jacob; Harris, David R; Sun, Guoyong; Palmer, Andre F

    2009-01-01

    A recent study by Palmer, Sun, and Harris (Biotechnol. Prog., 25:189-199, 2009) demonstrated that tangential flow filtration (TFF) can be used to produce HPLC-grade bovine and human hemoglobin (Hb). In this current study, we assessed the quality of bovine Hb (bHb) purified by introducing a 10 L batch-mode diafiltration step to the previously mentioned TFF Hb purification process. The bHb was purified from bovine red blood cells (RBCs) by filtering clarified RBC lysate through 50 nm (stage I) and 500 kDa (stage II) hollow fiber (HF) membranes. The filtrate was then passed through a 100 kDa (stage III) HF membrane with or without an additional 10 L diafiltration step to potentially remove additional small molecular weight impurities. Protein assays, SDS-PAGE, and LC-MS of the purified bHb (stage III retentate) reveal that addition of a diafiltration step has no effect on bHb purity or yield; however, it does increase the methemoglobin level and oxygen affinity of purified bHb. Therefore, we conclude that no additional benefit is gained from diafiltration at stage III and a three stage TFF process is sufficient to produce HPLC-grade bHb.

  4. The hemoglobin O mutation in Indonesia: distribution and phenotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, D; Harahap, A; Setianingsih, I; Nainggolan, I; Tranggana, S; Pakasi, R; Marzuki, S

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated hemoglobin O Indonesia (HbOIna) in related ethnic populations of the Indonesian archipelago: 1725 individuals of the five ethnic populations of South Sulawesi (Bugis, Toraja, Makassar, Mandar, and Kajang) and 959 individuals of the neighboring islands, who were divided into five phylogenetic groups: (a) Batak; (b) Malay from Padang, Pakanbaru, and Palembang in the island of Sumatra; (c) Javanese-related populations (Java, Tengger, and Bali) from the islands of Java and Bali; (d) populations of the Lesser Sunda Islands of Lombok, Sumba, and Sumbawa; and (e) the Papuan-languagespeaking population of Alor Island. Nineteen individuals heterozygous for HbO(Ina) were identified from the Bugis, Toraja, Makassar, and Kajang ethnic populations, but none from the other populations. In all cases, the underlying mutation was found to be in codon 116 (GAG to AAG) of the alpha1-globin gene, resulting in the Glull6Lys amino acid change. The level of HbO in the 17 individuals plus 12 additional family members carrying the mutation was found to be 11.6 +/- 1.0%, significantly lower than the expected 17%-22%, indicating the instability of HbO.

  5. Five Rare β Globin Chain Hemoglobin Variants in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colah, Roshan B; Nadkarni, Anita; Gorakshakar, Ajit; Sawant, Pratibha; Gorivale, Manju; Mehta, Pallavi; Sawant, Madhavi; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-06-01

    Thalassemias as well as structural hemoglobin (Hb) variants are common monogenic inherited disorders of Hb in India. In this paper we describe 5 rare β-chain Hb variants identified in the Indian population on the basis of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of these 3 were identified during antenatal screening of β-thalassemia while the other 2 cases were referred to us for a diagnostic work up. These 5 Hb variants were Hb British Columbia (β CD 101 GAG → AAG), Hb Saint Louis (β CD28 CTG → CAG), Hb G Coushatta (β CD 22 GAA → GCA), Hb Pyrgos (β CD 83 GGC → GAC) and Hb Agenogi (β CD 90 GAG → AAG). Hb Saint Louis and Hb G Coushatta eluted in the HbA2 window, Hb British Columbia and Hb Agenogi eluted in the Hb C window while Hb Pyrgos eluted in an unknown window on HPLC. They were all identified by DNA sequencing. The child having Hb St. Louis had hepatosplenomegaly and anemia while the individuals with the other 4 variants were asymptomatic. Rare Hb variants are diagnostic curiosities that may be encountered by laboratories. Correct identification requires the application of more than one technique to avoid misdiagnosing them as more common variants (e.g. St. Louis and G Coushatta as E or D Iran on HPLC. Some, like G Coushatta may interfere with HPLC-based HbA1c estimation).

  6. Differential sensitivity of Chironomus and human hemoglobin to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Panicker, Lata; Mohole, Madhura; Sawant, Sangeeta; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2016-08-05

    Chironomus ramosus is known to tolerate high doses of gamma radiation exposure. Larvae of this insect possess more than 95% of hemoglobin (Hb) in its circulatory hemolymph. This is a comparative study to see effect of gamma radiation on Hb of Chironomus and humans, two evolutionarily diverse organisms one having extracellular and the other intracellular Hb respectively. Stability and integrity of Chironomus and human Hb to gamma radiation was compared using biophysical techniques like Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry and CD spectroscopy after exposure of whole larvae, larval hemolymph, human peripheral blood, purified Chironomus and human Hb. Sequence- and structure-based bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the sequence and structural similarities or differences in the heme pockets of respective Hbs. Resistivity of Chironomus Hb to gamma radiation is remarkably higher than human Hb. Human Hb exhibited loss of heme iron at a relatively low dose of gamma radiation exposure as compared to Chironomus Hb. Unlike human Hb, the heme pocket of Chironomus Hb is rich in aromatic amino acids. Higher hydophobicity around heme pocket confers stability of Chironomus Hb compared to human Hb. Previously reported gamma radiation tolerance of Chironomus can be largely attributed to its evolutionarily ancient form of extracellular Hb as evident from the present study.

  7. Human bulbar conjunctival hemodynamics in hemoglobin SS and SC disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanek, Justin; Gaynes, Bruce; Lim, Jennifer I; Molokie, Robert; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2013-08-01

    The known biophysical variations of hemoglobin (Hb) S and Hb C may result in hemodynamic differences between subjects with SS and SC disease. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare conjunctival hemodynamics between subjects with Hb SS and SC hemoglobinopathies. Image sequences of the conjunctival microcirculation were acquired in 9 healthy control subjects (Hb AA), 24 subjects with SC disease, and 18 subjects with SS disease, using a prototype imaging system. Diameter (D) and blood velocity (V) measurements were obtained in multiple venules of each subject. Data were categorized according to venule caliber by averaging V and D for venules with diameters less than (vessel size 1) or greater than (vessel size 2) 15 µm. V in vessel size 2 was significantly greater than V in vessel size 1 in the AA and SS groups (P ≥ 0.009), but not in the SC group (P = 0.1). V was significantly lower in the SC group as compared to the SS group (P = 0.03). In AA and SS groups, V correlated with D (P ≤ 0.005), but the correlation was not statistically significant in the SC group (P = 0.08). V was inversely correlated with hematocrit in the SS group for large vessels (P = 0.03); however, no significant correlation was found in the SC group (P ≥ 0.2). Quantitative assessment of conjunctival microvascular hemodynamics in SS and SC disease may advance understanding of sickle cell disease pathophysiology and thereby improve therapeutic interventions.

  8. The structural feature surrounding glycated lysine residues in human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shigenori; Nakahari, Takashi; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2011-06-01

    Complications derived from diabetes mellitus are caused by nonenzymatic protein glycation at the specific sites. LC/MS/MS was performed for the identification of the tryptic peptides of glycated hemoglobins using glyceraldehyde. After the identification of the glycation or non-glycation site, computer analysis of the structure surrounding the sites was carried out using PDB data (1BZ0). Five glycated lysine residues (Lys-16(α), -56(α), -8(β), -82(β), and -144(β)) and four non-glycated lysine residues (Lys-7(α), -40(α), -99(α), and -132(β)) were identified. The non-glycated lysine residues, Lys-7(α), -40(α), and -132(β), are most likely to form electrostatic interactions with the β carboxyl group of Asp-74(α), C-terminal His-146(β), and Glu-7(β) by virtue of their proximity, which is 2.67-2.91 Å (N-O). Additionally, there are histidine residues within 4.55-7.38 Å (N-N) around eight sites except for Lys-7(α). We conclude that the following factors seem to be necessary for glycation of lysine residues: (i) the apparent absence of aspartate or glutamate residues to inhibit the glycation reaction by forming an electrostatic interaction, (ii) the presence of histidine residues for acid-base catalysis of the Amadori rearrangement, and (iii) the presence of an amino acid residue capable of stabilizing a phosphate during proton transfer.

  9. Hemoglobin Bohr effects: atomic origin of the histidine residue contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guishan; Schaefer, Michael; Karplus, Martin

    2013-11-26

    The Bohr effect in hemoglobin, which refers to the dependence of the oxygen affinity on the pH, plays an important role in its cooperativity and physiological function. The dominant contribution to the Bohr effect arises from the difference in the pKa values of His residues of the unliganded (deoxy) and liganded (carbonmonoxy) structures. Using recent high resolution structures, the residue pKa values corresponding to the two structures are calculated. The method is based on determining the electrostatic interactions between residues in the protein, relative to those of the residue in solution, by use of the linearized finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo sampling of protonation states. Given that good agreement is obtained with the available experimental values for the contribution of His residues in HbA to the Bohr effect, the calculated results are used to determine the atomic origin of the pKa shift between deoxy and carbonmonoxy HbA. The contributions to the pKa shift calculated by means of the linear response approximation show that the salt bridge involving His146 plays an important role in the alkaline Bohr effect, as suggested by Perutz but that other interactions are significant as well. A corresponding analysis is made for the contribution of His143 to the acid Bohr effect for which there is no proposed explanation. The method used is summarized and the program by which it is implemented is described in the Appendix .

  10. [Altered states of consciousness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed.

  11. Comparison effects of dietary iron dextran and bacterial-iron supplementation on growth performance, fecal microbial flora, and blood profiles in sows and their litters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pinyao; Upadhaya, Santi Devi; Li, Jian; Kim, Inho

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to compare effects of dietary administration of iron dextran and bacterial-iron on growth performance, fecal microbial flora, and blood profiles in sows and their litters. A total of 20 multiparous sows (Landrace × Yorkshire) were randomly allotted into two treatments: (i) ID (basal diet, piglets were injected with iron dextran); (ii) BR (basal diet + bacterial-iron; bacterial-iron was given to sows, piglets were not injected with iron dextran). There were five replicates per treatment with two sows per replicate. No differences were observed on sow and piglet growth performance, fecal microbial flora as well as sow blood profiles between ID and BR treatments. In piglets, blood iron, red blood cell and hemoglobin concentrations in ID treatment were higher (P growth performance in lactating sows and piglets, but iron dextran injection has higher blood iron, white blood cell, red blood cell and hemoglobin concentrations in piglets.

  12. Hypoxia and anoxia effects on alcohol dehydrogenase activity and hemoglobin content in Chironomus riparius Meigen, 1804

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Grazioli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic effects of low oxygen content on alcohol-dehydrogenase (ADH activity and hemoglobin (Hb concentration were investigated in IV-instar larvae of Chironomus riparius (Diptera: Chironomidae from an Italian stream. Two series of short-term (48 h experiments were carried out: exposure to (1 progressive hypoxia (95 to 5% of oxygen saturation and (2 anoxia (at <5% of oxygen saturation. In (1, Hb amount increased with increasing oxygen depletion up to a critical value of oxygenation (about 70% of oxygen saturation. Below this percentage, the Hb amount declined to values comparable with those present in the control. The respiration rate (R remained almost constant at oxygen saturation >50% and decreased significantly only after 48 h of treatment (= <5% of oxygen saturation reaching values <100 mmolO2 gAFDW-1 h-1. ADH activity showed two phases of growth, within the first 14 h and over 18 h of exposure. Overall, we inferred that i Hb might function as short-term oxygen storage, enabling animals to delay the on-set of anaerobiosis; and ii alcoholic fermentation co-occurs for a short time with aerobic respiration, becoming the prevalent metabolic pathway below 5% of oxygen saturation (<1 mg L-1. These considerations were supported also by results from anoxia exposure (2. In such condition, larvae were visibly stressed, becoming immobile after few minutes of incubation, and ADH reached higher values than in the hypoxia treatment (2.03±0.15 UADH mg prot-1. Overall, this study showed a shift from aerobic to anaerobic activity in C. riparius larvae exposed to poorly oxygenated water with an associated alteration of ADH activity and the Hb amount. Such metabolites might be valid candidate biomarkers for the environmental monitoring of running waters.

  13. Preintercalation of Layered γ-Zirconium Phosphate for Preparation of Immobilized Hemoglobin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Layeredγ-Zirconium phosphate (γ-ZrP) preintercalated with butylamine, tetra (n-butylammonium)hydroxide, dimethylamine respectively, or only ultrasonificated, for preparation of immobilized hemoglobin were investigated in this report.

  14. Hemoglobin concentration determination based on near infrared spatially resolved transmission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linna; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-10-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method has been proved to be more effective than single point spectroscopy method in the experiment to predict the concentration of the Intralipid diluted solutions. However, Intralipid diluted solution is simple, cannot be the representative of turbid liquids. Blood is a natural and meaningful turbid liquid, more complicate. Hemoglobin is the major constituent of the whole blood. And hemoglobin concentration is commonly used in clinical medicine to diagnose many diseases. In this paper, near infrared spatially resolved transmission spectra (NIRSRTS) and Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) were used to predict the hemoglobin concentration of human blood. The results showed the prediction ability for hemoglobin concentration of the proposed method is better than single point transmission spectroscopy method. This paper demonstrated the feasibility of the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method for practical liquid composition analysis. This research provided a new thinking of practical turbid liquid composition analysis.

  15. COMPARISON OF FRUCTOSAMINE AND GLYCOSYLATED HEMOGLOBIN IN A NON-INSULIN DEPENDENT DIABETIC POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amini

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to determine the clinical value of frnctosamine assay for monitoring type II diabetic patients, correlation of frnctosamine with glycosylated hemoglobin was studied. 100 patients with type II diabetes mcllitus were compared with 100 normal subjects. Fasting blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, albumin and frnctosamine were measured in alt subjects. In the diabetic patients, a significant correlation was observed between fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (r = 0.64, p < 0.01 and scrum frnctosamine (r = 0.7, P < 0.01. Tlicrc was also a significant correlation between glycosylated hemoglobin and scrum frtictosmine (r = .94, I'<0.01. Frnctosamine, assay can be used as an index of diabetes control.

  16. Entamoeba histolytica HM1:IMSS: hemoglobin-degrading neutral cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Luna, J J; Negrete, E; Reyes, M; de la Garza, M

    1998-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica HMI:IMSS trophozoites were able to utilize human hemoglobin but not hemin as a sole iron source to grow in vitro. Proteases from crude extracts of E. histolytica degraded human, porcine, and bovine hemoglobins at pH 7.0. These proteolytic activities were found by electrophoresis in SDS-polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with hemoglobin, with apparent molecular weights of 116, 82, and 21 kDa, the 82-kDa protein being the most active protease against this substrate. The proteases were classified in the cysteine group since the activities were inhibited by l-trans-epoxysuccinylleucylamido(4-guanidino)butane, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, iodoacetate, and N-ethylmaleimide and activated with dithiothreitol. Other pathogenic strains of E. histolytica showed the same pattern of hemoglobinases. These hemoglobin-degrading proteases could be playing an important role in iron acquisition by E. histolytica.

  17. Hemoglobin variants detected by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) analysis and the effects on HbA1c measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir, Nadzimah Mohd; Thevarajah, M; Yean, Chew Yee

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hemoglobin (Hb) A1c is a tool widely used to monitor long-term glycemic control in diabetic patients. The objective of our study is to compare the HbA1c values measured on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and immunoassay in patients who were detected to have hemoglobin variant after HbA1c analysis. Materials and Methods: We compared the HbA1c values measured using the Arkray Adams A1c HA-8160 (HPLC method) and Roche Cobas Integra (immunoturbidimetric method) from diab...

  18. Influences of Triton X-100 on Hemoglobin Behaviors in Hemoglobin/Acyclovir/Triton X-100/H2O System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Tian-Qing; GUO,Rong

    2007-01-01

    The influences of Triton X-100 on hemoglobin(Hb)behaviors were studied by the methods of UV-Vis spectrum,fluorescence spectrum,HPLC,conductivity,zeta potential and negative-staining transmission electron microscope in Hb/acyclovir/Triton X-100/H2O system.With the increase of Triton X-100 concentration in the system,the percentage of the free acyclovir increased from 58%-63% to 90%-94%.The static quenching constant and the association number of acyclovir to Hb decreased.The fluorescence spectrum,conductivity,zeta potential,fluorescence polarization and negative-staining morphology of Hb tended to recover to those of the original state of Hb in the same concentration of Hb.The interaction between Triton X-100 and Hb is stronger than that between acyclovir and Hb.Most Triton-X-100 was associated with Hb at low Triton X-100 concentration.But the interaction of Triton X-100 with Hb was apparently dominant in high Triton X-100 concentration.The Hb structure was unfolded and finally denatured.

  19. [A new case of hemoglobin J Capetown alpha 92 (FG 4) Arg replaced by gln].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacon, G; Amegnizin, K E; Belkhodja, O; Denis, P; Krishnamoorthy, R; Labie, D; Lefrancois, R; Michel, Y; Pasquis, P; Wajcman, H

    1977-01-01

    Hemoglobin J Capetown was found incidentally in a patient of french origin suffering from urticaria with delayed pressure oedema. Using a preparative finger-print technique, the structural determination was easy. A functional study of the purified component confirmed the high oxygen affinity of hemoglobin J Capetown and demonstrated a low reactivity for organic phosphates. These results may explain the perturbations observed in the whole blood.

  20. "Live High-Train High" increases hemoglobin mass in Olympic swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian; Lundby, Carsten; Jørgensen, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    This study tested whether 3-4 weeks of classical "Live High-Train High" (LHTH) altitude training increases swim-specific VO2max through increased hemoglobin mass (Hbmass).......This study tested whether 3-4 weeks of classical "Live High-Train High" (LHTH) altitude training increases swim-specific VO2max through increased hemoglobin mass (Hbmass)....

  1. Effects of Second Trimester Maternal Hemoglobin Levels on Birth Weight and Birth Time

    OpenAIRE

    DÜNDAR, Özgür; ÇİFTPINAR, Tolga; TÜTÜNCÜ, Levent; ERGÜR, Ali Rüştü; ATAY, Mehmet Vedat; MÜNGEN, Ercüment; YERGÖK, Yusuf Ziya

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of our study is to investigate the effects of anemia at the second trimester on birth weight and birth time. Patients and Methods: The medical reports of 1116 pregnant women who attended and delivered at our clinic between January 2005 and October 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups as having <9 gr/dl hemoglobin or ≥9 gr/dl hemoglobin levels. The gestational and the perinatal outcomes of the normal a...

  2. STUDY OF HEMOGLOBIN LEVELS IN PREGNANT WOMEN AND ITS VARIOUS EFFECTS ON PREGNANCY OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: When maternal anemia is diagnosed before mid-pregnancy, it has been associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery. High maternal hemoglobin is associated with fetal growth restriction. Several epidemiologic studies have shown that high fetal hemoglobin is associated with lower birth weight and increased incidence of IUGR and intrauterine death. MATERIAL AND METHODS: It was a prospective observational study. All pregnant women attending antenatal clinic with first visit before 18 weeks of gestation were included in the study. Hemoglobin levels were done on women at the first visit to antenatal clinic and also in the third trimester between 34-36 weeks. Outcome criteria were birth weight of neonate, gestational age at delivery, maternal weight gain in pregnancy, development of PIH, IUGR, IUD and preterm labor. RESULTS: Increased weight gain in pregnancy was associated with increase in mean birth weight r=0.23 (P value 0.672. Increase in the hemoglobin concentration was associated with increase in birth weight r=0.36 (P value 0.49. It was observed that high hemoglobin concentration in pregnancy was associated with more length of gestation but it was not significant r=0.31 (P value 0.50. CONCLUSION: During early pregnancy normal hemoglobin concentrations were associated with higher birth weights. Weight gain in pregnancy was associated with lower hemoglobin concentrations at term and higher birth weights. The best outcomes of pregnancy were observed in women who had normal hemoglobin concentrations at the onset of pregnancy and who became anemic at term, presumably due to physiologic hemodilution.

  3. Evaluation of Electrical and Optical Plethysmography Sensors for Noninvasive Monitoring of Hemoglobin Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Completely noninvasive monitoring of hemoglobin concentration has not yet been fully realized in the clinical setting. This study investigates the viability of measuring hemoglobin concentration noninvasively by evaluating the performance of two types of sensor using a tissue phantom perfused with a blood substitute. An electrical sensor designed to measure blood volume changes during the cardiac cycle was used together with an infrared optical sensor for detection of erythrocyte-bound hemogl...

  4. Preservative effects of Aspirin on Human Hemoglobin glycation in Diabetic Condition

    OpenAIRE

    A. Divsalar; J Behroozi; AA Saboury; NN Poursasan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background & aim: Diabetes is a common disease which is characterized by hyperglycemia and the increase of protein glycation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aspirin-induced damage in human hemoglobin in diabetic glycation. Materials & Methods: In this study, hemoglobin extracted from the blood of healthy individuals was incubated in the presence and absence of glucose and aspirin for 5 weeks. The rate of haem glycotation was determined in different cond...

  5. HEMOGLOBIN PRODUCTION FACTORS IN THE HUMAN LIVER : ANEMIAS, HYPOPROTEINEMIA, CIRRHOSIS, PIGMENT ABNORMALITIES, AND PREGANCY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, G H; Robscheit-Robbins, F S

    1942-09-01

    Human liver tissue has been assayed to determine the amount of hemoglobin production factors in normal and abnormal states. Standardized dogs made anemic by blood removal have been used in this biological assay. Normal animal liver as control is rated as 100 per cent. Normal human liver tissue as compared with the normal animal control contains more of these hemoglobin production factors-a biological assay ratio of 120 to 160 per cent. Infections, acute and chronic, do not appear to modify these values, the concentration of hemoglobin-producing factors falling within the normal range. Pernicious anemia and aplastic anemia both show large liver stores of hemoglobin-producing factors-a biological assay ratio of 200 to 240 per cent. Therapy in pernicious anemia reduces these liver stores as new red cells are formed. Secondary anemia presents a low normal or subnormal liver store of hemoglobin-producing factors-an assay of 60 to 130 per cent. Hemochromatosis, erythroblastic anemia, and hemolytic icterus in spite of large iron deposits in the liver usually show a biological assay which is normal or close to normal. Polycythemia shows low reserve stores of hemoglobin-producing factors. Leukemias present a wide range of values discussed above. Hypoproteinemia almost always is associated with low reserve stores of hemoglobin-producing factors in the liver-biological assays of 60 to 80 per cent. Hypoproteinemia means a depletion of body protein reserve stores including the labile protein liver reserves-a strong indication that the prehemoglobin material (or globin) is related to these liver stores. Pregnancy, eclampsia, and lactation all may present subnormal liver stores of hemoglobin-producing factors. Exhaustion of protein stores lowers the barrier to infection and renders the liver very susceptible to many toxic substances. It should not be difficult to correct hypoproteinemia under these conditions and thus relieve the patient of a real hazard.

  6. Demographic Correlates of Low Hemoglobin Deferral among Prospective Whole Blood Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Alan E.; Schlumpf, Karen S.; Wright, David J.; Custer, Brian; Spencer, Bryan; Murphy, Edward L.; Simon, Toby L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Approximately 10% of attempted blood donations are not allowed because of low hemoglobin deferral. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Low hemoglobin deferrals were tracked in over 715,000 whole blood donors at six blood centers across the United States. A multivariable logistic regression model was developed to comprehensively assess demographic correlates for low hemoglobin deferral. RESULTS Demographic factors significantly associated with low hemoglobin deferral include female gender (11 times greater odds than males), increasing age in men (men over 80 have 29 times greater odds than men under 20); African American race (2–2.5 times greater odds than Caucasians); Hispanic ethnicity in women (1.29 times greater odds than Caucasian women) and weight in men (men under 124 pounds have 2.5 times greater odds than men over 200 pounds). Interestingly, increasing donation frequency is associated with decreased odds for low hemoglobin deferral (women with 1 donation in the previous 12 months have 2 times greater odds than those with 6 donations). CONCLUSIONS Low hemoglobin deferral is associated with female gender, older age, African-American race/ethnicity and lower body weight in men. An inverse association with donation frequency suggests a selection bias in favor of donors able to give more frequently. These data provide useful information that can be utilized to manage blood donors in order to limit low hemoglobin deferrals and assist in policy decisions such as changing the hemoglobin cut-off or permissible frequency of donation. They also generate hypotheses for new research of the causes of anemia in defined groups of donors. PMID:20412525

  7. The hemoglobin system of the brown moray Gymnothorax unicolor: structure/function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrini, M; Verde, C; Olianas, A; Giardina, B; Corda, M; Sanna, M T; Fais, A; Deiana, A M; di Prisco, G; Pellegrini, M

    2001-07-01

    The Gymnothorax unicolor hemoglobin system is characterized by two components, called cathodic and anodic on the basis of their isoelectric point, which were separated by ion-exchange chromatography. The oxygen-binding properties of the purified components were studied in the absence and presence of chloride and/or GTP or ATP in the pH range 6.5-8.0. Stripped cathodic hemoglobin showed a small reverse Bohr effect, high oxygen affinity, and low co-operativity; the addition of chloride only caused a small decrease in oxygen affinity. In the presence of GTP or ATP, the oxygen affinity was dramatically reduced, the co-operativity increased, and the reverse Bohr effect abolished. Stripped anodic hemoglobin is characterized by both low oxygen affinity and co-operativity, and displayed a normal Bohr effect; the addition of chloride increased co-operativity, whereas ATP and GTP significantly modulated oxygen affinity at acidic pH values, enhancing the Bohr effect and giving rise to the Root effect. The complete amino-acid sequences of the alpha and beta chains of both hemoglobins were established; the molecular basis of the functional properties of the hemoglobins is discussed in the light of the primary structure and compared with those of other fish hemoglobins.

  8. Effect of non-enzymatic glycation on esterase activities of hemoglobin and myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhrojit; Bose, Tania; Roy, Anjana; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2007-07-01

    Heme proteins--hemoglobin and myoglobin possess esterase activities. Studies with purified hemoglobin from normal individuals and diabetic patients revealed that the esterase activity as measured from hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) was higher in diabetic condition and increased progressively with extent of the disease. HbA(1c), the major glycated hemoglobin, which increases proportionately with blood glucose level in diabetes mellitus, exhibited more esterase activity than the non-glycated hemoglobin fraction, HbA(0), as demonstrated spectrophotometrically as well as by activity staining. Glycation influenced esterase activity of hemoglobin by increasing the affinity for the substrate and the rate of the reaction. Both HbA(0) and HbA(1c)-mediated catalysis of p-NPA hydrolysis was pH-dependent. Esterase activity of in vitro-glycated myoglobin (GMb) was also higher than that of its non-glycated analog (Mb). The amplified esterase activities of hemoglobin and myoglobin might be associated with glycation-induced structural modifications of the proteins.

  9. The crystal structure of a tetrameric hemoglobin in a partial hemichrome state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Antonio; Vitagliano, Luigi; di Prisco, Guido; Zagari, Adriana; Mazzarella, Lelio

    2002-01-01

    Tetrameric hemoglobins are the most widely used systems in studying protein cooperativity. Allosteric effects in hemoglobins arise from the switch between a relaxed (R) state and a tense (T) state occurring upon oxygen release. Here we report the 2.0-Å crystal structure of the main hemoglobin component of the Antarctic fish Trematomus newnesi, in a partial hemichrome form. The two α-subunit iron atoms are bound to a CO molecule, whereas in the β subunits the distal histidine residue is the sixth ligand of the heme iron. This structure, a tetrameric hemoglobin in the hemichrome state, demonstrates that the iron coordination by the distal histidine, usually associated with denaturing states, may be tolerated in a native-like hemoglobin structure. In addition, several features of the tertiary and quaternary organization of this structure are intermediate between the R and T states and agree well with the R → T transition state properties obtained by spectroscopic and kinetic techniques. The analysis of this structure provides a detailed pathway of heme–heme communication and it indicates that the plasticity of the β heme pocket plays a role in the R → T transition of tetrameric hemoglobins. PMID:12093902

  10. Analysis of hemoglobin F production in Saudi Arabian families with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B A; Salameh, M; Ahmed, M; Olivieri, N; Antognetti, G; Orkin, S H; Huisman, T H; Nathan, D G

    1987-09-01

    Erythrocytes and progenitor-derived erythroblasts of sickle cell anemia patients from the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia contain increased fetal hemoglobin and G gamma globin. A distinctive DNA polymorphism haplotype in the beta globin gene cluster (++- +-), tightly coupled to a C----T substitution at position -158 5' to the cap site of the G gamma globin gene, is strongly associated with sickle cell disease in this region. To determine whether the increased fetal hemoglobin production and/or elevated G gamma globin content are tightly linked to this haplotype, we studied 55 members of five Saudi families in which sickle cell disease is present. The results did not suggest a tight linkage of the haplotype to increased fetal hemoglobin production. On the other hand, several sickle trait family members heterozygous for the haplotype had normal fetal hemoglobin production in culture but elevated G gamma to A gamma ratios in peripheral blood. This observation suggests that in this genetic background increased expression of the G gamma globin gene may occur without a measurable increase in total fetal hemoglobin production. The family studies also clearly demonstrate that increased fetal hemoglobin production by erythroid progenitors is dependent on zygosity for the sickle gene in this population. These findings strongly suggest that other factors, such as the products of genes stimulated by hemolytic stress or other genetic determinants associated with the Saudi beta S chromosome, may interact with the -158 C----T substitution and influence gamma globin gene expression in this population.

  11. Hemoglobin mass and peak oxygen uptake in untrained and trained female altitude residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böning, D; Cristancho, E; Serrato, M; Reyes, O; Mora, M; Coy, L; Rojas, J

    2004-11-01

    Total hemoglobin mass has not been systematically investigated in females at altitude. We measured this quantity (CO-rebreathing method) as well as peak oxygen uptake in 54 young women (age 22.5 +/- 0.6 SE years) with differing physical fitness living in Bogota (2600 m) and compared the results with those of 19 subjects from 964 m in Colombia and 75 subjects from 35 m in Germany. In spite of an increased hemoglobin concentration the hemoglobin mass was not changed in highlanders (means 9.0 to 9.5 g . kg (-1) in untrained subjects at all altitude levels). Endurance trained athletes, however, showed a rise in hemoglobin mass by 2 - 3 g . kg (-1) at all sites. Erythropoietin was little increased in Bogota; iron stores were within the normal range. Aerobic performance capacity was lower at high altitude than at sea level and remained so also after correction for the hypoxic deterioration in untrained and moderately trained subjects but not in athletes; possibly the cause was reduced daily physical activity in non-athletic Bogotanians compared to lowlanders. After exclusion of the factor V.O(2peak) by analysis of covariance a mean rise of 6.6 % in hemoglobin mass at 2600 m was calculated being smaller than in males (> 12 %). The attenuated increase of hemoglobin mass in female highlanders possibly results from stimulation of ventilation improving arterial oxygen saturation or from an increased hypoxia tolerance of cellular metabolism both caused by female sexual hormones.

  12. Profile of hemoglobin D trait in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuphan K. Dolai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb D Punjab is one of the most commonly observed abnormal hemoglobinopathy worldwide. There was no systematic large published study to investigate the characteristic of Hb D Punjab trait in India. This study was conducted in school and college students, newly married couples and pregnant women after proper counseling in the rural areas of West Bengal state in eastern India. Complete blood count was done by Sysmax Automated Hematology Analyzer KX 21 (Sysmex Corp., Kobe, Japan and thalassemia testing was done using high-performance liquid chromatography (Variant TM - Bio-Rad Lab., Hercules, CA, USA. A total of 46,139 individuals were screened for hemoglobinopathies. Hb D trait was found in 0.35%. Hypochromia rather than microcytosis is consistent finding in Hb D trait. Anisocytosis is absent in Hb D trait. In almost all (99.37% cases, Hb D is within 40% of total hemoglobin. This data is likely to be helpful for screening of hemoglobinopathy in resource poor setting.  血红蛋白(Hb D Punjab是全球最普遍的异常血红蛋白病之一。在印度,之前并没有研究D型特征血红蛋白病的大型出版物。本研究在印度东部的西孟加拉邦的农村地区进行,研究对象是接受过相关咨询后的在校生,大学生,新婚夫妇和孕妇。完整的血细胞计数由日本神户市Sysmex公司的KX21自动化血液分析仪完成,血液测试由美国加州赫拉克勒斯Variant-Bio-Rad实验室通过高效液相色谱法完成。总计46139人被筛查,D型特征血红蛋白病的发现率为0.35%。血红蛋白过少而非小红细胞症,是D型特征血红蛋白病的主要症状。红细胞大小不均没有在D型特征血红蛋白病中被检测出。在所有的情况中(99.37%),D型特征血红蛋白占所有血红蛋白总数的40%。这些数据有利于在资源匮乏地区对血红蛋白病的筛查。

  13. The bacterial lipocalins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, R E

    2000-10-18

    The lipocalins were once regarded as a eukaryotic protein family, but new members have been recently discovered in bacteria. The first bacterial lipocalin (Blc) was identified in Escherichia coli as an outer membrane lipoprotein expressed under conditions of environmental stress. Blc is distinguished from most lipocalins by the absence of intramolecular disulfide bonds, but the presence of a membrane anchor is shared with two of its closest homologues, apolipoprotein D and lazarillo. Several common features of the membrane-anchored lipocalins suggest that each may play an important role in membrane biogenesis and repair. Additionally, Blc proteins are implicated in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and in the activation of immunity. Recent genome sequencing efforts reveal the existence of at least 20 bacterial lipocalins. The lipocalins appear to have originated in Gram-negative bacteria and were probably transferred horizontally to eukaryotes from the endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of the mitochondrion. The genome sequences also reveal that some bacterial lipocalins exhibit disulfide bonds and alternative modes of subcellular localization, which include targeting to the periplasmic space, the cytoplasmic membrane, and the cytosol. The relationships between bacterial lipocalin structure and function further illuminate the common biochemistry of bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  14. Determination of glycated hemoglobin in patients with advanced liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theresa Lahousen; Karin Hegenbarth; Rottraut Ille; Rainer W. Lipp; Robert Krause; Randie R. Little; Wolfgang J. Schnedl

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c)determination methods and to determine fructosamine in patients with chronic hepatitis, compensated cirrhosis and in patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin.METHODS: HbA1c values were determined in 15 patients with compensated liver cirrhosis and in 20 patients with chronic hepatitis using the ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography and the immunoassay methods.Fructosamine was determined using nitroblue tetrazolium.RESULTS: Forty percent of patients with liver cirrhosis had HbA1c results below the non-diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method, while fructosamine results were either within the reference range or elevated. Twenty percent of patients with chronic hepatitis (hepatic fibrosis)had HbA1c results below the non-diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method. In patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin, 50% of HbA1c results were below the non-diabetic reference using at least one of the HbA1c methods.CONCLUSION: Only evaluated in context with all liver function parameters as well as a red blood count including reticulocytes, HbA1c results should be used in patients with advanced liver disease. HbA1c and fructosamine measurements should be used with caution when evaluating long-term glucose control in patients with hepatic cirrhosis or in patients with chronic hepatitis and ribavirin treatment.

  15. The Pathophysiology of Extracellular Hemoglobin Associated with Enhanced Oxidative Reactions

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    Joseph M Rifkind

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb continuously undergoes autoxidation producing superoxide which dismutates into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and is a potential source for subsequent oxidative reactions. Autoxidation is most pronounced under hypoxic conditions in the microcirculation and for unstable dimers formed at reduced Hb concentrations. In the red blood cell (RBC, oxidative reactions are inhibited by an extensive antioxidant system. For extracellular Hb, whether from hemolysis of RBCs and/or the infusion of Hb-based blood substitutes, the oxidative reactions are not completely neutralized by the available antioxidant system. Un-neutralized H2O2 oxidizes ferrous and ferric Hbs to Fe(IV-ferrylHb and oxyferrylHb, respectively. FerrylHb further reacts with H2O2 producing heme degradation products and free iron. OxyferrylHb, in addition to Fe(IV contains a free radical that can undergo additional oxidative reactions. Fe(IIIHb produced during Hb autoxidation also readily releases heme, an additional source for oxidative stress. These oxidation products are a potential source for oxidative reactions in the plasma, but to a greater extent when the lower molecular weight Hb dimers enter cells and tissues. Heme and oxyferryl have been shown to have a proinflammatory effect further increasing their potential for oxidative stress. These oxidative reactions contribute to a number of pathological situations including atherosclerosis, kidney malfunction, sickle cell disease and malaria. The toxic effects of extracellular Hb are of particular concern for increased hemolysis due to hemolytic anemia. Hemolysis is further exacerbated in various diseases and their treatments. Blood transfusions are required whenever there is an appreciable decrease in RBCs due to hemolysis or blood loss. It is, therefore, essential that transfused blood, whether stored RBCs or blood obtained by an Autologous Blood Recovery System from the patient, does not further increase extracellular Hb.

  16. Expression and purification of recombinant hemoglobin in Escherichia coli.

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    Chandrasekhar Natarajan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant DNA technologies have played a pivotal role in the elucidation of structure-function relationships in hemoglobin (Hb and other globin proteins. Here we describe the development of a plasmid expression system to synthesize recombinant Hbs in Escherichia coli, and we describe a protocol for expressing Hbs with low intrinsic solubilities. Since the α- and β-chain Hbs of different species span a broad range of solubilities, experimental protocols that have been optimized for expressing recombinant human HbA may often prove unsuitable for the recombinant expression of wildtype and mutant Hbs of other species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a test case for our expression system, we produced recombinant Hbs of the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus, a species that has been the subject of research on mechanisms of Hb adaptation to hypoxia. By experimentally assessing the combined effects of induction temperature, induction time and E. coli expression strain on the solubility of recombinant deer mouse Hbs, we identified combinations of expression conditions that greatly enhanced the yield of recombinant protein and which also increased the efficiency of post-translational modifications. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our protocol should prove useful for the experimental study of recombinant Hbs in many non-human animals. One of the chief advantages of our protocol is that we can express soluble recombinant Hb without co-expressing molecular chaperones, and without the need for additional reconstitution or heme-incorporation steps. Moreover, our plasmid construct contains a combination of unique restriction sites that allows us to produce recombinant Hbs with different α- and β-chain subunit combinations by means of cassette mutagenesis.

  17. Structural and functional characterization of Delphinus delphis hemoglobin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, Barbara; Messana, Irene; Maggiani, Federica; Olianas, Alessandra; Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Crnjar, Roberto; Castagnola, Massimo; Giardina, Bruno; Sanna, Maria Teresa

    2009-11-01

    Structural analysis of the hemoglobin (Hb) system of Delphinus delphis revealed a high globin multiplicity: HPLC-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis evidenced three major beta (beta1 16,022 Da, beta2 16,036 Da, beta3 16,036 Da, labeled according to their progressive elution times) and two major alpha globins (alpha1 15,345 Da, alpha2 15,329 Da). ESI-tandem mass and nucleotide sequence analyses showed that beta2 globin differs from beta1 for the substitution Val126 --> Leu, while beta3 globin differs from beta2 for the isobaric substitution Lys65 --> Gln. The alpha2 globin differs from the alpha1 for the substitution Ser15 --> Ala. Anion-exchange chromatography allowed the separation of two Hb fractions and HPLC-ESI-MS analysis revealed that the fraction with higher pI (HbI) contained beta1, beta2 and both the alpha globins, and the fraction with lower pI (HbII) contained beta3 and both the alpha globins. Both D. delphis Hb fractions displayed a lower intrinsic oxygen affinity, a decreased effect of 2,3-BPG and a reduced cooperativity with respect to human HbA(0), with HbII showing the more pronounced differences. With respect to HbA(0), either the substitution Probeta5 --> Gly or the Probeta5 --> Ala is present in all the cetacean beta globins sequenced so far, and it has been hypothesized that position 5 of beta globins may have a role in the interaction with 2,3-BPG. Regarding the particularly lowered cooperativity of HbII, it is interesting to observe that the variant human HbA, characterized by the substitution Lysbeta65 --> Gln (HbJ-Cairo) has a decreased cooperativity with respect to HbA(0).

  18. Hemoglobin Variability Does Not Predict Mortality in European Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joseph; Kronenberg, Florian; Aljama, Pedro; Anker, Stefan D.; Canaud, Bernard; Molemans, Bart; Stenvinkel, Peter; Schernthaner, Guntram; Ireland, Elizabeth; Fouqueray, Bruno; Macdougall, Iain C.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with CKD exhibit significant within-patient hemoglobin (Hb) level variability, especially with the use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) and iron. Analyses of dialysis cohorts in the United States produced conflicting results regarding the association of Hb variability with patient outcomes. Here, we determined Hb variability in 5037 European hemodialysis (HD) patients treated over 2 years to identify predictors of high variability and to evaluate its association with all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. We assessed Hb variability with various methods using SD, residual SD, time-in-target (11.0 to 12.5 g/dl), fluctuation across thresholds, and area under the curve (AUC). Hb variability was significantly greater among incident patients than prevalent patients. Compared with previously described cohorts in the United States, residual SD was similar but fluctuations above target were less frequent. Using logistic regression, age, body mass index, CVD history, dialysis vintage, serum albumin, Hb, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) use, ESA use, dialysis access type, dialysis access change, and hospitalizations were significant predictors of high variability. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression showed that SD, residual SD, time-in-target, and AUC did not predict all-cause or CVD mortality during a median follow-up of 12.4 months (IQR: 7.7 to 17.4). However, patients with consistently low levels of Hb (<11 g/dl) and those who fluctuated between the target range and <11 g/dl had increased risks for death (RR 2.34; 95% CI: 1.24 to 4.41 and RR 1.74; 95% CI: 1.00 to 3.04, respectively). In conclusion, although Hb variability is common in European HD patients, it does not independently predict mortality. PMID:20798262

  19. Passive immunization with a polyclonal antiserum to the hemoglobin receptor of Haemophilus ducreyi confers protection against a homologous challenge in the experimental swine model of chancroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Isabelle; Fusco, William G; Choudhary, Neelima; Routh, Patty A; Cholon, Deborah M; Hobbs, Marcia M; Almond, Glen W; Orndorff, Paul E; Elkins, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has an obligate requirement for heme. Heme is acquired by H. ducreyi from its human host via TonB-dependent transporters expressed at its bacterial surface. Of 3 TonB-dependent transporters encoded in the genome of H. ducreyi, only the hemoglobin receptor, HgbA, is required to establish infection during the early stages of the experimental human model of chancroid. Active immunization with a native preparation of HgbA (nHgbA) confers complete protection in the experimental swine model of chancroid, using either Freund's or monophosphoryl lipid A as adjuvants. To determine if transfer of anti-nHgbA serum is sufficient to confer protection, a passive immunization experiment using pooled nHgbA antiserum was conducted in the experimental swine model of chancroid. Pigs receiving this pooled nHgbA antiserum were protected from a homologous, but not a heterologous, challenge. Passively transferred polyclonal antibodies elicited to nHgbA bound the surface of H. ducreyi and partially blocked hemoglobin binding by nHgbA, but were not bactericidal. Taken together, these data suggest that the humoral immune response to the HgbA vaccine is protective against an H. ducreyi infection, possibly by preventing acquisition of the essential nutrient heme.

  20. Effects of different osmolarities on bacterial biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation depends on several factors. The influence of different osmolarities on bacterial biofilm formation was studied. Two strains (Enterobacter sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp.) exhibited the most remarkable alterations. Biofilm formation is an important trait and its use has been associated to the protection of organisms against environmental stresses.

  1. Channel catfish hemoglobin genes: identification, phylogenetic and syntenic analysis, and specific induction in response to heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianbin; Liu, Shikai; Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Ruijia; Zhang, Jiaren; Jiang, Yanliang; Li, Chao; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Li, Jiale; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2014-03-01

    Hemoglobins transport oxygen from gill to inner organs in fish, and this process is affected by temperature, one of the major environmental factors for fish. The hemoglobin gene clusters have been well studied in humans and several model fish species, but remain largely unknown in catfish. Here, eight α- and six β-hemoglobin genes were identified and characterized in channel catfish. Genomic synteny analysis showed that these hemoglobin genes were separated into two unlinked clusters, the MN cluster containing six α- and six β-hemoglobin genes, and the LA cluster consisting of two α-hemoglobin genes. Channel catfish hemoglobin genes were ubiquitously expressed in all the 10 tested tissues from healthy fish, but exhibited higher expression level in spleen, head kidney, and trunk kidney. In response to heat stress, hemoglobin genes, especially MN Hbα4, MN Hbα5, MN Hbα6, MN Hbβ4, MN Hbβ5, MN Hbβ6, LA Hbα1, and LA Hbα2, presumably the embryonic hemoglobin genes, were drastically up-regulated in the gill and head kidney of heat-tolerant fishes, but not in these tissues of the heat-intolerant fish, suggesting the importance of the embryonic hemoglobin genes in coping with the low oxygen conditions under heat stress.

  2. Cloning and Characterization of a Caesalpinoid (Chamaecrista fasciculate) Hemoglobin: The Structural Transition from a Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobin to a Leghemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) and leghemoglobins (Lbs) are plant proteins that can reversibly bind O2 and other ligands. The nsHbs are hexacoordinate and appear to modulate cellular concentrations of NO and maintain energy levels under hypoxic conditions. The Lbs are pentacoordinate and facilita...

  3. Structural characterization of hemoglobins from Monilifera and Frenulata tubeworms (Siboglinids): first discovery of giant hexagonal-bilayer hemoglobin in the former "Pogonophora" group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Cédric; Andersen, Ann C; Bruneaux, Matthieu; Le Guen, Dominique; Terrier, Peran; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; Zal, Franck

    2010-01-01

    Siboglinids are symbiotic polychete annelids having hemoglobins as essential oxygen- and sulfide-carriers for their endosymbiotic bacteria. We analyzed the structure of the hemoglobins from two species of siboglinids: the monilifera Sclerolinum contortum and the frenulata Oligobrachia webbi (i.e. haakonmosbiensis) from Norwegian cold seeps. Measured by Multi-Angle Laser Light Scattering (MALLS), Sclerolinum shows a 3190+/-50 kDa hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb) and a 461+/-46 kDa ring-Hb, just as vestimentifera, whereas Oligobrachia has a 409+/-3.7 kDa ring-Hb only. Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) showed Sclerolinum HBL-Hb composed of seven monomeric globins (15-16 kDa), three disulfide-bonded globin heterodimers and three linkers. The heterodimers always contain globin-b (15814.4+/-1.5 Da). Sclerolinum ring-Hb is composed of globins and dimers with identical masses as its HBL-Hb, but lacks linkers. Oligobrachia ring-Hb has three globin monomers (14-15 kDa) only, with no disulfide-bonded dimers. Comparison of Sclerolinum hemoglobins between Storegga and Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, using the normalized height of deconvoluted ESI-MS peaks, shows differences in globin monomers abundances that could reflect genetic differences or differential gene expression between distinct seep populations. The discovery of HBL-Hb in Sclerolinum is a new element supporting the hypothesis of monilifera being phylogenetically more closely related to vestimentifera, than to frenulata.

  4. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  5. Improved biomass and protein production in solid-state cultures of an Aspergillus sojae strain harboring the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Lugo, Rodrigo; Madrigal, Marvin; Yelemane, Vikas; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2015-11-01

    The biotechnological value of Aspergillus sojae ATCC 20235 (A. sojae) for production of pectinases in solid-state fermentation (SSF) has been demonstrated recently. However, a common drawback of fungal solid-state cultures is the poor diffusion of oxygen into the fungi that limits its growth and biological productivity. The bacterial Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) has favored the metabolism and productivities of various bacterial and yeast strains besides alleviating hypoxic conditions of its native host, but the use of VHb in filamentous fungi still remains poor explored. Based on the known effects of VHb, this study assessed its applicability to improve A. sojae performance in SSF. The VHb gene (vgb) under control of the constitutive Aspergillus nidulants gpdA promoter was introduced into the genome of A. sojae by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Successful fungal transformants were identified by fluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. In solid-state cultures, the content of protease, exo-polygalacturonase (exo-PG), and exo-polymethylgalacturonase (exo-PMG) of the transformed fungus (A. sojae vgb+) improved were 26, 60, and 44 % higher, respectively, in comparison to its parental strain (A. sojae wt). Similarly, biomass content was also 1.3 times higher in the transformant strain. No significant difference was observed in endo-polygalacturonase (endo-PG) content between both fungal strains, suggesting dissimilar effects of VHb towards different enzymatic productions. Overall, our results show that biomass, protease, and exo-pectinase content of A. sojae in SSF can be improved by transformation with VHb.

  6. Studies on the contributions of steric and polarity effects to the H2S-binding properties of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dandan; Wang, Hui; Li, Haichao; Liu, Li; Li, Zhengqiang

    2017-01-01

    We have reported recently that Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) is a potential H2S receptor and storage molecule in bacterial metabolism. In this study, molecular cloning and site-directed mutagenesis were employed to investigate the structural basis for H2S binding. Association and dissociation rate constants (kon and koff) were determined using stopped-flow rapid-scanning spectrophotometry and compared with those for wild type VHb. Several unanticipated factors were found to govern H2S binding properties, due to the distinct structure of VHb. The results presented in this paper show that: i) bulkier residues at positions E7 and E11 decrease H2S binding accessibility, while the residue located at position B10 blocks bound H2S from escaping. ii) hydroxyl sidechains within the distal heme pocket reduce H2S reactivity to VHb; iii) Pro(E8) is involved in moving the E7-E10 loop region to trigger opening of the distal heme pocket to facilitate H2S binding.

  7. A combined approach for β-thalassemia based on gene therapy-mediated adult hemoglobin (HbA) production and fetal hemoglobin (HbF) induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccato, Cristina; Breda, Laura; Salvatori, Francesca; Breveglieri, Giulia; Gardenghi, Sara; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Brognara, Eleonora; Lampronti, Ilaria; Borgatti, Monica; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Gene therapy might fall short in achieving a complete reversion of the β-thalassemic phenotype due to current limitations in vector design and myeloablative regimen. Following gene transfer, all or a large proportion of erythroid cells might express suboptimal levels of β-globin, impairing the therapeutic potential of the treatment. Our aim was to evaluate whether, in absence of complete reversion of the β-globin phenotype upon gene transfer, it is possible to use fetal hemoglobin induction to eliminate the residual α-globin aggregates and achieve normal levels of hemoglobin. Transgenic K562 cell lines and erythroid precursor cells from β(0)39-thalassemia patients were employed. Gene therapy was performed with the lentiviral vector T9W. Induction of fetal hemoglobin was obtained using mithramycin. Levels of mRNA and hemoglobins were determined by qRT-PCR and HPLC. First, we analyzed the effect of mithramycin on K562 transgenic cell lines harboring different copies of a lentiviral vector carrying the human β-globin gene, showing that γ-globin mRNA expression and HbF production can be induced in the presence of high levels of β-globin gene expression and HbA accumulation. We then treated erythroid progenitor cells from β-thalassemic patients with T9W, which expresses the human β-globin gene and mithramycin separately or in combination. When transduction with our lentiviral vector is insufficient to completely eliminate the unpaired α-globin chains, combination of β-globin gene transfer therapy together with fetal hemoglobin induction might be very efficacious to remove the excess of α-globin proteins in thalassemic erythroid progenitor cells.

  8. Hemoglobin E Disorders in South Gujarat – A Study of 35 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B M Jha, Bhavna Gamit, Jitendra Patel, Kunal J Prajapati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Among the inherited disorders of blood, hemoglobinopathies and thalassemia constitute a major bulk of non-communicable genetic disease in India. Most commonly found abnormal hemoglobins in India are hemoglobin S (Hb S, hemoglobin E (Hb E and hemoglobin D (Hb D. The distribution of Hb E (?2?226Glu?Lys is mostly restricted to north-eastern India and it is relatively rare in rest of the country. Identification of this disorder is immensely important epidemiologically and aid in prevention of more serious hemoglobin disorder. Aims:Thepurpose of the study is to highlight importance of identification of Hb E disorders and prevention of doubly heterozygous state for Hb E and ?-thalassemia which may be falsely characterized clinically by thalassemia major. Material and Method:This study is a part of the work done under Sickle Cell Anemia Control Programme, under which samples are tested for various routine as well as specific tests such as dithionite tube turbidity test (DTT Test, hemoglobin electrophoresis and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC to diagnose Sickle cell disorders along with other hemoglobinopathies. Result and Conclusion: Total 70308 cases were analyzed during the period ofJune 2007 to October 2011 out of these 35 cases of Hb E variant were identified. Among these 29 cases of Hb E trait, 1 case of Hb E disease and 5 cases of Hb E ?-thalassemia were identified. Hb E trait and Hb E disease were asymptomatic while 5 cases of Hb E ?-thalassemia were suffering from haemolytic anemia. Detection of this asymptomatic abnormal hemoglobin will help in the prevention of more serious doubly heterozygous hemoglobinopathy.

  9. Hemoglobin Q-Iran detected in family members from Northern Iran: a case report

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    Khorshidi Mohammad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemoglobin Q-Iran (α75Asp→His is an important member of the hemoglobin Q family, molecularly characterized by the replacement of aspartic acid by histidine. The first report of hemoglobin Q-Iran and the nomenclature of this hemoglobinopathy dates back to 1970. Iran is known as a country with a high prevalence of α- and β-thalassemia and different types of hemoglobinopathy. Many of these variants are yet to be identified as the practice of molecular laboratory techniques is limited in this part of the world. Applying such molecular methods, we report the first hemoglobin Q-Iran cases in Northern Iran. Case presentation An unusual band was detected in an isoelectric focusing test and cellulose acetate electrophoresis of a sample from a 22-year-old Iranian man from Mazandaran Province. Capillary zone electrophoresis analysis identified this band as hemoglobin Q. A similar band was also detected in his mother's electrophoresis (38 years, Iranian ethnicity. The cases underwent molecular investigation and the presence of a hemoglobin Q-Iran mutation was confirmed by the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction method. Direct conventional sequencing revealed a single guanine to cytosine missense mutation (c.226G > C; GAC >CAC at codon 75 in the α-globin gene in both cases. Conclusion The wide spectrum and high frequency of nondeletional α-globin mutations in Mazandaran Province is remarkable and seem to differ considerably from what has been found in Mediterranean populations. This short communication reports the first cases of patients with hemoglobin Q found in that region.

  10. Hemoglobin levels as a component of the paraneoplastic syndrome in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslanagić Selma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, some studies indicate that paraneoplastic syndrome may be the first sign of lung cancer and may serve in early detection of cancer. Namely, during the last ten years, an increasing importance is given to hematological paraneoplastic syndrome of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether hemoglobin levels have paraneoplastic nature in patients diagnosed with lung cancer prior to any form of therapy, and to examine its relationships with platelet count. The study included 239 patients with lung cancer who were hospitalized at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases, Clinical Center of Sarajevo, during the period from January 2005 to December 2008, and a control group of 60 healthy persons. The study did not include lung cancer patients with evident hemoptysis and patients who were under chemotherapy and/or were undergoing surgery. The results of our study have shown that the average hemoglobin for each histopathological type of lung cancer was significantly lower than the average hemoglobin in control group, except for large cell carcinoma. Lung cancers are classified according to the TNM classification. There were no significant differences in average hemoglobin between different stage of non small cell lung carcinoma as well as in average hemoglobin between limited and extended stage of small cell lung carcinoma. Our results also showed that there was a significant negative correlation between platelet count and hemoglobin levels. On the basis of our results we concluded that low hemoglobin in patients with lung cancer, with no evident hemoptysis, may have the character of paraneoplastic syndrome.

  11. Gender difference of alanine aminotransferase elevation may be associated with higher hemoglobin levels among male adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Chih-Cheng Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the gender difference of ALT elevation and its association with high hemoglobin levels. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 3547 adolescents (2005 females, mean age of 16.5?.3 years who were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen received health checkups in 2006. Body mass index (BMI, levels of hemoglobin, ALT and cholesterol were measured. ALT >42 U/L was defined as elevated ALT. Elevated ALT levels were detected in 112 of the 3547 participants (3.3%, more prevalent in males than in females (5.4% vs. 1.4%, p11 g/dl in females or >13.5 g/dl in males, but the cumulative cases of elevated ALT increased more quickly in males. Proportion of elevated ALT increased as either the BMI or hemoglobin level rise, more apparent in male adolescents. Logistic regression modeling showed odds ratio (95% confidence interval were 24.7 (15.0-40.6 for BMI ≥27 kg/m(2; 5.5 (2.9-10.4 for BMI 24-27 kg/m(2; 2.7 (1.3-5.5 for Q5 (top 20th percentile hemoglobin level; and 2.6 (1.6-4.1 for male gender. Further separately fitting the logistic models for two genders, the significance of Q5 hemoglobin level only appeared in the males. CONCLUSIONS: High hemoglobin level is a significant risk factor of ALT elevation after control hepatitis B, obesity and gender. Males have greater risk of abnormal liver function which may be associated with higher hemoglobin levels.

  12. Ex vivo hemoglobin status study using photoacoustic computed tomography small animal scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to calibrate the PCT scanner to quantify the hemoglobin status utilizing a blood flow phantom. Materials and Methods: A blood circulation system was designed and constructed to control the oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration of blood. As a part of the circulation system, a 1.1mm FEP tube was placed in the center of imaging tank of PCT scanner as the imaging object. Photoacoustic spectra (690-950 nm) was acquired for different hemoglobin concentrations (CtHb) and oxygen saturation levels (SaO2), where the formers was formed by diluting blood samples with PBS and the latter by mixing blood with gases at different oxygen content. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to calculate the photon energy depositions in the phantom tube, which took into account photon losses in water and blood. A Kappa value which represents the energy transfer efficiency of hemoglobin molecule was calculated based on the PCT measurement and simulation result. The final SaO2 value of each blood sample was calculated based on the PCT spectrum and Kappa value. These oxygen saturation results were compared with co-oximeter measurements to obtain systematic errors. Results and Conclusion: The statistic error of calculating Kappa value from hemoglobin concentration experiment was less than 5%. The systematic error between PCT spectra analysis and co-oximeter analysis for hemoglobin oxygen saturation was -4.5%. These calibration techniques used to calculate Kappa and hemoglobin absorption spectra would be used in hypoxia measurements in tumors as well as for endogenous biomarkers studies.

  13. Evaluation and interference study of hemoglobin A1c measured by turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J; Hoke, C; Ettinger, B; Penerian, G

    1998-03-01

    The technical performance of the turbidimetric immunoinhibition (TI) assay for hemoglobin (Hb) A1c (Tina-quant Hb A1c, Boehringer Mannheim, Indianapolis, Ind) was evaluated by using the BM/Hitachi 911 analyzer. Intra-assay imprecision was less than 2.7%, and interassay imprecision was less than 2.8% as measured by coefficient of variation. In 93 subjects with diabetes who did not have hemoglobin variants, results of the TI assay for Hb A1c correlated strongly with those obtained by using a high-performance liquid chromatography analyzer (Diamat, BioRad Laboratories, Hercules, Calif). Among 241 subjects who had or did not have hemoglobin variants, the TI assay for Hb A1c correlated strongly with results of affinity chromatography for total glycated hemoglobin (Glyc-Affin GHb, IsoLab, Akron, Ohio). We also studied the effect of various percentages of hemoglobin S, C, E, and F on the accuracy of the TI Hb A1c assay. Only high hemoglobin F percentages caused interference. More than 14 times as many samples can be analyzed per hour by using the TI Hb A1c assay than can be analyzed by using the HPLC assay. For high-volume reference laboratories, using the fully automated TI Hb A1c assay to monitor glycemic control in patients with diabetes may be preferable to using the conventional ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography Hb A1c assay because the TI assay measures Hb A1c more accurately in patients with diabetes who have hemoglobin variants, and it requires less time.

  14. Reaction of dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids with valine and hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuewei; Wang, Shuguang; Xia, Qingsu; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Doerge, Daniel R; Cai, Lining; Fu, Peter P

    2014-10-20

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids exert toxicity through metabolism to dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids that bind to cellular protein and DNA, leading to hepatotoxicity, genotoxicity, and tumorigenicity. To date, it is not clear how dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids bind to cellular constituents, including amino acids and proteins, resulting in toxicity. Metabolism of carcinogenic monocrotaline, riddelliine, and heliotrine produces dehydromonocrotaline, dehyroriddelliine, and dehydroheliotrine, respectively, as primary reactive metabolites. In this study, we report that reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with valine generated four highly unstable 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived valine (DHP-valine) adducts. For structural elucidation, DHP-valine adducts were derivatized with phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) to DHP-valine-PITC products. After HPLC separation, their structures were characterized by mass spectrometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, (1)H NMR, and (1)H-(1)H COSY NMR spectral analysis. Two DHP-valine-PITC adducts, designated as DHP-valine-PITC-1 and DHP-valine-PITC-3, had the amino group of valine linked to the C7 position of the necine base, and the other two DHP-valine-PITC products, DHP-valine-PITC-2 and DHP-valine-PITC-4, linked to the C9 position of the necine base. DHP-valine-PITC-1 was interconvertible with DHP-valine-PITC-3, and DHP-valine-PITC-2 was interconvertible with DHP-valine-PITC-4. Reaction of dehydroriddelliine and dehydroheliotrine with valine provided similar results. However, reaction of valine and dehydroretronecine (DHR) under similar experimental conditions did not produce DHP-valine adducts. Reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with rat hemoglobin followed by derivatization with PITC also generated the same four DHP-valine-PITC adducts. This represents the first full structural elucidation of

  15. Bacterial infection in an Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin Hai; Xia, Zhao Fei

    2013-03-01

    One pregnant captive Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris), with a body length of 225 cm, was found dead on 8 June 2009. The dolphin was anorexic and circling at the bottom of the pool before death. Laboratory tests revealed an increased leukocyte count and decreased platelet count; increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate; and slightly decreased red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. Alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, and glucose were significantly decreased. Moreover, uric acid and alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were elevated. A 57-cm fetus was recovered. The respiratory system, intestinal mucosa, mesentery and mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen were congested and hemorrhagic. The heart, liver, and kidney appeared normal. Klebsiella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were identified in the amniotic fluid. This is the first case report of bacterial infection in an Irrawaddy dolphin.

  16. Antibiotic use during pregnancy alters the commensal vaginal microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, J.; Schjørring, S.; Eskildsen, Carl Emil Aae

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics may induce alterations in the commensal microbiota of the birth canal in pregnant women. Therefore, we studied the effect of antibiotic administration during pregnancy on commensal vaginal bacterial colonization at gestational week 36. Six hundred and sixty-eight pregnant women from...

  17. Seizures Complicating Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical data of 116 patients, 1 month to <5 years of age, admitted for bacterial meningitis, and grouped according to those with and without seizures during hospitalization, were compared in a study at Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and other centers in Taiwan.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy comparison between clinical signs and hemoglobin color scale as screening methods in the diagnosis of anemia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Leal,Luciana Pedrosa; Mônica M. Osório

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to compare the validity and reproducibility of clinical signs with the World Health Organization hemoglobin color scale. METHODS: Two hundred six children in the age range of 6-23 months, at the Instituto Materno Infantil Prof. Fernando Figueira, IMIP, were assessed. Two examiners evaluated the clinical signs and the hemoglobin color scale of each child at the different times. The hemoglobin value was used as a standard for validation. RESULTS: in more than 90% of cases the agreem...

  19. Identification of the Presence of Variant Hemoglobin Using a Measurement of the Labile HbA1c (#C) Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Masafumi; Inada, Shinya; Miyazaki, Ayako

    2016-07-01

    Labile HbA1c migrates in the #C fraction together with modified hemoglobin (such as carbamylated hemoglobin, acetaldehyde hemoglobin, and acetylated hemoglobin) when HbA1c is measured by Arkray's high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It is assumed that most of the labile glycation products of variant hemoglobin do not migrate in #C fraction; in addition, a part of the stable glycation products of variant hemoglobin migrates in #C fraction. We hypothesized that subjects with variant hemoglobin are likely to show abnormally low or high values of #C fraction. In this study, we investigated this hypothesis. Twenty-one non-diabetic subjects with nine types of variant hemoglobin, and 103 non-diabetic subjects without variant hemoglobin were used. HbA1c and #C fraction were measured by Arkray's HPLC (HA-8180) using standard mode. The values of #C fraction in the control group were 1.75 ± 0.15% (range: 1.5-2.1%). The variant hemoglobin group reported #C fraction values of ≤1.3% in twelve subjects, ≥2.3% in five subjects, and within the reference range (1.4-2.2%) in three subjects. When the cutoff values of #C fraction were set at ≤1.3% and ≥2.3%, sensitivity and specificity were 86% and 100%, respectively. Most non-diabetic subjects with variant hemoglobin showed abnormal values of #C fraction. Measurement of #C fraction is a useful screening test for variant hemoglobin in non-diabetic subjects.

  20. Perbandingan Zat Besi dengan dan Tanpa Vitamin C terhadap Kadar Hemoglobin Wanita Usia Subur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti Anggriani Utama

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Anemia pada wanita pekerja masih merupakan masalah kesehatan yang dapat menurunkan produktivitas kerja. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membandingkan zat besi dengan dan tanpa vitamin C terhadap kadar hemoglobin. Jenis penelitian yang digunakan yaitu Quasy Experimental dengan Pre Test and Post Test Control Group Design. Populasi penelitian berjumlah 600 orang dan sampel berjumlah 60 orang. Teknik pengambilan sampel random sampling. Pengumpulan data dilakukan dengan cara pengamatan, wawancara, pemeriksaan hemoglobin, dan data sekunder. Pada kelompok perlakuan diberi tablet zat besi dan dVitamin C, pada kelompok kontrol hanya diberi tablet zat besi. Intervensi yang dilakukan adalah pemberian tablet zat besi dengan dan tanpa vitamin C, satu kapsul perminggu.Nilai rata-rata kadar hemoglobin pada kelompok kontrol pada sebelum intervensi yaitu 9,15 gram/dL dan setelah intervensi meningkat menjadi 10,19 gram/dL. Pada kelompok perlakuan rata-rata kadar hemoglobin sebelum intervensi sebesar 9,5 gram/dL dan meningkat menjadi 11,44 gram/dL sesudah inter- vensi. Hasil uji T berpasangan menunjukkan perbedaan yang signifikan pada nilai mean kadar hemoglobin pada kelompok kontrol dan perlakuan (nilai p = 0,000. Penelitian ini diharapkan dapat digunakan sebagai salah satu masukan perencanaan dan evaluasi program gizi yang dapat dilakukan dalam rangka meningkatkan pola hidup sehat wanita pekerja di PT Sarana Mandiri Mukti Kepahiang. Anemia in women workers, remains a health problem that can reduce work productivity. The study aimed to compare iron with and without vitamin C to hemoglobin levels. Quasy experimental research was conducted with pre test and post test control group design. Study population were of 600 people and 60 people as sample with random sampling technique. Data was collected through observations, interviews, examination of hemoglobin and secondary data. In the treatment group were given iron and plus Vitamin C, in the control group were given

  1. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant D Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered gastrointestinal (GI motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO.

  2. Hypoxic survival requires a 2-on-2 hemoglobin in a process involving nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Düner, Melis; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas

    2013-06-25

    Hemoglobins are recognized today as a diverse family of proteins present in all kingdoms of life and performing multiple reactions beyond O2 chemistry. The physiological roles of most hemoglobins remain elusive. Here, we show that a 2-on-2 ("truncated") hemoglobin, termed THB8, is required for hypoxic growth and the expression of anaerobic genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. THB8 is 1 of 12 2-on-2 hemoglobins in this species. It belongs to a subclass within the 2-on-2 hemoglobin class I family whose members feature a remarkable variety of domain arrangements and lengths. Posttranscriptional silencing of the THB8 gene results in the mis-regulation of several genes and a growth defect under hypoxic conditions. The latter is intensified in the presence of an NO scavenger, which also impairs growth of wild-type cells. As recombinant THB8 furthermore reacts with NO, the results of this study indicate that THB8 is part of an NO-dependent signaling pathway.

  3. Hypoxic survival requires a 2-on-2 hemoglobin in a process involving nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Düner, Melis; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobins are recognized today as a diverse family of proteins present in all kingdoms of life and performing multiple reactions beyond O2 chemistry. The physiological roles of most hemoglobins remain elusive. Here, we show that a 2-on-2 (“truncated”) hemoglobin, termed THB8, is required for hypoxic growth and the expression of anaerobic genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. THB8 is 1 of 12 2-on-2 hemoglobins in this species. It belongs to a subclass within the 2-on-2 hemoglobin class I family whose members feature a remarkable variety of domain arrangements and lengths. Posttranscriptional silencing of the THB8 gene results in the mis-regulation of several genes and a growth defect under hypoxic conditions. The latter is intensified in the presence of an NO scavenger, which also impairs growth of wild-type cells. As recombinant THB8 furthermore reacts with NO, the results of this study indicate that THB8 is part of an NO-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:23754374

  4. Correlation of maternal factors and hemoglobin concentration during pregnancy Shiraz 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Akbarzadeh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anemia in pregnancy is a serious condition, contributing to maternal mortality, morbidity and fetal morbidity and its prevalence varies between 35-100% in developing countries. This investigation is conducted to survey the correlation of maternal factors and the changes in hemoglobin in pregnant women. Method: In this study, 108 healthy pregnant women with gestational age of 10 to 14 weeks, chosen by cluster random sampling were included. The women were followed in three visits: at the end of the first, second and third trimester. In addition, correlation of Hb concentration with maternal factors including BMI, age parity, hyperemesis, gestational age, pregnancy interval and weight gain was investigated. Results: There was no significant correlation between BMI, parity, pregnancy interval, severe nausea and vomiting and also maternal age with hemoglobin level during pregnancy. Moreover, Multiple regression models showed that adequate maternal weight gain (P<0.009 and high hemoglobin (p<0.0001 in the first trimester were positive predictors and late iron supplementation was negative predictor of hemoglobin in pregnancy (P<0.006. Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that adequate maternal weight gain, high hemoglobin in the first trimester and also late iron supplementation could be as predictors in clinical settings in this query.

  5. Development of hemoglobin A1c certified reference material by liquid chromatography isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jiaming; Wu, Liqing; Yang, Bin; Yang, Yi; Wang, Jing

    2012-04-01

    We report the development of a National Institute of Metrology (NIM) hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) certified reference material (CRM). Each CRM unit contains about 10 μL of hemoglobin. Both hemoglobin and glycated hemoglobin were quantitatively determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) with synthesized VHLTPE and glycated VHLTPE as standards. The mass fraction of synthesized VHLTPE or glycated VHLTPE was also quantitatively determined by HPLC-IDMS with NIM amino acid CRMs as standards. The homogeneity and stability of the CRMs were examined with a commercial HbA(1c) analyzer based on the HPLC principle. Fifteen units were randomly selected for homogeneity examination, and statistical analysis showed there was no inhomogeneity. Examination of the stability showed that the CRM was stable for at least 6 months at -80 °C. Uncertainty components of the balance, amino acid purity, hydrolysis and proteolysis efficiency, method reproducibility, homogeneity, and stability were taken into consideration for uncertainty evaluation. The certified value of NIM HbA(1c) CRM was expressed as the ratio of HbA(1c) to total hemoglobin in moles, and was (9.6 ± 1.9)%. The CRM can be used as a calibration or validation standard for clinical diagnostics. It is expected to improve the comparability for HbA(1c) measurement in China.

  6. Preparation of Cu(2+)-mediated magnetic imprinted polymers for the selective sorption of bovine hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruixia; Cui, Xihui; Hao, Yi; He, Gaiyan; Zhang, Min; Tang, Yuhai

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a novel Cu(2+)-mediated core-shell bovine hemoglobin imprinted superparamagnetic polymers were synthesized. First, carboxyl group directly-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles were produced by a facile one-pot hydrothermal method. Next, copper ions were introduced to chelate with carboxyl groups and further bonded with template bovine hemoglobin as co-functional monomer. Then, functional monomers 3-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane and octyltrimethoxysilane were adopted to form the thin polymer layers. Finally, after removal of the templates, the imprinting shells with specific recognition cavities for bovine hemoglobin were obtained on Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The resultant molecularly imprinted polymers have high adsorption capacity and satisfactory selectivity for bovine hemoglobin with the help of copper ions. The obtained magnetic nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The measurements demonstrated that the as-synthesized nanomaterials exhibited good dispersion, high crystallinity, and satisfactory superparamagnetic properties. The feasibility of this method was further confirmed by using the imprinted nanomaterials to specifically extract bovine hemoglobin from real bovine blood samples.

  7. Molecular Mechanism of AHSP-Mediated Stabilization of Alpha-Hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng,L.; Gell, D.; Zhou, S.; Gu, L.; Kong, Y.; Li, J.; Hu, M.; Yan, N.; Lee, C.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobin A (HbA), the oxygen delivery system in humans, comprises two alpha and two beta subunits. Free alpha-hemoglobin (alphaHb) is unstable, and its precipitation contributes to the pathophysiology of beta thalassemia. In erythrocytes, the alpha-hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) binds alphaHb and inhibits its precipitation. The crystal structure of AHSP bound to Fe(II)-alphaHb reveals that AHSP specifically recognizes the G and H helices of alphaHb through a hydrophobic interface that largely recapitulates the alpha1-beta1 interface of hemoglobin. The AHSP-alphaHb interactions are extensive but suboptimal, explaining why beta-hemoglobin can competitively displace AHSP to form HbA. Remarkably, the Fe(II)-heme group in AHSP bound alphaHb is coordinated by the distal but not the proximal histidine. Importantly, binding to AHSP facilitates the conversion of oxy-alphaHb to a deoxygenated, oxidized [Fe(III)], nonreactive form in which all six coordinate positions are occupied. These observations reveal the molecular mechanisms by which AHSP stabilizes free alphaHb.

  8. Hemoglobin adducts of N-substituted aryl compounds in exposure control and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, H G; Birner, G; Kowallik, P; Schütze, D; Zwirner-Baier, I

    1993-03-01

    Arylamines, nitroarenes, and azo dyes yield a common type of metabolite, the nitroarene, which produces a hydrolyzable adduct with protein and is closely related to the critical, ultimate toxic and genotoxic metabolite. The target dose as measured by hemoglobin adducts in erythrocytes reflects not only the actual uptake from the environment but also an individual's capacity for metabolic activation and is therefore an improved dosimeter for human exposure. The usefulness of hemoglobin adducts in molecular epidemiology is now widely recognized. With regard to risk assessment, many questions need to be answered. The described experiments in rats address some of these questions. The relationship between binding to hemoglobin in erythrocytes and to proteins in plasma has been found to vary considerably for a number of diamines. The fraction of hydrolyzable adducts out of the total protein adducts formed also varies in both compartments. This indicates that the kind of circulating metabolites and their availability in different compartments is compound specific. This has to do with the complex pattern of competing metabolic pathways, and the role of N-acetylation and deacetylation is emphasized. An example of nonlinear dose dependence adds to the complexity. Analysis of hemoglobin adducts reveals interesting insights into prevailing pathways, which not only apply to the chemical, but may also be useful to assess an individual's metabolic properties. In addition, it is demonstrated that the greater part of erythrocytes and benzidine-hemoglobin adducts are eliminated randomly in rats, i.e., following first-order kinetics.

  9. Monitor hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in living mouse tail using photoacoustic CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use PCT spectroscopy scanner to monitor the hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation change of living mouse by imaging the artery and veins in a mouse tail. Materials and Methods: One mouse tail was scanned using the PCT small animal scanner at the isosbestic wavelength (796nm) to obtain its hemoglobin concentration. Immediately after the scan, the mouse was euthanized and its blood was extracted from the heart. The true hemoglobin concentration was measured using a co-oximeter. Reconstruction correction algorithm to compensate the acoustic signal loss due to the existence of bone structure in the mouse tail was developed. After the correction, the hemoglobin concentration was calculated from the PCT images and compared with co-oximeter result. Next, one mouse were immobilized in the PCT scanner. Gas with different concentrations of oxygen was given to mouse to change the oxygen saturation. PCT tail vessel spectroscopy scans were performed 15 minutes after the introduction of gas. The oxygen saturation values were then calculated to monitor the oxygen saturation change of mouse. Results: The systematic error for hemoglobin concentration measurement was less than 5% based on preliminary analysis. Same correction technique was used for oxygen saturation calculation. After correction, the oxygen saturation level change matches the oxygen volume ratio change of the introduced gas. Conclusion: This living mouse tail experiment has shown that NIR PCT-spectroscopy can be used to monitor the oxygen saturation status in living small animals.

  10. Clinical Significance of Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content in the Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Karagülle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia (IDA and to compare it with other conventional iron parameters. METHODS: A total of 32 female patients with IDA (serum hemoglobin 120 g/L and serum ferritin <20 ng/mL were enrolled. RESULTS: CHr was 24.95±3.92 pg in female patients with IDA and 29.93±2.96 pg in female patients with iron deficiency. CHr showed a significant positive correlation with hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, serum iron, and transferrin saturation and a significant negative correlation with transferrin and total iron-binding capacity. The cut-off value of CHr for detecting IDA was 29 pg. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that CHr is a useful parameter that can be confidently used in the diagnosis of IDA, and a CHr cut-off value of 29 pg predicts IDA.

  11. Iron bioavailability of maize hemoglobin in a Caco-2 cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Anastasia L; Proulx, Amy K; Scott, M Paul; Beavers, Alyssa; Reddy, Manju B

    2013-07-31

    Maize ( Zea mays ) is an important staple crop in many parts of the world but has low iron bioavailability, in part due to its high phytate content. Hemoglobin is a form of iron that is highly bioavailable, and its bioavailability is not inhibited by phytate. It was hypothesized that maize hemoglobin is a highly bioavailable iron source and that biofortification of maize with iron can be accomplished by overexpression of maize globin in the endosperm. Maize was transformed with a gene construct encoding a translational fusion of maize globin and green fluorescent protein under transcriptional control of the maize 27 kDa γ-zein promoter. Iron bioavailability of maize hemoglobin produced in Escherichia coli and of stably transformed seeds expressing the maize globin-GFP fusion was determined using an in vitro Caco-2 cell culture model. Maize flour fortified with maize hemoglobin was found to have iron bioavailability that is not significantly different from that of flour fortified with ferrous sulfate or bovine hemoglobin but is significantly higher than unfortified flour. Transformed maize grain expressing maize globin was found to have iron bioavailability similar to that of untransformed seeds. These results suggest that maize globin produced in E. coli may be an effective iron fortificant, but overexpressing maize globin in maize endosperm may require a different strategy to increase bioavailable iron content in maize.

  12. Study of the interaction between bovine hemoglobin and analogs of biphenyldicarboxylate by spectrofluorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiyong, E-mail: wangry@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Yin, Yujing [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Ruiqiang [The First Afficiated Hospiatal of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Xie, Yuanzhe; Ge, Baoyu; Li, Zhigang; Li, Zhen; Shi, Jie [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Chang, Junbiao, E-mail: changjunbiao@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2013-12-15

    The interaction between bovine hemoglobin and analogs of Biphenyldicarboxylate was investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, ultraviolet–vis absorbance, resonance light-scattering spectra and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra at pH 7.40. The quenching mechanism and binding constants were determined by the quenching of bovine hemoglobin fluorescence in presence of analogs. Results showed that the nature of the quenching was of static type. Both the van der Waals and hydrogen bonding played a major role in stabilizing the complex. The distance between donor and acceptors was obtained to be 2.11–2.25 nm according to Förster's theory. The influence of analogs on the conformation of bovine hemoglobin was investigated. -- Highlights: • The interactions between bovine hemoglobin and analogs of DDB have been investigated. • Results reveal that DDB has the strongest affinity for hemoglobin among four compounds. • The van der Waals and hydrogen bonding play major role in the binding process. • The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects has been investigated.

  13. Selective Removal of Hemoglobin from Blood Using Hierarchical Copper Shells Anchored to Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaokun; Yan, Mingyang

    2017-01-01

    Hierarchical copper shells anchored on magnetic nanoparticles were designed and fabricated to selectively deplete hemoglobin from human blood by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Briefly, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles coated with polyacrylic acid were first synthesized by a one-pot solvothermal method. Hierarchical copper shells were then deposited by immobilizing Cu2+ on nanoparticles and subsequently by reducing between the solid CoFe2O4@COOH and copper solution with NaBH4. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The particles were also tested against purified bovine hemoglobin over a range of pH, contact time, and initial protein concentration. Hemoglobin adsorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and reached equilibrium in 90 min. Isothermal data also fit the Langmuir model well, with calculated maximum adsorption capacity 666 mg g−1. Due to the high density of Cu2+ on the shell, the nanoparticles efficiently and selectively deplete hemoglobin from human blood. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the particles with hierarchical copper shells effectively remove abundant, histidine-rich proteins, such as hemoglobin from human blood, and thereby minimize interference in diagnostic and other assays.

  14. Dynamin like protein 1 participated in the hemoglobin uptake pathway of Plasmodium falciparum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hong-chang; GAO Yu-hui; ZHONG Xiang; WANG Heng

    2009-01-01

    Background During the blood stage of malaria infection, parasites internalize in the host red blood cells and degrade massive amounts of hemoglobin for their development. Although the morphology of the parasite's hemoglobin uptake pathway has been clearly observed, little has been known about its molecular mechanisms. Methods The recombinant proteins from Plasmodium falciparum, dynamin like protein 1 (PfDYN1) and 2 (PfDYN2) GTPase domain, were expressed in E .coli and showed GTPase activity. By using a dynamin inhibitor, dynasore, we demonstrated the involvement of PfDYN1 in the hemoglobin uptake pathway. Results The GTPase activity of the two recombinant proteins was inhibited by dynasore in vitro. Treatment of parasite cultures with 80 μmol/L dynasore at the ring and early trophozoite stage resulted in substantial inhibition of parasite growth and in an obvious decline of hemoglobin quantum. Furthermore, reduced intraceliular hemozoin accumulation and decreased uptake of the FITC-dextran were also observed, together with distinctive changes in the ultrastructure of parasites after the dynasore treatment. Conclusions Our results show that PfDYN1 plays an important role in the hemoglobin uptake pathway of P. Falciparum and suggest its possibility of being a novel target for malaria chemotherapy.

  15. Quantitative absorption cytometry for measuring red blood cell hemoglobin mass and volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Malka, Roy; Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Schaak, Diane; Higgins, John M

    2014-04-01

    We present an optical system, called the quantitative absorption cytometer (QAC), to measure the volume and hemoglobin mass of red blood cells flowing through a microfluidic channel. In contrast to clinical hematology analyzers, where cells are sphered in order for both volume and hemoglobin to be measured accurately, the QAC measures cells in their normal physiological shape. Human red blood cells are suspended in a refractive index-matching absorbing buffer, driven through a microfluidic channel, and imaged using a transmission light microscope onto a color camera. A red and a blue LED illuminate cells and images at each color are used to independently retrieve cell volume and hemoglobin mass. This system shows good agreement with red blood cell indices retrieved by a clinical hematology analyzer and in fact measures a smaller coefficient of variation of hemoglobin concentration. In addition to cell indices, the QAC returns height and mass maps of each measured cell. These quantitative images are valuable for analyzing the detailed morphology of individual cells as well as statistical outliers found in the data. We also measured red blood cells in hypertonic and hypotonic buffers to quantify the correlation between volume and hemoglobin mass under osmotic stress. Because this method is invariant to cell shape, even extremely nonspherical cells in hypertonic buffers can be measured accurately.

  16. Smartphone spectrometer for non-invasive diffuse reflectance spectroscopy based hemoglobin sensing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Perry S.

    2016-10-01

    Fiber-optic based diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is shown to be a highly specific and highly sensitive method for non-invasive detection of various cancers (e.g. cervical and oral) as well as many other diseases. Fiber-optic DRS diagnosis relies on non-invasive biomarker detection (e.g. oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin) and can be done without the need for sophisticated laboratory analysis of samples. Thus, it is highly amenable for clinical adoption especially in resource scarce regions that have limited access to such developed laboratory infrastructure. Despite the demonstrated effectiveness of fiber-optic DRS, such systems remain cost prohibitive in many of these regions, mainly due to the use of bulky and expensive spectrometers. Here, a fiber-optic DRS system is coupled to a smartphone spectrometer and is proposed as a low-cost solution for non-invasive tissue hemoglobin sensing. The performance of the system is assessed by measuring tissue phantoms with varying hemoglobin concentrations. A DRS retrieval algorithm is used to extract hemoglobin parameters from the measurements and determine the accuracy of the system. The results are then compared with those of a previously reported fiber-optic DRS system which is based on a larger more expensive spectrometer system. The preliminary results are encouraging and indicate the potential of the smartphone spectrometer as a viable low-cost option for non-invasive tissue hemoglobin sensing.

  17. Monitoring of plethysmography variability index and total hemoglobin levels during cesarean sections with antepartum hemorrhage for early detection of bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elsakka

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Plethysmography variability index and non invasive hemoglobin monitoring as well can be used for optimization of intravascular volume status during cesarean sections in parturients with antepartum hemorrhage.

  18. Penta- and hexa-coordinate ferric hemoglobins display distinct pH titration profiles measured by Soret peak shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Sheetal; Kumar, Amit; Shandilya, Manish; Mukhi, Nitika; Singh, Amit Kumar; Kateriya, Suneel; Kaur, Jagreet; Kundu, Suman

    2016-10-01

    Hemoglobins with diverse characteristics have been identified in all kingdoms of life. Their ubiquitous presence indicates that these proteins play important roles in physiology, though function for all hemoglobins are not yet established with certainty. Their physiological role may depend on their ability to bind ligands, which in turn is dictated by their heme chemistry. However, we have an incomplete understanding of the mechanism of ligand binding for these newly discovered hemoglobins and the measurement of their kinetic parameters depend on their coordination at the heme iron. To gain insights into their functional role, it is important to categorize the new hemoglobins into either penta- or hexa-coordinated varieties. We demonstrate that simple pH titration and absorbance measurements can determine the coordination state of heme iron atom in ferric hemoglobins, thus providing unambiguous information about the classification of new globins. This method is rapid, sensitive and requires low concentration of protein. Penta- and hexa-coordinate hemoglobins displayed distinct pH titration profiles as observed in a variety of hemoglobins. The pentacoordinate distal histidine mutant proteins of hexacoordinate hemoglobins and ligand-bound hexacoordinate forms of pentacoordinate hemoglobins reverse the pH titration profiles, thus validating the sensitivity of this spectroscopic technique.

  19. Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a novel optimization algorithm based on the social foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. This paper presents a variation on the original BFO algorithm, namely, the Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization (CBFO, which significantly improve the original BFO in solving complex optimization problems. This significant improvement is achieved by applying two cooperative approaches to the original BFO, namely, the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the implicit space decomposition level and the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the hybrid space decomposition level. The experiments compare the performance of two CBFO variants with the original BFO, the standard PSO and a real-coded GA on four widely used benchmark functions. The new method shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  20. Bacterial Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Niu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the behaviors at different developmental stages in Escherichia coli (E. coli lifecycle and developing a new biologically inspired optimization algorithm named bacterial colony optimization (BCO. BCO is based on a lifecycle model that simulates some typical behaviors of E. coli bacteria during their whole lifecycle, including chemotaxis, communication, elimination, reproduction, and migration. A newly created chemotaxis strategy combined with communication mechanism is developed to simplify the bacterial optimization, which is spread over the whole optimization process. However, the other behaviors such as elimination, reproduction, and migration are implemented only when the given conditions are satisfied. Two types of interactive communication schemas: individuals exchange schema and group exchange schema are designed to improve the optimization efficiency. In the simulation studies, a set of 12 benchmark functions belonging to three classes (unimodal, multimodal, and rotated problems are performed, and the performances of the proposed algorithms are compared with five recent evolutionary algorithms to demonstrate the superiority of BCO.

  1. Bacterial assays for recombinagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, G R

    1992-12-01

    Two principal strategies have been used for studying recombinagenic effects of chemicals and radiation in bacteria: (1) measurement of homologous recombination involving defined alleles in a partially diploid strain, and (2) measurement of the formation and loss of genetic duplications in the bacterial chromosome. In the former category, most methods involve one allele in the bacterial chromosome and another in a plasmid, but it is also possible to detect recombination between two chromosomal alleles or between two extrachromosomal alleles. This review summarizes methods that use each of these approaches for detecting recombination and tabulates data on agents that have been found to be recombinagenic in bacteria. The assays are discussed with respect to their effectiveness in testing for recombinagens and their potential for elucidating mechanisms underlying recombinagenic effects.

  2. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Squiers BSE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient’s peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined.

  3. [Noninvasive total hemoglobin monitoring based on multiwave spectrophotometry in obstetrics and gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyregov, A V; Ovechkin, A Iu; Petrov, S V

    2012-01-01

    Results of prospective randomized comparative research of 2 total hemoglobin estimation methods are presented. There were laboratory tests and continuous noninvasive technique with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET. Research was carried out in two stages. At the 1st stage (gynecology)--67 patients were included and in second stage (obstetrics)--44 patients during and after Cesarean section. The standard deviation of noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation from absolute values (invasive) was 7.2 and 4.1%, an standard deviation in a sample--5.2 and 2.7 % in gynecologic operations and surgical delivery respectively, that confirms lack of reliable indicators differences. The method of continuous noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET technology can be recommended for use in obstetrics and gynecology.

  4. Hemoglobin is associated with retinal vascular fractals in type 1 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Hodgson, Lauren A B; Kawasaki, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Software - Fractal (IRIS-Fractal). Df was calculated from a disc-centered retinal photo from the right eye. Hemoglobin concentrations were measured using routine equipment. RESULTS: Of 175 patients with gradable images, median age was 57.7 years and median duration of diabetes was 42 years. Median retinal...... concentration would be associated with retinal vascular fractals in a relevant population. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study of 204 long-term type 1 diabetes patients from a population-based cohort, retinal digital photos were captured and graded for fractal dimension (Df) by International Retinal Imaging.......01) and age (coefficient -0.0046 for each 10-year increase in age, p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Hemoglobin correlated independently with retinal vascular fractals indicating a relationship between hemoglobin availability and retinal vascular structure....

  5. Hemoglobin Willamette (β51Pro → Arg): Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa Dias, Matheus Martins; Távora, Saymon Medeiros; de Galiza Neto, Gentil Claudino; de Souza, Jacqueline Holanda; da Silva, Herivaldo Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of hemoglobin (Hb) Willamette (β51 Pro → Arg) in the Hematology Department of a tertiary hospital in Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil. A literature review of the cases described in health sciences databases using as a descriptor Hb Willamette was performed, revealing 12 reported cases, of which only one presented with anemia. Herein, we describe a case of a female 29 years old, with hemoglobinopathy Willamette presenting clinically with anemia, having the lowest hemoglobin rate of the published cases. The relatives of the patient were evaluated andthe patient’s mother corresponded to the first description of the association between Hb Willamette and HbC. Among the hemoglobinopathies, hemoglobin Willamette is an extremely rare disease; therefore it is important to analyze its clinical and laboratory manifestations for accurate diagnosis and assessment of potential interactions with other genetic variants. PMID:28286631

  6. Hemoglobin Willamette (b51 Pro → Arg: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orivaldo Alves Barbosa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of hemoglobin (Hb Willamette (β51 Pro → Arg in the Hematology Department of a tertiary hospital in Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil. A literature review of the cases described in health sciences databases using as a descriptor Hb Willamette was performed, revealing 12 reported cases, of which only one presented with anemia. Herein, we describe a case of a female 29 years old, with hemoglobinopathy Willamette presenting clinically with anemia, having the lowest hemoglobin rate of the published cases. The relatives of the patient were evaluated andthe patient’s mother corresponded to the first description of the association between Hb Willamette and HbC. Among the hemoglobinopathies, hemoglobin Willamette is an extremely rare disease; therefore it is important to analyze its clinical and laboratory manifestations for accurate diagnosis and assessment of potential interactions with other genetic variants.

  7. The role of nitric oxide and hemoglobin in plant development and morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim; Shah, Jay K; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2013-01-01

    Plant morphogenesis is regulated endogenously through phytohormones and other chemical signals, which may act either locally or distant from their place of synthesis. Nitric oxide (NO) is formed by a number of controlled processes in plant cells. It is a central signaling molecule with several...... effects on control of plant growth and development, such as shoot and root architecture. All plants are able to express non-symbiotic hemoglobins at low concentration. Their function is generally not related to oxygen transport or storage; instead they effectively oxidize NO to NO3– and thereby control...... the local cellular NO concentration. In this review, we analyze available data on the role of NO and plant hemoglobins in morphogenetic processes in plants. The comparison of the data suggests that hemoglobin gene expression in plants modulates development and morphogenesis of organs, such as roots...

  8. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content in the diagnosis of iron deficiency in Chinese pre-menopausal women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Dan; CHEN Yu; WU Wei; ZHANG Feng; XU Jia; CUI Wei; LI Shu-lan; LI Rong-sheng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Pre-menopausal women are at risk for iron deficiency due to menstrual blood losses. The prevalence rates (PR) of iron depletion, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency were 34.4%, 15.1% and 49.5% in pre-menopausal non-pregnant women respectively in China.1 Traditionally, the diagnosis of iron deficiency relies on the hematological markers (hemoglobin (HGB),mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), red cell distribution width (RDW))and biochemical markers (serum ferritin (SF), serum iron (SI), transferrin saturation (TS), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC)). Recently, the reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) is considered to be used as a marker of iron deficiency.2 The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic efficiency of CHr with the old markers in diagnosis of iron deficiency in Chinese pre-menopausal women.

  9. Normal reference value of hemoglobin of young women and geographical factors in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GEMiao

    2003-01-01

    A research is conducted on the relationship between the normal reference value of 20,475 examples of hemoglobin of young women and five geographical factors in 208 areas in China, the normal reference value is determined by the hemoglobincyanide method. It is found that the correlation of geographical factors and the normal reference value of hemoglobin of young women are quite significant (F=142.81). By using the method of multiple linear regression analysis, one regression equation is inferred. If geographical values are obtained in some areas, the normal reference value of hemoglobin of young women of this area can be reckoned by using the regression equation. Furthermore, depending on the geographical factors, China can be divided into six regions:Oinghai-Tibet (Qingzang) Plateau. Southwest. Northwest. Southeast. North and Northeast China.

  10. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishko, V. V.; Nogovitsina, Y. M.; Ivshina, I. B.

    2014-04-01

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references.

  11. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Al Amri Saleh

    1995-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is an infection of the ascitic fluid without obvious intra-abdominal source of sepsis; usually complicates advanced liver disease. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial: low ascitic protein-content, which reflects defi-cient ascitic fluid complement and hence, reduced opsonic activity is thought to be the most important pathogenic factor. Frequent and prolonged bacteremia has been considered as another pertinent cause of SBP. This disease is...

  12. Modelling bacterial speciation

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    A central problem in understanding bacterial speciation is how clusters of closely related strains emerge and persist in the face of recombination. We use a neutral Fisher–Wright model in which genotypes, defined by the alleles at 140 house-keeping loci, change in each generation by mutation or recombination, and examine conditions in which an initially uniform population gives rise to resolved clusters. Where recombination occurs at equal frequency between all members of the population, we o...

  13. Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a recently developed nature-inspired optimization algorithm, which is based on the foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. Up to now, BFO has been applied successfully to some engineering problems due to its simplicity and ease of implementation. However, BFO possesses a poor convergence behavior over complex optimization problems as compared to other nature-inspired optimization techniques. This paper first analyzes how the run-length unit parameter of BFO controls the exploration of the whole search space and the exploitation of the promising areas. Then it presents a variation on the original BFO, called the adaptive bacterial foraging optimization (ABFO, employing the adaptive foraging strategies to improve the performance of the original BFO. This improvement is achieved by enabling the bacterial foraging algorithm to adjust the run-length unit parameter dynamically during algorithm execution in order to balance the exploration/exploitation tradeoff. The experiments compare the performance of two versions of ABFO with the original BFO, the standard particle swarm optimization (PSO and a real-coded genetic algorithm (GA on four widely-used benchmark functions. The proposed ABFO shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  14. Neglected bacterial zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikeka, I; Dumler, J S

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. Although many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which broad-spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. This review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control.

  15. Glutathione transferases and glutathionylated hemoglobin in workers exposed to low doses of 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primavera, Alessandra; Fustinoni, Silvia; Biroccio, Antonino; Ballerini, Sabrina; Urbani, Andrea; Bernardini, Sergio; Federici, Giorgio; Capucci, Enrico; Manno, Maurizio; Lo Bello, Mario

    2008-11-01

    We evaluated glutathione transferase (GST) activities and the levels of glutathionylated hemoglobin in the RBC of 42 workers exposed to 1,3-butadiene in a petrochemical plant, using 43 workers not exposed to 1,3-butadiene and 82 foresters as internal and external controls, respectively. Median 1,3-butadiene exposure levels were 1.5, 0.4, and 0.1 microg/m3 in 1,3-butadiene-exposed workers, in workers not directly exposed to 1,3-butadiene, and in foresters, respectively. In addition, we determined in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of the same individuals the presence of GST polymorphic genes GSTT1 and GSTM1 and the distribution of GSTP1 allelic variants. Comparing the mean values observed in petrochemical workers with those of control foresters, we found a marked decrease of GST enzymatic activity and a significant increase of glutathionylated hemoglobin in the petrochemical workers. A weak but significant negative correlation was found between levels of 1,3-butadiene exposure and GST activity, whereas a positive correlation was found between 1,3-butadiene exposure and glutathionylated hemoglobin. A negative correlation was also observed between GST activity and glutathionylated hemoglobin. No influence of confounders was observed. Using a multiple linear regression model, up to 50.6% and 41.9% of the variability observed in glutathionylated hemoglobin and GST activity, respectively, were explained by 1,3-butadiene exposure, working setting, and GSTT1 genotype. These results indicate that occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene induces an oxidative stress that impairs the GST balance in RBC, and suggest that GST activity and glutathionylated hemoglobin could be recommended as promising biomarkers of effect in petrochemical workers.

  16. Challenges in HbA1c Analysis and Reporting in Patients with Variant Hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, T A; Sheme, Z A; Sultana, G S; Sultana, B; Mishu, F A; Khan, N Z; Sarkar, B C; Muttalib, M A; Khan, S A; Choudhury, S; Mahtab, H

    2016-04-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA(1)c) is a well-established indicator of mean glycemia. The presence of genetic variants of hemoglobin can profoundly affect the accuracy of HbA(1)c measurements. Variants of hemoglobin especially Hemoglobin E (HbE) is prevalent in South East Asia including Bangladesh. The objective of our study is to compare the HbA(1)c values measured on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Turbidimetric Inhibition Immunoassay (TINIA) in diabetic patients with variant hemoglobins including HbE. A total of 7595 diabetic patients receiving treatment at BIRDEM General Hospital were analyzed for HbA(1)c results within a period of two months from December 2013 to January 2014. Seventy two cases out of 7595 (0.95%) had either undetectable or below normal HbA(1)c levels (males-33 and females-39; ratio = 0.82:1) by HPLC method. In 34(0.45%) cases, HbA(1)c value was undetectable by HPLC method but was in the reportable range by TINIA method. In the other 38 (0.55%) cases, HbA(1)c levels were below the reportable range (Hb variant, proper knowledge of hemoglobin variants which affect the measurements HbA(1)c level is essential. MCV of 80fl or below may serve as a rough guide to select samples that require analysis by TINIA method. Moreover, HPLC may be a convenient and inexpensive tool for screening of hemoglobinopathies especially among diabetic population in Bangladesh. It may therefore be helpful in improving management of complications related to both anaemia and iron overload.

  17. Adult, embryonic and fetal hemoglobin are expressed in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, Marwan; Turner, A Robert; Allalunis-Turner, Joan

    2014-02-01

    Hemoglobin is a hemoprotein, produced mainly in erythrocytes circulating in the blood. However, non-erythroid hemoglobins have been previously reported in other cell types including human and rodent neurons of embryonic and adult brain, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive tumor among gliomas. However, despite extensive basic and clinical research studies on GBM cells, little is known about glial defence mechanisms that allow these cells to survive and resist various types of treatment. We have shown previously that the newest members of vertebrate globin family, neuroglobin (Ngb) and cytoglobin (Cygb), are expressed in human GBM cells. In this study, we sought to determine whether hemoglobin is also expressed in GBM cells. Conventional RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, western blot analysis, mass spectrometry and fluorescence microscopy were used to investigate globin expression in GBM cell lines (M006x, M059J, M059K, M010b, U87R and U87T) that have unique characteristics in terms of tumor invasion and response to radiotherapy and hypoxia. The data showed that α, β, γ, δ, ζ and ε globins are expressed in all tested GBM cell lines. To our knowledge, we are the first to report expression of fetal, embryonic and adult hemoglobin in GBM cells under normal physiological conditions that may suggest an undefined function of those expressed hemoglobins. Together with our previous reports on globins (Ngb and Cygb) expression in GBM cells, the expression of different hemoglobins may constitute a part of series of active defence mechanisms supporting these cells to resist various types of treatments including chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  18. IS HEMOGLOBIN E GENE WIDELY SPREAD IN THE STATE OF MADHYA PRADESH IN CENTRAL INDIA? EVIDENCE FROM FIVE TYPICAL FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Balgir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Red cell inherited hemoglobin anomalies are commonly encountered in the central region of India. These cause a public health concern due to high degree of morbidity, mortality, and fetal loss in the backward, underprivileged, and vulnerable people. Purpose: To report five typical families of hemoglobin E disorders identified for the first time in the state of Madhya Pradesh from central India. Methods: Out of a total of 445 couples/families (excluding the present study with 1526 persons (848 males and 678 females referred from a tertiary hospital in central India for investigations of anemia/hemoglobinopathies during the period from March 2010 to February 2014, we came across five typical rare couples/families of hemoglobin E disorders worthy of detailed investigations. Laboratory investigations were carried out following the standard procedures after cross checking for quality control from time to time. Results: For the first time, we have encountered nine cases of heterozygous hemoglobin E trait, two members with hemoglobin E-β-thalassemia (double heterozygosity, two cases of sickle cell-hemoglobin E disease (double heterozygosity, and none with homozygous hemoglobin E. Cases  of hemoglobin E trait, hemoglobin E-β-thalassemia, sickle cell-β-thalassemia and sickle cell-E disease showed moderate to severe anemia, and target cells, and reduced values of red cell indices like RBC, Hb level, HCT, MCV, MCH and MCHC, representing abnormal hematological profile and clinical manifestations before blood transfusion. Conclusions: Double heterozygosity for hemoglobinopathies such as occurrence of β-thalassemia mutation with structurally abnormal hemoglobins (Hb S and Hb E is a rare entity, but occurs with severe clinical manifestations only in those areas or communities where these are highly prevalent, testifying the migrations and genetic admixture. Distribution of hemoglobin E and β-thalassemia in different districts of Madhya Pradesh

  19. A haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor conveys innate immunity to Trypanosoma brucei in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; De Muylder, Géraldine; Nielsen, Marianne J;

    2008-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is lysed by apolipoprotein L-I, a component of human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles that are also characterized by the presence of haptoglobin-related protein. We report that this process is mediated by a parasite glycoprotein receptor, which...... receptor also recognized the complex between hemoglobin and haptoglobin-related protein, which explains its ability to capture trypanolytic HDLs. Thus, in humans the presence of haptoglobin-related protein has diverted the function of the trypanosome haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor to elicit innate host...

  20. The Present and Future Global Burden of the Inherited Disorders of Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Frédéric B

    2016-04-01

    The inherited disorders of hemoglobin represent the most common monogenic diseases. This article provides a brief description of the main inherited disorders of hemoglobin and their classification, and summarizes progress made in the last decade toward a better awareness and recognition of these disorders as a global health problem. Also presented are the main demographic, genetic, and environmental factors that influence the present and future health burden of these disorders. The strengths and limitations of existing estimates and current health policies in high-, low-, and middle-income countries are discussed.