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Sample records for bacterial growth rate

  1. Bounds on bacterial cell growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    Landy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that rod-like bacteria in nutrient-rich media grow in length at an exponential rate. Here, I point out that it is the elongated shape of these bacteria that allows for this behavior. Further, I show that when a bacterium's growth is limited by some nutrient -- taken in by the cell through a diffusion-to-capture process -- its growth is suppressed: In three-dimensional geometries, the length $L$ is bounded by $\\log L \\lesssim t^{1/2}$, while in two dimensions the length is bounded by a power-law form. Fits of experimental growth curves to these predicted, sub-exponential forms could allow for direct measures of quantities relating to cellular metabolic rates.

  2. Can we estimate bacterial growth rates from ribosomal RNA content?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the quantity of RNA in bacterial cells and their growth rate under laboratory conditions. It may be possible to use this relationship to provide information on the activity of natural bacterial communities, and in particular on growth rate. However, if this approach is to provide reliably interpretable information, the relationship between RNA content and growth rate must be well-understood. In particular, a requisite of such applications is that the relationship must be universal among bacteria, or alternately that the relationship can be determined and measured for specific bacterial taxa. The RNA-growth rate relationship has not been used to evaluate bacterial growth in field studies, although RNA content has been measured in single cells and in bulk extracts of field samples taken from coastal environments. These measurements have been treated as probable indicators of bacterial activity, but have not yet been interpreted as estimators of growth rate. The primary obstacle to such interpretations is a lack of information on biological and environmental factors that affect the RNA-growth rate relationship. In this paper, the available data on the RNA-growth rate relationship in bacteria will be reviewed, including hypotheses regarding the regulation of RNA synthesis and degradation as a function of growth rate and environmental factors; i.e. the basic mechanisms for maintaining RNA content in proportion to growth rate. An assessment of the published laboratory and field data, the current status of this research area, and some of the remaining questions will be presented.

  3. Growth-rate-dependent dynamics of a bacterial genetic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osella, Matteo; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2013-01-01

    Gene networks exhibiting oscillatory dynamics are widespread in biology. The minimal regulatory designs giving rise to oscillations have been implemented synthetically and studied by mathematical modeling. However, most of the available analyses generally neglect the coupling of regulatory circuits with the cellular “chassis” in which the circuits are embedded. For example, the intracellular macromolecular composition of fast-growing bacteria changes with growth rate. As a consequence, important parameters of gene expression, such as ribosome concentration or cell volume, are growth-rate dependent, ultimately coupling the dynamics of genetic circuits with cell physiology. This work addresses the effects of growth rate on the dynamics of a paradigmatic example of genetic oscillator, the repressilator. Making use of empirical growth-rate dependencies of parameters in bacteria, we show that the repressilator dynamics can switch between oscillations and convergence to a fixed point depending on the cellular state of growth, and thus on the nutrients it is fed. The physical support of the circuit (type of plasmid or gene positions on the chromosome) also plays an important role in determining the oscillation stability and the growth-rate dependence of period and amplitude. This analysis has potential application in the field of synthetic biology, and suggests that the coupling between endogenous genetic oscillators and cell physiology can have substantial consequences for their functionality.

  4. Growth against entropy in bacterial metabolism: the phenotypic trade-off behind empirical growth rate distributions in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Daniele; Capuani, Fabrizio; De Martino, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The solution space of genome-scale models of cellular metabolism provides a map between physically viable flux configurations and cellular metabolic phenotypes described, at the most basic level, by the corresponding growth rates. By sampling the solution space of E. coli's metabolic network, we show that empirical growth rate distributions recently obtained in experiments at single-cell resolution can be explained in terms of a trade-off between the higher fitness of fast-growing phenotypes and the higher entropy of slow-growing ones. Based on this, we propose a minimal model for the evolution of a large bacterial population that captures this trade-off. The scaling relationships observed in experiments encode, in such frameworks, for the same distance from the maximum achievable growth rate, the same degree of growth rate maximization, and/or the same rate of phenotypic change. Being grounded on genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions, these results allow for multiple implications and extensions in spite of the underlying conceptual simplicity.

  5. Anthocyanin Incorporated Dental Copolymer: Bacterial Growth Inhibition, Mechanical Properties, and Compound Release Rates and Stability by 1H NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Halyna Hrynash; Vinay Kumar Pilly; Alexandra Mankovskaia; Yaoyang Xiong; Getulio Nogueira Filho; Eduardo Bresciani; Céline Marie Lévesque; Anuradha Prakki

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate bacterial growth inhibition, mechanical properties, and compound release rate and stability of copolymers incorporated with anthocyanin (ACY; Vaccinium macrocarpon). Methods. Resin samples were prepared (Bis-GMA/TEGDMA at 70/30 mol%) and incorporated with 2 w/w% of either ACY or chlorhexidine (CHX), except for the control group. Samples were individually immersed in a bacterial culture (Streptococcus mutans) for 24 h. Cell viability (n = 3) was assessed by counting the ...

  6. Effects of Surface Area and Flow Rate on Marine Bacterial Growth in Activated Carbon Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Shimp, Robert J.; Pfaender, Frederic K.

    1982-01-01

    The colonization of granular activated carbon columns by bacteria can have both beneficial and potentially detrimental consequences. Bacterial growth on the carbon surface can remove adsorbed organics and thus partially regenerate the carbon bed. However, growth can also increase the levels of bacteria in the column effluents, which can adversely affect downstream uses of the treated water. This study of a sand column and several activated carbon columns demonstrated that considerable marine ...

  7. Population dynamics of a Salmonella lytic phage and its host: implications of the host bacterial growth rate in modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sílvio B; Carvalho, Carla; Azeredo, Joana; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of bacteriophages in the ecology of bacterial communities coupled with their ability to control pathogens turn essential to understand and predict the dynamics between phage and bacteria populations. To achieve this knowledge it is essential to develop mathematical models able to explain and simulate the population dynamics of phage and bacteria. We have developed an unstructured mathematical model using delay-differential equations to predict the interactions between a broad-host-range Salmonella phage and its pathogenic host. The model takes into consideration the main biological parameters that rule phage-bacteria interactions likewise the adsorption rate, latent period, burst size, bacterial growth rate, and substrate uptake rate, among others. The experimental validation of the model was performed with data from phage-interaction studies in a 5 L bioreactor. The key and innovative aspect of the model was the introduction of variations in the latent period and adsorption rate values that are considered as constants in previous developed models. By modelling the latent period as a normal distribution of values and the adsorption rate as a function of the bacterial growth rate it was possible to accurately predict the behaviour of the phage-bacteria population. The model was shown to predict simulated data with a good agreement with the experimental observations and explains how a lytic phage and its host bacteria are able to coexist. PMID:25051248

  8. Population dynamics of a Salmonella lytic phage and its host: implications of the host bacterial growth rate in modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvio B Santos

    Full Text Available The prevalence and impact of bacteriophages in the ecology of bacterial communities coupled with their ability to control pathogens turn essential to understand and predict the dynamics between phage and bacteria populations. To achieve this knowledge it is essential to develop mathematical models able to explain and simulate the population dynamics of phage and bacteria. We have developed an unstructured mathematical model using delay-differential equations to predict the interactions between a broad-host-range Salmonella phage and its pathogenic host. The model takes into consideration the main biological parameters that rule phage-bacteria interactions likewise the adsorption rate, latent period, burst size, bacterial growth rate, and substrate uptake rate, among others. The experimental validation of the model was performed with data from phage-interaction studies in a 5 L bioreactor. The key and innovative aspect of the model was the introduction of variations in the latent period and adsorption rate values that are considered as constants in previous developed models. By modelling the latent period as a normal distribution of values and the adsorption rate as a function of the bacterial growth rate it was possible to accurately predict the behaviour of the phage-bacteria population. The model was shown to predict simulated data with a good agreement with the experimental observations and explains how a lytic phage and its host bacteria are able to coexist.

  9. Measurement of bacterial growth rates in subsurface sediments using the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, P M; Ventullo, R M

    1988-07-01

    Microbial growth rates in subsurface sediment from three sites were measured using incorporation of tritiated thymidine into DNA. Sampling sites included Lula, Oklahoma, Traverse City, Michigan, and Summit Lake, Wisconsin. Application of the thymidine method to subsurface sediments required (1) thymidine concentrations greater than 125 nM, (2) incubation periods of less than 4 hours, (3) addition of SDS and EDTA for optimum macromolecular extraction, and (4) DNA purification, in order to accurately measure the rate of thymidine incorporation into DNA. Macromolecule extraction recoveries, as well as the percentage of tritium label incorporated into the DNA fraction, were variable and largely dependent upon sediment composition. In general, sandy sediments yielded higher extraction recoveries and demonstrated a larger percentage of label incorporated into DNA than sediments that contained a high silt-clay component. Reported results also indicate that the acid-base hydrolysis procedure routinely used for macromolecular fractionation in water samples may not be routinely applicable to the modified sediment procedure where addition of SDS and EDTA are required for macromolecule extraction. Growth rates exhibited by subsurface communities are relatively slow, ranging from 5.1 to 10.2×10(5) cells g(-1) day(-1). These rates are 2-1,000-fold lower than growth rates measured in surface sediments. These data lend support to the supposition that subsurface microbial communities are nutritionally stressed. PMID:24201529

  10. Influence of filtration and glucose amendment on bacterial growth rate at different tidal conditions in the Minho Estuary River (NW Portugal)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anne, I.; Fidalgo, M. L.; Thosthrup, L.;

    2006-01-01

    Bacterioplankton abundance, biomass and growth rates were studied in the Minho Estuary River (NW Portugal). The influence of tidal conditions, glucose amendment, and the filtration process on total bacterial abundance, total and faecal coliforms, as well as faecal streptococci, were evaluated in...

  11. Enteral nutrient solutions. Limiting bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paauw, J D; Fagerman, K E; McCamish, M A; Dean, R E

    1984-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of enteral nutrient solutions ( ENS ) in FFcess of food product standards is known to occur in the hospital setting. The large amounts of bacteria often given with ENS have been shown to create a reservoir for nosocomial infections, and nonpathogenic bacteria have been implicated. Patient tolerance is dependent on immune status and the bacterial load delivered to the gut. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bacterial growth-sustaining properties of various ENS and to devise methods to limit bacterial growth. Five commercial products were prepared under sterile conditions. After inoculation with approximately 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm3 of Enterobacter cloacae, each solution was hung at room temperature for 24 hours with samples drawn at fixed intervals and plated for bacterial counts. Bacterial growth rates in Ensure, Travasorb , and Vital were markedly higher than those in Precision and Vivonex. Vivonex was noted to contain potassium sorbate (KS) used as a fungistatic agent. Recent studies have identified KS as a broad-spectrum bacteriostatic food preservative that is federally approved for this use. KS (0.03%) was added to Travasorb inoculated with 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm(3) of E. cloacae. The bacterial growth rate was reduced by 75 per cent, and the final count of 2-3 X 10(4) organisms/ml was within the federally regulated limit for milk. This study suggests that initial inoculum, growth rate, and hang time can be altered to provide a significant reduction in final bacterial counts in ENS . PMID:6428286

  12. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  13. Population Dynamics of a Salmonella Lytic Phage and Its Host: Implications of the Host Bacterial Growth Rate in Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Sílvio Roberto Branco; Carvalho, Carla A. O. C. M.; Azeredo, Joana; Ferreira, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of bacteriophages in the ecology of bacterial communities coupled with their ability to control pathogens turn essential to understand and predict the dynamics between phage and bacteria populations. To achieve this knowledge it is essential to develop mathematical models able to explain and simulate the population dynamics of phage and bacteria. We have developed an unstructured mathematical model using delay-differential equations to predict the interactions betwee...

  14. Bacterial production and growth rate estimation from [3H]thymidine incorporation for attached and free-living bacteria in aquatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production and specific growth rates of attached and free-living bacteria were estimated in an oligotrophic marine system, La Salvaje Beach, Vizcaya, Spain, and in a freshwater system having a higher nutrient concentration, Butron River, Vizcaya, Spain. Production was calculated from [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation by estimating specific conversion factors (cells or micrograms of C produced per mole of thymidine incorporated) for attached and free-living bacteria, respectively, in each system. Conversion factors were not statistically different between attached and free-living bacteria: 6.812 x 1011 and 8.678 x 1011 μg of C mol-1 for free-living and attached bacteria in the freshwater system, and 1.276 x 1011 and 1.354 x 1011 μg of C mol-1 for free-living and attached bacteria in the marine system. Therefore, use of a unique conversion factor for the mixed bacterial population is well founded. However, conversion factors were higher in the freshwater system than in the marine system. This could be due to the different tropic conditions of the two systems. Free-living bacteria contributed the most to production in the two systems (85% in the marine system and 67% in the freshwater system) because of their greater contribution to total biomass. Specific growth rates calculated from production data and biomass data were similar for attached and free-living bacteria

  15. Periodic growth of bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Takemasa; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Hiramatsu, Fumiko; Kobayashi, Naoki; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Kurosu, Sayuri; Nakatsuchi, Michio; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2005-06-01

    The formation of concentric ring colonies by bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Proteus mirabilis has been investigated experimentally, focusing our attention on the dependence of local cell density upon the bacterial motility. It has been confirmed that these concentric ring colonies reflect the periodic change of the bacterial motility between motile cell state and immotile cell state. We conclude that this periodic change is macroscopically determined neither by biological factors (i.e., biological clock) nor by chemical factors (chemotaxis as inhibitor). And our experimental results strongly suggest that the essential factor for the change of the bacterial motility during concentric ring formation is the local cell density.

  16. Bacterial volatiles promote growth in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Mohamed A. Farag; Hu, Chia-Hui; Reddy, Munagala S.; Wei, Han-Xun; Paré, Paul W.; Kloepper, Joseph W.

    2003-01-01

    Several chemical changes in soil are associated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Some bacterial strains directly regulate plant physiology by mimicking synthesis of plant hormones, whereas others increase mineral and nitrogen availability in the soil as a way to augment growth. Identification of bacterial chemical messengers that trigger growth promotion has been limited in part by the understanding of how plants respond to external stimuli. With an increasing appreciation of...

  17. Impact of medications on bacterial growth in syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerenyi, M; Borza, Z; Csontos, C; Ittzes, B; Batai, I

    2011-11-01

    Syringes used to administer intravenous medications in an intensive care unit were cultured, and the isolates were compared with those from positive blood cultures from the same patients. The overall contamination rate was 16%, and syringes used for drugs such as insulin, which support bacterial growth, had higher contamination rates. All syringes should be changed routinely after 6h. PMID:21864939

  18. Evaluation of silicon oil on bacterial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Adams

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze the antimicrobial properties of silicon oil (Óleo de Silicone®, Ophthalmos, Brazil on in vitro bacterial growth of different microorganisms related to endophthalmitis. METHODS: The following microorganisms were analyzed: (1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27583; (2 Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922; (3 Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923; (4 Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228; (5 Candida albicans (ATCC 10231; (6 Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 13883; and (7 Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 49619. The plates were incubated at 35 ± 2ºC and its growth examined after 24 hours. An empty disk was placed in the center of each plate as a control. RESULTS: No inhibition halos were verified in any of the plates containing the four different concentrations of the bacterial inocula. CONCLUSIONS: The silicon oil 1000 cps does not have any effect on bacterial growth of any of the studied microrganisms.

  19. Growth rate of nuclei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Zdeněk; Demo, Pavel

    Bratislava: Slovak Society for Industrial Chemistry, 2015 - (Koman, M.; Jorík, V.; Kožíšek, Z.). s. 26-26 ISBN 978-80-89597-28-4. [Joint Seminar Development of Materials Science in Research and Education /25./. 31.08.2015-04.09.2015, Kežmarské Žľaby] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0891 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : growth rate * nucleation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  20. Fractal Growth of Bacterial Colonies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek; Fridrich, Miroslav; Burkhard, M.

    London : Chapman&Hall, 1995 - (Novak, M.M.), s. 179-191 ISBN 0-412-71020-X. [Fractal Reviews in the Natural and Applied Sciences. Marseille (FI), 07.02.1995-10.02.1995] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fractal * bacteria l colony * growth pattern Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  1. Bacterial growth laws and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Matthew; Hwa, Terence

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative empirical relationships between cell composition and growth rate played an important role in the early days of microbiology. Gradually, the focus of the field began to shift from growth physiology to the ever more elaborate molecular mechanisms of regulation employed by the organisms. Advances in systems biology and biotechnology have renewed interest in the physiology of the cell as a whole. Furthermore, gene expression is known to be intimately coupled to the growth state of th...

  2. Effect of DSS on Bacterial Growth in Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinková, J; Svobodová, H; Brachtlová, T; Gardlík, R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an idiopathic autoimmune disorder that is mainly divided into ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Probiotics are known for their beneficial effect and used as a treatment option in different gastrointestinal problems. The aim of our study was to find suitable bacterial vectors for gene therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 were investigated as potential vectors. Our results show that the growth of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 was inhibited in the majority of samples collected from dextran sodium sulphate-treated animals compared with control growth in phosphate-buffered saline. The growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 in all investigated samples was enhanced or unaffected in comparison with phosphate-buffered saline; however, it did not reach the growth rates of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Dextran sodium sulphate treatment had a stimulating effect on the growth of both strains in homogenates of distant small intestine and proximal colon samples. The gastrointestinal tract contents and tissue homogenates did not inhibit growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 in comparison with the negative control, and provided more suitable environment for growth compared to Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. We therefore conclude that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 is a more suitable candidate for a potential bacterial vector, even though it has no known probiotic properties. PMID:27085009

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Bacterial Growth with Earphone Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjay Mukhopadhyay

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently the worldwide usage of earphones has increased especially among the school and college students who have a high rate of sharing among them. Alike airline headsets, headphones and stethoscope ear-pieces, ear phones can easily be a vector of potential pathogens, which can give rise to otitis externa. Purpose: To compare the bacterial growth of the external ear in association with earphone and assess the role of earphones as vector or microorganisms. Material and Methods: 50 voluntary male subjects (age 18-25 years were chosen and divided into two groups, A and B, according to the use of earphones. Swabs were taken from their left ear and the left earpiece of the earphone. Samples were processed as recommended. Results: In group A, bacteria were found in 20 (80% ear and 14 (56% earphone swabs. In group B, bacteria were found in 23 (92% ear and 17 (68% earphone swabs. Group B showed heavy growth and a significant increase in the number of bacterial growths after frequent and constant use. Conclusion: Frequent and constant use of earphones increases the bacterial growth in the ear and sharing of earphones might be a potential vector of commensals. It is therefore, always better not to share or else to clean the earphones before sharing.

  4. On growth and flow: bacterial biofilms in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, William; Leombruni, Alberto; Tranzer, Olivier; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Bacterial biofilms often occur in porous media, where they play pivotal roles in medicine, industry and the environment. Though flow is ubiquitous in porous media, its effects on biofilm growth have been largely ignored. Using patterned microfluidic devices that simulate unconsolidated soil, we find that the structure of Escherichia coli biofilms undergoes a self-organization mediated by the interaction of growth and flow. Intriguingly, we find that biofilm productivity peaks at intermediate flow rates, when the biofilm is irrigated by a minimum number of preferential flow channels. At larger and smaller flow rates, fluid flows more uniformly through the matrix, but productivity drops due to removal by shear and reduced nutrient transport, respectively. These dynamics are correctly predicted by a simple network model. The observed tradeoff between growth and flow may have important consequences on biofilm-mediated processes such as biochemical cycling, antibiotic resistance and water filtration.

  5. GROWTH RATE OF ARABIAN FOALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. PIESZKA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Arabian horses are treated as one of the most noble horse breed in the world. It isalso one of the oldest breed known as a root of many other breeds. Opposite toThoroughbred horses Arabian ones are very healthy, easy to keep with low fodderdemand. They are still incredibly resistant to environmental conditions. Growth anddevelopment of foals is also very interesting because it is more similar to growth ofprimitive than to noble foals. The object of this study was to analyse the growth rateof Arabian foals bred in Poland. 382 foals born in Bialka Stud in 1983-2003 weretaken under consideration. The height at withers, girth and cannon circumferencemeasured at 1 day and 6 and 18 months of life were analysed. On this base thegrowth rate was calculated. Horses were divided into different groups accordingtheir year of birth, sex, coat colour and sire and dam lines. The statistical differencesbetween particular groups were evaluated. It was stated that year of birth affectedsignificantly the growth rate of Arabian foals. Colts were characterized bysignificantly higher growth rate of cannon circumference. Horses of different coatcolour did not differ in growth rate of any parameter. Affiliation to particular sireand dam lines had some effects on growth rate of Arabian foals.

  6. Archaeal Abundance across a pH Gradient in an Arable Soil and Its Relationship to Bacterial and Fungal Growth Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Bengtson, Per; Sterngren, Anna E.; Rousk, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Soil pH is one of the most influential factors for the composition of bacterial and fungal communities, but the influence of soil pH on the distribution and composition of soil archaeal communities has yet to be systematically addressed. The primary aim of this study was to determine how total archaeal abundance (quantitative PCR [qPCR]-based estimates of 16S rRNA gene copy numbers) is related to soil pH across a pH gradient (pH 4.0 to 8.3). Secondarily, we wanted to assess how archaeal abund...

  7. Autoradiographic study of the localization and evolution of growth zones in bacterial colonies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incorporation of [3H] leucine in the bacteria of 18 to 48 h-old colonies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus thuringiensis, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli enabled the localization of bacterial multiplication sites by means of autoradiography of sagittal sections. In colonies where fast diameter expansion occurred, all the bacteria from the peripheral corona contributed to peripheral growth; in colonies where the expansion was slower, the growth rate of the bacteria in this region was heterogeneous. Besides this peripheral growth, a central region of bacterial multiplication was always found, but with variable localization and extension. In aerobic species, such as P. aeruginosa and P. putida, the central growth site was limited to the zone of oxygen penetration into the bacterial mass. However, in facultatively anaerobic species, bacterial multiplication depended on nutrient supply. For 48 h-old colonies of S. aureus, a more complex localization of growth seemed to be affected simultaneously by nutrient penetration and accumulation of toxic substances. (author)

  8. GDP growth rate and population

    OpenAIRE

    Kitov, Ivan O.

    2005-01-01

    Real GDP growth rate in developed countries is found to be a sum of two terms. The first term is the reciprocal value of the duration of the period of mean income growth with work experience, Tcr. The current value of Tcr in the USA is 40 years. The second term is inherently related to population and defined by the relative change in the number of people with a specific age (9 years in the USA), (1/2)*dN9(t) /N9(t), where N9(t) is the number of 9-year-olds at time t. The Tcr grows as the squa...

  9. Effects of Growth Hormone on Bacterial Translocation Due to Intestinal Obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    BALIK, Ahmet A.

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial translocation is an important etiologic factor in multisystem organ failure and sepsis, which have a high mortality rate. To determine the effects of growth hormone on bacterial translocation, an experimental study was performed. Twenty pathogen-free rabbits were divided into two groups each containing 10 rabbits. After loop obstruction was performed, the rabbits in the control group were given saline solution whereas the rabbits in the study group received growth hormone...

  10. Oral iron acutely elevates bacterial growth in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, James H; Bradbury, Richard S; Fulford, Anthony J; Jallow, Amadou T; Wegmüller, Rita; Prentice, Andrew M; Cerami, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency worldwide and routine supplementation is standard policy for pregnant mothers and children in most low-income countries. However, iron lies at the center of host-pathogen competition for nutritional resources and recent trials of iron administration in African and Asian children have resulted in significant excesses of serious adverse events including hospitalizations and deaths. Increased rates of malaria, respiratory infections, severe diarrhea and febrile illnesses of unknown origin have all been reported, but the mechanisms are unclear. We here investigated the ex vivo growth characteristics of exemplar sentinel bacteria in adult sera collected before and 4 h after oral supplementation with 2 mg/kg iron as ferrous sulfate. Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (all gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (gram-positive) showed markedly elevated growth in serum collected after iron supplementation. Growth rates were very strongly correlated with transferrin saturation (p oral supplements with highly soluble (non-physiological) iron, as typically used in low-income settings, could promote bacteremia by accelerating early phase bacterial growth prior to the induction of immune defenses. PMID:26593732

  11. A novel approach for estimating growth phases and parameters of bacterial population in batch culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using mathematical analysis, a new method has been developed for studying the growth kinetics of bacterial populations in batch culture. First, sampling data were smoothed with the spline interpolation method. Second, the instantaneous rates were derived by numerical differential techniques and finally, the derived data were fitted with the Gaussian function to obtain growth parameters. We named this the Spline-Numerical-Gaussian or SNG method. This method yielded more accurate estimates of the growth rates of bacterial populations and new parameters. It was possible to divide the growth curve into four different but continuous phases based on changes in the instantaneous rates. The four phases are the accelerating growth phase, the constant growth phase, the decelerating growth phase and the declining phase. Total DNA content was measured by flow cytometry and varied depending on the growth phase. The SNG system provides a very powerful tool for describing the kinetics of bacterial population growth. The SNG method avoids the unrealistic assumptions generally used in the traditional growth equations.

  12. Metal loss growth rate distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoletti, Erika S.M.; Olivier, Joao H.; Souza, Ricardo D. de; Addor, Pedro N. [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    Significant efforts have been dedicated in recent decades to the development of damage tolerance criteria and ILI tool technology and, by combining both, operators can nowadays determine their system's integrity condition at the time of inspection with considerable accuracy. However, to accomplish proper integrity management it is also necessary to estimate the damage progression over time. As corrosion is one of the most time-dependent threats to pipeline integrity, aging systems' operational reliability and cost-effectiveness mostly rely on the accuracy of their corrosion growth-rate estimations. The diversity of mechanisms acting concomitantly along a single pipeline, and the inherent stochastic nature of the corrosion process makes its mechanistic modeling a complex task. This paper introduces the use of exploratory statistical analysis combined with segmentation strategies to produce representative corrosion rates of metal-loss anomaly populations reported by ILI. The procedure could provide input suitable for both deterministic and probabilistic FFP analysis: for the latter, proper computational tools to process best fitting distributions being required. Three case studies, where diverse segmentation principles have been applied, are presented to illustrate methodology application. (author)

  13. Methods of modelling relative growth rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arne Pommerening; Anders Muszta

    2015-01-01

    Background:Analysing and modelling plant growth is an important interdisciplinary field of plant science. The use of relative growth rates, involving the analysis of plant growth relative to plant size, has more or less independently emerged in different research groups and at different times and has provided powerful tools for assessing the growth performance and growth efficiency of plants and plant populations. In this paper, we explore how these isolated methods can be combined to form a consistent methodology for modelling relative growth rates. Methods:We review and combine existing methods of analysing and modelling relative growth rates and apply a combination of methods to Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) stem-analysis data from North Wales (UK) and British Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesi (Mirb.) Franco) yield table data. Results:The results indicate that, by combining the approaches of different plant-growth analysis laboratories and using them simultaneously, we can advance and standardise the concept of relative plant growth. Particularly the growth multiplier plays an important role in modelling relative growth rates. Another useful technique has been the recent introduction of size-standardised relative growth rates. Conclusions:Modelling relative growth rates mainly serves two purposes, 1) an improved analysis of growth performance and efficiency and 2) the prediction of future or past growth rates. This makes the concept of relative growth ideally suited to growth reconstruction as required in dendrochronology, climate change and forest decline research and for interdisciplinary research projects beyond the realm of plant science.

  14. Improved Method for Determining Bacterial Filtration Rates in Zooplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Marvalin, Olivier; Lazarek, Stanislaw

    1988-01-01

    Filtration rates were determined for a natural population of zooplankton grazers (Bosmina longirostris [Müll.], Cyclops vicinus vicinus [Ulianine], Acanthodiaptomus denticornis [Wierz.], and Daphnia longispina [Müll.]) by using 3H-labeled bacteria as food for these organisms. There was a relationship between filtration rates of the major zooplankton grazers and the prevailing algal and bacterial composition in the lake water. Low filtration rates were obtained in the presence of colonial and ...

  15. Phosphorus and bacterial growth in drinking water.

    OpenAIRE

    Miettinen, I T; Vartiainen, T; Martikainen, P J

    1997-01-01

    The availability of organic carbon is considered the key factor to regulate microbial regrowth in drinking water network. However, boreal regions (northern Europe, Russia, and North America) contain a large amount of organic carbon in forests and peatlands. Therefore, natural waters (lakes, rivers, and groundwater) in the northern hemisphere generally have a high content of organic carbon. We found that microbial growth in drinking water in Finland is highly regulated not only by organic carb...

  16. Evolution of bacterial and fungal growth media

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Srijoni; Bose, Chandra; Ojha, Nupur; Das, Nabajit; Das, Jagaree; Pal, Mrinmoy; Khurana, Sukant

    2015-01-01

    Microbial media has undergone several changes since its inception but some key challenges remain. In recent years, there has been exploration of several alternative nutrient sources, both to cater to the specificity in requirement of growth of “fussy microorganisms” and also to reduce costs for large-scale fermentation that is required for biotechnology. Our mini-review explores these developments and also points at lacunas in the present areas of exploration, such as a lack of concerted effo...

  17. Tracking bacterial growth in liquid media and a new bacterial life model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘实

    1999-01-01

    By increasing viscosity of liquid media above 8.4 centipoise (cp) i.e. 0.084 g·cm-1·S-1 individual growth and family formation of Escherichia coli was continuously observed in real-time for up to 6 h. The observations showed primarily unidirectional growth and reproduction of E. coli and suggested more than one reproduction in the observed portion of E. coli life span. A new bacterial life model is proposed: each bacterium has a stable cell polarity that ultimately transforms into two bacteria of different generations; the life cycle of a bacterium can contain more than one reproduction cycle; and the age of a bacterium should be defined by its experienced chronological time. This new bacterial life model differs from the dominant concepts of bacterial life but complies with all basic life principles based on direct observation of macroorganisms.

  18. Methods of modelling relative growth rate

    OpenAIRE

    Arne Pommerening; Anders Muszta

    2015-01-01

    Background Analysing and modelling plant growth is an important interdisciplinary field of plant science. The use of relative growth rates, involving the analysis of plant growth relative to plant size, has more or less independently emerged in different research groups and at different times and has provided powerful tools for assessing the growth performance and growth efficiency of plants and plant populations. In this paper, we explore how these isolated methods can be combined to form...

  19. Asymptotic Cellular Growth Rate as the Effective Information Utilization Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Pugatch, Rami; Tlusty, Tsvi

    2013-01-01

    We study the average asymptotic growth rate of cells in randomly fluctuating environments. Using a game-theoretic perspective, we show that any response strategy has an asymptotic growth rate, which is the sum of: (i) the maximal growth rate at the worst possible distribution of environments, (ii) relative information between the actual distribution of environments to the worst one, and (iii) information utilization rate which is the information rate of the sensory devices minus the "information dissipation rate", the amount of information not utilized by the cell for growth. In non-stationary environments, the optimal strategy is the time average of the instantaneous optimal strategy and the optimal switching times are evenly spaced in the statistical (Fisher) metric.

  20. Individual based simulations of bacterial growth on agar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginovart, M.; López, D.; Valls, J.; Silbert, M.

    2002-03-01

    The individual based simulator, INDividual DIScrete SIMulations (INDISIM) has been used to study the behaviour of the growth of bacterial colonies on a finite dish. The simulations reproduce the qualitative trends of pattern formation that appear during the growth of Bacillus subtilis on an agar plate under different initial conditions of nutrient peptone concentration, the amount of agar on the plate, and the temperature. The simulations are carried out by imposing closed boundary conditions on a square lattice divided into square spatial cells. The simulator studies the temporal evolution of the bacterial population possible by setting rules of behaviour for each bacterium, such as its uptake, metabolism and reproduction, as well as rules for the medium in which the bacterial cells grow, such as concentration of nutrient particles and their diffusion. The determining factors that characterize the structure of the bacterial colony patterns in the presents simulations, are the initial concentrations of nutrient particles, that mimic the amount of peptone in the experiments, and the set of values for the microscopic diffusion parameter related, in the experiments, to the amount of the agar medium.

  1. Measurements of Protein Crystal Face Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal growth rates will be determined for several hyperthermophile proteins.; The growth rates will be assessed using available theoretical models, including kinetic roughening.; If/when kinetic roughening supersaturations are established, determinations of protein crystal quality over a range of supersaturations will also be assessed.; The results of our ground based effort may well address the existence of a correlation between fundamental growth mechanisms and protein crystal quality.

  2. Growth Rates of Microbes in the Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchman, David L.

    2016-01-01

    A microbe's growth rate helps to set its ecological success and its contribution to food web dynamics and biogeochemical processes. Growth rates at the community level are constrained by biomass and trophic interactions among bacteria, phytoplankton, and their grazers. Phytoplankton growth rates are approximately 1 d-1, whereas most heterotrophic bacteria grow slowly, close to 0.1 d-1; only a few taxa can grow ten times as fast. Data from 16S rRNA and other approaches are used to speculate about the growth rate and the life history strategy of SAR11, the most abundant clade of heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans. These strategies are also explored using genomic data. Although the methods and data are imperfect, the available data can be used to set limits on growth rates and thus on the timescale for changes in the composition and structure of microbial communities.

  3. Export growth, economic growth and real exchange rate in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wing-Keung Lo, K.

    2000-01-01

    The thesis studies the export growth, economic growth and real exchange rate in Indonesia. The research is a piece of empirical studies mainly covering the period from 1974 to 1993. Indonesia is an oil-exporting country. Economic recession with high inflation rate in the early eighties prompted the government to undertake a series of economic and financial reforms. It was believed that oil export earnings by itself could not sustain long-term economic growth. Trade reform and devaluation woul...

  4. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.;

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that coll...... cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology......The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that...

  5. Role of Rate of Specific Growth Rate in Different Growth Processes: A First Principle Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Dibyendu; Patra, Sankar Nayaran

    2015-01-01

    In the present communication, effort is given for the development of a common platform that helps to address several growth processes found in literature. Based on first principle approach, the role of rate of specific growth rate in different growth processes has been considered in an unified manner. It is found that different growth equations can be derived from the same rate equation of specific growth rate. The dependence of growth features of different growth processes on the parameters of the rate equation of specific growth rate has been examined in detail. It is found that competitive environment may increase the saturation level of population size. The exponential growth could also be addressed in terms of two important factors of growth dynamics, as reproduction and competition. These features are, most probably, not reported earlier.

  6. Incubation Station for the Bacterial Growth Study in Biological Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Rafael Duharte Rodríguez; Ibrain Ceballo Acosta; Carmen B. Busoch Morlán; Ángel Regueiro Gómez

    2015-01-01

    This work shows the designing and characterization of a prototype of laboratory incubator as support of Microbiology research, in particular for the research of the bacterial growth in biological samples through optic methods (Turbidimetry) and electrometric measurements of bioimpedance. It shows the results of simulation and experimentation of the design proposed for the canals of measurement of the variables: temperature and humidity, with a high linearity from the adequate selection of the...

  7. Temperature influence on phytoplankton community growth rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Elliot; Moore, J. Keith; Primeau, Francois; Tanouye, David

    2016-04-01

    A large database of field estimates of phytoplankton community growth rates in natural populations was compiled and analyzed to determine the apparent temperature effect on phytoplankton community growth rate. We conducted an ordinary least squares regression to optimize the parameters in two commonly used growth-temperature relations (Arrhenius and Q10 models). Both equations fit the observational data equally with the optimized parameter values. The optimum apparent Q10 value was 1.47 ± 0.08 (95% confidence interval, CI). Microzooplankton grazing rates closely matched the temperature trends for phytoplankton growth. This likely reflects a dynamic adjustment of biomass and grazing rates by the microzooplankton to match their available food source, illustrating tight coupling of phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing rates. The field-measured temperature effect and growth rates were compared with estimates from the satellite Carbon-based Productivity Model (CbPM) and three Earth System Models (ESMs), with model output extracted at the same month and sampling locations as the observations. The optimized, apparent Q10 value calculated for the CbPM was 1.51, with overestimation of growth rates. The apparent Q10 value in the Community Earth System Model (V1.0) was 1.65, with modest underestimation of growth rates. The GFDL-ESM2M and GFDL-ESM2G models produced apparent Q10 values of 1.52 and 1.39, respectively. Models with an apparent Q10 that is significantly greater than ~1.5 will overestimate the phytoplankton community growth response to the ongoing climate warming and will have spatial biases in estimated growth rates for the current era.

  8. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

    2011-04-18

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  9. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine C Goldfarb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum-level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e. glycine, sucrose are numerous (>500, phylogenetically-clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacterales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e. cellulose, lignin or tannin-protein are fewer (168 but more phylogenetically-dispersed, occurring across 8 phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  10. Analysis of a Stochastic Model for Bacterial Growth and the Lognormality of the Cell-Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ken; Wakita, Jun-ichi

    2016-07-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell division and the linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We find that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values that give a good lognormal approximation; thus, the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  11. Analysis of a stochastic model for bacterial growth and the lognormality in the cell-size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell divisions and linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We derive that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values which give good lognormal approximation, so the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  12. Bacterial gene regulation in diauxic and nondiauxic growth

    CERN Document Server

    Narang, A; Narang, Atul; Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    2006-01-01

    When bacteria are grown on a mixture of two growth-limiting substrates, they exhibit a rich spectrum of substrate consumption patterns including diauxic growth, simultaneous consumption, and bistable growth. In previous work, we showed that a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution captures all the substrate consumption patterns. Here, we construct the bifurcation diagram of the minimal model. The bifurcation diagram explains several general properties of mixed-substrate growth. (1) In almost all cases of diauxic growth, the "preferred" substrate is the one that, by itself, supports a higher specific growth rate. In the literature, this property is often attributed to optimality of regulatory mechanisms. Here, we show that the minimal model, which contains only induction, displays the property under fairly general conditions. This suggests that the higher growth rate of the preferred substrate is an intrinsic property of the induction and dilution kinetics.(2) The model explains the ph...

  13. Bacterial activity and bacterioplankton diversity in the eutrophic River Warnow--direct measurement of bacterial growth efficiency and its effect on carbon utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentin, Mareike; Freese, Heike M; Schumann, Rhena

    2011-01-01

    The influence of bacterial activity and diversity on bacterial growth efficiency was investigated in a flatland river. Eutrophic River Warnow drains predominantly agricultural land and is heavily loaded with nutrients, dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM), especially humic substances. Although the water column bacterial community consists of many inactive or damaged cells, bacterioplankton sustained a high bacterial secondary production of 0.2-14.5 μg C L(-1) h(-1) and a high DNA synthesis (thymidine uptake) of 6.1-15.5 μg C L(-1) h(-1). The direct and short-term measurement of bacterial respiration (by optodes) revealed high respiration rates especially in summer leading to directly estimated bacterial growth efficiencies (BGE) of 2-28%. These values are compared to calculations based only on bacterial production, which considerably overestimated BGEs. From all these data, River Warnow can be characterized as a strongly remineralizing system. River Warnow was dominated among others by Cytophaga/Flavobacteria and Actinobacteria which are typical for organic rich waters because of their ability to degrade high molecular weight compounds. However, community composition did not significantly affect BGE. PMID:20676625

  14. Incubation Station for the Bacterial Growth Study in Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rafael Duharte Rodríguez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the designing and characterization of a prototype of laboratory incubator as support of Microbiology research, in particular for the research of the bacterial growth in biological samples through optic methods (Turbidimetry and electrometric measurements of bioimpedance. It shows the results of simulation and experimentation of the design proposed for the canals of measurement of the variables: temperature and humidity, with a high linearity from the adequate selection of the corresponding sensors and the analogue components of every canal, controlled with help of a microcontroller AT89C51 (ATMEL with adequate benefi ts for this type of application.

  15. Distribution of bacterial growth activity in flow-chamber biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Christensen, Bjarke B.; Johansen, Tove;

    1999-01-01

    In microbial communities such as those found in biofilms, individual organisms most often display heterogeneous behavior with respect to their metabolic activity, growth status, gene expression pattern, etc. In that context, a novel reporter system for monitoring of cellular growth activity has...... growth activity in organisms outside the group of enteric bacteria. Construction of fusions to genes encoding unstable Gfp proteins opened up the possibility of the monitoring of rates of rRNA synthesis and, in this way, allowing on-line determination of the distribution of growth activity in a complex...

  16. Spatial Patterning of Newly-Inserted Material during Bacterial Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursell, Tristan

    2012-02-01

    In the life cycle of a bacterium, rudimentary microscopy demonstrates that cell growth and elongation are essential characteristics of cellular reproduction. The peptidoglycan cell wall is the main load-bearing structure that determines both cell shape and overall size. However, simple imaging of cellular growth gives no indication of the spatial patterning nor mechanism by which material is being incorporated into the pre-existing cell wall. We employ a combination of high-resolution pulse-chase fluorescence microscopy, 3D computational microscopy, and detailed mechanistic simulations to explore how spatial patterning results in uniform growth and maintenance of cell shape. We show that growth is happening in discrete bursts randomly distributed over the cell surface, with a well-defined mean size and average rate. We further use these techniques to explore the effects of division and cell wall disrupting antibiotics, like cephalexin and A22, respectively, on the patterning of cell wall growth in E. coli. Finally, we explore the spatial correlation between presence of the bacterial actin-like cytoskeletal protein, MreB, and local cell wall growth. Together these techniques form a powerful method for exploring the detailed dynamics and involvement of antibiotics and cell wall-associated proteins in bacterial cell growth.[4pt] In collaboration with Kerwyn Huang, Stanford University.

  17. Lactic acid bacterial extract as a biogenic mineral growth modifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Ballav M.; Singh, Atul K.; Ramesh, Aiyagari; Das, Gopal

    2009-04-01

    The formation of minerals and mechanisms by which bacteria could control their formation in natural habitats is now of current interest for material scientists to have an insight of the mechanism of in vivo mineralization, as well as to seek industrial and technological applications. Crystalline uniform structures of calcium and barium minerals formed micron-sized building blocks when synthesized in the presence of an organic matrix consisting of secreted protein extracts from three different lactic acid bacteria (LAB) viz.: Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC 1325, Lactobacillus acidophilus NRRL B4495 and Pediococcus acidilactici CFR K7. LABs are not known to form organic matrix in biological materialization processes. The influence of these bacterial extracts on the crystallization behavior was investigated in details to test the basic coordination behavior of the acidic protein. In this report, varied architecture of the mineral crystals obtained in presence of high molecular weight protein extracts of three different LAB strains has been discussed. The role of native form of high molecular weight bacterial protein extracts in the generation of nucleation centers for crystal growth was clearly established. A model for the formation of organic matrix-cation complex and the subsequent events leading to crystal growth is proposed.

  18. [Osmoregulation--an important parameter of bacterial growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochocka, Marta; Boratyński, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Environmental conditions such as temperature, pH, radiation and osmotic pressure are important factors limiting the growth and multiplication of bacteria. Regular structure and metabolism of bacterial cells are maintained through a stable arrangement of the water-electrolyte system, regulated by osmosis. The rapid changes caused by osmotic shock (dehydration, rehydration) might lead to modifications of the phospholipid structure of the cell membrane and even cell death. Advances disturbing the osmosis, which are a natural part of living cells, may appear for example in colloid systems. The biological identification of the osmotic pressure is connected with an increase or decrease in the environmental osmotic strength of microorganisms' habitat. Cells exposed to osmotic stress, such as an increase in osmotic pressure, initiate mechanisms of active coping with the adverse consequences of its effects. Osmoregulatory processes are designed to maintain cell turgor, hence ensuring proper conditions for bacterial growth. Osmoregulation, which consists of maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance of cells, raising concerns accumulation of specific compatible solutes (osmolytes). Osmolytes are small, soluble organic molecules with a positive influence on membrane stabilization and proteins, without disrupting cellular functions. Storage of compatible solutes takes place by synthesis or by downregulation from the medium by means of special transport systems, activated by mechanical stimuli. Knowledge of the impact of osmotic pressure on microbial cells and the regulation of its activity led to the appropriate use of bacteria in various branches of the biotechnology industry. PMID:22173436

  19. Osmoregulation – an important parameter of bacterial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sochocka

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental conditions such as temperature, pH, radiation and osmotic pressure are important factors limiting the growth and multiplication of bacteria. Regular structure and metabolism of bacterial cells are maintained through a stable arrangement of the water-electrolyte system, regulated by osmosis. The rapid changes caused by osmotic shock (dehydration, rehydration might lead to modifications of the phospholipid structure of the cell membrane and even cell death. Advances disturbing the osmosis, which are a natural part of living cells, may appear for example in colloid systems. The biological identification of the osmotic pressure is connected with an increase or decrease in the environmental osmotic strength of microorganisms’ habitat. Cells exposed to osmotic stress, such as an increase in osmotic pressure, initiate mechanisms of active coping with the adverse consequences of its effects. Osmoregulatory processes are designed to maintain cell turgor, hence ensuring proper conditions for bacterial growth. Osmoregulation, which consists of maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance of cells, raising concerns accumulation of specific compatible solutes (osmolytes. Osmolytes are small, soluble organic molecules with a positive influence on membrane stabilization and proteins, without disrupting cellular functions. Storage of compatible solutes takes place by synthesis or by downregulation from the medium by means of special transport systems, activated by mechanical stimuli. Knowledge of the impact of osmotic pressure on microbial cells and the regulation of its activity led to the appropriate use of bacteria in various branches of the biotechnology industry.

  20. EVIDENCE ON EMPLOYMENT RATE AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia VĂCEANU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores a causal relationship between employment rate and economic growth for European Union countries, in general, and produces a structural assessment of employment on the background of labour market dynamics. Economic growth is the key in economic theory and the main source of well-being and quality of life. Since the 2008 financial crisis, most European countries have experienced job shortage and unemployment problem, but today's European economic outlook is strengthening on the bases of a GDP growing momentum. Empirical data shows, regardless the GDP's moderate positive trend, the employment rate did not increase enough. Given this, the present analysis address the question: to what extent the employment rate is affected by economic growth?

  1. Changes in urine composition after trauma facilitate bacterial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubron Cecile

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Critically ill patients including trauma patients are at high risk of urinary tract infection (UTI. The composition of urine in trauma patients may be modified due to inflammation, systemic stress, rhabdomyolysis, life support treatment and/or urinary catheter insertion. Methods Prospective, single-centre, observational study conducted in patients with severe trauma and without a history of UTIs or recent antibiotic treatment. The 24-hour urine samples were collected on the first and the fifth days and the growth of Escherichia coli in urine from patients and healthy volunteers was compared. Biochemical and hormonal modifications in urine that could potentially influence bacterial growth were explored. Results Growth of E. coli in urine from trauma patients was significantly higher on days 1 and 5 than in urine of healthy volunteers. Several significant modifications of urine composition could explain these findings. On days 1 and 5, trauma patients had an increase in glycosuria, in urine iron concentration, and in the concentrations of several amino acids compared to healthy volunteers. On day 1, the urinary osmotic pressure was significantly lower than for healthy volunteers. Conclusion We showed that urine of trauma patients facilitated growth of E. coli when compared to urine from healthy volunteers. This effect was present in the first 24 hours and until at least the fifth day after trauma. This phenomenon may be involved in the pathophysiology of UTIs in trauma patients. Further studies are required to define the exact causes of such modifications.

  2. An integral parametrization of the bacterial growth curve experimental demonstration with E. coli C600 bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work an integral parametrization of the bacterial growth curve is presented. The values of the parameters are obtained by fitting to the experimental data. Those parameters, with allow to describe the growth in its different phases, are the followings: slopes of the curve in its three parts and the time which divides the last two phases of the bacterial growth. The experimental data are bacterial densities measured by optical methods. The bacteria used was the E. coli C600. (Author)

  3. Modeling Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2003-01-01

    Tetragonal lysozyme 110 face crystal growth rates, measured over 5 orders of magnitude in range, can be described using a model where growth occurs by 2D nucleation on the crystal surface for solution supersaturations of c/c(sub eq) less than or equal to 7 +/- 2. Based upon the model, the step energy per unit length, beta was estimated to be approx. 5.3 +/- 0.4 x 10(exp -7) erg/mol-cm, which for a step height of 56 A corresponds to barrier of approx. 7 +/- 1 k(sub B)T at 300 K. For supersaturations of c/c(sub eq) > 8, the model emphasizing crystal growth by 2D nucleation not only could not predict, but also consistently overestimated, the highest observable crystal growth rates. Kinetic roughening is hypothesized to occur at a cross-over supersaturation of c/c(sub eq) > 8, where crystal growth is postulated to occur by a different process such as adsorption. Under this assumption, all growth rate data indicated that a kinetic roughening transition and subsequent crystal growth by adsorption for all solution conditions, varying in buffer pH, temperature and precipitant concentration, occurs for c/c(sub eq)(T, pH, NaCl) in the range between 5 and 10, with an energy barrier for adsorption estimated to be approx. 20 k(sub B)T at 300 K. Based upon these and other estimates, we determined the size of the critical surface nucleate, at the crossover supersaturation and higher concentrations, to range from 4 to 10 molecules.

  4. Growth rates and production of heterotrophic bacteria and phytoplankton in the North Pacific subtropical gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David R.; Karl, David M.; Laws, Edward A.

    1996-10-01

    In field work conducted at 26°N, 155°W, in the North Pacific subtropical gyre, phytoplankton growth rates μp estimated from 14C labeling of chlorophyll a (chl a) averaged approximately one doubling per day in the euphotic zone (0-150 m). Microbial (microalgal plus heterotrophic bacterial) growth rates μm calculated from the incorporation of 3H-adenine into DNA were comparable to or exceeded phytoplankton growth rates at most depths in the euphotic zone. Photosynthetic rates averaged 727 mg C m -2 day -1 Phytoplankton carbon biomass, calculated from 14C labeling of chl a, averaged 7.2 mg m -3 in the euphotic zone. Vertical profiles of particulate DNA and ATP suggested that no more than 15% of particulate DNA was associated with actively growing cells. Heterotrophic bacterial carbon biomass was estimated from a two-year average at station ALOHA (22°45'N, 158°W) of flow cytometric counts of unpigmented, bacteria-size particles which bound DAPI on the assumption that 15% of the particles were actively growing cells and that heterotrophic bacterial cells contained 20 fg C cell -1 The heterotrophic bacterial carbon so calculated averaged 1.1 mg m -3 in the euphotic zone. Heterotrophic bacterial production was estimated to be 164 mg C m -2 day -1 or 23% of the calculated photosynthetic rate. Estimated heterotrophic bacterial growth rates averaged 0.97 day -1 in the euphotic zone and reached 4.7 day - at a depth of 20 m. Most heterotrophic bacterial production occurred in the upper 40 m of the euphotic zone, suggesting that direct excretion by phytoplankton, perhaps due to photorespiration or ultraviolet light effects, was a significant source of dissolved organic carbon for the bacteria.

  5. Bacterial growth on a superhydrophobic surface containing silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antibacterial effect of silver can be exploited in the food and beverage industry and medicinal applications to reduce biofouling of surfaces. Very small amount of silver ions are enough to destructively affect the metabolism of bacteria. Moreover, superhydrophobic properties could reduce bacterial adhesion to the surface. In this study we fabricated superhydrophobic surfaces that contained nanosized silver particles. The superhydrophobic surfaces were manufactured onto stainless steel as combination of ceramic nanotopography and hydrophobication by fluorosilane. Silver nanoparticles were precipitated onto the surface by a chemical method. The dissolution of silver from the surface was tested in an aqueous environment under pH values of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13. The pH value was adjusted with nitric acid and ammonia. It was found that dissolution rate of silver increased as the pH of the solution altered from the pH of de-ionized water to lower and higher pH values but dissolution occurred also in de-ionized water. The antimicrobial potential of this coating was investigated using bacterial strains isolated from the brewery equipment surfaces. The results showed that the number of bacteria adhering onto steel surface was significantly reduced (88%) on the superhydrophobic silver containing coating

  6. Effect of crushed mussel shell addition on bacterial growth in acid polluted soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Calviño, David; Garrido-Rodríguez, B.; Arias-Estévez, M.;

    2015-01-01

    We applied three different doses of crushed mussel shell (CMS) on two Cu-polluted acid soils to study the effect of these amendments on the growth of the bacterial community during 730 days. Soil pH increased in the short and medium term due to CMS addition. In a first stage, bacterial growth was...

  7. Impact of ZnO and Ag Nanoparticles on Bacterial Growth and Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, M. S.; Digiovanni, K. A.

    2007-12-01

    Hundreds of consumer products containing nanomaterials are currently available in the U.S., including computers, clothing, cosmetics, sports equipment, medical devices and product packaging. Metallic nanoparticles can be embedded in or coated on product surfaces to provide antimicrobial, deodorizing, and stain- resistant properties. Although these products have the potential to provide significant benefit to the user, the impact of these products on the environment remains largely unknown. The purpose of this project is to study the effect of metallic nanoparticles released to the environment on bacterial growth and viability. Inhibition of bacterial growth was tested by adding doses of suspended ZnO and Ag nanoparticles into luria broth prior to inoculation of Escherichia coli cells. ZnO particles (approximately 40 nm) were obtained commercially and Ag particles (12-14 nm) were fabricated by reduction of silver nitrate with sodium borohydride. Toxicity assays were performed to test the viability of E. coli cells exposed to both ZnO and Ag nanoparticles using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit (Invitrogen). Live cells stain green whereas cells with compromised membranes that are considered dead or dying stain red. Cells were first grown, stained, and exposed to varying doses of metallic nanoparticles, and then bacterial viability was measured hourly using fluorescence microscopy. Results indicate that both ZnO and Ag nanoparticles inhibit the growth of E. coli in liquid media. Preliminary results from toxicity assays confirm the toxic effect of ZnO and Ag nanoparticles on active cell cultures. Calculated death rates resulting from analyses of toxicity studies will be presented.

  8. In situ growth rates and biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations in chronic lung infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, L.; Haagensen, J.A.; Jelsbak, L.; Sternberg, C.; Høiby, Niels; Molin, S.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    The growth dynamics of bacterial pathogens within infected hosts are a fundamental but poorly understood feature of most infections. We have focused on the in situ distribution and growth characteristics of two prevailing and transmissible Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones that have caused chronic lung...... matrix, whereas nonmucoid variants were present mainly as dispersed cells. To obtain estimates of the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in CF lungs, we used quantitative FISH to indirectly measure growth rates of bacteria in sputum samples (reflecting the in vivo lung conditions). The concentration of r......-phase subpopulation seemed to be present in sputa. This was found for both mucoid and nonmucoid variants despite their different organizations in sputum. The results suggest that the bacterial population may be confronted with selection forces that favor optimized growth activities. This scenario constitutes a new...

  9. In situ investigation of growth rates and growth rate dispersion of α-lactose monohydrate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, T. D.; Ogden, M. I.; Parkinson, G. M.

    2009-02-01

    The growth rates and growth rate dispersion (GRD) of four different faces of α-lactose monohydrate crystal were measured at 30, 40 and 50 °C in the relative supersaturation range 0.55-2.33 in aqueous solutions. The overall growth rate of the crystal is around 50-60% of the (0 1 0) face of the crystal. The power law was applied to the growth rates of the four faces and the activation energies were calculated to be between 9.5 and 13.7 kcal/mol. This indicates a diffusion-controlled growth, but the exponents calculated are between 2.5 and 3.1 which are higher than unity. Introduction of critical supersaturation decreased the exponents to between 1.8 and 2.4. The variance of GRD for the (0 1 0) face is twice the variance of the GRD of the (1 1 0) and (1 0 0) faces and 10 times higher than the (1 1¯ 1¯) face at the same supersaturations and temperatures. The GRD of the four faces were similar when expressed as a function of growth rate. However, the (0 1 1) face displayed lower GRD than the other faces at the same temperatures and supersaturations.

  10. Bacterial Community Dynamics and Biodegradation Rates in Untreated and Oily Soils During PAH Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach taken in this study represents an attempt to address the possible selective effects of Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on the bacterial community structure of an untreated garden soil (S) and a chronically contaminated oily soil (CS). Untreated and chronically hydrocarbon polluted soils, collected from Egypt were enriched in shaking flasks containing 50 mg/l anthracene as a sole source of carbon over a period of 15 days. Bacterial communities in each soil were profiled by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the PCR amplified 16 S r DNA gene fragments after 0, 5, 10, and 15 days. Culture able biodegrading bacterial counts on minerals- Silica gel- Oil (MSD) plates as well as anthracene degradation for both soils were followed up at the same time intervals. Nine bacterial species were found to be dominant in the pristine soil before enrichment with the model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), eight of them disappeared after live days of enrichment with the domination of one new species. It stayed dominant in soil until 15 days - exposure to anthracene. Therefore it can be used as a bio marker for PAH pollution. The chronically contaminated soil revealed a remarkable increase in the diversity directly after 5 days exposure to PAH HPLC analysis of the extracted anthracene remained in the biodegradation flasks after different degradation periods revealed that a higher biodegradation rates were accomplished by the oily soil consortium rather than by the pristine one. Before exposure to PAH, counts of culture able biodegrading bacteria were found to be higher in the untreated soil rather than in the oily one. After exposure the situation has been a bit altered as the counts in the untreated soil revealed a temporary suppression with a prolongation of the time required for growth as a result of the hydrocarbon stress

  11. Factors Affecting Bacterial Growth in Drinking Water Distribution System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI LU; XIAO-JIAN ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Objective To define the influence of some parameters, including assimilable organic carbon (AOC), chloramine residual, etc. on the bacterial growth in drinking water distribution systems. Methods Three typical water treatment plants in a northern city (City T) of China and their corresponding distribution systems were investigated. Some parameters of the water samples, such as heterotrophic plate content (HPC), AOC, CODMn, TOC, and phosphate were measured. Results The AOC in most water samples were more than 100 μg/L, or even more than 200 μg/L in some cases. The HPC in distribution systems increased significantly with the decrease of residual chlorine. When the residual chlorine was less than 0.1 mg/L, the magnitude order of HPC was 104 CFU/mL; when it was 0.5-0.7 mg/L, the HPC was about 500 CFU/mL. Conclusion For controlling the biostability of drinking water, the controlling of AOC and residual chlorine should be considered simultaneously. The influence of phosphors on the AOC tests of water is not significant. Phosphors may not be the limiting nutrient in the water distribution systems.

  12. Bacterial growth on chitosan-coated polypropylene textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erben, D; Hola, V; Jaros, J; Rahel, J

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is a problem common in all systems where microorganisms and aqueous environment meet. Prevention of biofouling is therefore important in many industrial processes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the ability of material coating to inhibit biofilm formation. Chitosan-coated polypropylene nonwoven textile was prepared using dielectric barrier discharge plasma activation. Resistance of the textile to biofouling was then tested. First, the textile was submerged into a growth medium inoculated with green fluorescein protein labelled Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After overnight incubation at 33°C, the textile was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy for bacterial enumeration and biofilm structure characterisation. In the second stage, the textile was used as a filter medium for prefiltered river water, and the pressure development on the in-flow side was measured to quantify the overall level of biofouling. In both cases, nontreated textile samples were used as a control. The results indicate that the chitosan coating exhibits antibacterial properties. The developed method is applicable for the evaluation of the ability to inhibit biofilm formation. PMID:23724330

  13. Species Diversity Enhances Predator Growth Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H. Olson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Predators can be important top-down regulators of community structure and are known to have both positive and negative effects on species diversity. However, little is known about the reciprocal effects of species diversity on predators. Across a set of 80 lakes in Connecticut, USA, we found a strong positive correlation between prey species diversity (using the Shannon-Weiner Diversity Index and growth rates of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides. This correlation was strongest for small predators and decreased with body size. Although the underlying mechanisms are not known, the correlation is not driven by total fish abundance, predator abundance, or productivity.

  14. Individual growth detection of bacterial species in an in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabenski, L; Maisch, T; Santarelli, F; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G

    2014-11-01

    Most in vitro studies on the antibacterial effects of antiseptics have used planktonic bacteria in monocultures. However, this study design does not reflect the in vivo situation in oral cavities harboring different bacterial species that live in symbiotic relationships in biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a simple in vitro polymicrobial model consisting of only three bacterial strains of different phases of oral biofilm formation to simulate in vivo oral conditions. Therefore, we studied the biofilm formation of Actinomyces naeslundii (An), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), and Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) on 96-well tissue culture plates under static anaerobic conditions using artificial saliva according to the method established by Pratten et al. that was supplemented with 1 g l(-1) sucrose. Growth was separately determined for each bacterial strain after incubation periods of up to 72 h by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and live/dead staining. Presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) was visualized by Concanavalin A staining. Increasing incubation times of up to 72 h showed adhesion and propagation of the bacterial strains with artificial saliva formulation. An and Ef had significantly higher growth rates than Fn. Live/dead staining showed a median of 49.9 % (range 46.0-53.0 %) of living bacteria after 72 h of incubation, and 3D fluorescence microscopy showed a three-dimensional structure containing EPS. An in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model was established to better simulate oral conditions and had the advantage of providing the well-controlled experimental conditions of in vitro testing. PMID:25119373

  15. Resource availability and competition shape the evolution of survival and growth ability in a bacterial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Pekkonen

    Full Text Available Resource availability is one of the main factors determining the ecological dynamics of populations or species. Fluctuations in resource availability can increase or decrease the intensity of resource competition. Resource availability and competition can also cause evolutionary changes in life-history traits. We studied how community structure and resource fluctuations affect the evolution of fitness related traits using a two-species bacterial model system. Replicated populations of Serratia marcescens (copiotroph and Novosphingobium capsulatum (oligotroph were reared alone or together in environments with intergenerational, pulsed resource renewal. The comparison of ancestral and evolved bacterial clones with 1 or 13 weeks history in pulsed resource environment revealed species-specific changes in life-history traits. Co-evolution with S. marcescens caused N. capsulatum clones to grow faster. The evolved S. marcescens clones had higher survival and slower growth rate then their ancestor. The survival increased in all treatments after one week, and thereafter continued to increase only in the S. marcescens monocultures that experienced large resource pulses. Though adaptive radiation is often reported in evolution studies with bacteria, clonal variation increased only in N. capsulatum growth rate. Our results suggest that S. marcescens adapted to the resource renewal cycle whereas N. capsulatum was more affected by the interspecific competition. Our results exemplify species-specific evolutionary response to both competition and environmental variation.

  16. Polymer film deposition on agar using a dielectric barrier discharge jet and its bacterial growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, T.-C.; Cho, J.; Mcintyre, K.; Jo, Y.-K.; Staack, D.

    2012-08-01

    Polymer film deposition on agar in ambient air was achieved using the helium dielectric barrier discharge jet (DBD jet) fed with polymer precursors, and the bacterial growth inhibition due to the deposited film was observed. The DBD jet with precursor addition was more efficient at sterilization than a helium-only DBD jet. On the areas where polymer films cover the agar the bacterial growth was significantly inhibited. The inhibition efficacy showed dependence on the film thickness. The DBD jet without precursor also created a modified agar layer, which may slow the growth of some bacterial strains.

  17. Bacterial Growth in Amniotic Fluid Is Dependent on the Iron-Availability and the Activity of Bacterial Iron-Uptake System

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Young-Joon; Park, Sang-Kee; Oh, Jae-Wook; Sun, Hui-Yu; Shin, Sung-Heui

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the relationship among iron-availability, antibacterial activity, role of meconium as an iron source and the activity of bacterial iron-uptake system (IUS) for bacterial growth in amniotic fluid (AF) were investigated. Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 and its streptonigrin-resistant (SR) mutant with defective IUS were used as the test strains. The growth of S. aureus in AF was stimulated dosedependently by addition of meconium. Bacterial growth stimulated by meconium was ...

  18. A probabilistic neural network approach for modeling and classification of bacterial growth/no-growth data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajmeer, M; Basheer, I

    2002-10-01

    In this paper, we propose to use probabilistic neural networks (PNNs) for classification of bacterial growth/no-growth data and modeling the probability of growth. The PNN approach combines both Bayes theorem of conditional probability and Parzen's method for estimating the probability density functions of the random variables. Unlike other neural network training paradigms, PNNs are characterized by high training speed and their ability to produce confidence levels for their classification decision. As a practical application of the proposed approach, PNNs were investigated for their ability in classification of growth/no-growth state of a pathogenic Escherichia coli R31 in response to temperature and water activity. A comparison with the most frequently used traditional statistical method based on logistic regression and multilayer feedforward artificial neural network (MFANN) trained by error backpropagation was also carried out. The PNN-based models were found to outperform linear and nonlinear logistic regression and MFANN in both the classification accuracy and ease by which PNN-based models are developed. PMID:12133614

  19. Evaluation of toxic effects of several carboxylic acids on bacterial growth by toxicodynamic modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez José

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effects of organic acids on microbial fermentation are commonly tested in investigations about metabolic behaviour of bacteria. However, they typically provide only descriptive information without modelling the influence of acid concentrations on bacterial kinetics. Results We developed and applied a mathematical model (secondary model to capture the toxicological effects of those chemicals on kinetic parameters that define the growth of bacteria in batch cultures. Thus, dose-response kinetics were performed with different bacteria (Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Carnobacterium pisicola, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Listonella anguillarum exposed at increasing concentrations of individual carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic. In all bioassays the acids affected the maximum bacterial load (Xm and the maximum growth rate (vm but only in specific cases the lag phase (λ was modified. Significance of the parameters was always high and in all fermentations the toxicodynamic equation was statistically consistent and had good predictability. The differences between D and L-lactic acid effects were significant for the growth of E. coli, L. mesenteroides and C. piscicola. In addition, a global parameter (EC50,τ was used to compare toxic effects and provided a realistic characterization of antimicrobial agents using a single value. Conclusions The effect of several organic acids on the growth of different bacteria was accurately studied and perfectly characterized by a bivariate equation which combines the basis of dose-response theory with microbial growth kinetics (secondary model. The toxicity of carboxylic acids was lower with the increase of the molecular weight of these chemicals.

  20. Effect of Vibration on Bacterial Growth and Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research grant was to provide a fundamental, systematic investigation of the effects of oscillatory acceleration on bacterial proliferation and their responses to antibiotics in a liquid medium.

  1. Fructose-enhanced reduction of bacterial growth on nanorough surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durmus NG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Naside Gozde Durmus1, Erik N Taylor1, Fatih Inci3,4, Kim M Kummer1, Keiko M Tarquinio5, Thomas J Webster1,21School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 2Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3Bio-Acoustic-MEMS in Medicine (BAMM Laboratory, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, MA, USA; 4Istanbul Technical University, Molecular Biology-Genetics and Biotechnology Program, Mobgam, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey; 5Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Patients on mechanical ventilators for extended periods of time often face the risk of developing ventilator-associated pneumonia. During the ventilation process, patients incapable of breathing are intubated with polyvinyl chloride (PVC endotracheal tubes (ETTs. PVC ETTs provide surfaces where bacteria can attach and proliferate from the contaminated oropharyngeal space to the sterile bronchoalveolar area. To overcome this problem, ETTs can be coated with antimicrobial agents. However, such coatings may easily delaminate during use. Recently, it has been shown that changes in material topography at the nanometer level can provide antibacterial properties. In addition, some metabolites, such as fructose, have been found to increase the efficiency of antibiotics used to treat Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus infections. In this study, we combined the antibacterial effect of nanorough ETT topographies with sugar metabolites to decrease bacterial growth and biofilm formation on ETTs. We present for the first time that the presence of fructose on the nanorough surfaces decreases the number of planktonic S. aureus bacteria in the solution and biofilm formation on the surface after 24 hours. We thus envision that this method has the potential to impact the future of surface engineering of

  2. Influence of macrophyte decomposition on growth rate and community structure of Okefenokee Swamp bacterioplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved substances released during decomposition of the white water lily (Nymphaea odorata) can alter the growth rate of Okefenokee Swamp bacterioplankton. In microcosm experiments dissolved compounds released bacterioplankton, followed by a period of intense bacterial growth. Rates of [3H]thymidine incorporation and turnover of dissolved D-glucose were depressed by over 85%, 3 h after the addition of Nymphaea leachates to microcosms containing Okefenokee Swamp water. Bacterial activity subsequently recovered; after 20 h [3H]thymidine incorporation in leachate-treated microcosms was 10-fold greater than that in control microcosms. The recovery of activity was due to a shift in the composition of the bacterial population toward resistance to the inhibitory compounds present in Nymphaea leachates. Inhibitory compounds released during the decomposition of aquatic macrophytes thus act as selective agents which alter the community structure of the bacterial population with respect to leachate resistance. Soluble compounds derived from macrophyte decomposition influence the rate of bacterial secondary production and the availability of microbial biomass to microconsumers

  3. PEROXOTITANATE- AND MONOSODIUM METAL-TITANATE COMPOUNDS AS INHIBITORS OF BACTERIAL GROWTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.

    2011-01-19

    Sodium titanates are ion-exchange materials that effectively bind a variety of metal ions over a wide pH range. Sodium titanates alone have no known adverse biological effects but metal-exchanged titanates (or metal titanates) can deliver metal ions to mammalian cells to alter cell processes in vitro. In this work, we test a hypothesis that metal-titanate compounds inhibit bacterial growth; demonstration of this principle is one prerequisite to developing metal-based, titanate-delivered antibacterial agents. Focusing initially on oral diseases, we exposed five species of oral bacteria to titanates for 24 h, with or without loading of Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(II), and Pt(IV), and measuring bacterial growth in planktonic assays through increases in optical density. In each experiment, bacterial growth was compared with control cultures of titanates or bacteria alone. We observed no suppression of bacterial growth by the sodium titanates alone, but significant (p < 0.05, two-sided t-tests) suppression was observed with metal-titanate compounds, particularly Au(III)-titanates, but with other metal titanates as well. Growth inhibition ranged from 15 to 100% depending on the metal ion and bacterial species involved. Furthermore, in specific cases, the titanates inhibited bacterial growth 5- to 375-fold versus metal ions alone, suggesting that titanates enhanced metal-bacteria interactions. This work supports further development of metal titanates as a novel class of antibacterials.

  4. Control of bacterial adhesion and growth on honeycomb-like patterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Ding, Yonghui; Ge, Xiang; Leng, Yang

    2015-11-01

    It is a great challenge to construct a persistent bacteria-resistant surface even though it has been demonstrated that several surface features might be used to control bacterial behavior, including surface topography. In this study, we develop micro-scale honeycomb-like patterns of different sizes (0.5-10 μm) as well as a flat area as the control on a single platform to evaluate the bacterial adhesion and growth. Bacteria strains, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with two distinct shapes (rod and sphere) are cultured on the platforms, with the patterned surface-up and surface-down in the culture medium. The results demonstrate that the 1 μm patterns remarkably reduce bacterial adhesion and growth while suppressing bacterial colonization when compared to the flat surface. The selective adhesion of the bacterial cells on the patterns reveals that the bacterial adhesion is cooperatively mediated by maximizing the cell-substrate contact area and minimizing the cell deformation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Moreover, study of bacterial behaviors on the surface-up vs. surface-down samples shows that gravity does not apparently affect the spatial distribution of the adherent cells although it indeed facilitates bacterial adhesion. Furthermore, the experimental results suggest that two major factors, i.e. the availability of energetically favorable adhesion sites and the physical confinements, contribute to the anti-bacterial nature of the honeycomb-like patterns. PMID:26302067

  5. Mechanisms and rates of bacterial colonization of sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Grossart, H.P.; Ploug, H.;

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying the rate at which bacteria colonize aggregates is a key to understanding microbial turnover of aggregates. We used encounter models based on random walk and advection-diffusion considerations to predict colonization rates from the bacteria's motility patterns (swimming speed, tumbling...... (0 to 2 s(-1)). The rates at which these bacteria colonized artificial aggregates (stationary and sinking) largely agreed with model predictions. We report several findings. (i) Motile bacteria rapidly colonize aggregates, whereas nonmotile bacteria do not. 00 Flow enhances colonization rates. (iii...

  6. The papain inhibitor (SPI) of Streptomyces mobaraensis inhibits bacterial cysteine proteases and is an antagonist of bacterial growth

    OpenAIRE

    Zindel, S.; Kaman, W.E.; Frols, S.; Pfeifer, F; Peters, A.; Hays, J.P.; Fuchsbauer, H.-L.

    2013-01-01

    A novel papain inhibitory protein (SPI) from Streptomyces mobaraensis was studied to measure its inhibitory effect on bacterial cysteine protease activity (Staphylococcus aureus SspB) and culture supernatants (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacillus anthracis). Further, growth of Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio cholerae was completely inhibited by 10 μM SPI. At this concentration of SPI, no cytotoxicity was observed. We conclude that SPI inhibits bacte...

  7. Bacterial Growth on Photochemically Transformed Leachates from Aquatic and Terrestrial Primary Producers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anesio, A.M.; Nielsen, Jon Theil; Granéli, W.

    2000-01-01

    We measured bacterial growth on phototransformed dissolved organic matter (DOM) leached from eight different primary producers. Leachates (10 mg C liter-1) were exposed to artificial UVA + UVB radiation, or kept in darkness, for 20 h. DOM solutions were subsequently inoculated with lake water...... leachate and type of bacterial growth criterion. Bacterial carbon utilization (biomass production plus respiration) over the entire incubation period (120 h) was enhanced by UV radiation of leachate from the terrestrial leaves, relative to carbon utilization in non-irradiated leachates. Conversely, carbon...... utilization was reduced by radiation of the leachates from aquatic macrophytes. In a separate experiment, the stable C and N isotope composition of bacteria grown on irradiated and non-irradiated DOM was estimated. Bacterial growth on UV-irradiated DOM was enriched in 13C relative to the bacteria in the non...

  8. Monensin inhibits growth of bacterial contaminants from fuel ethanol plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of commercial fermentation cultures by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a common and costly problem to the fuel ethanol industry. Virginiamycin (VIR) and penicillin (PEN) are frequently used to control bacterial contamination but extensive use of antibiotics may select for strains with d...

  9. Concurrent growth rate and transcript analyses reveal essential gene stringency in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Goh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genes essential for bacterial growth are of particular scientific interest. Many putative essential genes have been identified or predicted in several species, however, little is known about gene expression requirement stringency, which may be an important aspect of bacterial physiology and likely a determining factor in drug target development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Working from the premise that essential genes differ in absolute requirement for growth, we describe silencing of putative essential genes in E. coli to obtain a titration of declining growth rates and transcript levels by using antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNA and expressed antisense RNA. The relationship between mRNA decline and growth rate decline reflects the degree of essentiality, or stringency, of an essential gene, which is here defined by the minimum transcript level for a 50% reduction in growth rate (MTL(50. When applied to four growth essential genes, both RNA silencing methods resulted in MTL(50 values that reveal acpP as the most stringently required of the four genes examined, with ftsZ the next most stringently required. The established antibacterial targets murA and fabI were less stringently required. CONCLUSIONS: RNA silencing can reveal stringent requirements for gene expression with respect to growth. This method may be used to validate existing essential genes and to quantify drug target requirement.

  10. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  11. Sweat secretion rates in growth hormone disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Main, K M; Juul, A;

    2000-01-01

    While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome.......While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome....

  12. Shaping the Growth Behaviour of Bacterial Aggregates in Biofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Melaugh, Gavin; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Irie, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Aled; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Diggle, Steve P; Gordon, Vernita; Allen, Rosalind J

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are usually assumed to originate from individual cells deposited on a surface. However, many biofilm-forming bacteria tend to aggregate in the planktonic phase meaning it is possible that many natural and infectious biofilms originate wholly or partially from pre-formed cell aggregates. Here, we use agent-based computer simulations to investigate the role of pre-formed aggregates in biofilm development. Focusing on the role of aggregate shape, we find that the degree of spreading of an aggregate on a surface can play a key role in determining its eventual fate during biofilm development. Specifically, initially spread aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding bacterial cells is low, while initially rounded aggregates perform better when competition is high. These contrasting outcomes are governed by a trade-off between aggregate surface area and height. Our results provide new insight into biofilm formation and development, and reveal new factors that may be at play in the...

  13. Prophylactic treatment with growth hormone improves intestinal barrier function and alleviates bacterial translocation in stressed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁连安; 黎介寿; 李幼生; 刘放南; 谭力

    2004-01-01

    Background Damage to the gut barrier often occurs during critical illnesses. In such cases, it is very important to alleviate impairment of the intestinal barrier and protect intestinal barrier function. This study investigated the protective effect of growth hormone on intestinal barrier function in rats under stress.Methods This study consisted of prospective, randomized, and controlled animal experiments. Twenty-five Sprague-Dawley rats served as total parenteral nutrition (TPN) models and were divided into three groups: TPN group, sepsis (Sep) group, and growth hormone (GH) group. Another 8 rats served as normal controls. Each group received different stress stimuli. Rats were fed for 7 days, and samples were taken for examination 24 hours after garaging with dual saccharides. Results The architecture of the small intestinal mucosa in the Sep group showed the most severe damage among all groups. Nitric oxide levels in blood plasma and immunoglobulin A levels in the intestinal mucosa of the GH group were significantly lower than in the Sep group (P<0.02). There were no significant changes in CD3 counts and in the CD4/CD8 ratio between the four groups. Dual sugar tests and bacteriological examinations revealed that intestinal permeability and rate of bacterial translocation in the GH group were lower than in the Sep group (P<0.01, respectively).Conclusion Prophylactic treatment with growth hormone can alleviate damage to intestinal barrier function caused by trauma and endotoxemia in rats under stress.

  14. Coevolution with phages does not influence the evolution of bacterial mutation rates in soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Pedro; Buckling, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Coevolution with phages drive the evolution of high bacterial mutation rates in vitro, but the relevance of this finding to natural populations is unclear. Here, we investigated how coevolution affects mutation rate evolution in soil, in the presence and absence of the rest of the natural microbial community. Although mutation rate on average increased threefold, neither coevolving phages nor the rest of natural community significantly affected mutation rates. Our results suggest that feature...

  15. Growth rates and aggregate welfare : an international comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Kakwani, Nanak

    1991-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between growth rates and changes in welfare, using alternative procedures for measuring growth. The Bank and other organizations often compute growth rates by fitting a least-squares linear trend line to the logarithmic values of economic indicators for a period. This paper questions the use of the least-squares procedure for measuring people's economic welfare over time. Instead, the author develops a conceptual framework for deriving an aggregate growth ...

  16. Distribution of bacterial growth activity in flow-chamber biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Christensen, Bjarke B.; Johansen, Tove; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Andersen, Jens Bo; Givskov, Michael Christian; Molin, Søren

    1999-01-01

    community. With the use of these reporter tools, it is demonstrated that individual cells of a toluene-degrading P. putida strain growing in a benzyl alcohol-supplemented biofilm have different levels of growth activity which develop as the biofilm gets older. Cells that eventually grow very slowly or not......In microbial communities such as those found in biofilms, individual organisms most often display heterogeneous behavior with respect to their metabolic activity, growth status, gene expression pattern, etc. In that context, a novel reporter system for monitoring of cellular growth activity has...... at all may be stimulated to restart growth if provided with a more easily metabolizable carbon source. Thus, the dynamics of biofilm growth activity has been tracked to the level of individual cells, cell clusters, and microcolonies....

  17. Small Regulatory RNA-Induced Growth Rate Heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Mars, Ruben A. T.; Nicolas, Pierre; Ciccolini, Mariano; Reilman, Ewoud; Reder, Alexander; Schaffer, Marc; Maeder, Ulrike; Voelker, Uwe; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Denham, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary Bacterial cells that share the same genetic information can display very different phenotypes, even if they grow under identical conditions. Despite the relevance of this population heterogeneity for processes like drug resistance and development, the molecular players that induce heterogenic phenotypes are often not known. Here we report that in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis a small regulatory RNA (sRNA) can induce heterogeneity in growth rates by increas...

  18. Growth rate determinations from radiocarbon in bamboo corals (genus Keratoisis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jesse R.; Robinson, Laura F.; Hönisch, Bärbel

    2015-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements are an important tool for determining growth rates of bamboo corals, a cosmopolitan group of calcitic deep-sea corals. Published growth rate estimates for bamboo corals are highly variable, with potential environmental or ecological drivers of this variability poorly constrained. Here we systematically investigate the application of 14C for growth rate determinations in bamboo corals using 55 14C dates on the calcite and organic fractions of six bamboo corals (identified as Keratoisis sp.) from the western North Atlantic Ocean. Calcite 14C measurements on the distal surface of these corals and five previously published bamboo corals exhibit a strong one-to-one relationship with the 14C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DI14C) in ambient seawater (r2=0.98), confirming the use of Keratoisis sp. calcite 14C as a proxy for seawater 14C activity. Radial growth rates determined from 14C age-depth regressions, 14C plateau tuning and bomb 14C reference chronologies range from 12 to 78 μm y-1, in general agreement with previously published radiometric growth rates. We document potential biases to 14C growth rate determinations resulting from water mass variability, bomb radiocarbon, secondary infilling (ontogeny), and growth rate nonlinearity. Radial growth rates for Keratoisis sp. specimens do not correlate with ambient temperature, suggesting that additional biological and/or environmental factors may influence bamboo coral growth rates.

  19. Shaping the Growth Behaviour of Biofilms Initiated from Bacterial Aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaugh, Gavin; Hutchison, Jaime; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Irie, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Aled; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Diggle, Stephen P; Gordon, Vernita D; Allen, Rosalind J

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are usually assumed to originate from individual cells deposited on a surface. However, many biofilm-forming bacteria tend to aggregate in the planktonic phase so that it is possible that many natural and infectious biofilms originate wholly or partially from pre-formed cell aggregates. Here, we use agent-based computer simulations to investigate the role of pre-formed aggregates in biofilm development. Focusing on the initial shape the aggregate forms on the surface, we find that the degree of spreading of an aggregate on a surface can play an important role in determining its eventual fate during biofilm development. Specifically, initially spread aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated bacterial cells is low, while initially rounded aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated cells is high. These contrasting outcomes are governed by a trade-off between aggregate surface area and height. Our results provide new insight into biofilm formation and development, and reveal new factors that may be at play in the social evolution of biofilm communities. PMID:26934187

  20. Rates of gyrase supercoiling and transcription elongation control supercoil density in a bacterial chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Rovinskiy

    Full Text Available Gyrase catalyzes negative supercoiling of DNA in an ATP-dependent reaction that helps condense bacterial chromosomes into a compact interwound "nucleoid." The supercoil density (σ of prokaryotic DNA occurs in two forms. Diffusible supercoil density (σ(D moves freely around the chromosome in 10 kb domains, and constrained supercoil density (σ(C results from binding abundant proteins that bend, loop, or unwind DNA at many sites. Diffusible and constrained supercoils contribute roughly equally to the total in vivo negative supercoil density of WT cells, so σ = σ(C+σ(D. Unexpectedly, Escherichia coli chromosomes have a 15% higher level of σ compared to Salmonella enterica. To decipher critical mechanisms that can change diffusible supercoil density of chromosomes, we analyzed strains of Salmonella using a 9 kb "supercoil sensor" inserted at ten positions around the genome. The sensor contains a complete Lac operon flanked by directly repeated resolvase binding sites, and the sensor can monitor both supercoil density and transcription elongation rates in WT and mutant strains. RNA transcription caused (- supercoiling to increase upstream and decrease downstream of highly expressed genes. Excess upstream supercoiling was relaxed by Topo I, and gyrase replenished downstream supercoil losses to maintain an equilibrium state. Strains with TS gyrase mutations growing at permissive temperature exhibited significant supercoil losses varying from 30% of WT levels to a total loss of σ(D at most chromosome locations. Supercoil losses were influenced by transcription because addition of rifampicin (Rif caused supercoil density to rebound throughout the chromosome. Gyrase mutants that caused dramatic supercoil losses also reduced the transcription elongation rates throughout the genome. The observed link between RNA polymerase elongation speed and gyrase turnover suggests that bacteria with fast growth rates may generate higher supercoil densities

  1. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Bacterial Colony Growth in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xinxian; Mugler, Andrew; Nemenman, Ilya

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial cells growing in liquid culture have been well studied and modeled. However, in nature, bacteria often grow as biofilms or colonies in physically structured habitats. A comprehensive model for population growth in such conditions has not yet been developed. Based on the well-established theory for bacterial growth in liquid culture, we develop a model for colony growth in 3D in which a homogeneous colony of cells locally consume a diffusing nutrient. We predict that colony growth is initially exponential, as in liquid culture, but quickly slows to sub-exponential after nutrient is locally depleted. This prediction is consistent with our experiments performed with E. coli in soft agar. Our model provides a baseline to which studies of complex growth process, such as such as spatially and phenotypically heterogeneous colonies, must be compared.

  2. Using Reactive Transport Modeling to Understand Changes in Electrical Conductivity Associated with Bacterial Growth and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regberg, A. B.; Singha, K.; Picardal, F.; Brantley, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Previous research has linked measured changes in the bulk electrical conductivity (σb) of water-saturated sediments to the respiration and growth of anaerobic bacteria. If the mechanism causing this signal is understood and characterized it could be used to identify and monitor zones of bacterial activity in the subsurface. The 1-D reactive transport model PHREEQC was used to understand σb signals by modeling chemical gradients within two column reactors and corresponding changes in effluent chemistry. The flow-through column reactors were packed with Fe(III)-bearing sediment from Oyster, VA and inoculated with an environmental consortia of microorganisms. Influent in the first reactor was amended with 1mM Na-acetate to encourage the growth of iron-reducing bacteria. Influent in the second reactor was amended with 0.1mM Na-Acetate and 2mM NaNO3 to encourage the growth of nitrate-reducing bacteria. While effluent concentrations of acetate, Fe(II), NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ remained at steady state, we measured a 3-fold increase (0.055 S/m - 0.2 S/m) in σb in the iron-reducing column and a 10-fold increase in σb (0.07 S/m - 0.8 S/m) in the nitrate-reducing column over 198 days. The ionic strength in both reactors remained constant through time indicating that the measured increases in σb were not caused by changing effluent concentrations. PHREEQC successfully matched the measured changes in effluent concentrations for both columns when the reaction database was modified in the following manner. For the iron-reducing column, kinetic expressions governing the rate of iron reduction, the rate of bacterial growth, and the production of methane were added to the reaction database. Additionally, surface adsorption and cation exchange reactions were added so that the model was consistent with measured effluent chemistry. For the nitrate-reducing column, kinetic expressions governing nitrate reduction and bacterial growth were added to the reaction database. Additionally

  3. Effects of time, temperature, and preservative on bacterial growth in enteral nutrient solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerman, K E; Paauw, J D; McCamish, M A; Dean, R E

    1984-06-01

    Bacterial contamination and the effects of time, temperature, and preservative on bacterial growth in enteral nutrient solutions were studied. Bacteria were counted after 24-hour incubation of five samples of frozen Travasorb STD (Travenol Laboratories) from the pharmacy and five samples freshly reconstituted in the dietary department. Growth in samples of Travasorb STD prepared in the pharmacy was studied after (1) fresh mixing, 24-hour refrigeration, and 12 hours at room temperature, (2) freezing, thawing, and 12 hours at room temperature, and (3) freezing, thawing, 24-hour refrigeration, and 12 hours at room temperature. Duplicate samples of five products [Ensure (Ross Laboratories), Precision LR (Doyle Pharmaceuticals), Travasorb STD, Vital (Ross Laboratories), and Vivonex STD ( Norwich -Eaton)] were inoculated with Enterobacter cloacae, and growth curves for 24 hours were plotted. This challenge study was repeated using Travasorb STD as a control and Travasorb STD with potassium sorbate added. Bacterial contamination following reconstitution was not significantly different between pharmacy and dietary department samples. Growth after 12 hours at room temperature was not significantly different for the three sets of storage conditions. Logarithmic growth occurred only at room temperature. All products supported growth of E. cloacae, but growth was significantly lower in Vivonex STD (which contains potassium sorbate) and Precision LR. Growth was reduced by 70% versus control at 12 hours in Travasorb STD containing 0.036% potassium sorbate and by 90% with 0.2% potassium sorbate. Microbial growth in enteral nutrient solutions was dependent on the initial inoculum and the storage time at room temperature. Addition of potassium sorbate to these solutions may greatly reduce bacterial growth. PMID:6430069

  4. Biocontrol of Fusarium graminearum Growth and Deoxynivalenol Production in Wheat Kernels with Bacterial Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuijuan Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is the main causal pathogen affecting small-grain cereals, and it produces deoxynivalenol, a kind of mycotoxin, which displays a wide range of toxic effects in human and animals. Bacterial strains isolated from peanut shells were investigated for their activities against F. graminearum by dual-culture plate and tip-culture assays. Among them, twenty strains exhibited potent inhibition to the growth of F. graminearum, and the inhibition rates ranged from 41.41% to 54.55% in dual-culture plate assay and 92.70% to 100% in tip-culture assay. Furthermore, eighteen strains reduced the production of deoxynivalenol by 16.69% to 90.30% in the wheat kernels assay. Finally, the strains with the strongest inhibitory activity were identified by morphological, physiological, biochemical methods and also 16S rDNA and gyrA gene analysis as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The current study highlights the potential application of antagonistic microorganisms and their metabolites in the prevention of fungal growth and mycotoxin production in wheat kernels. As a biological strategy, it might avoid safety problems and nutrition loss which always caused by physical and chemical strategies.

  5. Optimization of a new mathematical model for bacterial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research is to optimize a new mathematical equation as a primary model to describe the growth of bacteria under constant temperature conditions. An optimization algorithm was used in combination with a numerical (Runge-Kutta) method to solve the differential form of the new gr...

  6. Volatile emissions from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis mirror bacterial growth and enable distinction of different strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Trefz

    Full Text Available Control of paratuberculosis in livestock is hampered by the low sensitivity of established direct and indirect diagnostic methods. Like other bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP emits volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Differences of VOC patterns in breath and feces of infected and not infected animals were described in first pilot experiments but detailed information on potential marker substances is missing. This study was intended to look for characteristic volatile substances in the headspace of cultures of different MAP strains and to find out how the emission of VOCs was affected by density of bacterial growth. One laboratory adapted and four field strains, three of MAP C-type and one MAP S-type were cultivated on Herrold's egg yolk medium in dilutions of 10(-0, 10(-2, 10(-4 and 10(-6. Volatile substances were pre-concentrated from the headspace over the MAP cultures by means of Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME, thermally desorbed from the SPME fibers and separated and identified by means of GC-MS. Out of the large number of compounds found in the headspace over MAP cultures, 34 volatile marker substances could be identified as potential biomarkers for growth and metabolic activity. All five MAP strains could clearly be distinguished from blank culture media by means of emission patterns based on these 34 substances. In addition, patterns of volatiles emitted by the reference strain were significantly different from the field strains. Headspace concentrations of 2-ethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, 3-methylfuran, 2-pentylfuran, ethyl acetate, 1-methyl-1-H-pyrrole and dimethyldisulfide varied with density of bacterial growth. Analysis of VOCs emitted from mycobacterial cultures can be used to identify bacterial growth and, in addition, to differentiate between different bacterial strains. VOC emission patterns may be used to approximate bacterial growth density. In a perspective volatile marker substances could be used to

  7. On the growth rate of the foliicolous lichen Strigula elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde-Duyfjes, de B.E.E.

    1967-01-01

    The diametral growth rate of the foliicolous lichen Strigula elegans (Fée) Müll. Arg., measured under natural conditions in the African tropical rainforest, has been established to amount to (0.7-)3-3-6(-8) mm annually. As compared to the diametral growth rate of lichens from temperate regions, whic

  8. An Economic Growth Model with Optimal Growth Rate and Individual Years of Schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An economic growth model with individual years of schooling is present. It is proved that there exist optimal individual years of schooling for fixed wage growth rate. On the other hand, the economy has balance growth path for given individual years of schooling. Finally, we prove that there exist optimal individual years of schooling and economic growth rate such that the individual lifetime utility reaches maximum and the economy grows on a balance growth path.

  9. Maximum growth rates and possible life strategies of different bacterioplankton groups in relation to phosphorus availability in a freshwater reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, Karel; Hornák, Karel; Jezbera, Jan; Nedoma, Jirí; Vrba, Jaroslav; Straskrábová, Viera; Macek, Miroslav; Dolan, John R; Hahn, Martin W

    2006-09-01

    We investigated net growth rates of distinct bacterioplankton groups and heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNF) communities in relation to phosphorus availability by analysing eight in situ manipulation experiments, conducted between 1997 and 2003, in the canyon-shaped Rímov reservoir (Czech Republic). Water samples were size-fractionated and incubated in dialysis bags at the sampling site or transplanted into an area of the reservoir, which differed in phosphorus limitation (range of soluble reactive phosphorus concentrations--SRP, 0.7-96 microg l-1). Using five different rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes, net growth rates of the probe-defined bacterial groups and HNF assemblages were estimated and related to SRP using Monod kinetics, yielding growth rate constants specific for each bacterial group. We found highly significant differences among their maximum growth rates while insignificant differences were detected in the saturation constants. However, the latter constants represent only tentative estimates mainly due to insufficient sensitivity of the method used at low in situ SRP concentrations. Interestingly, in these same experiments HNF assemblages grew significantly faster than any bacterial group studied except for a small, but abundant cluster of Betaproteobacteria (targeted by the R-BT065 probe). Potential ecological implications of different growth capabilities for possible life strategies of different bacterial phylogenetic lineages are discussed. PMID:16913921

  10. On the Transformations between Temporal and Spatial Growth Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Melinda S.; Williams, R. T.

    1987-09-01

    This note compares the error distributions for three transformation formulae between temporal growth rate and spatial growth rate with the linearized barotropic vorticity equation. The sech2 and the tanh basic-state profiles are used for illustration. The transformation which uses the phase velocity gives a moderate error which does not have a strong dependence on the growth rate. The formulae derived by Gaster, and later by Nayfeh and Padhye, which employ the group velocity, have errors that are a function of the ratio of the spatial growth rate to the wavenumber. The errors from their formulae are small when the ratio is small, but the errors increase with the ratio so that all three transformation formulae give similar errors when the ratio is of order one. Nayfeh and Padhye's formula is rederived for the barotropic vorticity equation with a procedure which shows that ratio of growth rate to wavenumber must be small for accuracy.

  11. Growth rates and feeding management of Irish thoroughbred foals

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Róisín

    2015-01-01

    peer-reviewed Limited studies have focused on the growth of Irish Thoroughbred (TB) foals. The objectives of this study were to track the growth of foals and to monitor growth rates based on nutritional intakes. The growth of 72 foals, on eight Irish stud farms were monitored monthly from birth to six months of age. Body weight (BW), average daily gain (ADG), wither height (WH), body length (BL), heart girth (HG) and cannon bone circumference (CC) were measured monthly. Representative samp...

  12. Larval developmental rate, metabolic rate and future growth performance in Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serrano, Jonathan Vaz; Åberg, Madelene; Gjoen, Hans Magnus;

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies in salmonids suggest a link between larval developmental rate, metabolic rate, and future growth. However, the connection between growth during exogenous and endogenous feeding is still debated. In the current study, a positive relationship between larval developmental rate, quan...

  13. Multiscale study of bacterial growth: Experiments and model to understand the impact of gas exchange on global growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanne-Aulet, David; Piacentini, Adalberto; Guillot, Pierre; Marchal, Philippe; Moreau, Gilles; Colin, Annie

    2015-11-01

    Using a millifluidics and macroscale setup, we study quantitatively the impact of gas exchange on bacterial growth. In millifluidic environments, the permeability of the incubator materials allows an unlimited oxygen supply by diffusion. Moreover, the efficiency of diffusion at small scales makes the supply instantaneous in comparison with the cell division time. In hermetic closed vials, the amount of available oxygen is low. The growth curve has the same trend but is quantitatively different from the millifluidic situation. The analysis of all the data allows us to write a quantitative modeling enabling us to capture the entire growth process.

  14. Allometries of maximum growth rate versus body mass at maximum growth indicate that non-avian dinosaurs had growth rates typical of fast growing ectothermic sauropsids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Werner

    Full Text Available We tested if growth rates of recent taxa are unequivocally separated between endotherms and ectotherms, and compared these to dinosaurian growth rates. We therefore performed linear regression analyses on the log-transformed maximum growth rate against log-transformed body mass at maximum growth for extant altricial birds, precocial birds, eutherians, marsupials, reptiles, fishes and dinosaurs. Regression models of precocial birds (and fishes strongly differed from Case's study (1978, which is often used to compare dinosaurian growth rates to those of extant vertebrates. For all taxonomic groups, the slope of 0.75 expected from the Metabolic Theory of Ecology was statistically supported. To compare growth rates between taxonomic groups we therefore used regressions with this fixed slope and group-specific intercepts. On average, maximum growth rates of ectotherms were about 10 (reptiles to 20 (fishes times (in comparison to mammals or even 45 (reptiles to 100 (fishes times (in comparison to birds lower than in endotherms. While on average all taxa were clearly separated from each other, individual growth rates overlapped between several taxa and even between endotherms and ectotherms. Dinosaurs had growth rates intermediate between similar sized/scaled-up reptiles and mammals, but a much lower rate than scaled-up birds. All dinosaurian growth rates were within the range of extant reptiles and mammals, and were lower than those of birds. Under the assumption that growth rate and metabolic rate are indeed linked, our results suggest two alternative interpretations. Compared to other sauropsids, the growth rates of studied dinosaurs clearly indicate that they had an ectothermic rather than an endothermic metabolic rate. Compared to other vertebrate growth rates, the overall high variability in growth rates of extant groups and the high overlap between individual growth rates of endothermic and ectothermic extant species make it impossible to rule

  15. Biofilm growth alters regulation of conjugation by a bacterial pheromone

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Laura; Barnes, Aaron; Dunny, Gary; Chatterjee, Anushree; Hu, Wei-Shou; Yarwood, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Conjugation is an important mode of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, enhancing the spread of antibiotic resistance. In clinical settings, biofilms are likely locations for antibiotic resistance transfer events involving nosocomial pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis. Here we demonstrate that growth in biofilms alters the induction of conjugation by a sex pheromone in E. faecalis. Mathematical modeling suggested that a higher plasmid copy number in biofilm cells would enhance a switch...

  16. Effect of Humic Substance Photodegradation on Bacterial Growth and Respiration in Lake Water

    OpenAIRE

    Anesio, Alexandre M.; Granéli, Wilhelm; Aiken, George R.; Kieber, David J.; Mopper, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses how humic substance (HS) chemical composition and photoreactivity affect bacterial growth, respiration, and growth efficiency (BGE) in lake water. Aqueous solutions of HSs from diverse aquatic environments representing different dissolved organic matter sources (autochthonous and allochthonous) were exposed to artificial solar UV radiation. These solutions were added to lake water passed through a 0.7-μm-pore-size filter (containing grazer-free lake bacteria) followed by ...

  17. A new model for the spectral induced polarization signature of bacterial growth in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Revil, A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Jardani, A.; Smith, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent biogeophysics studies demonstrated the sensitivity of complex conductivity to bacterial growth and microbial mediated mineral transformations in porous media. Frequency-domain induced polarization is a minimally invasive manner to measure the complex conductivity of a material over a broad range of frequencies. The real component of complex conductivity is associated with electromigration of the charge carriers, and the imaginary component represents reversible energy storage of charge carriers at polarization length scales. Quantitative relationship between frequency-domain induced polarization responses and bacterial growth and decay in porous media is analyzed in this study using a new developed model. We focus on the direct contribution of bacteria themselves to the complex conductivity in porous media in the absence of biomineralization. At low frequencies, the induced polarization of bacteria (α-polarization) is related to the properties of the electrical double layer surrounding the membrane surface of bacteria. Surface conductivity and α-polarization are due to the Stern layer of the counterions occurring in a brush of polymers coating the surface of the bacteria, and can be related to the cation exchange capacity of the bacteria. From the modeling results, at low frequencies (bacterial populations are usually described by Monod kinetics, we show that the changes in imaginary conductivity with time can be used to determine bacterial growth kinetics parameters such as the growth and endogenous decay coefficient.

  18. Growth rate and crystal habit of germanium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlling steps of GeTe crystal growth under different experimental conditions were determined. Diffusion coefficient of GeTe molecules in argon was found, and condensation coefficient was evaluated. Influence of mass transfer rate in a gas on crystal habit was studied: crystals have round faces at low rates and dendritic growth is observed at high rates. Optimal conditions of growing edged crystals of germanium telluride of α-3 mm size were determined

  19. Cell Wall Nonlinear Elasticity and Growth Dynamics: How Do Bacterial Cells Regulate Pressure and Growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi

    In my thesis, I study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. I find strong evidence of power--law stress--stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E = 23±8 MPa and 49±20 MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3 kPa. The nonlinearity in cell elasticity serves as a plausible mechanism to balance the mechanical protection and tension measurement sensitivity of the cell envelope. I also study the growth dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis cell wall to help understand the mechanism of the spatiotemporal order of inserting new cell wall material. High density fluorescent markers are used to label the entire cell surface to capture the morphological changes of the cell surface at sub-cellular to diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-minute temporal resolution. This approach reveals that rod-shaped chaining B. subtilis cells grow and twist in a highly heterogeneous fashion both spatially and temporally. Regions of high growth and twisting activity have a typical length scale of 5 μm, and last for 10-40 minutes. Motivated by the quantification of the cell wall growth dynamics, two microscopy and image analysis techniques are developed and applied to broader applications beyond resolving bacterial growth. To resolve densely distributed quantum dots, we present a fast and efficient image analysis algorithm, namely Spatial Covariance Reconstruction (SCORE) microscopy that takes into account the blinking statistics of the fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than single-particle localization based methods

  20. Aortic growth rates in chronic aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine and compare rates of descending aortic enlargement and complications in chronic aortic dissection with and without a proximal aortic graft. Methods and materials: Fifty-two patients with dissection involving the descending aorta and who had undergone at least two computed tomography (CT) examinations at our institution between November, 1993 and February, 2004 were identified, including 24 non-operated patients (four type A, 20 type B) and 28 operated patients (type A). CT examinations per patient ranged from two to 10, and follow-up ranged from 1-123 months (mean 49 months, median 38.5 months). On each CT image, the aortic short axis (SA), false lumen (FL), and true lumen (TL) diameters were measured at the longitudinal midpoint of the dissection and at the point of maximum aortic diameter. Complications were tabulated, including aortic rupture and aortic enlargement requiring surgery. Results: For non-operated patients, the midpoint and maximum point SA, TL, and FL diameters increased significantly over time. For operated patients, the midpoint and maximum point SA and FL diameters increased significantly over time. In both groups, aortic enlargement was predominantly due to FL expansion. Diameter increases in non-operated patients were significantly larger than those in operated patients. The rate of change in aortic diameter was constant, regardless of aortic size. Four non-operated and six operated patients developed aortic complications. Conclusions: In patients with a dissection involving the descending thoracic aorta, the FL increased in diameter over time, at a constant rate, and to a greater degree in non-operated patients (mostly type B) compared with operated patients (all type A)

  1. Growth Rates in the Quaquaversal Tiling

    OpenAIRE

    Draco, Brimstone; Sadun, Lorenzo; Van Wieren, Douglas

    1998-01-01

    Conway and Radin's ``quaquaversal'' tiling of R^3 is known to exhibit statistical rotational symmetry in the infinite volume limit. A finite patch, however, cannot be perfectly isotropic, and we compute the rates at which the anisotropy scales with size. In a sample of volume N, tiles appear in O(N^{1/6}) distinct orientations. However, the orientations are not uniformly populated. A small (O(N^{1/84})) set of these orientations account for the majority of the tiles. Furthermore, these orient...

  2. Dynamic Metabolic Modeling of Denitrifying Bacterial Growth: The Cybernetic Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Liu, Chongxuan

    2015-06-29

    Denitrification is a multistage reduction process converting nitrate ultimately to nitrogen gas, carried out mostly by facultative bacteria. Modeling of the denitrification process is challenging due to the complex metabolic regulation that modulates sequential formation and consumption of a series of nitrogen oxide intermediates, which serve as the final electron acceptors for denitrifying bacteria. In this work, we examined the effectiveness and accuracy of the cybernetic modeling framework in simulating the growth dynamics of denitrifying bacteria in comparison with kinetic models. In four different case studies using the literature data, we successfully simulated diauxic and triauxic growth patterns observed in anoxic and aerobic conditions, only by tuning two or three parameters. In order to understand the regulatory structure of the cybernetic model, we systematically analyzed the effect of cybernetic control variables on simulation accuracy. The results showed that the consideration of both enzyme synthesis and activity control through u- and v-variables is necessary and relevant and that uvariables are of greater importance in comparison to v-variables. In contrast, simple kinetic models were unable to accurately capture dynamic metabolic shifts across alternative electron acceptors, unless an inhibition term was additionally incorporated. Therefore, the denitrification process represents a reasonable example highlighting the criticality of considering dynamic regulation for successful metabolic modeling.

  3. Bacterial growth in a simulated Martian subsurface environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronyak, R. E.; Pavlov, A.; House, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    The ability of microorganisms to grow under Martian conditions has implications in both the search for life and habitability of Mars as well as the potential contamination of Mars by landing spacecraft. Factors that inhibit the growth of organisms on Mars include UV radiation, low pressure and temperature, CO2 atmosphere, lack of liquid water, and extreme desiccation. Yet a possible biozone capable of supporting microbial life on Mars exists in the shallow subsurface where there is protection from harsh UV rays. In addition, the presence of widespread subsurface ice, confirmed by the Phoenix Lander, offers a water source as the ice sublimates through the upper soil. Here we will determine the ability of the organism Halomonas desiderata strain SP1 to grow in the simulated Martian subsurface environment. Halomonas was chosen as the bacteria of interest due to its tolerance to extreme environments, including carrying salt concentrations and pH. Experiments were carried out in the Mars Simulation Chamber, where temperatures, pressures, and atmospheric composition can be closely monitored to simulate Martian conditions. A series of stress experiments were conducted to observe Halomonas's ability to withstand exposure to a Mars analog soil, freezing temperatures, anoxic conditions, and low pressures. We have determined that Halomonas is able to survive exposures to low temperatures, pressures, and anoxic conditions. We will report on the survival and growth of Halomonas in the simulated Martian permafrost under low (6-10 mbar) atmospheric pressures.

  4. The influence of low intensity microwave on some bacterial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action for of low intensity microwaves (power density 10 mW/cm2, frequency of about 10.75 GHz) on growth dynamics was searched in two microbial cultures: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC-6538 (Gram positive bacteria) and Escherichia coli ATCC-10536 (Gram negative bacteria). It was evaluated the number of living cells/ml using a JASCO spectrophotometer for measurements carried out at 3, 6 , 9, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 72 hours in samples and controls. The results obtained revealed a stimulatory effect of microwaves on cell multiplication in both tested bacteria all over the experiment. Statistical computation showed different mathematical functions for experimental graphs approach. Logarithmic function was found to fit to E. coli growth (correlation coefficient equal to 0.978) while exponential function was found to approximate S. aureus dynamics (correlation coefficient equal to 0.758). A low thermal effect could be the main cause of such behaviour, as expected. However, a non-thermal effect could also be involved in the dynamics of these pathogen microorganisms. (authors)

  5. Chlorhexidine Digluconate Effects on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Some Field Isolates of Animal Bacterial Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Hemati, Majid; Habibian Dehkordi, Saeed; Bahadoran, Shahab; Khoshnood, Sheida; Khubani, Shahin; Dokht Faraj, Mahdi; Hakimi Alni, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: To study chlorhexidine digluconate disinfectant effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some bacterial field isolates from animals. Objectives: The current study investigated chlorhexidine digluconate effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some field isolates of veterinary bacterial pathogens. Materials and Methods: Forty clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella serotypes, Staphylococcus. aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae (10 isolates for ea...

  6. Applicability of bacterial growth models in spreadable processed cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Weiss

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Food spoilage is a process in which the quality parameters decrease and products are no longer edible. This is a cumulative effect of bacteria growth and their metabolite production, which is a factor limiting shelf life. Thus, the aim of the study was to evaluate whether microbiological growth models for total viable count (TVC and Clostridium strain bacteria are reliable tools for prediction of microbiological changes in spreadable processed cheese. Material and methods. Investigations were conducted for two types of bacteria: TVC and Clostridium in following temperature: 8°C, 20°C and 30°C. A total number of aerobic bacteria was determined based on standard PN-EN ISO 4833:2004 and Clostridium was detected by using microbiological procedure for sulphite-reducing anaerobic spore-bacteria with a selective nourishment. During the analysis nonlinear regression and Baranyi and Roberts primary model were used. Results. For temperatures 20°C and 30°C, Baranyi and Roberts model, for total viable count showed determination coeffi cient of 70%. The models prepared for Clostridium, in these temperatures, showed much lower R2, respectively 25% and 30%. At the abovementioned temperatures also the expiration of product shelf life was much shorter and amounted 70 days at 20°C and 7 days at 30°C. For both types of bacteria incubated at 8°C the numbers of bacteria decrease until the expiration of product shelf life. Conclusions. Models used in the analyses, Baranyi and Roberts and nonlinear regression, poorly matched the experimental data, hence they are not reliable tools. Nevertheless, they gave information about dynamic of microbiological changes in spreadable processed cheese.

  7. Oral iron acutely elevates bacterial growth in human serum

    OpenAIRE

    James H Cross; Bradbury, Richard S.; Fulford, Anthony J; Jallow, Amadou T.; Rita Wegmüller; Prentice, Andrew M.; Carla Cerami

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency worldwide and routine supplementation is standard policy for pregnant mothers and children in most low-income countries. However, iron lies at the center of host-pathogen competition for nutritional resources and recent trials of iron administration in African and Asian children have resulted in significant excesses of serious adverse events including hospitalizations and deaths. Increased rates of malaria, respiratory infections, severe ...

  8. Effect of corrosion rate and surface energy of silver coatings on bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Zhao, Q

    2010-03-01

    Many studies suggest a strong antimicrobial activity of silver coatings. The biocidal activity of silver is related to the biologically active silver ion released from silver coatings. However, no studies have been reported on the effect of surface energy of silver coatings on antibacterial performance. In this paper, three silver coatings with various corrosion rates and surface energies were prepared on stainless steel plates using AgNO(3) based electroless plating solutions. The corrosion rate and surface energy of the silver coatings were characterized with CorrTest Electrochemistry Workstation and Dataphysics OCA-20 contact angle analyzer, respectively. The antibacterial performance of the silver coatings was evaluated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, which frequently causes medical device-associated infections. The experimental results showed that surface energy had significant influence on initial bacterial adhesion at low corrosion rate. The extended DLVO theory was used to explain the bacterial adhesion behavior. PMID:19910169

  9. Crack growth rate of PWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Aquitaine 1 program, carried out jointly by FRAMATOME and the CEA is intended to improve knowledge about cracking mechanisms in AISI 316 L austenitic stainless steel under conditions similar to those of the PWR environment (irradiation excluded). Experiments of fatigue crack growth are performed on piping elements, scale 1/4 of primary pipings, by means of internal hydraulic cyclic pressure. Interpretation of results requires a knowledge of the stress intensity factor Ksub(I) at the front of the crack. Results of a series of calculations of Ksub(I) obtained by different methods for defects of finite and infinite length (three dimensional calculations) are given in the paper. The following have been used: calculations by finite elements, calculations by weight function. Notches are machined on the test pipes, which are subjected to internal hydraulic pressure cycles, under cold conditions, to initiate a crack at the tip of the notch. They are then cycled at a frequency of 4 cycles/hour on on water demineralised loop at a temperature of 2800C, the pressure varying at each cycle between approximately 160 bars and 3 bars. After each test, a specimen containing the defect is taken from the pipe for micrographic analysis. For the first test the length of the longitudinal external defect is assumed infinite. The number of cycles carried out is 5880 cycles. Two defects are machined in the tube for the second test. The number of cycles carried out is N = 440. The tests are performed under hot conditions (T = 2800C). For the third test two defects are analysed under cold and hot conditions. The number of cycles carried out for the external defect is 7000 when hot and 90000 when cold. The number of cycles for the internal defect is 1650 when hot and 68000 when cold. In order to interpret the results, the data da/dN are plotted on a diagram versus ΔK. Comparisons are made between these results and the curves from laboratory tests

  10. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Waheed Qurashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98 growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity.

  11. Primordial soup was edible: abiotically produced Miller-Urey mixture supports bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xueshu; Backman, Daniel; Lebedev, Albert T; Artaev, Viatcheslav B; Jiang, Liying; Ilag, Leopold L; Zubarev, Roman A

    2015-01-01

    Sixty years after the seminal Miller-Urey experiment that abiotically produced a mixture of racemized amino acids, we provide a definite proof that this primordial soup, when properly cooked, was edible for primitive organisms. Direct admixture of even small amounts of Miller-Urey mixture strongly inhibits E. coli bacteria growth due to the toxicity of abundant components, such as cyanides. However, these toxic compounds are both volatile and extremely reactive, while bacteria are highly capable of adaptation. Consequently, after bacterial adaptation to a mixture of the two most abundant abiotic amino acids, glycine and racemized alanine, dried and reconstituted MU soup was found to support bacterial growth and even accelerate it compared to a simple mixture of the two amino acids. Therefore, primordial Miller-Urey soup was perfectly suitable as a growth media for early life forms. PMID:26412575

  12. Quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry for monitoring fractal growth pattern of Bacillus thuringiensis bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Paromita; Soni, Jalpa; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Sengupta, Tapas K.

    2013-02-01

    It is of considerable current interest to develop various methods which help to understand and quantify the cellular association in growing bacterial colonies and is also important in terms of detection and identification of a bacterial species. A novel approach is used here to probe the morphological structural changes occurring during the growth of the bacterial colony of Bacillus thuringiensis under different environmental conditions (in normal nutrient agar, in presence of glucose - acting as additional nutrient and additional 3mM arsenate as additional toxic material). This approach combines the quantitative Mueller matrix polarimetry to extract intrinsic polarization properties and inverse analysis of the polarization preserving part of the light scattering spectra to determine the fractal parameter H (Hurst exponent) using Born approximation. Interesting differences are observed in the intrinsic polarization parameters and also in the Hurst exponent, which is a measurement of the fractality of a pattern formed by bacteria while growing as a colony. These findings are further confirmed with optical microscopic studies of the same sample and the results indicate a very strong and distinct dependence on the environmental conditions during growth, which can be exploited to quantify different bacterial species and their growth patterns.

  13. Chlorhexidine Gluconate Dressings Reduce Bacterial Colonization Rates in Epidural and Peripheral Regional Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Kerwat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bacterial colonization of catheter tips is common in regional anesthesia and is a suspected risk factor for infectious complications. This is the first study evaluating the effect of CHG-impregnated dressings on bacterial colonization of regional anesthesia catheters in a routine clinical setting. Methods. In this prospective study, regional anesthesia catheter infection rates were examined in two groups of patients with epidural and peripheral regional catheters. In the first group, regional anesthesia was dressed with a conventional draping. The second group of patients underwent catheter dressing using a CHG-impregnated draping. Removed catheters and the insertion sites were both screened for bacterial colonization. Results. A total of 337 catheters from 308 patients were analysed. There was no significant reduction of local infections in either epidural or peripheral regional anesthesia catheters in both CHG and conventional groups. In the conventional group, 21% of the catheter tips and 41% of the insertion sites showed positive culture results. In the CHG-group, however, only 3% of the catheter tips and 8% of the insertion sites were colonised. Conclusion. CHG dressings significantly reduce bacterial colonization of the tip and the insertion site of epidural and peripheral regional catheters. However, no reductions in rates of local infections were seen.

  14. An impedance response model for inhibitory effect of antibiotics on bacterial growth in biometallurgy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶菡; 魏万之; 张书芬; 张进忠; 毛友安

    2004-01-01

    An impedance response model reflecting the inhibitory effect of antibiotics on bacterial growth in biometallurgy was established. Three inhibition parameters, i.e. the maximum amount inhibitory constant of the bacterial growth(K1 ), the maximum specific growth inhibitory constant(K2 ) and the lag time inhibitory constant(K3 ), were included in the model. The influence of these parameters on the response curve was discussed in detail. By fitting experimental data towards the proposed model, three growth parameters (A, μm and λ) in the presence of antibiotics were gained and compared. The results show that the growth ability of bacteria is decreased due to the influence of antibiotics. The experimental and fitted curves have goodness-of-fit in the range of 0. 987 - 1. 008. Moreover, the kinetic growth parameters obtained from this model are closed to those from the Logistics popular growth model.These results show that the proposed model is validity to reflect the inhibitory effect of antibiotics on bacteria.

  15. Protein thermodynamics can be predicted directly from biological growth rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Corkrey

    Full Text Available Life on Earth is capable of growing from temperatures well below freezing to above the boiling point of water, with some organisms preferring cooler and others hotter conditions. The growth rate of each organism ultimately depends on its intracellular chemical reactions. Here we show that a thermodynamic model based on a single, rate-limiting, enzyme-catalysed reaction accurately describes population growth rates in 230 diverse strains of unicellular and multicellular organisms. Collectively these represent all three domains of life, ranging from psychrophilic to hyperthermophilic, and including the highest temperature so far observed for growth (122 °C. The results provide credible estimates of thermodynamic properties of proteins and obtain, purely from organism intrinsic growth rate data, relationships between parameters previously identified experimentally, thus bridging a gap between biochemistry and whole organism biology. We find that growth rates of both unicellular and multicellular life forms can be described by the same temperature dependence model. The model results provide strong support for a single highly-conserved reaction present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA. This is remarkable in that it means that the growth rate dependence on temperature of unicellular and multicellular life forms that evolved over geological time spans can be explained by the same model.

  16. Bacterial growth in humic waters exposed to UV-radiation and simulated sunlight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corin, N.; Backlund, P.; Wiklund, T.

    1998-01-01

    Sterile filtered (0.45 mu m) humic lake water was exposed to simulated sunlight (300-800 nm) or W-radiation (254 run)for various periods of times and the dissolved organic carbon content, absorbance at 254 and 460 nm and PH were recorded. The irradiated water was inoculated with a natural bacterial...... assemblage and the number of viable bacteria war estimated 3 and 5 days after the inoculation using the plate count technique. The number of viable bacteria increased with the irradiation time indicating that the chemical changes of the humus macromolecules observed during irradiation resulted in an...... increased availability of the dissolved organic material as bacterial substrate. No inhibitory effect on the bacterial growth, due to the presence of toxic organic reaction products, was observed. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd....

  17. The effects of a low-intensity red laser on bacterial growth, filamentation and plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, C.; Santos, J. N.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of nonphotosynthesizing microorganisms to light could increase cell division in cultures, a phenomenon denominated as biostimulation. However, data concerning the importance of the genetic characteristics of cells on this effect are as yet scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity red laser on the growth, filamentation and plasmids in Escherichia coli cells proficient and deficient in DNA repair. E. coli cultures were exposed to a laser (658 nm, 10 mW, 1 and 8 J cm-2) to study bacterial growth and filamentation. Also, bacterial cultures hosting pBSK plasmids were exposed to the laser to study DNA topological forms from the electrophoretic profile in agarose gels. Data indicate the low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on the growth of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III deficient cells; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) led to no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids from exonuclease III deficient cells, but plasmids from wild type cells were altered. A low-intensity red laser at the low fluences used in phototherapy has no effect on growth, but induces filamentation and alters the topological forms of plasmid DNA in E. coli cultures depending on the DNA repair mechanisms.

  18. The effects of a low-intensity red laser on bacterial growth, filamentation and plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of nonphotosynthesizing microorganisms to light could increase cell division in cultures, a phenomenon denominated as biostimulation. However, data concerning the importance of the genetic characteristics of cells on this effect are as yet scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity red laser on the growth, filamentation and plasmids in Escherichia coli cells proficient and deficient in DNA repair. E. coli cultures were exposed to a laser (658 nm, 10 mW, 1 and 8 J cm−2) to study bacterial growth and filamentation. Also, bacterial cultures hosting pBSK plasmids were exposed to the laser to study DNA topological forms from the electrophoretic profile in agarose gels. Data indicate the low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on the growth of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III deficient cells; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) led to no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids from exonuclease III deficient cells, but plasmids from wild type cells were altered. A low-intensity red laser at the low fluences used in phototherapy has no effect on growth, but induces filamentation and alters the topological forms of plasmid DNA in E. coli cultures depending on the DNA repair mechanisms. (paper)

  19. Bacterial population in intestines of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon under different growth stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanilada Rungrassamee

    Full Text Available Intestinal bacterial communities in aquaculture have been drawn to attention due to potential benefit to their hosts. To identify core intestinal bacteria in the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon, bacterial populations of disease-free shrimp were characterized from intestines of four developmental stages (15-day-old post larvae (PL15, 1- (J1, 2- (J2, and 3-month-old (J3 juveniles using pyrosequencing, real-time PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE approaches. A total of 25,121 pyrosequencing reads (reading length = 442±24 bases were obtained, which were categorized by barcode for PL15 (7,045 sequences, J1 (3,055 sequences, J2 (13,130 sequences and J3 (1,890 sequences. Bacteria in the phyla Bacteroides, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were found in intestines at all four growth stages. There were 88, 14, 27, and 20 bacterial genera associated with the intestinal tract of PL15, J1, J2 and J3, respectively. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Proteobacteria (class Gammaproteobacteria was a dominant bacteria group with a relative abundance of 89% for PL15 and 99% for J1, J2 and J3. Real-time PCR assay also confirmed that Gammaproteobacteria had the highest relative abundance in intestines from all growth stages. Intestinal bacterial communities from the three juvenile stages were more similar to each other than that of the PL shrimp based on PCA analyses of pyrosequencing results and their DGGE profiles. This study provides descriptive bacterial communities associated to the black tiger shrimp intestines during these growth development stages in rearing facilities.

  20. Investigation of growth rate dispersion in lactose crystallisation by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, T. D.; Ogden, M. I.; Parkinson, G. M.

    2014-09-01

    α-Lactose monohydrate crystals have been reported to exhibit growth rate dispersion (GRD). Variation in surface dislocations has been suggested as the cause of GRD, but this has not been further investigated to date. In this study, growth rate dispersion and the change in morphology were investigated in situ and via bottle roller experiments. The surfaces of the (0 1 0) faces of crystals were examined with Atomic Force Microscopy. Smaller, slow growing crystals tend to have smaller (0 1 0) faces with narrow bases and displayed a single double spiral in the centre of the crystal with 2 nm high steps. Additional double spirals in other crystals resulted in faster growth rates. Large, fast growing crystals were observed to have larger (0 1 0) faces with fast growth in both the a and b directions (giving a broader crystal base) with macro steps parallel to the (c direction). The number and location of spirals or existence of macro steps appears to influence the crystal morphology, growth rates and growth rate dispersion in lactose crystals.

  1. Insights for Analyzing Earnings Growth Rates: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    A study at one public university investigated the annualized rate of salary/wage increase of employees from the time of hiring until July 1992. It examined promotion patterns, equity adjustments, employee degree acquisition, and certification of clerical workers. The study underscored the wide variation in earnings growth rates due in large part…

  2. Urban Public Pension, Replacement Rates and Population Growth Rate in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zaigui

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses an overlapping generations model to investigate the urban public pension in China. It examines the effects of the replacement rates and population growth rate on the capital-labor ratio, pension benefits, consumption and utility, and finds the optimal replacement rate. It is shown that raising the individual account benefit replacement rate only induces the increase in the individual account benefits. Raising the social pool benefit replacement rate induces the increase in the...

  3. Re-assessing copepod growth using the Moult Rate method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirst, Andrew G.; Keister, J. E.; Richardson, A. J.; Ward, P.; Shreeve, R. S.; Escribano, R.

    2014-01-01

    method has been shown to have serious flaws. Here we re-examine the results from the majority of published MR method studies and re-estimate growth rates using the modified Moult Rate (MMR) method, which ascribes changes in mass to the appropriate time period over which it was accrued. The MR method has...... typically over-estimated growth rates (on 80% of occasions) for life stages where the subsequent stage is actively moulting; the median and mean MR values are 138 and 164%, respectively, of the corrected MMR values. We were unable to correct the original data for life stages that are followed by a non...

  4. Effects of Benzalkonium Chloride on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation by Animal Bacterial Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Hemati, Majid; Shabanpour, Ziba; Habibian Dehkordi, Saeed; BAHADORAN, Shahab; Lotfalian, Sharareh; Khubani, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Resistance toward quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) is widespread among a diverse range of microorganisms and is facilitated by several mechanisms such as biofilm formation. Objectives: In this study, the effects of benzalkonium chloride on planktonic growth and biofilm formation by some field isolates of animal bacterial pathogens were investigated. Materials and Methods: Forty clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella serotypes, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus...

  5. Associated bacterial flora, growth, and toxicity of cultured benthic dinoflagellates Ostreopsis lenticularis and Gambierdiscus toxicus.

    OpenAIRE

    Tosteson, T. R.; Ballantine, D L; Tosteson, C G; Hensley, V; Bardales, A T

    1989-01-01

    The growth, toxicity, and associated bacterial flora of 10 clonal cultures of the toxic benthic dinoflagellates Ostreopsis lenticularis and Gambierdiscus toxicus isolated from the coastal waters of southwest Puerto Rico have been examined. Clonal cultures of O. lenticularis grew more rapidly and at broader temperature ranges than those of G. toxicus. All five Ostreopsis clones were toxic, while only one of the five Gambierdiscus clones was poisonous. The degree of toxicity among poisonous clo...

  6. Growth hormone reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irr[iated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth hormone stimulates the growth of intestinal mucosa and may reduce the severity of injury caused by r[iation. Male Wistar rats underwent abdominal irr[iation (12 Gy) and were treated with either human growth hormone (hGH) or saline, and sacrificed at day 4 or 7 post-irr[iation. Bacterial translocation, and the ileal mucosal thickness, proliferation, and disaccharidase activity were assessed. Mortality was 65% in irr[iated animals, whereas hGH caused a decrement (29%, p<0.05). Bacterial translocation was also reduced by hGH (p<0.05). Treating irr[iated rats with hGH prevented body weight loss (p<0.05). Mucosal thickness increased faster in irr[iated hGH-treated animals. The proliferative index showed an increment in hGH-treated animals (p<0.05). Giving hGH to irr[iated rats prevented decrease in sucrose activity, and increment in lactase activity. In conclusion, giving hGH to irr[iated rats promotes the [aptative process of the intestine and acute r[iation-related negative effects, including mortality, bacterial translocation, and weight loss. (orig.)

  7. In-depth characterization of wastewater bacterial community in response to algal growth using pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jangho; Lee, Juyoun; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woo, Sung-Geun; Baek, Gyu Seok; Park, Joonhong

    2013-10-28

    Microalgae have been regarded as a natural resource for sustainable materials and fuels, as well as for removal of nutrients and micropollutants from wastewater, and their interaction with bacteria in wastewater is a critical factor to consider because of the microbial diversity and complexity in a variety of wastewater conditions. Despite their importance, very little is known about the ecological interactions between algae and bacteria in a wastewater environment. In this study, we characterized the wastewater bacterial community in response to the growth of a Selenastrum gracile UTEX 325 population in a real municipal wastewater environment. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing technique was used for indepth analysis of amplicons of 16S rRNA genes from different conditions in each reactor, with and without the algal population. The algal growth reduced the bacterial diversity and affected the bacterial community structure in the wastewater. The following in-depth analysis of the deep-sequenced amplicons showed that the algal growth selectively stimulated Sphingobacteria class members, especially the Sediminibacterium genus population, in the municipal wastewater environment. PMID:23867704

  8. Food additives reduce lactic acid bacterial growth in culture medium and in meat products, increasing product shelf life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleonice Mendes Pereira Sarmento

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The uncontrolled growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB in meat and meat products leads to product spoilage, and thus shortens product shelf life. Although food additives are known to decrease LAB growth, this effect has not been analyzed in detail. Here, a detailed analysis was performed of the effects of sodium chloride, sodium polyphosphate, sodium lactate, sodium nitrite/nitrate, and garlic on the growth of the Lactobacillus plantarum in culture medium. The results were used to design and test experimental formulations of meat products. Initially, the effect of food additives on L. plantarum was evaluated using a Fractional Factorial Design (FFD, followed by a Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD. The Modified Gompertz Model was adjusted to the growth curves to determine the Kinetic parameters of bacterial growth (logarithmic increase in the population, specific growth rate, and lag phase extension. Higher sodium lactate and sodium chloride levels had a negative impact on L. plantarum growth parameters (p?0.05. Therefore, we designed experimental formulations of mortadella and smoked pork sausages containing 4% sodium lactate (w w-1 and 2.4-3.5% sodium chloride (w w-1, and determined LAB growth from samples of stored products produced according to these formulations, in order to determine product shelf life. There was an increased lag phase of LAB growth for most experimental formulations. Also, the experimental smoked pork sausages had a longer shelf life, which was increased by at least 22 days, suggesting that the proposed formulation, with higher than standard lactate concentration, increased the product’s shelf life.

  9. Noise in gene expression is coupled to growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Leeat; van Dijk, David; Weingarten-Gabbay, Shira; Davidi, Dan; Jona, Ghil; Weinberger, Adina; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2015-12-01

    Genetically identical cells exposed to the same environment display variability in gene expression (noise), with important consequences for the fidelity of cellular regulation and biological function. Although population average gene expression is tightly coupled to growth rate, the effects of changes in environmental conditions on expression variability are not known. Here, we measure the single-cell expression distributions of approximately 900 Saccharomyces cerevisiae promoters across four environmental conditions using flow cytometry, and find that gene expression noise is tightly coupled to the environment and is generally higher at lower growth rates. Nutrient-poor conditions, which support lower growth rates, display elevated levels of noise for most promoters, regardless of their specific expression values. We present a simple model of noise in expression that results from having an asynchronous population, with cells at different cell-cycle stages, and with different partitioning of the cells between the stages at different growth rates. This model predicts non-monotonic global changes in noise at different growth rates as well as overall higher variability in expression for cell-cycle-regulated genes in all conditions. The consistency between this model and our data, as well as with noise measurements of cells growing in a chemostat at well-defined growth rates, suggests that cell-cycle heterogeneity is a major contributor to gene expression noise. Finally, we identify gene and promoter features that play a role in gene expression noise across conditions. Our results show the existence of growth-related global changes in gene expression noise and suggest their potential phenotypic implications. PMID:26355006

  10. Nitrogen and phosphorus co-limitation of bacterial productivity and growth in the Oligotrophic Sub-Tropical North Atlantic

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Matthew M.; Moore, C. M.; Langlois, Rebecca; Milne, A; Achterberg, Eric P.; Nachtigall, Kerstin; Lochte, Karin; Geider, R. J.; LaRoche, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial productivity and biomass are thought to be limited by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in much of the world’s oceans. However, the mixed layer of oligotrophic oceans is often depleted in dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate, raising the possibility that macronutrients may also limit heterotrophic bacterial growth. We used nutrient bioassay experiments to determine whether inorganic nutrients (N, P, Fe) and/or DOC could limit bacterial productivity and biomass in the central Nort...

  11. Greenhouse Gas Growth Rates from AIRS Hyperspectral Radiance Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strow, L. L.; Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Hannon, S.; Imbiriba, B.; Schou, P.

    2009-12-01

    The AIRS seven year hyperspectral radiance record provides an ideal platform for measurings growth rates of infrared active minor gases, especially carbon dioxide and methane. The largest changes in CLARREO radiances will likely be due to increasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. We have produced a 5+ year record of almost cloud-free AIRS radiances, from which we have derived the radiance anomaly and linear time rate of change. The source of these radiances are the L1b radiances corrected for small frequency drifts. Growth rates of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, ozone, and CFC11 are simultaneously derived from zonal averages of these radiance rates for tropics, and mid-latitude northern and southern hemispheres. The effective linear rate of change of ~5 layers of water vapor and temperature, plus the surface temperature are also simultaneously derived with the minor gas rates. No model data or prior is needed and more than 1000 channels are used in the fit. Sampling issues may preclude the use of the mid-latitude temperature and water vapor rates for climate analysis, but possibly not for the tropics. The resulting greenhouse gas growth rates agree very well with in-situ measurements, which suggests high radiometric stability for AIRS. Radiance intercomparisons for climate analysis between IASI and AIRS will also be presented.

  12. Growth rate in the dynamical dark energy models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avsajanishvili, Olga [Ilia State University, Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Tbilisi (Georgia); Arkhipova, Natalia A. [Astro Space Center of P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation); Samushia, Lado [Kansas State University, Department of Physics, Manhattan, KS (United States); Ilia State University, Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Tbilisi (Georgia); Kahniashvili, Tina [Carnegie Mellon University, McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Laurentian University, Department of Physics, Sudbury, ON (Canada); Ilia State University, Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Tbilisi (Georgia)

    2014-11-15

    Dark energy models with a slowly rolling cosmological scalar field provide a popular alternative to the standard, time-independent cosmological constant model. We study the simultaneous evolution of background expansion and growth in the scalar field model with the Ratra-Peebles self-interaction potential. We use recent measurements of the linear growth rate and the baryon acoustic oscillation peak positions to constrain the model parameter α that describes the steepness of the scalar field potential. (orig.)

  13. Crystal-face growth rate: role of the neighbouring concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been made of the phenomena occurring in the neighbourhood of a growing crystal-face, with the help of several methods based on interferometric observation. If the system is considered at a given moment, it is possible to express the growth rate of the crystal in two ways: 1) using the origin of the solute contributing to the growth, by application of Fick's law modified in certain cases by a correction factor involving the absolute value of the concentration near the crystal face. 2) directly, using the supersaturation in the crystal-face neighbourhood. On the other hand, if an attempt is made to take into account the changes in growth rate with time, it is seen that this rate is not dependent on diffusion phenomena, but that the convection currents in the solution play an important role. (author)

  14. Influence of corruption on economic growth rate and foreign investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobnik, Boris; Shao, Jia; Njavro, Djuro; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Stanley, H. E.

    2008-06-01

    We analyze the dependence of the Gross Domestic Product ( GDP) per capita growth rates on changes in the Corruption Perceptions Index ( CPI). For the period 1999 2004 for all countries in the world, we find on average that an increase of CPI by one unit leads to an increase of the annual GDP per capita growth rate by 1.7%. By regressing only the European countries with transition economies, we find that an increase of CPI by one unit generates an increase of the annual GDP per capita growth rate by 2.4%. We also analyze the relation between foreign direct investments received by different countries and CPI, and we find a statistically significant power-law functional dependence between foreign direct investment per capita and the country corruption level measured by the CPI. We introduce a new measure to quantify the relative corruption between countries based on their respective wealth as measured by GDP per capita.

  15. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, But Not Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichen; Xue, Chao; Song, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer (OF) regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF), chemical fertilizer (CF), organic–inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF), and OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA) of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen–fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments) significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with OF application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR vs. sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the α- and β- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil microbial community structure, but not total levels of

  16. New and fast method to quantify respiration rates of bacterial and plankton communities in freshwater ecosystems by using optical oxygen sensor spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentin, Mareike; Freese, Heike M; Karsten, Ulf; Schumann, Rhena

    2007-11-01

    A new method of respiration rate measurement based on oxygen luminescence quenching in sensor spots was evaluated for the first time for aquatic bacterial communities. The commonly used Winkler and Clark electrode methods to quantify oxygen concentration both require long incubation times, and the latter additionally causes signal drift due to oxygen consumption at the cathode. The sensor spots proved to be advantageous over those methods in terms of precise and quick oxygen measurements in natural bacterial communities, guaranteeing a respiration rate estimate during a time interval short enough to neglect variations in organism composition, abundance, and activity. Furthermore, no signal drift occurs during measurements, and respiration rate measurements are reliable even at low temperatures and low oxygen consumption rates. Both a natural bacterioplankton sample and a bacterial isolate from a eutrophic river were evaluated in order to optimize the new method for aquatic microorganisms. A minimum abundance of 2.2 x 10(6) respiring cells ml(-1) of a bacterial isolate was sufficient to obtain a distinct oxygen depletion signal within 20 min at 20 degrees C with the new oxygen sensor spot method. Thus, a culture of a bacterial isolate from a eutrophic river (OW 144; 20 x 10(6) respiring bacteria ml(-1)) decreased the oxygen saturation about 8% within 20 min. The natural bacterioplankton sample respired 2.8% from initially 94% oxygen-saturated water in 30 min. During the growth season in 2005, the planktonic community of a eutrophic river consumed between 0.7 and 15.6 micromol O(2) liter(-1) h(-1). The contribution of bacterial respiration to the total plankton community oxygen consumption varied seasonally between 11 and 100%. PMID:17766446

  17. Radiocarbon Based Ages and Growth Rates: Hawaiian Deep Sea Corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L

    2006-01-13

    The radial growth rates and ages of three different groups of Hawaiian deep-sea 'corals' were determined using radiocarbon measurements. Specimens of Corallium secundum, Gerardia sp., and Leiopathes glaberrima, were collected from 450 {+-} 40 m at the Makapuu deep-sea coral bed using a submersible (PISCES V). Specimens of Antipathes dichotoma were collected at 50 m off Lahaina, Maui. The primary source of carbon to the calcitic C. secundum skeleton is in situ dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Using bomb {sup 14}C time markers we calculate radial growth rates of {approx} 170 {micro}m y{sup -1} and ages of 68-75 years on specimens as tall as 28 cm of C. secundum. Gerardia sp., A. dichotoma, and L. glaberrima have proteinaceous skeletons and labile particulate organic carbon (POC) is their primary source of architectural carbon. Using {sup 14}C we calculate a radial growth rate of 15 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of 807 {+-} 30 years for a live collected Gerardia sp., showing that these organisms are extremely long lived. Inner and outer {sup 14}C measurements on four sub-fossil Gerardia spp. samples produce similar growth rate estimates (range 14-45 {micro}m y{sup -1}) and ages (range 450-2742 years) as observed for the live collected sample. Similarly, with a growth rate of < 10 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of {approx}2377 years, L. glaberrima at the Makapuu coral bed, is also extremely long lived. In contrast, the shallow-collected A. dichotoma samples yield growth rates ranging from 130 to 1,140 {micro}m y{sup -1}. These results show that Hawaiian deep-sea corals grow more slowly and are older than previously thought.

  18. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates. PMID:26952406

  19. Nanocrystalline silicon prepared at high growth rate using helium dilution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koyel Bhattacharya; Debajyoti Das

    2008-06-01

    Growth and optimization of the nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si : H) films have been studied by varying the electrical power applied to the helium diluted silane plasma in RF glow discharge. Wide optical gap and conducting intrinsic nanocrystalline silicon network of controlled crystalline volume fraction and oriented crystallographic lattice planes have been obtained at a reasonably high growth rate from helium diluted silane plasma, without using hydrogen. Improving crystallinity in the network comprising ∼ 10 nm Si-nanocrystallites and contributing optical gap widening, conductivity ascending and that obtained during simultaneous escalation of the deposition rate, promises significant technological impact.

  20. Orbit width scaling of TAE instability growth rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth rate of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) driven unstable by resonant coupling of energetic charged particles is evaluated in the ballooning limit over a wide range of parameters. All damping effects are ignored. Variations in orbit width, aspect ratio, and the ratio of alfven velocity to energetic particle birth velocity, are explored. The relative contribution of passing and trapped particles, and finite Larmor radius effects, are also examined. The phase space location of resonant particles with interact strongly with the modes is described. The accuracy of the analytic results with respect to growth rate magnitude and parametric dependence is investigated by comparison with numerical results

  1. Stainless steels: general considerations and rates of crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the different types of stainless steels, and presents the laws governing the rates of crack growth for several stainless steels extensively used for the manufacture of structures in nuclear power plants. The laws are not discussed in detail in the report. After a brief review of the development of stainless steels, the main categories of stainless steels, their mechanical characteristics and corrosion resistance, are presented. Finally, the rates of crack growth are presented for various stainless steels, mainly austenitic. The study overall aim is an investigation of the cracking in the 900 MWe primary pump thermal barriers and shafts

  2. The growth rate of gas hydrate from refrigerant R12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendoush, Abdullah Abbas; Jassim, Najim Abid [Centre of Engineering Physics, Ministry of Sciences and Technology, P.O. Box 765, Baghdad (Iraq); Joudi, Khalid A. [Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2006-07-15

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were presented dealing with three phase direct-contact heat transfer by evaporation of refrigerant drops in an immiscible liquid. Refrigerant R12 was used as the dispersed phase, while water and brine were the immiscible continuous phase. A numerical solution is presented to predict the formation rate of gas hydrates in test column. The solution provided an acceptable agreement when compared with experimental results. The gas hydrate growth rate increased with time. It increased with increasing dispersed phase flow rate. The presence of surface-active sodium chloride in water had a strong inhibiting effect on the gas hydrate formation rate. (author)

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Enhanced Bacterial Growth on Hexadecane with Red Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Jang, In-Ae; Ahn, Sungeun; Shin, Bora; Kim, Jisun; Park, Chulwoo; Jee, Seung Cheol; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2015-11-01

    Red clay was previously used to enhance bioremediation of diesel-contaminated soil. It was speculated that the enhanced degradation of diesel was due to increased bacterial growth. In this study, we selected Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1, a soil-borne degrader of diesel and alkanes, as a model bacterium and performed transcriptional analysis using RNA sequencing to investigate the cellular response during hexadecane utilization and the mechanism by which red clay promotes hexadecane degradation. We confirmed that red clay promotes the growth of A. oleivorans DR1 on hexadecane, a major component of diesel, as a sole carbon source. Addition of red clay to hexadecane-utilizing DR1 cells highly upregulated β-oxidation, while genes related to alkane oxidation were highly expressed with and without red clay. Red clay also upregulated genes related to oxidative stress defense, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutaredoxin genes, suggesting that red clay supports the response of DR1 cells to oxidative stress generated during hexadecane utilization. Increased membrane fluidity in the presence of red clay was confirmed by fatty acid methyl ester analysis at different growth phases, suggesting that enhanced growth on hexadecane could be due to increased uptake of hexadecane coupled with upregulation of downstream metabolism and oxidative stress defense. The monitoring of the bacterial community in soil with red clay for a year revealed that red clay stabilized the community structure. PMID:25956940

  4. Control of bacterial biofilm growth on surfaces by nanostructural mechanics and geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, A. K.; Hochbaum, A. I.; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, J.

    2011-12-01

    Surface-associated communities of bacteria, called biofilms, pervade natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms are resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial treatments and therefore pose persistent pathogenic threats. The use of surface chemistry to inhibit biofilm growth has been found to only transiently affect initial attachment. In this work, we investigate the tunable effects of physical surface properties, including high-aspect-ratio (HAR) surface nanostructure arrays recently reported to induce long-range spontaneous spatial patterning of bacteria on the surface. The functional parameters and length scale regimes that control such artificial patterning for the rod-shaped pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa are elucidated through a combinatorial approach. We further report a crossover regime of biofilm growth on a HAR nanostructured surface versus the nanostructure effective stiffness. When the 'softness' of the hair-like nanoarray is increased beyond a threshold value, biofilm growth is inhibited as compared to a flat control surface. This result is consistent with the mechanoselective adhesion of bacteria to surfaces. Therefore by combining nanoarray-induced bacterial patterning and modulating the effective stiffness of the nanoarray—thus mimicking an extremely compliant flat surface—bacterial mechanoselective adhesion can be exploited to control and inhibit biofilm growth.

  5. Control of bacterial biofilm growth on surfaces by nanostructural mechanics and geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface-associated communities of bacteria, called biofilms, pervade natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms are resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial treatments and therefore pose persistent pathogenic threats. The use of surface chemistry to inhibit biofilm growth has been found to only transiently affect initial attachment. In this work, we investigate the tunable effects of physical surface properties, including high-aspect-ratio (HAR) surface nanostructure arrays recently reported to induce long-range spontaneous spatial patterning of bacteria on the surface. The functional parameters and length scale regimes that control such artificial patterning for the rod-shaped pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa are elucidated through a combinatorial approach. We further report a crossover regime of biofilm growth on a HAR nanostructured surface versus the nanostructure effective stiffness. When the 'softness' of the hair-like nanoarray is increased beyond a threshold value, biofilm growth is inhibited as compared to a flat control surface. This result is consistent with the mechanoselective adhesion of bacteria to surfaces. Therefore by combining nanoarray-induced bacterial patterning and modulating the effective stiffness of the nanoarray—thus mimicking an extremely compliant flat surface—bacterial mechanoselective adhesion can be exploited to control and inhibit biofilm growth.

  6. Growth of 48 built environment bacterial isolates on board the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neches, Russell Y.; Lang, Jenna M.; Brown, Wendy E.; Severance, Mark; Cavalier, Darlene

    2016-01-01

    Background. While significant attention has been paid to the potential risk of pathogenic microbes aboard crewed spacecraft, the non-pathogenic microbes in these habitats have received less consideration. Preliminary work has demonstrated that the interior of the International Space Station (ISS) has a microbial community resembling those of built environments on Earth. Here we report the results of sending 48 bacterial strains, collected from built environments on Earth, for a growth experiment on the ISS. This project was a component of Project MERCCURI (Microbial Ecology Research Combining Citizen and University Researchers on ISS). Results. Of the 48 strains sent to the ISS, 45 of them showed similar growth in space and on Earth using a relative growth measurement adapted for microgravity. The vast majority of species tested in this experiment have also been found in culture-independent surveys of the ISS. Only one bacterial strain showed significantly different growth in space. Bacillus safensis JPL-MERTA-8-2 grew 60% better in space than on Earth. Conclusions. The majority of bacteria tested were not affected by conditions aboard the ISS in this experiment (e.g., microgravity, cosmic radiation). Further work on Bacillus safensis could lead to interesting insights on why this strain grew so much better in space. PMID:27019789

  7. Characteristics of bacterial and fungal growth in plastic bottled beverages under a consuming condition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Maiko; Ohnishi, Takahiro; Araki, Emiko; Kanda, Takashi; Tomita, Atsuko; Ozawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Kanji; Konuma, Hirotaka; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    Microbial contamination in unfinished beverages can occur when drinking directly from the bottle. Various microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens, are able to grow in these beverages at room temperature or in a refrigerator. In this study, we elucidated the characteristics of microorganism growth in bottled beverages under consuming condition models. Furthermore, we provide insight into the safety of partially consumed bottled beverages with respect to food hygiene. We inoculated microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens, into various plastic bottled beverages and analysed the dynamic growth of microorganisms as well as bacterial toxin production in the beverages. Eight bottled beverage types were tested in this study, namely green tea, apple juice drink, tomato juice, carbonated drink, sport drink, coffee with milk, isotonic water and mineral water, and in these beverages several microorganism types were used: nine bacteria including three toxin producers, three yeasts, and five moulds. Following inoculation, the bottles were incubated at 35°C for 48 h for bacteria, 25°C for 48 h for yeasts, and 25°C for 28 days for moulds. During the incubation period, the number of bacteria and yeasts and visible changes in mould-growth were determined over time. Our results indicated that combinations of the beverage types and microorganism species correlated with the degree of growth. Regarding factors that affect the growth and toxin-productivity of microorganisms in beverages, it is speculated that the pH, static/shaking culture, temperature, additives, or ingredients, such as carbon dioxide or organic matter (especially of plant origin), may be important for microorganism growth in beverages. Our results suggest that various types of unfinished beverages have microorganism growth and can include food borne pathogens and bacterial toxins. Therefore, our results indicate that in terms of food hygiene it is necessary to consume beverages immediately after opening

  8. Inhibition of bacterial growth by different mixtures of propofol and thiopentone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Propofol is, as a result of its formulation, an ideal bacterial and yeast culture medium. An outbreak of sepsis in humans and an increase in wound infections in dogs has been ascribed to the use of propofol. It has been previously reported that a 1:1 mixture of propofol and thiopentone has bactericidal properties. This study was undertaken to determine if further serial mixtures of propofol and thiopentone maintained the bactericidal properties. Mixtures of 1:1 (solution A, 5:1 (solution B, 10:1 (solution C, 50:1 (solution D and 100:1 (solution E of 1 % propofol to 2.5 % thiopentone, 2.5 % thiopentone (solution T, 1 % propofol (solution P and saline (solution S were prepared and inoculated with between 105 and 106 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. A sample was withdrawn from each solution at 0, 1, 6, 12, 48 and 120 hours after inoculation and a bacterial count was performed. This study showed that thiopentone and solution A behaved in similar fashion by inhibiting bacterial growth and was bactericidal after 48 hours. Solution B was not bactericidal against S. aureus and C. albicans. Propofol and solutions D and E all supported growth of all the organisms tested. These data indicate that mixtures of propofol and thiopentone at a ratio less than 1:1 do not maintain the bactericidal properties.

  9. Trophosome of the Deep-Sea Tubeworm Riftia pachyptila Inhibits Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Julia; Aistleitner, Karin; Horn, Matthias; Krenn, Liselotte; Dirsch, Verena; Zehl, Martin; Bright, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila lives in symbiosis with the chemoautotrophic gammaproteobacterium Cand. Endoriftia persephone. Symbionts are released back into the environment upon host death in high-pressure experiments, while microbial fouling is not involved in trophosome degradation. Therefore, we examined the antimicrobial effect of the tubeworm’s trophosome and skin. The growth of all four tested Gram-positive, but only of one of the tested Gram-negative bacterial strains was inhibited by freshly fixed and degrading trophosome (incubated up to ten days at either warm or cold temperature), while no effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae was observed. The skin did not show antimicrobial effects. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the ethanol supernatant of fixed trophosomes lead to the tentative identification of the phospholipids 1-palmitoleyl-2-lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-palmitoleyl-1-lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine and the free fatty acids palmitoleic, palmitic and oleic acid, which are known to have an antimicrobial effect. As a result of tissue autolysis, the abundance of the free fatty acids increased with longer incubation time of trophosome samples. This correlated with an increasing growth inhibition of Bacillus subtilis and Listeria welshimeri, but not of the other bacterial strains. Therefore, the free fatty acids produced upon host degradation could be the cause of inhibition of at least these two bacterial strains. PMID:26730960

  10. Associated bacterial flora, growth, and toxicity of cultured benthic dinoflagellates Ostreopsis lenticularis and Gambierdiscus toxicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosteson, T R; Ballantine, D L; Tosteson, C G; Hensley, V; Bardales, A T

    1989-01-01

    The growth, toxicity, and associated bacterial flora of 10 clonal cultures of the toxic benthic dinoflagellates Ostreopsis lenticularis and Gambierdiscus toxicus isolated from the coastal waters of southwest Puerto Rico have been examined. Clonal cultures of O. lenticularis grew more rapidly and at broader temperature ranges than those of G. toxicus. All five Ostreopsis clones were toxic, while only one of the five Gambierdiscus clones was poisonous. The degree of toxicity among poisonous clones was highly variable. The number of associated bacterial genera and their frequency of occurrence were quite variable among clones of both dinoflagellate genera. Bacterial isolates represented six genera (Nocardia, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, Aeromonas, Flavobacterium, and Moraxella) in addition to coryneform bacteria. Extracts of dinoflagellate-associated bacteria grown in pure culture were not toxic. Gambierdiscus clones were characterized by the frequent presence of Pseudomonas spp. (four of five clones) and the absence of coryneforms. In O. lenticularis, only one of five clones showed the presence of Pseudomonas spp., and Moraxella sp. was absent altogether. Detailed analyses of toxicity and associated microflora in a selected Ostreopsis clone, repeatedly cultivated (four times) over a period of 160 days, showed that peak cell toxicities developed in the late static and early negative culture growth phases. Peak Ostreopsis cell toxicities in the stationary phase of culture growth were correlated with significant increases in the percent total bacteria directly associated with these cells. Changes in the quantity of bacteria directly associated with microalgal cell surfaces and extracellular matrices during culture growth may be related to variability and degree of toxicity in these laboratory-cultured benthic dinoflagellates. PMID:2705766

  11. The relationship between creep crack growth rates and creep-fatigue crack growth rates in austenitic Type 316 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between high temperature crack growth rates in type 316 steel under creep conditions and combined creep-fatigue cycling is examined by consideration of the similarities between the underlying physical mechanisms of crack advance. In this way it is shown that creep crack growth rates may be used to estimate the limits to which creep-fatigue cycling can cause crack growth rates to accelerate in this steel. The usefulness of the derived limit is discussed with particular reference to practical stressing modes including load and displacement control. It is concluded that in type 316 steel there is little difference between the behaviour of a crack propagating under combined creep-fatigue cycling and a creep crack growing under some restraint. (author)

  12. Growth rates of modern science: A bibliometric analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bornmann, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Many studies in information science have looked at the growth of science. In this study, we re-examine the question of the growth of science. To do this we (i) use current data up to publication year 2012 and (ii) analyse it across all disciplines and also separately for the natural sciences and for the medical and health sciences. Furthermore, the data are analysed with an advanced statistical technique (segmented regression analysis) which can identify specific segments with similar growth rates in the history of science. The study is based on two different sets of bibliometric data: (1) The number of publications held as source items in the Web of Science (WoS, Thomson Reuters) per publication year and (2) the number of cited references in the publications of the source items per cited reference year. We have looked at the rate at which science has grown since the mid-1600s. In our analysis we identified three growth phases in the development of science, which each led to growth rates tripling in compariso...

  13. Upscaling Calcite Growth Rates From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N [ORNL; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL; Steefel, Carl I [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative prediction of mineral reaction rates in the subsurface remains a daunting task partly because a key parameter for macroscopic models, the reactive site density, is poorly constrained. Here we report atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements on the calcite surface of monomolecular step densities, treated as equivalent to the reactive site density, as a function of aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio and saturation index. Data for the obtuse step orientation are combined with existing step velocity measurements to generate a model that predicts overall macroscopic calcite growth rates. The model is quantitatively consistent with several published macroscopic rates under a range of alkaline solution conditions, particularly for two of the most comprehensive data sets without the need for additional fit parameters. The model reproduces peak growth rates and its functional form is simple enough to be incorporated into reactive transport or other macroscopic models designed for predictions in porous media. However, it currently cannot model equilibrium, pH effects, and may overestimate rates at high aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratios. The discrepancies in rates at high calcium-to-carbonate ratios may be due to differences in pre-treatment, such as exposing the seed material to SI 1.0 to generate/develop growth hillocks, or other factors.

  14. Continuous monitoring of bacterial biofilm growth using uncoated Thickness-Shear Mode resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM) were used to nondestructively monitor in real time the microbial growth of the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) in a liquid broth. QCM, sometimes referred to as Thickness-Shear Mode (TSM) resonators, are highly sensitive sensors not only able to measure very small mass, but also non-gravimetric contributions of viscoelastic media. These devices can be used as biosensors for bacterial detection and are employed in many applications including their use in the food industry, water and environment monitoring, pharmaceutical sciences and clinical diagnosis. In this work, three strains of S. epidermidis (which differ in the ability to produce biofilm) have been continuously monitored using an array of piezoelectric TSM resonators, at 37 °C in a selective culturing media. Microbial growth was followed by measuring the changes in the crystal resonant frequency and bandwidth at several harmonics. It was shown that microbial growth can be monitored in real time using multichannel and multiparametric QCM sensors.

  15. Continuous monitoring of bacterial biofilm growth using uncoated Thickness-Shear Mode resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, P.; Resa, P.; Durán, C.; Maestre, J. R.; Mateo, M.; Elvira, L.

    2012-12-01

    Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM) were used to nondestructively monitor in real time the microbial growth of the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) in a liquid broth. QCM, sometimes referred to as Thickness-Shear Mode (TSM) resonators, are highly sensitive sensors not only able to measure very small mass, but also non-gravimetric contributions of viscoelastic media. These devices can be used as biosensors for bacterial detection and are employed in many applications including their use in the food industry, water and environment monitoring, pharmaceutical sciences and clinical diagnosis. In this work, three strains of S. epidermidis (which differ in the ability to produce biofilm) have been continuously monitored using an array of piezoelectric TSM resonators, at 37 °C in a selective culturing media. Microbial growth was followed by measuring the changes in the crystal resonant frequency and bandwidth at several harmonics. It was shown that microbial growth can be monitored in real time using multichannel and multiparametric QCM sensors.

  16. Net Assimilation Rate Determines the Growth Rates of 14 Species of Subtropical Forest Trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Li

    Full Text Available Growth rates are of fundamental importance for plants, as individual size affects myriad ecological processes. We determined the factors that generate variation in RGR among 14 species of trees and shrubs that are abundant in subtropical Chinese forests. We grew seedlings for two years at four light levels in a shade-house experiment. We monitored the growth of every juvenile plant every two weeks. After one and two years, we destructively harvested individuals and measured their functional traits and gas-exchange rates. After calculating individual biomass trajectories, we estimated relative growth rates using nonlinear growth functions. We decomposed the variance in log(RGR to evaluate the relationships of RGR with its components: specific leaf area (SLA, net assimilation rate (NAR and leaf mass ratio (LMR. We found that variation in NAR was the primary determinant of variation in RGR at all light levels, whereas SLA and LMR made smaller contributions. Furthermore, NAR was strongly and positively associated with area-based photosynthetic rate and leaf nitrogen content. Photosynthetic rate and leaf nitrogen concentration can, therefore, be good predictors of growth in woody species.

  17. Linear Stability of Binary Alloy Solidification for Unsteady Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the Mullins and Sekerka (MS) linear stability analysis to the unsteady growth rate case is considered for dilute binary alloys. In particular, the stability of the planar interface during the initial solidification transient is studied in detail numerically. The rapid solidification case, when the system is traversing through the unstable region defined by the MS criterion, has also been treated. It has been observed that the onset of instability is quite accurately defined by the "quasi-stationary MS criterion", when the growth rate and other process parameters are taken as constants at a particular time of the growth process. A singular behavior of the governing equations for the perturbed quantities at the constitutional supercooling demarcation line has been observed. However, when the solidification process, during its transient, crosses this demarcation line, a planar interface is stable according to the linear analysis performed.

  18. Sales Growth Rate Forecasting Using Improved PSO and SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate forecast of the sales growth rate plays a decisive role in determining the amount of advertising investment. In this study, we present a preclassification and later regression based method optimized by improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO for sales growth rate forecasting. We use support vector machine (SVM as a classification model. The nonlinear relationship in sales growth rate forecasting is efficiently represented by SVM, while IPSO is optimizing the training parameters of SVM. IPSO addresses issues of traditional PSO, such as relapsing into local optimum, slow convergence speed, and low convergence precision in the later evolution. We performed two experiments; firstly, three classic benchmark functions are used to verify the validity of the IPSO algorithm against PSO. Having shown IPSO outperform PSO in convergence speed, precision, and escaping local optima, in our second experiment, we apply IPSO to the proposed model. The sales growth rate forecasting cases are used to testify the forecasting performance of proposed model. According to the requirements and industry knowledge, the sample data was first classified to obtain types of the test samples. Next, the values of the test samples were forecast using the SVM regression algorithm. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model has good forecasting performance.

  19. Computing the crystal growth rate by the interface pinning method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Hummel, Felix; Dellago, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    An essential parameter for crystal growth is the kinetic coefficient given by the proportionality between supercooling and average growth velocity. Here, we show that this coefficient can be computed in a single equilibrium simulation using the interface pinning method where two-phase configurati......An essential parameter for crystal growth is the kinetic coefficient given by the proportionality between supercooling and average growth velocity. Here, we show that this coefficient can be computed in a single equilibrium simulation using the interface pinning method where two...... is investigated in detail for the Lennard-Jones model. We find that the kinetic coefficient scales as the inverse square-root of temperature along the high temperature part of the melting line. The practical usability of the method is demonstrated by computing the kinetic coefficient of the elements...... Na and Si from first principles. A generalized version of the method may be used for computing the rates of crystal nucleation or other rare events....

  20. Exchange-Driven Growth with Birth Rate Less Than Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhen-Quan; KE Jian-Hong; YE Gao-Xiang

    2005-01-01

    We further study the kinetic behavior of the exchange-driven growth with birth and death for the case of birth rate kernel being less than that of death based on the mean-field theory. The symmetric exchange rate kernel is K(k,j) = K'(k,j) = Ikjv, and the birth and death rates are proportional to the aggregate's size. The long time asymptotic behavior of the aggregate size distribution ak(t) is found to obey a much unusual scaling law with an exponentially growing scaling function φ(x) = exp(x).

  1. Relating Productivity Events to Holocene Bivalve Shell Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, J. W.; Krause, R. A.; Kowalewski, M.; Romanek, C. S.; Kaufman, D. S.; Simoes, M. G.

    2007-12-01

    The growth rate of a bivalve can be influenced by many environmental factors that can change during the life of the organism. In this contribution we present initial data from a millennium scale chronology to assess the relationship between ontogenetic growth in the bivalve Semele casali and paleoenvironmental conditions preserved in the shell using growth increment analysis, radiocarbon-calibrated amino acid racemization dating techniques, stable isotopes (C and O) and high spatial resolution (125-150 samples per cm of shell profile) trace element (Ba, Mn) analysis (LA-ICPMS). Time-averaged specimens of S. casali were dredged from two sites at 10 meters and 30 meters depth along the inner continental shelf at Ubatuba Bay in the Southeast Brazilian Bight, an area influenced by productivity pulses triggered by coastal runoff events and coastal upwelling. Seventy-five individual valves were dated using amino acid racemization (aspartic acid). Dates were calculated using an expanded version of a previously published relationship (Barbour Wood et al., 2006 Quaternary Research 323- 331) between aspartic acid ratios and AMS radiocarbon dates of twelve S. casali individuals from the same sampling locations. The resulting time series has complete coverage for the past three thousand years at centennial resolution. From this time series, a sub-sample of dated valves was selected for more detailed growth increment, stable isotope and high-resolution trace element (Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca) analyses. Oceanic productivity is expressed differentially in the trace element profiles of S. casali with elevated Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios capturing nutrient input through coastal runoff events while elevated Ba/Ca and depressed Mn/Ca ratios represent input through coastal upwelling. Fluctuations in Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca are not correlated to fluctuations in relative growth throughout the ontogeny of an individual bivalve, nor are they expected to be as periods of increased productivity are transient

  2. 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene mineralization and bacterial production rates of natural microbial assemblages from coastal sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrogenous energetic constituent, 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), is widely reported to be resistant to bacterial mineralization (conversion to CO2); however, these studies primarily involve bacterial isolates from freshwater where bacterial production is typically limited by phosphorus. This study involved six surveys of coastal waters adjacent to three biome types: temperate broadleaf, northern coniferous, and tropical. Capacity to catabolize and mineralize TNT ring carbon to CO2 was a common feature of natural sediment assemblages from these coastal environments (ranging to 270+/-38 μg C kg-1 d-1). More importantly, these mineralization rates comprised a significant proportion of total heterotrophic production. The finding that most natural assemblages surveyed from these ecosystems can mineralize TNT ring carbon to CO2 is consistent with recent reports that assemblage components can incorporate TNT ring carbon into bacterial biomass. These data counter the widely held contention that TNT is recalcitrant to bacterial catabolism of the ring carbon in natural environments. - Highlights: → TNT mineralization is a common feature of natural bacterial assemblages in coastal sediments. → TNT mineralization rates comprised a significant proportion of total heterotrophic production. → These data counter the widely held contention that TNT is recalcitrant to bacterial catabolism of the ring carbon in natural environments. - The capacity to mineralize TNT ring carbon to CO2 is a common feature of natural bacterial assemblages in coastal sediment.

  3. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  4. Scaling laws in the dynamics of crime growth rate

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, Luiz Gustavo de Andrade; Mendes, Renio dos Santos

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of crimes in areas with large concentrations of people have made cities one of the main source of violence. Understanding characteristics of how crime rate expands and its relations with the cities size goes beyond an academic question, being a central issue for the contemporary society. Here, we characterize and analyze quantitative aspects of murders in the period from 1980 to 2009 in Brazilian cities. We find that the distribution of the annual, biannual and triannual logarithmic homicide growth rates exhibit the same functional form for distinct scales, that is, a scale invariant behaviour. We also identify asymptotic power-law decay relations between the standard deviations of these three growth rates and the initial size. Further, we discuss similarities with complex organizations.

  5. Percieved Relationship between Exchange Rate, Interest Rate and Economic Growth in Nigeria: 1970-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. J Obansa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was specifically embarked upon to establish empirically the relationship exiting among Exchange rate, Interest rate and economic growth in Nigerian economy over the period of 1970-2010. Fundamentally, the period of the study was fractured into two prominent distinctions of economic era - the regulation era and the deregulation era. The study adopted vector auto- regression (VAR technique, with specific emphasis on Impulse Response factor and the Forecast Error Variance Decomposition. The result indicated that Exchange rate had a stronger impact on Economic growth than Interest rate. Particularly, Interest rate impact was found to be positive but however declined as the time horizon increased. It had a little impact on Economic growth in the period of regulation than in the deregulation era. The conclusion arising from the study shows that Exchange rate liberalization was good to Nigerian Economy as it promotes Economic growth. Interest rate liberalization on the other hand does not make an appreciable impact on the Economic growth as it undermines investment drive. The paper therefore recommends that Interest rate liberalization and deregulation should be replaced with the policy of Interest rate regulation as obtained in the 1970s and early 1980s. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; text-align:justify; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

  6. Last Five Years Pakistan Economic Growth Rate GDP And Its Comparison With China India And Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Rehman; Luan Jingdong; Yuneng Du

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This paper formulates and reviews Pakistans last five years economic growth rate and its comparison with the growth rate of China India and Bangladesh. As growth rate the amount of increment of a specific variable has gained within a specific period of time and context. In fact economic growth rate provides general direction and magnitude of growth for overall economy.

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF THE ECONOMIC GROWTH ON THE BIRTH RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAVU MIHAELA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The changes occurred over time in the population have effects on the economy, especially the reductions in thebirth rate which may lead to disturbances in the population structure. The relationship between the economic growthand the birth rate in Romania is analysed over an 11-year period, in order to see its intensity. The presentation of theevolution of the gross domestic product and of the birth rate is completed by the calculation of the Spearmancoefficient for determining the intensity of the relationship between the two indicators. The decrease of the birth rate isdetermined, to a modest extent, by the economic growth, with a wide range of factors that influence it. In this situation,the establishment and implementation of a birth rate recovery strategy is highly necessary to reduce the imbalancecreated in the population structure.

  8. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Park, Chiwoo; Evans, James E.; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William D.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-01-08

    Direct observations of solution-phase nanoparticle growth using in situ liquid transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have demonstrated the importance of “non-classical” growth mechanisms, such as aggregation and coalescence, on the growth and final morphology of nanocrystals at the atomic and single nanoparticle scales. To date, groups have quantitatively interpreted the mean growth rate of nanoparticles in terms of the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) model for Ostwald ripening, but less attention has been paid to modeling the corresponding particle size distribution. Here we use in situ fluid stage scanning TEM to demonstrate that silver nanoparticles grow by a length-scale dependent mechanism, where individual nanoparticles grow by monomer attachment but ensemble-scale growth is dominated by aggregation. Although our observed mean nanoparticle growth rate is consistent with the LSW model, we show that the corresponding particle size distribution is broader and more symmetric than predicted by LSW. Following direct observations of aggregation, we interpret the ensemble-scale growth using Smoluchowski kinetics and demonstrate that the Smoluchowski model quantitatively captures the mean growth rate and particle size distribution.

  9. A study of the growth rates and growth habits of ice crystals in a solution of antifreeze (glyco) proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianzhong; Luo, Liaofu

    1996-12-01

    The mechanism of the antifreeze glycoprotein/antifreeze protein interaction on the surface of ice is analyzed. The theory of ice crystal growth in an AF(G)P solution is presented. A quantitative calculation of the growth rates for gain growth has been obtained. The anisotropic growth habits and growth rates of ice crystals in an AF(G)P solution are explained.

  10. The Case for an M2 Growth Rate of 10%

    OpenAIRE

    William Carlson; Conway Lackman

    2013-01-01

    The recovery from the 2008-2009 recession has been much slower than the average recovery since the 1924 recession. As analysts who believe that the St. Louis model created by Leonall Andersen and Jerry Jordan still has relevance we believe that the slow rate of M2 growth since 2Q2009 is a major reason why GDP growth has been so slow. At the 9th Annual Missouri Economics Conference on March 27, 2009 we presented a paper, “Interwar Hoarding, Liquidity Traps, and the 2008 Solvency Trap” in whic...

  11. Bubble growth rate in water binary systems at subatmospheric pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vapor-type bubble growth rate has been experimentally studied during bubble boiling both in water and in the following ''positive'' aqueous, binary systems: water-ethanol, water-1-buthanol, water-2-buthanon at pressures between 2 and 26 kPa, the Jackoby numbers between 2700 and 700, and volatile organic component contents between 2 and 30%. Numerical solutions have been presented for growth and annihilation of spherical and axis-symmetrical vapor-type bubbles during transfer between the isometric and isobaric phases. Occurrence of fluctuations both in bubble radius and bubble surface temperature has been predicted

  12. Growth Rate Factor Analysis of Turkey Using Grey System Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Ceviz, Emre; Erden, Caner

    2015-01-01

    In this study, by using Grey System Theory (GST), factors of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth rate is analyzed. Macro-economic and financial data in the 2000s is used to evaluate the economic growth of Turkey. GST which can be used with little or inadequate amount of data, was preferred in the analysis. Although discovered in 1982, GST increases the amount of usage and publication especially after the 2000s. The gray system theory in the study focused on the impact on economic analysis. At...

  13. Improvements in plant growth rate using underwater discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The drainage water from plant pots was irradiated by plasma and then recycled to irrigate plants for improving the growth rate by supplying nutrients to plants and inactivating the bacteria in the bed-soil. Brassica rapa var. perviridis (Chinese cabbage; Brassica campestris) plants were cultivated in pots filled with artificial soil, which included the use of chicken droppings as a fertiliser. The water was recycled once per day from a drainage water pool and added to the bed-soil in the pots. A magnetic compression type pulsed power generator was used to produce underwater discharge with repetition rate of 250 pps. The plasma irradiation times were set as 10 and 20 minutes per day over 28 days of cultivation. The experimental results showed that the growth rate increased significantly with plasma irradiation into the drainage water. The growth rate increased with the plasma irradiation time. The nitrogen concentration of the leaves increased as a result of plasma irradiation based on chlorophyll content analysis. The bacteria in the drainage water were inactivated by the plasma irradiation.

  14. Application of a microcomputer-based system to control and monitor bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, J A; Luli, G W; Dekleva, M L; Strohl, W R

    1984-02-01

    A modular microcomputer-based system was developed to control and monitor various modes of bacterial growth. The control system was composed of an Apple II Plus microcomputer with 64-kilobyte random-access memory; a Cyborg ISAAC model 91A multichannel analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converter; paired MRR-1 pH, pO(2), and foam control units; and in-house-designed relay, servo control, and turbidimetry systems. To demonstrate the flexibility of the system, we grew bacteria under various computer-controlled and monitored modes of growth, including batch, turbidostat, and chemostat systems. The Apple-ISAAC system was programmed in Labsoft BASIC (extended Applesoft) with an average control program using ca. 6 to 8 kilobytes of memory and up to 30 kilobytes for datum arrays. This modular microcomputer-based control system was easily coupled to laboratory scale fermentors for a variety of fermentations. PMID:16346462

  15. Noise in gene expression is coupled to growth rate

    OpenAIRE

    Keren, Leeat; van Dijk, David; Weingarten-Gabbay, Shira; Davidi, Dan; Jona, Ghil; Weinberger, Adina; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Genetically identical cells exposed to the same environment display variability in gene expression (noise), with important consequences for the fidelity of cellular regulation and biological function. Although population average gene expression is tightly coupled to growth rate, the effects of changes in environmental conditions on expression variability are not known. Here, we measure the single-cell expression distributions of approximately 900 Saccharomyces cerevisiae promoters across four...

  16. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Díaz-Pérez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G

    2015-10-01

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6ºC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μ at the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) and generally covaried with μ but, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μ and K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. PMID:26362925

  17. Red and infrared laser therapy inhibits in vitro growth of major bacterial species that commonly colonize skin ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Natanael Teixeira Alves; Gomes, Rosana Caetano; Santos, Marcos Ferracioli; Brandino, Hugo Evangelista; Martinez, Roberto; de Jesus Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is used in chronic wounds due to its healing effects. However, bacterial species may colonize these wounds and the optimal parameters for effective bacterial inhibition are not clear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of LLLT on bacterial growth in vitro. Bacterial strains including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were suspended in saline solution at a concentration of 10(3) cells/ml and exposed to laser irradiation at wavelengths of 660, 830, and 904 nm at fluences of 0 (control), 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 J/cm(2). An aliquot of the irradiated suspension was spread on the surface of petri plates and incubated at 37 °C for quantification of colony-forming unit after 24, 48, and 72 h. Laser irradiation inhibited the growth of S. aureus at all wavelengths and fluences higher than 12 J/cm(2), showing a strong correlation between increase in fluence and bacterial inhibition. However, for P. aeruginosa, LLLT inhibited growth at all wavelengths only at a fluence of 24 J/cm(2). E. coli had similar growth inhibition at a wavelength of 830 nm at fluences of 3, 6, 12, and 24 J/cm(2). At wavelengths of 660 and 904 nm, growth inhibition was only observed at fluences of 12 and 18 J/cm(2), respectively. LLLT inhibited bacterial growth at all wavelengths, for a maximum of 72 h after irradiation, indicating a correlation between bacterial species, fluence, and wavelength. PMID:26886585

  18. Bacterial secondary production on vascular plant detritus: relationships to detritus composition and degradation rate.

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, M.A. (María Asunción); Hodson, R E

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial production at the expense of vascular plant detritus was measured for three emergent plant species (Juncus effusus, Panicum hemitomon, and Typha latifolia) degrading in the littoral zone of a thermally impacted lake. Bacterial secondary production, measured as tritiated thymidine incorporation into DNA, ranged from 0.01 to 0.81 microgram of bacterial C mg of detritus-1 day-1. The three plant species differed with respect to the amount of bacterial productivity they supported per mil...

  19. Bacterial endophyte Sphingomonas sp. LK11 produces gibberellins and IAA and promotes tomato plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Hussain, Javid; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Al-Khiziri, Salima; Ullah, Ihsan; Ali, Liaqat; Jung, Hee-Young; Lee, In-Jung

    2014-08-01

    Plant growth promoting endophytic bacteria have been identified as potential growth regulators of crops. Endophytic bacterium, Sphingomonas sp. LK11, was isolated from the leaves of Tephrosia apollinea. The pure culture of Sphingomonas sp. LK11 was subjected to advance chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques to extract and isolate gibberellins (GAs). Deuterated standards of [17, 17-(2)H2]-GA4, [17, 17-(2)H2]-GA9 and [17, 17-(2)H2]-GA20 were used to quantify the bacterial GAs. The analysis of the culture broth of Sphingomonas sp. LK11 revealed the existence of physiologically active gibberellins (GA4: 2.97 ± 0.11 ng/ml) and inactive GA9 (0.98 ± 0.15 ng/ml) and GA20 (2.41 ± 0.23). The endophyte also produced indole acetic acid (11.23 ± 0.93 μM/ml). Tomato plants inoculated with endophytic Sphingomonas sp. LK11 showed significantly increased growth attributes (shoot length, chlorophyll contents, shoot, and root dry weights) compared to the control. This indicated that such phyto-hormones-producing strains could help in increasing crop growth. PMID:24994010

  20. Combining prebiotics with probiotic bacteria can enhance bacterial growth and secretion of bacteriocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranckutė, Raminta; Kaunietis, Arnoldas; Kuisienė, Nomeda; Čitavičius, Donaldas J

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing interest in supporting human health by using prebiotics, such as oligosaccharides, and beneficial bacteria, also called probiotics. Combining these two components we can develop synbiotics. In order to create successful combination of synbiotic it is very important to evaluate the influence of prebiotic oligosaccharides to probiotic bacteria and their behavior, such as growth and secretion of health related biomolecules, including bacteriocins. In this study seven type strains of probiotic bacteria (five Lactobacillus sp. and two Lactococcus sp.) and two Lactobacillus sp. strains, isolated from probiotic yoghurt, were cultivated with various commercially available and extracted oligosaccharides (OS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of these OS on type and isolated bacterial strains growth and antibacterial activity. Obtained results suggest that combination of certain OS with probiotic strains may considerably improve their growth and/or antibacterial activity. We also determined the antibacterial activity spectrum of investigated strains with combination of OS against common food borne pathogens. Results of this work show that prebiotic OS can be useful for modulating probiotic bacteria growth, antibacterial activity and even specificity of this activity. PMID:27181578

  1. In situ high rate growth of high temperature superconductor tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, M. R. B. (Malcom R. Beasley); Peng, L. S. (Luke S.); Wang, W. (Weizhi); Jo, W.; Ohnishi, T. (Tsuyoshi); Marshall, A. F. (Ann F.); Hammond, R. H. (Robert H.); Beasley, M. R. (Malcom R.); Peterson, E. J. (Eric J.); Ericson, R. (Richard)

    2001-01-01

    In situ high rate growth of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} superconducting films has been carried out using e-beam deposition. A deposition flux controller is developed to monitor and control the deposition rates using tunable diode laser based atomic absorption. Wide range of temperatures, deposition rates, and oxygen fluxes including atomic and molecular oxygen, as well as ozone, have been explored in order to understand both kinetic and thermodynamic stability. Critical current density above 1 MA/cm{sup 2} has been achieved on SrTiO{sub 3} substrate samples in growth rate up to 75 {angstrom}/sec. Samples prepared on IBAD YSZ/Ni tapes exhibit similar R(T)s and x-ray diffraction patterns. However, critical current densities of the tapes are around kA/cm{sup 2} or lower. The poor critical current density of the tape is attributed to interaction between the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} film and the YSZ buffer layer.

  2. Salamander growth rates increase along an experimental stream phosphorus gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumpers, Phillip M; Maerz, John C; Rosemond, Amy D; Benstead, Jonathan P

    2015-11-01

    Nutrient-driven perturbations to the resource base of food webs are predicted to attenuate with trophic distance, so it is unclear whether higher-level consumers will generally respond to anthropogenic nutrient loading. Few studies have tested whether nutrient (specifically, nitrogen [N] and phosphorus [P]) enrichment of aquatic ecosystems propagates through multiple trophic levels to affect predators, or whether N vs. P is relatively more important in driving effects on food webs. We conducted two-year whole-stream N and P additions to five streams to generate gradients in N and P concentration and N:P ratio (target N:P = 2, 8, 16, 32, 128). Larval salamanders are vertebrate predators of primary and secondary macroinvertebrate consumers in many heterotrophic headwater streams in which the basal resources are detritus and associated microorganisms. We determined the effects of N and P on the growth rates of caged and free-roaming larval Desmognathus quadramaculatus and the average body size of larval Eurycea wilderae. Growth rates and average body size increased by up to 40% and 60%, respectively, with P concentration and were negatively related to N:P ratio. These findings were consistent across both species of salamanders using different methodologies (cage vs. free-roaming) and at different temporal scales (3 months vs. 2 yr). Nitrogen concentration was not significantly related to increased growth rate or body size of the salamander species tested. Our findings suggest that salamander growth responds to the relaxation of ecosystem-level P limitation and that moderate P enrichment can have relatively large effects on vertebrate predators in detritus-based food webs. PMID:27070018

  3. Response of leaf endophytic bacterial community to elevated CO2 at different growth stages of rice plant

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Gaidi; Zhang, Huayong; Lin, Xiangui; Zhu, Jianguo; Jia, Zhongjun

    2015-01-01

    Plant endophytic bacteria play an important role in plant growth and health. In the context of climate change, the response of plant endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 at different rice growing stages is poorly understood. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we investigated the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 (eCO2) at the tillering, filling, and maturity stages of the rice plant under different nitrogen fertilization conditions [low nitrogen fertilizatio...

  4. Response of leaf endophytic bacterial community to elevated CO2 at different growth stages of rice plant

    OpenAIRE

    Gaidi eRen; Huayong eZhang; Xiangui eLin; Jianguo eZhu; Zhongjun eJia

    2015-01-01

    Plant endophytic bacteria play an important role in plant growth and health. In the context of climate change, the response of plant endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 at different rice growing stages is poorly understood. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we investigated the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 (eCO2) at the tillering, filling and maturity stages of the rice plant under different nitrogen fertilization conditions (low nitrogen fertilization...

  5. Effects of Interactions of Auxin-Producing Bacteria and Bacterial-Feeding Nematodes on Regulation of Peanut Growths

    OpenAIRE

    Li Xu; Wensi Xu; Ying Jiang; Feng Hu; Huixin Li

    2015-01-01

    The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid)-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium) and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp.) on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1) after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and so...

  6. The plant pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici improves bacterial growth and triggers early gene regulations in the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, M; Frey-Klett, P; Boutin, M; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, A-Y; Martin, F; Guillot, L; Sarniguet, A

    2009-01-01

    In soil, some antagonistic rhizobacteria contribute to reduce root diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi. Direct modes of action of these bacteria have been largely explored; however, commensal interaction also takes place between these microorganisms and little is known about the influence of filamentous fungi on bacteria. An in vitro confrontation bioassay between the pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) and the biocontrol bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp was set up to analyse bacterial transcriptional changes induced by the fungal mycelium at three time-points of the interaction before cell contact and up until contact. For this, a Pf29Arp shotgun DNA microarray was constructed. Specifity of Ggt effect was assessed in comparison with one of two other filamentous fungi, Laccaria bicolor and Magnaporthe grisea. During a commensal interaction, Ggt increased the growth rate of Pf29Arp. Before contact, Ggt induced bacterial genes involved in mycelium colonization. At contact, genes encoding protein of stress response and a patatin-like protein were up-regulated. Among all the bacterial genes identified, xseB was specifically up-regulated at contact by Ggt but down-regulated by the other fungi. Data showed that the bacterium sensed the presence of the fungus early, but the main gene alteration occurred during bacterial-fungal cell contact. PMID:19121038

  7. Effect of an acute necrotic bacterial gill infection and feed deprivation on the metabolic rate of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M A; Powell, M D; Becker, J A; Carter, C G

    2007-10-31

    In this study, experiments were conducted to examine the effect of an acute necrotic bacterial gill infection on the metabolic rate (M(O2)) of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. Fed and unfed Atlantic salmon smolts were exposed to a high concentration (5 x 10(12) CFU ml(-1)) of the bacteria Tenacibaculum maritimum, their routine and maximum metabolic rates (M(O2rout) and M(O2max), respectively) were measured, and relative metabolic scope determined. A significant decrease in metabolic scope was found for both fed and unfed infected groups. Fed infected fish had a mean +/- standard error of the mean (SEM) decrease of 2.21 +/- 0.97 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1), whilst unfed fish a mean +/- SEM decrease of 3.16 +/- 1.29 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1). The decrease in metabolic scope was a result of significantly increased M(O2rout) of both fed and unfed infected salmon. Fed infected fish had a mean +/- SEM increase in M(O2rout) of 1.86 +/- 0.66 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1), whilst unfed infected fish had a mean +/- SEM increase of 2.16 +/- 0.72 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1). Interestingly, all groups maintained M(O2max) regardless of infection status. Increases in M(O2rout) corresponded to a significant increase in blood plasma osmolality. A decrease in metabolic scope has implications for how individuals allocate energy; fish with smaller metabolic scope will have less energy to allocate to functions such as growth, reproduction and immune response, which may adversely affect the efficiency of fish growth. PMID:18159670

  8. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  9. Effects of assimilable organic carbon and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Liu

    Full Text Available Assimilable organic carbon (AOC is one of the most important factors affecting the re-growth of microorganisms in drinking water. High AOC concentrations result in biological instability, but disinfection kills microbes to ensure the safety of drinking water. Free chlorine is an important oxidizing agent used during the disinfection process. Therefore, we explored the combined effects of AOC and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water using flow cytometry (FCM. The initial AOC concentration was 168 μg.L(-1 in all water samples. Without free chlorine, the concentrations of intact bacteria increased but the level of AOC decreased. The addition of sodium hypochlorite caused an increase and fluctuation in AOC due to the oxidation of organic carbon. The concentrations of intact bacteria decreased from 1.1 × 10(5 cells.mL(-1 to 2.6 × 10(4 cells.mL(-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.6 mg.L(-1 to 4.8 × 10(4 cells.mL(-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.3 mg.L(-1 due to free chlorine originating from sodium hypochlorite. Additionally, free chlorine might be more obviously affected AOC concentrations than microbial growth did. These results suggested that AOC and free chlorine might have combined effects on microbial growth. In this study, our results showed concentrations determined by FCM were higher than those by HPC, which indicated that some E. coli detected by FCM might not be detected using HPC in drinking water. The level of free chlorine might restrain the consumption of AOC by inhibiting the growth of E. coli; on the other hand, chlorination might increase the level of AOC, thereby increase the potential for microbial growth in the drinking water network.

  10. The effect of different growth regimes on the endophytic bacterial communities of the fern, Dicksonia sellowiana hook (Dicksoniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene de Araújo Barros

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Endophytic bacteria associated with the fern Dicksonia sellowiana were investigated. The bacterial communities from the surface-sterilized pinnae and rachis segments of the plants from the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest that grew in native field conditions were compared with the bacterial communities from plants grown in greenhouses and plants that were initially grown in greenhouses and then transferred to the forest. From 540 pinnae and 540 rachis segments, 163 (30.2% and 346 (64.2% were colonized by bacteria, respectively. The main bacterial genera and species that were isolated included Bacillus spp. (B. cereus, B. megaterium, B. pumilus and B. subtilis, Paenibacillus sp., Amphibacillus sp., Gracilibacillus sp., Micrococcus sp. and Stenotrophomonas spp. (S. maltophilia and S. nitroreducens. B. pumilus was the most frequently isolated bacterial species. Amphibacillus and Gracilibacillus were reported as endophytes for the first time. Other commonly found bacterial genera were not observed in D. sellowiana, which may reflect preferences of specific bacterial communities inside this fern or detection limitations due to the isolation procedures. Plants that were grown in greenhouses and plants that were reintroduced into the forest displayed more bacterial genera and species diversity than native field plants, suggesting that reintroduction shifts the bacterial diversity. Endophytic bacteria that displayed antagonistic properties against different microorganisms were detected, but no obvious correlation was found between their frequencies with plant tissues or with plants from different growth regimes. This paper reports the first isolation of endophytic bacteria from a fern.

  11. The Importance of Growth Kinetic Analysis in Determining Bacterial Susceptibility against Antibiotics and Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eTheophel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Routine antibiotics susceptibility testing still relies on standardized cultivation-based analyses, including measurement of inhibition zones in conventional agar diffusion tests and endpoint turbidity-based measurements. Here, we demonstrate that common off-line monitoring and endpoint determination after 18–24 h could be insufficient for reliable growth-dependent evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility. Different minimal inhibitory concentrations were obtained in 20- and 48-h microdilution plate tests using an Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate (strain UKI-MB07 as a model organism. Hence, we used an on-line kinetic assay for simultaneous cultivation and time-resolved growth analysis in a 96-well format instead of off-line susceptibility testing. Growth of the Enterococcus test organism was delayed up to 30 h in the presence of 0.25 µg mL-1 of vancomycin and 8 µg mL-1 of fosfomycin, after which pronounced growth was observed. Despite the delayed onset of growth, treatment with fosfomycin, daptomycin, fusidic acid, cefoxitin, or gentamicin resulted in higher maximum growth rates and/or higher final optical density values compared with antibiotic-free controls, indicating that growth stimulation and hormetic effects may occur with extended exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations. Whereas neither maximum growth rate nor final cell density correlated with antibiotic concentration, the lag phase duration for some antibiotics was a more meaningful indicator of dose-dependent growth inhibition. Our results also reveal that non-temporal growth profiles are only of limited value for cultivation-based antimicrobial silver nanoparticle susceptibility testing. The exposure to Ag(0 nanoparticles led to plasma membrane damage in a concentration-dependent manner and induced oxidative stress in Enterococcus faecium UKI-MB07, as shown by intracellular ROS accumulation.

  12. Impurity leaching rates of 1000 liter growth tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A; Floyd, R; Robey, H F; Torres, R

    1999-02-19

    This memo reports on the analysis of some recent measurements of solution impurity levels in the three KDP and one DKDP Pilot Production 1000 liter growth tanks (Tanks B, C, D, & F). Solution samples were taken on a weekly basis during recent crystal growth runs in each tank and were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-ES). The solution history for five specific elements, Si, B, Al, Fe and Ca will be analyzed in detail. The first four of these elements are input into solution via slow dissolution of the glass vessel at a rate which is strongly dependent on the solution temperature. Si and B continuously accumulate in solution, since they are not incorporated into the crystal. Al and Fe by comparison are incorporated into the crystal (primarily the prismatic sectors) and present problems to inclusion-free growth (Al) and 30 damage (Fe). The level of these impurities initially increases when the crystal size is small but later decreases when the rate of incorporation into the crystal exceeds the rate of dissolution of the glass tank. The last element, Ca is of interest since it has recently been observed to be one of the elements found at the location of 3cu damage. For Si and B, the dissolution or leach rate from the glass tank is easily obtained from the results of the chemical analysis. The temperature dependent leach rates are shown to be comparable (within a factor of two) for all four tanks, with Tank B (DKDP) having the lowest rate of Si accumulation. The glass leach rates of the two incorporating elements Al and Fe require substantially more analysis as the daily variation of the crystal dimensions, the solution concentration, and the mass of KDP remaining in solution must be taken into account in order to separate the rate of impurity incorporation from the rate of dissolution of the glass. The method for accomplishing this separation is described, and the result obtained is that the leach rates of all four tanks are within a

  13. Effects of sulfur chemistry and flow rate on fatigue crack growth rates in LWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue crack growth rate tests, at a load ratio of 0.2, have been conducted on steels of low, medium and high sulfur contents (0.004%, 0.013% and 0.025%) in PWR water at both low and high flow rates. Crack growth rates show no dependence on flow rate, but are strongly dependent on sulfur content, with a large proportion of environmental assistance for the highest sulfur contents. Tests of low and high sulfur content steels at a load ratio of 0.7 show relatively little environmental assistance in either case. The fractography of these specimens shows the usual brittle appearance for environmentally-assisted fatigue crack growth. In addition, the opposing fracture surfaces match perfectly, indicating that little or no dissolution of the metal matrix has occurred, and there is very little plastic flow associated with the fatigue cracking process. The x-ray photoelectron emission examination of the fracture surface oxides shows that FeS and FeS2 coexist in the oxide layer, suggesting that the conditions within the crack enclave involved near-neutral pH and cathodic potentials

  14. On the growth rate of leaf-wise intersections

    CERN Document Server

    Macarini, Leonardo; Paternain, Gabriel P

    2011-01-01

    We define a new variant of Rabinowitz Floer homology that is particularly well suited to studying the growth rate of leaf-wise intersections. We prove that for closed manifolds $M$ whose loop space is "complicated", if $\\Sigma$ is a non-degenerate fibrewise starshaped hypersurface in $T^*M$ and $\\phi$ is a generic Hamiltonian diffeomorphism then the number of leaf-wise intersection points of $\\phi$ in $\\Sigma$ grows exponentially in time. Concrete examples of such manifolds $M$ are the connected sum of two copies of $S^2 \\times S^2$, the connected sum of $T^4$ and $CP^2$, or any surface of genus greater than one.

  15. Effects of Gypsophila saponins on bacterial growth kinetics and on selection of subterranean clover rhizosphere bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons, F; Amellal, N; Leyval, C; Saint-Martin, N; Henry, M

    2003-06-01

    Plant secondary metabolites, such as saponins, have a considerable impact in agriculture because of their allelopathic effects. They also affect the growth of soil microorganisms, especially fungi. We investigated the influence of saponins on rhizosphere bacteria in vitro and in soil conditions. The effects of gypsophila saponins on the growth kinetics of rhizosphere bacteria were studied by monitoring the absorbance of the cultures in microtiter plates. Gypsophila saponins (1%) increased the lag phase of bacterial growth. The impact of gypsophila saponins on subterranean clover rhizosphere was also investigated in a pot experiment. The addition of gypsophila saponins did not modify clover biomass but significantly increased (twofold with 1% saponins) the weight of adhering soil. The number of culturable heterotrophic bacteria of the clover rhizosphere was not affected by the addition of gypsophila saponins. Nevertheless, the phenotypical characterization of the dominant Gram-negative strains of the clover rhizosphere, using the Biolog system, showed qualitative and quantitative differences induced by 1% saponins. With the addition of saponins, the populations of Chryseomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp., the two dominant culturable genera of control clover, were no longer detectable or were significantly decreased, while that of Aquaspirillum dispar increased and Aquaspirillum spp. became the major genus. Aquaspirillum dispar and Aquaspirillum spp. were also the dominant rhizosphere bacteria of Gypsophila paniculata, which greatly accumulates these saponins in its roots. These results suggest that saponins may control rhizosphere bacteria in soil through rhizodeposition mechanisms. PMID:14569290

  16. Sevoflurane Contamination: Water Accumulation in Sevoflurane Vaporizers Can Allow Bacterial Growth in the Vaporizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Arthur W

    2016-06-15

    Sevoflurane vaporizers (GE Tec 7) were difficult to fill with "slow flow" and a need to "burp." Evaluation of the bottle of sevoflurane (AbbVie Ultane) demonstrated a contaminant. Four of the facilities' 13 sevoflurane vaporizers had the contaminant. Unopened sevoflurane bottles did not have evidence of contamination. The contaminant was found to be water at pH 6.0 growing Staphylococcus epidermidis. Gas chromatography revealed the production of multiple metabolites of sevoflurane, including primarily urea and 1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (83% and 9.6% of volatiles) in addition to multiple other organic molecules. Sevoflurane contains water that can accumulate in vaporizers allowing bacterial growth. PMID:27301057

  17. Attached biomass growth and substrate utilization rate in a moving bed biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Marques

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A moving bed bioreactor containing cubes of polyether foam immersed in a synthetic wastewater (an aqueous mixture of meat extract, yeast extract, dextrose, meat peptone, ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, potassium mono-hydrogen-phosphate and magnesium sulphate was used to evaluate bacterial growth and biomass yield parameters based on Monod's equation. The wastewater was supplied in the bottom of the equipment flowing ascending in parallel with a diffused air current that provided the mixing of the reactor content. Suspended and attached biomass concentration was measured through gravimetric methods. Good agreement was found between experimental kinetic parameters values and those obtained by other researchers. The only significant difference was the high global biomass content about 2 times the values obtained in conventional processes, providing high performance with volumetric loading rates up to 5.5 kg COD/m³/d.

  18. The effects of accelerated growth rates and estrogen implants in prepubertal Holstein heifers on growth, feed efficiency, and blood parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, B P; Heinrichs, A J; Kensinger, R S

    1999-08-01

    Sixty-eight Holstein heifers were used to determine the effects of accelerated growth rates by increased nutrient intake and estrogen implants on feed efficiency, structural growth, and blood parameters in heifers between 19 and 39 wk of age. At the beginning of the treatment period, the heifers were assigned to one of four treatment groups by using a randomized complete block design in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement. The treatments were standard growth rate (700 g/d), accelerated growth rate (1000 g/d), standard growth rate with an estradiol implant, and accelerated growth rate with an estradiol implant. All heifers received the same diet, but dry matter intake was adjusted weekly to achieve the target rate of gain. Accelerating heifer growth rates from 705 to 1007 g/d improved feed efficiency 5.1%, increased the rate of withers height, heart girth, and hip width growth 12, 27, and 27%, respectively, and body condition scores 0.25 points. Estradiol implants improved feed efficiency 2.4% and decreased the rate of withers height 6% and heart girth growth 3.5%. Increased nutrient intake and average daily gain depressed mean plasma growth hormone and urea nitrogen content 17 and 7%, respectively, while elevating insulin-like growth factor-1 levels by 10%. Estradiol implants increased mean plasma growth hormone content by 29% and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels by 17%, but decreased urea nitrogen content by 11%. Feeding prepubertal heifers for accelerated growth rates increased structural growth with a small increase in body condition, whereas estradiol implants improved feed efficiency and decreased the growth rate of withers height and heart girth without affecting the rate of hip width growth. PMID:10480101

  19. Relationship between maternal distress with fetus growth rate: mediator role of heart rate

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The aim of present investigation was to study the relationship between mothers` distress and fetal growth. In this correlational study, 110 pregnant women selected randomly and completed Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) before ultrasound measurement of fetus. The results of structural equation model have shown that the overall model has been accepted (χ2 = 36.4, df = 24, p>0.05). In fact, by increasing mothers` stress and anxiety, the fetus heart rate was increased and it decreased the ...

  20. Standard test method for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fatigue crack growth rates from near-threshold to Kmax controlled instability. Results are expressed in terms of the crack-tip stress-intensity factor range (ΔK), defined by the theory of linear elasticity. 1.2 Several different test procedures are provided, the optimum test procedure being primarily dependent on the magnitude of the fatigue crack growth rate to be measured. 1.3 Materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by strength so long as specimens are of sufficient thickness to preclude buckling and of sufficient planar size to remain predominantly elastic during testing. 1.4 A range of specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but size is variable to be adjusted for yield strength and applied force. Specimen thickness may be varied independent of planar size. 1.5 The details of the various specimens and test configurations are shown in Annex A1-Annex A3. Specimen configurations other than t...

  1. Perspectives on massive coral growth rates in a changing ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Janice M; Cantin, Neal E

    2014-06-01

    The tropical ocean environment is changing at an unprecedented rate, with warming and severe tropical cyclones creating obvious impacts to coral reefs within the last few decades and projections of acidification raising concerns for the future of these iconic and economically important ecosystems. Documenting variability and detecting change in global and regional climate relies upon high-quality observational records of climate variables supplemented, prior to the mid-19th century, with reconstructions from various sources of proxy climate information. Here we review how annual density banding patterns that are recorded in the skeletons of massive reef-building corals have been used to document environmental change and impacts within coral reefs. Massive corals provide a historical perspective of continuous calcification processes that pre-date most ecological observations of coral reefs. High-density stress bands, abrupt declines in annual linear extension, and evidence of partial mortality within the skeletal growth record reveal signatures of catastrophic stress events that have recently been attributed to mass bleaching events caused by unprecedented thermal stress. Comparison of recent trends in annual calcification with century-scale baseline calcification rates reveals that the frequency of growth anomalies has increased since the late 1990s throughout most of the world's coral reef ecosystems. Continuous coral growth histories provide valuable retrospective information on the coral response to environmental change and the consequences of anthropogenic climate change. Co-ordinated efforts to synthesize and combine global calcification histories will greatly enhance our understanding of current calcification responses to a changing ocean. PMID:25070864

  2. Simultaneous Assessment of Acidogenesis-Mitigation and Specific Bacterial Growth-Inhibition by Dentifrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Forbes

    Full Text Available Dentifrices can augment oral hygiene by inactivating bacteria and at sub-lethal concentrations may affect bacterial metabolism, potentially inhibiting acidogenesis, the main cause of caries. Reported herein is the development of a rapid method to simultaneously measure group-specific bactericidal and acidogenesis-mitigation effects of dentifrices on oral bacteria. Saliva was incubated aerobically and anaerobically in Tryptone Soya Broth, Wilkins-Chalgren Broth with mucin, or artificial saliva and was exposed to dentifrices containing triclosan/copolymer (TD; sodium fluoride (FD; stannous fluoride and zinc lactate (SFD1; or stannous fluoride, zinc lactate and stannous chloride (SFD2. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined turbidometrically whilst group-specific minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC were assessed using growth media and conditions selective for total aerobes, total anaerobes, streptococci and Gram-negative anaerobes. Minimum acid neutralization concentration (MNC was defined as the lowest concentration of dentifrice at which acidification was inhibited. Differences between MIC and MNC were calculated and normalized with respect to MIC to derive the combined inhibitory and neutralizing capacity (CINC, a cumulative measure of acidogenesis-mitigation and growth inhibition. The overall rank order for growth inhibition potency (MIC under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was: TD> SFD2> SFD1> FD. Acidogenesis-mitigation (MNC was ordered; TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1. CINC was ordered TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1 aerobically and TD> FD> SFD1> SFD2 anaerobically. With respect to group-specific bactericidal activity, TD generally exhibited the greatest potency, particularly against total aerobes, total anaerobes and streptococci. This approach enables the rapid simultaneous evaluation of acidity mitigation, growth inhibition and specific antimicrobial activity by dentifrices.

  3. Small regulatory RNA-induced growth rate heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Ruben A T; Nicolas, Pierre; Ciccolini, Mariano; Reilman, Ewoud; Reder, Alexander; Schaffer, Marc; Mäder, Ulrike; Völker, Uwe; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Denham, Emma L

    2015-03-01

    Isogenic bacterial populations can consist of cells displaying heterogeneous physiological traits. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) could affect this heterogeneity since they act by fine-tuning mRNA or protein levels to coordinate the appropriate cellular behavior. Here we show that the sRNA RnaC/S1022 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can suppress exponential growth by modulation of the transcriptional regulator AbrB. Specifically, the post-transcriptional abrB-RnaC/S1022 interaction allows B. subtilis to increase the cell-to-cell variation in AbrB protein levels, despite strong negative autoregulation of the abrB promoter. This behavior is consistent with existing mathematical models of sRNA action, thus suggesting that induction of protein expression noise could be a new general aspect of sRNA regulation. Importantly, we show that the sRNA-induced diversity in AbrB levels generates heterogeneity in growth rates during the exponential growth phase. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the resulting subpopulations of fast- and slow-growing B. subtilis cells reflect a bet-hedging strategy for enhanced survival of unfavorable conditions. PMID:25790031

  4. Small regulatory RNA-induced growth rate heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben A T Mars

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Isogenic bacterial populations can consist of cells displaying heterogeneous physiological traits. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs could affect this heterogeneity since they act by fine-tuning mRNA or protein levels to coordinate the appropriate cellular behavior. Here we show that the sRNA RnaC/S1022 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can suppress exponential growth by modulation of the transcriptional regulator AbrB. Specifically, the post-transcriptional abrB-RnaC/S1022 interaction allows B. subtilis to increase the cell-to-cell variation in AbrB protein levels, despite strong negative autoregulation of the abrB promoter. This behavior is consistent with existing mathematical models of sRNA action, thus suggesting that induction of protein expression noise could be a new general aspect of sRNA regulation. Importantly, we show that the sRNA-induced diversity in AbrB levels generates heterogeneity in growth rates during the exponential growth phase. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the resulting subpopulations of fast- and slow-growing B. subtilis cells reflect a bet-hedging strategy for enhanced survival of unfavorable conditions.

  5. Effect of inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate and immune parameters in Pacific White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutchanee Chotikachinda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of dietary inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate, and immune parameters in pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei was investigated. Three dosages of inactive yeast cell wall (0, 1, and 2 g kg-1 were tested in three replicate groups of juvenile shrimps with an average initial weight of 7.15±0.05 g for four weeks. There was no significant difference in final weight, survival rate, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, feed intake, protein efficiency ratio, and apparent net protein utilization of each treatments. However, different levels of inactive yeast cell wall showed an effect on certain immune parameters (p<0.05. Total hemocyte counts, granular hemocyte count, and bacterial clearance were better in shrimp fed diets supplemented with 1 and 2 g kg-1 inactive yeast cell wall as compared with thecontrol group.

  6. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrey Silvia D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum. The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines. Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites.

  7. Growth rate controlled barium partitioning in calcite and aragonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetschl, Katja Elisabeth; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Baldermann, Andre; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The barium (Ba) content and the Ba/Ca molar ratios in biogenic and abiotic carbonates have been widely used from the scientific community as a geochemical proxy especially in marine and early diagenetic settings. The Ba content of carbonate minerals has been earlier associated to changes in oceanic circulation that may have been caused by upwelling, changes in weathering regimes and river-runoff as well as melt water discharge. The physicochemical controls of Ba ion incorporation in the two most abundant CaCO3 polymorphs found in Earth's surface environments, i.e. calcite and aragonite, have adequately been studied only for calcite. These earlier studies (i.e. [1]) suggest that at increasing growth rate, Ba partitioning in calcite is increasing as well. In contrast, to date the effect of growth rate on the partitioning of Ba in aragonite remains questionable, despite the fact that this mineral phase is the predominant carbonate-forming polymorph in shallow marine environments. To shed light on the mechanisms controlling Ba ion uptake in carbonates in this study we performed steady-state Ba co-precipitation experiments with calcite and aragonite at 25°C. The obtained results for the partitioning of Ba in calcite are in good agreement with those reported earlier by [1], whereas those for aragonite indicate a reduction of Ba partitioning at elevated aragonite growth rates, with the partitioning coefficient value between solid and fluid to be approaching the unity. This finding is good agreement with the formation of a solid solution in the aragonite-witherite system, owing to the isostructural crystallography of the two mineral phases. Moreover, our data set provides new insights that are required for reconstructing the evolution of the Ba content of pristine marine versus diagenetically altered carbonate minerals commonly occurring in marine subfloor settings, as the thermodynamically less stable aragonite will transform to calcite enriched in Ba, whilst affecting

  8. Long-term warming of a subarctic heath decreases soil bacterial community growth but has no effects on its temperature adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Bååth, E

    2011-01-01

    , respectively. The decrease was most likely due to decreased availability of labile substrate under warming. However, we found no evidence for temperature adaptation of soil bacterial communities. The optimum temperature for bacterial growth was on average 25 °C, and the apparent minimum temperature for growth......We tested whether bacterial communities of subarctic heath soil are adapted to elevated temperature after experimental warming by open-top greenhouses for 7 or 17 years. The long-term warming by 1–2 °C significantly decreased bacterial community growth, by 28% and 73% after 7 and 17 years...

  9. Growth kinetics of a diesel-degrading bacterial strain from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahalan, S F A; Yunus, I; Johari, W L W; Shukor, M Y; Halmi, M I E; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2014-03-01

    A diesel-degrading bacterium was isolated from a diesel-contaminated site in Selangor, Malaysia. The isolate was tentatively identified as Acinetobacter sp. strain DRY12 based on partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny and Biolog GN microplate panels and Microlog database. Optimum growth occurred from 3 to 5% diesel and the strain was able to tolerate as high as 8% diesel. The optimal pH that supported growth of the bacterium was between pH 7.5 to 8.0. The isolate exhibited optimal growth in between 30 and 35 degrees C. The best nitrogen source was potassium nitrate (between 0.6 and 0.9% (w/v)) followed by ammonium chloride, sodium nitrite and ammonium sulphate in descending order. An almost complete removal of diesel components was seen from the reduction in hydrocarbon peaks observed using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography analysis after 10 days of incubation. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibiting growth with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate- micromax was 0.039 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant Ks and inhibition constant Ki, were 0.387% and 4.46%, respectively. MATH assays showed that 75% of the bacterium was found in the hexadecane phase indicating that the bacterium was hydrophobic. The characteristics of this bacterium make it useful for bioremediation works in the Tropics. PMID:24665769

  10. The transport mechanism of bacterial Cu+-ATPases: distinct efflux rates adapted to different function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimunda, Daniel; González-Guerrero, Manuel; Leeber, Blaise W; Argüello, José M

    2011-06-01

    Cu(+)-ATPases play a key role in bacterial Cu(+) homeostasis by participating in Cu(+) detoxification and cuproprotein assembly. Characterization of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA, a model protein within the subfamily of P(1B-1) type ATPases, has provided structural and mechanistic details on this group of transporters. Atomic resolution structures of cytoplasmic regulatory metal binding domains (MBDs) and catalytic actuator, phosphorylation, and nucleotide binding domains are available. These, in combination with whole protein structures resulting from cryo-electron microscopy analyses, have enabled the initial modeling of these transporters. Invariant residues in helixes 6, 7 and 8 form two transmembrane metal binding sites (TM-MBSs). These bind Cu(+) with high affinity in a trigonal planar geometry. The cytoplasmic Cu(+) chaperone CopZ transfers the metal directly to the TM-MBSs; however, loading both of the TM-MBSs requires binding of nucleotides to the enzyme. In agreement with the classical transport mechanism of P-type ATPases, occupancy of both transmembrane sites by cytoplasmic Cu(+) is a requirement for enzyme phosphorylation and subsequent transport into the periplasmic or extracellular milieus. Recent transport studies have shown that all Cu(+)-ATPases drive cytoplasmic Cu(+) efflux, albeit with quite different transport rates in tune with their various physiological roles. Archetypical Cu(+)-efflux pumps responsible for Cu(+) tolerance, like the Escherichia coli CopA, have turnover rates ten times higher than those involved in cuproprotein assembly (or alternative functions). This explains the incapability of the latter group to significantly contribute to the metal efflux required for survival in high copper environments. PMID:21210186

  11. Biochemical composition of Rhodomonas baltica as a function of the dilution rate during steady rate of growth

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Hoang Bao Chau

    2013-01-01

    The algae Rhodomonas baltica, Karsten was cultured in Guillard f-medium with the phosphate concentration reduced to 5 µmol/L. The cultures were diluted at seven different dilution rates corresponding approximately to growth rates of 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100% of µmax measured in batch culture. The biochemical composition of the algae was measured for variable specific growth rate in cultures maintained in steady state of growth. The main objective of the thesis was to study the...

  12. Does seed mass drive the differences in relative growth rate between growth forms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jennie; Thompson, Ken; Rees, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The idea that herbaceous plants have higher relative growth rates (RGRs) compared with woody plants is fundamental to many of the most influential theories in plant ecology. This difference in growth rate is thought to reflect systematic variation in physiology, allocation and leaf construction. Previous studies documenting this effect have, however, ignored differences in seed mass. As woody species often have larger seeds and RGR is negatively correlated with seed mass, it is entirely possible the lower RGRs observed in woody species is a consequence of having larger seeds rather than different growth strategies. Using a synthesis of the published literature, we explored the relationship between RGR and growth form, accounting for the effects of seed mass and study-specific effects (e.g. duration of study and pot volume), using a mixed-effects model. The model showed that herbaceous species do indeed have higher RGRs than woody species, and that the difference was independent of seed mass, thus at all seed masses, herbaceous species on average grow faster than woody ones. PMID:23677351

  13. Reproductive value, the stable stage distribution, and the sensitivity of the population growth rate to changes in vital rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hal Caswell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The population growth rate, or intrinsic rate of increase, measures the potential rate of growth of a population with specified and fixed vital rates.The sensitivity of population growth rate to changes in the vital rates can be written in terms of the stable stage or age distribution and the reproductive value distribution. If the vital rate measures the rate of production of one type of individual by another, then the sensitivity of growth rate is proportional to the reproductive value of the destination type and the representation in the stable stage distribution of the source type. This formal relationship exists in three forms: one limited to age-classified populations, a second that applies to stage- or age-classified populations, and a third that uses matrix calculus. Each uses a different set of formal demographic techniques; together they provide a relationship that beautifully cuts across different types of demographic models.

  14. Rating Growth of Scientific Knowledge and Risk from Theory Bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    In physics the value of a theory is measured by its agreement with experimental data. But how should the physics community gauge the value of an emerging theory that has not been tested experimentally as of yet? With no reality check, a hypothesis like string theory may linger for a while before physicists will know its actual value in describing nature. In this short article, I advocate the need for a website operated by graduate students that will use various measures of publicly available data (such as the growth rate of newly funded experiments, research grants, publications, and faculty jobs) to gauge the future dividends of various research frontiers. The analysis can benefit from past experience (e.g. in research areas that suffered from limited experimental data over long periods of time) and aim to alert the community of the risk from future theory bubbles.

  15. Growth rate inhibition of phytopathogenic fungi by characterized chitosans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio N. Oliveira Junior

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effects of fifteen chitosans with different degrees of polymerization (DP and different degrees of acetylation (F A on the growth rates (GR of four phytopathogenic fungi (Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum, and Rhizopus stolonifer were examined using a 96-well microtiter plate and a microplate reader. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the chitosans ranged from 100 µg × mL-1 to 1,000 µg × mL-1 depending on the fungus tested and the DP and F A of the chitosan. The antifungal activity of the chitosans increased with decreasing F A. Chitosans with low F A and high DP showed the highest inhibitory activity against all four fungi. P. expansum and B. cinerea were relatively less susceptible while A. alternata and R. stolonifer were relatively more sensitive to the chitosan polymers. Scanning electron microscopy of fungi grown on culture media amended with chitosan revealed morphological changes.

  16. International co-operative group on cyclic crack growth rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Cyclic Crack Growth Group was formed in 1977 with the general objective to co-ordinate research and development efforts on corrosion fatigue on pressure boundary materials in light water reactor service environments. Three co-operative programs have been agreed. The first was on data reduction methods. The same raw data were given to the members and the derived curves of dα/dN, as a function of ΔK, obtained, were then compared. Many discrepancies were observed at the first attempt but comparison and discussion enabled the participants to reach a good agreement. The second was a Round-Robin experiment on pressure vessel steel in a water environment at 2880C. The results were most interesting and an understanding of the discrepancies observed was achieved. The third program is Round-Robin tests on pressure vessel steel specimens in simulated BWR and PWR environments at high R ratios. The aim of this co-operative work is to develop a sufficient understanding of the mechanisms controlling the rate of crack growth to enable all the data generated in different laboratories to be used by the international technical community with confidence as truly representative of typical LWR operational conditions. (author)

  17. Aerosol observations and growth rates in the tropical tropopause layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Waddicor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of Aitken and accumulation mode aerosol observed downwind of the anvils of deep tropical thunderstorms. The measurements were made by condensation nuclei counters flown on the Egrett high-altitude aircraft from Darwin during the ACTIVE campaign, in monsoon conditions producing widespread convection over land and ocean. Maximum measured concentrations of aerosol in the size range 10–100 nm were 25 000 cm−3 STP. By calculating back-trajectories from the observations, and projecting on to infrared satellite images, the time since the air exited cloud was estimated. In this way a time scale of ~ 3–4 h was derived for the 10–100 nm aerosol concentration to reach its peak. We examine the hypothesis that the growth in aerosol concentrations can be explained by production of sulphuric acid from SO2 followed by particle nucleation and coagulation. Estimates of the sulphuric acid production rate show that the observations are only consistent with this hypothesis if the particles coagulate to sizes > 10 nm much more quickly than is suggested by current theory. Alternatively, other condensible gases (possibly organic drive the growth of aerosol particles in the TTL.

  18. Error Growth Rate in the MM5 Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, S.; Palamarchuk, J.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this work is to estimate model error growth rates in simulations of the atmospheric circulation by the MM5 model all the way from the short range to the medium range and beyond. The major topics are addressed to: (i) search the optimal set of parameterization schemes; (ii) evaluate the spatial structure and scales of the model error for various atmospheric fields; (iii) determine geographical regions where model errors are largest; (iv) define particular atmospheric patterns contributing to the fast and significant model error growth. Results are presented for geopotential, temperature, relative humidity and horizontal wind components fields on standard surfaces over the Atlantic-European region during winter 2002. Various combinations of parameterization schemes for cumulus, PBL, moisture and radiation are used to identify which one provides a lesser difference between the model state and analysis. The comparison of the model fields is carried out versus ERA-40 reanalysis of the ECMWF. Results show that the rate, at which the model error grows as well as its magnitude, varies depending on the forecast range, atmospheric variable and level. The typical spatial scale and structure of the model error also depends on the particular atmospheric variable. The distribution of the model error over the domain can be separated in two parts: the steady and transient. The first part is associated with a few high mountain regions including Greenland, where model error is larger. The transient model error mainly moves along with areas of high gradients in the atmospheric flow. Acknowledgement: This study has been supported by NATO Science for Peace grant #981044. The MM5 modelling system used in this study has been provided by UCAR. ERA-40 re-analysis data have been obtained from the ECMWF data server.

  19. N-acetyl-L-cysteine affects growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, and bacterial biofilm formation on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-08-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Using 10 different bacterial strains isolated from a paper mill, we found that the mode of action of NAC is chemical, as well as biological, in the case of bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces. The initial adhesion of bacteria is dependent on the wettability of the substratum. NAC was shown to bind to stainless steel, increasing the wettability of the surface. Moreover, NAC decreased bacterial adhesion and even detached bacteria that were adhering to stainless steel surfaces. Growth of various bacteria, as monocultures or in a multispecies community, was inhibited at different concentrations of NAC. We also found that there was no detectable degradation of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by NAC, indicating that NAC reduced the production of EPS, in most bacteria tested, even at concentrations at which growth was not affected. Altogether, the presence of NAC changes the texture of the biofilm formed and makes NAC an interesting candidate for use as a general inhibitor of formation of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel surfaces. PMID:12902275

  20. Product formation from thiophene by a mixed bacterial culture. Influence of benzene as growth substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivas, Isabelle Marie; Mosbæk, Hans; Arvin, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The influence of benzene as a growth substrate on the cometabolic conversion of thiophene was investigated in batch systems with microorganisms originating from an creosote contaminated site. Benzene was shown to stimulate the conversion of thiophene with a first-order rate, during the initial...... phase of transformation. The microorganisms were able to transform thiophene in the absence of benzene at a zero-order rate. Thiophene was converted to five oxidation products, regardless of the presence of benzene. Benzene had no influence on the distribution of these oxidation products. The main...

  1. Utility of phenomenological models for describing temperature dependence of bacterial growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Heitzer, A.; Kohler, H P; Reichert, P.; Hamer, G

    1991-01-01

    We compared three unstructured mathematical models, the master reaction, the square root, and the damage/repair models, for describing the relationship between temperature and the specific growth rates of bacteria. The models were evaluated on the basis of several criteria: applicability, ease of use, simple interpretation of model parameters, problem-free determination of model parameters, statistical evaluation of goodness of fit (chi 2 test), and biological relevance. Best-fit parameters f...

  2. The Influence of Ozonization For DO, BOD and Bacterial Growth in The Liquid Waste From Tanning Leather Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research of ozonization influence of dissolved oxygen (DO), biological oxygen demand (BOD) and the bacterial growth in the liquid waste from tanning leather industry has been done. The objectives of this research was to studied the influence of ozonization for decomposition process of the organic compound in these waste by indicator of BOD decreased, increased of DO and decomposer bacterial growth. The ozonization was carried out by time variation 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120, 135, 150, 165, 180, 195 and 210 minutes. Each samples of the waste has been ozonized keep in the sterile reaction tube for isolated of bacterial and the other keep in the bottle for BOD and DO measurement. These research results show that ozonization with 16.243 x 10-4 mg/second debit for 3 hours can decreased of BOD were 19.61 %, and ozonization for 3.5 hours can increased of DO were 82.5%. The other hand, 3 hours ozonization can decreased of kind of bacterial growth were 80 %. (author)

  3. Stimulated bacterial growth under elevated p CO₂: results from an off-shore mesocosm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Sonja; Galgani, Luisa; Riebesell, Ulf; Schulz, Kai-Georg; Engel, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Marine bacteria are the main consumers of freshly produced organic matter. Many enzymatic processes involved in the bacterial digestion of organic compounds were shown to be pH sensitive in previous studies. Due to the continuous rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration, seawater pH is presently decreasing at a rate unprecedented during the last 300 million years but the consequences for microbial physiology, organic matter cycling and marine biogeochemistry are still unresolved. We studied the effects of elevated seawater pCO2 on a natural plankton community during a large-scale mesocosm study in a Norwegian fjord. Nine Kiel Off-Shore Mesocosms for Future Ocean Simulations (KOSMOS) were adjusted to different pCO2 levels ranging initially from ca. 280 to 3000 µatm and sampled every second day for 34 days. The first phytoplankton bloom developed around day 5. On day 14, inorganic nutrients were added to the enclosed, nutrient-poor waters to stimulate a second phytoplankton bloom, which occurred around day 20. Our results indicate that marine bacteria benefit directly and indirectly from decreasing seawater pH. During the first phytoplankton bloom, 5-10% more transparent exopolymer particles were formed in the high pCO2 mesocosms. Simultaneously, the efficiency of the protein-degrading enzyme leucine aminopeptidase increased with decreasing pH resulting in up to three times higher values in the highest pCO2/lowest pH mesocosm compared to the controls. In general, total and cell-specific aminopeptidase activities were elevated under low pH conditions. The combination of enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of organic matter and increased availability of gel particles as substrate supported up to 28% higher bacterial abundance in the high pCO2 treatments. We conclude that ocean acidification has the potential to stimulate the bacterial community and facilitate the microbial recycling of freshly produced organic matter, thus strengthening the role of the microbial loop in the

  4. Growth-rate regulated genes have profound impact on interpretation of transcriptome profiling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regenberg, Birgitte; Grotkjaer, Thomas; Winther, Ole;

    2006-01-01

    Growth rate is central to the development of cells in all organisms. However, little is known about the impact of changing growth rates. We used continuous cultures to control growth rate and studied the transcriptional program of the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with generation times...

  5. Growth responses of Picea mongolica seedlings to defoliation rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Chun-jing; HAN Shi-jie; QI Shu-yan; XU Wen-duo; LI Dao-tang

    2005-01-01

    Picea mongolica W. D. Xu. is an endemic species in China. The spruce forest is only found in semi-arid habitat in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. Based on the simulative defoliation experiment, it was proved that Picea mongolica seedlings had the compensatory and overcompensatory effects under the certain defoliation rate. The results of variance analysis on growth indexes showed that in PM Ⅰ (natural regeneration seedlings under Picea mongolica forest), the differences of H1 (height in June 23) and H2 (height in September 3) were extremely significant, and the difference of D(diameter at the breast height) were not significant. In PM Ⅱ (artificial regeneration seedlings under Betula platyphylla Suk. forest), the difference of H1 was significant, the difference of H2 was not significant, and the difference of D was extremely significant. The regression equations were established and the compensatory and overcompensatory points were obtained. In PM Ⅰ , the compensatory points of H1, H2, and D were 0.7628, 0.7436, 0.5725, and the overcompensatory points were 0.6056, 0.5802 and 0.2909 respectively. In PM Ⅱ, the compensatory points of H1, H2, and D are 0.5012, 0.3421, 0.2488, and the overcompensatory points are 0.4137, 0.2633 and 0.0747 respectively. These results suggested that the induction of compensatory growth mechanisms in spruce seedlings required a threshold level of defoliation, and the insects in Picea mongolica forest could be controlled in a certain degree.

  6. Clostridial necrotic enteritis in chicken associated with growth rate depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adin Priadi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen causing necrotic enteritis. C. perfringens only causes necrotic enteritis when it transforms from non-toxin producing type to toxin producing type. The alpha toxin, (phospholipase C is believed to be a key to the occurrence of Clostridial necrotic enteritis (CNE. The best known predisposing factor is mucosal damage, caused by coccidiosis that damages the intestinal lining, making the gut susceptible to infections including C. perfringens. The purpose of this study was to observe the chicken performance in experimental CNE and field cases of CNE. Diagnosis of CNE were made by latex agglutination test, isolation and identification of the agent. Pathological and histopathological changes were also observed. Experimentally, NE could be reproduced when Eimeria sp and C. perfringens spores are inoculated in chicken. Signs of an NE are wet litter and diarrhea, and an increase in mortality is not often obvious. The depression of growth rate and feed efficiency of chicken become noticeable by week 5 because of damage to the intestine and the subsequent reduction in digestion and absorption of food. Subclinical form of CNE was also frequently found in the field, leading to significant decreases in performance. Chicken gut samples examinations revealed that subclinical form of CNE causes damage to the intestinal mucosa caused by C. perfringens leads to decreased digestion and absorption, increased feed conversion ratio and reduced weight gain. Dual infection with C. perfringens and Eimeria sp. was frequently found in field. The results of these studies provide evidence for C. perfringens as a causative bacteria for growth depression.

  7. Bacterial growth and biofilm formation in household-stored groundwater collected from public wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkowska-But, Aleksandra; Kalwasińska, Agnieszka; Swiontek Brzezinska, Maria

    2015-06-01

    The research was aimed at assessing changes in the number of bacteria and evaluating biofilm formation in groundwater collected from public wells, both aspects directly related to the methods of household storage. In the research, water collected from Cretaceous aquifer wells in Toruń (Poland) was stored in a refrigerator and at room temperature. Microbiological parameters of the water were measured immediately after the water collection, and then after 3 and 7 days of storage under specified conditions. The microbiological examination involved determining the number of heterotrophic bacteria capable of growth at 22 and 37 °C, the number of spore-forming bacteria, and the total number of bacteria on membrane filters. The storage may affect water quality to such an extent that the water, which initially met the microbiological criteria for water intended for human consumption, may pose a health risk. The repeated use of the same containers for water storage results in biofilm formation containing live and metabolically active bacterial cells. PMID:26042968

  8. In vitro growth of the bacterial kidney disease organism Renibacterium salmoninarum on a nonserum, noncharcoal-based "homospecies-metabolite" medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teska, J D

    1994-07-01

    Laboratory and field trials were conducted to evaluate in vitro growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum in media without serum or charcoal. Growth of this bacterium, the cause of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in salmonids, is accelerated by addition of a growth enhancing "metabolite" of unknown composition to KDM2 medium, the medium commonly used for isolation of R. salmoninarum. KDM2 medium supplemented with greater than 1% (v/v) metabolite enhanced growth even without addition of either serum or charcoal. Medium containing 5% metabolite (denoted Five-M) allowed optimal growth in laboratory studies and was further evaluated as a primary plating medium for recovery of the bacterium isolated from chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) exhibiting clinical BKD. Recovery rates of R. salmoninarum using Five-M medium were 4% and 36% higher, respectively, than comparable rates using a serum-based medium for the two salmon populations evaluated. Five-M medium is an effective, inexpensive alternative to serum-based or charcoal-based media. PMID:7933282

  9. The Italian Patient (Why Italian Growth Rates Diverges)

    OpenAIRE

    Scognamiglio Pasini Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The performance of Italian economy has always been a fascinating puzzle for economists, both during the miraculous economic boom and in the current age of zero growth. This paper identifies the sluggish productivity dynamic as the main explanatory factor of Italian growth limits. It analyses the existing relationship between productivity and growth from three different points of view: the Keynesian approach, Neo-monetarism and Supply-Side Economics. The paper analyses the Italian growth disea...

  10. Variation in coral growth rates with depth at Discovery Bay, Jamaica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huston, M.

    1985-01-01

    Growth rates, determined by X-radiographic measurement of skeletal extension, decreased with depth for four of six species of coral examined at Discovery Bay, Jamaica. Growth of Porites astreoides, Montastrea annularis, Colpophyllia natans, and Siderastrea siderea decreased significantly with depth over a 1- to 30-m depth range. In Montastrea cavernosa, the highest growth rate occurred in the middle of the sampled depth range. Agaricia agaricites had no measurable change in growth rate with depth. A compilation of available growth data for Atlantic and Pacific corals shows a strong pattern of highest growth rates a short distance below the surface and a decrease with depth.

  11. Growth rate of sheep fed high fat ration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwinsyah Lubis

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating high amount of fats into the ration for ruminants will affect the rumen microbes adversely and will reducefiber digestion potential. To correct such negative effects, the free fatty acids used for feed should be bond with Ca++, so it canpassing through the rumen savely (rumen by-pass fat. To test the Ca-fat utilization biologically, 20 growing male Garut shee pwere used and fed with 4 type of isocaloric-isoprotein concentrate feed which were allotted based on a randomized block desig nwith 5 replications. The concentrate (C-A was a positive control diet, while C-B was substituted with 10% free fatty acids (negative control, C-C was substituted with 10% Ca-fat, and C-D with 15% Ca-fat. The concentrate feed was fed at 500 g/d, while forage (King grass was 4 kg/d. Results of the experiment showed that the negative effect of free fatty acids can be corrected if it was given in the form of Ca-fat. Growth rate curve indicating a good growing pattern, with average daily gain was 100.18, 87.68, 112.86, and 115.00 g/d (P0.05. Carcass production was relatively good, where for C-A, C-B, C-C, and C-D were 14.84, 14.68, 16.34, and 15.72 kg (P<0.05 respectively, with final live weights of 34.00, 31.74, 34.58, and 34.30 kg (P<0.05. It can be concluded that Ca-fat (rumen by-pass fat can be used as an energy source component for growing sheep diet, and give the best result at 10% substitution rate in concentrate feed.

  12. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    OpenAIRE

    EoinLBrodie; KatherineCGoldfarb; ChinaAHanson; MarkABradford; MatthewDWallenstein

    2011-01-01

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear ...

  13. In vitro evaluation of Pseudomonas bacterial isolates from rice phylloplane for biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani and plant growth promoting traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Shamima; Kadir, Jugah; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Saud, Halimi Mohd

    2016-07-01

    The ability for biocontrol and plant growth promotion of three Pseudomonas bacterial isolates namely Pseudomonas fluorescens (UMB20), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (KMB25) and Pseudomonas asplenii (BMB42) obtained from rice plants was investigated. Fungal growth inhibition by the isolates ranged from 86.85 to 93.15% in volatile and 100% in diffusible metabolites test. Among the isolates, BMB42 showed fungal growth inhibition significantly in the volatile metabolite test. Isolates UMB20 and BMB42 were able to synthesis chitinase with chitinolytic indices of 13.66 and 13.50, respectively. In case of -1,3-glucanase, all the isolates showed activity to produce this enzyme at varied levels and isolate KMB25 showed significantly highest activity (53.53 ppm). Among the three isolates, KMB25 showed positive response to protease production and all of them were negative to pectinase and lipase and positive to the production of siderophore, and HCN, and were able to solubilize tricalcium phosphate. All the three bacterial isolates were capable of forming biofilm at different levels. Above results suggest that phylloplane Pseudomonas bacterial isolates have potential for antifungal activities and plant growth promotion. PMID:27498507

  14. Long-run growth rate in a random multiplicative model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirjol, Dan [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-08-01

    We consider the long-run growth rate of the average value of a random multiplicative process x{sub i+1} = a{sub i}x{sub i} where the multipliers a{sub i}=1+ρexp(σW{sub i}₋1/2 σ²t{sub i}) have Markovian dependence given by the exponential of a standard Brownian motion W{sub i}. The average value (x{sub n}) is given by the grand partition function of a one-dimensional lattice gas with two-body linear attractive interactions placed in a uniform field. We study the Lyapunov exponent λ=lim{sub n→∞}1/n log(x{sub n}), at fixed β=1/2 σ²t{sub n}n, and show that it is given by the equation of state of the lattice gas in thermodynamical equilibrium. The Lyapunov exponent has discontinuous partial derivatives along a curve in the (ρ, β) plane ending at a critical point (ρ{sub C}, β{sub C}) which is related to a phase transition in the equivalent lattice gas. Using the equivalence of the lattice gas with a bosonic system, we obtain the exact solution for the equation of state in the thermodynamical limit n → ∞.

  15. Effect of dietary supplementation of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) on growth performance, survival, lactobacillus bacterial population and hemato-immunological parameters of stellate sturgeon (Acipenser stellatus) juvenile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, Reza; Iri, Yousef; Rostami, Hosseinali Khoshbavar; Razeghi Mansour, Majid

    2013-10-01

    The dietary supplementation of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) in stellate sturgeon juvenile, Acipenser stellatus (with mean initial body weight of 30.16 ± 0.14 g) was evaluated for the effect on growth, autochthonous intestinal microbiata and hemato-immunological parameters for 11 weeks. FOS was added at a level of 0, 1% and 2% to the commercial pellet diet (BioMar). At the end of the experiment, growth parameters, survival rate, lactobacillus bacterial population, hematological and immunological parameters were determined. The fish fed on 1% FOS significantly showed higher final weight, WG%, SGR and PER and lower FCR compared to those of the control group (P  0.05). However, FOS administration resulted in lower survival. The serum lysozyme activity was significantly affected by dietary 1% FOS (P  0.05). In fish fed on the diet with 1% FOS showed a significant increase of total heterotrophic autochthonous bacterial and presumptive LAB levels (P prebiotics. In addition to increase in WBC, RBC, MCV, hematocrit, hemoglobin and lymphocyte levels were observed in this group. These results indicated that dietary supplementation of FOS at a dose of 1% improved growth performance, beneficial intestinal microbiata and stimulate immune response of stellate sturgeon juvenile. PMID:23973846

  16. Discrete cyclic di-GMP-dependent control of bacterial predation versus axenic growth in Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hobley

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a Delta-proteobacterium that oscillates between free-living growth and predation on Gram-negative bacteria including important pathogens of man, animals and plants. After entering the prey periplasm, killing the prey and replicating inside the prey bdelloplast, several motile B. bacteriovorus progeny cells emerge. The B. bacteriovorus HD100 genome encodes numerous proteins predicted to be involved in signalling via the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP, which is known to affect bacterial lifestyle choices. We investigated the role of c-di-GMP signalling in B. bacteriovorus, focussing on the five GGDEF domain proteins that are predicted to function as diguanylyl cyclases initiating c-di-GMP signalling cascades. Inactivation of individual GGDEF domain genes resulted in remarkably distinct phenotypes. Deletion of dgcB (Bd0742 resulted in a predation impaired, obligately axenic mutant, while deletion of dgcC (Bd1434 resulted in the opposite, obligately predatory mutant. Deletion of dgcA (Bd0367 abolished gliding motility, producing bacteria capable of predatory invasion but unable to leave the exhausted prey. Complementation was achieved with wild type dgc genes, but not with GGAAF versions. Deletion of cdgA (Bd3125 substantially slowed predation; this was restored by wild type complementation. Deletion of dgcD (Bd3766 had no observable phenotype. In vitro assays showed that DgcA, DgcB, and DgcC were diguanylyl cyclases. CdgA lacks enzymatic activity but functions as a c-di-GMP receptor apparently in the DgcB pathway. Activity of DgcD was not detected. Deletion of DgcA strongly decreased the extractable c-di-GMP content of axenic Bdellovibrio cells. We show that c-di-GMP signalling pathways are essential for both the free-living and predatory lifestyles of B. bacteriovorus and that obligately predatory dgcC- can be made lacking a propensity to survive without predation of bacterial pathogens and thus possibly

  17. Quantitative estimation of net rates of production of bacterial and protozoal nitrogen and their interconversion in the rumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique is described using 35S-labelled bacteria or protozoa by which the rates of production of microbial and protozoal protein N may be calculated. The results indicate an average microbial protein yield of about 13.7gN.d-1 in sheep maintained on a diet consisting largely of cottonseed cake and wheat and rice bran. Evidence is presented that protozoa made little contribution to the microbial protein-N leaving the rumen. Also, the average rate of N flow from the protozoal to the bacterial pool was about 3.5g.d-1, whereas about 1.4g.d-1 of bacterial N was consumed by protozoa. (author)

  18. Valorization of lubricant-based wastewater for bacterial neutral lipids production: Growth-linked biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Pedro D M P; Lima, Filipa; Alves, Maria Madalena; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Pereira, Maria Alcina

    2016-09-15

    Lipids produced by microorganisms are currently of great interest as raw material for either biofuels or oleochemicals production. Significant biosynthesis of neutral lipids, such as triacylglycerol (TAG) and wax esters (WE) are thought to be limited to a few strains. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria (HCB), key players in bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated ecosystems, are among this group of strains. Hydrocarbon rich wastewaters have been overlooked concerning their potential as raw material for microbial lipids production. In this study, lubricant-based wastewater was fed, as sole carbon source, to two HCB representative wild strains: Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2, and Rhodococcus opacus PD630. Neutral lipid production was observed with both strains cultivated under uncontrolled conditions of pH and dissolved oxygen. A. borkumensis SK2 was further investigated in a pH- and OD-controlled fermenter. Different phases were assessed separately in terms of lipids production and alkanes removal. The maximum TAG production rate occurred during stationary phase (4 mg-TAG/L h). The maximum production rate of WE-like compounds was 15 mg/L h, and was observed during exponential growth phase. Hydrocarbons removal was 97% of the gas chromatography (GC) resolved straight-chain alkanes. The maximum removal rate was observed during exponential growth phase (6 mg-alkanes/L h). This investigation proposes a novel approach for the management of lubricant waste oil, aiming at its conversion into valuable lipids. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated under low salt (0.3%) and saline (3.3%) conditions, and presents clues for its technological development, since growth associated oil production opens the possibility for establishing continuous fermentation processes. PMID:27244293

  19. Simplified Capacitance Monitoring for the Determination of Campylobacter spp. Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacitance monitoring is commonly used as an efficient means to measure growth curves of bacterial pathogens. However, the use of capacitance monitoring with Campylobacter spp. was previously determined difficult due to the complexity of the required media. We investigated capacitance monitoring ...

  20. The lag-phase during diauxic growth is a trade-off between fast adaptation and high growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Dominique; Barnes, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Bi-phasic or diauxic growth is often observed when microbes are grown in a chemically defined medium containing two sugars (for example glucose and lactose). Typically, the two growth stages are separated by an often lengthy phase of arrested growth, the so-called lag-phase. Diauxic growth is usually interpreted as an adaptation to maximise population growth in multi-nutrient environments. However, the lag-phase implies a substantial loss of growth during the switch-over. It therefore remains unexplained why the lag-phase is adaptive. Here we show by means of a stochastic simulation model based on the bacterial PTS system that it is not possible to shorten the lag-phase without incurring a permanent growth-penalty. Mechanistically, this is due to the inherent and well established limitations of biological sensors to operate efficiently at a given resource cost. Hence, there is a trade-off between lost growth during the diauxic switch and the long-term growth potential of the cell. Using simulated evolution we predict that the lag-phase will evolve depending on the distribution of conditions experienced during adaptation. In environments where switching is less frequently required, the lag-phase will evolve to be longer whereas, in frequently changing environments, the lag-phase will evolve to be shorter.

  1. Evaluation of bacterial contamination rate of the anterior chamber during phacoemulsification surgery using an automated microbial detection system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim; Kocak; Funda; Kocak; Bahri; Teker; Ali; Aydin; Faruk; Kaya; Hakan; Baybora

    2014-01-01

    ·AIM: To assess the incidence of anterior chamber bacterial contamination during phacoemulsification surgery using an automated microbial detection system(BacT/Alert).·METHODS: Sixty-nine eyes of 60 patients who had uneventful phacoemulsification surgery, enrolled in this prospective study. No prophylactic topical or systemic antibiotics were used before surgery. After antisepsis with povidone-iodine, two intraoperative anterior chamber aqueous samples were obtained, the first whilst entering anterior chamber, and the second at the end of surgery. BacT/Alert culture system was used to detect bacterial contamination in the aqueous samples.·RESULTS: Neither aqueous samples obtained at the beginning nor conclusion of the surgery was positive for microorganisms on BacT/Alert culture system. The rate of bacterial contamination during surgery was 0%. None of the eyes developed acute-onset endophthalmitis after surgery.· CONCLUSION: In this study, no bacterial contamination of anterior chamber was observed during cataract surgery. This result shows that meticulous surgical preparation and technique can prevent anterior chamber contamination during phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

  2. Improving protein delivery of fibroblast growth factor-2 from bacterial inclusion bodies used as cell culture substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Seras Franzoso, Joaquin; Peebo, Karl; Garcia Fruitós, Elena; Vázquez Gómez, Esther; Rinas, Ursula; Villaverde Corrales, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Altres ajuts: We are indebted CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN, Spain) for funding our research on inclusion bodies. Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) have recently been used to generate biocompatible cell culture interfaces, with diverse effects on cultured cells such as cell adhesion enhancement, stimulation of cell growth or induction of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Additionally, novel applications of IBs as sustained protein delivery systems with...

  3. Spontaneous elaboration of transforming growth factor beta suppresses host defense against bacterial infection in autoimmune MRL/lpr mice

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Infection with gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria remains a leading cause of death in patients with systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE), even in the absence of immunosuppressive therapy. To elucidate the mechanisms that underly the increased risk of infection observed in patients with systemic autoimmunity, we have investigated host defense against bacterial infection in a murine model of autoimmunity, the MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) mouse. Our previous study implicated transforming growth ...

  4. Mycelium-Like Networks Increase Bacterial Dispersal, Growth, and Biodegradation in a Model Ecosystem at Various Water Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrich, Anja; König, Sara; Miltner, Anja; Banitz, Thomas; Centler, Florian; Frank, Karin; Thullner, Martin; Harms, Hauke; Kästner, Matthias; Wick, Lukas Y

    2016-05-15

    Fungal mycelia serve as effective dispersal networks for bacteria in water-unsaturated environments, thereby allowing bacteria to maintain important functions, such as biodegradation. However, poor knowledge exists on the effects of dispersal networks at various osmotic (Ψo) and matric (Ψm) potentials, which contribute to the water potential mainly in terrestrial soil environments. Here we studied the effects of artificial mycelium-like dispersal networks on bacterial dispersal dynamics and subsequent effects on growth and benzoate biodegradation at ΔΨo and ΔΨm values between 0 and -1.5 MPa. In a multiple-microcosm approach, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged derivative of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as a model organism and sodium benzoate as a representative of polar aromatic contaminants. We found that decreasing ΔΨo and ΔΨm values slowed bacterial dispersal in the system, leading to decelerated growth and benzoate degradation. In contrast, dispersal networks facilitated bacterial movement at ΔΨo and ΔΨm values between 0 and -0.5 MPa and thus improved the absolute biodegradation performance by up to 52 and 119% for ΔΨo and ΔΨm, respectively. This strong functional interrelationship was further emphasized by a high positive correlation between population dispersal, population growth, and degradation. We propose that dispersal networks may sustain the functionality of microbial ecosystems at low osmotic and matric potentials. PMID:26944849

  5. Effects of Bacillus subtilis KN-42 on Growth Performance, Diarrhea and Faecal Bacterial Flora of Weaned Piglets

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yuanliang; Dun, Yaohao; Li, Shenao; Zhao, Shumiao; Peng, Nan; Liang, Yunxiang

    2014-01-01

    This research focused on the effects of different doses of Bacillus subtilis KN-42 on the growth performance, diarrhea incidence, faecal bacterial flora, and the relative number of Lactobacillus and Escherichia coli in faeces of weaned piglets to determine whether the strain can serve as a candidate antimicrobial growth promoter. A total of 360 piglets (initial body weight 7.14±0.63 kg) weaned at 26±2 days of age were randomly allotted to 5 treatment groups (4 pens per treatment with 18 pigs ...

  6. Export incentives, exchange rate policy and export growth in Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.G. van Wijnbergen; I. Arslan

    1993-01-01

    The driving forces behind the Turkish export miracle, and in fact its very existence, have remained a matter of debate We show there was a boom. As to contributing factors, import growth in the Middle East in excess of import growth elsewhere made a negative contribution. On exports to non-oil count

  7. A Model to Explain Plant Growth Promotion Traits: A Multivariate Analysis of 2,211 Bacterial Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Pedro Beschoren; Granada, Camille E.; Ambrosini, Adriana; Moreira, Fernanda; de Souza, Rocheli; dos Passos, João Frederico M.; Arruda, Letícia; Passaglia, Luciane M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria can greatly assist sustainable farming by improving plant health and biomass while reducing fertilizer use. The plant-microorganism-environment interaction is an open and complex system, and despite the active research in the area, patterns in root ecology are elusive. Here, we simultaneously analyzed the plant growth-promoting bacteria datasets from seven independent studies that shared a methodology for bioprospection and phenotype screening. The soil richness of the isolate's origin was classified by a Principal Component Analysis. A Categorical Principal Component Analysis was used to classify the soil richness according to isolate's indolic compound production, siderophores production and phosphate solubilization abilities, and bacterial genera composition. Multiple patterns and relationships were found and verified with nonparametric hypothesis testing. Including niche colonization in the analysis, we proposed a model to explain the expression of bacterial plant growth-promoting traits according to the soil nutritional status. Our model shows that plants favor interaction with growth hormone producers under rich nutrient conditions but favor nutrient solubilizers under poor conditions. We also performed several comparisons among the different genera, highlighting interesting ecological interactions and limitations. Our model could be used to direct plant growth-promoting bacteria bioprospection and metagenomic sampling. PMID:25542031

  8. A model to explain plant growth promotion traits: a multivariate analysis of 2,211 bacterial isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Beschoren da Costa

    Full Text Available Plant growth-promoting bacteria can greatly assist sustainable farming by improving plant health and biomass while reducing fertilizer use. The plant-microorganism-environment interaction is an open and complex system, and despite the active research in the area, patterns in root ecology are elusive. Here, we simultaneously analyzed the plant growth-promoting bacteria datasets from seven independent studies that shared a methodology for bioprospection and phenotype screening. The soil richness of the isolate's origin was classified by a Principal Component Analysis. A Categorical Principal Component Analysis was used to classify the soil richness according to isolate's indolic compound production, siderophores production and phosphate solubilization abilities, and bacterial genera composition. Multiple patterns and relationships were found and verified with nonparametric hypothesis testing. Including niche colonization in the analysis, we proposed a model to explain the expression of bacterial plant growth-promoting traits according to the soil nutritional status. Our model shows that plants favor interaction with growth hormone producers under rich nutrient conditions but favor nutrient solubilizers under poor conditions. We also performed several comparisons among the different genera, highlighting interesting ecological interactions and limitations. Our model could be used to direct plant growth-promoting bacteria bioprospection and metagenomic sampling.

  9. The transport mechanism of bacterial Cu+-ATPases: distinct efflux rates adapted to different function

    OpenAIRE

    Raimunda, Daniel; González-Guerrero, Manuel; Leeber, Blaise W.; Argüello, José M.

    2011-01-01

    Cu+-ATPases play a key role in bacterial Cu+ homeostasis by participating in Cu+ detoxification and cuproprotein assembly. Characterization of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA, a model protein within the subfamily of P1B-1 type ATPases, has provided structural and mechanistic details on this group of transporters. Atomic resolution structures of cytoplasmic regulatory metal binding domains (MBDs) and catalytic actuator, phosphorylation, and nucleotide binding domains are available. These, in combi...

  10. The effect of subminimal inhibitory concentrations of penicillin on growth rate and haemolysin activity of group G Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica V. Vieira

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the subminimal inhibitory concentrations (1/3 and 1/4 of the MIC of penicillin on growth rate and on haemolysin production of a strain of group G Streptococcus was studied. It was shown that 1/3 of the MIC almost completely inhibited the bacterial growth, but it was not able to inhibit haemolysin activity in the culture supernate. The generation time of bacteria grown in 1/4 of the MIC was approximately twice longer than that of the control culture. In all cultures, the haemolysin, after being produced (or liberated, reached a peak and decreased to low levels, which could suggest that group G Streptococcus produces some end products of metabolism that are able to inhibit haemolysin activity.

  11. Ice Crystal Growth Rates Under Upper Troposphere Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Bailey, Matthew; Hallett, John

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions for growth of ice crystals (temperature and ice supersaturation) are often not well constrained and it is necessary to simulate such conditions in the laboratory to investigate such growth under well controlled conditions over many hours. The growth of ice crystals from the vapour in both prism and basal planes was observed at temperatures of -60 C and -70 C under ice supersaturation up to 100% (200% relative humidity) at pressures derived from the standard atmosphere in a static diffusion chamber. Crystals grew outward from a vertical glass filament, thickening in the basal plane by addition of macroscopic layers greater than 2 m, leading to growth in the prism plane by passing of successive layers conveniently viewed by time lapse video.

  12. Stress corrosion crack growth rates and general corrosion rates at crack tips of steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum stress corrosion crack growth rates for a number of structural materials (steels and nickel alloys) have been measured in 288 C water. Also, the general corrosion rates of these materials have been determined from weight loss experiments in simulated stress corrosion crack tip electrolytes at 288 C. It is shown that the stress corrosion crack growth rates are typically twenty times faster than the general corrosion rates. This correlation holds over five orders of magnitude. It is concluded that strategies to prevent stress corrosion cracking in high temperature aqueous environments might include alloys of higher general corrosion resistance

  13. Effects of chemical and biological pesticides on plant growth parameters and rhizospheric bacterial community structure in Vigna radiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Non-target effects of pesticides employing qualitative and quantitative approaches. • Qualitative shifts in resident and active bacterial community structure. • Abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts were reduced significantly. • Effects of biological pesticide similar to chemical pesticides on rhizospheric bacteria. - Abstract: With increasing application of pesticides in agriculture, their non-target effects on soil microbial communities are critical to soil health maintenance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemical pesticides (chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin) and a biological pesticide (azadirachtin) on growth parameters and the rhizospheric bacterial community of Vigna radiata. Qualitative and quantitative analysis by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and q-PCR, respectively, of the 16S rRNA gene and transcript were performed to study the impact of these pesticides on the resident and active rhizospheric bacterial community. While plant parameters were not affected significantly by the pesticides, a shift in the bacterial community structure was observed with an adverse effect on the abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts. Chlorpyrifos showed almost complete degradation toward the end of the experiment. These non-target impacts on soil ecosystems and the fact that the effects of the biopesticide mimic those of chemical pesticides raise serious concerns regarding their application in agriculture

  14. Effects of chemical and biological pesticides on plant growth parameters and rhizospheric bacterial community structure in Vigna radiata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sunil; Gupta, Rashi; Sharma, Shilpi, E-mail: shilpi@dbeb.iitd.ac.in

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • Non-target effects of pesticides employing qualitative and quantitative approaches. • Qualitative shifts in resident and active bacterial community structure. • Abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts were reduced significantly. • Effects of biological pesticide similar to chemical pesticides on rhizospheric bacteria. - Abstract: With increasing application of pesticides in agriculture, their non-target effects on soil microbial communities are critical to soil health maintenance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemical pesticides (chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin) and a biological pesticide (azadirachtin) on growth parameters and the rhizospheric bacterial community of Vigna radiata. Qualitative and quantitative analysis by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and q-PCR, respectively, of the 16S rRNA gene and transcript were performed to study the impact of these pesticides on the resident and active rhizospheric bacterial community. While plant parameters were not affected significantly by the pesticides, a shift in the bacterial community structure was observed with an adverse effect on the abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts. Chlorpyrifos showed almost complete degradation toward the end of the experiment. These non-target impacts on soil ecosystems and the fact that the effects of the biopesticide mimic those of chemical pesticides raise serious concerns regarding their application in agriculture.

  15. The Real Exchange Rate and Growth in Zimbabwe: Does the Currency Regime Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Brixiova, Zuzana; Ncube, Mthuli

    2014-01-01

    Zimbabwe faces growth and external competitiveness challenges, as indicated by its low trend growth and investment, declining share in the world exports, high current account deficits, and external debt. The stock-flow approach to the equilibrium exchange rate reveals that the real exchange rate experienced periods of sizeable overvaluation, both prior to the 2008 economic collapse and under the current multicurrency regime. While overvaluation hampers GDP growth, as well as growth and employ...

  16. Working Paper - 210 - The Real Exchange Rate and Growth in Zimbabwe Does the Currency Regime Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Zuzana Brixiova; Mthuli Ncube

    2014-01-01

    Zimbabwe faces growth and external competitiveness challenges, as indicated by its low trend growth and investment, declining share in the world exports, high current account deficits, and external debt. The stock-flow approach to the equilibrium exchange rate reveals that the real exchange rate experienced periods of sizeable overvaluation, both prior to the 2008 economic collapse and under the current multicurrency regime. While overvaluation hampers GDP growth, as well as growth and employ...

  17. Impact of Food Beverage Price Index and Exchange Rate Volatility on Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Onasanya Olanrewaju k; Adeniji Oyebimpe Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Many factors such as money supply, exchange rate, interest rate, gross domestic product, inflation rate, unemployment rate, frictional unemployment and other flow variables have great impact on economic growth rate. These factors have significant effect on capital movement, business outlook and economic development. Over past decades, numerous studies have used these variables to investigate their impact on economic growth especially using the econometric approach. Results obtained from such ...

  18. Growth rate change driven by external perturbation in the azuki bean weevil

    CERN Document Server

    Fukano, T

    2003-01-01

    In laboratory experiments we obtain that the apparent growth rate of the population becomes larger than one under the normal condition, triggered by the external perturbation as the removal of individuals. The changed growth rate is stable for a while. We also propose a simple model of population dynamics allowing both matching and mis-matching the trend of the external perturbation, and show that the growth rate of the model population is changeable and stable to some extent.

  19. Individual Growth Rates of Nikolsky’s Viper, Vipera berus nikolskii (Squamata, Viperidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko Z. S.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Capture-mark-recapture data was used to infer growth rates of the Nikolsky’s viper, Vipera berus nikolskii (Vedmederja, Grubant et Rudaeva, 1986, in the Eastern Ukraine. We have found that growth rate is negatively correlated with age. The difference in growth rates before maturation is not significant between different sexes. Growth rates decrease rapidly after maturation in males and females, however adult males retain significantly higher average growth rates. There is large dispersion of growth rates in the group of adult females, which is caused, probably, by alteration of complete arrest of growth in the years with reproduction and more intensive growth in the years without it. Asymptotic snout-ventral length estimated after Von Bertalanffy model was 680 mm in females and 630 mm in males. Females mature after fifth and males mature after fourth hibernation. The larger females in vipers can not be the result of higher growth rates in females, but are the outcome of a combination of other factors including different maturation time and size (older and being larger, and, perhaps, longer life span due to lower mortality. Growth rates of the Nikolsky’s viper in the nature are higher than in other species in the group of small Eurasian vipers.

  20. Effect of cold work on initiation stage crack growth rate of nickel based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the effect of cold work on initiation stage crack growth rates of nickel based alloy, initiation stage crack growth rates were measured for simulated PWR primary water conditions using flat type specimens which were prepared from three different heats of alloy 600 and then 20 and 40% cold worked. Almost all data showed the stress had an increasing linear dependency on crack growth rate ; however there was some scattering of data and some materials showed a different tendency. Since yield strength was increased by cold work, for the same stress, the initiation stage crack growth rates were restrained or were not changed significantly by cold work. (author)

  1. Climate forcing growth rates: doubling down on our Faustian bargain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko

    2013-03-01

    Rahmstorf et al 's (2012) conclusion that observed climate change is comparable to projections, and in some cases exceeds projections, allows further inferences if we can quantify changing climate forcings and compare those with projections. The largest climate forcing is caused by well-mixed long-lived greenhouse gases. Here we illustrate trends of these gases and their climate forcings, and we discuss implications. We focus on quantities that are accurately measured, and we include comparison with fixed scenarios, which helps reduce common misimpressions about how climate forcings are changing. Annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions have shot up in the past decade at about 3% yr-1, double the rate of the prior three decades (figure 1). The growth rate falls above the range of the IPCC (2001) 'Marker' scenarios, although emissions are still within the entire range considered by the IPCC SRES (2000). The surge in emissions is due to increased coal use (blue curve in figure 1), which now accounts for more than 40% of fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Figure 1. Figure 1. CO2 annual emissions from fossil fuel use and cement manufacture, an update of figure 16 of Hansen (2003) using data of British Petroleum (BP 2012) concatenated with data of Boden et al (2012). The resulting annual increase of atmospheric CO2 (12-month running mean) has grown from less than 1 ppm yr-1 in the early 1960s to an average ~2 ppm yr-1 in the past decade (figure 2). Although CO2 measurements were not made at sufficient locations prior to the early 1980s to calculate the global mean change, the close match of global and Mauna Loa data for later years suggests that Mauna Loa data provide a good approximation of global change (figure 2), thus allowing a useful estimate of annual global change beginning with the initiation of Mauna Loa measurements in 1958 by Keeling et al (1973). Figure 2. Figure 2. Annual increase of CO2 based on data from the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL 2012). CO2 change

  2. Different Transcriptional Responses from Slow and Fast Growth Rate Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Adapted to Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Ninoska; Maza, Felipe; Navea-Perez, Helen; Aravena, Andrés; Marquez-Fontt, Bárbara; Navarrete, Paola; Figueroa, Guillermo; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8°C of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8°C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature. PMID:26973610

  3. EFFECT OF HUMIC COMPOUNDS ON BACTERIAL GROWTH IN BIOREMEDIATION OF PAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rezaei Kalantary, A. Badkoubi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs which are introduced into environment are potentially carcinogenic, mutagenic and toxic contaminants. The effect of extractable humic substances (EHS on bacterial density in bioremediation of anthracene in liquid systems was investigated. The ratio of EHS to anthracene were in two concentrations of 0.35 and 1.05 g dry EHS (with 30% organic matter per one mg anthracene. In the tests with EHS, an increase in bacterial density even by 8 fold of magnitude was seen in 12-15 days. Then a fast decrease was occurred and prolonged till the end of the test time for the tests that had EHS without anthracene. In the tests which anthracene was the only substrate increasing in bacterial population was not seen. The results showed that up to 21 days the system was free from degradation. So the first increasing in bacterial population showed that EHS might be used as a readily substrate for PAH degraders. The presence of EHS (fulvic and humic acid can stimulate bacterial community and activity that caused enhancement in anthracene bioremediation.

  4. Growth promotion and colonization of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum cv. Alamo by bacterial endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seonhwa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Switchgrass is one of the most promising bioenergy crop candidates for the US. It gives relatively high biomass yield and can grow on marginal lands. However, its yields vary from year to year and from location to location. Thus it is imperative to develop a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production system. One of the most feasible ways to increase biomass yields is to harness benefits of microbial endophytes. Results We demonstrate that one of the most studied plant growth promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, and greenhouse conditions. In several in vitro experiments, the average fresh weight of PsJN-inoculated plants was approximately 50% higher than non-inoculated plants. When one-month-old seedlings were grown in a growth chamber for 30 days, the PsJN-inoculated Alamo plants had significantly higher shoot and root biomass compared to controls. Biomass yield (dry weight averaged from five experiments was 54.1% higher in the inoculated treatment compared to non-inoculated control. Similar results were obtained in greenhouse experiments with transplants grown in 4-gallon pots for two months. The inoculated plants exhibited more early tillers and persistent growth vigor with 48.6% higher biomass than controls. We also found that PsJN could significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub-optimal conditions. However, PsJN-mediated growth promotion in switchgrass is genotype specific. Conclusions Our results show B. phytofirmans strain PsJN significantly promotes growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under different conditions, especially in the early growth stages leading to enhanced production of tillers. This phenomenon may benefit switchgrass establishment in the first year. Moreover, PsJN significantly stimulated growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub

  5. [Qualitative and quantitative determination of bacterial populations in an aquatic environment. 7. Development of bacterial growth on raw materials exposed to potable water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dott, W; Schoenen, D

    1985-05-01

    Refined steel plates coated with different materials that contained available organic compounds led to a microbial growth on the surface. Even plastics and bitumen which were used in the sphere of drinking water showed after an exposure time of three months up to 192 ml slime per square meter. The number of viable bacteria within the Aufwuchs was in the range of 10(7) cfu/ml. The production of slime increased with time. The relation of carbohydrate and protein content significantly changed from 2 at the beginning to 30 after 12 months of incubation the bitumen coating test plates. This indicates an increase synthesis of carbohydrate containing extracellular polymeric substances during the late phase of growth. The bacteria isolated from the Aufwuchs mainly belonged to the genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Acinetobacter, Caulobacter, sheated bacteria and other gramnegative physiologically nonreactiv roads. During exposure of the plates the relation changed within the bacterial communities of the main groups. Comparing the bacteria communities of inlet and outflow water it became evident that the later one was influenced by bacteria of the Aufwuchs. PMID:4024773

  6. Electrical spiking in bacterial biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Masi, Elisa; Ciszak, Marzena; Santopolo, Luisa; Frascella, Arcangela; Giovannetti, Luciana; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Mancuso, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In nature, biofilms are the most common form of bacterial growth. In biofilms, bacteria display coordinated behaviour to perform specific functions. Here, we investigated electrical signalling as a possible driver in biofilm sociobiology. Using a multi-electrode array system that enables high spatio-temporal resolution, we studied the electrical activity in two biofilm-forming strains and one non-biofilm-forming strain. The action potential rates monitored during biofilm-forming bacterial gro...

  7. The physiological basis of reaction norms: the interaction among growth rate, the duration of growth and body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowitz, Goggy; Nijhout, H Frederik

    2004-12-01

    The general effects of temperature and nutritional quality on growth rate and body size are well known. We know little, however, about the physiological mechanisms by which an organism translates variation in diet and temperature into reaction norms of body size or development time. We outline an endocrine-based physiological mechanism that helps explain how this translation occurs in the holometabolous insect Manduca sexta (Sphingidae). Body size and development time are controlled by three factors: (i) growth rate, (ii) the timing of the cessation of juvenile hormone secretion (measured by the critical weight) and (iii) the timing of ecdysteroid secretion leading to pupation (the interval to cessation of growth [ICG] after reaching the critical weight). Thermal reaction norms of body size and development time are a function of how these three factors interact with temperature. Body size is smaller at higher temperatures, because the higher growth rate decreases the ICG, thereby reducing the amount of mass that can accumulate. Development time is shorter at higher temperatures because the higher growth rate decreases the time required to attain the critical weight and, independently, controls the duration of the ICG. Life history evolution along altitudinal, latitudinal and seasonal gradients may occur through differential selection on growth rate and the duration of the two independently controlled determinants of the growth period. PMID:21676730

  8. The Effect of Load-Line Displacement Rate on the SCC Growth Rate of Nickel Alloys and Mechanistic Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Morton

    2005-10-19

    A key set of SCC growth experiments was designed to test the hypothesis that deformation/creep is the rate controlling step in LPSCC. These tests were performed on Alloy X-750 AH compact tension specimens at a various constant displacement rates. The deformation/creep rate within the crack tip zone is proportional to the test displacement rate. If crack growth rates were observed to increase with the load-line displacement rate, then this would indicate that deformation/creep is a critical SCC mechanism process. However, results obtained from the load-line displacement tests did not find X-750 AH SCC growth rate to be dependent on the position rate and therefore do not support the assumption that deformation/creep is the rate controlling process in LPSCC. The similarities between the SCC response of X-750, Alloy 600 and EN82H suggests that it is likely that the same SCC process is occurring for all these alloys (i.e., the same rate controlling step) and that deformation based models are also inappropriate for Alloy 600 and EN82H. The strong temperature and coolant hydrogen dependencies exhibited by these alloys make it more likely that nickel alloy LPSCC is controlled by an environmental or corrosion driven process.

  9. Strictly Endogenous Growth with Non-renewable Resources Implies an Unbounded Growth Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Groth, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Conventional endogenous growth theory relies on the assumption of constant returns to ”broad capital”. As Solow pointed out, the strength of this assumption is revealed by recognizing that even the slightest touch of increasing returns creates explosive growth: infinite output in finite time! But Solow’s observation ignored natural resources. What happens if non-renewable resources enter the ”growth engine”? In this case (strictly) endogenous growth requires the technology to be such that the...

  10. Non-Linearity between Inflation Rate and GDP Growth in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Qaiser Munir; Kasim Mansur

    2009-01-01

    This study analyses the relationship between inflation rate and economic growth rate in the period 1970-2005 in Malaysia. A specific question that is addressed in this study is what the threshold inflation rate for Malaysia. The findings suggest that there is one inflation threshold value exist for Malaysia. This evidence strongly supports the view that the relationship between inflation rate and economic growth is nonlinear. The estimated threshold regression model suggests 3.89% as the thre...

  11. Energy and Growth under Flexible Exchange Rates: A Simulation Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs, Jeffrey D

    1980-01-01

    This paper offers a theoretical framework for studying the inter-actions of energy prices and economic growth. The incorporation of energy prices and quantities in a macroeconomic setting focuses on (1)the aggregate technology; (2) the interdependence of energy producers and consumers in the world economy; and (3) the asset markets as the channel through which energy price changes affect output and capital accumulation. While several existing studies consider aspects of these issues, none pro...

  12. Effects of interactions of auxin-producing bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes on regulation of peanut growths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Xu, Wensi; Jiang, Ying; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2015-01-01

    The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid)-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium) and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp.) on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1) after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and soil auxin concentration. The addition of nematodes caused greater increases in these indices than those of bacteria, while the addition of the combination of bacteria and nematodes caused further increases. After 42-day growth, the increases in soil respiration differed between the additions of two kinds of nematodes because of differences in their life strategies. The effects of the bacteria and nematodes on the nutrient and hormone concentrations were responsible for the increases in plant growth. These results indicate the potential for promoting plant growth via the addition of nematodes and bacteria to soil. PMID:25867954

  13. Effects of interactions of auxin-producing bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes on regulation of peanut growths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp. on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1 after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and soil auxin concentration. The addition of nematodes caused greater increases in these indices than those of bacteria, while the addition of the combination of bacteria and nematodes caused further increases. After 42-day growth, the increases in soil respiration differed between the additions of two kinds of nematodes because of differences in their life strategies. The effects of the bacteria and nematodes on the nutrient and hormone concentrations were responsible for the increases in plant growth. These results indicate the potential for promoting plant growth via the addition of nematodes and bacteria to soil.

  14. Native bacterial endophytes promote host growth in a species-specific manner; phytohormone manipulations do not result in common growth responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang Hoa Long

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All plants in nature harbor a diverse community of endophytic bacteria which can positively affect host plant growth. Changes in plant growth frequently reflect alterations in phytohormone homoeostasis by plant-growth-promoting (PGP rhizobacteria which can decrease ethylene (ET levels enzymatically by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC deaminase or produce indole acetic acid (IAA. Whether these common PGP mechanisms work similarly for different plant species has not been rigorously tested. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated bacterial endophytes from field-grown Solanum nigrum; characterized PGP traits (ACC deaminase activity, IAA production, phosphate solubilization and seedling colonization; and determined their effects on their host, S. nigrum, as well as on another Solanaceous native plant, Nicotiana attenuata. In S. nigrum, a majority of isolates that promoted root growth were associated with ACC deaminase activity and IAA production. However, in N. attenuata, IAA but not ACC deaminase activity was associated with root growth. Inoculating N. attenuata and S. nigrum with known PGP bacteria from a culture collection (DSMZ reinforced the conclusion that the PGP effects are not highly conserved. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that natural endophytic bacteria with PGP traits do not have general and predictable effects on the growth and fitness of all host plants, although the underlying mechanisms are conserved.

  15. Attached biomass growth and substrate utilization rate in a moving bed biofilm reactor

    OpenAIRE

    J. J. Marques; Souza, R. R.; C. S. Souza; I. C. C. Rocha

    2008-01-01

    A moving bed bioreactor containing cubes of polyether foam immersed in a synthetic wastewater (an aqueous mixture of meat extract, yeast extract, dextrose, meat peptone, ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, potassium mono-hydrogen-phosphate and magnesium sulphate) was used to evaluate bacterial growth and biomass yield parameters based on Monod's equation. The wastewater was supplied in the bottom of the equipment flowing ascending in parallel with a dif...

  16. A Minimalistic Resource Allocation Model to Explain Ubiquitous Increase in Protein Expression with Growth Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barenholz, Uri; Keren, Leeat; Segal, Eran; Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins show changes in level across growth conditions. Many of these changes seem to be coordinated with the specific growth rate rather than the growth environment or the protein function. Although cellular growth rates, gene expression levels and gene regulation have been at the center of biological research for decades, there are only a few models giving a base line prediction of the dependence of the proteome fraction occupied by a gene with the specific growth rate. We present a simple model that predicts a widely coordinated increase in the fraction of many proteins out of the proteome, proportionally with the growth rate. The model reveals how passive redistribution of resources, due to active regulation of only a few proteins, can have proteome wide effects that are quantitatively predictable. Our model provides a potential explanation for why and how such a coordinated response of a large fraction of the proteome to the specific growth rate arises under different environmental conditions. The simplicity of our model can also be useful by serving as a baseline null hypothesis in the search for active regulation. We exemplify the usage of the model by analyzing the relationship between growth rate and proteome composition for the model microorganism E.coli as reflected in recent proteomics data sets spanning various growth conditions. We find that the fraction out of the proteome of a large number of proteins, and from different cellular processes, increases proportionally with the growth rate. Notably, ribosomal proteins, which have been previously reported to increase in fraction with growth rate, are only a small part of this group of proteins. We suggest that, although the fractions of many proteins change with the growth rate, such changes may be partially driven by a global effect, not necessarily requiring specific cellular control mechanisms. PMID:27073913

  17. Microbial biogeography along an estuarine salinity gradient: combined influences of bacterial growth and residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Byron C; Hopkinson, Charles S; Sogin, Mitchell L; Hobbie, John E

    2004-03-01

    Shifts in bacterioplankton community composition along the salinity gradient of the Parker River estuary and Plum Island Sound, in northeastern Massachusetts, were related to residence time and bacterial community doubling time in spring, summer, and fall seasons. Bacterial community composition was characterized with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal DNA. Average community doubling time was calculated from bacterial production ([(14)C]leucine incorporation) and bacterial abundance (direct counts). Freshwater and marine populations advected into the estuary represented a large fraction of the bacterioplankton community in all seasons. However, a unique estuarine community formed at intermediate salinities in summer and fall, when average doubling time was much shorter than water residence time, but not in spring, when doubling time was similar to residence time. Sequencing of DNA in DGGE bands demonstrated that most bands represented single phylotypes and that matching bands from different samples represented identical phylotypes. Most river and coastal ocean bacterioplankton were members of common freshwater and marine phylogenetic clusters within the phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and ACTINOBACTERIA: Estuarine bacterioplankton also belonged to these phyla but were related to clones and isolates from several different environments, including marine water columns, freshwater sediments, and soil. PMID:15006771

  18. The impact of risk management on internal and sustainable growth rate: Evidence from Tehran Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Vakili Fard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the relative risk of firms has been an open discussion among researchers. There are many studies on learning how leverage may influence on growth of the firms. This article reviews the relationship between risk management, internal and sustainable growth of accepted companies in Tehran stock exchange. The survey considers three types of risks including operating, financial and compound and investigates their relationships with internal growth rate as well as sustainable growth rate. Using some regression techniques, the study has determined negative and meaningful relationships between different types of leverage on side and internal as well as sustainable growth on the other side.

  19. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Characterization of cellular growth is central to understanding living systems. Here, we applied a three-factor design to study the relationship between specific growth rate and genome-wide gene expression in 36 steady-state chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three...... factors we considered were specific growth rate, nutrient limitation, and oxygen availability. Results: We identified 268 growth rate dependent genes, independent of nutrient limitation and oxygen availability. The transcriptional response was used to identify key areas in metabolism around which m...

  20. Economic growth and currency crisis: A real exchange rate entropic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Matesanz Gómez, David; Guillermo J. Ortega

    2005-01-01

    We propose a country classification of economic growth currency crisis consequences based on the entropic analysis of the real exchange rate. We show that this ranking is highly correlated with the annual minimum rate of growth, a proxy used to quantify real currency crisis effects.

  1. Geographic After-Tax Real Income Differentials and Population Growth Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Gigi; Cebula, Richard; Koch, James

    1989-01-01

    This empirical note investigates the impact of geographic after-tax real, as opposed to nominal, income differentials on geographic population growth rates. The focus is on Florida's 67 counties and the 1980-88 time period. The empirical results imply that the population growth rate in Florida counties was of after-tax real income.

  2. THE GROWTH RATE AND STATISTICAL FLUCTUATION OF BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATE FORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ke-zhu; Tan Wei-han

    2000-01-01

    Using the generating function method to solve the master equation ofBose-Einstein condensate and to evaluate the growth rate, statisticalfluctuation of condensate atoms, we find out that there is a plateau inthe growth rate curve and a super-Poisson distribution observed.

  3. A re-examination of tigerfish growth rates in Lake Kariba

    OpenAIRE

    Beattie, I.H.

    1982-01-01

    Growth rates of male and female tigerfish Hydrocynus vittatus were determined from length/frequencies of fish from the Sanyati Basin and Sinamwenda estuary, Lake Kariba. Growth rates were similar in both sexes for the first two years, after which females grew faster and reached a greater length. Fish from the Sanyati Basin appeared to grow slightly faster than those from the Sinamwenda Estuary.

  4. Evaluation of free-stall mattress bedding treatments to reduce mastitis bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristula, M A; Dou, Z; Toth, J D; Smith, B I; Harvey, N; Sabo, M

    2008-05-01

    Bacterial counts were compared in free-stall mattresses and teat ends exposed to 5 treatments in a factorial study design on 1 dairy farm. Mattresses in five 30-cow groups were subjected to 1 of 5 bedding treatments every other day: 0.5 kg of hydrated limestone, 120 mL of commercial acidic conditioner, 1 kg of coal fly ash, 1 kg of kiln-dried wood shavings, and control (no bedding). Counts of coliforms, Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus spp. were lowest on mattresses bedded with lime. Mattresses bedded with the commercial acidic conditioner had the next lowest counts for coliforms, Klebsiella spp., and Streptococcus spp. Wood shavings and the no-bedding control had the highest counts for coliform and Klebsiella spp. Compared with wood shavings or control, fly ash reduced the counts of coliforms, whereas for the other 3 bacterial groups, the reduction was not always significant. Streptococcus spp. counts were greatest in the control group and did not differ among the shavings and fly ash groups. Teat swab results indicated that hydrated lime was the only bedding treatment that significantly decreased the counts of both coliforms and Klebsiella spp. There were no differences in Streptococcus spp. numbers on the teats between any of the bedding treatments. Bacterial populations grew steadily on mattresses and were generally higher at 36 to 48 h than at 12 to 24 h, whereas bacterial populations on teats grew rapidly by 12 h and then remained constant. Hydrated lime was the only treatment that significantly reduced bacterial counts on both mattresses and teat ends, but it caused some skin irritation. PMID:18420619

  5. Evaluation of free-stall mattress bedding treatments to reduce mastitis bacterial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristula, M.A.; Dou, Z.; Toth, J.D.; Smith, B.I.; Harvey, N.; Sabo, M. [University of Penn, Kennett Square, PA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Bacterial counts were compared in free-stall mattresses and teat ends exposed to 5 treatments in a factorial study design on 1 dairy farm. Mattresses in five 30-cow groups were subjected to 1 of 5 bedding treatments every other day: 0.5 kg of hydrated limestone, 120 mL of commercial acidic conditioner, 1 kg of coal fly ash, 1 kg of kiln-dried wood shavings, and control (no bedding). Counts of coliforms, Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus spp. were lowest on mattresses bedded with lime. Mattresses bedded with the commercial acidic conditioner had the next lowest counts for coliforms, Klebsiella spp., and Streptococcus spp. Wood shavings and the no-bedding control had the highest counts for coliform and Klebsiella spp. Compared with wood shavings or control, fly ash reduced the counts of coliforms, whereas for the other 3 bacterial groups, the reduction was not always significant. Streptococcus spp. counts were greatest in the control group and did not differ among the shavings and fly ash groups. Teat swab results indicated that hydrated lime was the only bedding treatment that significantly decreased the counts of both coliforms and Klebsiella spp. There were no differences in Streptococcus spp. numbers on the teats between any of the bedding treatments. Bacterial populations grew steadily on mattresses and were generally higher at 36 to 48 h than at 12 to 24 h, whereas bacterial populations on teats grew rapidly by 12 h and then remained constant. Hydrated lime was the only treatment that significantly reduced bacterial counts on both mattresses and teat ends, but it caused some skin irritation.

  6. Family poverty affects the rate of human infant brain growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L Hanson

    Full Text Available Living in poverty places children at very high risk for problems across a variety of domains, including schooling, behavioral regulation, and health. Aspects of cognitive functioning, such as information processing, may underlie these kinds of problems. How might poverty affect the brain functions underlying these cognitive processes? Here, we address this question by observing and analyzing repeated measures of brain development of young children between five months and four years of age from economically diverse backgrounds (n = 77. In doing so, we have the opportunity to observe changes in brain growth as children begin to experience the effects of poverty. These children underwent MRI scanning, with subjects completing between 1 and 7 scans longitudinally. Two hundred and three MRI scans were divided into different tissue types using a novel image processing algorithm specifically designed to analyze brain data from young infants. Total gray, white, and cerebral (summation of total gray and white matter volumes were examined along with volumes of the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes. Infants from low-income families had lower volumes of gray matter, tissue critical for processing of information and execution of actions. These differences were found for both the frontal and parietal lobes. No differences were detected in white matter, temporal lobe volumes, or occipital lobe volumes. In addition, differences in brain growth were found to vary with socioeconomic status (SES, with children from lower-income households having slower trajectories of growth during infancy and early childhood. Volumetric differences were associated with the emergence of disruptive behavioral problems.

  7. EXCHANGE RATE AND ECONOMIC GROWTH. THE CASE OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Ghiba

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the difficulties created by the economic crisis, many exporters have criticized the National Bank of Romania (NBR’s policy regarding the exchange rate evolution. They argue that depreciation is a necessary condition for recovery and not financial stability. On the contrary, Romania cannot afford a shock in the exchange rate level. The risk associated with such a measure is too high for an emerging country and it annihilates any export competitive advantages. Therefore, depreciation may delay the imperative of Romanian economic recovery. A solid economic recovery should have as starting point a financial system sound and stable. Excessive exchange rate depreciation jeopardizes the financial soundness of banks and the borrower’s ability to repay their loans. Therefore, it creates inflationary flare-ups, particularly dangerous for the economy of any state.

  8. Effects of begging on growth rates of nestling chicks

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Gironés, Miguel Ángel; Jesús M Zúñiga; Redondo, T.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether an increase in begging levels delays growth of chicks. In experiment 1, we hand-reared nine pairs of ring dove squabs, divided into a control and a begging group. All squabs received similar amounts of food, but those in the begging group had to beg for a prolonged period in order to be fed, while squabs in the control group received food without begging. Squabs stopped responding to the treatment after 10 days and, at that time, there was no effect of induced begging ...

  9. Specimen size-considerations in fatigue crack growth rate testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of specimen size upon the fatigue-crack growth behavior of annealed AISI Type 304 stainless steel was studied at two stress ratios at an elevated temperature. The resulting data were examined in the light of the present ASTM size criterion (based upon monotonic yield stength) as well as a proposed criterion based upon the material flow strength. The flow stress criterion is considerably less restrictive than the present ASTM Criterion, and the results of this study indicate that the flow stress criterion is entirely appropriate for strain-hardening materials such as the austenitic stainless steels

  10. Rate of growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens in donated blood.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibb, A. P.; Martin, K M; Davidson, G A; Walker, B.; Murphy, W G

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To examine how delayed refrigeration of blood affects the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, one of the two most important causes of sepsis resulting from transfusion of contaminated blood. METHODS--Two donations of whole blood were each divided into three aliquots and inoculated with 5-10 cfu/ml of a P fluorescens strain from a case of transfusion associated sepsis. From each donation, one aliquot was placed at 4 degrees C, one was held at 20 degrees C for six hours prior to refrigerat...

  11. Nucleation kinetics and crystal growth with fluctuating rates at the intermediate stage of phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal growth kinetics accompanied by particle growth with fluctuating rates at the intermediate stage of phase transitions is analyzed theoretically. The integro-differential model of governing equations is solved analytically for size-independent growth rates and arbitrary dependences of the nucleation frequency on supercooling/supersaturation. Two important cases of Weber–Volmer–Frenkel–Zel'dovich and Mier nucleation kinetics are detailed. A Fokker–Plank type equation for the crystal-size density distribution function is solved explicitly. (paper)

  12. Elemental profiling of single bacterial cells as a function of copper exposure and growth phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Yu

    Full Text Available The elemental composition of single cells of Nitrosomonas europaea 19718 was studied via synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM as a function of inhibition by divalent copper (Cu(II and batch growth phase. Based on XFM, the intracellular Cu concentrations in exponential phase cultures of N. europaea exposed to Cu(II were statistically higher than in stationary phase cultures at the 95% confidence interval (α = 0.05. However, the impact of Cu inferred from specific oxygen uptake rate (sOUR measurements at the two physiological states was statistically not dissimilar at the Cu(II doses tested, except at 1000 µM Cu(II, at which exponential phase cultures were significantly more inhibited. Furthermore, the elemental composition in uninhibited exponential and stationary phase N. europaea cultures was similar. Notably, the molar fractions of Cu and Fe, relative to other elements in N. europaea cultures were statistically higher than those recently reported in Pseudomonas fluorescens possibly owing to the preponderance of metal cofactor rich catalytic enzymes (such as ammonia monooxygenase and electron transport mechanisms in N. europaea.

  13. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  14. PWSCC crack growth rate of alloy 690 to simulate actual plant material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the PWSCC crack growth rate of domestically produced alloy 690, alloy 690 materials were obtained from two companies which supply materials that are used in actual plants. PWSCC crack growth rates of cold worked alloy TT690 were measured under simulated PWR primary water conditions. The crack growth rates of 20% cold-worked alloy TT690 from both companies were less than 5×10-11 m/s, and the crack growth rates were not as fast as reported from Bettis. Also it was observed that there was up to about 2.5 times difference in the crack growth rates of TT690 of the two companies. (author)

  15. How Do Output Growth Rate Distributions Look Like? Some Time-Series Evidence on OECD Countries

    CERN Document Server

    Fagiolo, G; Roventini, A; Fagiolo, Giorgio; Napoletano, Mauro; Roventini, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the statistical properties of within-country GDP and industrial production (IP) growth rate distributions. Many empirical contributions have recently pointed out that cross-section growth rates of firms, industries and countries all follow Laplace distributions. In this work, we test whether also within-country, time-series GDP and IP growth rates can be approximated by tent-shaped distributions. We fit output growth rates with the exponential-power (Subbotin) family of densities, which includes as particular cases both the Gaussian and the Laplace distributions. We find that, for a large number of OECD countries including the U.S., both GDP and IP growth rates are Laplace distributed. Moreover, we show that fat-tailed distributions robustly emerge even after controlling for outliers, autocorrelation and heteroscedasticity.

  16. Effects of Eucommia ulmoides extract on longitudinal bone growth rate in adolescent female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Jeong-Il; Song, MiKyung; Lee, Donghun; Song, Jungbin; Kim, Soo Young; Park, Juyeon; Choi, Ho-Young; Kim, Hocheol

    2015-01-01

    Eucommia ulmoides is one of the popular tonic herbs for the treatment of low back pain and bone fracture and is used in Korean medicine to reinforce muscles and bones. This study was performed to investigate the effects of E. ulmoides extract on longitudinal bone growth rate, growth plate height, and the expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in adolescent female rats. In two groups, we administered a twice-daily dosage of E. ulmoides extract (at 30 and 100 mg/kg, respectively) per os over 4 days, and in a control group, we administered vehicle only under the same conditions. Longitudinal bone growth rate in newly synthesized bone was observed using tetracycline labeling. Chondrocyte proliferation in the growth plate was observed using cresyl violet dye. In addition, we analyzed the expressions of BMP-2 and IGF-1 using immunohistochemistry. Eucommia ulmoides extract significantly increased longitudinal bone growth rate and growth plate height in adolescent female rats. In the immunohistochemical study, E. ulmoides markedly increased BMP-2 and IGF-1 expressions in the proliferative and hypertrophic zones. In conclusion, E. ulmoides increased longitudinal bone growth rate by promoting chondrogenesis in the growth plate and the levels of BMP-2 and IGF-1. Eucommia ulmoides could be helpful for increasing bone growth in children who have growth retardation. PMID:25087723

  17. Growth rates of the population in a branching Brownian motion with an inhomogeneous breeding potential

    CERN Document Server

    Berestycki, Julien; Harris, John W; Harris, Simon C; Roberts, Matthew I

    2012-01-01

    We consider a branching particle system where each particle moves as an independent Brownian motion and breeds at a rate proportional to its distance from the origin raised to the power $p$, for $p\\in[0,2)$. The asymptotic behaviour of the right-most particle for this system is already known; in this article we give large deviations probabilities for particles following "difficult" paths, growth rates along "easy" paths, the total population growth rate, and we derive the optimal paths which particles must follow to achieve this growth rate.

  18. Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals slow growth and low mutation rates during latent infections in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Colangeli

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the growth and mutation rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latent infection in humans. However, studies in rhesus macaques have suggested that latent infections have mutation rates that are higher than that observed during active tuberculosis disease. Elevated mutation rates are presumed risk factors for the development of drug resistance. Therefore, the investigation of mutation rates during human latency is of high importance. We performed whole genome mutation analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates from a multi-decade tuberculosis outbreak of the New Zealand Rangipo strain. We used epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis to identify four cases of tuberculosis acquired from the same index case. Two of the tuberculosis cases occurred within two years of exposure and were classified as recently transmitted tuberculosis. Two other cases occurred more than 20 years after exposure and were classified as reactivation of latent M. tuberculosis infections. Mutation rates were compared between the two recently transmitted pairs versus the two latent pairs. Mean mutation rates assuming 20 hour generation times were 5.5 X 10(-10 mutations/bp/generation for recently transmitted tuberculosis and 7.3 X 10(-11 mutations/bp/generation for latent tuberculosis. Generation time versus mutation rate curves were also significantly higher for recently transmitted tuberculosis across all replication rates (p = 0.006. Assuming identical replication and mutation rates among all isolates in the final two years before disease reactivation, the u 20 hr mutation rate attributable to the remaining latent period was 1.6 × 10(-11 mutations/bp/generation, or approximately 30 fold less than that calculated during the two years immediately before disease. Mutations attributable to oxidative stress as might be caused by bacterial exposure to the host immune system were not increased in latent infections. In conclusion, we did not find any

  19. Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals slow growth and low mutation rates during latent infections in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangeli, Roberto; Arcus, Vic L; Cursons, Ray T; Ruthe, Ali; Karalus, Noel; Coley, Kathy; Manning, Shannon D; Kim, Soyeon; Marchiano, Emily; Alland, David

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the growth and mutation rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latent infection in humans. However, studies in rhesus macaques have suggested that latent infections have mutation rates that are higher than that observed during active tuberculosis disease. Elevated mutation rates are presumed risk factors for the development of drug resistance. Therefore, the investigation of mutation rates during human latency is of high importance. We performed whole genome mutation analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates from a multi-decade tuberculosis outbreak of the New Zealand Rangipo strain. We used epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis to identify four cases of tuberculosis acquired from the same index case. Two of the tuberculosis cases occurred within two years of exposure and were classified as recently transmitted tuberculosis. Two other cases occurred more than 20 years after exposure and were classified as reactivation of latent M. tuberculosis infections. Mutation rates were compared between the two recently transmitted pairs versus the two latent pairs. Mean mutation rates assuming 20 hour generation times were 5.5 X 10(-10) mutations/bp/generation for recently transmitted tuberculosis and 7.3 X 10(-11) mutations/bp/generation for latent tuberculosis. Generation time versus mutation rate curves were also significantly higher for recently transmitted tuberculosis across all replication rates (p = 0.006). Assuming identical replication and mutation rates among all isolates in the final two years before disease reactivation, the u 20 hr mutation rate attributable to the remaining latent period was 1.6 × 10(-11) mutations/bp/generation, or approximately 30 fold less than that calculated during the two years immediately before disease. Mutations attributable to oxidative stress as might be caused by bacterial exposure to the host immune system were not increased in latent infections. In conclusion, we did not find any evidence to suggest

  20. Effect of PGR producing bacterial strains isolated from vermisources on germination and growth of Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandharaj Marimuthu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen bacterial strains were isolated from vermisources andscreened for Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA production among themonly nine strains produce IAA and they were identified asStreptococcus spp., Micrococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Bacillus spp., Enterobacter spp., Escherichia spp., Alcaligenes spp., Erwinia spp., and Pseudomonas spp. Among all other strains Bacillus sp. showed the higher IAA production hence selected for further molecular analysis and confirmed as Bacillus cereus. The B. cereus was grown in nutrient broth supplemented with different concentrations (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5mg/ml of tryptophan for seven days at pH 7 and at 37ºC. Crude IAA was used for in vitro phytostimulatory studies using Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. The plant growth parameters were analyzed at different day intervals (5, 10 and 15 days. Supplementation of 5 ml crude IAA (2mg/ml of tryptophan dynamically enhances the plant growth parameters after 15 days.

  1. Microalgal growth with intracellular phosphorus for achieving high biomass growth rate and high lipid/triacylglycerol content simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yin-Hu; Yu, Yin; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2015-09-01

    Nutrient deprivation is a commonly-used trigger for microalgal lipid accumulation, but its adverse impact on microalgal growth seems to be inevitable. In this study, Scenedesmus sp. LX1 was found to show similar physiological and biochemical variation under oligotrophic and eutrophic conditions during growth with intracellular phosphorus. Under both conditions microalgal chlorophyll content and photosynthesis activity was stable during this growth process, leading to significant increase of single cell weight and size. Therefore, while algal density growth rate dropped significantly to below 1.0 × 10(5)cells mL(-1) d(-1) under oligotrophic condition, the biomass dry weight growth rate still maintained about 40 mg L(-1) d(-1). Meanwhile, the lipid content in biomass and triacylglycerols (TAGs) content in lipids increased significantly to about 35% and 65%, respectively. Thus, high biomass growth rate and high lipid/TAG content were achieved simultaneously at the late growth phase with intracellular phosphorus. Besides, microalgal biomass produced was rich in carbohydrate with low protein content. PMID:26056779

  2. Radiation Sterilization of Two Commonly Culture Media Used for Bacterial Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sterilization of culture media used for the cultivation of bacteria by Co-60 gamma ray was investigated. Nutrient agar and tryptone glucose yeast extract (TGY) media widely used for the propagation of bacteria were sterilized with 15 kGy dose gamma radiation. Seven different bacterial species were grown as well on the radiation sterilized media as on media sterilized by autoclaving in a conventional way

  3. Characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes and their capacity to promote plant growth from plants grown using organic or conventional practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye eXia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants have a diverse internal microbial biota that has been shown to have an important influence on a range of plant health attributes. Although these endophytes have been found to be widely occurring, few studies have correlated agricultural production practices with endophyte community structure and function. One agricultural system that focuses on preserving and enhancing soil microbial abundance and biodiversity is organic farming, and numerous studies have shown that organically managed system have increased microbial community characteristics. Herein, the diversity and specificity of culturable bacterial endophytes were evaluated in four vegetable crops: corn, tomato, melon and pepper grown under organic or conventional practices. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized shoot, root and seed tissues and sequence identified. A total of 336 bacterial isolates were identified, and grouped into 32 species and 5 phyla. Among these, 239 isolates were from organically grown plants and 97 from those grown conventionally. Although a diverse range of bacteria were documented, 186 were from the Phylum Firmicutes, representing 55% of all isolates. Using the Shannon diversity index, we observed a gradation of diversity in tissues, with shoots and roots having a similar value, and seeds having the least diversity. Importantly, endophytic microbial species abundance and diversity was significantly higher in the organically grown plants compared to those grown using conventional practices, potentially indicating that organic management practices may increase endophyte presence and diversity. The impact that these endophytes could have on plant growth and yield was evaluated by reintroducing them into tomato plants in a greenhouse environment. Of the bacterial isolates tested, 61% were found to promote tomato plant growth and 50%-64% were shown to enhance biomass accumulation, illustrating their potential agroecosystem application.

  4. Characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes and their capacity to promote plant growth from plants grown using organic or conventional practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ye; DeBolt, Seth; Dreyer, Jamin; Scott, Delia; Williams, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Plants have a diverse internal microbial biota that has been shown to have an important influence on a range of plant health attributes. Although these endophytes have been found to be widely occurring, few studies have correlated agricultural production practices with endophyte community structure and function. One agricultural system that focuses on preserving and enhancing soil microbial abundance and biodiversity is organic farming, and numerous studies have shown that organically managed system have increased microbial community characteristics. Herein, the diversity and specificity of culturable bacterial endophytes were evaluated in four vegetable crops: corn, tomato, melon, and pepper grown under organic or conventional practices. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized shoot, root, and seed tissues and sequence identified. A total of 336 bacterial isolates were identified, and grouped into 32 species and five phyla. Among these, 239 isolates were from organically grown plants and 97 from those grown conventionally. Although a diverse range of bacteria were documented, 186 were from the Phylum Firmicutes, representing 55% of all isolates. Using the Shannon diversity index, we observed a gradation of diversity in tissues, with shoots and roots having a similar value, and seeds having the least diversity. Importantly, endophytic microbial species abundance and diversity was significantly higher in the organically grown plants compared to those grown using conventional practices, potentially indicating that organic management practices may increase endophyte presence and diversity. The impact that these endophytes could have on plant growth and yield was evaluated by reintroducing them into tomato plants in a greenhouse environment. Of the bacterial isolates tested, 61% were found to promote tomato plant growth and 50-64% were shown to enhance biomass accumulation, illustrating their potential agroecosystem application. PMID:26217348

  5. Study of failures in a rabbit line selected for growth rate

    OpenAIRE

    C. Naturil-Alfonso; R. Lavara; Millán , P.; Rebollar, P.G.; J.S. Vicente; F. Marco-Jiménez

    2016-01-01

    Selection for growth rate is negatively related with reproductive fitness. The aim of this work was to analyse the causes of fertility failure in rabbit does selected for growth rate and characterised for reproductive deficiencies (line R). In the experiment, 82 does were divided into 2 groups: naturally mated (NM) and artificially inseminated (AI), to relate luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration with ovulation induction and pregnancy rate by laparoscopic determination. Additionally, in 38 o...

  6. Rate of Head Circumference Growth as a Function of Autism Diagnosis and History of Autistic Regression

    OpenAIRE

    WEBB, SARA JANE; Nalty, Theresa; Munson, Jeff; Brock, Catherine; Abbott, Robert; Dawson, Geraldine

    2007-01-01

    Several reports indicate that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with increased rate of head growth in early childhood. Increased rate of growth may index aberrant processes during early development, may precede the onset of symptoms, and may predict severity of the disease course. We examined rate of change in occipitofrontal circumference measurements (abstracted from medical records) in 28 boys with ASD and in 8 boys with developmental delay without autism from birth to age 36 mo...

  7. Stool consistency is strongly associated with gut microbiota richness and composition, enterotypes and bacterial growth rates

    OpenAIRE

    Vandeputte, Doris; Falony, Gwen; Araujo Vieira Da Silva, Sara Manuel; Tito Tadeo, Raul Yhossef; Joossens, Marie; Raes, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The assessment of potentially confounding factors affecting colon microbiota composition is essential to the identification of robust microbiome based disease markers. Here, we investigate the link between gut microbiota variation and stool consistency using Bristol Stool Scale classification, which reflects faecal water content and activity, and is considered a proxy for intestinal colon transit time. Design Through 16S rDNA Illumina profiling of faecal samples of 53 healthy women,...

  8. The effects of temperature and NaCl concentration on tetragonal lysozyme face growth rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pusey, Marc Lee

    1994-01-01

    Measurements were made of the (110) and (101) face growth rates of the tetragonal form of hen egg white lysozyme at 0.1M sodium acetate buffer, pH 4.0, from 4 to 22 C and with 3.0%, 5.0%, and 7.0% NaCl used as the precipitating salt. The data were collected at supersaturation ratios ranging from approximately 4 to approximately 63. Both decreasing temperature and increasing salt concentrations shifted plots of the growth rate versus C/C(sat) to the right, i.e. higher supersaturations were required for comparable growth rates. The observed trends in the growth data are counter to those expected from the solubility data. If tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth is by addition of ordered aggregates from the solution, then the observed growth data could be explained as a result of the effects of lowered temperature and increased salt concentration on the kinetics and equilibrium processes governing protein-protein interactions in solution. The data indicate that temperature would be a more tractable means of controlling the growth rate for tetragonal lysozyme crystals contrary to the usual practice in, e.g., vapor diffusion protein crystal growth, where both the precipitant and protein concentrations are simultaneously increased. However, the available range for control is dependent upon the protein concentration, with the greatest growth rate control being at the lower concentration.

  9. A NOVEL PARAMETER FOR EVALUATING THE FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH RATE IN CARBON STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.S.Wang; S.Q.Zhu; N.Kawagoishi; H.Nisitani

    2001-01-01

    A novel parameter is suggested for evaluating the fatigue crack growth rate in carbonsteels.Fatigue crack propagation tests of an annealed 0.42% carbon steel were carriedout under different conditions to investigate the relationship between this dominatingparameter and the crack opening displacement (COD).A new equation of fatiguecrack growth rate is formulated in terms of the suggested parameter.The physicalmeanings of the material parameters in this equation are explored experimentally.Considering the relation of crack growth and deformation properties,a simple andapplicable method is proposed to evaluate the fatigue crack growth rate.It is alsoobserved that the material parameters in the fatigue crack growth rate equation ofcarbon steels are related linearly to the material strength.The results are in a goodagreement with experimental results.

  10. Bilateral Trade and SEE–Eurozone Countries Growth Rate Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerija Botrić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to explore the role of trade in aligning the synchronisation patterns between the South Eastern European (see countries – Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, FYR of Macedonia, Kosovo, Montenegro, Romania and Serbia – and members of the euro area. More precisely, we investigate whether bilateral trade flows affect output synchronisation between the euro area countries and see countries and compare trade-synchronisation patterns between the see countries and new member states that have not yet introduced the euro (NMS. The results show that the levels of output similarities between the see countries and NMS are different and that the see countries exhibit lower output correlation with the euro area members than the NMS. Exploring the role of trade in aligning growth patterns has in some cases found positive effects, much stronger for the see countries, which have lower trade intensity levels. We argue that the reason for these results is related to the fact that other factors could be dominant in the NMS countries (policy measures alignment within the EU, while for the see countries only trade relationships had the opportunity to exert noticeable effects in the analysed period.

  11. Anthropogenic and biophysical contributions to increasing atmospheric CO2 growth rate and airborne fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Le Quéré

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We quantify the relative roles of natural and anthropogenic influences on the growth rate of atmospheric CO2 and the CO2 airborne fraction, considering both interdecadal trends and interannual variability. A combined ENSO-Volcanic Index (EVI relates most (~75% of the interannual variability in CO2 growth rate to the El-Niño-Southern-Oscillation (ENSO climate mode and volcanic activity. Analysis of several CO2 data sets with removal of the EVI-correlated component confirms a previous finding of a detectable increasing trend in CO2 airborne fraction (defined using total anthropogenic emissions including fossil fuels and land use change over the period 1959–2006, at a proportional growth rate 0.24% y−1 with probability ~0.9 of a positive trend. This implies that the atmospheric CO2 growth rate increased slightly faster than total anthropogenic CO2 emissions. To assess the combined roles of the biophysical and anthropogenic drivers of atmospheric CO2 growth, the increase in the CO2 growth rate (1.9% y−1 over 1959–2006 is expressed as the sum of the growth rates of four global driving factors: population (contributing +1.7% y−1; per capita income (+1.8% y−1; the total carbon intensity of the global economy (−1.7% y−1; and airborne fraction (averaging +0.2% y−1 with strong interannual variability. The first three of these factors, the anthropogenic drivers, have therefore dominated the last, biophysical driver as contributors to accelerating CO2 growth. Together, the recent (post-2000 increase in growth of per capita income and decline in the negative growth (improvement in the carbon intensity of the economy will drive a significant further acceleration in the CO2 growth rate over coming decades, unless these recent trends reverse.

  12. Combinative effects of a bacterial type-III effector and a biocontrol bacterium on rice growth and disease resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haiying Ren; Ganyu Gu; Juying Long; Qian Yin; Tingquan Wu; Tao Song; Shujian Zhang; Zhiyi Chen; Hansong Dong

    2006-12-01

    Expression of HpaGXoo, a bacterial type-III effector, in transgenic plants induces disease resistance. Resistance also can be elicited by biocontrol bacteria. In both cases, plant growth is often promoted. Here we address whether biocontrol bacteria and HpaGXoo can act together to provide better results in crop improvement. We studied effects of Pseudomonas cepacia on the rice variety R109 and the hpaGXoo-expressing rice line HER1. Compared to R109, HER1 showed increased growth, grain yield, and defense responses toward diseases and salinity stress. Colonization of roots by P. cepacia caused 20% and 13% increase, in contrast to controls, in root growth of R109 and HER1. Growth of leaves and stems also increased in R109 but that of HER1 was inhibited. When P. cepacia colonization was subsequent to plant inoculation with Rhizoctonia solani, a pathogen that causes sheath blight, the disease was less severe than controls in both R109 and HER1; HER1, nevertheless, was more resistant, suggesting that P. cepacia and HpaGXoo cooperate in inducing disease resistance. Several genes that critically regulate growth and defense behaved differentially in HER1 and R109 while responding to P. cepacia. In R109 leaves, the OsARF1 gene, which regulates plant growth, was expressed in consistence with growth promotion by P. cepacia. Inversely, OsARF1 expression was coincident with inhibition in growth of HER1 leaves. In both plants, the expression of OsEXP1, which encodes an expansin protein involved in plant growth, was concomitant with growth promotion in leaves instead of roots, in response to P. cepacia. We also studied OsMAPK, a gene that encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase and controls defense responses toward salinity and infection by pathogens in rice. In response to P. cepacia, an early expression of OsMAPK was coincident with R109 resistance to the disease, while HER1 expressed the gene similarly whether P. cepacia was present or not. Evidently, P. cepacia and GXoo

  13. Population Growth Rate, Life Expectancy and Pension Program Improvement in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zaigui

    2008-01-01

    Applying an overlapping-generations model with lifetime uncertainty, we examine in this paper China’s partially funded public pension system. The findings show that the individual contribution rate does not affect the capital-labor ratio but the firm contribution rate does. The optimal firm contribution rate depends on the capital share of income, social discount factor, survival probability, and population growth rate. The simulation results indicate that the optimal firm contribution rate r...

  14. The effect of real exchange rate misalignment on economic growth in South Africa / S. Zwedala.

    OpenAIRE

    Zwedala, Sibulele

    2013-01-01

    The growth performance of the South African economy over the past two and a half decades has been disappointing. The economy has not reached the high growth rates of the 1960s, which is desperately needed to alleviate poverty in the country. While the sources of growth have been a subject of much debate, recently the notion that the Real Exchange Rate (RER) level of a country matters for growth has attracted attention. While it is generally expected that the value of the currency should not r...

  15. Crescimento bacteriano em perfluorocarbonos líquidos: estudo "in vitro" Bacterial growth in perfluorocarbon liquids: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leciana Rorato Chiconelli Vanzo

    2001-08-01

    calibrated 1:1000 loop at times zero, 72 h, 168 h and 240 h after contamination. Bacterial growth was determined by counting the colonies on blood agar plates 24 hours after each replating. Results: Time zero demonstrated bacterial growth in all media, confirming inoculation. During the subsequent hours no further growth of these microorganisms was observed in PFO. Both bacteria developed abundantly in the remaining culture media at all times studied. The control flask did not show any bacterial growth. Conclusions: The results show that PFO does not represent a favorable medium for bacterial growth.

  16. Crescimento bacteriano em perfluorocarbonos líquidos: estudo "in vitro" Bacterial growth in perfluorocarbon liquids: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leciana Rorato Chiconelli Vanzo

    2001-02-01

    bacterium was also inoculated in 1 ml of the remaining culture media. Entire colonies were used because perfluoroctane is immiscible with water. All solutions were kept in an incubator at 37(0C for 10 days. The cultures were replated under a laminar flow hood using a calibrated 1:1000 loop at times zero, 72 h, 168 h and 240 h after contamination. Bacterial growth was determined by counting the colonies on blood agar plates 24 hours after each replating. Results: Time zero demonstrated bacterial growth in all media, confirming inoculation. During the subsequent hours no further growth of these microorganisms was observed in perfluoroctane. Both bacteria developed abundantly in the remaining culture media at all times studied. The control flask did not show any bacterial growth. Conclusions: The "in vitro" results show that PFO does not seem to represent a favorable medium for bacterial growth.

  17. Lower-leg growth rates in children with asthma during treatment with ciclesonide and fluticasone propionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lone, Agertoft; Søren, Pedersen

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of short-term lower-leg growth rate in children by knemometry has become established as an integral part of the available measures of systemic activity of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in children. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the novel ICS ciclesonide (CIC) and...... no significant effect on lower-leg growth rate in children aged 6-12 yr with mild asthma. In contrast, a similar dose of FP significantly reduced lower-leg growth rate compared with placebo and CIC....

  18. Growth rate enhancement of free-electron laser by two consecutive wigglers with axial magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Hasanbeigi; A Farhadian; E Khademi Bidhendi

    2014-06-01

    The operative mechanism for a free-electron laser (FEL) with two consecutive helical wigglers having opposite circular polarization in the presence of an axial magnetic field is proposed and analysed. With the help of fluid theory, a tenth-degree polynomial dispersion equation for electromagnetic and space-charge waves is derived. The results are used to illustrate and discuss the dependence of growth rate on different system parameters. Finally, it is shown that for the same system parameters the growth rate of the proposed structure is more than the growth rate of instability in a conventional FEL.

  19. The effect of rumen content transfer on rate of bacteria and protozoa growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims the experiment wants to know the benefit of rate of microbial protein in rumen content and to complete the information that isolates is useful for ruminant animals feed. The result indicated that buffaloes from East Nusa Tenggara is the best when they are used as donor rumen transfer making isolate. When rumen of ongole cattle generation was mixed in rumen content of buffaloes from East Nusa Tenggara and incubated 48 h, the rate of bacteria cell growth is better than rate of protozoa cell growth comparing to the other animals. The values are 30.99 mg/h/100 ml and 24.92 mg.h/100 ml respectively. The results of isolate selection in 48 h incubation indicated that treatment F is the best. The results rates of bacteria cell growth and rate of protozoa's cell growth are 26.96 mg/h/100 ml and 2.53 mg/h/100 respectively. The result of in vitro study indicated that pH and ammonia concentration support the rate of bacteria cell growth and do not cause the toxicity of microbes and animal . The rate of bacteria cell growth on D treatment is significant to A,B, and C treatments. The values are 21.44 mg/h/100 ml. 7.99; 13.13; and 13.38 mg/h/100 ml respectively. The result rates of protozoa's cell growth tends lower than rates of bacteria cell. The overall conclusion is a lower or a higher rate of microorganism cell growth depends on the environment condition. (author)

  20. A multiphasic approach for the identification of endophytic bacterial in strawberry fruit and their potential for plant growth promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Magalhães, Karina Teixeira; Lorenzetii, Emi Rainildes; Souza, Thiago Pereira; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2012-02-01

    This study used a multiphasic approach, characterized by the simultaneous use of culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, to investigate endophytic bacterial communities in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) fruit. A total of 92 bacterial endophytes were isolated and initially grouped by their repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR banding pattern and biochemical features. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of 45 representatives showed that the isolates belonged to the species Bacillus subtilis (eight isolates), Bacillus sp. (seven isolates), Enterobacter sp. (seven isolates), Enterobacter ludwigii (six isolates), Lactobacillus plantarum (six isolates), Pseudomonas sp. (five isolates), Pantoea punctata (three isolates), and Curtobacterium citreum (three isolates). Nucleic acids were extracted from the strawberry fruit and subjected to 16S rRNA gene directed polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (16S rRNA PCR-DGGE). The species B. subtilis, Enterobacter sp., and Pseudomonas sp. were detected both by isolation and DGGE. The DGGE fingerprints of total bacterial DNA did not exhibit bands corresponding to several of the representative species isolated in the extinction dilution (L. plantarum, C. citreum, and P. punctata). In contrast, bands in the DGGE profile that were identified as relatives of Arthrobacter sp. and one uncultivable Erythrobacter sp. were not recovered by cultivation techniques. After isolation, the nitrogen fixation ability and the in vitro production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) equivalents and siderophores were evaluated. A high percentage of isolates were found to possess the ability to produce siderophores and IAA equivalents; however, only a few isolates belonging to the genera Pseudomonas and Enterobacter showed the ability to fix nitrogen. Plant growth promotion was evaluated under greenhouse conditions and revealed the ability of the Bacillus strains to enhance the number of leaves

  1. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors increase growth rate with time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Alexander T.; Finkel, Kelsey A.; Warner, Kristy A.; Nör, Felipe; Tice, David; Martins, Manoela D.; Jackson, Trachette L.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are frequently used for translational cancer research, and are assumed to behave consistently as the tumor ages. However, growth rate constancy as a function of time is unclear. Notably, variable PDX growth rates over time might have implications for the interpretation of translational studies. We characterized four PDX models through several in vivo passages from primary human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma. We developed a mathematical approach to merge growth data from different passages into a single measure of relative tumor volume normalized to study initiation size. We analyzed log-relative tumor volume increase with linear mixed effect models. Two oral pathologists analyzed the PDX tissues to determine if histopathological feature changes occurred over in vivo passages. Tumor growth rate increased over time. This was determined by repeated measures linear regression statistical analysis in four different PDX models. A quadratic statistical model for the temporal effect predicted the log-relative tumor volume significantly better than a linear time effect model. We found a significant correlation between passage number and histopathological features of higher tumor grade. Our mathematical treatment of PDX data allows statistical analysis of tumor growth data over long periods of time, including over multiple passages. Non-linear tumor growth in our regression models revealed the exponential growth rate increased over time. The dynamic tumor growth rates correlated with quantifiable histopathological changes that related to passage number in multiple types of cancer. PMID:26783960

  2. Measuring the Rate of Conjugal Plasmid Transfer and Phage Infection in a Bacterial Population Using Quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhenmao; Goddard, Noel

    2012-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer between species is an important mechanism for bacterial genome evolution. In Escherichia coli, conjugation is the transfer from a donor(F^+) to a recipient(F^-) cell through cell-to-cell contact. We demonstrate a novel qPCR method for quantifying the transfer kinetics of the F plasmid in a population by enumerating the relative abundance of genetic loci unique to the plasmid and the chromosome. This approach allows us to query the plasmid transfer rate without the need for selective culturing with unprecedented single locus resolution. It also allows us to investigate the inhibition of conjugation in the presence of filamentous bacteriophages M13. Experimental data is then compared with numerical simulation using a mass action, resource limited model.

  3. Daily changes in temperature, not the circadian clock, regulate growth rate in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick A Matos

    Full Text Available Plant growth is commonly regulated by external cues such as light, temperature, water availability, and internal cues generated by the circadian clock. Changes in the rate of growth within the course of a day have been observed in the leaves, stems, and roots of numerous species. However, the relative impact of the circadian clock on the growth of grasses has not been thoroughly characterized. We examined the influence of diurnal temperature and light changes, and that of the circadian clock on leaf length growth patterns in Brachypodium distachyon using high-resolution time-lapse imaging. Pronounced changes in growth rate were observed under combined photocyles and thermocycles or with thermocycles alone. A considerably more rapid growth rate was observed at 28°C than 12°C, irrespective of the presence or absence of light. In spite of clear circadian clock regulated gene expression, plants exhibited no change in growth rate under conditions of constant light and temperature, and little or no effect under photocycles alone. Therefore, temperature appears to be the primary cue influencing observed oscillations in growth rate and not the circadian clock or photoreceptor activity. Furthermore, the size of the leaf meristem and final cell length did not change in response to changes in temperature. Therefore, the nearly five-fold difference in growth rate observed across thermocycles can be attributed to proportionate changes in the rate of cell division and expansion. A better understanding of the growth cues in B. distachyon will further our ability to model metabolism and biomass accumulation in grasses.

  4. Rates and mechanisms of bacterial mutagenesis from maximum-depth sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Justin; Rasouly, Aviram; Shamovsky, Ilya; Akivis, Yonatan; Steinman, Susan R; Mishra, Bud; Nudler, Evgeny

    2016-06-30

    In 1943, Luria and Delbrück used a phage-resistance assay to establish spontaneous mutation as a driving force of microbial diversity. Mutation rates are still studied using such assays, but these can only be used to examine the small minority of mutations conferring survival in a particular condition. Newer approaches, such as long-term evolution followed by whole-genome sequencing, may be skewed by mutational ‘hot’ or ‘cold’ spots. Both approaches are affected by numerous caveats. Here we devise a method, maximum-depth sequencing (MDS), to detect extremely rare variants in a population of cells through error-corrected, high-throughput sequencing. We directly measure locus-specific mutation rates in Escherichia coli and show that they vary across the genome by at least an order of magnitude. Our data suggest that certain types of nucleotide misincorporation occur 10(4)-fold more frequently than the basal rate of mutations, but are repaired in vivo. Our data also suggest specific mechanisms of antibiotic-induced mutagenesis, including downregulation of mismatch repair via oxidative stress, transcription–replication conflicts, and, in the case of fluoroquinolones, direct damage to DNA. PMID:27338792

  5. Growth inhibition of bacterial isolates recovered from two types of Portuguese dry smoked sausages (chouriço)

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, T.J.S.; Bruno-Soares, A.; Jensen, B. B.; Barreto, A.S.; Hojberg, O.

    2008-01-01

    Potassium sorbate (PS), sodium benzoate (SB) and methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (MHB) were investigated as surface treatments for their ability to inhibit the growth of 18 isolates of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria from two types of Portuguese dry smoked sausages (Chouric o). MHB significantly inhibited the growth rate of 12 of the isolates (p < 0.05) whereas no effect was observed for four isolates of lactic acid bacteria, identified as Enterococcus faecium, Pediococcus acidilactici ...

  6. Crack growth rate in core shroud horizontal welds using two models for a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Two models were used to predict SCC growth rate in a core shroud of a BWR. • A weld residual stress distribution with 30% stress relaxation by neutron was used. • Agreement is shown between the measurements of SCC growth rate and the predictions. • Slip–oxidation model is better at low fluences and empirical model at high fluences. - Abstract: An empirical crack growth rate correlation model and a predictive model based on the slip–oxidation mechanism for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) were used to calculate the crack growth rate in a BWR core shroud. In this study, the crack growth rate was calculated by accounting for the environmental factors related to aqueous environment, neutron irradiation to high fluence and the complex residual stress conditions resulting from welding. In estimating the SCC behavior the crack growth measurements data from a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant are referred to, and the stress intensity factor vs crack depth throughout thickness is calculated using a generic weld residual stress distribution for a core shroud, with a 30% stress relaxation induced by neutron irradiation. Quantitative agreement is shown between the measurements of SCC growth rate and the predictions of the slip–oxidation mechanism model for relatively low fluences (5 × 1024 n/m2), and the empirical model predicted better the SCC growth rate than the slip–oxidation model for high fluences (>1 × 1025 n/m2). The relevance of the models predictions for SCC growth rate behavior depends on knowing the model parameters

  7. Ab initio determination of the instability growth rate of warm dense beryllium-deuterium interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zhang-ping@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Zi; Li, DaFang [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Accurate knowledge about the interfacial unstable growth is of great importance in inertial confinement fusion. During implosions, the deuterium-tritium capsule is driven by laser beams or X-rays to access the strongly coupled and partially degenerated warm dense matter regime. At this stage, the effects of dissipative processes, such as diffusion and viscosity, have significant impact on the instability growth rates. Here, we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to determine the equations of state and the transport coefficients. Several models are used to estimate the reduction in the growth rate dispersion curves of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities with considering the presence of these dissipative effects. We show that these instability growth rates are effectively reduced when considering diffusion. The findings provide significant insights into the microscopic mechanism of the instability growth at the ablator-fuel interface and will refine the models used in the laser-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments.

  8. Ab initio determination of the instability growth rate of warm dense beryllium-deuterium interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Li, Zi; Li, DaFang; Zhang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Accurate knowledge about the interfacial unstable growth is of great importance in inertial confinement fusion. During implosions, the deuterium-tritium capsule is driven by laser beams or X-rays to access the strongly coupled and partially degenerated warm dense matter regime. At this stage, the effects of dissipative processes, such as diffusion and viscosity, have significant impact on the instability growth rates. Here, we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to determine the equations of state and the transport coefficients. Several models are used to estimate the reduction in the growth rate dispersion curves of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities with considering the presence of these dissipative effects. We show that these instability growth rates are effectively reduced when considering diffusion. The findings provide significant insights into the microscopic mechanism of the instability growth at the ablator-fuel interface and will refine the models used in the laser-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments.

  9. Ab initio determination of the instability growth rate of warm dense beryllium-deuterium interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate knowledge about the interfacial unstable growth is of great importance in inertial confinement fusion. During implosions, the deuterium-tritium capsule is driven by laser beams or X-rays to access the strongly coupled and partially degenerated warm dense matter regime. At this stage, the effects of dissipative processes, such as diffusion and viscosity, have significant impact on the instability growth rates. Here, we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to determine the equations of state and the transport coefficients. Several models are used to estimate the reduction in the growth rate dispersion curves of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities with considering the presence of these dissipative effects. We show that these instability growth rates are effectively reduced when considering diffusion. The findings provide significant insights into the microscopic mechanism of the instability growth at the ablator-fuel interface and will refine the models used in the laser-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments

  10. A panel data investigation of real exchange rate misalignment and growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Vilela Vieira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the role of real exchange rate misalignment on long-run growth for a set of ninety countries using time series data from 1980 to 2004. We first estimate a panel data model (fixed and random effects for the real exchange rate in order to produce estimates of the equilibrium real exchange rate and this is then used to construct measures of real exchange rate misalignment. We provide an alternative set of estimates of RER misalignment using panel cointegration methods. The results for the two-step System GMM panel growth models indicate that the coefficients for real exchange rate misalignment are positive for different model specification and samples, which means that a more depreciated (appreciated real exchange rate helps (harms long-run growth. The estimated coefficients are higher for developing and emerging countries.

  11. PRODUCTION OF PLANT GROWTH PROMOTING SUBSTANCES IN BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM THE SEAGRASS RHIZOSPHERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants and rhizosphere bacteria have evolved chemical signals that enable their mutual growth. These relationships have been well investigated with agriculturally important plants, but not in seagrasses, which are important to the stability of estuaries. Seagrasses are rooted in ...

  12. Effects of Phlomis umbrosa Root on Longitudinal Bone Growth Rate in Adolescent Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghun; Kim, Young-Sik; Song, Jungbin; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Hyun Jung; Guo, Hailing; Kim, Hocheol

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of Phlomis umbrosa root on bone growth and growth mediators in rats. Female adolescent rats were administered P. umbrosa extract, recombinant human growth hormone or vehicle for 10 days. Tetracycline was injected intraperitoneally to produce a glowing fluorescence band on the newly formed bone on day 8, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine was injected to label proliferating chondrocytes on days 8-10. To assess possible endocrine or autocrine/paracrine mechanisms, we evaluated insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in response to P. umbrosa administration in either growth plate or serum. Oral administration of P. umbrosa significantly increased longitudinal bone growth rate, height of hypertrophic zone and chondrocyte proliferation of the proximal tibial growth plate. P. umbrosa also increased serum IGFBP-3 levels and upregulated the expressions of IGF-1 and BMP-2 in growth plate. In conclusion, P. umbrosa increases longitudinal bone growth rate by stimulating proliferation and hypertrophy of chondrocyte with the increment of circulating IGFBP-3. Regarding the immunohistochemical study, the effect of P. umbrosa may also be attributable to upregulation of local IGF-1 and BMP-2 expressions in the growth plate, which can be considered as a GH dependent autocrine/paracrine pathway. PMID:27070559

  13. Effects of Phlomis umbrosa Root on Longitudinal Bone Growth Rate in Adolescent Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghun Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of Phlomis umbrosa root on bone growth and growth mediators in rats. Female adolescent rats were administered P. umbrosa extract, recombinant human growth hormone or vehicle for 10 days. Tetracycline was injected intraperitoneally to produce a glowing fluorescence band on the newly formed bone on day 8, and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine was injected to label proliferating chondrocytes on days 8–10. To assess possible endocrine or autocrine/paracrine mechanisms, we evaluated insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 in response to P. umbrosa administration in either growth plate or serum. Oral administration of P. umbrosa significantly increased longitudinal bone growth rate, height of hypertrophic zone and chondrocyte proliferation of the proximal tibial growth plate. P. umbrosa also increased serum IGFBP-3 levels and upregulated the expressions of IGF-1 and BMP-2 in growth plate. In conclusion, P. umbrosa increases longitudinal bone growth rate by stimulating proliferation and hypertrophy of chondrocyte with the increment of circulating IGFBP-3. Regarding the immunohistochemical study, the effect of P. umbrosa may also be attributable to upregulation of local IGF-1 and BMP-2 expressions in the growth plate, which can be considered as a GH dependent autocrine/paracrine pathway.

  14. Stress corrosion crack growth rate measurement in high temperature water using small precracked bend specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to stress corrosion crack growth rate measurements was studied. Several test series were performed on small elastic-plastically loaded SEN(B) specimens in high temperature water. One test was performed on a 25 mm C(T) specimen under linear-elastic loading. The tests on the SEN(B) specimens were performed using either rising displacement or a combination of rising and constant displacement loading. The test on the 25 mm C(T) specimen was performed using a combination of constant load and constant displacement. The studied materials were AISI 304 steel in sensitized, mill-annealed and irradiated conditions, AISI 316 in cold-worked condition, Inconel 82 and 182 weld metals in as-welded and thermally aged conditions and ferritic low activation steel F82H in tempered condition. The crack growth rate tests were performed in simulated pure BWR water and simulated BWR water with 10-100 ppb SO42- at 230-290 deg C. It was shown that intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility can be determined using an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics approach. Fracture surface morphology in sensitized AISI 304 and welded AISI 321 steels depends on the applied loading rate in BWR water. The fracture surface morphology changes from transgranular to intergranular, when J-integral increase rate is decreased. However, extremely slow displacement rate is needed for the fracture surface morphology to be fully intergranular. Rising J results in transgranular stress corrosion cracking (or strain-induced corrosion cracking) also in the mill-annealed AISI 304 and 321 steels. Tests on irradiated AISI 304 steel showed that welding together with exposure to low neutron fluence in the BWR operating conditions results in a higher susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking than welding or irradiation alone. Ferritic low activation steel F82H (in tempered condition) is not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under static loading

  15. The Role Of Industry Structure, Costs, And Economic Spillovers In Determining State Employment Growth Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Mark D. Partridge; Rickman, Dan S.

    1996-01-01

    We examine differential state employment growth by appraising the relative effects of traditional cost factors versus knowledge and technology spillovers. One emphasis is the influence that industry composition has on employment growth. Traditional cost factors examined include wage rates, unionization, taxes, and government policies such as unemployment insurance and welfare programs. The results suggest that industry composition does influence growth, working through several different avenu...

  16. Cumulative Causation and Evolutionary Micro-Founded Technical Change. On the Determinants of Growth rate Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Llerena; André Lorentz

    2004-01-01

    We develop in this paper an alternative approach to the New Growth Theory to analyse growth rate differences among integrated economies. The model presented here considers economic growth as a disequilibrium process. It introduces in a cumulative causation framework, micro-founded process of technical change taking into account elements rooted in evolutionary and Neo-Austrian literature. We then attempt to open the ??Kaldor-Verdoorn law black-box?? using a microlevel modelling of industrial d...

  17. Influence of nitrogen supply on the area, mass and relative growth rate of maize leaf

    OpenAIRE

    OROKA FRANK OKE

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the effect of nitrogen application on the area, biomass and relative growth rate of maize leaf using a non-destructive method. Results showed high nitrogen supply, leaf area and leaf biomass.

  18. Enhancing product quantity by controlling the specific growth rate of Pichia pastoris expressing human serum albumin

    OpenAIRE

    Hama, Adel; Eyer, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Establish a fed-batch process to culture a Pichia pastoris strain producing a recombinant protein (hSA), highlighting the relationship between the specific growth rate and the protein quality, as well as seeking for enhanced productivity.

  19. Growth rate of Usnea aurantiacoatra (Jacq.) Bory on Fildes Peninsula, Antarctica and its climatic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Kromer, Bernd; Schukraft, Gerd; Bubenzer, Olaf; Huang, Man-Rong; Wang, Ze-Min; Bian, Lin-Gen; Li, Cheng-Sen

    2014-01-01

    The ages of a fruticose lichen of Usnea aurantiacoatra (Jacq.) Bory, from Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Southwest Antarctic, were determined by radiocarbon (14C), and it is 1993-1996 at bottom and 2006-2007 at top of the lichen branch. The growth rates of U. aurantiacoatra calculated are 4.3 to 5.5 mm year(-1) based on its length and ages. The comparisons show that the growth rates of U. aurantiacoatra are higher than those of U. antarctica (0.4 to 1.1 mm year(-1)). The growth rates of fruticose lichens are always higher, usually >2 mm year(-1), than those of crustose ones, usually lichen growth rates in polar areas may respond to the climatic and environmental changes, and the lichens may act as bio-monitor of natural condition. PMID:24968131

  20. Density but not climate affects the population growth rate of guanacos ( Lama guanicoe) (Artiodactyla, Camelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubillaga, María; Skewes, Oscar; Soto, Nicolás; Rabinovich, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of population density and climatic variables on the rate of population growth in the guanaco ( Lama guanicoe), a wild camelid species in South America. We used a time series of 36 years (1977-2012) of population sampling in Tierra del Fuego, Chile. Individuals were grouped in three age-classes: newborns, juveniles, and adults; for each year a female population transition matrix was constructed, and the population growth rate (λ) was estimated for each year as the matrix highest positive eigenvalue. We applied a regression analysis with finite population growth rate (λ) as dependent variable, and total guanaco population, sheep population, annual mean precipitation, and winter mean temperature as independent variables, with and without time lags. The effect of guanaco population size was statistically significant, but the effects of the sheep population and the climatic variables on guanaco population growth rate were not statistically significant. PMID:25187878

  1. Data compilation of respiration, feeding, and growth rates of marine pelagic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic rate of organisms may either be viewed as a basic property from which other vital rates and many ecological patterns emerge and that follows a universal allometric mass scaling law; or it may be considered a property of the organism that emerges as a result of the organism...... similar scaling but different elevations, such that the mass-specific rates converge on a rather narrow size-independent range. In contrast, ingestion and growth rates follow a near-universal taxa-independent ~3/4 mass scaling power law. We argue that the declining mass-specific clearance rates with size......'s adaptation to the environment, with consequently less universal mass scaling properties. Data on body mass, maximum ingestion and clearance rates, respiration rates and maximum growth rates of animals living in the ocean epipelagic were compiled from the literature, mainly from original papers but also from...

  2. RELATIONSHIP AND CAUSALITY BETWEEN ECONOMIC GROWTH RATE AND CERTAIN DISEASES IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAGHIAR T. Traian

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to further research the already established relationship between economic growth and health by using the results of some previous works and applying them on the recent data, in order to find out if the economic growth rate i

  3. Regeneration and growth rates of allofragments in four common stream plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Tenna; Madsen, Tom Vindbæk; Sennels, R. S. H.

    perfoliatus L. and Ranunculus baudotii x pseudofluitans. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) if shoots with an apical tip have higher regeneration (growth of new shoots and rhizomes from allofragments) and colonisation (root attachment in sediment) abilities and higher relative growth rates...

  4. In Search of Inflation Rate Compatible with Growth Target in CEMAC Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Mantsie, Rufin-Willy

    2012-01-01

    Inflation produces adverse effects to growth in economies. However, economic analysis faces aproblem of determining the threshold at which inflation becomes harmful to the economy. Inthis article we try to determine the inflation rate favorable to growth or not for the CEMACcountries and to make contributions to economic policy.

  5. Anthropogenic and biophysical contributions to increasing atmospheric CO2 growth rate and airborne fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Le Quéré

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We quantify the relative roles of natural and anthropogenic influences on the growth rate of atmospheric CO2 and the CO2 airborne fraction, considering both interdecadal trends and interannual variability. A combined ENSO-Volcanic Index (EVI relates most (~75% of the interannual variability in CO2 growth rate to the El-Niño-Southern-Oscillation (ENSO climate mode and volcanic activity. Analysis of several CO2 data sets with removal of the EVI-correlated component confirms a previous finding of a detectable increasing trend in CO2 airborne fraction (defined using total anthropogenic emissions including fossil fuels and land use change over the period 1959–2006, at a proportional growth rate 0.24% y−1 with probability ~0.9 of a positive trend. This implies that the atmospheric CO2 growth rate increased slightly faster than total anthropogenic CO2 emissions. An extended form of the Kaya identity relates the increase in the CO2 growth rate (1.9% y−1 over 1959–2006 to the growth rates of four global driving factors: population (contributing +1.7% y−1; per capita income (+1.8% y−1; the total carbon intensity of the global economy (−1.7% y−1; and airborne fraction (averaging +0.2% y−1 with strong interannual variability. Together, the recent (post-2000 increase in growth of per capita income and decline in the negative growth (improvement in the carbon intensity of the economy will drive a significant acceleration in the CO2 growth rate over coming decades, unless these recent trends reverse. To achieve an annual reduction rate in total emissions of −2% y−1 (which would halve emissions in 35 years in the presence of a per-capita income growth rate of 2% y−1 and a population growth rate of 1% y−1, it is necessary to achieve a decline in total carbon intensity of the economy at a rate of around −5% y−1, three times the 1959–2006 average.

  6. Thermal effects on growth and respiration rates of the mayfly, Dolania americana (ephemeroptera)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mayfly Dolania Americana, common in the sand of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, was studied to determine the effects of seasonal changes in temperature on population growth rates and to determine the effects of slight elevations in water temperature on respiration rates of this benthic species. Growth of the population increased with stream temperature until peak emergence of adults in June and July. There was a strong inverse correlation between body weight and respiration rates of immature nymphs. Respiration rates at 2.5, 5, and 100C above ambient creekwater temperatures were not significantly higher than those measured at ambient creekwater temperatures. (auth)

  7. Phylogenetic, functional, and structural components of variation in bone growth rate of amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, Jorge; Legendre, Pierre; de Ricqlès, Armand; Montes, Laëtitia; de Margerie, Emmanuel; Castanet, Jacques; Desdevises, Yves

    2008-01-01

    The biological features observed in every living organism are the outcome of three sets of factors: historical (inherited by homology), functional (biological adaptation), and structural (properties inherent to the materials with which organs are constructed, and the morphogenetic rules by which they grow). Integrating them should bring satisfactory causal explanations of empirical data. However, little progress has been accomplished in practice toward this goal, because a methodologically efficient tool was lacking. Here we use a new statistical method of variation partitioning to analyze bone growth in amniotes. (1) Historical component. The variation of bone growth rates contains a significant phylogenetic signal, suggesting that the observed patterns are partly the outcome of shared ancestry. (2) Functional causation. High growth rates, although energy costly, may be adaptive (i.e., they may increase survival rates) in taxa showing short growth periods (e.g., birds). In ectothermic amniotes, low resting metabolic rates may limit the maximum possible growth rates. (3) Structural constraint. Whereas soft tissues grow through a multiplicative process, growth of mineralized tissues is accretionary (additive, i.e., mineralization fronts occur only at free surfaces). Bone growth of many amniotes partially circumvents this constraint: it is achieved not only at the external surface of the bone shaft, but also within cavities included in the bone cortex as it grows centrifugally. Our approach contributes to the unification of historicism, functionalism, and structuralism toward a more integrated evolutionary biology. PMID:18315815

  8. Specific growth rate regulation in a simulated fed-batch E. coli fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, I.; Ferreira, E. C.

    2006-01-01

    The specific growth rate is one of the most important process variables characterizing the state of microorganisms during fermentations mainly because the biosynthesis of many products of interest is often related with the values assumed by this parameter. In the particular case of the fed-batch operation of Escherichia coli for the production of recombinant proteins, it is often argued that both pre- and the post-induction specific growth rates should be closely controlled in ...

  9. ENDOSULFAN INDUCED CHANGES IN GROWTH RATE, PIGMENT COMPOSITION AND PHOTOSYNTHETIC ACTIVITY OF MOSQUITO FERN AZOLLA MICROPHYLLA

    OpenAIRE

    Raja W.; Rathaur P.; John S. A.; Ramteke P. W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series reporting a study on the effects of different concentrations of insecticide, Endosulfan (0-600ppm) was premeditated on 5th day after insecticide exposure with respect to growth rate, pigment composition and photosynthetic activity of Azolla microphylla under laboratory conditions which become non-target organism in the rice fields. Endosulfan inhibited the relative growth rate, pigment content and photosynthetic O2 evolution. Phycocyanin was main target fo...

  10. Adhesion and growth rate of Clostridium cellulolyticum ATCC 35319 on crystalline cellulose.

    OpenAIRE

    Gelhaye, E.; Petitdemange, H.; Gay, R

    1993-01-01

    The rate of tritiated-thymidine incorporation into DNA was used to estimate Clostridium cellulolyticum H10 growth rates on Avicel cellulose, taking into consideration both the unattached cells and the cells adhered to the substrate. The generation time on cellobiose calculated from the data on cell density (4.5 h) agreed well with the generation time calculated by tritiated-thymidine incorporation (3.8 h). Growth on Avicel cellulose occurred when bacteria were adhered to their substrate; 80% ...

  11. Curved characteristics best suited for Growth rates, Relative strength and Performance Time of female Olympic weightlifters

    OpenAIRE

    EBADA, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to identify Growth rates, Relative strength, and performance time for female lifters and defining Curved characteristics best suited for growth rates, relative strength, and performance Time of female Olympic weightlifters and evaluate the performance of snatch and Clean & Jerk for female lifters, coaches use the curved characteristics as standard guide them through planning and preparing training programs. The study Applied on a sample of 88 female lifter participants in weig...

  12. Anti-Candida albicans activity of Pichia anomala as determined by a growth rate reduction assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, A D; Abdelal, A T; Ahearn, D G

    1988-01-01

    Killer toxin activity of Pichia anomala WC65 appeared fungicidal for P. bimundalis WC38 and fungistatic for Candida albicans RC1. Inhibitory activity against sensitive C. albicans showed a linear relationship between toxin concentrations and the inverse of the reduced growth rates. The plot of toxin concentrations against growth rates was hyperbolic, as is characteristic of saturation kinetics. Sensitivity of C. albicans to the toxin decreased with increased cell age. The measurement of growt...

  13. Density but not climate affects the population growth rate of guanacos ( Lama guanicoe) (Artiodactyla, Camelidae)

    OpenAIRE

    María Zubillaga; Oscar Skewes; Nicolás Soto; Jorge E Rabinovich

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of population density and climatic variables on the rate of population growth in the guanaco ( Lama guanicoe), a wild camelid species in South America. We used a time series of 36 years (1977-2012) of population sampling in Tierra del Fuego, Chile. Individuals were grouped in three age-classes: newborns, juveniles, and adults; for each year a female population transition matrix was constructed, and the population growth rate (λ) was estimated for each year as the matri...

  14. Oil Export Earnings, Exchange Rate Variability, and Economic Growth in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Folorunso Sunday Ayadi; Olubunmi Elizabeth Oluwagbemi

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates oil revenue and exchange rate volatility and as well as their impacts on Nigerian economic growth which is examined from 1980 – 2010. Exchange rate volatility was captured using standard deviationof monthly nominal effective exchange rate. During this period, Nigeria recorded high levels of volatility (in oil receipt and effective exchange rate) as can be seen from the Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (ARCH) and the General Autoregressive Conditional Het...

  15. Small regulatory RNA-induced growth rate heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mars, Ruben A. T.; Pierre Nicolas; Mariano Ciccolini; Ewoud Reilman; Alexander Reder; Marc Schaffer; Ulrike Mäder; Uwe Völker; Jan Maarten van Dijl; Denham, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic bacterial populations can consist of cells displaying heterogeneous physiological traits. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) could affect this heterogeneity since they act by fine-tuning mRNA or protein levels to coordinate the appropriate cellular behavior. Here we show that the sRNA RnaC/S1022 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can suppress exponential growth by modulation of the transcriptional regulator AbrB. Specifically, the post-transcriptional abrB-RnaC/S1022 inter...

  16. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of nail infection is often caused by a bacterial infection but may also be caused by herpes, a ... to a type of yeast called Candida , or bacterial infection, and this may lead to abnormal nail growth. ...

  17. SCC crack growth rate of cold worked 316L stainless steel in PWR environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Donghai; Chen, Kai; Yu, Lun; Lu, Hui [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Lefu, E-mail: lfzhang@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shi, Xiuqiang; Xu, Xuelian [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Many component failures in nuclear power plants were found to be caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cold worked austenitic steels. Some of the pressure boundary component materials are even cold worked up to 35% plastic deformation, leaving high residual stress and inducing high growth rate of corrosion crack. Controlling water chemistry is one of the best counter measure to mitigate this problem. In this work, the effects of temperature (200 up to 325 °C) and dissolved oxygen (0 up to 2000 μg/L) on SCC crack growth rates of cold worked austenitic stainless steel type 316L have been tested by using direct current potential drop (DCPD) method. The results showed that temperature affected SCC crack growth rates more significantly in oxygenated water than in deaerated water. In argon deaerated water, the crack growth rate exhibited a peak at about 250 °C, which needs further verification. At 325 °C, the SCC crack growth rate increased rapidly with the increase of dissolved oxygen concentration within the range from 0 up to 200 μg/L, while when dissolved oxygen was above 200 μg/L, the crack growth rate followed a shallower dependence on dissolved oxygen concentration.

  18. On the measurement of fatigue crack growth rates of steels using non-standard specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue crack growth rates were measured using K-Decreasing Method during precracking of standard (Compact Tension) and non-standard (Charpy V -notch and Three-Point-Bend) specimens of four ferritic steels. Crack growth rates from the specimens were then inter-compared. The results from Compact Tension specimens were within ±15% error bar of the results from Three-Point-Bend specimens and were within ±6% error bar of the results from Charpy V -notch. The inter-comparison of the mean crack growth rates of any of the steels as obtained using different specimen geometries did not reveal any systematic dependence of crack growth rates vis-a-vis the specimens utilized. The experimental results suggested the possibility of generating material crack growth rate data as a bonus during fatigue precracking of fracture toughness specimens including Charpy V-notch and Three-Point-Bend specimens. The results also indicated distinct possibility of the measurement of steady state fatigue crack growth rate of irradiated steels using either Compact Tension and Three-Point-Bend fracture toughness specimens with a/W ≤ 0.65 or during precrackingstep of a few designated impact specimens from surveillance locations to be used as fracture toughness specimens for generation of irradiated material fracture toughness data. (author)

  19. Factors influencing crystal growth rates from undercooled liquids of pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasi, Niraj S; Baird, Jared A; Kestur, Umesh S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2014-08-21

    Amorphous forms of drugs are increasingly being used to deliver poorly water-soluble compounds. Therefore, understanding the magnitude and origin of differences in crystallization kinetics is highly important. The goal of this study was to better understand the factors that influence crystal growth rates from pharmaceutically relevant undercooled liquids and to evaluate the range of growth rates observed. The crystal growth rates of 31 drugs were determined using an optical microscope in the temperature region between the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the melting temperature (Tm). Thermodynamic parameters such as Tm, melting enthalpy, and Tg were determined using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Selected viscosity values for the undercooled liquid were taken from the literature. The growth rates of the different compounds were found to be very different from each other with a variation of about 5 orders of magnitude between the fastest growing compounds and the slowest growing compounds. A comparison of the physicochemical properties showed that compounds that had fast crystal growth rates had smaller molecular weights, higher melting temperatures, lower melt entropies, lower melt viscosities, and higher crystal densities. Variations in the growth rates of the compounds could be rationalized to a large extent by considering the thermodynamic driving force for crystallization, the viscosity, and the entropy difference between the melt and undercooled liquid. This study therefore provides important insight into factors that may compromise the stability of amorphous pharmaceuticals. PMID:25076138

  20. SCC crack growth rate of cold worked 316L stainless steel in PWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many component failures in nuclear power plants were found to be caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cold worked austenitic steels. Some of the pressure boundary component materials are even cold worked up to 35% plastic deformation, leaving high residual stress and inducing high growth rate of corrosion crack. Controlling water chemistry is one of the best counter measure to mitigate this problem. In this work, the effects of temperature (200 up to 325 °C) and dissolved oxygen (0 up to 2000 μg/L) on SCC crack growth rates of cold worked austenitic stainless steel type 316L have been tested by using direct current potential drop (DCPD) method. The results showed that temperature affected SCC crack growth rates more significantly in oxygenated water than in deaerated water. In argon deaerated water, the crack growth rate exhibited a peak at about 250 °C, which needs further verification. At 325 °C, the SCC crack growth rate increased rapidly with the increase of dissolved oxygen concentration within the range from 0 up to 200 μg/L, while when dissolved oxygen was above 200 μg/L, the crack growth rate followed a shallower dependence on dissolved oxygen concentration

  1. Diversity and distribution of the endophytic bacterial community at different stages of Eucalyptus growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Paulo Sérgio Balbino; de Oliveira, Marcelo Nagem Valério; Delvaux, Júlio César; de Jesus, Guilherme Luiz; Borges, Arnaldo Chaer; Tótola, Marcos Rogério; Neves, Júlio César Lima; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2016-06-01

    The relationships between plants and endophytic bacteria significantly contribute to plant health and yield. However, the microbial diversity in leaves of Eucalyptus spp. is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the endophytic diversity in leaves of hybrid Eucalyptus grandis x E. urophylla (Eucalyptus "urograndis") by using culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches, to better understand their ecology in leaves at different stages of Eucalyptus development, including bacteria with N2 fixation potential. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria (classes alpha-, beta- and gamma-) and Actinobacteria were identified in the Eucalyptus "urograndis" endophytic bacterial community. Within this community, the species Novosphingobium barchaimii, Rhizobium grahamii, Stenotrophomonas panacihumi, Paenibacillus terrigena, P. darwinianus and Terrabacter lapilli represent the first report these bacteria as endophytes. The diversity of the total endophytic bacteria was higher in the leaves from the 'field' (the Shannon-Wiener index, 2.99), followed by the indices obtained in the 'clonal garden' (2.78), the 'recently out from under shade (2.68), 'under shade' (2.63) and 'plants for dispatch' (2.51). In contrast, for diazotrophic bacteria, the highest means of these indices were obtained from the leaves of plants in the 'under shade' (2.56), 'recently out from under shade (2.52)' and 'field' stages (2.54). The distribution of the endophytic bacterial species in Eucalyptus was distinct and specific to the development stages under study, and many of the species had the potential for nitrogen fixation, raising the question of whether these bacteria could contribute to overall nitrogen metabolism of Eucalyptus. PMID:27010209

  2. Expression of the bacterial type III effector DspA/E in Saccharomyces cerevisiae down-regulates the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway leading to growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamer, Sabrina; Guillas, Isabelle; Shimobayashi, Mitsugu; Kunz, Caroline; Hall, Michael N; Barny, Marie-Anne

    2014-06-27

    Erwinia amylovora, the bacterium responsible for fire blight, relies on a type III secretion system and a single injected effector, DspA/E, to induce disease in host plants. DspA/E belongs to the widespread AvrE family of type III effectors that suppress plant defense responses and promote bacterial growth following infection. Ectopic expression of DspA/E in plant or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is toxic, indicating that DspA/E likely targets a cellular process conserved between yeast and plant. To unravel the mode of action of DspA/E, we screened the Euroscarf S. cerevisiae library for mutants resistant to DspA/E-induced growth arrest. The most resistant mutants (Δsur4, Δfen1, Δipt1, Δskn1, Δcsg1, Δcsg2, Δorm1, and Δorm2) were impaired in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Exogenously supplied sphingolipid precursors such as the long chain bases (LCBs) phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine also suppressed the DspA/E-induced yeast growth defect. Expression of DspA/E in yeast down-regulated LCB biosynthesis and induced a rapid decrease in LCB levels, indicating that serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, was repressed. SPT down-regulation was mediated by dephosphorylation and activation of Orm proteins that negatively regulate SPT. A Δcdc55 mutation affecting Cdc55-PP2A protein phosphatase activity prevented Orm dephosphorylation and suppressed DspA/E-induced growth arrest. PMID:24828506

  3. Crack growth rate under cyclic bending in the explosively welded steel/titanium bimetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The results of the tests on fatigue crack growth in a steel/titanium composite under oscillatory bending. ► Hardness of both joined materials in all their section is higher than hardness of the materials before cladding. ► The main crack propagated in the direction parallel to the loading action and they did not include secondary cracks. ► When the crack growth was being passed along the interface line, decrease of the crack growth rate took place. -- Abstract: The paper presents the results of the tests on fatigue crack growth in a steel/titanium composite under oscillatory bending. Two kinds of specimens of rectangular cross sections were tested. In the tested specimens, the ratio of heights of basic and overlaid materials was h1:h2 = 2.5:1 and 1:1. In the specimens, the fatigue crack growth was parallel to the applied loading and its direction changed at the interface line. Next, the crack growth along the interface line or the crack growth passing through the interface line were observed. When the crack growth passed along the interface line, decrease of the crack growth rate took place. The specimens have the uniform crack growth at both sides of lateral surfaces. At the composite fractures in the steel and titanium, transcrystalline cracks are dominating.

  4. Joint effects of heavy metal binary mixtures on seed germination, root and shoot growth, bacterial bioluminescence, and gene mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In Chul Kong

    2013-01-01

    This investigation was to assess the joint effects of metal binary mixtures on seed germination,root and shoot growth,bacterial bioluminescence,and gene mutation based on the one toxic unit (1 TU) approach.Different sensitivities and orders of toxicity of metal mixtures were observed among the bioassays.In general,mostly additive or antagonistic effects were observed,while almost no synergistic effects by the binary metal mixtures in all bioassays.Therefore,the combined effects of heavy metals in the different bioassays were difficult to generalize since they were dependent on both chemical type and the organism used in each bioassay.However,these results indicate that a battery of bioassays with mixture chemicals as opposed to just a single assay with single metal is a better strategy for the bioassessment of environmental pollutants.

  5. Physical and bacterial controls on inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon during a sea ice growth and decay experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J.; Delille, B.; Kaartokallio, H.;

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how physical incorporation, brine dynamics and bacterial activity regulate the distribution of inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in artificial sea ice during a 19-day experiment that included periods of both ice growth and decay. The experiment was performed...... major changes in DOC concentrations. (3) Different forms of DOC have different properties and hence incorporation efficiencies. In particular, the terrestrially-derived DOC from the river water was less efficiently incorporated into sea ice than the DOC in the seawater. Therefore the main factors...... regulating the distribution of the dissolved compounds within sea ice are clearly a complex interaction of brine dynamics, biological activity and in the case of dissolved organic matter, the physico-chemical properties of the dissolved constituents themselves....

  6. A quantitative theory of solid tumor growth, metabolic rate and vascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B Herman

    Full Text Available The relationships between cellular, structural and dynamical properties of tumors have traditionally been studied separately. Here, we construct a quantitative, predictive theory of solid tumor growth, metabolic rate, vascularization and necrosis that integrates the relationships between these properties. To accomplish this, we develop a comprehensive theory that describes the interface and integration of the tumor vascular network and resource supply with the cardiovascular system of the host. Our theory enables a quantitative understanding of how cells, tissues, and vascular networks act together across multiple scales by building on recent theoretical advances in modeling both healthy vasculature and the detailed processes of angiogenesis and tumor growth. The theory explicitly relates tumor vascularization and growth to metabolic rate, and yields extensive predictions for tumor properties, including growth rates, metabolic rates, degree of necrosis, blood flow rates and vessel sizes. Besides these quantitative predictions, we explain how growth rates depend on capillary density and metabolic rate, and why similar tumors grow slower and occur less frequently in larger animals, shedding light on Peto's paradox. Various implications for potential therapeutic strategies and further research are discussed.

  7. An inverse modeling procedure to determine particle growth and nucleation rates from measured aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Verheggen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical nucleation theory is unable to explain the ubiquity of nucleation events observed in the atmosphere. This shows a need for an empirical determination of the nucleation rate. Here we present a novel inverse modeling procedure to determine particle nucleation and growth rates based on consecutive measurements of the aerosol size distribution. The particle growth rate is determined by regression analysis of the measured change in the aerosol size distribution over time, taking into account the effects of processes such as coagulation, deposition and/or dilution. This allows the growth rate to be determined with a higher time-resolution than can be deduced from inspecting contour plots ('banana-plots''. Knowing the growth rate as a function of time enables the evaluation of the time of nucleation of measured particles of a certain size. The nucleation rate is then obtained by integrating the particle losses from time of measurement to time of nucleation. The regression analysis can also be used to determine or verify the optimum value of other parameters of interest, such as the wall loss or coagulation rate constants. As an example, the method is applied to smog chamber measurements. This program offers a powerful interpretive tool to study empirical aerosol population dynamics in general, and nucleation and growth in particular.

  8. Stature of Sub-arctic Birch in Relation to Growth Rate, Lifespan and Tree Form

    OpenAIRE

    JÓNSSON, THORBERGUR HJALTI

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Sub-arctic mountain birch Betula pubescens var. pumila communities in the North Atlantic region are of variable stature, ranging from prostrate scrubs to forests with trees up to 12 m high. Four hypotheses were tested, relating growth and population characteristics of sub-arctic birch woodland and scrub to tree stature; i.e. the variable stature of birch woods is due to differences in (1) the mean growth rate; (2) the age-related patterns of growth rate; (3) the life exp...

  9. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles S; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-11-11

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple (≈ 1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a simple physical principle governing these complex biological processes: a single temperature-dependent scale of cellular time governs the stochastic dynamics of growth and division in balanced growth conditions. PMID:25349411

  10. Aggregate formation in a freshwater bacterial strain induced by growth state and conspecific chemical cues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blom, J. F.; Horňák, Karel; Šimek, Karel; Pernthaler, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 9 (2010), s. 2486-2495. ISSN 1462-2912 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/08/0015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : aggregate formation * Sphingobium sp. * chemical cues * growth state Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.537, year: 2010

  11. Bacterial growth in ground beef prepared from electrically stimulated and nonstimulated muscles.

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, J L; Smith, G. C.; Savell, J W; Vanderzant, C.

    1981-01-01

    Ground beef samples prepared from electrically stimulated and nonstimulated biceps femoris and infraspinatus muscles were inoculated with Lactobacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., Acinetobacter sp., or a mixture of Lactobacillus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Acinetobacter spp., Moraxella sp., Microbacterium thermosphactum, and Erwinia herbicola. There were no significant differences in growth of various bacteria in ground beef made from electrically stimulated and nonstimulated muscles.

  12. Experimental design and estimation of growth rate distributions in size-structured shrimp populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss inverse problem results for problems involving the estimation of probability distributions using aggregate data for growth in populations. We begin with a mathematical model describing variability in the early growth process of size-structured shrimp populations and discuss a computational methodology for the design of experiments to validate the model and estimate the growth-rate distributions in shrimp populations. Parameter-estimation findings using experimental data from experiments so designed for shrimp populations cultivated at Advanced BioNutrition Corporation are presented, illustrating the usefulness of mathematical and statistical modeling in understanding the uncertainty in the growth dynamics of such populations

  13. Effects of soil nitrogen:phosphorus ratio on growth rate of Artemisia ordosica seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To address how the ratios of nitrogen and phosphorus (N:P ratios) in soil affect plant growth, we performed a two-factor (soil available N:P ratios and plant density) randomized block pot experiment to examine the relationships between soil N:P ratios, and the N:P ratios and growth rate of Artemisia ordosica seedlings. Under moderate water stress and adequate nutrient status, both soil N:P and plant density influenced the N:P ratios and growth rates of A. ordosica. With the increase of soil N:P ratios, the growth rates of A. ordosica seedlings decreased significantly. With the increase of soil N:P ratios, N:P ratios in A. ordosica seedlings increased significantly. While the nitrogen concentrations in the plant increased slightly, the phosphorus concentrations significantly decreased. With the increase of plant density, the shoot N:P ratios and growth rates significantly decreased, which resulted from soil N:P ratios. Thus, soil N:P ratios influenced the N:P ratios in A. ordosica seedlings, and hence, influenced its growth. Our results suggest that, under adequate nutrient environment, soil N:P ratios can be a limiting factor for plant growth.

  14. Jackknife-corrected parametric bootstrap estimates of growth rates in bivalve mollusks using nearest living relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Troy A; Kowalewski, Michał

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimates of growth rates can augment ecological and paleontological applications of body-size data. However, in contrast to body-size estimates, assessing growth rates is often time-consuming, expensive, or unattainable. Here we use an indirect approach, a jackknife-corrected parametric bootstrap, for efficient approximation of growth rates using nearest living relatives with known age-size relationships. The estimate is developed by (1) collecting a sample of published growth rates of closely related species, (2) calculating the average growth curve using those published age-size relationships, (3) resampling iteratively these empirically known growth curves to estimate the standard errors and confidence bands around the average growth curve, and (4) applying the resulting estimate of uncertainty to bracket age-size relationships of the species of interest. This approach was applied to three monophyletic families (Donacidae, Mactridae, and Semelidae) of mollusk bivalves, a group characterized by indeterministic shell growth, but widely used in ecological, paleontological, and geochemical research. The resulting indirect estimates were tested against two previously published geochemical studies and, in both cases, yielded highly congruent age estimates. In addition, a case study in applied fisheries was used to illustrate the potential of the proposed approach for augmenting aquaculture management practices. The resulting estimates of growth rates place body size data in a constrained temporal context and confidence intervals associated with resampling estimates allow for assessing the statistical uncertainty around derived temporal ranges. The indirect approach should allow for improved evaluation of diverse research questions, from sustainability of industrial shellfish harvesting to climatic interpretations of stable isotope proxies extracted from fossil skeletons. PMID:24071629

  15. How to determine control of growth rate in a chemostat. Using metabolic control analysis to resolve the paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, Jacky L.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Groeneveld, Philip;

    1994-01-01

    how, paradoxically, one can determine control of growth rate, of growth yield and of other fluxes in a chemostat. We develop metabolic control analysis for the chemostat. this analysis does not depend on the particular way in which specific growth rate varies with the concentration of the growth...

  16. Capital accumulation, structural change and real exchange rate in a Keynesian-Structuralist growth model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oreiro José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show at theoretical level that maintaining a competitive real exchange rate positively affects the economic growth of developing countries by means of a Keynesian-Structuralist model that combines elements of Kaleckian growth models with the balance of payments constrained growth models pioneered developed by Thirlwall. In this setting, the level of real exchange rate is capable, due to its effect over capital accumulation, to induce a structural change in the economy, making endogenous income elasticities of exports and imports. For reasonable parameter values it is shown that in steady-state growth there is two long-run equilibrium values for real exchange rate, one that corresponds to an under-valued currency and another that corresponds to an over-valued currency. If monetary authorities run exchange rate policy in order to target a competitive level for real exchange rate, than under-valued equilibrium is stable and the economy will show a high growth rate in the long-run.

  17. Element content of Ochromonas danica: a replicated chemostat study controlling the growth rate and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Savannah; Grover, James P; Chrzanowski, Thomas H

    2010-11-01

    Ecological stoichiometry focuses on the balance between multiple nutrient elements in resources and in consumers of those resources. The major consumers of bacteria in aquatic food webs are heterotrophic and mixotrophic nanoflagellates. Despite the importance of this consumer-resource interaction to understanding nutrient dynamics in the aquatic food web, few data are available addressing the element stoichiometry of flagellate consumers. Ochromonas danica, a mixotrophic bacterivore, was used as a model organism to study the relationships among temperature, growth rate and element stoichiometry. Ochromonas danica was grown in chemostats at dilution rates ranging between 0.03 and 0.10 h(-1) and temperatures ranging between 15 and 28 °C. Cells accumulated elements as interactive functions of temperature and growth rate, with the highest element concentrations corresponding to cells grown at a low temperature and high growth rates. The highest concentrations of elements were associated with small cells. Temperature and growth rate affected the element stoichiometry (as C:N, C:P and N:P) of O. danica in a complex manner, but the growth rate had a greater effect on ratios than did temperature. PMID:21039649

  18. Effect of cell size and shear stress on bacterium growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadlallah, Hadi; Jarrahi, Mojtaba; Herbert, Éric; Peerhossaini, Hassan; PEF Team

    2015-11-01

    Effect of shear stress on the growth rate of Synechocystis and Chlamydomonas cells is studied. An experimental setup was prepared to monitor the growth rate of the microorganisms versus the shear rate inside a clean room, under atmospheric pressure and 20 °C temperature. Digital magnetic agitators are placed inside a closed chamber provided with airflow, under a continuous uniform light intensity over 4 weeks. In order to study the effect of shear stress on the growth rate, different frequencies of agitation are tested, 2 vessels filled with 150 ml of each specie were placed on different agitating system at the desired frequency. The growth rate is monitored daily by measuring the optical density and then correlate it to the cellular concentration. The PH was adjusted to 7 in order to maintain the photosynthetic activity. Furthermore, to measure the shear stress distribution, the flow velocity field was measured using PIV. Zones of high and low shear stress were identified. Results show that the growth rate is independent of the shear stress magnitude, mostly for Synechocystis, and with lower independency for Chlamydomonas depending on the cell size for each species.

  19. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  20. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Steve A. [University of California San Diego

    2013-05-02

    Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass (Brachypodium distachyon) also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation.

  1. Effect of Temperature on the Void Growth in Pure Aluminium at High Strain-Rate Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Mei-Lan; HE Hong-Liang; YAN Shi-Lin

    2007-01-01

    @@ With the environment temperature varying from 273K to 773K, the dynamic process of void growth in pure aluminium at high strain-rate loading is calculated based on the dynamic growth equation of a void with internal pressure. The result shows that the effect of temperature on the growth of void should be emphasized. Because the initial pressure of void with gas will increase and the viscosity of materials will decrease with the rising of temperature, the growth of void is accelerated. Furthermore, material inertia restrains the growth of void evidently when the diameter exceeds 10μm. The effect of surface tension is very weak in the whole process of void growth.

  2. Value of volume measurements in evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysms growth rate and need for surgical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos, E-mail: kontopodisn@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece); Metaxa, Eleni, E-mail: emmetaxa@gmail.com [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Papaharilaou, Yannis, E-mail: yannisp@iacm.forth.gr [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Georgakarakos, Efstratios, E-mail: efstratiosgeorg@gmail.com [Vascular Surgery Department, “Demokritus” University of Thrace Medical School, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Tsetis, Dimitris, E-mail: tsetis@med.uoc.gr [Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Ioannou, Christos V., E-mail: ioannou@med.uoc.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To examine whether indices other than the traditionally used abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximum diameter, such as AAA volume, intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness and ILT volume, may be superior to evaluate aneurismal enlargement. Materials and methods: Thirty-four small AAAs (initially presenting a maximum diameter <5.5 cm which is the threshold for surgical repair) with an initial and a follow-up CT were examined. Median increase and percentile annual change of these variables was calculated. Correlation between growth rates as determined by the new indices under evaluation and those of maximum diameter were assessed. AAAs were divided according to outcome (surveillance vs. elective repair after follow-up which is based on the maximum diameter criterion) and according to growth rate (high vs. low) based on four indices. Contingency between groups of high/low growth rate regarding each of the four indices on one hand and those regarding need for surgical repair on the other was assessed. Results: A strong correlation between growth rates of maximum diameter and those of AAA and ILT volumes could be established. Evaluation of contingency between groups of outcome and those of growth rate revealed significant associations only for AAA and ILT volumes. Subsequently AAAs with a rapid volumetric increase over time had a likelihood ratio of 10 to be operated compared to those with a slower enlargement. Regarding increase of maximum diameter, likelihood ratio between AAAs with rapid and those with slow expansion was only 3. Conclusion: Growth rate of aneurysms regarding 3Dimensional indices of AAA and ILT volumes is significantly associated with the need for surgical intervention while the same does not hold for growth rates determined by 2Dimensional indices of maximum diameter and ILT thickness.

  3. Value of volume measurements in evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysms growth rate and need for surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine whether indices other than the traditionally used abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximum diameter, such as AAA volume, intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness and ILT volume, may be superior to evaluate aneurismal enlargement. Materials and methods: Thirty-four small AAAs (initially presenting a maximum diameter <5.5 cm which is the threshold for surgical repair) with an initial and a follow-up CT were examined. Median increase and percentile annual change of these variables was calculated. Correlation between growth rates as determined by the new indices under evaluation and those of maximum diameter were assessed. AAAs were divided according to outcome (surveillance vs. elective repair after follow-up which is based on the maximum diameter criterion) and according to growth rate (high vs. low) based on four indices. Contingency between groups of high/low growth rate regarding each of the four indices on one hand and those regarding need for surgical repair on the other was assessed. Results: A strong correlation between growth rates of maximum diameter and those of AAA and ILT volumes could be established. Evaluation of contingency between groups of outcome and those of growth rate revealed significant associations only for AAA and ILT volumes. Subsequently AAAs with a rapid volumetric increase over time had a likelihood ratio of 10 to be operated compared to those with a slower enlargement. Regarding increase of maximum diameter, likelihood ratio between AAAs with rapid and those with slow expansion was only 3. Conclusion: Growth rate of aneurysms regarding 3Dimensional indices of AAA and ILT volumes is significantly associated with the need for surgical intervention while the same does not hold for growth rates determined by 2Dimensional indices of maximum diameter and ILT thickness

  4. Discrete cyclic di-GMP-dependent control of bacterial predation versus axenic growth in Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Hobley; Fung, Rowena K. Y.; Carey Lambert; Maximilian A T S Harris; Dabhi, Jayesh M.; King, Simon S.; Basford, Sarah M; Kaoru Uchida; Robert Till; Rashidah Ahmad; Shin-Ichi Aizawa; Mark Gomelsky; R Elizabeth Sockett

    2012-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a Delta-proteobacterium that oscillates between free-living growth and predation on Gram-negative bacteria including important pathogens of man, animals and plants. After entering the prey periplasm, killing the prey and replicating inside the prey bdelloplast, several motile B. bacteriovorus progeny cells emerge. The B. bacteriovorus HD100 genome encodes numerous proteins predicted to be involved in signalling via the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)...

  5. Primordial soup was edible: abiotically produced Miller-Urey mixture supports bacterial growth

    OpenAIRE

    Xueshu Xie; Daniel Backman; Albert T. Lebedev; Viatcheslav B. Artaev; Liying Jiang; Ilag, Leopold L.; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2015-01-01

    Sixty years after the seminal Miller-Urey experiment that abiotically produced a mixture of racemized amino acids, we provide a definite proof that this primordial soup, when properly cooked, was edible for primitive organisms. Direct admixture of even small amounts of Miller-Urey mixture strongly inhibits E. coli bacteria growth due to the toxicity of abundant components, such as cyanides. However, these toxic compounds are both volatile and extremely reactive, while bacteria are highly capa...

  6. Characterization of the sulfate uptake and assimilation pathway from Xanthomonas citri - targets for bacterial growth inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambascia, C.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Microorganisms require sulfur for growth and obtain it either for inorganic sulfate or organosulfur compounds. ATP-Binding Cassete (SulT family) or major facilitator superfamily-type (SulP) transporters are responsible for the sulfate transport into the cell. In Xanthomonas citri, the phytopathogenic bacterium that causes the canker citrus disease, there are no reports related to the importance of these transporters during in vitro or in vivo infection. We identified in X. citri genome all the genes that belong to the well-characterized cys regulon from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, which includes three ABC transporters and all the enzymes necessary for sulfate oxide reduction to sulfide and cysteine. Once these genes have been shown to be extremely important for bacteria growth and development in different environments, we chose the sbpcysWUA and cysDNCHIJG operons, which encodes the ABC inorganic sulfate ABC transporter and all the enzymes necessary for conversion of sulfate in cysteine, respectively. As a step for crystallization trials and resolution of their tridimensional structures, the referred genes were amplified and cloned into the cloning vector pGEM T-easy. In addition, using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling we characterized all the protein functions as well as built tridimensional models of their structure for determination of the active sites. The importance of each protein is discussed aiming the discovery of a good target for development of inhibitors that could block the bacterium growth. (author)

  7. Inhibitory Concentration and Minimum Contact Time Gambir Extract (Uncaria gambier Roxb Against Bacterial Growth Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafsah Katu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis (E.Faecalis gram-positive bacteria commonly found in endodontic retreatment cases. Extract Gambir, a type of dried sap from the leaves and young stems of plants gambier (Uncaria gambier Roxb contains catechins, which are potent antibacterial and anti fungal with minimal side effects. This study aimed to determine the inhibitory concentrations and minimal contact time Gambir extract on the growth of the bacteria E. faecalis. Research applied a design with lab experiments, conducted on May 30-June 16, 2011 at the Laboratory of Pharmacognosy-Phytochemicals Faculty of Pharmacy and Laboratory of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin. Materials and methods; 600 gr Gambir which has been crushed, extracted with reflux and rotary method. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration is determined with 5 ml of 5.25% NaOCl as a positive control and sterile distilled water negative control. Antibacterial activity is determined based on the time zone diameter hambat.Analisis contact and SPSS version 16.0 for windows with One-way ANOVA test and LSD on (p <0.05. Results indicated that Statistical analysis showed a 1% concentration and contact time of 24 hours, effectively inhibits the growth of bacteria E.faecalis. in conclusion, Gambir extract effectively inhibits the growth of bacteria E. faecalis.

  8. Characterization of the sulfate uptake and assimilation pathway from Xanthomonas citri - targets for bacterial growth inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Microorganisms require sulfur for growth and obtain it either for inorganic sulfate or organosulfur compounds. ATP-Binding Cassete (SulT family) or major facilitator superfamily-type (SulP) transporters are responsible for the sulfate transport into the cell. In Xanthomonas citri, the phytopathogenic bacterium that causes the canker citrus disease, there are no reports related to the importance of these transporters during in vitro or in vivo infection. We identified in X. citri genome all the genes that belong to the well-characterized cys regulon from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, which includes three ABC transporters and all the enzymes necessary for sulfate oxide reduction to sulfide and cysteine. Once these genes have been shown to be extremely important for bacteria growth and development in different environments, we chose the sbpcysWUA and cysDNCHIJG operons, which encodes the ABC inorganic sulfate ABC transporter and all the enzymes necessary for conversion of sulfate in cysteine, respectively. As a step for crystallization trials and resolution of their tridimensional structures, the referred genes were amplified and cloned into the cloning vector pGEM T-easy. In addition, using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling we characterized all the protein functions as well as built tridimensional models of their structure for determination of the active sites. The importance of each protein is discussed aiming the discovery of a good target for development of inhibitors that could block the bacterium growth. (author)

  9. Characteristics of Growth Rate of Coral Porites from Sanya Bay, Hainan Island and its Relationship to Environmental Variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Qi; Zhang Yechun; Sun Donghuai

    2003-01-01

    The time series of annual and seasonal growth rate of two coral Porites, collected at different sites of fringe reef in the Sanya Bay, Hainan Island have been obtained by analyzing X-radiograph of skeletal band. There are obvious seasonal variations of the growth rate in two corals, the average low rate in winter and the average high rate from spring to autumn. Compared with the time series of environmental variables, the coral growth rate is only correlated statistically with seawater temperature and not related to rainfall and sunshine. Furthermore, the growth rate in spring and summer is correlated directly with seawater temperature of the winter-early spring ( between December and March ) and the other seasonal growth rate has no relationship with seasonal variations of seawater temperature. We propose that seawater temperature is one of the factors affecting the coral growth rate in the area and the low seawater temperature is a primary control of the seasonal growth rate.

  10. Generation time, net reproductive rate, and growth in stage-age-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Major insights into the relationship between life-history features and fitness have come from Lotka's proof that population growth rate is determined by the level (expected amount) of reproduction and the average timing of reproduction of an individual. But this classical result is limited...... to age-structured populations. Here we generalize this result to populations structured by stage and age by providing a new, unique measure of reproductive timing (Tc) that, along with net reproductive rate (R0), has a direct mathematical relationship to and approximates growth rate (r). We use...... macroscopic features of the life history determine population growth rate r and reveal a complex interplay of trait dynamics, timing, and level of reproduction. Our results contribute to a new framework of population and evolutionary dynamics in stage-and-age-structured populations....

  11. Fluoroquinolone-macrolide combination therapy for chronic bacterial prostatitis: retrospective analysis of pathogen eradication rates, inflammatory findings and sexual dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vittorio Magri; Emanuele Montanari; Vi(s)nja (S)kerk; Alemka Markoti(c); Emanuela Marras; Antonella Restelli; Kurt G Naber; Gianpaolo Perletti

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the safety and efficacy of fluoroquinolone-macrolide combination therapy in category Ⅱ chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP).The aim of this study is to retrospectively compare the microbiological and clinical findings of two treatment schemes for CBP based on the combination of azithromycin (500 mg,thrice-weekly) with a once-daily 500-or 750-mg dose of ciprofloxacin (Cipro-500 or Cipro-750 cohort,respectively).Combined administration of azithromycin (1500 mg week-1) with ciprofloxacin at the rate of 750 mg day-1 for 4 weeks rather than at 500 mg day-1 for 6 weeks increased the eradication rates from 62.35% to 77.32% and the total bacteriological success from 71.76% to 85.57%.A significant decrease in pain and voiding signs/symptoms and a significant reduction in inflammatory leukocyte counts and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were sustained throughout an 18-month follow-up period in both groups.Ejaculatory pain,haemospermia and premature ejaculation were significantly attenuated on microbiological eradication in both groups,but the latter subsided more promptly in the Cipro-750 cohort.In total,59 Cipro-750 patients showed mild-to-severn erectile dysfunction (ED) at baseline,while 22 patients had no ED on microbiological eradication and throughout the follow-up period.In conclusion fluoroquinolone-macrolide therapy resulted in pathogen eradication and CBP symptom attenuation,including pain,voiding disturbances and sexual dysfunction.A once-daily 750-mg dose of ciprofloxacin for 4 weeks showed enhanced eradication rates and lower inflammatory white blood cell counts compared to the 500-mg dose for 6 weeks.Our results are open to further prospective validation.

  12. Pretreatment Growth Rate Predicts Radiation Response in Vestibular Schwannomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Nina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Larvie, Mykol [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Curtin, Hugh [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McKenna, Michael J. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are often followed without initial therapeutic intervention because many tumors do not grow and radiation therapy is associated with potential adverse effects. In an effort to determine whether maximizing initial surveillance predicts for later treatment response, the predictive value of preirradiation growth rate of VS on response to radiation therapy was assessed. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with 65 VS were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiation surgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. Pre- and postirradiation linear expansion rates were estimated using volumetric measurements on sequential magnetic resonance images (MRIs). In addition, postirradiation tumor volume change was classified as demonstrating shrinkage (ratio of volume on last follow-up MRI to MRI immediately preceding irradiation <80%), stability (ratio 80%-120%), or expansion (ratio >120%). The median pre- and postirradiation follow-up was 20.0 and 27.5 months, respectively. Seven tumors from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients were excluded from statistical analyses. Results: In the 58 non-NF2 patients, there was a trend of correlation between pre- and postirradiation volume change rates (slope on linear regression, 0.29; P=.06). Tumors demonstrating postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 89%/year, and those without postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 41%/year (P=.02). As the preirradiation growth rate increased, the probability of postirradiation expansion also increased. Overall, 24.1% of tumors were stable, 53.4% experienced shrinkage, and 22.5% experienced expansion. Predictors of no postirradiation tumor expansion included no prior surgery (P=.01) and slower tumor growth rate (P=.02). The control of tumors in NF2 patients was only 43%. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for VS, but tumors that grow quickly preirradiation may be

  13. Pretreatment Growth Rate Predicts Radiation Response in Vestibular Schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are often followed without initial therapeutic intervention because many tumors do not grow and radiation therapy is associated with potential adverse effects. In an effort to determine whether maximizing initial surveillance predicts for later treatment response, the predictive value of preirradiation growth rate of VS on response to radiation therapy was assessed. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with 65 VS were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiation surgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. Pre- and postirradiation linear expansion rates were estimated using volumetric measurements on sequential magnetic resonance images (MRIs). In addition, postirradiation tumor volume change was classified as demonstrating shrinkage (ratio of volume on last follow-up MRI to MRI immediately preceding irradiation <80%), stability (ratio 80%-120%), or expansion (ratio >120%). The median pre- and postirradiation follow-up was 20.0 and 27.5 months, respectively. Seven tumors from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients were excluded from statistical analyses. Results: In the 58 non-NF2 patients, there was a trend of correlation between pre- and postirradiation volume change rates (slope on linear regression, 0.29; P=.06). Tumors demonstrating postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 89%/year, and those without postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 41%/year (P=.02). As the preirradiation growth rate increased, the probability of postirradiation expansion also increased. Overall, 24.1% of tumors were stable, 53.4% experienced shrinkage, and 22.5% experienced expansion. Predictors of no postirradiation tumor expansion included no prior surgery (P=.01) and slower tumor growth rate (P=.02). The control of tumors in NF2 patients was only 43%. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for VS, but tumors that grow quickly preirradiation may be

  14. Influence of water relations and growth rate on plant element uptake and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greger, Maria [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Botany

    2006-02-15

    Plant uptake of Ni, Sr, Mo, Cs, La, Th, Se, Cl and I was examined to determine how plant water relations and growth rate influence the uptake and distribution of these elements in the studied plants. The specific questions were how water uptake and growth rate influenced the uptake of various nuclides and how transpiration influenced translocation to the shoot. The knowledge gained will be used in future modelling of radionuclide leakage from nuclear waste deposits entering the ecosystem via plants. The plant studied was willow, Salix viminalis, a common plant in the areas suggested for waste disposal; since there can be clone variation, two different clones having different uptake properties for several other heavy metals were used. The plants were grown in nutrient solution and the experiments on 3-month-old plants were run for 3 days. Polyethylene glycol was added to the medium to decrease the water uptake rate, a fan was used to increase the transpiration rate, and different light intensities were used to produce different growth rates. Element concentration was analysed in roots and shoots. The results show that both the uptake and distribution of various elements are influenced in different ways and to various extents by water flow and plant growth rate, and that it is not possible from the chemical properties of these elements to know how they will react. However, in most cases increased growth rate diluted the concentration of the element in the tissue, reduced water uptake reduced the element uptake, while transpiration had no effect on the translocation of elements to the shoot. The clones did not differ in terms of either the uptake or translocation of the elements, except that I was not taken up and translocated to the shoot in one of the clones when the plant water flow or growth rate was too low. Not all of the elements were found in the plant in the same proportions as they had been added to the nutrient solution.

  15. Influence of water relations and growth rate on plant element uptake and distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant uptake of Ni, Sr, Mo, Cs, La, Th, Se, Cl and I was examined to determine how plant water relations and growth rate influence the uptake and distribution of these elements in the studied plants. The specific questions were how water uptake and growth rate influenced the uptake of various nuclides and how transpiration influenced translocation to the shoot. The knowledge gained will be used in future modelling of radionuclide leakage from nuclear waste deposits entering the ecosystem via plants. The plant studied was willow, Salix viminalis, a common plant in the areas suggested for waste disposal; since there can be clone variation, two different clones having different uptake properties for several other heavy metals were used. The plants were grown in nutrient solution and the experiments on 3-month-old plants were run for 3 days. Polyethylene glycol was added to the medium to decrease the water uptake rate, a fan was used to increase the transpiration rate, and different light intensities were used to produce different growth rates. Element concentration was analysed in roots and shoots. The results show that both the uptake and distribution of various elements are influenced in different ways and to various extents by water flow and plant growth rate, and that it is not possible from the chemical properties of these elements to know how they will react. However, in most cases increased growth rate diluted the concentration of the element in the tissue, reduced water uptake reduced the element uptake, while transpiration had no effect on the translocation of elements to the shoot. The clones did not differ in terms of either the uptake or translocation of the elements, except that I was not taken up and translocated to the shoot in one of the clones when the plant water flow or growth rate was too low. Not all of the elements were found in the plant in the same proportions as they had been added to the nutrient solution

  16. Influence of oxygen transfer on Pseudomonas putida effects on growth rate and biodesulfurization capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, S; Rodriguez, A; Gomez, E; Alcon, A; Santos, V E; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-04-01

    The growth rate and desulfurization capacity accumulated by the cells during the growth of Pseudomonas putida KTH2 under different oxygen transfer conditions in a stirred and sparged tank bioreactor have been studied. Hydrodynamic conditions were changed using different agitation conditions. During the culture, several magnitudes associated to growth, such as the specific growth rate, the dissolved oxygen concentration and the carbon source consumption have been measured. Experimental results indicate that cultures are influenced by the fluid dynamic conditions into the bioreactor. An increase in the stirrer speed from 400 to 700 rpm has a positive influence on the cell growth rate. Nevertheless, the increase of agitation from 700 to 2000 rpm hardly has any influence on the growth rate. The effect of fluid dynamics on the cells development of the biodesulfurization (BDS) capacity of the cells during growth is different. The activities of the intracellular enzymes involved in the 4S pathway change with dissolved oxygen concentration. The enzyme activities have been evaluated in cells at several growth time and different hydrodynamic conditions. An increase of the agitation from 100 to 300 rpm has a positive influence on the development of the overall BDS capacity of the cells during growth. This capacity shows a decrease for higher stirrer speeds and the activity of the enzymes monooxygenases DszC and DszA decreases dramatically. The highest value of the activity of DszB enzyme was obtained with cells cultured at 100 rpm, while this activity decreases when the stirrer speed was increased higher than this value. PMID:26762940

  17. Crystal Growth Rate Dispersion: A Predictor of Crystal Quality in Microgravity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Richard D.; Judge, Russell A.; Snell, Edward H.; vanderWoerd, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    In theory macromolecular crystals grow through a process involving at least two transport phenomena of solute to the crystal surface: diffusion and convection. In absence of standard gravitational forces, the ratio of these two phenomena can change and explain why crystal growth in microgravity is different from that on Earth. Experimental evidence clearly shows, however, that crystal growth of various systems is not equally sensitive to reduction in gravitational forces, leading to quality improvement in microgravity for some crystals but not for others. We hypothesize that the differences in final crystal quality are related to crystal growth rate dispersion. If growth rate dispersion exists on Earth, decreases in microgravity, and coincides with crystal quality improvements then this dispersion is a predictor for crystal quality improvement. In order to test this hypothesis, we will measure growth rate dispersion both in microgravity and on Earth and will correlate the data with previously established data on crystal quality differences for the two environments. We present here the first crystal growth rate measurement data for three proteins (lysozyme, xylose isomerase and human recombinant insulin), collected on Earth, using hardware identical to the hardware to be used in microgravity and show how these data correlate with crystal quality improvements established in microgravity.

  18. Combination of therapeutic ultrasound with antibiotics interfere with the growth of bacterial culture that colonizes skin ulcers: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirro, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira; Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi de; Sousa, Natanael Teixeira Alves de; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli are among the major bacterial species that colonize skin ulcers. Therapeutic ultrasound (TUS) produces biophysical effects that are relevant to wound healing; however, its application over a contaminated injury is not evidence-based. The objective of this research was to analyze the effect of TUS on in vitro-isolated S. aureus and E. coli, including the combination of ultrasound and antibiotics, in order to assess their antibiotic action on bacterial susceptibility. For the experiments, the bacterial strains were suspended in saline, then diluted (10(4)CFU/mL) for irradiation (at 1 and 3MHz, 0.5 and 0.8W/cm(2) for 0 and 15min) and the combination treatment of ultrasonication and antibiotics was administered by adding nalidixic acid (S. aureus) and tetracycline (E. coli) at concentrations equivalent to 50% of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The experiments were carried out in duplicate with six repetitions. The suspensions were inoculated on to Petri plates and incubated at 37°C and the colony forming units (CFUs) were counted after 24h. The results were subjected to the Shapiro-Wilk normality test, followed by parametric ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 1%. The results demonstrated that the action of TUS at 1MHz inhibited bacterial growth while at 3MHz, bacterial growth was observed in both species. However, the synergistic combination of ultrasound and antibiotics was able to inhibit the growth of both bacteria completely after 15min of ultrasonication. The results suggest that the action of ultrasound on S. aureus and E. coli are dependent on the oscillation frequency as well as the intensity and time of application. The combination of ultrasound with antibiotics was able to inhibit bacterial growth fully at all frequencies and doses in both species. PMID:27150772

  19. DNA segregation by the bacterial actin AlfA during Bacillus subtilis growth and development

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Eric; Herrera, Nick C; Gunderson, Felizza Q.; Derman, Alan I.; Dance, Amber L; Sims, Jennifer; Larsen, Rachel A.; Pogliano, Joe

    2006-01-01

    We here identify a protein (AlfA; actin like filament) that defines a new family of actins that are only distantly related to MreB and ParM. AlfA is required for segregation of Bacillus subtilis plasmid pBET131 (a mini pLS32-derivative) during growth and sporulation. A 3-kb DNA fragment encoding alfA and a downstream gene (alfB) is necessary and sufficient for plasmid stability. AlfA-GFP assembles dynamic cytoskeletal filaments that rapidly turn over (t1/2

  20. Inhibitors of bacterial growth in urine: what is the role of betaines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, S T; Peddie, B A; Randall, K; Lever, M

    1999-05-01

    It has long been recognised that some individuals produce urine that is inhibitory to uropathogens. This may be partly explained by inhibitors. Several inhibitors have been identified in urine including urea and organic acids. Bacteria adapt to high osmolarity by activating osmoregulated betaine porters and accumulating organic osmolytes intracellularly. The preferred substrate is glycine betaine, which is present in urine, and promotes rapid growth by balancing osmotic forces and stabilising macromolecular structures against the toxicity of urea and low pH. Other dietary betaines such as trigonelline may also be taken but enhance urea toxicity. The importance of such compounds in vivo is unknown. PMID:10394986

  1. Impact of Temperature on Bacterial Growth and Survival in Drinking-Water Pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Asamoah Sakyi; Roland Asare

    2012-01-01

    A study of a model drinking water distribution system, using previously used galvanized steel pipes, was carried out to evaluate the impact of temperature on the growth and survival of total coliform, E. coli and Heterotrophic Plate Count (HPC) bacteria for a maximum of 21 days residence time in the water phase in pipes and their respective glass control bottles. The study showed that for water temperatures of 15, 25 and 37ºC, HPC bacteria initially increased in the first 2-4 days but much hi...

  2. Trace incorporation of heavy water reveals slow and heterogeneous pathogen growth rates in cystic fibrosis sputum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, Sebastian H.; Sessions, Alex L.; Cowley, Elise S.; Reyes, Carmen; Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Hu, Yang; Orphan, Victoria J.; Kato, Roberta; Newman, Dianne K.

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment for chronic infections is undermined by a significant gap in understanding of the physiological state of pathogens at the site of infection. Chronic pulmonary infections are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of millions of immunocompromised individuals worldwide, yet drugs that are successful in laboratory culture are far less effective against pathogen populations persisting in vivo. Laboratory models, upon which preclinical development of new drugs is based, can only replicate host conditions when we understand the metabolic state of the pathogens and the degree of heterogeneity within the population. In this study, we measured the anabolic activity of the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus directly in the sputum of pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), by combining the high sensitivity of isotope ratio mass spectrometry with a heavy water labeling approach to capture the full range of in situ growth rates. Our results reveal S. aureus generation times with a median of 2.1 d, with extensive growth rate heterogeneity at the single-cell level. These growth rates are far below the detection limit of previous estimates of CF pathogen growth rates, and the rates are slowest in acutely sick patients undergoing pulmonary exacerbations; nevertheless, they are accessible to experimental replication within laboratory models. Treatment regimens that include specific antibiotics (vancomycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tobramycin) further appear to correlate with slow growth of S. aureus on average, but follow-up longitudinal studies must be performed to determine whether this effect holds for individual patients.

  3. Empirical Analysis of Non-Performing Loans Trend and Growth Rate in Nigerian Banking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniefiok Akpan Umoren

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing trend in Non-performing loans (NPLs adversely affected availability of credits to economic agents in all sectors of the economy thereby constraining financial intermediation and economic activities. The study examined the trend and growth rates of NPLs in the Nigerian banking system during the major banking policy reforms regimes namely: pre-consolidation (1979 – 2004 and post consolidation era (2005 – 2014. Time series data collected were analyzed using descriptive and regression analyses. Results indicated irregular fluctuations in NPLs’ trend in both periods. This result suggested prevalent of high credit risk and corresponding reduction in lending capability of banks in the economy. Regression estimates of NPLs’ trend in the two regimes showed significant negative growth rates. This implies that, financial policies implemented in the country yielded positive impacts over time. NPLs assumed an exponential growth rate of -1.39% and -15.55% during the pre and post consolidated eras respectively. An average exponential growth rate of -5.2% was obtained during the entire period. Quadratic trend analysis revealed that, increase influence of time variable significantly reduced NPLs during pre- consolidation regime and the entire period considered. However, this influence was stagnated during post consolidation period. Based on the result, it is recommended that, prudent lending coupled with swift and orderly clean-up of banking system loan portfolios should be adopted to decelerate NPLs trend and growth rate in Nigeria. Time is an important element in designing and implementing any banking and macroeconomic policy.

  4. Rapid growth reduces cold resistance: evidence from latitudinal variation in growth rate, cold resistance and stress proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby Stoks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physiological costs of rapid growth may contribute to the observation that organisms typically grow at submaximal rates. Although, it has been hypothesized that faster growing individuals would do worse in dealing with suboptimal temperatures, this type of cost has never been explored empirically. Furthermore, the mechanistic basis of the physiological costs of rapid growth is largely unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Larvae of the damselfly Ischnura elegans from two univoltine northern and two multivoltine southern populations were reared at three temperatures and after emergence given a cold shock. Cold resistance, measured by chill coma recovery times in the adult stage, was lower in the southern populations. The faster larval growth rates in the southern populations contributed to this latitudinal pattern in cold resistance. In accordance with their assumed role in cold resistance, Hsp70 levels were lower in the southern populations, and faster growing larvae had lower Hsp70 levels. Yet, individual variation in Hsp70 levels did not explain variation in cold resistance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: WE PROVIDE EVIDENCE FOR A NOVEL COST OF RAPID GROWTH: reduced cold resistance. Our results indicate that the reduced cold resistance in southern populations of animals that change voltinism along the latitudinal gradient may not entirely be explained by thermal selection per se but also by the costs of time constraint-induced higher growth rates. This also illustrates that stressors imposed in the larval stage may carry over and shape fitness in the adult stage and highlights the importance of physiological costs in the evolution of life-histories at macro-scales.

  5. Bacterial structure and characterization of plant growth promoting and oil degrading bacteria from the rhizospheres of mangrove plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Flávia Lima; dos Santos, Henrique Fragoso; Martins, Edir Ferreira; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2011-08-01

    Most oil from oceanic spills converges on coastal ecosystems, such as mangrove forests, which are threatened with worldwide disappearance. Particular bacteria that inhabit the rhizosphere of local plant species can stimulate plant development through various mechanisms; it would be advantageous if these would also be capable of degrading oil. Such bacteria may be important in the preservation or recuperation of mangrove forests impacted by oil spills. This study aimed to compare the bacterial structure, isolate and evaluate bacteria able to degrade oil and stimulate plant growth, from the rhizospheres of three mangrove plant species. These features are particularly important taking into account recent policies for mangrove bioreme-diation, implying that oil degradation as well as plant maintenance and health are key targets. Fifty-seven morphotypes were isolated from the mangrove rhizospheres on Bushneil-Haas (BH) medium supplemented with oil as the sole carbon source and tested for plant growth promotion. Of this strains, 60% potentially fixed nitrogen, 16% showed antimicrobial activity, 84% produced siderophores, 51% had the capacity to solubilize phosphate, and 33% produced the indole acetic acid hormone. Using gas chromatography, we evaluated the oil-degrading potential of ten selected strains that had different morphologies and showed Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) features. The ten tested strains showed a promising degradation profile for at least one compound present in the oil. Among degrader strains, 46% had promising PGPR potential, having at least three of the above capacities. These strains might be used as a consortium, allowing the concomitant degradation of oil and stimulation of mangrove plant survival and maintenance. PMID:21887634

  6. Proteomic analysis of growth phase-dependent expression of Legionella pneumophila proteins which involves regulation of bacterial virulence traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Hayashi

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, which is a causative pathogen of Legionnaires' disease, expresses its virulent traits in response to growth conditions. In particular, it is known to become virulent at a post-exponential phase in vitro culture. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the exponential phase and post-exponential phase to identify candidates associated with L. pneumophila virulence using 2-Dimentional Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 68 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two growth phases, 64 were up-regulated at a post-exponential phase. The up-regulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis, ketone body biogenesis and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB biogenesis, suggesting that L. pneumophila may utilize sugars and lipids as energy sources, when amino acids become scarce. Proteins related to motility (flagella components and twitching motility-associated proteins were also up-regulated, predicting that they enhance infectivity of the bacteria in host cells under certain conditions. Furthermore, 9 up-regulated proteins of unknown function were found. Two of them were identified as novel bacterial factors associated with hemolysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBCs. Another 2 were found to be translocated into macrophages via the Icm/Dot type IV secretion apparatus as effector candidates in a reporter assay with Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase. The study will be helpful for virulent analysis of L. pneumophila from the viewpoint of physiological or metabolic modulation dependent on growth phase.

  7. Environmental effects of the growth rate of intertidal invertebrates and some implications for foraging waders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanink, Jan H.; Zwarts, Leo

    The paper describes effects of intertidal height and sediment type on growth rate of the bivalves Cerastoderma edule, Macoma balthica, Mya arenaria, Mytilus edulis and Scrobicularia plana, and of the worms Arenicola marina, Nephtys hombergii and Nereis diversicolor in the eastern part of the Dutch Wadden Sea. In most species, exposure time was negatively correlated with length growth, although interfering effects of sediment type could not be ruled out. When controlled for the effects of exposure time, clay content of the sediment appeared to affect the growth of all species, but in different ways. The variation was related to the foraging methods of the invertebrates. Foraging waders may use the spatial variation in growth rate of the invertebrates to optimize the exploitation of individual cohorts.

  8. Spatial distribution of soda straws growth rates of the Coufin Cave (Vercors, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrette Yves

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Choranche Cave system (Vercors, France is an excellent locality for measuring the growth rates of large numbers soda straws. This is especially the case for the Coufin Cave, as enlargement of the cave entrance in 1875 led to a change in stalactite color from brown to white, thus providing a reliable chronomarker. The date of this brown-to-white calcite transition has been confirmed by lamina counting. We measured and georeferenced the growth-lengths of 306 soda straws in a 1m2 area of the roof of the Coufin Cave entrance chamber. Because of the very slow and sometimes inexistent water feeding of those stalactites, hydrochemistry analysis were not achieved and drop rate effect on growth were neglected; this study is based on a geomorphological and geostatistical work. By measuring a large number of soda straws in a very small area for which most of the parameters affecting stalactite growth could be considered uniform, and because flow rates are very slow (frequencies are always superior to 1 drop per half hour, we could ascribe differences in growth rates to variations in the global increase of water flow through the unsaturated matrix. Statistical and geostatistical analyses of the measurements showed that this set of similarly shaped stalactites actually consisted of three Gaussian populations with different mean growth rates: fast growth rate (FGR- mean of 0.92 mm.y-1, medium growth rate (MGR- mean of 0.47 mm.y-1 and low growth rate (LGR- 0.09 mm.y-1. Plotting the lengths and spatial distribution of the 20 longest FGR soda straws revealed that there is a rough pattern to the water flow through the cave roof. Even if no direction is statisticaly different from others, the observed directional pattern is consistent with local and regional tectonic observations. Plots of the spatial distribution of the soda straws show that FGR soda straws follow lines of regional geological stress, whereas MGR and LGR soda straws are more dispersed.

  9. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  10. Phase and its morphologies of Ti-45 %Al alloy directionally solidified at different growth rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang; SU Yan-qing; BI Wei-sheng; GUO Jing-Jie; JIA Jun; FU Heng-zhi

    2005-01-01

    The microstructures of Ti-45%Al(molar fraction) alloy directionally solidified at different growth rates in alumina tube by electromagnetic heating zone melting were studied. The measured temperature gradient of the system is about 104K/m. The microstructures show that the primary solidified phase is β phase at different growth rates. The growth at low rates from 1.94 × 10-6 m/s to 4. 16 × 10-6 m/s results in a transient solid/liquid interface structure from planar to shallow cellular. This transient rate is larger than the theoretical value of vc = 6.94 × 10-7 m/s.Compared with vt = vc/k = 1.01 × 10-6 m/s, the cellular-dendritic transient rate of experiment is observed in the range of 1.67 × 10-5- 2.50 × 10-5 m/s. The primary arm spacing decreases with increasing growth rate.

  11. Plasma deposition of boron films with high growth rate and efficiency using carborane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The injection of carborane (C2B10H12) on the PISCES-B linear plasma device has been used to produce boron containing films on various target species. Film growth rates achieved are extremely high (up to 30 nm/s) compared to those typically found for glow discharges (∼0.01 nm/s). For low-Z target materials (C and Al) the film production is highly efficient, with the boron film growth rate comparable to the incident ion flux and the injection rate of boron atoms. The boron to carbon ratio is 3.0-3.6 for these films. Similarly high growth rates (∼10 nm/s) are obtained with high-Z target (W), but with lower deposition efficiency and higher B/C film ratio. The high film growth rate/efficiency are apparently linked to the high degree of carborane ionization and dissociation caused by the ∼40 eV PISCES-B plasma, compared with T<1 eV plasmas of glow discharges. This technique opens the possibility of continuously producing protective B films in thermonuclear devices where net erosion rates approach 10 nm/s

  12. Are international growth rates constrained by the balance of payments? A comment on Professor Thirlwall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S.L. MCCOMBIE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In a recent article A.P. Thirlwall derived what he termed a “fundamental law” which he argued explains the disparate post-war growth rates of advanced countries. In this note, the author takes issue with Thirlwall’s model, showing that together with the empirical evidence it is not capable of discriminating between the demand and the supply orientated approaches to growth.

  13. Horizon Instability of Extremal Kerr Black Holes: Nonaxisymmetric Modes and Enhanced Growth Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Casals, Marc; Zimmerman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We show that the horizon instability of the extremal Kerr black hole is associated with a singular branch point in the Green function at the superradiant bound frequency. We study generic initial data supported away from the horizon and find an enhanced growth rate due to nonaxisymmetric modes. The growth is controlled by the conformal weight of each mode. We speculate on connections to near-extremal black holes and holographic duality.

  14. Simple Predicting Method for Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Based on Tensile Strength of Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Three types of fatigue tests for an annealed carbon steel containing carbon of 0.42 % were carried out on smooth specimens and specimens with a small blind hole in order to investigate the fatigue crack growth law. A simple predicting method for crack growth rates has been proposed involving strength σb and the relation between cyclic stress and strain. The validity of proposed method has been confirmed by experiments on several carbon steels with different loadings.

  15. Can Uzbekistan Economy Retain Its High Growth Rates? Scenarios of Economic Development in 2015-30

    OpenAIRE

    Popov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Uzbekistan in recent 10 years is an extremely successful economy – high growth (8%), low domestic and international debt, undervalued exchange rate, relatively even distribution of income, creation from scratch competitive export oriented auto industry. It is important though to avoid “dizziness from success” and to envisage possible growth traps in the future. This paper discusses two unfavourable scenarios – negative terms of trade shock due to the decline in cotton, gas and gold prices (a ...

  16. Economic Growth, Financial Depth and Lending Rate Nexus: A Case of Oil Dependant Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Najeeb Muhammad Nasir; Nasir Ali; Imran Khokhar

    2014-01-01

    This research empirically investigates the long and short run causal relationships between economic growth, financial depth and lending rate in the unique economic setup of Saudi Arabia where 92% of total GDP comes from oil exports. Study uses two proxies for financial depth namely liquid liability indicator and banks claim to the private sector to GDP ratio, while economic growth is measured by real GDP per capita. This study intends to get answers for such questions as, if financial depth e...

  17. Poor correlation between phytoplankton community growth rates and nutrient concentration in the sea

    OpenAIRE

    Regaudie-de-gioux, A.; Sal, S; Á. López-Urrutia

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient availability is one of the major factors regulating marine productivity and phytoplankton community structure. While the response of phytoplankton species to nutrient variation is relatively well known, that of phytoplankton community remains unclear. We question whether phytoplankton community growth rates respond to nutrient concentration in a similar manner to phytoplankton species composing the community, that is, following Monod's model. Data on in situ marine community growth r...

  18. Interactive effects of and light on growth rates and RUBISCO content of small and large centric diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Campbell, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    Among marine phytoplankton groups, diatoms span the widest range of cell size, with resulting effects upon their nitrogen uptake, photosynthesis and growth responses to light. We grew two strains of marine centric diatoms, the small Thalassiosira pseudonana and the larger T. punctigera in high and low nitrogen media, across a range of growth light levels. Nitrogen and total proteins per cell decreased with increasing growth light in both species when grown under low nitrogen media. Surprisingly, low nitrogen increased the cellular allocation to RUBISCO and the rate of electron transport away from Photosystem II for the smaller diatom under low growth light, and for the larger diatom across the range of growth lights. Low nitrogen decreased the growth rate of the smaller diatom, particularly under higher light, but stimulated the growth rate of the larger diatom. Our results show that the high nitrogen in common growth media favours the growth rate of a small diatom but inhibits growth of a larger species.

  19. Slow Growth Rates of Amazonian Trees: Consequences for Carbon Sequestration and Forest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, S. A.; Camargo, P. B.; Selhorst, D.; Chambers, J.; Higuchi, N.; Martinelli, L. A.; Trumbore, S.

    2004-12-01

    Growth rates for tropical forest trees estimated from radiocarbon ages and dendrometer measurements illustrate differences in forest age and structure among three sites located in the eastern, central and western Amazon basin. Although growth rates vary dramatically among individual trees overall the slowest growing trees (averaging \\sim0.1mm yr-1 as opposed to 0.3mm yr-1 diameter increment) are found in the central Amazon. Small individuals (DBH \\500 yr are encountered at all sites. Only \\sim2MgC ha-1 year-1, or \\SIM7% of annual photosynthesis, is allocated to growth of living wood at the eastern and central Amazon sites. Rates of C allocation to stem growth are similar across the three sites we studied because slowest growth occurs at the central Amazon site that has highest stem density and greatest biomass. Extrapolating our growth increment data to forest stand, we estimate the mean age of individual trees is \\SIM350 years in the central Amazon but \\SIM200\\-250 years in the other two areas. The mean age of C making up the trees has a smaller range of \\SIM250\\-310 years, because of the greater fraction of biomass in larger individuals in the eastern and western Amazon sites. These residence times for C are longer than those of 100\\-180 years obtained by simply dividing the total biomass C by the rate of C allocation to new wood for the same reason. We estimate that >20% of trees at all sites should have ages >300 years, and that maximum tree ages of >1000 years, though not common, are in accord with the growth rates we find. The fact that many Amazon trees attain ages greater than several centuries should be accounted for in management practices in these forests.

  20. Toroidicity and shape dependence of peeling mode growth rates in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth rate of the peeling mode instability with large toroidal mode number is calculated for general axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, including tokamaks and the spherical torus (ST) equilibia by using formalism presented by Connor et al. Analytic equilibia with non-zero edge current density and quasi-uniform current profiles are assumed. It is found that in sharp D-shape tokamak plasma, the derivative of the safety factor with respect to the poloidal flux becomes very large, making the perturbed poloidal motion very large, in turn making a significant reduction of the growth rate of the peeling mode, similar to the X-point effect in diverted plasma. The large aspect ratio effect is also studied, which reduces the growth rate further. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  1. ANALYSIS OF TUITION GROWTH RATES BASED ON CLUSTERING AND REGRESSION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuition plays a significant role in determining whether a student could afford higher education, which is one of the major driving forces for country development and social prosperity. So it is necessary to fully understand what factors might affect the tuition and how they affect it. However, many existing studies on the tuition growth rate either lack sufficient real data and proper quantitative models to support their conclusions, or are limited to focus on only a few factors that might affect the tuition growth rate, failing to make a comprehensive analysis. In this paper, we explore a wide variety of factors that might affect the tuition growth rate by use of large amounts of authentic data and different quantitative methods such as clustering and regression models.

  2. Investigation of the growth rate for joint fast breeder reactor and light water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of fuel consumption and breeding characteristics of FBR-LWR joint operation is presented. The FBR operates in a closed cycle with joint-reprocessing of core and blanket material. The LWR-portion that runs on FBR plutonium operates in an open cycle. The growth rate of the system is defined based upon the fact that the discharge from the system will make up a fraction of an identical system; the system growth rate is found to have an almost linear dependence on the fraction of the LWR fed by plutonium from the FBR. The LWR growth rate, which is negative, is a constant and represents the fraction of the fuel burnt in the LWR-fraction that runs on FBR plutonium per year

  3. STRATIFIED MODEL FOR ESTIMATING FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH RATE OF METALLIC MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yong-yu; LIU Xin-wei; YANG Fan

    2005-01-01

    The curve of relationship between fatigue crack growth rate and the stress strength factor amplitude represented an important fatigue property in designing of damage tolerance limits and predicting life of metallic component parts. In order to have a morereasonable use of testing data, samples from population were stratified suggested by the stratified random sample model (SRAM). The data in each stratum corresponded to the same experiment conditions. A suitable weight was assigned to each stratified sample according to the actual working states of the pressure vessel, so that the estimation of fatigue crack growth rate equation was more accurate for practice. An empirical study shows that the SRAM estimation by using fatigue crack growth rate data from different stoves is obviously better than the estimation from simple random sample model.

  4. Measurement of fatigue crack growth rate in pipe and pipe weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Striation spacing on the fracture surface developed during fatigue crack growth in pipes and pipe welds have been examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Striation spacing was measured on the fracture surface in maximum depth (radial) and surface (circumferential) direction at several locations. Striation spacing increases with crack growth in thickness (depth) direction of pipe and pipe weld. Local direction of striation spacing is different from the global direction of crack growth in cracked pipe. Striation spacing was compared with the conventionally evaluated crack growth rate where crack growth was measured using Alternate Current Potential Difference (ACPD) based instrument. Striation spacing is marginally lower for carbon steel and higher for stainless steel in comparison to da/dN in the Paris regime (evaluated from 'a Vs N' plot). Striation spacing form fracture surface of pipe was also compared with those measured on CT specimen. (author)

  5. Non-monotonic growth rates of sawtooth precursors evidenced with a new method on ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezinet, D.; Igochine, V.; Weiland, M.; Yu, Q.; Gude, A.; Meshcheriakov, D.; Sertoli, M.; the Asdex Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a new method to derive, from soft x-ray (SXR) tomography, robust estimates of the core displacement, growth rate and frequency of a 1/1 sawtooth crash precursor. The method is valid for very peaked SXR profiles and is robust against both the inversion algorithm and the presence of tungsten in a rotating plasma. Three typical ASDEX Upgrade crashes are then analysed. In all cases a postcursor is observed, suggesting incomplete reconnection. Despite different dynamics, in all three cases the growth rate of the core displacement shows similar features. First, it is not constant, supporting the idea of non-linear growth. Second, it can be divided into clearly identified phases with quasi-constant growth rates, suggesting sudden change of growth regime rather than smooth transitions. Third, its evolution is non-monotonic, with phases of accelerated growth followed by damped phases. This damping is interpreted for two cases respectively as an effect of fast ions and of mode coupling, based on the result of a MHD simulation. The mode frequency is observed in all cases to be closely related to the plasma bulk rotation profile, with little or no visible effect of the electron diamagnetic drift frequency. The onset criterion could not be clearly identified and it is shown that the role of the pressure gradient is not as expected from a naive extrapolation of the linear stability theory.

  6. Effects of varying media, temperature, and growth rates on the intracellular concentrations of yeast amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Force, E; Benítez, T

    1995-01-01

    Variations of the yeast free amino acid pool under different culture conditions were studied in two Saccharomyces strains, the laboratory haploid strain S288C and the industrial fermentative yeast IFI256. The internal amino acid pool of both strains was measured when grown in laboratory (minimal and complete) versus semiindustrial (molasses with or without added biotin and/or diammonium phosphate) media, in fermentable (glucose, fructose, sucrose) versus respirable (glycerol) carbon sources, in different temperatures (22, 30, and 37 degrees C), pHs (2.0-4.75), and growth rates (0.018-0.24 h-1) in continuous culture, and at different phases of the growth curve in batch culture (lag, exponential, early and late stationary). Results indicated that environmental conditions, particularly the presence of amino acids in the media, enormously influenced the intracellular amino acid concentration. Higher values were detected in molasses than in laboratory media and in fermentable carbon sources (glucose, fructose, sucrose) than in glycerol. Variations in the amino acid pool along the growth curve were greater at 37 degrees C than at other temperatures; in all cases, the highest values were measured at the beginning of the exponential phase. In continuous culture and at different growth rates, intracellular free amino acid concentrations increased by 3-10-fold when the growth rate was lower than 0.05 h-1, representing 20-35% of the total (free plus protein) amino acid content and indicating that amino acid yield was a partly growth-linked parameter. PMID:7654310

  7. A Generalized Preferential Attachment Model for Business Firms Growth Rates: I. Empirical Evidence

    CERN Document Server

    Pammolli, F; Buldyrev, S V; Riccaboni, M; Matia, K; Yamasaki, K; Stanley, H E; Pammolli, Fabio; Fu, Dongfeng; Riccaboni, Massimo; Matia, Kaushik; Yamasaki, Kazuko

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a model of proportional growth to explain the distribution $P(g)$ of business firm growth rates. The model predicts that $P(g)$ is Laplace in the central part and depicts an asymptotic power-law behavior in the tails with an exponent $\\zeta=3$. Because of data limitations, previous studies in this field have been focusing exclusively on the Laplace shape of the body of the distribution. We test the model at different levels of aggregation in the economy, from products, to firms, to countries, and we find that the its predictions are in good agreement with empirical evidence on both growth distributions and size-variance relationships.

  8. Stress- and Growth Rate-Related Differences between Plate Count and Real-Time PCR Data during Growth of Listeria monocytogenes▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert-Schwillinsky, Franziska; Pin, Carmen; Dzieciol, Monika; Wagner, Martin; Hein, Ingeborg

    2009-01-01

    To assess the overestimation of bacterial cell counts in real-time PCR in relation to stress and growth phase, four different strains of L. monocytogenes were exposed to combinations of osmotic stress (0.5 to 8% [vol/vol] NaCl) and acid stress (pH 5 to 7) in a culture model at a growth temperature of 10°C or were grown under optimal conditions. Growth curves obtained from real-time PCR, optical density, and viable count data were compared. As expected, optical density data revealed entirely d...

  9. Measuring selection in human populations using the growth rate per generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewbank, Douglas

    2016-04-19

    Estimates of the speed of evolution between generations depend on the association between individual traits and a measure of fitness. The two most frequently used measures of fitness are the net reproduction rate and the 1-year growth factor implied by the fertility and mortality rates. Results based on the two lead to very different results. The reason is that the 1-year growth factor is not a measure of change between generations. Therefore, studies of changes between generations should use the amount of growth over the length of a generation. This is especially important for studies of human populations because of the long length of generation. In addition, estimates based on a single year's growth are overly sensitive to data on individuals who fail to reproduce. The effects of using a generational measure are demonstrated using data from Kenya and Ukraine. These results demonstrate that using a 1-year growth rate to measure fitness leads to estimates that understate the rate at which evolution changes the characteristics of a human population. PMID:27022075

  10. Airborne measurements of nucleation mode particles I: coastal nucleation and growth rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. O'Dowd

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A light aircraft was equipped with a bank of Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs (50% cut from 3–5.4–9.6 nm and a nano-Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (nSMPS and deployed along the west coast of Ireland, in the vicinity of Mace Head. The objective of the exercise was to provide high resolution micro-physical measurements of the coastal nucleation mode in order to map the spatial extent of new particle production regions and to evaluate the evolution, and associated growth rates of the coastal nucleation-mode aerosol plume. Results indicate that coastal new particle production is occurring over most areas along the land-sea interface with peak concentrations at the coastal plume-head in excess of 106 cm−3. Pseudo-Lagrangian studies of the coastal plume evolution illustrated significant growth of new particles to sizes in excess of 8 nm approximately 10 km downwind of the source region. Close to the plume head (<1 km growth rates can be as high as 123–171 nm h−1, decreasing gradually to 53–72 nm h−1 at 3 km. Further along the plume, at distances up to 10 km, the growth rates are calculated to be 17–32 nm h−1. Growth rates of this magnitude suggest that after a couple of hours, coastal nucleation mode particles can reach significant sizes where they can contribution to the regional aerosol loading.

  11. Effects of lowered pH on marine phytoplankton growth rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berge, Terje; Daugbjerg, Niels; Andersen, Betinna Balling;

    2010-01-01

    concentration of seawater. Ocean acidification may potentially both stimulate and reduce primary production by marine phytoplankton. Data are scarce on the response of marine phytoplankton growth rates to lowered pH/increased CO2. Using the acid addition method to lower the seawater pH and manipulate the...... carbonate system, we determined in detail the lower pH limit for growth rates of 2 model species of common marine phytoplankton. We also tested whether growth and production rates of 6 other common species of phytoplankton were affected by ocean acidification (lowered to pH 7.0). The lower pH limits for...... statistically similar in the pH range of ~7.0 to 8.5. Our results and literature reports on growth at lowered pH indicate that marine phytoplankton in general are resistant to climate change in terms of ocean acidification, and do not increase or decrease their growth rates according to ecological relevant...

  12. Collaborative Project: Understanding the Chemical Processes tat Affect Growth rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurry, Peter [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Smuth, James [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate.

  13. Growth rate of peeling mode in the near separatrix region of diverted tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical expression of the peeling mode in the near separatrix region of diverted tokamak plasma is derived. It is shown that in diverted plasmas both with single and double X points, though the perturbed potential energy of the unstable peeling mode tends to be large, its growth rate becomes very small due to the even larger kinetic energy. Compared to some recent studies that give qualitatively correct results about this growth rate, our result is directly related with the diverted equilibrium quantities suitable for application to realistic experiments. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  14. A study on the rate of contribution of education investment to the economic growth in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Bo-nai; Lai Xiong-xiang

    2006-01-01

    There is an evident bi-directional causality relationship between education investment and economic growth based on an analysis of statistics from 1952 to 2003 released by the State Statistics Bureau.A generalized difference regression model is set up to investigate the relationship between the two.Studies show that the rate of contribution of education investment to economic growth was 24.4 percent from 1952 to 2003.Further examination indicates that after the market-oriented economy restructuring,this rate increased by a wide margin of 7 percent,from 22.8 percent to 29.7 percent.

  15. Intuitive calculation of the relativistic Rayleigh-Taylor instability linear growth rate

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, A

    2011-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is a key process in many fields of Physics ranging from astrophysics to inertial confinement fusion. It is usually analyzed deriving the linearized fluid equations, but the physics behind the instability is not always clear. Recent works on this instability allow for an very intuitive understanding of the phenomenon and for a straightforward calculation of the linear growth rate. In this Letter, it is shown that the same reasoning allows for a direct derivation of the relativistic expression of the linear growth rate for an incompressible fluid.

  16. Growth rates of interchange modes in the dense z-pinch and gas blanket effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A class of models of the dense z-pinch in which the bulk of the plasma is neutrally stable against interchange is studied. At a radius a the plasma is abruptly terminated and surrounded by a gas blanket. Instability results from the surface current necessary to maintain pressure balance at the plasma-gas interface. A single dispersion relation applies to all models in this class and shows two effects of the gas blanket in reducing growth rate. (1) Partial support of plasma pressure by external gas pressure reduces the driving force for the instability, and (2) mass loading of the relatively dense neutral gas reduces growth rate

  17. Effects of distributions of growth rates on recrystallization kinetics and microstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Rasmus Brauner; Schmidt, Søren; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2007-01-01

    The effects on recrystallization kinetics and microstructure of growth rate distributions rather than a single growth rate for recrystallizing grains were investigated by geometric simulations. The grains were set to grow as spheres with radii r = At1-alpha. The results show that distributions in A...... and alpha may produce significant changes in the microstructure and texture, whereas only distributions in alpha may change the overall evolution in kinetics represented by V-v(t) by completely changing the shape of the kinetics curve. (c) 2007 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All...

  18. Hormone-dependent bacterial growth, persistence and biofilm formation--a pilot study investigating human follicular fluid collected during IVF cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise S Pelzer

    Full Text Available Human follicular fluid, considered sterile, is aspirated as part of an in vitro fertilization (IVF cycle. However, it is easily contaminated by the trans-vaginal collection route and little information exists in its potential to support the growth of microorganisms. The objectives of this study were to determine whether human follicular fluid can support bacterial growth over time, whether the steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone (present at high levels within follicular fluid contribute to the in vitro growth of bacterial species, and whether species isolated from follicular fluid form biofilms. We found that bacteria in follicular fluid could persist for at least 28 weeks in vitro and that the steroid hormones stimulated the growth of some bacterial species, specifically Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp. Streptococcus spp. and E. coli. Several species, Lactobacillus spp., Propionibacterium spp., and Streptococcus spp., formed biofilms when incubated in native follicular fluids in vitro (18/24, 75%. We conclude that bacteria aspirated along with follicular fluid during IVF cycles demonstrate a persistent pattern of growth. This discovery is important since it can offer a new avenue for investigation in infertile couples.

  19. Growth rates in modern speleothems from Santana Cave, Brazil, by the 210Pb-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Santana Cave is located at the Upper Ribeira Touristic State Park (PETAR-Parque Estadual Turístico do Alto Ribeira) in southern São Paulo State, Brazil. This paper describes 210Pb activity concentration data in soda straw stalactites samples collected at Salão das Flores in Santana Cave that is a fossil tributary of the cave river. Non-expensive alpha counting following some analytical steps for extracting and depositing 210Po were used for providing the 210Pb data. In the analyzed samples, 210Pb values of increasingly older samples fitted an exponential curve, thus suggesting that the production of 210Pb has been constant with time. Also, the near-ideal fit indicated that the growth was uniform and there was no break in the continuous growth. The soda straw growth rates were determined from the best fit to the exponential curve through the 210Pb activity concentration. The results of the measurements allowed estimate a longitudinal rate corresponding to 1.3 mm/yr and a lateral rate of 0.01 mm/yr, which permitted calculate times of 70 years and 317–498 years for their formation, respectively. The lateral growth rate is compatible with values from studies of chemical weathering rates held under laboratory and natural conditions.

  20. Dependence of microstructures on growth rate in YBCO films by TFA-MOD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YBa2Cu3Oy (YBCO) films grown by starting solutions with Ba-poor (Y:Ba:Cu = 1:1.5:3, Ba/Y = 1.5) have been reported to perform higher Jc than that for YBCO films with stoichiometric one due to smaller and less pores in YBCO films by metal organic deposition (MOD) using tri-fluoroacetates (TFA). However, we have reported that a lot of non-reacted particles such as Y and Cu oxides were remained for the YBCO film surface grown by the precursors using Ba-poor solution. In this study, influences of YBCO growth rate on microstructures of the YBCO film were discussed to control microstructures of these second phase particles. As a result, microstructures of the YBCO film depended strongly on the YBCO growth rate, residues of Y and Cu oxides were dispersed randomly throughout the YBCO film grown at higher growth rate. Consequently, it was succeeded to control the segregated phases as seen in the previous YBCO film with Ba/Y = 1.5 at the film surface into the YBCO film. Jc of the YBCO film grown at higher rate was a value almost equal to that grown at previous growth rate.

  1. Survival, recruitment, and population growth rate of an important mesopredator: the northern raccoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Elizabeth M; Cameron Devitt, Susan E; Sunquist, Melvin E; Goswami, Varun R; Oli, Madan K

    2014-01-01

    Populations of mesopredators (mid-sized mammalian carnivores) are expanding in size and range amid declining apex predator populations and ever-growing human presence, leading to significant ecological impacts. Despite their obvious importance, population dynamics have scarcely been studied for most mesopredator species. Information on basic population parameters and processes under a range of conditions is necessary for managing these species. Here we investigate survival, recruitment, and population growth rate of a widely distributed and abundant mesopredator, the northern raccoon (Procyon lotor), using Pradel's temporal symmetry models and >6 years of monthly capture-mark-recapture data collected in a protected area. Monthly apparent survival probability was higher for females (0.949, 95% CI = 0.936-0.960) than for males (0.908, 95% CI = 0.893-0.920), while monthly recruitment rate was higher for males (0.091, 95% CI = 0.078-0.106) than for females (0.054, 95% CI = 0.042-0.067). Finally, monthly realized population growth rate was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.996-1.004), indicating that our study population has reached a stable equilibrium in this relatively undisturbed habitat. There was little evidence for substantial temporal variation in population growth rate or its components. Our study is one of the first to quantify survival, recruitment, and realized population growth rate of raccoons using long-term data and rigorous statistical models. PMID:24901349

  2. Microscopic Rate Constants of Crystal Growth from Molecular Dynamic Simulations Combined with Metadynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Kozma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation of crystal growth can be decomposed into two steps: the determination of the microscopic rate constants and a mesoscopic kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. We proposed a method to determine kinetic rate constants of crystal growth. We performed classical molecular dynamics on the equilibrium liquid/crystal interface of argon. Metadynamics was used to explore the free energy surface of crystal growth. A crystalline atom was selected at the interface, and it was displaced to the liquid phase by adding repulsive Gaussian potentials. The activation free energy of this process was calculated as the maximal potential energy density of the Gaussian potentials. We calculated the rate constants at different interfacial structures using the transition state theory. In order to mimic real crystallization, we applied a temperature difference in the calculations of the two opposite rate constants, and they were applied in kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The novelty of our technique is that it can be used for slow crystallization processes, while the simple following of trajectories can be applied only for fast reactions. Our method is a possibility for determination of elementary rate constants of crystal growth that seems to be necessary for the long-time goal of computer-aided crystal design.

  3. Effect of low-temperature plasma treatment on the growth and reproduction rate of some plant pathogenic bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mráz, Ivan; Beran, P.; Šerá, Božena; Gavril, B.; Hnatiuc, E.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2014), s. 63-67. ISSN 1125-4653 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : LTAPP * bacterial growth * Clavibacter michigannsis subsp michiganensis * Escherichia coli * Erwinia amylovora Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; BO - Biophysics (UEK-B) Impact factor: 1.043, year: 2014

  4. Predicting bacterial growth in raw, salted, and cooked chicken breast fillets during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarz, Liane Aldrighi; Fonseca, Gustavo Graciano; Prentice, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Growth curves were evaluated for aerobic mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria, Pseudomonas spp. and Staphylococcus spp., grown in raw, salted, and cooked chicken breast at 2, 4, 7, 10, 15, and 20 ℃, respectively, using the modified Gompertz and modified logistic models. Shelf life was determined based on microbiological counts and sensory analysis. Temperature increase reduced the shelf life, which varied from 10 to 26 days at 2 ℃, from nine to 21 days at 4 ℃, from six to 12 days at 7 ℃, from four to eight days at 10 ℃, from two to four days at 15 ℃, and from one to two days at 20 ℃. In most cases, cooked chicken breast showed the highest microbial count, followed by raw breast and lastly salted breast. The data obtained here were useful for the generation of mathematical models and parameters. The models presented high correlation and can be used for predictive purposes in the poultry meat supply chain. PMID:26683484

  5. CdTe–TiO2 nanocomposite: an impeder of bacterial growth and biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resurgence of infectious diseases and associated issues related to antibiotic resistance has raised enormous challenges which may possibly be confronted primarily by nanotechnology routes. One key need of critical significance in this context is the development of an agent capable of inhibiting quorum sensing mediated biofilm formation in pathogenic organisms. In this work we examine the possible use of a nanocomposite, CdTe–TiO2, as an impeder of growth and biofilm. In the presence of CdTe–TiO2, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis shows exposed cells without the surrounding matrix. Confocal laser scanning microscopy shows spatially distributed fluorescence, a typical indication of an impeded biofilm, as opposed to the control which shows matrix-covered cells and continuous fluorescence, typical of biofilm formation. Quantitatively, the inhibition of biofilm was ∼57%. CdTe–TiO2 also exhibits good antibacterial properties against Gram positive and Gram negative organisms by virtue of the generation of reactive oxygen species inside the cells, reflected by a ruptured appearance in the SEM analysis. (paper)

  6. CdTe-TiO2 nanocomposite: an impeder of bacterial growth and biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholap, Haribhau; Patil, Rajendra; Yadav, Prasad; Banpurkar, Arun; Ogale, Satishchandra; Gade, Wasudeo

    2013-05-01

    The resurgence of infectious diseases and associated issues related to antibiotic resistance has raised enormous challenges which may possibly be confronted primarily by nanotechnology routes. One key need of critical significance in this context is the development of an agent capable of inhibiting quorum sensing mediated biofilm formation in pathogenic organisms. In this work we examine the possible use of a nanocomposite, CdTe-TiO2, as an impeder of growth and biofilm. In the presence of CdTe-TiO2, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis shows exposed cells without the surrounding matrix. Confocal laser scanning microscopy shows spatially distributed fluorescence, a typical indication of an impeded biofilm, as opposed to the control which shows matrix-covered cells and continuous fluorescence, typical of biofilm formation. Quantitatively, the inhibition of biofilm was ˜57%. CdTe-TiO2 also exhibits good antibacterial properties against Gram positive and Gram negative organisms by virtue of the generation of reactive oxygen species inside the cells, reflected by a ruptured appearance in the SEM analysis.

  7. Tropical dendrochemistry: A novel approach for reconstructing seasonally-resolved growth rates from ringless tropical trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussart, P. M.; Myneni, S. C.

    2005-12-01

    Although tropical forests play an active role in the global carbon cycle and are host to a variety of pristine paleoclimate archives, they remain poorly characterized as compared to other ecosystems on the planet. In particular, dating and reconstructing the growth rate history of tropical trees remains a challenge and continues to delay research efforts towards understanding tropical forest dynamics. Traditional dendrochronological techniques have found limited applications in the tropics because temperature seasonality is often too small to initiate the production of visible annual growth rings. Dendrometers, cambium scarring methods and sub-annual records of oxygen and carbon isotopes from tree cellulose may be used to estimate growth rate histories when growth rings are absent. However, dendrometer records rarely extend beyond the past couple of decades and the generation of seasonally-resolved isotopic records remains labour intensive, currently prohibiting the level of record replication necessary for statistical analysis. Here, we present evidence that Ca may also be used as a proxy for dating and reconstructing growth rates of trees lacking visible growth rings. Using the Brookhaven National Lab Synchrotron, we recover a radial record of cyclic variations in Ca from a Miliusa velutina tree from northern Thailand. We determine that the Ca cycles are seasonal based on a comparison between radiocarbon age estimates and a trace element age model, which agree within 2 years over the period of 1955 to 2000. The amplitude of the Ca annual cycle is significantly correlated with growth rate estimates, which are also correlated to the amount of dry season rainfall. The measurements at the Synchrotron are fast, non-destructive and require little sample preparation. Application of this technique in the tropics holds the potential to resolve longstanding questions about tropical forest dynamics and interannual to decadal changes in the carbon cycle.

  8. Etabolism in compensatory growth . III. The urea, glucose and C02 entry rates in animal undergoing compensatory growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pram Mahyudin

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucose (GER, Urea (UER and C02 (C02 ER entry rates were studied at four points in the growth curve viz: before feed restriction (PI after 8 weeks of feed restriction (P2, after 3 weeks (P3 and 15 weeks (P4 following resumption ofad libitum feeding. Sixteen Merino wethers were used and offerred pelleted lucerne (Medicago sativa ad libitum for 3 weeks; then they were divided into 2 groups of eight. Group I continued to be fed ad libitum and Group 11 was fed pelleted lucerne at half maintenance level for 8 weeks and then fed ad libitum until the end of experiment. During feed restriction (P2, UER, urinary urea and urea transferred from the blood to the gut were 74% lower in group II than those in group I due to the reduction of N intake . At P2 GER and C02ER were also lower (53% and 56%, respectively because of the reduction of available glucose precursor and metabolic rate. Similarly AV concentration difference of glucose, glucose taken up by the hind-limb muscle and the percentage of glucose taken up by muscle that was oxidised were reduced by 52%, 86% and 48%, respectively . When animals resumed ad libitum feeding, the components of urea entry rate (except plasma urea concentration, GER and C02ER were markedly increased indicating A switch to the anabolic mode, followed by increased glucose taken up and oxidised by the hind-limb muscle . The significance of glucose in muscle metabolism during compensatory growth was shown in the dramatic increase in the actual rate of glucose oxidation per unit muscle weight . It appears that the priority of usage of glucose taken up by muscle during compensatory growth is for oxidation to both C02 and lactate.

  9. Stimulated Bacterial Growth under Elevated pCO2: Results from an Off-Shore Mesocosm Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Sonja; Galgani, Luisa; Riebesell, Ulf; Schulz, Kai-Georg; Engel, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Marine bacteria are the main consumers of freshly produced organic matter. Many enzymatic processes involved in the bacterial digestion of organic compounds were shown to be pH sensitive in previous studies. Due to the continuous rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration, seawater pH is presently decreasing at a rate unprecedented during the last 300 million years but the consequences for microbial physiology, organic matter cycling and marine biogeochemistry are still unresolved. We studied the effects of elevated seawater pCO2 on a natural plankton community during a large-scale mesocosm study in a Norwegian fjord. Nine Kiel Off-Shore Mesocosms for Future Ocean Simulations (KOSMOS) were adjusted to different pCO2 levels ranging initially from ca. 280 to 3000 µatm and sampled every second day for 34 days. The first phytoplankton bloom developed around day 5. On day 14, inorganic nutrients were added to the enclosed, nutrient-poor waters to stimulate a second phytoplankton bloom, which occurred around day 20. Our results indicate that marine bacteria benefit directly and indirectly from decreasing seawater pH. During the first phytoplankton bloom, 5–10% more transparent exopolymer particles were formed in the high pCO2 mesocosms. Simultaneously, the efficiency of the protein-degrading enzyme leucine aminopeptidase increased with decreasing pH resulting in up to three times higher values in the highest pCO2/lowest pH mesocosm compared to the controls. In general, total and cell-specific aminopeptidase activities were elevated under low pH conditions. The combination of enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of organic matter and increased availability of gel particles as substrate supported up to 28% higher bacterial abundance in the high pCO2 treatments. We conclude that ocean acidification has the potential to stimulate the bacterial community and facilitate the microbial recycling of freshly produced organic matter, thus strengthening the role of the microbial loop in the

  10. Activity Of Bacterial Proteolytic Enzymes on Antinutritional Factors in Soybeans and the Effect on Growth and Organ Weights of Piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuoGui-cheng; YangLi-jie; 等

    1999-01-01

    A significant reduction of trypsin inhibitory activity by selected bacterial proteolytic enzymes was demonstrated in vitro.Two trials were conducted to examine the capacity of the tested enzymes to inactivate soybean ANFs in vivo.In trial I,twenty-four piglets weaned at four weeks of age were assigned in replicate groups of 4 piglets per pen to one of three dietary treatments:(1)control;(2)Enzyme 1-supplemented(E1);(3)Enzyme 2-supplemented (E2).In trial II,twenty piglets weaned at five weeks of age were alloted to five treatment diets:(1)contro,1:(2) 0.1% P4-supplemented;(3)0.5% P4-supplemented;(4)0.1% P7-supplemented;(5)0.5% P7-supplemented.The optimum pH for hydrolysis was 8 for E.9-11 for E2,8.5 for P4 and nuctral for P7.After 17 days of the trial,daily gain of piglets on enzymes E1 and E2 was 36% and 18% more than that in the control group,although the difference was not significant.the animals on the treated groups had a tendency to have lighter heart(7.8 and 5.9%),spleen(11.1 and 7.4%) and pancreas(16.7 and 12.5% for E1 and E2 respectively)in relation to empty body weight than those in the control.the small intestine of pigs on the treated groups was significantly lighter(18.9 for E1 and 7.7% for E2) than that in the control(P<0.05).The stomach(26.4 and 24%,p=0.198) and cecum (21.9 and 9.4%,p=0.114) also showed the same pattern.The growth depression was attributed to reduced feed intake caused by antinutritional factors in soybeans.It is concluded that supplements of proteolytic enzymes E1 or E2 had a positive effect on growth and efficiency and caused much less reaction in the gut as manifested by the weight of the tract and of its accessory organs.Dietary saupplements of P4 or P7 had no significant effect on growth,but reduced reaction of soybean antinutritional factors in the gut,especialy P4 in dose of 0.5%.The growth depression was attributed to low feed intake caused by antinutritional factors in soybeans.

  11. Activity Of Bacterial Proteolytic Enzymes on Antinutritional Factors in Soybeans and the Effect on Growth and Organ Weights of Piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A significant reduction of trypsin inhibitory activity by selected bacterial proteolytic enzymes was demon- strated in vitro. Two trials were conducted to examine the capacity of the tested enzymes to inactivate soybean ANFs in vivo. In trial I,twenty-four piglets weaned at four weeks of age were assigned in replicate groups of 4 piglets per pen to one of three dietary treatments: (1)control; (2)Enzyme 1-supplemented(E1); (3)Enzyme 2-supplemented (E2). In trial II,twenty piglets weaned at five weeks of age were alloted to five treatment di- ets:(1)contro,l: (2)0. 1% P4-supplemented; (3)0. 5% P4-supplemented; (4)0. 1% P7-supplemented; (5)0. 5% P7-supplemented. The optimum pH for hydrolysis was 8 for E,9-11 for E2,8.5 for P4 and nuctral for P7. After 17 days of the trial,daily gain of piglets on enzymes E1 and E2 was 36% and 18% more than that in the control group,although the difference was not significant. The animals on the treated groups had a tendency to have lighter heart(7.8 and 5.9%),spleen(11. 1 and 7.4%) and pancreas(16.7 and 12.5% for E1 and E2 respectively)in relation to empty body weight than those in the control. The small intestine of pigs on the treated groups was significantly lighter(18.9 for E1 and 7.7% for E2) than that in the control( P < 0.05 ). The stomach (26.4 and 24%,p=0. 198) and cecum(21.9and 9.4%,p=0. 114) also showed the same pat- tern. The growth depression was attributed to reduced feed intake caused by antinutritional factors in soy beans. It is concluded that supplements of proteolytic enzymes E1 or E2 had a positive effect on growth and ef- ficiency and caused much less reaction in the gut as manifested by the weight of the tract and of its accessory organs. Dietary saupplements of P4 or P7 had no significant effect on growth,but reduced reaction of soybean antinutritional factors in the gut,especialy P4 in dose of 0.5%. The growth depression was attributed to low feed intake caused by antinutritional

  12. The effect of dislocation cores on growth hillock vicinality and normal growth rates of KDP ?1 0 1? surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Yoreo, J. J.; Land, T. A.; Rashkovich, L. N.; Onischenko, T. A.; Lee, J. D.; Monovskii, O. V.; Zaitseva, N. P.

    1997-12-01

    We present results from atomic force microscopy measurements on KDP {1 0 1} faces which show that over the range of supersaturations, 3% ≤ σ ≤ 30%, the terrace widths on vicinal growth hillocks formed by dislocations are nearly independent of both supersaturation and dislocation structure, in contradiction to the predictions of simple BCF models. The data also show that, for Burgers vectors in excess of one unit step height, the dislocations generate hollow cores in accordance with theoretical predictions. Both analytical and numerical analyses are presented, which show that a model that takes into account the effect of these cores on the period of step rotation predicts a dependence of slope on supersaturation and Burgers vector, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. These calculations also show that the effect of the core perimeter on the step transit time dominates the effect of reduced step velocity due to stresses near the core. Consequently, a simple analytical expression can be used to describe the slope even in the case of anistropic step kinetics. Finally, the results are used to explain the reproducible character of macroscopic growth rates and to rescale data on growth rate as a function of temperature and supersturation onto a single curve.

  13. Comparison of two bacterial azoreductases acquired during adaptation to growth on azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, T; Gasser, F; Kulla, H G; Leisinger, T

    1984-05-01

    Selection for utilization of carboxy-Orange I [1-(4'-carboxyphenylazo)-4-naphthol] in the chemostat yielded Pseudomonas strain K24 which was unable to grow on carboxy-Orange II [1-(4'-carboxyphenylazo)-2-naphthol] while selection for growth on carboxy-Orange II had previously led to strain KF46 which did not utilize carboxy-Orange I. Orange I azoreductase of strain K24, the key enzyme of dye degradation, was purified 80-fold with 17% yield to electrophoretic homogeneity and compared to the previously purified Orange II azoreductase of strain KF46. Common properties of the two enzymes were their monomeric structure, their specificity for NADPH and NADH as cosubstrates, the range of their Km values for substrates and cosubstrates as well as their reactivity towards a series of substrate analogs. They differed from each other with respect to molecular weight (21,000 and 30,000) and in the absolute requirement of Orange I azoreductase for a hydroxy group in the 4'position of the naphthol ring of the substrate molecule as compared to the requirement for substrates with a 2-naphthol moiety by Orange II azoreductase. The pure enzymes did not exhibit immunological cross-reaction with each other. Crude extracts of strains K24 and KF46 and of azoreductase-negative strains isolated at different stages of the adaptation experiments, however, contained material which cross-reacted (CRM) with both anti Orange I azoreductase serum and anti Orange II azoreductase serum. The CRM may represent a common precursor protein of the azoreductases in strains K24 and KF46. PMID:6742955

  14. Growth rates and the prevalence and progression of scoliosis in short-statured children on Australian growth hormone treatment programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPhee Ian

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design and aim This was a longitudinal chart review of a diverse group (cohort of patients undergoing HGH (Human Growth Hormone treatment. Clinical and radiological examinations were performed with the aim to identify the presence and progression of scoliosis. Methods and cohort 185 patients were recruited and a database incorporating the age at commencement, dose and frequency of growth hormone treatment and growth charts was compiled from their Medical Records. The presence of any known syndrome and the clinical presence of scoliosis were included for analysis. Subsequently, skeletally immature patients identified with scoliosis were followed up over a period of a minimum four years and the radiologic type, progression and severity (Cobb angle of scoliosis were recorded. Results Four (3.6% of the 109 with idiopathic short stature or hormone deficiency had idiopathic scoliosis (within normal limits for a control population and scoliosis progression was not prospectively observed. 13 (28.8% of 45 with Turner syndrome had scoliosis radiologically similar to idiopathic scoliosis. 11 (48% of 23 with varying syndromes, had scoliosis. In the entire cohort, the growth rates of those with and without scoliosis were not statistically different and HGH treatment was not ceased because of progression of scoliosis. Conclusion In this study, there was no evidence of HGH treatment being responsible for progression of scoliosis in a small number of non-syndromic patients (four. An incidental finding was that scoliosis, similar to the idiopathic type, appears to be more prevalent in Turner syndrome than previously believed.

  15. Biodegradation of soil-applied pesticides by selected strains of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and their effects on bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myresiotis, Charalampos K; Vryzas, Zisis; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2012-04-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the influence of four PGPR strains on the degradation of five soil applied pesticides and their effects on bacterial growth. Interactions of Bacillus subtilis GB03, Bacillus subtilis FZB24, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens IN937a and Bacillus pumilus SE34 with two concentrations of acibenzolar-S-methyl, metribuzin, napropamide, propamocarb hydrochloride and thiamethoxam in liquid culture and soil microcosm were studied. The degradation of acibenzolar-S-methyl by all PGPR tested in low and high concentration, was 5.4 and 5.7 times, respectively, faster than that in non-inoculated liquid culture medium. At the end of the 72-h liquid cultured experiments, 8-18, 9-11, 15-36 and 11-22% of metribuzin, napropamide, propamocarb hydrochloride and thiamethoxam, respectively, had disappeared from PGPR inoculated medium. Under the soil microcosm experimental conditions, the half-lives of acibenzolar-S-methyl incubated in the presence of PGPR strains spiked at 1.0 and 10.0 mg kg(-1) were 10.3-16.4 and 9.2-15.9 days, respectively, markedly lower compared with >34.2 days in the control. From the rest pesticides studied degradation of propamocarb hydrochloride and thiamethoxam was enhanced in the presence of B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a and B. pumilus SE34. Acibenzolar-S-methyl, propamocarb hydrochloride and thiamethoxam significantly increased the PGPR growth. However, the stimulatory effect was related to the level of pesticide spiked. PMID:21870159

  16. Effect of reactor pressure on the growth rate and structural properties of GaN films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI JinYu; HAO Yue; ZHANG JinCheng; YANG LinAn

    2009-01-01

    The effect of reactor pressure on the growth rate,surface morphology and crystalline quality of GaN films grown on sapphire by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is studied.The results show that as the reactor pressure increases from 2500 to 20000 Pa,the GaN surface becomes rough and the growth rate of GaN films decreases.The rough surface morphology is associated with the initial high temperature GaN islands,which are large with low density due to low adatom surface diffusion under high reactor pressure.These islands prolong the occurrence of 2D growth mode and decrease the growth rate of GaN film.Meanwhile,the large GaN islands with low density lead to the reduction of threading dislocation density during subsequent island growth and coalescence,and consequently decrease the full width at half maximum of X-ray rocking curve of the GaN film.

  17. Temperature Effects on the Growth Rates and Photosynthetic Activities of Symbiodinium Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiastuti Karim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching is caused by environmental stress and susceptibility to bleaching stress varies among types of coral. The physiological properties of the algal symbionts (Symbiodinium spp., especially extent of damage to PSII and its repair capacity, contribute importantly to this variability in stress susceptibility. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the growth rates and photosynthetic activities of six cultured strains of Symbiodinium spp. (clades A, B, C, D, and F at elevated temperature (33 °C. We also observed the recovery of photodamaged-PSII in the presence or absence of a chloroplast protein synthesis inhibitor (lincomycin. The growth rates and photochemical efficiencies of PSII (Fv/Fm decreased in parallel at high temperature in thermally sensitive strains, B-K100 (clade B followed by culture name and A-Y106, but not in thermally tolerant strains, F-K102 and D-K111. In strains A-KB8 and C-Y103, growth declined markedly at high temperature, but Fv/Fm decreased only slightly. These strains may reallocate energy from growth to the repair of damaged photosynthetic machineries or protection pathways. Alternatively, since recoveries of photo-damaged PSII at 33 °C were modest in strains A-KB8 and C-Y103, thermal stressing of other metabolic pathways may have reduced growth rates in these two strains. This possibility should be explored in future research efforts.

  18. Bacterial antigen induced release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGFR1 before and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mads N; Lykke, J; Werther, Kim;

    2005-01-01

    -induced release of sVEGF and sVEGFR1 from whole blood in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty-one patients with abdominal diseases undergoing five different surgical procedures were included in the study. Blood samples were drawn from patients before and after the operation. White blood cells and platelets were......OBJECTIVE: The influence of surgery on release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (sVEGF) and the soluble inhibitory receptor (sVEGFR1) is unknown. The effect of major and minor surgery on variations in sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations in vivo was studied, and on bacterial antigen...... counted, and plasma sVEGF and sVEGFR1 were determined. Whole blood from each blood sample was stimulated in vitro with bacteria-derived antigens (lipopolysaccharides or protein A) and sVEGF and sVEGFR1 levels were subsequently determined in the supernatants. RESULTS: Neither sVEGF nor sVEGFR1...

  19. The impact of disease on the survival and population growth rate of the Tasmanian devil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachish, Shelly; Jones, Menna; McCallum, Hamish

    2007-09-01

    1. We investigated the impact of a recently emerged disease, Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD), on the survival and population growth rate of a population of Tasmanian devils, Sarcophilus harrisii, on the Freycinet Peninsula in eastern Tasmania. 2. Cormack-Jolly-Seber and multistate mark-recapture models were employed to investigate the impact of DFTD on age- and sex-specific apparent survival and transition rates. Disease impact on population growth rate was investigated using reverse-time mark-recapture models. 3. The arrival of DFTD triggered an immediate and steady decline in apparent survival rates of adults and subadults, the rate of which was predicted well by the increase in disease prevalence in the population over time. 4. Transitions from healthy to diseased state increased with disease prevalence suggesting that the force of infection in the population is increasing and that the epidemic is not subsiding. 5. The arrival of DFTD coincided with a marked, ongoing decline in the population growth rate of the previously stable population, which to date has not been offset by population compensatory responses. PMID:17714271

  20. Total volatile fatty acids and bacterial production rates as affected by rations containing untreated or ammonia (urea) treated rice straw in croos-bred cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was conducted to study the effect of feeding ammoniated rice straw on ruminal total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) and bacterial production rates. Twelve karan swiss, male, rumen fistulated calves (2-2.5 yrs) were divided in three equal groups. Animals were offered rice straw either untreated (A) or 4 per cent urea+40 per cent moisture treated and ensiled for 30 days (B) or 5 per cent urea+30 per cent moisture treated and ensiled for 30 days (C). Protein requirements were met through concentrate mixture. Levels of NH3-N and TCA-precipitable-N in strained rumen liquor (SRL) were significantly higher (20.34±0.022, 63.26±0.81 (B), 20.78±0.41, 64.98±0.87 (C) (mg/100 ml SRL) in groups fed ammoniated ±0.31, 45.94±1.91 mg/100 ml S RL), respectively. The bacterial production rates in the rumen (g/day) were significantly higher in groups B and C as compared to group A. TVFA concentrations (mmole/100 ml SRL ) and TVFA production rates (mmole/d) were also significantly higher in groups B and C as compared to group A. The bacterial production rates were significantly co-related with TVFA, NH3-N, TCA precipitable-N concentration in the rumen and ATP production. Multiple regression equations relating bacterial production rates with (i)NH3-N and TVFA concentration in the rumen, (ii)NH3-N and TVFA production rates and (iii)NH3-N and ATP produced were also developed. (author). 18 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James N. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States); McMurry, Peter H. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  2. Radiocarbon-Based Ages and Growth Rates of Bamboo Corals from the Gulf of Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Flood-Page, S; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L; Fallon, S J; McCulloch, M

    2004-12-12

    Deep-sea coral communities have long been recognized by fisherman as areas that support large populations of commercial fish. As a consequence, many deep-sea coral communities are threatened by bottom trawling. Successful management and conservation of this widespread deep-sea habitat requires knowledge of the age and growth rates of deep-sea corals. These organisms also contain important archives of intermediate and deep-water variability, and are thus of interest in the context of decadal to century-scale climate dynamics. Here, we present {Delta}{sup 14}C data that suggest that bamboo corals from the Gulf of Alaska are long-lived (75-126 years) and that they acquire skeletal carbon from two distinct sources. Independent verification of our growth rate estimates and coral ages is obtained by counting seasonal Sr/Ca cycles and probable lunar cycle growth bands.

  3. Rate-dependent morphology of Li2O2 growth in Li-O2 batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Horstmann, B; Mitchell, R; Bessler, W G; Shao-Horn, Y; Bazant, M Z

    2013-01-01

    Compact solid discharge products enable energy storage devices with high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities, but solid deposits on active surfaces can disturb charge transport and induce mechanical stress. In this Letter we develop a nanoscale continuum model for the growth of Li2O2 crystals in lithium-oxygen batteries with organic electrolytes, based on a theory of electrochemical non-equilibrium thermodynamics originally applied to Li-ion batteries. As in the case of lithium insertion in phase-separating LiFePO4 nanoparticles, the theory predicts a transition from complex to uniform morphologies of Li2O2 with increasing current. Discrete particle growth at low discharge rates becomes suppressed at high rates, resulting in a film of electronically insulating Li2O2 that limits cell performance. We predict that the transition between these surface growth modes occurs at current densities close to the exchange current density of the cathode reaction, consistent with experimental observations.

  4. Growth rate of multiple intracranial hydatid cysts assessed by CT from the time of embolisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the case of a 25-year-old man with multiple bilateral hydatid cysts of the brain in whom we were able to assess the growth rate of the cysts on repeated examination. On average, the cysts increased in diameter by 1 cm per month. (orig.)

  5. A Study on the Rate of Contribution of Education Investment to the Economic Growth in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bo-nai; Lai, Xiong-xiang

    2006-01-01

    There is an evident bi-directional causality relationship between education investment and economic growth based on an analysis of statistics from 1952 to 2003 released by the State Statistics Bureau. A generalized difference regression model is set up to investigate the relationship between the two. Studies show that the rate of contribution of…

  6. Extracting growth rates from the non-laminated coralline sponge Astrosclera willeyana using "bomb" radiocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallon, S; Guilderson, T

    2004-06-30

    Coralline sponges have the potential to fill in gaps in our understanding of subsurface oceanographic variability. However, one disadvantage they have compared to hermatypic reef building coral proxies is that they do not have annual density bands and need to be radiometrically dated for an age determination. To elucidate growth rate variability we have measured radiocarbon in 1 mm increments from Astrosclera willeyana sponges collected off the Central and Northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and from Truk in the Caroline Islands and compared these radiocarbon profiles to independently dated coral radiocarbon records. Growth rates of the GBR sponges average 1.2 {+-} 0.3 and 1.0 {+-} 0.3 mm yr{sup -1}, north and central respectively but can vary by a factor of two. The growth rate of the Truk sponge averages 1.2 {+-} 0.1 mm yr{sup -1}. These growth rates are significantly faster to those measured for other GBR Astrosclera willeyana sponges (0.2 mm yr{sup -1}) by Calcein staining (Woerheide 1988).

  7. STRONG LAW OF LARGE NUMBERS AND GROWTH RATE FOR NOD SEQUENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Song-lin; WANG Xue-jun

    2015-01-01

    In the paper, we get the precise results of Hájek-Rényi type inequalities for the par-tial sums of negatively orthant dependent sequences, which improve the results of Theorem 3.1 and Corollary 3.2 in Kim (2006) and the strong law of large numbers and strong growth rate for negatively orthant dependent sequences.

  8. Effect of temperature on fatigue crack growth rate in inconel 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of temperature on fatigue crack growth rate in Inconel 690 steam generator tube was investigated at room temperature, 150 .deg. C, 300 .deg. C and 400 .deg. C in air environment. Fatigue tests was performed on compact tension(CT) specimens made to thickness 8mm. Heat treatment was performed to obtain various microstructures. Tests was conducted at load ratio 0.1, at frequency 10Hz using sinusoidal waveform. Crack length was monitored by compliance method using sensor probe. Tensile tests was performed to obtain yield strength for fatigue test at each testing temperature. Fracture modes were studied using scanning electron microscopy(SEM). Tensile properties of Inconel 690 were dependent on grain size and testing temperature. As temperature and grain size increased, yield strength decreased. At temperature above 300 .deg. C, the serrations which were an evidence of dynamic strain aging (DSA) were observed for all cases of materials. Fatigue crack growth rate decreased with increasing grain size. At low Δ K, grain size effect was significant at room temperature, which was due to roughness induced crack closure. With increasing temperature, fatigue crack growth rate increased and grain size effect decreased. Chormium carbides which have large size and semi-continuous distribution in the grain boundaries decreased fatigue crack growth rate

  9. Effect of temperature on microbial growth rate - thermodynamic analysis, the arrhenius and eyring-polanyi connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this work is to develop a new thermodynamic mathematical model for evaluating the effect of temperature on the rate of microbial growth. The new mathematical model is derived by combining the Arrhenius equation and the Eyring-Polanyi transition theory. The new model, suitable for ...

  10. What is the Long Run Growth Rate of the East Asian Tigers?

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, B. Bhaskara; Tamazian, Artur; Singh, Rup

    2010-01-01

    New panel data estimates for the four East Asian Tigers show that the contribution of total factor productivity (TFP) to growth is much higher than past estimates. An extended production function with learning by doing implies that TFP is about 3.5% and these countries will grow at this rate in the long run.

  11. Measurements of coherent tune shifts and head-tail growth rates at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Zorzano-Mier, M P; Burkhardt, H; Cornelis, Karel; Zimmermann, Frank; Papaphilippou, Y

    2000-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to monitor SPS impedance changes with regard to LHC, the coherent tune shifts and head-tail growth rates in the SPS were measured for single proton bunches at 26 GeV. From these measurements the real and imaginary components of the transverse broadband impedance can be estimated.

  12. Quantitative physiology of Lactococcus lactis at extreme low-growth rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the metabolic adaptation of Lactococcus lactis during the transition from a growing to a non-growing state using retentostat cultivation. Under retentostat cultivation, the specific growth rate decreased from 0.025 h-1 to 0.0001 h-1 in 42 days, while doubling time increased to m

  13. Wavelength dependence of the linear growth rate of the Es layer instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Cosgrove

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown, by computation of the linear growth rate, that midlatitude sporadic-E (Es layers are subject to a large scale electrodynamic instability. This instability is a logical candidate to explain certain frontal structuring events, and polarization electric fields, which have been observed in Es layers by ionosondes, by coherent scatter radars, and by rockets. However, the original growth rate derivation assumed an infinitely thin Es layer, and therefore did not address the short wavelength cutoff. Also, the same derivation ignored the effects of F region loading, which is a significant wavelength dependent effect. Herein is given a generalized derivation that remedies both these short comings, and thereby allows a computation of the wavelength dependence of the linear growth rate, as well as computations of various threshold conditions. The wavelength dependence of the linear growth rate is compared with observed periodicities, and the role of the zeroth order meridional wind is explored. A three-dimensional paper model is used to explain the instability geometry, which has been defined formally in previous works.

  14. Stress corrosion crack growth rates in NiCrMoV turbine disc steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion crack growth rates were obtained from precracked WOL specimens in simulated turbine environments - pure NaOH solutions, dilute NaOH-NaCl solutions and pure water. Tests were performed at 157 C on steels with yield strength in the range 706-1124 MPa

  15. Growth rate regulates membrane fluidity and membrane cold adaptation in .i.Bacillus subtilis./i

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beranová, J.; Jemiola-Rzeminska, M.; Elhottová, Dana; Strzalka, K.; Konopásek, I.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, - (2007), s. 85. ISSN 0009-0646. [Kongres Československé společnosti mikrobiologické /24./. 02.10.2007-05.10.2007, Liberec] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : growth rate * membrane fluidity * membrane cold adaptation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  16. Capitalizing on the Dynamic Features of Excel to Consider Growth Rates and Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel; Moore-Russo, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    It is common for both algebra and calculus instructors to use power functions of various degrees as well as exponential functions to examine and compare rates of growth. This can be done on a chalkboard, with a graphing calculator, or with a spreadsheet. Instructors often are careful to connect the symbolic and graphical (and occasionally the…

  17. A methodology to study cyclic debond growth at constant mode-mixity and energy release rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2010-01-01

    structures under well controlled cyclic energy release rate and mode-mixity. The proposed methodology uses the mixed mode bending (MMB) sandwich specimen and MMB test rig. Crack length measurements are based on an analytically available compliance expression. Accurate fatigue crack growth measurements and...

  18. Predicting Lexical Density Growth Rate in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Paul J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this longitudinal correlational study was to test whether an environmental variable and 4 child variables predicted growth rate of number of different nonimitative words used (i.e., lexical density). Method: Thirty-five young (age range = 21-54 months) children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who were initially…

  19. CK2 activity is modulated by growth rate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → CK2 subunits are nuclear both in glucose and in ethanol growing yeast cells. → CK2 activity is modulated in S. cerevisiae. → CK2 activity is higher in conditions supporting higher growth rates. → Vmax is higher in faster growing cells, while Km is not affected. -- Abstract: CK2 is a highly conserved protein kinase controlling different cellular processes. It shows a higher activity in proliferating mammalian cells, in various types of cancer cell lines and tumors. The findings presented herein provide the first evidence of an in vivo modulation of CK2 activity, dependent on growth rate, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In fact, CK2 activity, assayed on nuclear extracts, is shown to increase in exponential growing batch cultures at faster growth rate, while localization of catalytic and regulatory subunits is not nutritionally modulated. Differences in intracellular CK2 activity of glucose- and ethanol-grown cells appear to depend on both increase in molecule number and kcat. Also in chemostat cultures nuclear CK2 activity is higher in faster growing cells providing the first unequivocal demonstration that growth rate itself can affect CK2 activity in a eukaryotic organism.

  20. Growth rate of Usnea aurantiacoatra (Jacq. Bory on Fildes Peninsula, Antarctica and its climatic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    Full Text Available The ages of a fruticose lichen of Usnea aurantiacoatra (Jacq. Bory, from Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Southwest Antarctic, were determined by radiocarbon (14C, and it is 1993-1996 at bottom and 2006-2007 at top of the lichen branch. The growth rates of U. aurantiacoatra calculated are 4.3 to 5.5 mm year(-1 based on its length and ages. The comparisons show that the growth rates of U. aurantiacoatra are higher than those of U. antarctica (0.4 to 1.1 mm year(-1. The growth rates of fruticose lichens are always higher, usually >2 mm year(-1, than those of crustose ones, usually <1 mm year(-1, in polar areas. A warming trend on Fildes Peninsula is recorded in the period from 1969 to 2010 obviously: the mean annual temperature rose from -2.75 to -1.9°C and the average temperature of summer months from 0.95 to 1.4°C, as well as the average temperature of winter months from -6.75 to -5.5°C. The alteration of lichen growth rates in polar areas may respond to the climatic and environmental changes, and the lichens may act as bio-monitor of natural condition.