WorldWideScience

Sample records for bacterial genetic diversity

  1. Genetic diversity of citrus bacterial canker pathogens preserved in herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbin; Song, Qijian; Brlansky, Ronald H; Hartung, John S

    2007-11-20

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) was first documented in India and Java in the mid 19th century. Since that time, the known distribution of the disease has steadily increased. Concurrent with the dispersion of the pathogen, the diversity of described strains continues to increase, with novel strains appearing in Saudi Arabia, Iran, and Florida in the last decade. Herbarium specimens of infected plants provide an historical record documenting both the geographic distribution and genetic diversity of the pathogen in the past. However, no method was available to assess the genetic diversity within these herbarium samples. We have developed a method, insertion event scanning (IES), and applied the method to characterize the diversity present within CBC populations documented as herbarium specimens over the past century. IES is based on the specific amplification of junction fragments that define insertion events. The potential for IES in current forensic applications is demonstrated by finding an exact match of pathogen genotypes preserved in herbarium specimens from Japan and Florida, demonstrating the source of the original outbreak of citrus canker in Florida in 1911. IES is a very sensitive technique for differentiating bacterial strains and can be applied to any of the several hundred bacteria for which full genomic sequence data are available.

  2. Effects of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil. The changes in diversity were monitored in soil microcosms, enriched with 25 mug Hg(II) g(-1) soil, over a period of 3 months...... by purification of total soil DNA and amplification of bacterial 16S rDNA fragments by polymerase chain reaction. Concentrations of bioavailable and total mercury were measured throughout the experiment. The effect on the culturable heterotrophic and genetic diversity was very similar, showing an immediate...... analysed by Shannon-Weaver indices, functional diversity was found to increase almost immediately after mercury addition and to remain at a level higher than the control soil for the rest of the experiment. The fraction of culturable heterotrophic bacteria increased from 1% to 10% of the total bacterial...

  3. Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophages display limited genetic diversity and broad killing activity against bacterial skin isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Laura J; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Hayes, Clarmyra; Bowman, Charles; Inkeles, Megan; Loncaric, Anya; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kim, Jenny; Miller, Jeff F; Hatfull, Graham F; Modlin, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of the human microbiome has revealed diverse and complex microbial communities at distinct anatomic sites. The microbiome of the human sebaceous follicle provides a tractable model in which to study its dominant bacterial inhabitant, Propionibacterium acnes, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of the human disease acne. To explore the diversity of the bacteriophages that infect P. acnes, 11 P. acnes phages were isolated from the sebaceous follicles of donors with healthy skin or acne and their genomes were sequenced. Comparative genomic analysis of the P. acnes phage population, which spans a 30-year temporal period and a broad geographic range, reveals striking similarity in terms of genome length, percent GC content, nucleotide identity (>85%), and gene content. This was unexpected, given the far-ranging diversity observed in virtually all other phage populations. Although the P. acnes phages display a broad host range against clinical isolates of P. acnes, two bacterial isolates were resistant to many of these phages. Moreover, the patterns of phage resistance correlate closely with the presence of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat elements in the bacteria that target a specific subset of phages, conferring a system of prokaryotic innate immunity. The limited diversity of the P. acnes bacteriophages, which may relate to the unique evolutionary constraints imposed by the lipid-rich anaerobic environment in which their bacterial hosts reside, points to the potential utility of phage-based antimicrobial therapy for acne. Propionibacterium acnes is a dominant member of the skin microflora and has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of acne; however, little is known about the bacteriophages that coexist with and infect this bacterium. Here we present the novel genome sequences of 11 P. acnes phages, thereby substantially increasing the amount of available genomic information about this phage population

  4. Analysis of bacterial genetic diversity in biofloc by using ARDRA 16S-rRNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    , Widanarni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to analyze the genetic diversity of bacteria associated in bioflocs using 16S-rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR with ARDRA technique. A total of 38 dominant bacterial isolates was obtained from bioflocs samples and of these isolates, 16S-rRNA gene was then isolated and amplified using PCR. The 16S-rRNA gene of the isolates was then cut using HaeIII (5’-GG↓CC and HhaI (5’-GCG↓C restriction enzymes resulting an ARDRA pattern which was further used as the binary data for the construction of phylogenetics tree that was used to estimate the group of bacteria. The result with HaeIII cut restriction enzyme from biofloc-associated bacteria gave 11 ARDRA patterns, while with the restriction enzyme HhaI gave eight ARDRA patterns. Phylogenetics of bacterial populations from biofloc-based cultivation system water consisted of at least 13 different bacterial species. Result of sequencing from two gene sample 16S-rRNA were identified as Microbacterium foliorumand and Pseudomonas putida. Keywords: bacterial diversity, ARDRA, biofloc, phylogeny  ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis keragaman genetika bakteri bioflok menggunakan metode polymerase chain reaction (PCR 16S-rRNA dengan teknik ARDRA. Sebanyak 38 isolat bakteri dominan yang diperoleh diamplifikasi gen 16S-rRNAnya dengan PCR, kemudian dipotong dengan enzim restriksi HaeIII (5’-GG↓CC dan HhaI (5’-GCG↓C. Pola ARDRA ini dijadikan data biner sebagai input untuk konstruksi pohon filogenetika yang dapat digunakan untuk memerkirakan jenis bakteri yang ada. Gen 16S-rRNA hasil PCR setelah dipotong dengan enzim restriksi HaeIII didapatkan 11 pola ARDRA, sedangkan dengan enzim restriksi HhaI menghasilkan delapan pola ARDRA. Berdasarkan pohon filogenetika, diketahui populasi bakteri pada air sistem budidaya bioflok sedikitnya terdiri atas 13 jenis bakteri. Berdasarkan sekuensing dari dua sampel gen 16S-rRNA teridentifikasi jenis bakteri Microbacterium

  5. Effects of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil. The changes in diversity were monitored in soil microcosms, enriched with 25 mug Hg(II) g(-1) soil, over a period of 3 months...... by purification of total soil DNA and amplification of bacterial 16S rDNA fragments by polymerase chain reaction. Concentrations of bioavailable and total mercury were measured throughout the experiment. The effect on the culturable heterotrophic and genetic diversity was very similar, showing an immediate...... decrease after mercury addition but then slowly increasing throughout the entire experimental period. Pre-exposure levels were not reached within the time span of this investigation. The DGGE band pattern indicated that a shift in the community structure was responsible for recovered diversity. When...

  6. French invasive Asian tiger mosquito populations harbor reduced bacterial microbiota and genetic diversity compared to Vietnamese autochthonous relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eMinard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is one of the most significant pathogen vectors of the 21st century. Originating from Asia, it has invaded a wide range of eco-climatic regions worldwide. The insect-associated microbiota is now recognized to play a significant role in host biology. While genetic diversity bottlenecks are known to result from biological invasions, the resulting shifts in host-associated microbiota diversity has not been thoroughly investigated. To address this subject, we compared four autochthonous Ae. albopictus populations in Vietnam, the native area of Ae. albopictus, and three populations recently introduced to Metropolitan France, with the aim of documenting whether these populations display differences in host genotype and bacterial microbiota. Population-level genetic diversity (microsatellite markers and COI haplotype and bacterial diversity (16S rDNA metabarcoding were compared between field-caught mosquitoes. Bacterial microbiota from the whole insect bodies were largely dominated by Wolbachia pipientis. Targeted analysis of the gut microbiota revealed a greater bacterial diversity in which a fraction was common between French and Vietnamese populations. The genus Dysgonomonas was the most prevalent and abundant across all studied populations. Overall genetic diversities of both hosts and bacterial microbiota were significantly reduced in recently established populations of France compared to the autochthonous populations of Vietnam. These results open up many important avenues of investigation in order to link the process of geographical invasion to shifts in commensal and symbiotic microbiome communities, as such shifts may have dramatic impacts on the biology and/or vector competence of invading hematophagous insects.

  7. Genetic diversity of bacterial communities and gene transfer agents in northern South China Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Lin Sun

    Full Text Available Pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA amplicons was performed to investigate the unique distribution of bacterial communities in northern South China Sea (nSCS and evaluate community structure and spatial differences of bacterial diversity. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes constitute the majority of bacteria. The taxonomic description of bacterial communities revealed that more Chroococcales, SAR11 clade, Acidimicrobiales, Rhodobacterales, and Flavobacteriales are present in the nSCS waters than other bacterial groups. Rhodobacterales were less abundant in tropical water (nSCS than in temperate and cold waters. Furthermore, the diversity of Rhodobacterales based on the gene transfer agent (GTA major capsid gene (g5 was investigated. Four g5 gene clone libraries were constructed from samples representing different regions and yielded diverse sequences. Fourteen g5 clusters could be identified among 197 nSCS clones. These clusters were also related to known g5 sequences derived from genome-sequenced Rhodobacterales. The composition of g5 sequences in surface water varied with the g5 sequences in the sampling sites; this result indicated that the Rhodobacterales population could be highly diverse in nSCS. Phylogenetic tree analysis result indicated distinguishable diversity patterns among tropical (nSCS, temperate, and cold waters, thereby supporting the niche adaptation of specific Rhodobacterales members in unique environments.

  8. Assessing genetic structure and diversity of airborne bacterial communities by DNA fingerprinting and 16S rDNA clone library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Pierre-Alain; Lejon, David P. H.; Carvalho, Esmeralda; Bizet, Karine; Lemanceau, Philippe; Ranjard, Lionel; Mougel, Christophe

    The density, genetic structure and diversity of airborne bacterial communities were assessed in the outdoor atmosphere. Two air samples were collected on the same location (north of France) at two dates (March 2003 (sample1) and May 2003 (sample 2)). Molecular culture -independent methods were used to characterise airborne bacterial communities regardless of the cell culturability. The automated-ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (A-RISA) was performed to characterise the community structure in each sample. For both sampling dates, complex A-RISA patterns were observed suggesting a highly diverse community structure, comparable to those found in soil, water or sediment environments. Furthermore, differences in the genetic structure of airborne bacterial communities were observed between samples 1 and 2 suggesting an important variability in time. A clone library of 16S rDNA directly amplified from air DNA of sample 1 was constructed and sequenced to analyse the community composition and diversity. The Proteobacteria group had the greatest representation (60%), with bacteria belonging to the different subdivisions α- (19%), β-(21%), γ-(12%) and δ-(8%). Firmicute and Actinobacteria were also well represented with 14% and 12%, respectively. Most of the identified bacteria are known to be commonly associated with soil or plant environments suggesting that the atmosphere is mainly colonised transiently by microorganisms from local sources, depending on air fluxes.

  9. Genetic diversity of the conserved motifs of six bacterial leaf blight resistance genes in a set of rice landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Basabdatta; Sengupta, Samik; Prasad, Manoj; Ghose, Tapas Kumar

    2014-07-12

    Bacterial leaf blight (BLB) caused by the vascular pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most serious diseases leading to crop failure in rice growing countries. A total of 37 resistance genes against Xoo has been identified in rice. Of these, ten BLB resistance genes have been mapped on rice chromosomes, while 6 have been cloned, sequenced and characterized. Diversity analysis at the resistance gene level of this disease is scanty, and the landraces from West Bengal and North Eastern states of India have received little attention so far. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity at conserved domains of 6 BLB resistance genes in a set of 22 rice accessions including landraces and check genotypes collected from the states of Assam, Nagaland, Mizoram and West Bengal. In this study 34 pairs of primers were designed from conserved domains of 6 BLB resistance genes; Xa1, xa5, Xa21, Xa21(A1), Xa26 and Xa27. The designed primer pairs were used to generate PCR based polymorphic DNA profiles to detect and elucidate the genetic diversity of the six genes in the 22 diverse rice accessions of known disease phenotype. A total of 140 alleles were identified including 41 rare and 26 null alleles. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) value was 0.56/primer pair. The DNA profiles identified each of the rice landraces unequivocally. The amplified polymorphic DNA bands were used to calculate genetic similarity of the rice landraces in all possible pair combinations. The similarity among the rice accessions ranged from 18% to 89% and the dendrogram produced from the similarity values was divided into 2 major clusters. The conserved domains identified within the sequenced rare alleles include Leucine-Rich Repeat, BED-type zinc finger domain, sugar transferase domain and the domain of the carbohydrate esterase 4 superfamily. This study revealed high genetic diversity at conserved domains of six BLB resistance genes in a set of 22

  10. Evaluating human genetic diversity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    This book assesses the scientific value and merit of research on human genetic differences--including a collection of DNA samples that represents the whole of human genetic diversity--and the ethical...

  11. Imposing genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The idea that a world in which everyone was born "perfect" would be a world in which something valuable was missing often comes up in debates about the ethics of technologies of prenatal testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This thought plays an important role in the "disability critique" of prenatal testing. However, the idea that human genetic variation is an important good with significant benefits for society at large is also embraced by a wide range of figures writing in the bioethics literature, including some who are notoriously hostile to the idea that we should not select against disability. By developing a number of thought experiments wherein we are to contemplate increasing genetic diversity from a lower baseline in order to secure this value, I argue that this powerful intuition is more problematic than is generally recognized, especially where the price of diversity is the well-being of particular individuals.

  12. Genetic diversity, inbreeding and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujvari, Beata; Klaassen, Marcel; Raven, Nynke; Russell, Tracey; Vittecoq, Marion; Hamede, Rodrigo; Thomas, Frédéric; Madsen, Thomas

    2018-03-28

    Genetic diversity is essential for adaptive capacities, providing organisms with the potential of successfully responding to intrinsic and extrinsic challenges. Although a clear reciprocal link between genetic diversity and resistance to parasites and pathogens has been established across taxa, the impact of loss of genetic diversity by inbreeding on the emergence and progression of non-communicable diseases, such as cancer, has been overlooked. Here we provide an overview of such associations and show that low genetic diversity and inbreeding associate with an increased risk of cancer in both humans and animals. Cancer being a multifaceted disease, loss of genetic diversity can directly (via accumulation of oncogenic homozygous mutations) and indirectly (via increased susceptibility to oncogenic pathogens) impact abnormal cell emergence and escape of immune surveillance. The observed link between reduced genetic diversity and cancer in wildlife may further imperil the long-term survival of numerous endangered species, highlighting the need to consider the impact of cancer in conservation biology. Finally, the somewhat incongruent data originating from human studies suggest that the association between genetic diversity and cancer development is multifactorial and may be tumour specific. Further studies are therefore crucial in order to elucidate the underpinnings of the interactions between genetic diversity, inbreeding and cancer. © 2018 The Author(s).

  13. Diversity of aquatic bacterial populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teska, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    A study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of adapting the automated Quantum II for the identification of bacterial fish pathogens. Optimal incubation conditions were determined for each of the species used, and, by using a Chi-square goodness of fit test, it was shown that isolates could be sorted into like-species groups with a Ward's hierarchical cluster analysis technique. In a second study, population profiles, growth kinetics, and transformation kinetics were evaluated for bacteria isolated from 4 aquatic environments located in the southeastern United States. Gradual long-term accumulation of organic acids in the waters of the Okefenokee Swamp, located in southeast Georgia and northeast Florida, has resulted in acidic water ranging from pH 3.5 to 4.5. A study was designed to evaluate the metabolic efficiency of surface-water gram-negative nonfermentative bacteria and ascertain whether aquatic bacterial populations exhibit adaptation to the low pH conditions. Using the computerized AMBIS the uptake and incorporation of 35 S-methionine into bacterial proteins under 5 levels of pH was quantitated for each of the test organisms

  14. Joshua Lederberg's Legacy to Bacterial Genetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    team which developed the artificial intelligence software program DENDRAL. ... to clear up all the uncertainties and lay the firm foundations of modern bacterial genetics. In order to understand and appreciate. As far as bacterial genetics is concerned, even the very existence ... Do they exist before exposure to the selective.

  15. MULTIVARIATE DIVERSITY, HERITABILITY AND GENETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench germplasm from Ethiopia and Eritrea. Genetic. Resources and Crop Evolution 46:273-284. Ayele, M. 1999. Genetic diversity in tef. (Eragrostis tef (Zucc) Trotter) for osmotic adjustment, root traits, and Amplified. Fragment Length Polymorphism. PhD Thesis,. Texas Tech University, USA.

  16. Bacterial Diversity across Individual Lichens▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushegian, Alexandra A.; Peterson, Celeste N.; Baker, Christopher C. M.; Pringle, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Symbioses are unique habitats for bacteria. We surveyed the spatial diversity of bacterial communities across multiple individuals of closely related lichens using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and pyrosequencing. Centers of lichens house richer, more consistent assemblages than species-poor and compositionally disparate lichen edges, suggesting that ecological succession plays a role in structuring these communities. PMID:21531831

  17. Genetic diversity and dynamics of bacterial and yeast strains associated to Spanish-style green table-olive fermentations in large manufacturing companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Padrós, Helena; Caballero-Guerrero, Belén; Maldonado-Barragán, Antonio; Ruiz-Barba, José Luis

    2014-11-03

    We have genotyped a total of 1045 microbial isolates obtained along the fermentation time of Spanish-style green table olives from the fermentation yards (patios) of two large manufacturing companies in the Province of Sevilla, south of Spain. Genotyping was carried out using RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. In general, isolates clustered well into the relevant phylogenetic dendrograms, forming separate groups in accordance to their species adscription. We could identify which bacterial and yeast genotypes (strains) persisted throughout the fermentation at each patio. Also, which of them were more adapted to any of the three stages, i.e. initial, middle and final, described for this food fermentation. A number of genotypes were found to be shared by both patios. Fifty seven of these belonged to five different bacterial species, i.e. Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus paracollinoides/collinoides, Lactobacillus rapi, Pediococcus ethanolidurans and Staphylococcus sp., although most of them (51) belonged to L. pentosus. Four yeast genotypes were also shared, belonging to the species Candida thaimueangensis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora sp. Two genotypes of L. pentosus were found to be grouped with those of two strains used in commercially available starter cultures, one of them bacteriocinogenic, which were used up to three years before this study in these patios, demonstrating the persistence of selected strains in this environment. Biodiversity was assessed though different indexes, including richness, diversity and dominance. A statistically significant decrease in biodiversity between the initial and final stages of the fermentation was found in both patios. However, values of biodiversity indexes in the fermenters were very similar, and no significant differences were found in the total biodiversity between both patios. This study allowed us to identify a range of well adapted strains (genotypes), especially those belonging to the lactic acid bacteria

  18. Personalized Medicine and Human Genetic Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Goldstein, David B.; Angrist, Misha; Cavalleri, Gianpiero

    2014-01-01

    Human genetic diversity has long been studied both to understand how genetic variation influences risk of disease and infer aspects of human evolutionary history. In this article, we review historical and contemporary views of human genetic diversity, the rare and common mutations implicated in human disease susceptibility, and the relevance of genetic diversity to personalized medicine. First, we describe the development of thought about diversity through the 20th century and through more mo...

  19. Multiple genetic switches spontaneously modulating bacterial mutability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Randal N

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All life forms need both high genetic stability to survive as species and a degree of mutability to evolve for adaptation, but little is known about how the organisms balance the two seemingly conflicting aspects of life: genetic stability and mutability. The DNA mismatch repair (MMR system is essential for maintaining genetic stability and defects in MMR lead to high mutability. Evolution is driven by genetic novelty, such as point mutation and lateral gene transfer, both of which require genetic mutability. However, normally a functional MMR system would strongly inhibit such genomic changes. Our previous work indicated that MMR gene allele conversion between functional and non-functional states through copy number changes of small tandem repeats could occur spontaneously via slipped-strand mis-pairing during DNA replication and therefore may play a role of genetic switches to modulate the bacterial mutability at the population level. The open question was: when the conversion from functional to defective MMR is prohibited, will bacteria still be able to evolve by accepting laterally transferred DNA or accumulating mutations? Results To prohibit allele conversion, we "locked" the MMR genes through nucleotide replacements. We then scored changes in bacterial mutability and found that Salmonella strains with MMR locked at the functional state had significantly decreased mutability. To determine the generalizability of this kind of mutability 'switching' among a wider range of bacteria, we examined the distribution of tandem repeats within MMR genes in over 100 bacterial species and found that multiple genetic switches might exist in these bacteria and may spontaneously modulate bacterial mutability during evolution. Conclusions MMR allele conversion through repeats-mediated slipped-strand mis-pairing may function as a spontaneous mechanism to switch between high genetic stability and mutability during bacterial evolution.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms Influencing Genetic Diversity of Campylobacter jejuni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaasbeek, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important food-borne pathogen, causing human bacterial gastroenteritis. Throughout the years several methods have been developed for typing C. jejuni. These methods uncovered the existence of enormous genetic diversity within the species. Stable lineages of C. jejuni are

  1. Genetic diversity in a crop metapopulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerwaarden, van J.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.; Ross-Ibarra, J.

    2010-01-01

    The need to protect crop genetic resources has sparked a growing interest in the genetic diversity maintained in traditional farming systems worldwide. Although traditional seed management has been proposed as an important determinant of genetic diversity and structure in crops, no models exist that

  2. Personalized medicine and human genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Goldstein, David B; Angrist, Misha; Cavalleri, Gianpiero

    2014-07-24

    Human genetic diversity has long been studied both to understand how genetic variation influences risk of disease and infer aspects of human evolutionary history. In this article, we review historical and contemporary views of human genetic diversity, the rare and common mutations implicated in human disease susceptibility, and the relevance of genetic diversity to personalized medicine. First, we describe the development of thought about diversity through the 20th century and through more modern studies including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and next-generation sequencing. We introduce several examples, such as sickle cell anemia and Tay-Sachs disease that are caused by rare mutations and are more frequent in certain geographical populations, and common treatment responses that are caused by common variants, such as hepatitis C infection. We conclude with comments about the continued relevance of human genetic diversity in medical genetics and personalized medicine more generally. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. Genetic diversity evaluation of rapeseed genotypes ( Brassica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oilseed is the most important source of vegetable oil and the basis of breeding strategies is genetic diversity assessment. Genetic diversity of 19 rapeseed genotypes as well as their ancient ancestors Brassica rapa L. and Brassica oleracea L. were assessed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers and ...

  4. Genetic diversity in European Pisum germplasm collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, R.; Ambrose, M.A.; Knox, M.R.; Smykal, P.; Hybl, M.; Ramos, A.; Caminero, C.; Burstin, J.; Duc, G.; Soest, van L.J.; Swiecicki, W.K.; Pereira, M.G.; Vishnyakova, M.; Davenport, G.F.; Flavell, A.J.; Ellis, T.

    2012-01-01

    The distinctness of, and overlap between, pea genotypes held in several Pisum germplasm collections has been used to determine their relatedness and to test previous ideas about the genetic diversity of Pisum. Our characterisation of genetic diversity among 4,538 Pisum accessions held in 7 European

  5. Genetic diversity in Entamoeba histolytica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    starch in the medium. Jackson and Suparsad (1997) have reported that many zymodemes 'disappear' upon removal of the bacterial flora, suggesting that at least some of the bands are of bacterial rather than amoebal origin. If the zymodemes defined by stable bands alone are counted, only three remain for E. histolytica (II, ...

  6. Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, S P

    2009-11-02

    This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations

  7. What factors shape genetic diversity in cetaceans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Felicia; Whitehead, Hal; Frasier, Timothy R

    2018-02-01

    Understanding what factors drive patterns of genetic diversity is a central aspect of many biological questions, ranging from the inference of historical demography to assessing the evolutionary potential of a species. However, as a larger number of datasets have become available, it is becoming clear that the relationship between the characteristics of a species and its genetic diversity is more complex than previously assumed. This may be particularly true for cetaceans, due to their relatively long lifespans, long generation times, complex social structures, and extensive ranges. In this study, we used microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA data from a systematic literature review to produce estimates of diversity for both markers across 42 cetacean species. Factors relating to demography, distribution, classification, biology, and behavior were then tested using phylogenetic methods and linear models to assess their relative influence on the genetic diversity of both marker types. The results show that while relative nuclear diversity is correlated with population size, mitochondrial diversity is not. This is particularly relevant given the widespread use of mitochondrial DNA to infer historical demography. Instead, mitochondrial diversity was mostly influenced by the range and social structure of the species. In addition to population size, habitat type (neritic vs. oceanic) had a significant correlation with relative nuclear diversity. Combined, these results show that many often-unconsidered factors are likely influencing patterns of genetic diversity in cetaceans, with implications regarding how to interpret, and what can be inferred from, existing patterns of diversity.

  8. Diversity of Hindgut Bacterial Population in Subterranean Termite, Reticulitermes flavipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanrewaju Raji; Dragica Jeremic-Nikolic; Juliet D. Tang

    2017-01-01

    The termite hindgut contains a bacterial community that symbiotically aids in digestion of cellulosic materials. For this paper, a species survey of bacterial hindgut symbionts in termites collected from Saucier, Mississippi was examined. Two methods were tested for optimal genetic material isolation. Genomic DNA was isolated from the hindgut luminal contents of five...

  9. Synthesis and assessment of date palm genetic diversity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A thorough assessment of genetic diversity and population differentiation of Phoenix dactylifera are critical for its dynamic conservation and sustainable utilization of its genetic diversity. Estimates of genetic diversity based on phenotypic, biochemical and molecular markers; and fruit quality tr...

  10. Genetic diversity and relationships among cabbage ( Brassica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The integration of our data with historical documents confirmed that traditional cabbage landraces cultivated in North of China were first introduced from Russia. Key words: Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), genetic diversity, cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata), landraces, population structure.

  11. mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity and drug resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 88 No. 12 December 2011. MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS GENETIC DIVERSITY AND DRUG RESISTANCE CONFERRING MUTATIONS. IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO. L. Fenner, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland, S.

  12. Genetic diversity of grasscutter (Thryonomys swinderianus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa. There are very limited ecological studies on the grasscutter despite its importance as a protein resource. The objective of this study was to apply novel microsatellite markers to determine the genetic structure and diversity of ...

  13. Effect of disopyramide on bacterial diversity in drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Zhao, Xiaofei; Tian, Qi; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Xinhua

    2018-02-01

    Disopyramide was detected in drinking water by LC-MS/MS and the microbial diversity was investigated by PCR and high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that bacteria community structure in drinking water changed a lot when added different concentrations of disopyramide. The results of Shannon index showed that the total number and abundance of bacterial community species in drinking water samples decreased significantly after the addition of disopyramide. However, the number and abundance of community structure did not change with the concentration of disopyramide. Disopyramide inhibits the activity of bacterial community in drinking water and also can reduce the bacterial community diversity in drinking water.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 94; Issue 4. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria malaccensis revealed potential for future conservation ... Keywords. agarwood; conservation; home gardens; genetic diversity; population genetic structure; amplified fragment length polymorphism.

  15. Promiscuity in mice is associated with increased vaginal bacterial diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmanes, Matthew David

    2011-11-01

    Differences in the number of sexual partners (i.e., mating system) have the potential to exert a strong influence on the bacterial communities present in reproductive structures like the vagina. Because this structure serves as a conduit for gametes, bacteria present there may have a pronounced, direct effect on host reproductive success. As a first step towards the identification of the relationship between sexual behavior and potentially pathogenic bacterial communities inhabiting vital reproductive structures, as well as their potential effects on fitness, I sought to quantify differences in bacterial diversity in a promiscuous and monogamous mammal species. To accomplish this, I used two sympatric species of Peromyscus rodents— Peromyscus californicus and Peromyscus maniculatus that differ with regard to the number of sexual partners per individual to test the hypothesis that bacterial diversity should be greater in the promiscuous P. maniculatus relative to the monogamous P. californicus. As predicted, phylogenetically controlled and operational taxonomic unit-based indices of bacterial diversity indicated that diversity is greater in the promiscuous species. These results provide important new insights into the effects of mating system on bacterial diversity in free-living vertebrates, and may suggest a potential cost of promiscuity.

  16. Insights into the bacterial diversity in a freshwater-deprived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to conduct an investigation into the bacterial diversity in the freshwater-deprived Kariega Estuary, situated along the Eastern Cape coastline, using ribosomal RNA gene sequences obtained by pyrosequencing. Shifts in the microbial diversity were correlated to selected physico-chemical variables ...

  17. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    reservoir; under Antarctic ice or in near-boiling water; in acid springs or in alkaline pools – microbial life exists .... The close similarity of the rrnE region of Salmo- nella subspecies I to that of E. coli suggests lateral ..... transfer and the nature of bacterial innovation; Nature (Lon- don) 405 299–304. Pan A, Dutta C and Das J ...

  18. Genetic diversity of 11 European pig breeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavall, G.; Iannuccelli, N.; Legault, C.; Milan, D.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Andersson, L.; Fredholm, M.; Geldermann, H.; Foulley, J.L.; Chevalet, C.; Ollivier, L.

    2000-01-01

    A set of eleven pig breeds originating from six European countries, and including a small sample of wild pigs, was chosen for this study of genetic diversity. Diversity was evaluated on the basis of 18 microsatellite markers typed over a total of 483 DNA samples collected. Average breed

  19. RAPD markers demonstrate genetic diversity in Pterocarpus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAPD markers demonstrate genetic diversity in Pterocarpus angolensis from Zimbabwe and Zambia. E Chisha-Kasumu, S Woodward, A Price. Abstract. Understanding the availability, extent and apportionment of genetic variability in natural populations of the southern African savanna tree Pterocarpus angolensis can ...

  20. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale. E. Santos, M. Matos, P. Silva, A. M. Figueiras, C. Benito and O. Pinto-Carnide. J. Genet. 95, 273–281. Table 1. RAPD and ISSR primers used in this study. Primer. 5 –3. Primer. 5 –3. RAPDs (Operon). A1. CAGGCCCTTC. C5. CATGACCGCC. A4. AATCGGGCTG. C6.

  1. Genetic diversity of Sclerocarya birrea subspecies birrea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sclerocarya birrea, multipurpose plant is characteristic of the Sahel-Sudanian savanna and is widespread in West Africa. Although this species has a high socio-economic importance, its genetic organization was not well characterized in Burkina Faso. In this study, the intra and interpopulation genetic diversity of S. birrea ...

  2. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale. E. Santos, M. Matos, P. Silva, A. M. Figueiras, C. Benito and O. Pinto-Carnide. J. Genet. 95, 273–281. Table 1. RAPD and ISSR primers used in this study. Primer. 5 –3. Primer. 5 –3. RAPDs (Operon). A1. CAGGCCCTTC. C5. CATGACCGCC. A4.

  3. Genetic diversity in Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume. (Lauraceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, unweighed pair group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) analysis showed up to 89% genetic variation among these accessions, which is further supported by principle co-ordinate analysis (PCA). Key words: Genetic diversity, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, RAPD markers, DNA polymorphism.

  4. GENETIC DIVERSITY AND ECO-GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    GENETIC DIVERSITY AND ECO-GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF Eleusine ... floccifolia were analysed for genetic variation and inter-relationships using 20 microsatellite markers. All the ..... Key: ND = not done, B = B genome, A = A genome, AB = both A and B genome of Eleusine coracana subsp coracana (Dida et.

  5. Alfalfa domestication history, genetic diversity and genetic resources

    OpenAIRE

    Prosperi, Jean-Marie; Jenczewski, Eric; Muller, Marie-Helene; Fourtier, Stéphane; Sampoux, Jean-Paul; Ronfort, Joelle

    2014-01-01

    AGAP : GE²pop; The domestication history of alfalfa is poorly known. Here, we summarize recent results obtained from the investigation of the genetic diversity available in the Medicago sativa species complex, using different molecular markers and morphological characterization. We conclude that a large genetic diversity is still available in the wild form of the species, but original populations are restricted to a relatively small geographic area and in some instances submitted to gene flow...

  6. Metals affect soil bacterial and fungal functional diversity differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanowicz, Anna M; Niklińska, Maria; Laskowski, Ryszard

    2008-03-01

    Heavy metals can cause a decrease in the taxonomic diversity of soil communities. Because of functional redundancy, it remains unclear to what extent different functions performed by the soil microbial communities may be affected by pollution. We studied the impact of metal contamination on soil bacterial and fungal functional diversity, active microbial biomass, and soil respiration rate. Soil samples were collected from 39 sites along three forest and five meadow pollution transects near an abandoned Pb/Zn smelter in Avonmouth (UK) and Ni smelter in Clydach (UK), in a Cu mining and smelting region near Glogów (Poland), and in a Zn/Pb mining and smelting region near Olkusz (Poland). Biolog GN2 and SFN2 plates were used to study the bacterial and fungal functional diversity, which subsequently was expressed as Shannon's diversity index (H'). The active microbial biomass was measured as substrate-induced respiration. We found that the bacterial functional diversity significantly decreased, whereas the fungal functional diversity slightly increased, with increasing metal concentration. We also observed a slight negative effect of metal pollution on the active microbial biomass. No relationship was found between metal contamination and total soil respiration rate. This suggests a higher sensitivity of bacterial functional diversity as an indicator for the effects of metal pollution compared with overall soil respiration. All microbial parameters were affected by nutrient concentrations and/or soil pH.

  7. Implications of recurrent disturbance for genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ian D; Cary, Geoffrey J; Landguth, Erin L; Lindenmayer, David B; Banks, Sam C

    2016-02-01

    Exploring interactions between ecological disturbance, species' abundances and community composition provides critical insights for ecological dynamics. While disturbance is also potentially an important driver of landscape genetic patterns, the mechanisms by which these patterns may arise by selective and neutral processes are not well-understood. We used simulation to evaluate the relative importance of disturbance regime components, and their interaction with demographic and dispersal processes, on the distribution of genetic diversity across landscapes. We investigated genetic impacts of variation in key components of disturbance regimes and spatial patterns that are likely to respond to climate change and land management, including disturbance size, frequency, and severity. The influence of disturbance was mediated by dispersal distance and, to a limited extent, by birth rate. Nevertheless, all three disturbance regime components strongly influenced spatial and temporal patterns of genetic diversity within subpopulations, and were associated with changes in genetic structure. Furthermore, disturbance-induced changes in temporal population dynamics and the spatial distribution of populations across the landscape resulted in disrupted isolation by distance patterns among populations. Our results show that forecast changes in disturbance regimes have the potential to cause major changes to the distribution of genetic diversity within and among populations. We highlight likely scenarios under which future changes to disturbance size, severity, or frequency will have the strongest impacts on population genetic patterns. In addition, our results have implications for the inference of biological processes from genetic data, because the effects of dispersal on genetic patterns were strongly mediated by disturbance regimes.

  8. An analysis of the genetic diversity and genetic structure of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientific approaches to conservation of threatened species depend on a good understanding of the genetic information of wild and artificial population. The genetic diversity and structure analysis of 10 Eucommia ulmoides population was analyzed using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers in this paper.

  9. Update on bacterial meningitis: epidemiology, trials and genetic association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasanmoentalib, E. Soemirien; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease that continues to inflict a heavy toll. We reviewed recent advances in vaccination, randomized studies on treatment, and genetic association studies in bacterial meningitis. The incidence of bacterial meningitis has decreased after implementation of

  10. Monitoring changes in genetic diversity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bruford, MW

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available state-of-the-art in genetic monitoring, with an emphasis on new molecular tools and the richness of data they provide to supplement existing approaches. We also briefly consider proxy approaches that may be useful for many-species, global scale...

  11. Estimating bacterial diversity for ecological studies: methods, metrics, and assumptions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Birtel

    Full Text Available Methods to estimate microbial diversity have developed rapidly in an effort to understand the distribution and diversity of microorganisms in natural environments. For bacterial communities, the 16S rRNA gene is the phylogenetic marker gene of choice, but most studies select only a specific region of the 16S rRNA to estimate bacterial diversity. Whereas biases derived from from DNA extraction, primer choice and PCR amplification are well documented, we here address how the choice of variable region can influence a wide range of standard ecological metrics, such as species richness, phylogenetic diversity, β-diversity and rank-abundance distributions. We have used Illumina paired-end sequencing to estimate the bacterial diversity of 20 natural lakes across Switzerland derived from three trimmed variable 16S rRNA regions (V3, V4, V5. Species richness, phylogenetic diversity, community composition, β-diversity, and rank-abundance distributions differed significantly between 16S rRNA regions. Overall, patterns of diversity quantified by the V3 and V5 regions were more similar to one another than those assessed by the V4 region. Similar results were obtained when analyzing the datasets with different sequence similarity thresholds used during sequences clustering and when the same analysis was used on a reference dataset of sequences from the Greengenes database. In addition we also measured species richness from the same lake samples using ARISA Fingerprinting, but did not find a strong relationship between species richness estimated by Illumina and ARISA. We conclude that the selection of 16S rRNA region significantly influences the estimation of bacterial diversity and species distributions and that caution is warranted when comparing data from different variable regions as well as when using different sequencing techniques.

  12. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    that drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Streptococcus ... the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome (Sassanfar et al. 1996). .... (de la Cruz 2000). Microbial genome analyses have shown that the resistance determinants in such organisms are often associated with mobile genetic elements like plas-.

  13. Bacterial Community Diversity Harboured by Interacting Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaël Bili

    Full Text Available All animals are infected by microbial partners that can be passengers or residents and influence many biological traits of their hosts. Even if important factors that structure the composition and abundance of microbial communities within and among host individuals have been recently described, such as diet, developmental stage or phylogeny, few studies have conducted cross-taxonomic comparisons, especially on host species related by trophic relationships. Here, we describe and compare the microbial communities associated with the cabbage root fly Delia radicum and its three major parasitoids: the two staphylinid beetles Aleochara bilineata and A. bipustulata and the hymenopteran parasitoid Trybliographa rapae. For each species, two populations from Western France were sampled and microbial communities were described through culture independent methods (454 pyrosequencing. Each sample harbored at least 59 to 261 different bacterial phylotypes but was strongly dominated by one or two. Microbial communities differed markedly in terms of composition and abundance, being mainly influenced by phylogenetic proximity but also geography to a minor extent. Surprisingly, despite their strong trophic interaction, parasitoids shared a very low proportion of microbial partners with their insect host. Three vertically transmitted symbionts from the genus Wolbachia, Rickettsia, and Spiroplasma were found in this study. Among them, Wolbachia and Spiroplasma were found in both the cabbage fly and at least one of its parasitoids, which could result from horizontal transfers through trophic interactions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this hypothesis may explain some but not all cases. More work is needed to understand the dynamics of symbiotic associations within trophic network and the effect of these bacterial communities on the fitness of their hosts.

  14. Evolution and genetic diversity of Theileria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Hayashida, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-10-01

    Theileria parasites infect a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants worldwide, causing diseases with varying degrees of severity. A broad classification, based on the parasite's ability to transform the leukocytes of host animals, divides Theileria into two groups, consisting of transforming and non-transforming species. The evolution of transforming Theileria has been accompanied by drastic changes in its genetic makeup, such as acquisition or expansion of gene families, which are thought to play critical roles in the transformation of host cells. Genetic variation among Theileria parasites is sometimes linked with host specificity and virulence in the parasites. Immunity against Theileria parasites primarily involves cell-mediated immune responses in the host. Immunodominance and major histocompatibility complex class I phenotype-specificity result in a host immunity that is tightly focused and strain-specific. Immune escape in Theileria is facilitated by genetic diversity in its antigenic determinants, which potentially results in a loss of T cell receptor recognition in its host. In the recent past, several reviews have focused on genetic diversity in the transforming species, Theileriaparva and Theileriaannulata. In contrast, genetic diversity in Theileriaorientalis, a benign non-transforming parasite, which occasionally causes disease outbreaks in cattle, has not been extensively examined. In this review, therefore, we provide an outline of the evolution of Theileria, which includes T. orientalis, and discuss the possible mechanisms generating genetic diversity among parasite populations. Additionally, we discuss the potential implications of a genetically diverse parasite population in the context of Theileria vaccine development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic diversity in a crop metapopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerwaarden, J; van Eeuwijk, F A; Ross-Ibarra, J

    2010-01-01

    The need to protect crop genetic resources has sparked a growing interest in the genetic diversity maintained in traditional farming systems worldwide. Although traditional seed management has been proposed as an important determinant of genetic diversity and structure in crops, no models exist that can adequately describe the genetic effects of seed management. We present a metapopulation model that accounts for several features unique to managed crop populations. Using traditional maize agriculture as an example, we develop a coalescence-based model of a crop metapopulation undergoing pollen and seed flow as well as seed replacement. In contrast to metapopulation work on natural systems, we model seed migration as episodic and originating from a single source per population rather than as a constant immigration from the entire metapopulation. We find that the correlated origin of migrants leads to surprising results, including a loss of invariance of within-deme diversity and a parabolic relationship between F(ST) and migration quantity. In contrast, the effects of migration frequency on diversity and structure are more similar to classical predictions, suggesting that seed migration in managed crop populations cannot be described by a single parameter. In addition to migration, we investigate the effects of deme size and extinction rates on genetic structure, and show that high levels of pollen migration may mask the effects of seed management on structure. Our results highlight the importance of analytically evaluating the effects of deviations from classical metapopulation models, especially in systems for which data are available to estimate specific model parameters.

  16. Bacterial diversity of symptomatic primary endodontic infection by clonal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Maria Menezes NÓBREGA

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the bacterial diversity of 10 root canals with acute apical abscess using clonal analysis. Samples were collected from 10 patients and submitted to bacterial DNA isolation, 16S rRNA gene amplification, cloning, and sequencing. A bacterial genomic library was constructed and bacterial diversity was estimated. The mean number of taxa per canal was 15, ranging from 11 to 21. A total of 689 clones were analyzed and 76 phylotypes identified, of which 47 (61.84% were different species and 29 (38.15% were taxa reported as yet-uncultivable or as yet-uncharacterized species. Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Filifactor alocis, and Peptostreptococcus stomatis were the most frequently detected species, followed by Dialister invisus, Phocaeicola abscessus, the uncharacterized Lachnospiraceae oral clone, Porphyromonas spp., and Parvimonas micra. Eight phyla were detected and the most frequently identified taxa belonged to the phylum Firmicutes (43.5%, followed by Bacteroidetes (22.5% and Proteobacteria (13.2%. No species was detected in all studied samples and some species were identified in only one case. It was concluded that acute primary endodontic infection is characterized by wide bacterial diversity and a high intersubject variability was observed. Anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes, were the most frequently detected microorganisms.

  17. Bacterial diversity in the intestinal tract of the fungus- cultivating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-19

    Mar 19, 2007 ... culture dependent techniques, most of the isolates obtained belonged to the Gram-positive bacteria with a high G+C ... Key words: Fungus-cultivating termites, bacterial diversity, intestinal tract, 16S rRNA gene, RFLP. INTRODUCTION ...... disturbance and greenhouse gas fluxes in Sabah, East Malaysia.

  18. a neo-classical approach to explore untapped bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. SCIENCE WHERE CULTURE MATTERS: A NEO-CLASSICAL APPROACH TO EXPLORE UNTAPPED BACTERIAL DIVERSITY · UNDER GRADUATE RESEARCH An alternative model of doing science · THE EXPANSE OF LIFE · HOW MANY SP. OF BACTERIA IN 1 g SOIL? TORSVIK ET AL 1990.

  19. Physio-chemical characteristics and bacterial diversity in copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of seasonal change in temperature on the chemical compositions of water and bacterial diversity in copper mining wastewater reservoir (CMWR) located in Jiangxi province, China, was investigated. Wastewater samples were collected collected in December 2008 and May 2009 from different points of CMWR ...

  20. Diversity of Streptococcus mutans strains in bacterial interspecies interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Ling, J.; Crielaard, W.; Deng, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are matrix-enclosed microbial population adhere to each other and to surfaces. Compared to planktonic bacterial cells, biofilm cells show much higher levels of antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to investigate Streptococcus mutans strain diversity in biofilm formation and chlorhexidine

  1. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial diversity of Siloam hot water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bacterial diversity of Siloam hot water spring was determined using 454 pyrosequencing of two 16S rRNA variable regions V1-3 and V4-7. Analysis of the community DNA revealed that the phyla Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi and Verrucomicrobia were the most ...

  2. Bacterial diversity in the intestinal tract of the funguscultivating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microorganisms in the intestinal tracts of termites play a crucial role in the nutritional physiology of termites. The bacterial diversity in the fungus-cultivating Macrotermes michaelseni was examined using both molecular and culture dependent methods. Total DNA was extracted from the gut of the termite and 16S rRNA genes ...

  3. Neglect of genetic diversity in implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda Laikre; Fred W. Allendorf; Laurel C. Aroner; C. Scott Baker; David P. Gregovich; Michael M. Hansen; Jennifer A. Jackson; Katherine C. Kendall; Kevin Mckelvey; Maile C. Neel; Isabelle Olivieri; Nils Ryman; Michael K. Schwartz; Ruth Short Bull; Jeffrey B. Stetz; David A. Tallmon; Barbara L. Taylor; Christina D. Vojta; Donald M. Waller; Robin S. Waples

    2009-01-01

    Genetic diversity is the foundation for all biological diversity; the persistence and evolutionary potential of species depend on it. World leaders have agreed on the conservation of genetic diversity as an explicit goal of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Nevertheless, actions to protect genetic diversity are largely lacking. With only months left to the...

  4. Genomic management of animal genetic diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbroek, Kor

    2017-01-01

    Recently developed genomic tools, like SNP-genotyping and whole genome sequencing, and their analysis, offer great opportunities for the conservation and utilisation of animal genetic diversity, both among and within breeds. These genomic tools can be used to detect potentially valuable rare alleles

  5. High genetic diversity of Mycospaherella graminicola ( Zymoseptoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High genetic diversity of Mycospaherella graminicola (Zymoseptoria tritici) from a single wheat field in Tunisia as revealed by SSR markers. Samia Berraies, Mohamed Salah Gharbi, François Belzile, Amor Yahyaoui, Mohamed Rebah Hajlaoui, Mokhtar Trifi, Martine Jean, Salah Rezgui ...

  6. Genetic diversity of Cytospora chrysospermaisolates obtained from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cluster analysis of the data using Centroid method and Jaccard´s similarity coefficient, divided the isolates into six groups, showing a high genetic diversity among populations of C. chrysosperma. Although there was no correlation between geographical origins and the resulting groups of RAPD analysis, but the amount of ...

  7. Genetic Diversity in Insect Metal Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. S. Merritt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Insects encounter a variety of metals in their environment, many of which are required at some concentration for normal organismal homeostasis, but essentially all of which are toxic at higher concentrations. Insects have evolved a variety of genetic, and likely epigenetic, mechanisms to deal with metal stress. A recurring theme in all these systems is complexity and diversity; even simple, single gene, cases are complex. Of the known gene families, the metallothioneins are perhaps the best understood and provide good examples of how diverse metal response is. Interestingly, there is considerable diversity across taxa in these metal-responsive systems, including duplications to form small gene families and complex expression of single loci. Strikingly, different species have evolved different mechanisms to cope with the same, or similar, stress suggesting both independent derivation of, and plasticity in, the pathways involved. It is likely that some metal-response systems evolved early in evolutionary time and have been conserved, while others have diverged, and still others evolved more recently and convergently. In addition to conventional genetics, insects likely respond to environmental metal through a variety of epigenetic systems, but direct tests are lacking. Ultimately, it is likely that classical genetic and epigenetic factors interact in regulating insect metal responses. In light of this diversity across species, future studies including a broad-based examination of gene expression in non-model species in complex environments will likely uncover additional genes and genetic and epigenetic mechanisms.

  8. Genetic Diversity in Insect Metal Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Thomas J S; Bewick, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    Insects encounter a variety of metals in their environment, many of which are required at some concentration for normal organismal homeostasis, but essentially all of which are toxic at higher concentrations. Insects have evolved a variety of genetic, and likely epigenetic, mechanisms to deal with metal stress. A recurring theme in all these systems is complexity and diversity; even simple, single gene, cases are complex. Of the known gene families, the metallothioneins are perhaps the best understood and provide good examples of how diverse metal response is. Interestingly, there is considerable diversity across taxa in these metal-responsive systems, including duplications to form small gene families and complex expression of single loci. Strikingly, different species have evolved different mechanisms to cope with the same, or similar, stress suggesting both independent derivation of, and plasticity in, the pathways involved. It is likely that some metal-response systems evolved early in evolutionary time and have been conserved, while others have diverged, and still others evolved more recently and convergently. In addition to conventional genetics, insects likely respond to environmental metal through a variety of epigenetic systems, but direct tests are lacking. Ultimately, it is likely that classical genetic and epigenetic factors interact in regulating insect metal responses. In light of this diversity across species, future studies including a broad-based examination of gene expression in non-model species in complex environments will likely uncover additional genes and genetic and epigenetic mechanisms.

  9. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Over the years, there has been much controversy about the taxonomy of the Secale genus. ... have become routine in plant biotechnology, such as genetic diversity studies. ISSR (Zietkiewicz et al. 1994) and ... 1996) were not amplified in the bulk DNA samples. The number of plants used to construct the bulk samples was.

  10. Genetic diversity among sorghum landraces and polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) are playing an important role in molecular breeding. This investigation was undertaken to study the genetic diversity among local sorghum accessions from two different agro-ecological zones of Burkina Faso and to assess the polymorphism within local improved varieties ...

  11. Analysis of genetic diversity inpigeonpeagermplasm using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2016-11-25

    Nov 25, 2016 ... techniques are useful and could be a better alternative to other marker techniques in analyzing the genetic diversity .... the SSR primer alone in REMAP reactions, in control experiments for REMAP, the retrotransposon ... Molecular marker technology has evolved into a very powerful tool in plant biology for.

  12. Genetic diversity analysis of Tinospora cordifolia germplasm ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-03

    Apr 3, 2012 ... c Indian Academy of Sciences. RESEARCH NOTE. Genetic diversity analysis of Tinospora cordifolia germplasm collected from northwestern Himalayan region of India. VIJAY RANA1, KALPANA THAKUR1, RITU SOOD1, VARUN SHARMA1 and T. R. SHARMA2∗. 1Rice and Wheat Research Centre, Malan ...

  13. Genetic diversity among endangered rare Dalbergia cochinchinensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hocvan

    Dalbergia cochinchinensis is a species of legume in the Fabaceae family. This species is popular and valuable in Vietnam and is currently listed on the Vietnam Red List and on the IUCN Red List as endangered. Genetic diversity of the 35 genotypes of D. cochinchinensis species were evaluated by using 52 markers ...

  14. Genetic diversity among endangered rare Dalbergia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity among endangered rare Dalbergia cochinchinensis (Fabaceae) genotypes in Vietnam revealed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) ... The number of amplified fragments varied from 1 (OPR15, OPB05, RA142, OPR08, UBC348, OPE14 and OPO04) to 8 (OPP19) and their sizes ranged from 250 ...

  15. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this study was to quantify the molecular diversity and to determine the genetic relationships amongSecalespp. and among cultivars ofSecale ... Faculty of Sciences, Campo Grande, Lisboa, Portugal; Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad Complutense, C/ José Antonio Novais, 12, ...

  16. Bacterial Communities of Diverse Drosophila Species: Ecological Context of a Host–Microbe Model System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Srijak; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Kopp, Artyom

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is emerging as an important model of non-pathogenic host–microbe interactions. The genetic and experimental tractability of Drosophila has led to significant gains in our understanding of animal–microbial symbiosis. However, the full implications of these results cannot be appreciated without the knowledge of the microbial communities associated with natural Drosophila populations. In particular, it is not clear whether laboratory cultures can serve as an accurate model of host–microbe interactions that occur in the wild, or those that have occurred over evolutionary time. To fill this gap, we characterized natural bacterial communities associated with 14 species of Drosophila and related genera collected from distant geographic locations. To represent the ecological diversity of Drosophilids, examined species included fruit-, flower-, mushroom-, and cactus-feeders. In parallel, wild host populations were compared to laboratory strains, and controlled experiments were performed to assess the importance of host species and diet in shaping bacterial microbiome composition. We find that Drosophilid flies have taxonomically restricted bacterial communities, with 85% of the natural bacterial microbiome composed of only four bacterial families. The dominant bacterial taxa are widespread and found in many different host species despite the taxonomic, ecological, and geographic diversity of their hosts. Both natural surveys and laboratory experiments indicate that host diet plays a major role in shaping the Drosophila bacterial microbiome. Despite this, the internal bacterial microbiome represents only a highly reduced subset of the external bacterial communities, suggesting that the host exercises some level of control over the bacteria that inhabit its digestive tract. Finally, we show that laboratory strains provide only a limited model of natural host–microbe interactions. Bacterial taxa used in experimental studies are rare or absent in

  17. Does genetic diversity predict health in humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne C Lie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity, especially at genes important for immune functioning within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, has been associated with fitness-related traits, including disease resistance, in many species. Recently, genetic diversity has been associated with mate preferences in humans. Here we asked whether these preferences are adaptive in terms of obtaining healthier mates. We investigated whether genetic diversity (heterozygosity and standardized mean d(2 at MHC and nonMHC microsatellite loci, predicted health in 153 individuals. Individuals with greater allelic diversity (d(2 at nonMHC loci and at one MHC locus, linked to HLA-DRB1, reported fewer symptoms over a four-month period than individuals with lower d(2. In contrast, there were no associations between MHC or nonMHC heterozygosity and health. NonMHC-d(2 has previously been found to predict male preferences for female faces. Thus, the current findings suggest that nonMHC diversity may play a role in both natural and sexual selection acting on human populations.

  18. An analysis of the genetic diversity and genetic structure of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-26

    Dec 26, 2011 ... levels of genetic diversity (Hamrick and Godt, 1996). In addition, E. ulmoides is distributed in a wide range of climatic and geographic conditions in China during the cultivation history of more than 2,000 years (Zhang,. 1992) and rich vitality and high adaptability accumulated through the long-term history.

  19. Bacterial diversity characterization in petroleum samples from Brazilian reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Valéria Maia; Sette, Lara Durães; Simioni, Karen Christina Marques; dos Santos Neto, Eugênio Vaz

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating potential differences among the bacterial communities from formation water and oil samples originated from biodegraded and non-biodegraded Brazilian petroleum reservoirs by using a PCR-DGGE based approach. Environmental DNA was isolated and used in PCR reactions with bacterial primers, followed by separation of 16S rDNA fragments in the DGGE. PCR products were also cloned and sequenced, aiming at the taxonomic affiliation of the community members. The fingerprints obtained allowed the direct comparison among the bacterial communities from oil samples presenting distinct degrees of biodegradation, as well as between the communities of formation water and oil sample from the non-biodegraded reservoir. Very similar DGGE band profiles were observed for all samples, and the diversity of the predominant bacterial phylotypes was shown to be low. Cloning and sequencing results revealed major differences between formation water and oil samples from the non-biodegraded reservoir. Bacillus sp. and Halanaerobium sp. were shown to be the predominant components of the bacterial community from the formation water sample, whereas the oil sample also included Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Rhodococcus sp., Streptomyces sp. and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The PCR-DGGE technique, combined with cloning and sequencing of PCR products, revealed the presence of taxonomic groups not found previously in these samples when using cultivation-based methods and 16S rRNA gene library assembly, confirming the need of a polyphasic study in order to improve the knowledge of the extent of microbial diversity in such extreme environments. PMID:24031244

  20. Genetic diversity of Ascaris in southwestern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betson, Martha; Nejsum, Peter; Llewellyn-Hughes, Julia; Griffin, Claire; Atuhaire, Aaron; Arinaitwe, Moses; Adriko, Moses; Ruggiana, Andrew; Turyakira, Grace; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Stothard, J Russell

    2012-02-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ascariasis in southwestern Uganda, helminth control in the region has been limited. To gain further insights into the genetic diversity of Ascaris in this area, a parasitological survey in mothers (n=41) and children (n=74) living in two villages, Habutobere and Musezero, was carried out. Adult Ascaris worms were collected from infected individuals by chemo-expulsion using pyrantel pamoate treatment. Genetic diversity within these worms was assessed by inspection of DNA sequence variation in a mitochondrial marker and length polymorphism at microsatellite loci. Overall prevalence of ascariasis was 42.5% in mothers and 30.4% in their children and a total of 98 worms was examined from 18 hosts. Sequence analysis of a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene revealed 19 different haplotypes, 13 of which had not been previously encountered. Microsatellite analysis using eight loci provided evidence for high gene flow between worm populations from the two villages but comparing these worms with others obtained in a prior study on Unguja, Zanzibar, confirmed little genetic exchange and mixing of worm populations between the two areas. By adding to our understanding of the genetic diversity of Ascaris in Africa, this study provides useful information for monitoring changes in parasite population structure in the face of ongoing and future control. Copyright © 2011 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacterial diversity at different stages of the composting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulin Lars

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Composting is an aerobic microbiological process that is facilitated by bacteria and fungi. Composting is also a method to produce fertilizer or soil conditioner. Tightened EU legislation now requires treatment of the continuously growing quantities of organic municipal waste before final disposal. However, some full-scale composting plants experience difficulties with the efficiency of biowaste degradation and with the emission of noxious odours. In this study we examine the bacterial species richness and community structure of an optimally working pilot-scale compost plant, as well as a full-scale composting plant experiencing typical problems. Bacterial species composition was determined by isolating total DNA followed by amplifying and sequencing the gene encoding the 16S ribosomal RNA. Results Over 1500 almost full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were analysed and of these, over 500 were present only as singletons. Most of the sequences observed in either one or both of the composting processes studied here were similar to the bacterial species reported earlier in composts, including bacteria from the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Deinococcus-Thermus. In addition, a number of previously undetected bacterial phylotypes were observed. Statistical calculations estimated a total bacterial diversity of over 2000 different phylotypes in the studied composts. Conclusions Interestingly, locally enriched or evolved bacterial variants of familiar compost species were observed in both composts. A detailed comparison of the bacterial diversity revealed a large difference in composts at the species and strain level from the different composting plants. However, at the genus level, the difference was much smaller and illustrated a delay of the composting process in the full-scale, sub-optimally performing plants.

  2. It is elemental: soil nutrient stoichiometry drives bacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Reich, Peter B; Khachane, Amit N; Campbell, Colin D; Thomas, Nadine; Freitag, Thomas E; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren; Bardgett, Richard D; Singh, Brajesh K

    2017-03-01

    It is well established that resource quantity and elemental stoichiometry play major roles in shaping below and aboveground plant biodiversity, but their importance for shaping microbial diversity in soil remains unclear. Here, we used statistical modeling on a regional database covering 179 locations and six ecosystem types across Scotland to evaluate the roles of total carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availabilities and ratios, together with land use, climate and biotic and abiotic factors, in determining regional scale patterns of soil bacterial diversity. We found that bacterial diversity and composition were primarily driven by variation in soil resource stoichiometry (total C:N:P ratios), itself linked to different land uses, and secondarily driven by other important biodiversity drivers such as climate, soil spatial heterogeneity, soil pH, root influence (plant-soil microbe interactions) and microbial biomass (soil microbe-microbe interactions). In aggregate, these findings provide evidence that nutrient stoichiometry is a strong predictor of bacterial diversity and composition at a regional scale. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Enhancing (crop) plant photosynthesis by introducing novel genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dann, Marcel; Leister, Dario

    2017-09-26

    Although some elements of the photosynthetic light reactions might appear to be ideal, the overall efficiency of light conversion to biomass has not been optimized during evolution. Because crop plants are depleted of genetic diversity for photosynthesis, efforts to enhance its efficiency with respect to light conversion to yield must generate new variation. In principle, three sources of natural variation are available: (i) rare diversity within extant higher plant species, (ii) photosynthetic variants from algae, and (iii) reconstruction of no longer extant types of plant photosynthesis. Here, we argue for a novel approach that outsources crop photosynthesis to a cyanobacterium that is amenable to adaptive evolution. This system offers numerous advantages, including a short generation time, virtually unlimited population sizes and high mutation rates, together with a versatile toolbox for genetic manipulation. On such a synthetic bacterial platform, 10 000 years of (crop) plant evolution can be recapitulated within weeks. Limitations of this system arise from its unicellular nature, which cannot reproduce all aspects of crop photosynthesis. But successful establishment of such a bacterial host for crop photosynthesis promises not only to enhance the performance of eukaryotic photosynthesis but will also reveal novel facets of the molecular basis of photosynthetic flexibility.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Bacterial diversity in two Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krissi M Hewitt

    Full Text Available Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs are particularly susceptible to opportunistic infection. Infected infants have high mortality rates, and survivors often suffer life-long neurological disorders. The causes of many NICU infections go undiagnosed, and there is debate as to the importance of inanimate hospital environments (IHEs in the spread of infections. We used culture-independent next-generation sequencing to survey bacterial diversity in two San Diego NICUs and to track the sources of microbes in these environments. Thirty IHE samples were collected from two Level-Three NICU facilities. We extracted DNA from these samples and amplified the bacterial small subunit (16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence using 'universal' barcoded primers. The purified PCR products were pooled into a single reaction for pyrosequencing, and the data were analyzed using QIIME. On average, we detected 93+/-39 (mean +/- standard deviation bacterial genera per sample in NICU IHEs. Many of the bacterial genera included known opportunistic pathogens, and many were skin-associated (e.g., Propionibacterium. In one NICU, we also detected fecal coliform bacteria (Enterobacteriales in a high proportion of the surface samples. Comparison of these NICU-derived sequences to previously published high-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon studies of other indoor environments (offices, restrooms and healthcare facilities, as well as human- and soil-associated environments, found the majority of the NICU samples to be similar to typical building surface and air samples, with the notable exception of the IHEs which were dominated by Enterobacteriaceae. Our findings provide evidence that NICU IHEs harbor a high diversity of human-associated bacteria and demonstrate the potential utility of molecular methods for identifying and tracking bacterial diversity in NICUs.

  5. Genetic diversity and population structure of maize landraces from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ivoire. However, no study on the genetic diversity of the species has been performed to date. This study aims at analyzing the diversity and genetic structure of 35 maize accessions using 10 microsatellite markers. These accessions are from ...

  6. Genetic Diversity in Insect Metal Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas J. S. Merritt; Adam J. Bewick

    2017-01-01

    Insects encounter a variety of metals in their environment, many of which are required at some concentration for normal organismal homeostasis, but essentially all of which are toxic at higher concentrations. Insects have evolved a variety of genetic, and likely epigenetic, mechanisms to deal with metal stress. A recurring theme in all these systems is complexity and diversity; even simple, single gene, cases are complex. Of the known gene families, the metallothioneins are perhaps the best u...

  7. Limited Genetic Diversity of Brucella spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Gándara, Benjamín; Merino, Ahidé López; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2001-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) of 99 Brucella isolates, including the type strains from all recognized species, revealed a very limited genetic diversity and supports the proposal of a monospecific genus. In MLEE-derived dendrograms, Brucella abortus and a marine Brucella sp. grouped into a single electrophoretic type related to Brucella neotomae and Brucella ovis. Brucella suis and Brucella canis formed another cluster linked to Brucella melitensis and related to Rhizobium tropici....

  8. Soil bacterial diversity changes in different broomcorn millet intercropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoning; Liu, Sichen; Wang, Junjie; Wang, Haigang; Chen, Ling; Tian, Xiang; Zhang, Lijun; Chang, Jianwu; Wang, Lun; Mu, Zhixin; Qiao, Zhijun

    2017-12-01

    Plants growing in soil and the diverse microorganisms with which they are in direct contact have adapted to exploit their close association for mutual benefit. Various intercropping systems have been used to control plant disease and improve productivity in fields. Although high-throughput sequencing approaches have provided new insights into the soil bacterial community, current knowledge of intercropping of broomcorn millet with different leguminous plants is limited. In this study, characterization of different bacterial communities of monoculture and intercropping systems was achieved by deep sequencing. A total of 4684 operational taxonomic units were classified to the species level with good sampling depth and sequencing coverage. The abundance of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes varied at different growth stages and was related to growth of the intercropped plant. According to diversity analyses, Glycomyces, Aeromicrobium, Adhaeribacter, and Streptomyces were the dominant genera. In addition, we predicted functional gene composition based on bacterial OTUs present. Functional results showed that membrane transport and nutrient metabolism was highly abundant in all samples, although abundance varied at different growth stages, which indicated these pathways might be affected by the dominant categories of bacterial community. The dynamic changes observed during intercropping of broomcorn millet with different leguminous plants suggest that soil bacterial community structure exhibits a crop species-specific pattern. Further, agronomic trait data from different broomcorn millet intercropping systems were consistent with functional results and suggest that agronomic traits may be influenced by soil bacterial communities. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Diversity of Bacterial Photosymbionts in Lubomirskiidae Sponges from Lake Baikal

    OpenAIRE

    Kulakova, Nina V.; Denikina, Natalia N.; Belikov, Sergei I.

    2014-01-01

    Sponges are permanent benthos residents which establish complex associations with a variety of microorganisms that raise interest in the nature of sponge-symbionts interactions. A molecular approach, based on the identification of the 16S rRNA and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit genes, was applied to investigate diversity and phylogeny of bacterial phototrophs associated with four species of Lubomirskiidae in Lake Baikal. The phylogeny inferred from both genes sh...

  10. Molecular bacterial diversity and bioburden of commercial airliner cabin air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Duc, M.T.; Stuecker, T.; Venkateswaran, K. [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Biotechnology and Planetary Protection Group

    2007-11-15

    Microorganisms that exist in aircraft air systems are considered to be the primary source of microbial contamination that can lead to illness shortly after flying. More than 600 million passengers board commercial airline flights annually in the United States alone. In this study, culture-independent, biomarker-targeted bacterial enumeration and identification strategies were used to estimate total bacterial burden and diversity within the cabin air of commercial airliners. Air-impingement was used to collect samples of microorganisms from 4 flights on 2 commercial carriers. The total viable microbial population ranged from below detection limits to 4.1 x 10{sup 6} cells/m{sup 3} of air. Microbes were found to gradually accumulate from the time of passenger boarding through mid-flight. A sharp decline in bacterial abundance was then observed. Representatives of the {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} Proteobacteria, as well as Gram-positive bacteria, were isolated in varying abundance. Airline A had large abundances of Neisseria meningitidis rRNA gene sequences and Streptococcus oralis/mitis sequences. Airline B was dominated by pseudomonas synxantha sequences as well as N. meningitidis and S. oralis/mitis. The cabin air samples housed low bacterial diversity and were typically dominated by a particular subset of bacteria, notably opportunistic pathogenic inhabitants of the human respiratory tract and oral cavity. The microbes were found largely around the ventilation ducts and gasper conduits that supply cabin air. 45 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  11. Managing genetic diversity and society needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur da Silva Mariante

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Most livestock are not indigenous to Brazil. Several animal species were considered domesticated in the pre-colonial period, since the indigenous people manage them as would be typical of European livestock production. For over 500 years there have been periodic introductions resulting in the wide range of genetic diversity that for centuries supported domestic animal production in the country. Even though these naturalized breeds have acquired adaptive traits after centuries of natural selection, they have been gradually replaced by exotic breeds, to such an extent, that today they are in danger of extinction To avoid further loss of this important genetic material, in 1983 Embrapa Genetic Resources and Biotechnology decided to include conservation of animal genetic resources among its priorities. In this paper we describe the effort to genetically characterize these populations, as a tool to ensure their genetic variability. To effectively save the threatened local breeds of livestock it is important to find a niche market for each one, reinserting them in production systems. They have to be utilized in order to be conserved. And there is no doubt that due to their adaptive traits, the Brazilian local breeds of livestock can play an important role in animal production, to meet society needs.

  12. Genetic diversity of Coccidioides posadasii from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; de Lima, Rita Amanda Chaves; Ribeiro, Joyce Fonteles; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Gadelha Rocha, Marcos Fábio; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2013-05-01

    Studies of the genetic variation within populations of Coccidioides posadasii are scarce, especially for those recovered from South America. Understanding the distribution of genotypes among populations is important for epidemiological surveillance. This study evaluated the genetic diversity of 18 Brazilian strains of C. posadasii through the sequencing of the 18-28S region of nuclear rDNA, as well as through RAPD and M13-PCR fingerprinting techniques. The sequences obtained were compared to Coccidioides spp. previously deposited in GenBank. The MEGA5 program was used to perform phylogenetic analyses. Within the C. posadasii clade, a single cluster was observed, containing seven isolates from Ceará, which presented a single nucleotide polymorphism. These isolates were from the same geographical area. The strains of C. posadasii showed a lower rate of genetic diversity in the ITS1 and ITS2 regions. The results of M13 and RAPD-PCR fingerprinting indicated a similar electrophoretic profile. No differences between clinical and environmental isolates were detected. This was the first study assessing the genetic variability of a larger number of C. posadasii isolates from Brazil.

  13. Genetic diversity in Tunisian horse breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jemmali

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at screening genetic diversity and differentiation in four horse breeds raised in Tunisia, the Barb, Arab-Barb, Arabian, and English Thoroughbred breeds. A total of 200 blood samples (50 for each breed were collected from the jugular veins of animals, and genomic DNA was extracted. The analysis of the genetic structure was carried out using a panel of 16 microsatellite loci. Results showed that all studied microsatellite markers were highly polymorphic in all breeds. Overall, a total of 147 alleles were detected using the 16 microsatellite loci. The average number of alleles per locus was 7.52 (0.49, 7.35 (0.54, 6.3 (0.44, and 6 (0.38 for the Arab-Barb, Barb, Arabian, and English Thoroughbred breeds, respectively. The observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.63 (0.03 in the English Thoroughbred to 0.72 in the Arab-Barb breeds, whereas the expected heterozygosities were between 0.68 (0.02 in the English Thoroughbred and 0.73 in the Barb breeds. All FST values calculated by pairwise breed combinations were significantly different from zero (p  <  0.05 and an important genetic differentiation among breeds was revealed. Genetic distances, the factorial correspondence, and principal coordinate analyses showed that the important amount of genetic variation was within population. These results may facilitate conservation programs for the studied breeds and enhance preserve their genetic diversity.

  14. Genetic diversity among farmer-preferred cassava landraces in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding of genetic diversity among a breeding population is an important requirement for crop improvement as it allows for the selection of diverse parental combinations and formation of heterotic pools for genetic gain. This study was carried out to determine genetic diversity within and among 51 farmer-preferred ...

  15. Determination of genetic diversity among Turkish durum wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wheat landraces represent an important source of genetic variation that can be used for future wheat breeding program. The rich wheat landraces from Turkey have not been sufficiently analyzed genetically. For this reason, genetic diversity and relationship of the landraces must be determined. In this study, genetic diversity ...

  16. Entangled fates of holobiont genomes during invasion: nested bacterial and host diversities in Caulerpa taxifolia

    KAUST Repository

    Arnaud-Haond, S.

    2017-01-30

    Successful prevention and mitigation of biological invasions requires retracing the initial steps of introduction, as well as understanding key elements enhancing the adaptability of invasive species. We studied the genetic diversity of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia and its associated bacterial communities in several areas around the world. The striking congruence of α and ß diversity of the algal genome and endophytic communities reveals a tight association, supporting the holobiont concept as best describing the unit of spreading and invasion. Both genomic compartments support the hypotheses of a unique accidental introduction in the Mediterranean and of multiple invasion events in Southern Australia. In addition to helping with tracing the origin of invasion, bacterial communities exhibit metabolic functions that can potentially enhance adaptability and competitiveness of the consortium they form with their host. We thus hypothesize that low genetic diversities of both host and symbiont communities may contribute to the recent regression in the Mediterranean, in contrast with the persistence of highly diverse assemblages in southern Australia. This study supports the importance of scaling up from the host to the holobiont for a comprehensive understanding of invasions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic Diversity of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis Isolated in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hwan Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant pathogenic bacterial genus Pectobacteirum consists of heterogeneous strains. The P. carotovorum species is a complex strain showing divergent characteristics, and a new subspecies named P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis has been identified recently. In this paper, we re-identified the P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates from those classified under the subspecies carotovorum and newly isolated P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis strains. All isolates were able to produce plant cell-wall degrading enzymes such as pectate lyase, polygalacturonase, cellulase and protease. We used genetic and biochemical methods to examine the diversity of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates, and found genetic diversity within the brasiliensis subsp. isolates in Korea. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis based on the recA gene revealed a unique pattern for the brasiliensis subspecies. The Korean brasiliensis subsp. isolates were divided into four clades based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. However, correlations between clades and isolated hosts or year could not be found, suggesting that diverse brasiliensis subsp. isolates existed.

  18. Genetic Diversity of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis Isolated in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Jin-Beom; Lim, Jeong-A; Han, Sang-Wook; Heu, Sunggi

    2014-06-01

    The plant pathogenic bacterial genus Pectobacteirum consists of heterogeneous strains. The P. carotovorum species is a complex strain showing divergent characteristics, and a new subspecies named P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis has been identified recently. In this paper, we re-identified the P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates from those classified under the subspecies carotovorum and newly isolated P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis strains. All isolates were able to produce plant cell-wall degrading enzymes such as pectate lyase, polygalacturonase, cellulase and protease. We used genetic and biochemical methods to examine the diversity of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates, and found genetic diversity within the brasiliensis subsp. isolates in Korea. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis based on the recA gene revealed a unique pattern for the brasiliensis subspecies. The Korean brasiliensis subsp. isolates were divided into four clades based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. However, correlations between clades and isolated hosts or year could not be found, suggesting that diverse brasiliensis subsp. isolates existed.

  19. Genetic Diversity of Koala Retroviral Envelopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqin Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  20. Genetic Diversity of HIV-1 in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moussi, Awatef; Thomson, Michael M; Delgado, Elena; Cuevas, María Teresa; Nasr, Majda; Abid, Salma; Ben Hadj Kacem, Mohamed Ali; Benaissa Tiouiri, Hanene; Letaief, Amel; Chakroun, Mohamed; Ben Jemaa, Mounir; Hamdouni, Hayet; Tej Dellagi, Rafla; Kheireddine, Khaled; Boutiba, Ilhem; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Slim, Amine

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in Tunisia was analyzed. For this, 193 samples were collected in different regions of Tunisia between 2012 and 2015. A protease and reverse transcriptase fragment were amplified and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses were performed through maximum likelihood and recombination was analyzed by bootscanning. Six HIV-1 subtypes (B, A1, G, D, C, and F2), 5 circulating recombinant forms (CRF02_AG, CRF25_cpx, CRF43_02G, CRF06_cpx, and CRF19_cpx), and 11 unique recombinant forms were identified. Subtype B (46.4%) and CRF02_AG (39.4%) were the predominant genetic forms. A group of 44 CRF02_AG sequences formed a distinct Tunisian cluster, which also included four viruses from western Europe. Nine viruses were closely related to isolates collected in other African or in European countries. In conclusion, a high HIV-1 genetic diversity is observed in Tunisia and the local spread of CRF02_AG is first documented in this country.

  1. Genetic diversity of koala retroviral envelopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-03-17

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  2. Genetic diversity in aspen and its relation to arthropod abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Vornam, Barbara; Volmer, Katharina; Prinz, Kathleen; Kleemann, Frauke; Köhler, Lars; Polle, Andrea; Finkeldey, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    The ecological consequences of biodiversity have become a prominent public issue. Little is known on the effect of genetic diversity on ecosystem services. Here, a diversity experiment was established with European and North American aspen (Populus tremula, P. tremuloides) planted in plots representing either a single deme only or combinations of two, four and eight demes. The goals of this study were to explore the complex inter- and intraspecific genetic diversity of aspen and to then relate three measures for diversity (deme diversity, genetic diversity determined as Shannon index or as expected heterozygosity) to arthropod abundance. Microsatellite and AFLP markers were used to analyze the genetic variation patterns within and between the aspen demes and deme mixtures. Large differences were observed regarding the genetic diversity within demes. An analysis of molecular variance revealed that most of the total genetic diversity was found within demes, but the genetic differentiation among demes was also high. The complex patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation resulted in large differences of the genetic variation within plots. The average diversity increased from plots with only one deme to plots with two, four, and eight demes, respectively and separated plots with and without American aspen. To test whether intra- and interspecific diversity impacts on ecosystem services, arthropod abundance was determined. Increasing genetic diversity of aspen was related to increasing abundance of arthropods. However, the relationship was mainly driven by the presence of American aspen suggesting that species identity overrode the effect of intraspecific variation of European aspen. PMID:25674097

  3. Pyrosequencing and genetic diversity of microeukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Christoffer Bugge

    a well-studied country is an illustration of the limited knowledge of the microbial diversity. Finally, Article I separates a group of closely related fungi that could not be determined by morphology by using a phylogenetic analysis combining three marker genes. Using multiple markers makes it possible...... pathogens themselves. Protozoa is a morphological group which occurs in many different eukaryotic phyla, and many apparently morphologically similar types are very different from each others genetically. This complicates the development of good primers for analysis of their diversity with modern DNA based...... methods. Compared to other microorganisms such as fungi, algae and bacteria, much less is known about protozoa. It has been an essential element of this thesis to to advance our knowledge of protozoa by developing new primers for DNA-based studies of protozoa impact on ecosystems or as indicators...

  4. Induction of competence for genetic transformation by antibiotics: convergent evolution of stress responses in distant bacterial species lacking SOS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Xavier; Polard, Patrice; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Bacterial transformation is a programmed process resulting in genetic transfer and diversity. It relies on the development of competence via regulatory circuits which are diverse and tailored to the particular lifestyle of each species. Despite this diversity, some species have been reported to trigger competence in response to antibiotics. Here, we review these recent findings, which reinforce the view that competence is a stress response and can substitute for SOS in bacteria lacking it. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacterial diversity in the oral cavity of ten healthy individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bik, Elisabeth M.; Long, Clara Davis; Armitage, Gary C.; Loomer, Peter; Emerson, Joanne; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Nelson, Karen E.; Gill, Steven R.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the oral microbiota from 10 individuals with healthy oral tissues was determined using culture-independent techniques. From each individual, 26 specimens, each from different oral sites at a single point in time, were collected and pooled. An eleventh pool was constructed using portions of the subgingival specimens from all 10 individuals. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified using broad-range bacterial primers, and clone libraries from the individual and subgingival pools were constructed. From a total of 11 368 high-quality, non-chimeric, near full-length sequences, 247 species-level phylotypes (using a 99% sequence identity threshold) and 9 bacteria phyla were identified. At least 15 bacterial genera were conserved among all 10 individuals, with significant interindividual differences at the species and strain level. Comparisons of these oral bacterial sequences to near full-length sequences found previously in the large intestines and feces of other healthy individuals suggest that the mouth and intestinal tract harbor distinct sets of bacteria. Co-occurrence analysis demonstrated significant segregation of taxa when community membership was examined at the level of genus, but not at the level of species, suggesting that ecologically-significant, competitive interactions are more apparent at a broader taxonomic level than species. This study is one of the more comprehensive, high-resolution analyses of bacterial diversity within the healthy human mouth to date, and highlights the value of tools from macroecology for enhancing our understanding of bacterial ecology in human health. PMID:20336157

  6. Diversity of Bacterial Photosymbionts in Lubomirskiidae Sponges from Lake Baikal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina V. Kulakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sponges are permanent benthos residents which establish complex associations with a variety of microorganisms that raise interest in the nature of sponge-symbionts interactions. A molecular approach, based on the identification of the 16S rRNA and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit genes, was applied to investigate diversity and phylogeny of bacterial phototrophs associated with four species of Lubomirskiidae in Lake Baikal. The phylogeny inferred from both genes showed three main clusters of Synechococcus associated with Baikalian sponges. One of the clusters belonged to the cosmopolitan Synechococcus rubescens group and the two other were not related to any of the assigned phylogenetic groups but placed as sister clusters to S. rubescens. These results expanded the understanding of freshwater sponge-associated photoautotroph diversity and suggested that the three phylogenetic groups of Synechococcus are common photosynthetic symbionts in Lubomirskiidae sponges.

  7. Joshua Lederberg's Legacy to Bacterial Genetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Joshua Lederberg (1925-2008) was an extraordinarily gifted person. Starting his professional career at the age of 17 as a dish washer in Francis Ryan's laboratory in Columbia Uni- versity, he rose to be the President and later University. Professor Emeritus at Rockefeller University, occcupying chairs of Genetics at ...

  8. Genome-wide Association Analysis Tracks Bacterial Leaf Blight Resistance Loci In Rice Diverse Germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilla-Ermita, Christine Jade; Tandayu, Erwin; Juanillas, Venice Margarette; Detras, Jeffrey; Lozada, Dennis Nicuh; Dwiyanti, Maria Stefanie; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Mbanjo, Edwige Gaby Nkouaya; Ardales, Edna; Diaz, Maria Genaleen; Mendioro, Merlyn; Thomson, Michael J; Kretzschmar, Tobias

    2017-12-01

    A range of resistance loci against different races of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the pathogen causing bacterial blight (BB) disease of rice, have been discovered and characterized. Several have been deployed in modern varieties, however, due to rapid evolution of Xoo, a number have already become ineffective. The continuous "arms race" between Xoo and rice makes it imperative to discover new resistance loci to enable durable deployment of multiple resistance genes in modern breeding lines. Rice diversity panels can be exploited as reservoirs of useful genetic variation for bacterial blight (BB) resistance. This study was conducted to identify loci associated to BB resistance, new genetic donors and useful molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BB resistance using a diverse panel of 285 rice accessions was performed to identify loci that are associated with resistance to nine Xoo strains from the Philippines, representative of eight global races. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differential resistance were identified in the diverse panel and a subset of 198 indica accessions. Strong associations were found for novel SNPs linked with known bacterial blight resistance Xa genes, from which high utility markers for tracking and selection of resistance genes in breeding programs were designed. Furthermore, significant associations of SNPs in chromosomes 6, 9, 11, and 12 did not overlap with known resistance loci and hence might prove to be novel sources of resistance. Detailed analysis revealed haplotypes that correlated with resistance and analysis of putative resistance alleles identified resistant genotypes as potential donors of new resistance genes. The results of the GWAS validated known genes underlying resistance and identified novel loci that provide useful targets for further investigation. SNP markers and genetic donors identified in this study will help plant breeders in

  9. Linking bacterial diversity and geochemistry of uranium-contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kelly; Zholi, Alma; Frabutt, Dylan; Flood, Matthew; Floyd, Dalton; Tiquia, Sonia M

    2012-01-01

    To understand the link between bacterial diversity and geochemistry in uranium-contaminated groundwater, microbial communities were assessed based on clone libraries of 16S rDNA genes from the USDOE Oak Ridge Field Research Centre (FRC) site. Four groundwater wells (GW835, GW836, FW113-47 and FW215-49) with a wide range of pH (3 to 7), nitrate (44 to 23,400 mg L(-1)), uranium (0.73 to 60.36 mg L(-1)) and other metal contamination, were investigated. Results indicated that bacterial diversity correlated with the geochemistry of the groundwater. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. The highly contaminated well (FW113-47) had lower gene diversity than less contaminated wells (FW215-49, GW835 and GW836). The high concentrations of contaminants present in well FW113-47 stimulated the growth of organisms capable of reducing uranium (Shewanella and Pseudomonas), nitrate (Pseudomonas, Rhodanobacter and Xanthomonas) and iron (Stenotrophomonas), and which were unique to this well. The clone libraries consisted primarily of sequences closely related to the phylum Proteobacteria, with FW-113-47 almost exclusively containing this phylum. Metal-reducing bacteria were present in all four wells, which may suggest that there is potential for successful bioremediation of the groundwater at the Oak Ridge FRC. The microbial community information gained from this study and previous studies at the site can be used to develop predictive multivariate and geographical information system (GIS) based models for microbial populations at the Oak Ridge FRC. This will allow for a better understanding of what organisms are likely to occur where and when, based on geochemistry, and how these organisms relate to bioremediation processes at the site.

  10. Bacterial gene transfer by natural genetic transformation in the environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, M G; Wackernagel, W

    1994-01-01

    Natural genetic transformation is the active uptake of free DNA by bacterial cells and the heritable incorporation of its genetic information. Since the famous discovery of transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae by Griffith in 1928 and the demonstration of DNA as the transforming principle by Avery and coworkers in 1944, cellular processes involved in transformation have been studied extensively by in vitro experimentation with a few transformable species. Only more recently has it been c...

  11. Review: Genetic diversity and population structure of cotton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is the world's leading natural fiber crop and is cultivated in diverse temperate and tropical areas. In this sense, molecular markers are important tools for polymorphism identification in genetic diversity analyses. The objective of this study was to evaluate genetic diversity and population structure in ...

  12. Two decades of warming increases diversity of a potentially lignolytic bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pold, Grace; Melillo, Jerry M; DeAngelis, Kristen M

    2015-01-01

    As Earth's climate warms, the massive stores of carbon found in soil are predicted to become depleted, and leave behind a smaller carbon pool that is less accessible to microbes. At a long-term forest soil-warming experiment in central Massachusetts, soil respiration and bacterial diversity have increased, while fungal biomass and microbially-accessible soil carbon have decreased. Here, we evaluate how warming has affected the microbial community's capability to degrade chemically-complex soil carbon using lignin-amended BioSep beads. We profiled the bacterial and fungal communities using PCR-based methods and completed extracellular enzyme assays as a proxy for potential community function. We found that lignin-amended beads selected for a distinct community containing bacterial taxa closely related to known lignin degraders, as well as members of many genera not previously noted as capable of degrading lignin. Warming tended to drive bacterial community structure more strongly in the lignin beads, while the effect on the fungal community was limited to unamended beads. Of those bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) enriched by the warming treatment, many were enriched uniquely on lignin-amended beads. These taxa may be contributing to enhanced soil respiration under warming despite reduced readily available C availability. In aggregate, these results suggest that there is genetic potential for chemically complex soil carbon degradation that may lead to extended elevated soil respiration with long-term warming.

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis, is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A.

  14. Genetic diversity analysis of stress tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MD.Farid Islam

    2012-10-23

    Oct 23, 2012 ... can be invaluable in crop breeding. Genetic diversity analysis is used for estimating and establishing of genetic relationship in germplasm collection, identifying diverse parental combinations to create segregating progenies with maximum genetic variability for further selection and introgressing desirable ...

  15. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis, is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering impor- tant repositories of biological diversity, the genetic ...

  16. Genetic diversity and bottleneck studies in the Marwari horse breed

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Gupta A. K., Chauhan M., Tandon S. N. and Sonia 2005 Genetic diversity and bottleneck studies in the Marwari horse breed. J. Genet. 84, 295–301] ... developed to carry out studies of genetic variation (Brad- ley et al. 1996; Canon et al. ..... 1996 Mitochondrial diversity and the origins of African and. European cattle. Proc.

  17. Changes in Soil Bacterial Communities and Diversity in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-induced selective pressure is becoming increasingly important due to the growing use of silver (Ag) as an antimicrobial agent in biomedical and commercial products. With demonstrated links between environmental resistomes and clinical pathogens, it is important to identify microbial profiles related to silver tolerance/resistance. We investigated the effects of ionic Ag stress on soil bacterial communities and identified resistant/persistant bacterial populations. Silver treatments of 50 - 400 mg Ag kg-1 soil were established in five soils. Chemical lability measurements using diffusive gradients in thin-film devices confirmed that significant (albeit decreasing) labile Ag concentrations were present throughout the 9-month incubation period. Synchrotron X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy demonstrate that this decreasing lability was due to changes in Ag speciation to less soluble forms such as Ag0 and Ag2S. Real-time PCR and Illumina MiSeq screening of 16S rRNA bacterial genes showed β-diversity in response to Ag pressure, and immediate and significant reductions in 16S rRNA gene counts with varying degrees of recovery. These effects were more strongly influenced by exposure time than by Ag dose at these rates. Ag-selected dominant OTUs principally resided in known persister taxa (mainly Gram positive), including metal-tolerant bacteria and slow-growing Mycobacteria. Soil microbial communities have been implicated as sources of an

  18. Molecular analysis of the bacterial diversity in uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, A.

    2003-04-01

    A culture-independent molecular approach has been applied to investigate the bacterial diversity in three uranium contaminated sites. The three analysed soil samples have been collected from the uranium waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt (Germany), from the uranium mill tailings in Gunnison, Colorado (USA) and from the uranium mill tailings in Shiprock, New Mexico (USA). The 16S rDNA fragments which has been isolated through direct lysis of the whole-DNA were amplified by the use of the universal primers 16S 43f and 16S 1404r and cloned. With restriction fragment length polymorphismus (RFLP) were the clones screened and one representative of all RFLP types that occurred more than once in the clone library was sequenced and analysed. In spite of the contamination a considerable diversity and significant differences in the composition of the natural bacterial communities in these three sites have been found. In the sample collected from the waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt α-Proteobacteria and representatives of the Holophaga/Acidobacterium were numerically predominant. The distribution of bacteria in the sample collected from uranium mill tailings Gunnison was very similar to those found in the Haberland waste pile, but there were found besides α-Proteobacteria and representatives of Holophaga/Acidobacterium a lot of γ-Proteobacteria. The structure of the bacterial community in the sample collected from the uranium mill tailings Shiprock was significantly different. Only some representatives of the Holophaga/Acidobacterium and α-Proteobacteria were represented. Large populations of Bacilli, γ-Proteobacteria and green non sulfur bacteria were dominant in this sample. (orig.)

  19. Pyrosequencing and genetic diversity of microeukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Christoffer Bugge

    Free-living, heterotrophic protozoa have an important ecological role in most terrestrial ecosystems by their grazing of bacteria as one of the first links in food chains and webs. Furthermore, some of them serve as reservoirs for disease-causing bacteria and /or as occasional opportunistic...... pathogens themselves. Protozoa is a morphological group which occurs in many different eukaryotic phyla, and many apparently morphologically similar types are very different from each others genetically. This complicates the development of good primers for analysis of their diversity with modern DNA based...... methods. Compared to other microorganisms such as fungi, algae and bacteria, much less is known about protozoa. It has been an essential element of this thesis to to advance our knowledge of protozoa by developing new primers for DNA-based studies of protozoa impact on ecosystems or as indicators...

  20. Great ape genetic diversity and population history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sudmant, Peter H.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Most great ape genetic variation remains uncharacterized; however, its study is critical for understanding population history, recombination, selection and susceptibility to disease. Here we sequence to high coverage a total of 79 wild- and captive-born individuals representing all six great ape...... all species. We discover and assign 1,982 loss-of-function variants throughout the human and great ape lineages, determining that the rate of gene loss has not been different in the human branch compared to other internal branches in the great ape phylogeny. This comprehensive catalogue of great ape...... genome diversity provides a framework for understanding evolution and a resource for more effective management of wild and captive great ape populations....

  1. Genetic diversity and species diversity of stream fishes covary across a land-use gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, M.J.; Bagley, M.J.; Walters, D.M.; Jackson, S.A.; Daniel, F.B.; Chaloud, D.J.; Cade, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity and species diversity are expected to covary according to area and isolation, but may not always covary with environmental heterogeneity. In this study, we examined how patterns of genetic and species diversity in stream fishes correspond to local and regional environmental conditions. To do so, we compared population size, genetic diversity and divergence in central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) to measures of species diversity and turnover in stream fish assemblages among similarly sized watersheds across an agriculture-forest land-use gradient in the Little Miami River basin (Ohio, USA). Significant correlations were found in many, but not all, pair-wise comparisons. Allelic richness and species richness were strongly correlated, for example, but diversity measures based on allele frequencies and assemblage structure were not. In-stream conditions related to agricultural land use were identified as significant predictors of genetic diversity and species diversity. Comparisons to population size indicate, however, that genetic diversity and species diversity are not necessarily independent and that variation also corresponds to watershed location and glaciation history in the drainage basin. Our findings demonstrate that genetic diversity and species diversity can covary in stream fish assemblages, and illustrate the potential importance of scaling observations to capture responses to hierarchical environmental variation. More comparisons according to life history variation could further improve understanding of conditions that give rise to parallel variation in genetic diversity and species diversity, which in turn could improve diagnosis of anthropogenic influences on aquatic ecosystems. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Investigation of genetic diversity in flixweed ( Descurainia sophia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of genetic diversity in flixweed ( Descurainia sophia ) germplasm from Kerman province using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers.

  3. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Syrian indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Syrian indigenous goat populations. Halima Hassen, Barbara Rischkowsky, Adnan Termanini, Ghassen Jessry, Aynalem Haile, Michael Baum, Samir Lababidi ...

  4. Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ( Phoenix dactylifera L.) using the random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMPO) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methods.

  5. Restoration of coral populations in light of genetic diversity estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, T. L.; Porto, I.; Zubillaga, A. L.

    2009-09-01

    Due to the importance of preserving the genetic integrity of populations, strategies to restore damaged coral reefs should attempt to retain the allelic diversity of the disturbed population; however, genetic diversity estimates are not available for most coral populations. To provide a generalized estimate of genetic diversity (in terms of allelic richness) of scleractinian coral populations, the literature was surveyed for studies describing the genetic structure of coral populations using microsatellites. The mean number of alleles per locus across 72 surveyed scleractinian coral populations was 8.27 (±0.75 SE). In addition, population genetic datasets from four species ( Acropora palmata, Montastraea cavernosa, Montastraea faveolata and Pocillopora damicornis) were analyzed to assess the minimum number of donor colonies required to retain specific proportions of the genetic diversity of the population. Rarefaction analysis of the population genetic datasets indicated that using 10 donor colonies randomly sampled from the original population would retain >50% of the allelic diversity, while 35 colonies would retain >90% of the original diversity. In general, scleractinian coral populations are genetically diverse and restoration methods utilizing few clonal genotypes to re-populate a reef will diminish the genetic integrity of the population. Coral restoration strategies using 10-35 randomly selected local donor colonies will retain at least 50-90% of the genetic diversity of the original population.

  6. Characterisation of the gill mucosal bacterial communities of four butterflyfish species: a reservoir of bacterial diversity in coral reef ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverter, Miriam; Sasal, Pierre; Tapissier-Bontemps, N; Lecchini, D; Suzuki, M

    2017-06-01

    While recent studies have suggested that fish mucus microbiota play an important role in homeostasis and prevention of infections, very few studies have investigated the bacterial communities of gill mucus. We characterised the gill mucus bacterial communities of four butterflyfish species and although the bacterial diversity of gill mucus varied significantly between species, Shannon diversities were high (H = 3.7-5.7) in all species. Microbiota composition differed between butterflyfishes, with Chaetodon lunulatus and C. ornatissimus having the most similar bacterial communities, which differed significantly from C. vagabundus and C. reticulatus. The core bacterial community of all species consisted of mainly Proteobacteria followed by Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Chaetodonlunulatus and C. ornatissimus bacterial communities were mostly dominated by Gammaproteobacteria with Vibrio as the most abundant genus. Chaetodonvagabundus and C. reticulatus presented similar abundances of Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, which were well represented by Acinetobacter and Paracoccus, respectively. In conclusion, our results indicate that different fish species present specific bacterial assemblages. Finally, as mucus layers are nutrient hotspots for heterotrophic bacteria living in oligotrophic environments, such as coral reef waters, the high bacterial diversity found in butterflyfish gill mucus might indicate external fish mucus surfaces act as a reservoir of coral reef bacterial diversity. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Vehicles, Replicators, and Intercellular Movement of Genetic Information: Evolutionary Dissection of a Bacterial Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Jalasvuori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotic biosphere is vastly diverse in many respects. Any given bacterial cell may harbor in different combinations viruses, plasmids, transposons, and other genetic elements along with their chromosome(s. These agents interact in complex environments in various ways causing multitude of phenotypic effects on their hosting cells. In this discussion I perform a dissection for a bacterial cell in order to simplify the diversity into components that may help approach the ocean of details in evolving microbial worlds. The cell itself is separated from all the genetic replicators that use the cell vehicle for preservation and propagation. I introduce a classification that groups different replicators according to their horizontal movement potential between cells and according to their effects on the fitness of their present host cells. The classification is used to discuss and improve the means by which we approach general evolutionary tendencies in microbial communities. Moreover, the classification is utilized as a tool to help formulating evolutionary hypotheses and to discuss emerging bacterial pathogens as well as to promote understanding on the average phenotypes of different replicators in general. It is also discussed that any given biosphere comprising prokaryotic cell vehicles and genetic replicators may naturally evolve to have horizontally moving replicators of various types.

  8. Population genetic diversity and fitness in multiple environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGreevy Thomas J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When a large number of alleles are lost from a population, increases in individual homozygosity may reduce individual fitness through inbreeding depression. Modest losses of allelic diversity may also negatively impact long-term population viability by reducing the capacity of populations to adapt to altered environments. However, it is not clear how much genetic diversity within populations may be lost before populations are put at significant risk. Development of tools to evaluate this relationship would be a valuable contribution to conservation biology. To address these issues, we have created an experimental system that uses laboratory populations of an estuarine crustacean, Americamysis bahia with experimentally manipulated levels of genetic diversity. We created replicate cultures with five distinct levels of genetic diversity and monitored them for 16 weeks in both permissive (ambient seawater and stressful conditions (diluted seawater. The relationship between molecular genetic diversity at presumptive neutral loci and population vulnerability was assessed by AFLP analysis. Results Populations with very low genetic diversity demonstrated reduced fitness relative to high diversity populations even under permissive conditions. Population performance decreased in the stressful environment for all levels of genetic diversity relative to performance in the permissive environment. Twenty percent of the lowest diversity populations went extinct before the end of the study in permissive conditions, whereas 73% of the low diversity lines went extinct in the stressful environment. All high genetic diversity populations persisted for the duration of the study, although population sizes and reproduction were reduced under stressful environmental conditions. Levels of fitness varied more among replicate low diversity populations than among replicate populations with high genetic diversity. There was a significant correlation

  9. Genetic diversity and kelp forest vulnerability to climatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernberg, Thomas; Coleman, Melinda A; Bennett, Scott; Thomsen, Mads S; Tuya, Fernando; Kelaher, Brendan P

    2018-01-30

    Genetic diversity confers adaptive capacity to populations under changing conditions but its role in mediating impacts of climate change remains unresolved for most ecosystems. This lack of knowledge is particularly acute for foundation species, where impacts may cascade throughout entire ecosystems. We combined population genetics with eco-physiological and ecological field experiments to explore relationships among latitudinal patterns in genetic diversity, physiology and resilience of a kelp ecosystem to climate stress. A subsequent 'natural experiment' illustrated the possible influence of latitudinal patterns of genetic diversity on ecosystem vulnerability to an extreme climatic perturbation (marine heatwave). There were strong relationships between physiological versatility, ecological resilience and genetic diversity of kelp forests across latitudes, and genetic diversity consistently outperformed other explanatory variables in contributing to the response of kelp forests to the marine heatwave. Population performance and vulnerability to a severe climatic event were thus strongly related to latitudinal patterns in genetic diversity, with the heatwave extirpating forests with low genetic diversity. Where foundation species control ecological structure and function, impacts of climatic stress can cascade through the ecosystem and, consequently, genetic diversity could contribute to ecosystem vulnerability to climate change.

  10. Towards Concurrent Data Transmission: Exploiting Plasmid Diversity by Bacterial Conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unluturk, Bige D; Islam, M Siblee; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Ivanov, Stepan

    2017-06-01

    The progress of molecular communication (MC) is tightly connected to the progress of nanomachine design. State-of-the-art states that nanomachines can be built either from novel nanomaterials by the help of nanotechnology or they can be built from living cells which are modified to function as intended by synthetic biology. With the growing need of the biomedical applications of MC, we focus on developing bio-compatible communication systems by engineering the cells to become MC nanomachines. Since this approach relies on modifying cellular functions, the improvements in the performance can only be achieved by integrating new biological properties. A previously proposed model for molecular communication is using bacteria as information carriers between transmitters and receivers, also known as bacterial nanonetworks. This approach has suggested encoding information into the plasmids inserted into the bacteria which leads to extra overhead for the receivers to decode and analyze the plasmids to obtain the encoded information. Another scheme, which is proposed in this paper, is to determine the digital information transmitted based on the quantity of bacteria emitted. While this scheme has its simplicity, the major drawback is the low-data rate resulting from the long propagation of the bacteria. To improve the performance, this paper proposes a distributed modulation scheme utilizing three bacterial properties, namely, engineering of plasmids, conjugation, and bacterial motility. In particular, genetic engineering allows us to engineer the different combinations of genes representing the different series of bits. When compared with binary density modulation and the M-ary density modulation, it is shown that the distributed modulation scheme outperforms the other two approaches in terms of bit error probability as well as the achievable rate for varying quantity of bacteria transmitted, distances, as well as time slot length.

  11. Genome-scale genetic manipulation methods for exploring bacterial molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagarinova, Alla; Emili, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria are diverse and abundant, playing key roles in human health and disease, the environment, and biotechnology. Despite progress in genome sequencing and bioengineering, much remains unknown about the functional organization of prokaryotes. For instance, roughly a third of the protein-coding genes of the best-studied model bacterium, Escherichia coli, currently lack experimental annotations. Systems-level experimental approaches for investigating the functional associations of bacterial genes and genetic structures are essential for defining the fundamental molecular biology of microbes, preventing the spread of antibacterial resistance in the clinic, and driving the development of future biotechnological applications. This review highlights recently introduced large-scale genetic manipulation and screening procedures for the systematic exploration of bacterial gene functions, molecular relationships, and the global organization of bacteria at the gene, pathway, and genome levels.

  12. Kisameet Glacial Clay: an Unexpected Source of Bacterial Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Sarah L; Behroozian, Shekooh; Xu, Wanjing; Surette, Michael G; Li, Loretta; Davies, Julian

    2017-05-23

    Widespread antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is providing the impetus to explore novel sources of antimicrobial agents. Recently, the potent antibacterial activity of certain clay minerals has stimulated scientific interest in these materials. One such example is Kisameet glacial clay (KC), an antibacterial clay from a deposit on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada. However, our understanding of the active principles of these complex natural substances is incomplete. Like soils, clays may possess complex mixtures of bacterial taxa, including the Actinobacteria , a clade known to be rich in antibiotic-producing organisms. Here, we present the first characterization of both the microbial and geochemical characteristics of a glacial clay deposit. KC harbors surprising bacterial species richness, with at least three distinct community types. We show that the deposit has clines of inorganic elements that can be leached by pH, which may be drivers of community structure. We also note the prevalence of Gallionellaceae in samples recovered near the surface, as well as taxa that include medically or economically important bacteria such as Actinomycetes and Paenibacillus These results provide insight into the microbial taxa that may be the source of KC antibacterial activity and suggest that natural clays may be rich sources of microbial and molecular diversity. IMPORTANCE Identifying and characterizing the resident microbial populations (bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi) is key to understanding the ecology, chemistry, and homeostasis of virtually all sites on Earth. The Kisameet Bay deposit in British Columbia, Canada, holds a novel glacial clay with a history of medicinal use by local indigenous people. We previously showed that it has potent activity against a variety of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, suggesting it could complement our dwindling arsenal of antibiotics. Here, we have characterized the microbiome of this deposit to gain insight

  13. Genetic diversity among five T4-like bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, James M; Petrov, Vasiliy; Bertrand, Claire; Krisch, Henry M; Karam, Jim D

    2006-05-23

    Bacteriophages are an important repository of genetic diversity. As one of the major constituents of terrestrial biomass, they exert profound effects on the earth's ecology and microbial evolution by mediating horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and controlling their growth. Only limited genomic sequence data are currently available for phages but even this reveals an overwhelming diversity in their gene sequences and genomes. The contribution of the T4-like phages to this overall phage diversity is difficult to assess, since only a few examples of complete genome sequence exist for these phages. Our analysis of five T4-like genomes represents half of the known T4-like genomes in GenBank. Here, we have examined in detail the genetic diversity of the genomes of five relatives of bacteriophage T4: the Escherichia coli phages RB43, RB49 and RB69, the Aeromonas salmonicida phage 44RR2.8t (or 44RR) and the Aeromonas hydrophila phage Aeh1. Our data define a core set of conserved genes common to these genomes as well as hundreds of additional open reading frames (ORFs) that are nonconserved. Although some of these ORFs resemble known genes from bacterial hosts or other phages, most show no significant similarity to any known sequence in the databases. The five genomes analyzed here all have similarities in gene regulation to T4. Sequence motifs resembling T4 early and late consensus promoters were observed in all five genomes. In contrast, only two of these genomes, RB69 and 44RR, showed similarities to T4 middle-mode promoter sequences and to the T4 motA gene product required for their recognition. In addition, we observed that each phage differed in the number and assortment of putative genes encoding host-like metabolic enzymes, tRNA species, and homing endonucleases. Our observations suggest that evolution of the T4-like phages has drawn on a highly diverged pool of genes in the microbial world. The T4-like phages harbour a wealth of genetic material that has

  14. Genetic diversity among five T4-like bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Claire

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophages are an important repository of genetic diversity. As one of the major constituents of terrestrial biomass, they exert profound effects on the earth's ecology and microbial evolution by mediating horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and controlling their growth. Only limited genomic sequence data are currently available for phages but even this reveals an overwhelming diversity in their gene sequences and genomes. The contribution of the T4-like phages to this overall phage diversity is difficult to assess, since only a few examples of complete genome sequence exist for these phages. Our analysis of five T4-like genomes represents half of the known T4-like genomes in GenBank. Results Here, we have examined in detail the genetic diversity of the genomes of five relatives of bacteriophage T4: the Escherichia coli phages RB43, RB49 and RB69, the Aeromonas salmonicida phage 44RR2.8t (or 44RR and the Aeromonas hydrophila phage Aeh1. Our data define a core set of conserved genes common to these genomes as well as hundreds of additional open reading frames (ORFs that are nonconserved. Although some of these ORFs resemble known genes from bacterial hosts or other phages, most show no significant similarity to any known sequence in the databases. The five genomes analyzed here all have similarities in gene regulation to T4. Sequence motifs resembling T4 early and late consensus promoters were observed in all five genomes. In contrast, only two of these genomes, RB69 and 44RR, showed similarities to T4 middle-mode promoter sequences and to the T4 motA gene product required for their recognition. In addition, we observed that each phage differed in the number and assortment of putative genes encoding host-like metabolic enzymes, tRNA species, and homing endonucleases. Conclusion Our observations suggest that evolution of the T4-like phages has drawn on a highly diverged pool of genes in the microbial world. The T4

  15. Diversity of Streptococcus mutans strains in bacterial interspecies interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolan; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Ling, Junqi; Crielaard, Wim; Deng, Dong Mei

    2014-02-01

    Biofilms are matrix-enclosed microbial population adhere to each other and to surfaces. Compared to planktonic bacterial cells, biofilm cells show much higher levels of antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to investigate Streptococcus mutans strain diversity in biofilm formation and chlorhexidine (CHX) resistance of single S. mutans and dual S. mutans-Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Four clinical S. mutans strains (C180-2, C67-1, HG723 and UA159) formed 24-h biofilms with or without an E. faecalis strain. These biofilms were treated for 10 min with 0.025% CHX. Biofilm formation, CHX resistance and S.mutans-E. faecalis interactions were evaluated by biomass staining, resazurin metabolism, viable count and competition agar assays. The main finding is that the presence of E. faecalis generally reduced all dual-species biofilm formation, but the proportions of S. mutans in the dual-species biofilms as well as CHX resistance displayed a clear S. mutans strain dependence. In particular, decreased resistance against CHX was observed in dual S. mutans C67-1 biofilms, while increased resistance was found in dual S. mutans UA159 biofilms. In conclusion, the interaction of S. mutans with E. faecalis in biofilms varies between strains, which underlines the importance of studying strain diversity in inter-species virulence modulation and biofilm antimicrobial resistance. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The genetic diversity of wild rescuegrass is associated with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    c Indian Academy of Sciences. ONLINE RESOURCES. The genetic diversity of wild rescuegrass is associated with precipitation levels. ROMINA ... For correspondence. E-mail: nayub@cnia.inta.gov.ar. the analysis of its genetic diversity seem to be essential to conserve this species and to evaluate the agronomic poten-.

  17. Molecular characterization and assessment of genetic diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R Madhusudhana

    Selecting parents of diverse genetic base with contrasting phenotype is an important step in developing mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection and marker-assisted selection. We studied genetic diversity in 31 sorghum parents using 413 sorghum simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers.

  18. Genetic diversity in Kenyan populations of Acacia senegal (L.) willd ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... diversity (Houston and Houston, 1993). So, the conclusion that spatial organization of local populations and the concomitant patterns of gene flow are important determinants of the level of genetic diversity within each population and of a species becoming genetically diffe- rentiated over its range (Yeh, ...

  19. Genetic diversity, taxonomy and legumins implications of seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conrad Prof

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to estimate protein content diversity and the possible genetic relatedness. 28.3% similarity and 71.7% proteomic polymorphism was scored for the species. The high variability expressed by the lot reflects the genetic diversity amongst Fabaceae population.

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity among sixty bread wheat ( Triticum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of genetic diversity among wheat cultivars is important to ensure that a continuous pool of cultivars with varying desirable traits is maintained. In view of this, a molecular study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of sixty wheat cultivars using sixty microsatellite markers. Amplified alleles from each ...

  1. Genetic diversity of Pakistani maize genotypes using chromosome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For improvement of maize crop presence of genetic diversity in the germplasm is very important. This study was conducted to determine genetic diversity among 17 Pakistani maize genotypes using 10 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer sets. All the amplification products were in the range of <250-750 bp. To estimate the ...

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese honeybees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese honeybees (Apis cerana) under microsatellite markers. T Ji, L Yin, G Chen. Abstract. Using 21 microsatellite markers and PCR method, the polymorphisms of 20 Apis cerana honeybee populations across China was investigated and the genetic structure and diversity of ...

  3. Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient within Caspian horse population using microsatellite markers. ... structure and to the assessment of genetic diversity that may be helpful to horse breeders in designing and managing breeding or conservation strategies for the Caspian horse breed.

  4. Genetic diversity and association of ISSR markers with the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tung tree is a useful woody oil plant in the world. In this study, both the genetic diversity and biochemical traits were analyzed in order to improve the breeding methods on tung tree. The mean genetic similarity coefficient (Gs), the mean Nei's gene diversity (h) and the mean Shannon's information index (I) of tung tree were ...

  5. Genetic diversity and bottleneck studies in the Marwari horse breed

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic diversity within the Marwari breed of horses was evaluated using 26 different microsatellite pairs with 48 DNA samples from unrelated horses. This molecular characterisation was undertaken to evaluate the problem of genetic bottlenecks also, if any, in this breed. The estimated mean (± s.e.) allelic diversity was 5.9 ...

  6. Genetic diversity of Myanmar rice and their implementation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity of Myanmar rice and their implementation on management methods. ... The importance of the conservation on on-farm landraces of Oryza sativa and its wild relatives was proposed in order to ensure the genetic resources for further breeding and conserve biological diversity. Key words: Oryza sativa, rice, ...

  7. DNA landmarks for genetic diversity assessment in tea genotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) is one of the most important non-alcoholic beverages of the world. Natural genetic diversity in tea has been reduced due to continue selection in favor of desirable traits. The present study was conducted to estimate genetic diversity in tea genotypes cultivated in Pakistan using 20 randomly amplified ...

  8. Genetic diversity among natural populations of Ottelia acuminata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... Genetic diversity among geographically separated populations of Nepenthes mirabilis. Biologia Brat. 61: 295-298. Farès K, Guasmi F, Touil L, Triki T, Ferchichi A (2009). Genetic diversity of pistochio tree using inter-simple sequence repeat markers. ISSR supported by morphological and chemical markers.

  9. Genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from commercial swine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-07

    Sep 7, 2011 ... The infectious diseases caused by E. coli are very serious. Analysis of E. coli strains genetic diversity is important for epidemiology. The objective of this study was to use REP-PCR and ERIC-PCR for the analysis of genetic diversity among E. coli strains isolated from commercial swine farms in Sichuan ...

  10. Assessment of genetic diversity in Indian rice germplasm (Oryza ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA markers such as microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers have been widely used to estimate the genetic diversity in rice. The present study was carried out to decipher the pattern of genetic diversity in terms of both phenotypic and genotypic variability, and to assess the efficiency of random vis-à-vis QTL ...

  11. Genetic diversity in Ethiopian field pea ( Pisum sativum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field pea is an ancient legume crop grown mainly for food in Ethiopia. Even though, there are over one thousand five hundred field pea collections, only a few studies has been conducted on the magnitude and pattern of genetic diversity at molecular level particularly with SSR markers. In this study, genetic diversity of 142 ...

  12. DNA landmarks for genetic diversity assessment in tea genotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bilal

    2011-11-07

    Nov 7, 2011 ... Tea (Camellia sinensis) is one of the most important non-alcoholic beverages of the world. Natural ... present study was conducted to estimate genetic diversity in tea genotypes cultivated in Pakistan using. 20 randomly ..... genetic diversity in Oolong tea germplasms by AFLP fingerprinting. J. Tea Sci.

  13. Study on genetic diversity in Pakistani wheat varieties using simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) is a grass species, cultivated world wide. Globally, it is the most important human food grain and ranks second in total production as a cereal crop behind maize. Genetic diversity evaluation of germplasm is the basis of improvement in wheat. In the present study genetic diversity of 10 ...

  14. Genetic diversity analysis of rice cultivars from various origins using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity is of paramount importance for the success of any plant breeding program. An experiment was conducted to assess the extent of genetic diversity and similarity of 24 rice cultivars from various origins using 29 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. A total of 144 alleles were detected at the 29 SSR primer ...

  15. Phenotypic and molecular evaluation of genetic diversity of rapeseed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... The genetic diversity and relationships among rapeseed genotypes were evaluated using quantitative analysis ...... Utility of. AFLP markers for the assessment of genetic diversity within Brassica nigra germplasm. Plant Breed. 123: 13-16. Nyende AB (2008). Biotechnology in plant nutrient management for.

  16. Genetic diversity enhances restoration success by augmenting ecosystem services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Reynolds

    Full Text Available Disturbance and habitat destruction due to human activities is a pervasive problem in near-shore marine ecosystems, and restoration is often used to mitigate losses. A common metric used to evaluate the success of restoration is the return of ecosystem services. Previous research has shown that biodiversity, including genetic diversity, is positively associated with the provision of ecosystem services. We conducted a restoration experiment using sources, techniques, and sites similar to actual large-scale seagrass restoration projects and demonstrated that a small increase in genetic diversity enhanced ecosystem services (invertebrate habitat, increased primary productivity, and nutrient retention. In our experiment, plots with elevated genetic diversity had plants that survived longer, increased in density more quickly, and provided more ecosystem services (invertebrate habitat, increased primary productivity, and nutrient retention. We used the number of alleles per locus as a measure of genetic diversity, which, unlike clonal diversity used in earlier research, can be applied to any organism. Additionally, unlike previous studies where positive impacts of diversity occurred only after a large disturbance, this study assessed the importance of diversity in response to potential environmental stresses (high temperature, low light along a water-depth gradient. We found a positive impact of diversity along the entire depth gradient. Taken together, these results suggest that ecosystem restoration will significantly benefit from obtaining sources (transplants or seeds with high genetic diversity and from restoration techniques that can maintain that genetic diversity.

  17. Genetic diversity enhances restoration success by augmenting ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Laura K; McGlathery, Karen J; Waycott, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Disturbance and habitat destruction due to human activities is a pervasive problem in near-shore marine ecosystems, and restoration is often used to mitigate losses. A common metric used to evaluate the success of restoration is the return of ecosystem services. Previous research has shown that biodiversity, including genetic diversity, is positively associated with the provision of ecosystem services. We conducted a restoration experiment using sources, techniques, and sites similar to actual large-scale seagrass restoration projects and demonstrated that a small increase in genetic diversity enhanced ecosystem services (invertebrate habitat, increased primary productivity, and nutrient retention). In our experiment, plots with elevated genetic diversity had plants that survived longer, increased in density more quickly, and provided more ecosystem services (invertebrate habitat, increased primary productivity, and nutrient retention). We used the number of alleles per locus as a measure of genetic diversity, which, unlike clonal diversity used in earlier research, can be applied to any organism. Additionally, unlike previous studies where positive impacts of diversity occurred only after a large disturbance, this study assessed the importance of diversity in response to potential environmental stresses (high temperature, low light) along a water-depth gradient. We found a positive impact of diversity along the entire depth gradient. Taken together, these results suggest that ecosystem restoration will significantly benefit from obtaining sources (transplants or seeds) with high genetic diversity and from restoration techniques that can maintain that genetic diversity.

  18. Spatial scale drives patterns in soil bacterial diversity: Spatial scale drives soil diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Sarah L. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Gibbons, Sean M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Graduate Program in Biophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th St. Chicago IL 60637 USA; Owens, Sarah M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Department of Ecology and Evolution, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, 1101 E. 57th St. Chicago IL 606037 USA; Johnston, Eric R. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Jastrow, Julie D. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Gilbert, Jack A. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Department of Ecology and Evolution, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, 1101 E. 57th St. Chicago IL 606037 USA; Marine Biological Laboratory, 7 MBL Street Woods Hole MA 02543 USA; College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 China; Meyer, Folker [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2016-03-21

    Soil microbial communities are essential for ecosystem function, but linking community composition to biogeochemical processes is challenging because of high microbial diversity and large spatial variability of most soil characteristics. We investigated soil bacterial community structure in a switchgrass stand planted on soil with a history of grassland vegetation at high spatial resolution to determine whether biogeographic trends occurred at the centimeter scale. Moreover, we tested whether such heterogeneity, if present, influenced community structure within or among ecosystems. Pronounced heterogeneity was observed at centimeter scales, with abrupt changes in relative abundance of phyla from sample to sample. At the ecosystem scale (> 10 m), however, bacterial community composition and structure were subtly, but significantly, altered by fertilization, with higher alpha diversity in fertilized plots. Moreover, by comparing these data with data from 1772 soils from the Earth Microbiome Project, it was found that 20% diverse globally sourced soil samples, while grassland soils shared approximately 40% of their operational taxonomic units with the current study. By spanning several orders of magnitude, the analysis suggested that extreme patchiness characterized community structure at smaller scales but that coherent patterns emerged at larger length scales.

  19. Genetic diversity of Echinococcus spp. in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyaev, Sergey V; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Nakao, Minoru; Ingovatova, Galina M; Shoykhet, Yakov N; Bondarev, Alexandr Y; Odnokurtsev, Valeriy A; Loskutova, Kyunnyay S; Lukmanova, Gulnur I; Dokuchaev, Nikolai E; Spiridonov, Sergey; Alshinecky, Mikhail V; Sivkova, Tatyana N; Andreyanov, Oleg N; Abramov, Sergey A; Krivopalov, Anton V; Karpenko, Sergey V; Lopatina, Natalia V; Dupal, Tamara A; Sako, Yasuhito; Ito, Akira

    2013-11-01

    In Russia, both alveolar and cystic echinococcoses are endemic. This study aimed to identify the aetiological agents of the diseases and to investigate the distribution of each Echinococcus species in Russia. A total of 75 Echinococcus specimens were collected from 14 host species from 2010 to 2012. Based on the mitochondrial DNA sequences, they were identified as Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.), E. canadensis and E. multilocularis. E. granulosus s.s. was confirmed in the European Russia and the Altai region. Three genotypes, G6, G8 and G10 of E. canadensis were detected in Yakutia. G6 was also found in the Altai region. Four genotypes of E. multilocularis were confirmed; the Asian genotype in the western Siberia and the European Russia, the Mongolian genotype in an island of Baikal Lake and the Altai Republic, the European genotype from a captive monkey in Moscow Zoo and the North American genotype in Yakutia. The present distributional record will become a basis of public health to control echinococcoses in Russia. The rich genetic diversity demonstrates the importance of Russia in investigating the evolutionary history of the genus Echinococcus.

  20. Beauveria bassiana: Quercetinase production and genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eula Maria de M. B., Costa; Fabiana Cristina, Pimenta; Christian, Luz; Valéria de, Oliveira; Marília, Oliveira; Elda, Bueno; Silvana, Petrofeza

    2011-01-01

    Beauveria bassiana genetic diversity and ability to synthesize quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (quercetinase) were analyzed. B. bassiana isolates, obtained from Brazilian soil samples, produced quercetinase after induction using 0.5 g/L quercetin. B. bassiana ATCC 7159 (29.6 nmol/mL/min) and isolate IP 11 (27.5 nmol/ml/min) showed the best performances and IP 3a (9.5 nmol/mL/min) presented the lowest level of quercetinase activity in the culture supernatant. A high level of polymorphism was detected by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. The use of internal-transcribed-spacer ribosomal region restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP) did not reveal characteristic markers to differentiate isolates. However, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequence analysis provided more information on polymorphism among the isolates, allowing them to be clustered by relative similarity into three large groups. Correlation was tested according to the Person's correlation. Data of our studies showed, that lower associations among groups, level of quercetinase production, or geographical origin could be observed. This study presents the production of a novel biocatalyst by B. bassiana and suggests the possible industrial application of this fungal species in large-scale biotechnological manufacture of quercetinase. PMID:24031599

  1. Genetic diversity of Sclerocarya birrea subspecies birrea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-03

    Jan 3, 2012 ... population. Shannon's index was also estimated for the whole sample considered as a single population. To analyse genetic structure, genetic distances were constructed using the Nei's original measures of genetic identity and genetic distance (Nei, 1972). The degree of differentiation among popu-.

  2. Genetic diversity and kelp forest vulnerability to climatic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Wernberg, Thomas; Coleman, Melinda A.; Bennett, Scott; Thomsen, Mads S.; Tuya, Fernando; Kelaher, Brendan P.

    2018-01-01

    Genetic diversity confers adaptive capacity to populations under changing conditions but its role in mediating impacts of climate change remains unresolved for most ecosystems. This lack of knowledge is particularly acute for foundation species, where impacts may cascade throughout entire ecosystems. We combined population genetics with eco-physiological and ecological field experiments to explore relationships among latitudinal patterns in genetic diversity, physiology and resilience of a ke...

  3. Genetic diversity of faba bean ( Vicia faba L.) populations revealed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shannon indexes ranges from 0.166 to 0.248 with an average of 0.207. The genetic diversity within population of 0.743 was clearly higher than that of among population genetic diversity (Dst = 0.138), indicating an out-crossing predominance in the studied populations. The Dst value showed that 15.6% of the total genetic ...

  4. Generation of Campylobacter jejuni genetic diversity in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de P.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Achterberg, R.P.; Putten, van J.P.M.; Schouls, L.M.; Duim, B.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology studies suggest that horizontal genetic exchange is a major cause of pathogen biodiversity. We tested this concept for the bacterial enteropathogen Campylobacter jejuni by seeking direct in vivo evidence for the exchange of genetic material among Campylobacter strains. For

  5. Assessment of the genetic diversity of Kenyan coconut germplasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity and relationship among 48 coconut individuals (Cocos nucifera L.) collections from the Coastal lowland of Kenya were analyzed using 15 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs. Diversity parameters were calculated using Popgene Software version 1.31. The gene diversity values ranged from 0.0408 ...

  6. Cameroon native goat populations' genetic diversity and maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitochondrial diversity of native goat populations was high (Hd = 69, with haplotype diversity = 0.9945) indicating a rich genetic diversity with 5 clades. The Cameroon goat populations belong to Haplogroup A, the most abundant in the world. Based on the previous migratory scenarios, the Cameroon native goats may have ...

  7. Coral-Associated Bacterial Diversity is Conserved Across Two Deep-Sea Anthothela Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Nichole Lawler

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cold-water corals, similar to tropical corals, contain diverse and complex microbial assemblages. These bacteria provide essential biological functions within coral holobionts, facilitating increased nutrient utilization and production of antimicrobial compounds. To date, few cold-water octocoral species have been analyzed to explore the diversity and abundance of their microbial associates. For this study, 23 samples of the family Anthothelidae were collected from Norfolk (n = 12 and Baltimore Canyons (n = 11 from the western Atlantic in August 2012 and May 2013. Genetic testing found that these samples comprised two Anthothela species (Anthothela grandiflora and Anthothela sp. and Alcyonium grandiflorum. DNA was extracted and sequenced with primers targeting the V4-V5 variable region of the 16S rRNA gene using 454 pyrosequencing with GS FLX Titanium chemistry. Results demonstrated that the coral host was the primary driver of bacterial community composition. Al. grandiflorum, dominated by Alteromonadales and Pirellulales had much higher species richness, and a distinct bacterial community compared to Anthothela samples. Anthothela species (A. grandiflora and Anthothela sp. had very similar bacterial communities, dominated by Oceanospirillales and Spirochaetes. Additional analysis of core-conserved bacteria at 90% sample coverage revealed genus level conservation across Anthothela samples. This core included unclassified Oceanospirillales, Kiloniellales, Campylobacterales, and genus Spirochaeta. Members of this core were previously recognized for their functional capabilities in nitrogen cycling and suggest the possibility of a nearly complete nitrogen cycle within Anthothela species. Overall, many of the bacterial associates identified in this study have the potential to contribute to the acquisition and cycling of nutrients within the coral holobiont.

  8. The loss of genetic diversity in the Chinese paddlefish (Psephurus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    agement strategies for species conservation. Genetic diversity surveys in endangered populations typically determine the variation currently maintained in ... (Fang et al. 2002a, 2003), and genetic differentiation of populations (Wan et al. 2003b) of endangered animals. Besides a reliable genetic marker, detecting the loss of.

  9. Assessment of genetic diversity in sorghum accessions using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic polymorphism present among sorghum accessions was low, as evidenced by the high level of similarity in the AFLP marker profiles of different sorghum accessions. Pair-wise genetic similarity coefficients ranged from 0.87 to 0.99, with an average of 0.92. This indicates low levels of genetic diversity among tested ...

  10. Assessment of the genetic diversity in five generations of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    time, and genetic similarity could reach closer to 100% at 18-19 generation of this line. Key words: Litopenaeus vannamei, genetic diversity, genetic drift, ... of exotic pathogens (Batalha et al., 2002). Apart from the remarkable development of shrimp culture in ..... distance among the stocks (Table 4). y = 0.2948Ln(x) + 0.1385.

  11. DNA markers reveal genetic structure and localized diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High genetic diversity was observed among the landraces for both marker systems. STRUCTURE analysis revealed 4 clusters of genetically differentiated groups of landraces. Cluster analysis revealed a close relationship between landraces along geographic proximity with genetic distance between landraces increasing ...

  12. Genetic diversity in Cucurbita pepo landraces from northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dendrogram mainly grouped the populations according to their mature fruit colour, and then according to their geographical origin. All genetic parameters indicated that there was plentiful genetic diversity in C. pepo landraces of northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Key words: Cucurbita pepo landraces, genetic ...

  13. Genetic diversity of four protected indigenous chicken breeds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic diversity of four protected indigenous chicken breeds was evaluated with 25 microsatellite markers. Polymorphism information content (PIC), heterozygosity with the estimator of genetic differentiation FST and Nei's genetic distance were evaluated. The results showed that these four protected local chicken ...

  14. Contrasting genetic diversity among Oryza longistaminata (A. Chev ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular markers have been used extensively in studying genetic diversity, genetic relationships and germplasm management. However, the understanding of between and within population genetic variation and how it is partitioned on the basis of geographic origin is crucial as this helps to improve sampling efficiency.

  15. Genetic diversity analysis of the medicinal herb Plantago ovata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hierarchical cluster analysis using SPSS method showed genetic variation amongst genotypes dividing them into three major clusters comprising 10, seven and one genotypes, respectively. The result of present study indicates that RAPD analysis has determined the genetic relationships and estimated the genetic diversity ...

  16. Genetic diversity among natural populations of Ottelia acuminata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... ISSR is a dominant molecular marker revealed in mass, and has ... used reliably as molecular markers in genetic studies for .... Genetic diversity among geographically separated populations of Nepenthes mirabilis. Biologia Brat. 61: 295-298. Farès K, Guasmi F, Touil L, Triki T, Ferchichi A (2009). Genetic.

  17. Genetic diversity among some blackberry cultivars and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, genetic diversity among these blackberry cultivars and their genetic relationship with Boysenberry and raspberry were analyzed using AFLP markers. Our results indicated that Blackberry cultivars from North America had narrow genetic background which can pose a problem for future breeding programs.

  18. Multiple paternity does not depend on male genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonhauser, Kerstin E; Raveh, Shirley; Penn, Dustin J

    2014-07-01

    Polyandry is common in many species and it has been suggested that females engage in multiple mating to increase the genetic diversity of their offspring (genetic diversity hypothesis). Multiple paternity occurs in 30% of litters in wild populations of house mice, Mus musculus musculus , and multiple-sired litters are genetically more diverse than single-sired ones. Here, we aimed to test whether female house mice produce multiple-sired litters when they have the opportunity to produce genetically diverse litters. We assessed the rates of multiple paternity when females could choose to mate with two males that were genetically dissimilar to each other (i.e. nonsiblings and MHC dissimilar) compared with when females could choose to mate with two males that were genetically similar to each other (i.e. siblings and shared MHC alleles). Multiple mating may depend upon a female's own condition, and, therefore, we also tested whether inbred (from full-sibling matings) females were more likely to produce multiple-sired progeny than outbred controls. Overall we found that 29% of litters had multiple sires, but we found no evidence that females were more likely to produce multiple-sired litters when they had the opportunity to mate with genetically dissimilar males compared with controls, regardless of whether females were inbred or outbred. Thus, our findings do not support the idea that female mice increase multiple paternity when they have the opportunity to increase the genetic diversity of their offspring, as expected from the genetic diversity hypothesis.

  19. Genetic diversity in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis: molecular mechanisms and biological consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribble, Gena D; Kerr, Jennifer E; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that colonizes the human oral cavity. It is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a chronic periodontal disease affecting half of the adult population in the USA. To survive in the oral cavity, these bacteria must colonize dental plaque biofilms in competition with other bacterial species. Long-term survival requires P. gingivalis to evade host immune responses, while simultaneously adapting to the changing physiology of the host and to alterations in the plaque biofilm. In reflection of this highly variable niche, P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species and in this review the authors summarize genetic diversity as it relates to pathogenicity in P. gingivalis. Recent studies revealing a variety of mechanisms by which adaptive changes in genetic content can occur are also reviewed. Understanding the genetic plasticity of P. gingivalis will provide a better framework for understanding the host–microbe interactions associated with periodontal disease. PMID:23642116

  20. Computer-aided identification of polymorphism sets diagnostic for groups of bacterial and viral genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huygens Flavia

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and genes that exhibit presence/absence variation have provided informative marker sets for bacterial and viral genotyping. Identification of marker sets optimised for these purposes has been based on maximal generalized discriminatory power as measured by Simpson's Index of Diversity, or on the ability to identify specific variants. Here we describe the Not-N algorithm, which is designed to identify small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for user-specified subsets of known genetic variants. The algorithm does not treat the user-specified subset and the remaining genetic variants equally. Rather Not-N analysis is designed to underpin assays that provide 0% false negatives, which is very important for e.g. diagnostic procedures for clinically significant subgroups within microbial species. Results The Not-N algorithm has been incorporated into the "Minimum SNPs" computer program and used to derive genetic markers diagnostic for multilocus sequence typing-defined clonal complexes, hepatitis C virus (HCV subtypes, and phylogenetic clades defined by comparative genome hybridization (CGH data for Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocolitica and Clostridium difficile. Conclusion Not-N analysis is effective for identifying small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for microbial sub-groups. The best results to date have been obtained with CGH data from several bacterial species, and HCV sequence data.

  1. Genetic diversity of canine olfactory receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitte Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution has resulted in large repertoires of olfactory receptor (OR genes, forming the largest gene families in mammalian genomes. Knowledge of the genetic diversity of olfactory receptors is essential if we are to understand the differences in olfactory sensory capability between individuals. Canine breeds constitute an attractive model system for such investigations. Results We sequenced 109 OR genes considered representative of the whole OR canine repertoire, which consists of more than 800 genes, in a cohort of 48 dogs of six different breeds. SNP frequency showed the overall level of polymorphism to be high. However, the distribution of SNP was highly heterogeneous among OR genes. More than 50% of OR genes were found to harbour a large number of SNP, whereas the rest were devoid of SNP or only slightly polymorphic. Heterogeneity was also observed across breeds, with 25% of the SNP breed-specific. Linkage disequilibrium within OR genes and OR clusters suggested a gene conversion process, consistent with a mean level of polymorphism higher than that observed for introns and intergenic sequences. A large proportion (47% of SNP induced amino-acid changes and the Ka/Ks ratio calculated for all alleles with a complete ORF indicated a low selective constraint with respect to the high level of redundancy of the olfactory combinatory code and an ongoing pseudogenisation process, which affects dog breeds differently. Conclusion Our demonstration of a high overall level of polymorphism, likely to modify the ligand-binding capacity of receptors distributed differently within the six breeds tested, is the first step towards understanding why Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherd Dogs have a much greater potential for use as sniffer dogs than Pekingese dogs or Greyhounds. Furthermore, the heterogeneity in OR polymorphism observed raises questions as to why, in a context in which most OR genes are highly polymorphic, a subset of

  2. Does genetic diversity hinder parasite evolution in social insect colonies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, William Owen Hamar; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2006-01-01

    Polyandry is often difficult to explain because benefits of the behaviour have proved elusive. In social insects, polyandry increases the genetic diversity of workers within a colony and this has been suggested to improve the resistance of the colony to disease. Here we examine the possible impact...... of host genetic diversity on parasite evolution by carrying out serial passages of a virulent fungal pathogen through leaf-cutting ant workers of known genotypes. Parasite virulence increased over the nine-generation span of the experiment while spore production decreased. The effect of host relatedness...... upon virulence appeared limited. However, parasites cycled through more genetically diverse hosts were more likely to go extinct during the experiment and parasites cycled through more genetically similar hosts had greater spore production. These results indicate that host genetic diversity may indeed...

  3. Diversity of bacterial communities on the facial skin of different age-group Thai males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilantho, Alisa; Deekaew, Pamornya; Srisuttiyakorn, Chutika; Tongsima, Sissades; Somboonna, Naraporn

    2017-01-01

    Skin microbiome varies from person to person due to a combination of various factors, including age, biogeography, sex, cosmetics and genetics. Many skin disorders appear to be related to the resident microflora, yet databases of facial skin microbiome of many biogeographies, including Thai, are limited. Metagenomics derived B-RISA and 16S rRNA gene sequencing was utilized to identify the culture-independent bacterial diversity on Thai male faces (cheek and forehead areas). Skin samples were categorized (grouped) into (i) normal ( teenage.hea ) and (ii) acne-prone ( teenage.acn ) young adults, and normal (iii) middle-aged ( middle.hea ) and (iv) elderly ( elderly.hea ) adults. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing was successful as the sequencing depth had an estimated >98% genus coverage of the true community. The major diversity was found between the young and elderly adults in both cheek and forehead areas, followed by that between normal and acne young adults. Detection of representative characteristics indicated that bacteria from the order Rhizobiales, genera Sphingomonas and Pseudoalteromonas , distinguished the elderly.hea microbiota, along the clinical features of wrinkles and pores. Prediction of the metabolic potential revealed reduced metabolic pathways involved in replication and repair, nucleotide metabolism and genetic translation in the elderly.hea compared with that in the teenage.hea . For young adults, some unique compositions such as abundance of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis , with a minor diversity between normal and acne skins, were detected. The metabolic potentials of the acne vs. normal young adults showed that teenage.acn was low in many cellular processes (e.g., cell motility and environmental adaptation), but high in carbohydrate metabolism, which could support acne growth. Moreover, comparison with the age-matched males from the US (Boulder, Colorado) to gain insight into the diversity across national biogeography

  4. Autotrophic and heterotrophic bacterial diversity from Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.; Haldeman, D.L.; Igbinovia, A.; Castro, P.

    1996-01-01

    A basic understanding of the types and functions of microbiota present within the deep subsurface of Yucca Mountain will be important in terms of modeling the long term stability of a nuclear waste repository. Microorganisms can degrade building materials used in tunnel construction such as concrete and steel. For example, high concentrations of nitrifying bacteria, may cause corrosion of concrete due to the release of nitric acid. Likewise, sulfur-oxidizing and iron-oxidizing bacteria have been implicated in microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), and may contribute to the degradation of waste packages. In addition, the metabolic activities of microbiota may alter the geochemistry of surrounding environments, which may in turn influence the permeability of subsurface strata and the fate of radioactive compounds. Microorganisms that play roles in these processes have diverse methods of obtaining the energy required for growth and metabolism and have been recovered from a wide range of environments, including the deep subsurface. The purpose of this research was to determine if these bacterial groups, important to the long-term success of a high-level nuclear waste repository, were indigenous to Yucca Mountain

  5. Malagasy bats shelter a considerable genetic diversity of pathogenic Leptospira suggesting notable host-specificity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomard, Yann; Dietrich, Muriel; Wieseke, Nicolas; Ramasindrazana, Beza; Lagadec, Erwan; Goodman, Steven M; Dellagi, Koussay; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a disease of global concern with major impact in tropical regions. Despite the importance of this zoonosis for human health, the evolutionary and ecological drivers shaping bacterial communities in host reservoirs remain poorly investigated. Here, we describe Leptospira communities hosted by Malagasy bats, composed of mostly endemic species, in order to characterize host-pathogen associations and investigate their evolutionary histories. We screened 947 individual bats (representing 31 species, 18 genera and seven families) for Leptospira infection and subsequently genotyped positive samples using three different bacterial loci. Molecular identification showed that these Leptospira are notably diverse and include several distinct lineages mostly belonging to Leptospira borgpetersenii and L. kirschneri. The exploration of the most probable host-pathogen evolutionary scenarios suggests that bacterial genetic diversity results from a combination of events related to the ecology and the evolutionary history of their hosts. Importantly, based on the data set presented herein, the notable host-specificity we have uncovered, together with a lack of geographical structuration of bacterial genetic diversity, indicates that the Leptospira community at a given site depends on the co-occurring bat species assemblage. The implications of such tight host-specificity on the epidemiology of leptospirosis are discussed. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Low genetic diversity and high genetic differentiation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Possible reasons for the high population genetic differentiation and the low levels of genetic variation within populations are inbreeding and genetic drift. Of a total of 26 known populations, 14 are now extinct, five during the course of this study. Action to prevent complete extinction of the species is therefore urgent.

  7. Population Genetic Diversity in the Australian 'Seascape': A Bioregion Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C Pope

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity within species may promote resilience to environmental change, yet little is known about how such variation is distributed at broad geographic scales. Here we develop a novel Bayesian methodology to analyse multi-species genetic diversity data in order to identify regions of high or low genetic diversity. We apply this method to co-distributed taxa from Australian marine waters. We extracted published summary statistics of population genetic diversity from 118 studies of 101 species and > 1000 populations from the Australian marine economic zone. We analysed these data using two approaches: a linear mixed model for standardised data, and a mixed beta-regression for unstandardised data, within a Bayesian framework. Our beta-regression approach performed better than models using standardised data, based on posterior predictive tests. The best model included region (Integrated Marine and Coastal Regionalisation of Australia (IMCRA bioregions, latitude and latitude squared. Removing region as an explanatory variable greatly reduced model performance (delta DIC 23.4. Several bioregions were identified as possessing notably high genetic diversity. Genetic diversity increased towards the equator with a 'hump' in diversity across the range studied (-9.4 to -43.7°S. Our results suggest that factors correlated with both region and latitude play a role in shaping intra-specific genetic diversity, and that bioregion can be a useful management unit for intra-specific as well as species biodiversity. Our novel statistical model should prove useful for future analyses of within species genetic diversity at broad taxonomic and geographic scales.

  8. Effects of complex life cycles on genetic diversity: cyclical parthenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, R; Reichel, K; Malrieu, F; Masson, J P; Stoeckel, S

    2016-11-01

    Neutral patterns of population genetic diversity in species with complex life cycles are difficult to anticipate. Cyclical parthenogenesis (CP), in which organisms undergo several rounds of clonal reproduction followed by a sexual event, is one such life cycle. Many species, including crop pests (aphids), human parasites (trematodes) or models used in evolutionary science (Daphnia), are cyclical parthenogens. It is therefore crucial to understand the impact of such a life cycle on neutral genetic diversity. In this paper, we describe distributions of genetic diversity under conditions of CP with various clonal phase lengths. Using a Markov chain model of CP for a single locus and individual-based simulations for two loci, our analysis first demonstrates that strong departures from full sexuality are observed after only a few generations of clonality. The convergence towards predictions made under conditions of full clonality during the clonal phase depends on the balance between mutations and genetic drift. Second, the sexual event of CP usually resets the genetic diversity at a single locus towards predictions made under full sexuality. However, this single recombination event is insufficient to reshuffle gametic phases towards full-sexuality predictions. Finally, for similar levels of clonality, CP and acyclic partial clonality (wherein a fixed proportion of individuals are clonally produced within each generation) differentially affect the distribution of genetic diversity. Overall, this work provides solid predictions of neutral genetic diversity that may serve as a null model in detecting the action of common evolutionary or demographic processes in cyclical parthenogens (for example, selection or bottlenecks).

  9. Advances in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eBeare

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These bacteria include Chlamydia spp., which causes millions of cases of sexually transmitted disease and blinding trachoma annually, and members of the α-proteobacterial genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Orientia and Rickettsia, agents of serious human illnesses including epidemic typhus. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of human Q fever, has also been considered a prototypical obligate intracellular bacterium, but recent host cell-free (axenic growth has rescued it from obligatism. The historic genetic intractability of obligate intracellular bacteria has severely limited molecular dissection of their unique lifestyles and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Host cell restricted growth is a significant barrier to genetic transformation that can make simple procedures for free-living bacteria, such as cloning, exceedingly difficult. Low transformation efficiency requiring long term culture in host cells to expand small transformant populations is another obstacle. Despite numerous technical limitations, the last decade has witnessed significant gains in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacteria including allelic exchange. Continued development of genetic tools should soon enable routine mutation and complementation strategies for virulence factor discovery and stimulate renewed interest in these refractory pathogens. In this review, we discuss the technical challenges associated with genetic transformation of obligate intracellular bacteria and highlight advances made with individual genera.

  10. Seasonality in molecular and cytometric diversity of marine bacterioplankton: the reshuffling of bacterial taxa by vertical mixing

    KAUST Repository

    García, Francisca C.

    2015-07-17

    The ’cytometric diversity’ of phytoplankton communities has been studied based on single-cell properties, but the applicability of this method to characterize bacterioplankton has been unexplored. Here, we analysed seasonal changes in cytometric diversity of marine bacterioplankton along a decadal time-series at three coastal stations in the Southern Bay of Biscay. Shannon-Weaver diversity estimates and Bray-Curtis similarities obtained by cytometric and molecular (16S rRNA tag sequencing) methods were significantly correlated in samples from a 3.5-year monthly time-series. Both methods showed a consistent cyclical pattern in the diversity of surface bacterial communities with maximal values in winter. The analysis of the highly resolved flow cytometry time-series across the vertical profile showed that water column mixing was a key factor explaining the seasonal changes in bacterial composition and the winter increase in bacterial diversity in coastal surface waters. Due to its low cost and short processing time as compared to genetic methods, the cytometric diversity approach represents a useful complementary tool in the macroecology of aquatic microbes.

  11. Genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from commercial swine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR) for the analysis of genetic diversity among Escherichia coli strains isolated from commercial swine farms in Sichuan province of China. Thirty four strains of E. coli were selected by selective medium and conventional biochemical test from ...

  12. Isolation, genetic diversity and identification of a virulent pathogen of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation, genetic diversity and identification of a virulent pathogen of eriophyid mite, Aceria guerreronis (Acari: Eriophyidae) by DNA marker in Karnataka, India. Basavaraj Kalmath, B Mallik, S Onkarappa, R Girish, N Srinivasa ...

  13. Genetic diversity analysis of various red spider mite- resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-02

    resistant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cultivars that are applied in cultivar identification and breeder's right protection of cottons. The genomic DNA was used as template and random primers were used to analyze the genetic diversity.

  14. Genetic diversity assessment of farmers' and improved potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity assessment of farmers' and improved potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivars from Eritrea using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Biniam Mesfin Ghebreslassie, S. Mwangi Githiri, Tadesse Mehari, Remmy W. Kasili, Marc Ghislain, Eric Magembe ...

  15. Assessment of genetic diversity among sugarcane cultivars using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of genetic diversity among sugarcane cultivars using novel microsatellite markers. Manish Dev Sharma, Upma Dobhal, Prashant Singh, Shailender Kumar, AK Gaur, SP Singh, AS Jeena, Eapon P Koshy, S Kumar ...

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of various red spider miteresistant upland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resistant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cultivars that are applied in cultivar identification and breeder's right protection of cottons. The genomic DNA was used as template and random primers were used to analyze the genetic diversity of 21 accessions ...

  17. (AFLP) analysis of genetic diversity and relationship of Chinese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-05-30

    May 30, 2011 ... and 25 cultivars that originated from China with fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism molecular markers were ... Key words: Rosa rugosa, genetic diversity and relationship, amplified fragment length polymorphism. INTRODUCTION ... northern Japan (Ohwi, 1965), the Korean Peninsula.

  18. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of physic nut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl

    2013-02-27

    specific genetic ... diversity studies, molecular markers have been applied to identify and to select genotypes with ..... Biologia floral e polinização artificial de pinhão-manso no norte de. Minas Gerais. Pesq. Agropec. Bras.

  19. Salinity and bacterial diversity: to what extent does the concentration of salt affect the bacterial community in a saline soil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Canfora

    Full Text Available In this study, the evaluation of soil characteristics was coupled with a pyrosequencing analysis of the V2-V3 16S rRNA gene region in order to investigate the bacterial community structure and diversity in the A horizon of a natural saline soil located in Sicily (Italy. The main aim of the research was to assess the organisation and diversity of microbial taxa using a spatial scale that revealed physical and chemical heterogeneity of the habitat under investigation. The results provided information on the type of distribution of different bacterial groups as a function of spatial gradients of soil salinity and pH. The analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA showed differences in bacterial composition and diversity due to a variable salt concentration in the soil. The bacterial community showed a statistically significant spatial variability. Some bacterial phyla appeared spread in the whole area, whatever the salinity gradient. It emerged therefore that a patchy saline soil can not contain just a single microbial community selected to withstand extreme osmotic phenomena, but many communities that can be variously correlated to one or more environmental parameters. Sequences have been deposited to the SRA database and can be accessed on ID Project PRJNA241061.

  20. Genetic diversity and population structure in Meconopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This species is distributed in Qinghai, Xizang, Sichuan, Shanxi ,Gansu and Hubei provinces of the People's Republic of China. Genetic variation of ... Nei's coefficient of differentiation (GST) was found to be high (0.2320), also confirming the relatively high level of genetic differentiation within populations. By UPGMA cluster ...

  1. Genetic diversity and relationships among indigenous Mozambican ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population genetic variability was relatively high when compared to other African breeds. Only 4.5% of the total genetic variation could be ... The results support the hypothesis of the Bovino de Tete cattle being a result of crossbreeding between Sanga and Zebu breeds. This study presents the first extensive information on ...

  2. ONLINE RESOURCES Assessment of Genetic Diversity and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sony

    including null alleles, mutation, nature of the plant, selection process, small population size and heterozygote deficiency. The most important factor is sampling effect called genetic drift which causes a random change in genotypic frequencies. Evaluation of genetic variation and cluster analysis. The results obtained from ...

  3. Bistable responses in bacterial genetic networks: Designs and dynamical consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Ray, J. Christian J.; Narula, Jatin; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    A key property of living cells is their ability to react to stimuli with specific biochemical responses. These responses can be understood through the dynamics of underlying biochemical and genetic networks. Evolutionary design principles have been well studied in networks that display graded responses, with a continuous relationship between input signal and system output. Alternatively, biochemical networks can exhibit bistable responses so that over a range of signals the network possesses two stable steady states. In this review, we discuss several conceptual examples illustrating network designs that can result in a bistable response of the biochemical network. Next, we examine manifestations of these designs in bacterial master-regulatory genetic circuits. In particular, we discuss mechanisms and dynamic consequences of bistability in three circuits: two-component systems, sigma-factor networks, and a multistep phosphorelay. Analyzing these examples allows us to expand our knowledge of evolutionary design principles for networks with bistable responses. PMID:21385588

  4. Genetic manipulation of structural color in bacterial colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Villads Egede; Catón, Laura; Hamidjaja, Raditijo; Oosterink, Els; Wilts, Bodo D; Rasmussen, Torben Sølbeck; Sherlock, Michael Mario; Ingham, Colin J; Vignolini, Silvia

    2018-03-13

    Naturally occurring photonic structures are responsible for the bright and vivid coloration in a large variety of living organisms. Despite efforts to understand their biological functions, development, and complex optical response, little is known of the underlying genes involved in the development of these nanostructures in any domain of life. Here, we used Flavobacterium colonies as a model system to demonstrate that genes responsible for gliding motility, cell shape, the stringent response, and tRNA modification contribute to the optical appearance of the colony. By structural and optical analysis, we obtained a detailed correlation of how genetic modifications alter structural color in bacterial colonies. Understanding of genotype and phenotype relations in this system opens the way to genetic engineering of on-demand living optical materials, for use as paints and living sensors.

  5. A call for tiger management using "reserves" of genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Rachael A; Ramakrishnan, Uma; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Tigers (Panthera tigris), like many large carnivores, are threatened by anthropogenic impacts, primarily habitat loss and poaching. Current conservation plans for tigers focus on population expansion, with the goal of doubling census size in the next 10 years. Previous studies have shown that because the demographic decline was recent, tiger populations still retain a large amount of genetic diversity. Although maintaining this diversity is extremely important to avoid deleterious effects of inbreeding, management plans have yet to consider predictive genetic models. We used coalescent simulations based on previously sequenced mitochondrial fragments (n = 125) from 5 of 6 extant subspecies to predict the population growth needed to maintain current genetic diversity over the next 150 years. We found that the level of gene flow between populations has a large effect on the local population growth necessary to maintain genetic diversity, without which tigers may face decreases in fitness. In the absence of gene flow, we demonstrate that maintaining genetic diversity is impossible based on known demographic parameters for the species. Thus, managing for the genetic diversity of the species should be prioritized over the riskier preservation of distinct subspecies. These predictive simulations provide unique management insights, hitherto not possible using existing analytical methods.

  6. Genetic diversity of seagrass seeds influences seedling morphology and biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall Hughes, A; Hanley, Torrance C; Schenck, Forest R; Hays, Cynthia G

    2016-12-01

    Genetic diversity can influence ecological processes throughout ontogeny, yet whether diversity at early life history stages is important in long-lived taxa with overlapping generations is unclear. Seagrass systems provide some of the best evidence for the ecological effects of genetic diversity among adult shoots, but we do not know if the genetic diversity of seeds and seedlings also influences seagrass ecology. We tested the effects of seagrass (Zostera marina) seed diversity and relatedness on germination success, seedling morphology, and seedling production by comparing experimental assemblages of seeds collected from single reproductive shoots ("monocultures") to assemblages of seeds collected from multiple reproductive shoots ("polycultures"). There was no difference in seedling emergence, yet seedlings from polycultures had larger shoots above and below ground than seedlings from monocultures at the end of the 1-yr experiment. Genetic relatedness of the seedlings predicted some aspects of shoot morphology, with more leaves and longer roots and shoots at intermediate levels of relatedness, regardless of seed diversity. Our results suggest that studies of only adult stages may underestimate the importance of genetic diversity if the benefits at early life history stages continue to accrue throughout the life cycle. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. Bacterial profile of dentine caries and the impact of pH on bacterial population diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kianoush

    Full Text Available Dental caries is caused by the release of organic acids from fermentative bacteria, which results in the dissolution of hydroxyapatite matrices of enamel and dentine. While low environmental pH is proposed to cause a shift in the consortium of oral bacteria, favouring the development of caries, the impact of this variable has been overlooked in microbial population studies. This study aimed to detail the zonal composition of the microbiota associated with carious dentine lesions with reference to pH. We used 454 sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V3-V4 region to compare microbial communities in layers ranging in pH from 4.5-7.8 from 25 teeth with advanced dentine caries. Pyrosequencing of the amplicons yielded 449,762 sequences. Nine phyla, 97 genera and 409 species were identified from the quality-filtered, de-noised and chimera-free sequences. Among the microbiota associated with dentinal caries, the most abundant taxa included Lactobacillus sp., Prevotella sp., Atopobium sp., Olsenella sp. and Actinomyces sp. We found a disparity between microbial communities localised at acidic versus neutral pH strata. Acidic conditions were associated with low diversity microbial populations, with Lactobacillus species including L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. crispatus, being prominent. In comparison, the distinctive species of a more diverse flora associated with neutral pH regions of carious lesions included Alloprevotella tanerrae, Leptothrix sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Streptococcus anginosus. While certain bacteria were affected by the pH gradient, we also found that ∼ 60% of the taxa associated with caries were present across the investigated pH range, representing a substantial core. We demonstrated that some bacterial species implicated in caries progression show selective clustering with respect to pH gradient, providing a basis for specific therapeutic strategies.

  8. The study of genetic diversity in some Iranian accessions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hyoscyamus sp. is well known as a natural source of two main tropan alkaloids including hyoscyamine and scopolamine. The environmental conditions make a very wide diversity of this herb in Iran. This study was conducted to evaluate the genetic diversity within a set of 45 Iranian accessions of Hyoscyamus sp. using ...

  9. Assessing the genetic diversity of five Tanzanian chicken ecotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diversity was assessed based on morphological measurements and 29 microsatellite markers recommended by ISAG/FAO advisory group on animal genetic diversity. A principal component analysis (PCA) of morphological measures distinguished individuals most by body sizes and body weight. Morogoro Medium, Pemba ...

  10. The characterization of goat genetic diversity : Towards a genomic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajmone-Marsan, P.; Colli, L.; Han, J. L.; Achilli, A.; Lancioni, H.; Joost, S.; Crepaldi, P.; Pilla, F.; Stella, A.; Taberlet, P.; Boettcher, P.; Negrini, R.; Lenstra, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of genetic diversity at molecular level has been proposed as a valuable complement and sometimes proxy to phenotypic diversity of local breeds and is presently considered as one of the FAO priorities for breed characterization. By recommending a set of selected molecular markers

  11. Assessment of the genetic diversity of Kenyan coconut germplasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP-PROBOOK

    2016-10-05

    Oct 5, 2016 ... Genetic diversity and relationship among 48 coconut individuals (Cocos nucifera L.) collections from the Coastal lowland of ... Marker. CAC23 had the highest PIC and revealed highest gene diversity values in this study. Analysis of the ..... and Oceania (IPGRI-APO), Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. pp. 1-350.

  12. Genetic diversity analysis of mustard (Brassica spp.) germplasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    successfully cultivated between Aman and Boro rice rotation without affecting this popular cropping pattern. So, it is urgent to analyze the genetic diversity and its response for the selection of short duration mustard genotypes for increasing our cropping intensity. Diversity at marker loci is currently the most feasible strategy ...

  13. Genetic diversity of Tamarindus indica populations: Any clues on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamarindus indica is a domesticated species of high economic value for the Sahel region. Despite this importance, very few data is available on its diversity as well as its structure leading to controversial discussions on its origin. Thus it is questionable whether the knowledge of its genetic diversity and organisation may ...

  14. Genetic diversity in pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-31

    May 31, 2010 ... Genetic relationships among 88 pigeonpea accessions from a presumed centre of origin and diversity,. India and a presumed secondary centre of diversity in East Africa were evaluated using six microsatellite markers. Forty-seven (47) alleles were detected in the populations studied, with a mean of.

  15. Assessment of genetic diversity among wheat somaclonal variants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-10-26

    Oct 26, 2011 ... yield potential, wide adaptation, and durable resistance to important diseases such as the rusts. ... diversity levels among adapted, wheat germplasm can provide predictive estimates of genetic ..... diversity among Tibetan wheat, common wheat and European spelt wheat revealed by RAPD markers, ...

  16. Classification of genetic diversity and choice of parents for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-one accessions of cowpea of diverse eco-geographic origins were evaluated for genetic diversity using principal component analysis (PCA), single linkage cluster analysis (SLCA) and canonical techniques. The accessions were classified into six groups by PCA and SLCA while canonical technique identified five ...

  17. Assessing the genetic diversity of cultivars and wild soybeans using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing the diversity of the soybean germplasm base could introduce new genes affecting agronomic traits. In this study, we demonstrated the differences of genetic diversity level among 40 soybean accessions of cultivars, landraces and wild soybeans collected in the Shanxi Agricultural University using 40 simple ...

  18. Genetic diversity of endangered populations of Butia capitata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The flora and fauna of the Cerrado biome in central Brazil both show great diversity and high levels of endemism. Butia capitata is a palm native to this biome that has significant economic, social, and environmental value. We sought to identify and quantify the genetic diversity of four fragmented populations of B. capitata ...

  19. Analysis of genetic diversity in bambara groundnut [ Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to assess genetic diversity among 100 selected bambara groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc] landraces from a diverse geographic area of Tanzania. Eleven informative AFLP primer combinations generated a total of 49 scorable polymorphic amplification ...

  20. The genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... organization of genetic diversity. The Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes were present in similar frequencies (51 vs. 49%, respectively). All SSR markers tested were polymorphic with mean polymorphism information content (PIC) of 0.8. The model-based cluster analysis of SSR diversity in the STRUCTURE software ...

  1. Genetic diversity in pigeonpea [ Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic relationships among 88 pigeonpea accessions from a presumed centre of origin and diversity, India and a presumed secondary centre of diversity in East Africa were evaluated using six microsatellite markers. Forty-seven (47) alleles were detected in the populations studied, with a mean of eight alleles per locus.

  2. Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in mung bean germplasm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-04-02

    Apr 2, 2008 ... wider range of diversity but also groups the accessions ac- cording to their field performance for ... minous out group for all studies to test whether our reaction conditions were optimized to resolve it as a ...... Mignouna H. D., Ng N. Q., Ikea J. and Thotapilly G. 1998 Genetic diversity in cowpea as revealed by ...

  3. Bacterial diversity in relation to secondary production and succession on surfaces of the kelp Laminaria hyperborea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Mia M; Sjøtun, Kjersti; Lanzén, Anders; Øvreås, Lise

    2012-01-01

    Kelp forests worldwide are known as hotspots for macroscopic biodiversity and primary production, yet very little is known about the biodiversity and roles of microorganisms in these ecosystems. Secondary production by heterotrophic bacteria associated to kelp is important in the food web as a link between kelp primary production and kelp forest consumers. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between bacterial diversity and two important processes in this ecosystem; bacterial secondary production and primary succession on kelp surfaces. To address this, kelp, Laminaria hyperborea, from southwestern Norway was sampled at different geographical locations and during an annual cycle. Pyrosequencing (454-sequencing) of amplicons of the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria was used to study bacterial diversity. Incorporation of tritiated thymidine was used as a measure of bacterial production. Our data show that bacterial diversity (richness and evenness) increases with the age of the kelp surface, which corresponds to the primary succession of its bacterial communities. Higher evenness of bacterial operational taxonomical units (OTUs) is linked to higher bacterial production. Owing to the dominance of a few abundant OTUs, kelp surface biofilm communities may be characterized as low-diversity habitats. This is the first detailed study of kelp-associated bacterial communities using high-throughput sequencing and it extends current knowledge on microbial community assembly and dynamics on living surfaces. PMID:22763650

  4. Analysis of genetic diversity in accessions of Irvingia gabonensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to assess genetic diversity and relationships among 15 accessions of Irvingia gabonensis collected from Cameroun, Gabon, and Nigeria. Twelve AFLP+3 primers produced 384 polymorphic fragments. Average genetic distance (AGD) between the 15 accessions ...

  5. Genetic diversity of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench landraces from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEL

    2015-04-22

    Apr 22, 2015 ... preservation of their genetic potential. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) cultivated in the Northwest of Benin and to reveal certain fundamental evolutionary mechanisms. A total of 61 accessions of sorghum landraces belonging to the.

  6. Assessment and characterization of genetic diversity in Withania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... transfer of useful genes, thus maximizing the use of such available germplasms as genetic resource materials for breeders. The present input, first of its kind in Ashwagandha, will thus assist the marker assisted crop improvement programme. Key words: Withania somnifera, genetic diversity, RAPD, AFLP, polymorphism, ...

  7. Genetic diversity of some Saudi barley (Hordeum Vulgare L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-13

    Mar 13, 2012 ... Full Length Research Paper. Genetic diversity of some Saudi barley (Hordeum. Vulgare L.) landraces based on microsatellite markers. El-Awady A. M. Mohamed 1,2 and El-Tarras A. E. Adel1,2. 1Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Research Unit, Scientific Research Center, College of Medicine, Taif.

  8. Assessment of genetic diversity in Sudanese maize (Zea mays L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... 3Commission for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, National Centre for Research, P.O. Box 2404, Khartoum,. Sudan. Accepted 17 June, 2011. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers were used to assess genetic diversity in 27 Sudanese maize genotypes. Ten primers ...

  9. Study on genetic diversity in Pakistani wheat varieties using simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Study on genetic diversity in Pakistani wheat varieties using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Bahadar Zeb, Imtiaz Ahmad Khan, Shahid Ali*, Sardar Bacha, Saqib Mumtaz and Zahoor. Ahmed Swati. Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering NWFP, Agricultural ...

  10. Genetic Diversity of Indigenous Chickens in Cameroon | Fotsa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic Diversity of Indigenous Chickens in Cameroon. ... Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa ... Over time, the adaptation to harsh environmental conditions by the indigenous chickens resulted in a huge genetic potential that goes beyond the mere short-term objectives of sources of income, food protein, and ...

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure of sweet cassava using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the population structure and genetic diversity among 66 sweet cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) traditional accessions collected in Maringa, Parana, Brazil, using microsatellite molecular markers. Population structure was analyzed by means of genetic distances and ...

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of 10 Chinese indigenous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 89; Issue 1. Genetic diversity and population structure of 10 Chinese indigenous egg-type duck breeds assessed by microsatellite polymorphism. Li Hui-Fang Song Wei-Tao Shu Jing-Ting Chen Kuan-Wei Zhu Wen-Qi Han Wei Xu Wen-Juan. Research Article Volume 89 Issue 1 ...

  13. Supplementary data: Genetic diversity among old Portuguese bread ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Genetic diversity among old Portuguese bread wheat cultivars and botanical varieties evaluated by ITS rDNA PCR-RFLP markers. A. Carvalho, H. Guedes-Pinto and J. Lima-Brito. J. Genet. 88, 363–367. Table 1. Passport data of the old Portuguese bread wheat cultivars (2n = 6x = 42;. AABBDD).

  14. The loss of genetic diversity in the Chinese paddlefish (Psephurus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The loss of genetic diversity in the Chinese paddlefish. (Psephurus gladius Martens) as revealed by DNA fingerprinting. XUE-CHANG WU*. College of Life Sciences and the Key Laboratory of Conservation Genetics and Reproductive Biology for Endangered. Wild Animals of the Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, ...

  15. Low genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans population in potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    This study reveals the genetic diversity of P. infestans population in north China. A total of. 134 strains of P. ... Key words: Phytophthora infestans, population genetics, simple-sequence repeat (SSR), potato late blight. INTRODUCTION .... growth (about 5 to 7 days), the white mycelia of P. infestans were transferred to fresh ...

  16. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 95; Issue 3. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan domestic and Tibetan chicken populations. YUAN SU DIYAN LI UMA GAUR YAN WANG NAN WU BINLONG CHEN HONGXIAN XU HUADONG YIN YAODONG HU QING ZHU. RESEARCH ARTICLE ...

  17. Analysis of Genetic diversity and reltionships in local Tunisian barley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    Genetic diversity and environmental associations of wild barley, Hordeum spontaneum, in Turkey. Genetica, 68: 203-213. Nagaoka T, Ogihara Y (1997). Applicability of inter-simple sequence repeat polymorphism in wheat for use as DNA markers in comparison to RFLP and RAPD markers. Theor. Appl. Genet. 94: 597-602.

  18. Evaluation of genetic diversity of Portuguese Pinus sylvestris L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Online resources. Evaluation of genetic diversity of Portuguese Pinus sylvestris L. populations based on molecular data and inferences about the future use of this germplasm. J. Cipriano A. Carvalho C. Fernandes M. J. Gaspar J. Pires J. Bento L. Roxo J. Louzada J. Lima- ...

  19. Genetic diversity of Indonesia milkfish ( Chanos chanos ) using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity of milkfish (Chanos chanos) from Indonesia was investigated using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 255 loci were detected by combination of seven primers from 130 individuals collected at seven locations. AFLP analysis provided useful information in determining genetic ...

  20. Genetic diversity of Bambara groundnut ( Vigna subterranea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The existence of genetic diversity in germplasm collections is crucial for cultivar development. Genetic relationships among 105 Bambara groundnuts (Vigna subterranea (L) Verdc.) accessions from Kenya were evaluated using 12 microsatellite markers. The Bambara landraces were collected from farmers in the western ...

  1. Genetic diversity and population structure of the marbled rockfish ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    water pollution. The only genetic work on the rockfishes was undertaken by Dong et al. (2008) in Zhejiang, People's. Republic of China. This study used eight enzyme markers and reported a low level of polymorphism of only 27.78%. The objective of the present study was to assess the genetic diversity within populations ...

  2. Assessment of genetic diversity in Indian rice germplasm (Oryza ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Assessment of genetic diversity in Indian rice germplasm. (Oryza sativa L.): use of random versus trait linked microsatellite markers. Sheel Yadav, Ashutosh Singh, ..... Supplementary data, J. Genet. 92, 545–557. Table 3. Details of markers for yield related functional genes in rice. SSR marker. Chromosome. Forward primer.

  3. Genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations for seed quality traits in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Ashok Badigannavar and Gerald O. Myers. J. Genet. 94, 87–94. Table 1. List of cotton germplasm lines used in this study. Germplasm no. Cultivar. Region. Germplasm no. Cultivar.

  4. Genetic diversity of indigenous chicken ecotypes in Jordan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-10-11

    Oct 11, 2010 ... conservation of genetic resources of indigenous chicken breeds in Jordan. For more general view, Siegel et al. (1992) studied the genetic diversity among wild jungle fowl and commercial chickens, using RAPD fingerprinting technique, and provided information to assess the gene- tic variation and propose ...

  5. Genetic diversity analysis of pearl millet (Pennisetum glauccum [L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... assess the degree of polymorphisms within and among genotypes and to investigate if this approach was suitable for genetic studies of pearl ... markers for the assessment of genetic diversity and choosing parents for developing ..... RAPD mapping in a doubled haploid population of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

  6. Estimation of genetic diversity between three Saudi sheep breeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimation of genetic diversity between three Saudi sheep breeds using DNA markers. AAG Adam, NB Hamza, MAW Salim, KS Khalil. Abstract. The genetic variation of Najdi, Harri and Awassi breeds of Saudi sheep prevailing in Raniah province of Makka district were assessed and compared to Sudanese Desert sheep ...

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... of an elite germplasm collection of Jatropha curcas L., a biofuel plant. Plant Sci. 176, 505–513. Varshney R. K., Chabane K., Hendre P. S., Aggarwal R. K. and. Graner A. 2007 Comparative assessment of EST-SSR, EST-SNP and AFLP markers for evaluation of genetic diversity and con- servation of genetic ...

  8. Genetic diversity in African nutmeg (Monodora myristica) accessions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean polymorphic information content (PIC) and genetic diversity (He) were 0.673 and 0.697, respectively, indicating high genetic variation among the accessions. Cluster analysis delineated the accessions into four major groups. The maximum similarity index (0.88) based on Dice coefficient was recorded between ...

  9. Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in rice. (Oryza sativa L.) C. Vanniarajan, K. K. Vinod and Andy Pereira. J. Genet. 91, 9–19. Table 1. Chromosome-wise distribution of SSR alleles and their number (k), polymorphic information content (PIC) and allele discrimination index (Dm). Chromosome.

  10. Genetic diversity of Najdi sheep based on microsatellite analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MUNEEB

    2012-10-16

    Oct 16, 2012 ... Handley LJL, Byrne K, Santucci F, Townsend S, Taylor M, Bruford MW,. Hewitt GM (2007). Genetic structure of European sheep breeds. Heredity 99:620-631. Hoda A, Dobi P, Hyka G (2009). Genetic diversity and distances of. Albanian local sheep breeds using microsatellite markers. Livest. res. rural Dev.

  11. Genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among the mixed models analysed, mixed linear model (MLM) identified 21 quantitative trait loci for lint percentage and seed quality traits, such as seed protein and oil. Establishing genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations for the seed quality traits could be valuable in understanding the genetic ...

  12. Genetic diversity in Egyptian and Saudi goat breeds using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-12-30

    Dec 30, 2013 ... Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood of each sample and microsatellites techniques were used for analysis of DNA. The results showed that, the total ... other with only little genetic exchange between the geographically isolated populations. Key words: Microsatellites, Goats, Genetic diversity, ...

  13. Genetic diversity of Shaanxi soybean landraces based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... organized into linkage maps (Cregan et al., 1999). SSR markers have been used to evaluate genetic diversity and domestication of crops (Fu et al., 2007; Yoon et al.,. 2009; Li et al., 2010; Guo et al., 2010), develop genetic map (McCallum et al., 2006) and assistant selection in plant breeding (Kelley et al., ...

  14. Genetic relationships and diversity of Jatropha curcas accessions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study has been undertaken to assess the extent of genetic diversity in a representative set of 16 accessions of Jatropha curcas. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis was used to establish the genetic relationship among the accessions. From the eight ISSR primers used, the number of amplicons per primers ...

  15. Genetic diversity analysis and conservation of the Chinese herb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an economically important floral herb. However, little work has been conducted to further our understanding of the genetics of this herb. In this study, a representative set of germplasm of. S. miltiorrhiza populations was used to analyze genetic diversity using amplified fragment length polymorphism ...

  16. Analysis of genetic diversity in pigeon pea germplasm using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), an important legume crop is predominantly cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia and Africa. It is normally considered to have a low degree of genetic diversity, an impediment in undertaking crop improvement programmes.We have analysed genetic polymorphism of domesticated ...

  17. Inter simple sequence repeat analysis of genetic diversity of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper studied the genetic diversity of five cultivated pepper species using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis. The amplicons of 13 out of 15 designed primers were stable polymorphic and therefore were used as genetic biomarkers. 135 total clear bands were obtained, of which 102 were polymorphic bands ...

  18. Assessing genetic diversity of perennial ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to compare genetic diversity between commercial cultivars and natural germplasm which were obtained from Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America. There was a relatively high genetic variation in the whole collection judged by the polymorphism rate ...

  19. Assessment of genetic diversity among Capsicum annuum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vast genetic diversity is available in chilli which may facilitate the breeder to develop new varieties, provided the genetic distance between the accessions is properly understood. In this study, 45 accessions of chilli collected from Chilli Research Station, Devihosur, Haveri district of Karnataka State were subjected for RAPD ...

  20. Genetic diversity of a native chicken breed in Iran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2National Animal Breeding Center, P.O. Box 3111212290 Isfahan, Iran. [Nasr Esfahani E., Eskandarinasab M. P., Esmaeil Khanian S., Nikmard M. and Molaee V. 2012 Genetic diversity of a native chicken breed in Iran. J. Genet. 91, e28–e31. Online only: http://www.ias.ac.in/jgenet/OnlineResources/91/e28.pdf]. Introduction.

  1. DNA markers reveal genetic structure and localized diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uqhdesma

    2016-10-12

    Oct 12, 2016 ... with genetic distance between landraces increasing with an increase in geographic distance. The ... the extent and structure of crop genetic diversity is ...... Ribosomal DNA spacer length polymorphism in barley. Mendelian inheritance, chromosomal location and population dynamics. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.

  2. Genetic diversity in green gram [Vigna radiata (L.)] landraces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-07-03

    Jul 3, 2006 ... substantially increased our knowledge of the genetics of plant populations. These results have important implications for the conservation strategy. Information on the levels and distribution of genetic diversity of any plant species may contribute to the knowledge of their evolutionary history and potential, ...

  3. Genetic diversity in cocoa germplasm of southern Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The range of polymorphism of about 194 cocoa accessions collected in farms in Southern Cameroon during field surveys and 71 Trinitario and Upper Amazon clones available in genebanks on-station was assessed using 13 SSR markers. The gene diversity, genetic differentiation and genetic similarities were analysed for ...

  4. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Syrian indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-05-04

    May 4, 2016 ... Domestic goats in Syria may provide an interesting source of genetic variability due to its proximity to the centers of domestication. This study aimed to assess the morphological variation, genetic diversity and population substructure of the Syrian goat populations. Commonly, three goat genotypes are.

  5. Genetic diversity of Myanmar rice and their implementation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AMAJU

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... Myanmar has diverse agronomic landscape and potentially preserves high level of genetic resources for important crop species. ... bank population maintained by seed-propagation in a genebank for several generations and an “on- ..... of artificial and natural factors affecting the genetic. Yamanaka et al.

  6. Genetic diversity of Przewalski's gazelle using noninvasive DNA and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the genetic similarity and geographical closeness, we suggested that six populations should be managed as three separate conservation units and habitat corridors should be built to link the Yuanzhe, Hudong-Ketu, Haergai and Sand Island populations. Key words: Habitat fragment, genetic diversity, ...

  7. Genetic diversity in Chinese natural zoysiagrass based on inter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zoysiagrass (Zoysia sp.) is extensively used in turf establishment and livestock herbage due to its many outstanding characters. Native Zoysia sp. are widely distributed in China. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to investigate the genetic diversity and genetic relationships of 81 Chinese wild ...

  8. Genetic diversity and germplasm resource research on tung tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... characteristics such as insulation, acid and alkali resis- tance, as well as anticorrosion properties. It has gradually been applied to manufacturing modern paint, ..... genetic base and current situations of cultivars. This is different from earlier studies on genetic diversity at population level of some other plants, ...

  9. Genetic diversity of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FORRESTER

    2015-01-28

    Jan 28, 2015 ... The existence of genetic diversity in germplasm collections is crucial for cultivar development. Genetic relationships among 105 Bambara groundnuts (Vigna subterranea (L) Verdc.) accessions from Kenya were evaluated using 12 microsatellite markers. The Bambara landraces were collected from farmers ...

  10. Colloquium paper: microbes on mountainsides: contrasting elevational patterns of bacterial and plant diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jessica A; Lamanna, Christine; Morlon, Hélène; Kerkhoff, Andrew J; Enquist, Brian J; Green, Jessica L

    2008-08-12

    The study of elevational diversity gradients dates back to the foundation of biogeography. Although elevational patterns of plant and animal diversity have been studied for centuries, such patterns have not been reported for microorganisms and remain poorly understood. Here, in an effort to assess the generality of elevational diversity patterns, we examined soil bacterial and plant diversity along an elevation gradient. To gain insight into the forces that structure these patterns, we adopted a multifaceted approach to incorporate information about the structure, diversity, and spatial turnover of montane communities in a phylogenetic context. We found that observed patterns of plant and bacterial diversity were fundamentally different. While bacterial taxon richness and phylogenetic diversity decreased monotonically from the lowest to highest elevations, plants followed a unimodal pattern, with a peak in richness and phylogenetic diversity at mid-elevations. At all elevations bacterial communities had a tendency to be phylogenetically clustered, containing closely related taxa. In contrast, plant communities did not exhibit a uniform phylogenetic structure across the gradient: they became more overdispersed with increasing elevation, containing distantly related taxa. Finally, a metric of phylogenetic beta-diversity showed that bacterial lineages were not randomly distributed, but rather exhibited significant spatial structure across the gradient, whereas plant lineages did not exhibit a significant phylogenetic signal. Quantifying the influence of sample scale in intertaxonomic comparisons remains a challenge. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that the forces structuring microorganism and macroorganism communities along elevational gradients differ.

  11. Genetic diversity in farm animals - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, L. F.; Lenstra, J. A.; Eding, H.; Toro, M. A.; Scherf, B.; Pilling, D.; Negrini, R.; Finlay, E. K.; Jianlin, H.; Groeneveld, E.; Weigend, S.

    2010-01-01

    Domestication of livestock species and a long history of migrations, selection and adaptation have created an enormous variety of breeds. Conservation of these genetic resources relies on demographic characterization, recording of production environments and effective data management. In addition,

  12. Fingerprinting and diversity of bacterial copA genes in response to soil types, soil organic status and copper contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejon, David P H; Nowak, Virginie; Bouko, Sabrina; Pascault, Noémie; Mougel, Christophe; Martins, Jean M F; Ranjard, Lionel

    2007-09-01

    A molecular fingerprinting assay was developed to assess the diversity of copA genes, one of the genetic determinants involved in bacterial resistance to copper. Consensus primers of the copA genes were deduced from an alignment of sequences from proteobacterial strains. A PCR detection procedure was optimized for bacterial strains and allowed the description of a novel copA genetic determinant in Pseudomonas fluorescens. The copA DNA fingerprinting procedure was optimized for DNA directly extracted from soils differing in their physico-chemical characteristics and in their organic status (SOS). Particular copA genetic structures were obtained for each studied soil and a coinertia analysis with soil physico-chemical characteristics revealed the strong influence of pH, soil texture and the quality of soil organic matter. The molecular phylogeny of copA gene confirmed that specific copA genes clusters are specific for each SOS. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that this approach was sensitive to short-term responses of copA gene diversity to copper additions to soil samples, suggesting that community adaptation is preferentially controlled by the diversity of the innate copA genes rather than by the bioavailability of the metal.

  13. Genetic Diversity of Tick-Borne Rickettsial Pathogens; Insights Gained from Distant Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Aguilar Pierlé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to capture genetic variation with unprecedented resolution improves our understanding of bacterial populations and their ability to cause disease. The goal of the pathogenomics era is to define genetic diversity that results in disease. Despite the economic losses caused by vector-borne bacteria in the Order Rickettsiales, little is known about the genetic variants responsible for observed phenotypes. The tick-transmitted rickettsial pathogen Anaplasma marginale infects cattle in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide, including Australia. Genomic analysis of North American A. marginale strains reveals a closed core genome defined by high levels of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs. Here we report the first genome sequences and comparative analysis for Australian strains that differ in virulence and transmissibility. A list of genetic differences that segregate with phenotype was evaluated for the ability to distinguish the attenuated strain from virulent field strains. Phylogenetic analyses of the Australian strains revealed a marked evolutionary distance from all previously sequenced strains. SNP analysis showed a strikingly reduced genetic diversity between these strains, with the smallest number of SNPs detected between any two A. marginale strains. The low diversity between these phenotypically distinct bacteria presents a unique opportunity to identify the genetic determinants of virulence and transmission.

  14. Promiscuity, sexual selection, and genetic diversity: a reply to Spurgin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifjeld, Jan T; Gohli, Jostein; Johnsen, Arild

    2013-10-01

    We recently reported a positive association between female promiscuity and genetic diversity across passerine birds, and launched the hypothesis that female promiscuity acts as a balancing selection, pressure maintaining genetic diversity in populations (Gohli et al.2013). Spurgin (2013) questions both our analyses and interpretations. While we agree that the hypothesis needs more comprehensive empirical testing, we find his specific points of criticism unjustified. In a more general perspective, we call for a more explicit recognition of female mating preferences as mechanisms of selection in population genetics theory. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A; Dunn, Matthew R; Chaput, John C; Van Horn, Wade D; Egli, Martin

    2016-02-18

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson-Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Genetic diversity in Populus nigra plantations from west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Alimohamadi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to adopt strategies for forest conservation and development,it is necessary to estimate the amount and distribution of genetic diversity in existing populations of poplar in Iran. In this study, the genetic diversity between eight stands of Populus nigra established in Kermanshah province was evaluated on the basis of molecular and morphological markers. To amplify microsatellite loci (WPMS09, WPMS16 and WPMS18, DNA extraction from young and fresh leaveswas done. Various conditions of the PCR assay were examined and to evaluate the morphological variation of the morphological characters leaves (consist of 19 traits were measured. In addition, height growth was measured, to evaluate the growth function of the stands in homogeneous conditions. Genetic diversity in termof polymorphic loci was 0%, because three investigated microsatellite loci were monomorphic. The total number of alleles for 3 microsatellite loci was 6 (na = 2, ne = 2, heo = 1, hee = 0.51. Genetic identity based on Nei was 100%, so genetic distance was 0%. The whole sampled trees represented the same thus the genotype. No significant differences between the mean values of all morphological characters and height growth were revealed. Observed genetic similarity gave indication that same ramets had been selected to plant in poplar plantation established in Kermanshah province.These results suggest the need for an initial evaluation of the genetic diversity in selected ramets for planting in plantation to avoid repetition.

  17. Endophytic bacterial diversity in banana 'Prata Anã' (Musa spp. roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzane A. Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of endophytic bacteria in banana 'Prata Anã' roots was characterized. Two hundred and one endophytic bacteria were isolated, 151 of which were classified as Gram-positive and 50 as Gram-negative. No hypersensitivity response was observed in any of the isolates. The rep-PCR technique generated different molecular profiles for each primer set (REP, ERIC and BOX. Fifty readable loci were obtained and all of the fragments were polymorphic. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA of the isolates based on cleavage with four restriction enzymes yielded 45 polymorphic bands and no monomorphic bands. PCR amplified the nifH gene in 24 isolates. 16S rDNA sequencing of the 201 bacterial isolates yielded 102 high-quality sequences. Sequence analyses revealed that the isolates were distributed among ten bacterial genera (Agrobacterium, Aneurinibacillus, Bacillus, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Lysinibacillus, Micrococcus, Paenibacillus, Rhizobium and Sporolactobacillus and included 15 species. The greatest number of isolates belonged to the genus Bacillus. The bacteria identified in this study may be involved in promoting growth, phosphate solubilization, biological control and nitrogen fixation in bananas.

  18. Radiation induced mutants in elite genetic background for the augmentation of genetic diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Bhagwat, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), an important food crop for India, shows large genetic diversity. However, despite the large genetic resource, high genetic similarity is reported in cultivated varieties indicating genetic erosion. Radiation induced mutations provide genetic variability in elite background. In the present study, twenty gamma ray induced mutants of rice variety WL112 (carrying sd-1 semi-dwarfing gene) were analysed for genetic diversity using microsatellite markers. The high range of genetic diversity among mutants indicated that the mutants possess potential for enhancing variability in rice. Cluster analysis showed presence of five clusters having small sub-clusters. Earliness, semi-dwarf stature or resistance to blast disease observed among the mutants showed that these will be useful in breeding programmes. (author)

  19. Assessment of genetic diversity of sweet potato in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Cuevas, Hugo E; Montero-Rojas, Milly; Bird-Pico, Fernando; Luciano-Rosario, Dianiris; Siritunga, Dimuth

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand for food and the need for conservation of agricultural and genetic resources. In Puerto Rico (PR), the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been poorly understood, although it has been part of the diet since Pre-Columbus time. Thus, 137 landraces from different localities around PR were collected and subjected to a genetic diversity analysis using 23 SSR-markers. In addition, 8 accessions from a collection grown in Gurabo, PR at the Agricultural Experimental Station (GAES), 10 US commercial cultivars and 12 Puerto Rican accessions from the USDA repository collection were included in this assessment. The results of the analysis of the 23 loci showed 255 alleles in the 167 samples. Observed heterozygosity was high across populations (0.71) while measurements of total heterozygosity revealed a large genetic diversity throughout the population and within populations. UPGMA clustering method revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 contained 12 PR accessions from the USDA repository collection, while cluster 2 consisted of PR landraces, US commercial cultivars and the PR accessions from GAES. Population structure analysis grouped PR landraces in five groups including four US commercial cultivars. Our study shows the presence of a high level of genetic diversity of sweet potato across PR which can be related to the genetic makeup of sweet potato, human intervention and out-crossing nature of the plant. The history of domestication and dispersal of sweet potato in the Caribbean and the high levels of genetic diversity found through this study makes sweet potato an invaluable resource that needs to be protected and further studied.

  20. The Genetic Diversity of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Chacón-Duque, Juan Camilo; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2017-08-31

    The history of the Americas involved the encounter of millions of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans. A variable admixture of these three continental groups has taken place throughout the continent, influenced by demography and a range of social factors. This variable admixture has had a major influence on the genetic makeup of populations across the continent. Here, we summarize the demographic history of the region, highlight some social factors that affected historical admixture, and review major patterns of ancestry across the Western Hemisphere based on genetic data.

  1. Genetics of equine insect bite hypersensitivity and genetic diversity in horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shrestha, Merina

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variation contributing to the phenotypic variation was utilized in this thesis to understand the genetic background of a complex trait IBH, and to understand genetic diversity and relationships between various horse populations.

    IBH is the most common skin allergic disorder in

  2. Impact of oil contamination and biostimulation on the diversity of indigenous bacterial communities in soil microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, FF; Rosado, AS; Sebastian, GV; Casella, R; Machado, PLOA; Holmstrom, C; Kjelleberg, S; van Elsas, JD; Seldin, L

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of oil contamination and biostimulation (soil pH raise, and nitrogen, phosphate and sulphur addition) on the diversity of a bacterial community of an acidic Cambisol under Atlantic Forest. The experiment was based on the enumeration of bacterial

  3. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C Blasiak

    Full Text Available Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas.

  4. Bacterial Communities in Malagasy Soils with Differing Levels of Disturbance Affecting Botanical Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Leah C.; Schmidt, Alex W.; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Applequist, Wendy L.; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas. PMID:24465484

  5. COMPARITIVE GENETIC DIVERSITY ANALYSIS OF OAT (Avena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knsccf

    ... diversity, inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR), morphology, oat, relationship. INTRODUCTION. Oat (Avena sativa L.) is one of the most important forage and feed crops of the world. Oat is used as green fodder, straw, hay or silage. Oat grain makes a good balanced concentrate in the rations for poultry, cattle, sheep and.

  6. Genetic diversity analysis of Tinospora cordifolia germplasm ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-03

    Apr 3, 2012 ... Wiley Eastern Limited, New Delhi, India. Shinde V. M. and Dhalwal K. 2010 DNA fingerprinting of. Tinospora cordifolia using RAPD analysis. J. Global Pharma. Tech. 2, 38–42. Singh S., Singh D. R., Faseela F., Kumar N., Damodaran V. and. Srivastava R. C. 2011. Diversity of 21 taro (Colocasia esculenta.

  7. Impact of metagenomic DNA extraction procedures on the identifiable endophytic bacterial diversity in Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maropola, Mapula Kgomotso Annah; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Trindade, Marla

    2015-05-01

    Culture-independent studies rely on the quantity and quality of the extracted environmental metagenomic DNA (mDNA). To fully access the plant tissue microbiome, the extracted plant mDNA should allow optimal PCR applications and the genetic content must be representative of the total microbial diversity. In this study, we evaluated the endophytic bacterial diversity retrieved using different mDNA extraction procedures. Metagenomic DNA from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) stem and root tissues were extracted using two classical DNA extraction protocols (CTAB- and SDS-based) and five commercial kits. The mDNA yields and quality as well as the reproducibility were compared. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP) was used to assess the impact on endophytic bacterial community structures observed. Generally, the classical protocols obtained high mDNA yields from sorghum tissues; however, they were less reproducible than the commercial kits. Commercial kits retrieved higher quality mDNA, but with lower endophytic bacterial diversities compared to classical protocols. The SDS-based protocol enabled access to the highest sorghum endophytic diversities. Therefore, "SDS-extracted" sorghum root and stem microbiome diversities were analysed via 454 pyrosequencing, and this revealed that the two tissues harbour significantly different endophytic communities. Nevertheless, both communities are dominated by agriculturally important genera such as Microbacterium, Agrobacterium, Sphingobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Erwinia, Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas; which have previously been shown to play a role in plant growth promotion. This study shows that DNA extraction protocols introduce biases in culture-independent studies of environmental microbial communities by influencing the mDNA quality, which impacts the microbial diversity analyses and evaluation. Using the broad-spectrum SDS-based DNA extraction protocol allows the recovery of the most

  8. Bacterial diversity in different regions of gastrointestinal tract of Giant African Snail (Achatina fulica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Kiran D; Banskar, Sunil; Rane, Shailendra D; Charan, Shakti S; Kulkarni, Girish J; Sawant, Shailesh S; Ghate, Hemant V; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of invasive land snail Achatina fulica is known to harbor metabolically active bacterial communities. In this study, we assessed the bacterial diversity in the different regions of GI tract of Giant African snail, A. fulica by culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. Five 16S rRNA gene libraries from different regions of GI tract of active snails indicated that sequences affiliated to phylum γ-Proteobacteria dominated the esophagus, crop, intestine, and rectum libraries, whereas sequences affiliated to Tenericutes dominated the stomach library. On phylogenetic analysis, 30, 27, 9, 27, and 25 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from esophagus, crop, stomach, intestine, and rectum libraries were identified, respectively. Estimations of the total bacterial diversity covered along with environmental cluster analysis showed highest bacterial diversity in the esophagus and lowest in the stomach. Thirty-three distinct bacterial isolates were obtained, which belonged to 12 genera of two major bacterial phyla namely γ-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Among these, Lactococcus lactis and Kurthia gibsonii were the dominant bacteria present in all GI tract regions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis indicated significant differences in bacterial load in different GI tract regions of active and estivating snails. The difference in the bacterial load between the intestines of active and estivating snail was maximum. Principal component analysis (PCA) of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism suggested that bacterial community structure changes only in intestine when snail enters estivation state. PMID:23233413

  9. Genetic diversity of Carica papaya as revealed by AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M S; Moore, P H; Zee, F; Fitch, M M M; Steiger, D L; Manshardt, R M; Paull, R E; Drew, R A; Sekioka, T; Ming, R

    2002-06-01

    Genetic relationships among Carica papaya cultivars, breeding lines, unimproved germplasm, and related species were established using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Seventy-one papaya accessions and related species were analyzed with nine EcoRI-MseI primer combinations. A total of 186 informative AFLP markers was generated and analyzed. Cluster analysis suggested limited genetic variation in papaya, with an average genetic similarity among 63 papaya accessions of 0.880. Genetic diversity among cultivars derived from the same or similar gene pools was smaller, such as Hawaiian Solo hermaphrodite cultivars and Australian dioecious cultivars with genetic similarity at 0.921 and 0.912, respectively. The results indicated that self-pollinated hermaphrodite cultivars were as variable as open-pollinated dioecious cultivars. Genetic diversity between C. papaya and six other Carica species was also evaluated. Carica papaya shared the least genetic similarity with these species, with an average genetic similarity of 0.432; the average genetic similarity among the six other species was 0.729. The results from AFLP markers provided detailed estimates of the genetic variation within and among papaya cultivars, and supported the notion that C. papaya diverged from the rest of Carica species early in the evolution of this genus.

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure in Meconopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... Meconopsis quintuplinervia is regarded as a valuable medicinal plant in Tibetan medicinal system. This species is distributed in Qinghai, Xizang, Sichuan, Shanxi ,Gansu and Hubei provinces of the People's. Republic of China. Genetic variation of 16 M. quintuplinervia populations sampled from Qinghai ...

  11. Genetic fingerprinting and phylogenetic diversity of Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic fingerprinting of 18 different isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from Nigeria using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was carried out. Ten out of 100 Operon primers showed polymorphism among the isolates tested generating 88 bands, 51 of which were polymorphic with sizes ranging between 200 and ...

  12. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Quinta de Prados, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portuga; BioISI- Biosystems & Integrative Sciences Institute, University of Lisboa, Faculty of Sciences, Campo Grande, Lisboa, Portugal; Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Biologia, ...

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure among sorghum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Western Ethiopian region harbors a unique set of sorghum germplasm adapted to conditions not conventional to sorghums grown in other parts of the world. Accessions from the region possess unique resistance to multiple leaf and grain diseases. This study is aimed at exploring the extent of genetic variation and ...

  14. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Quinta de Prados,. 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal. 2Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad Complutense, C/ José Antonio Novais, 12,. 28040 Madrid, Spain. 3BioISI- Biosystems & Integrative Sciences Institute, ...

  15. [Evolutionary process unveiled by the maximum genetic diversity hypothesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Xia, Meng-Ying; Huang, Shi

    2013-05-01

    As two major popular theories to explain evolutionary facts, the neutral theory and Neo-Darwinism, despite their proven virtues in certain areas, still fail to offer comprehensive explanations to such fundamental evolutionary phenomena as the genetic equidistance result, abundant overlap sites, increase in complexity over time, incomplete understanding of genetic diversity, and inconsistencies with fossil and archaeological records. Maximum genetic diversity hypothesis (MGD), however, constructs a more complete evolutionary genetics theory that incorporates all of the proven virtues of existing theories and adds to them the novel concept of a maximum or optimum limit on genetic distance or diversity. It has yet to meet a contradiction and explained for the first time the half-century old Genetic Equidistance phenomenon as well as most other major evolutionary facts. It provides practical and quantitative ways of studying complexity. Molecular interpretation using MGD-based methods reveal novel insights on the origins of humans and other primates that are consistent with fossil evidence and common sense, and reestablished the important role of China in the evolution of humans. MGD theory has also uncovered an important genetic mechanism in the construction of complex traits and the pathogenesis of complex diseases. We here made a series of sequence comparisons among yeasts, fishes and primates to illustrate the concept of limit on genetic distance. The idea of limit or optimum is in line with the yin-yang paradigm in the traditional Chinese view of the universal creative law in nature.

  16. Molecular analysis of the bacterial diversity in a specialized consortium for diesel oil degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paixao, Douglas Antonio Alvaredo; Accorsini, Fabio Raphael; Vidotti, Maria Benincasa; Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes de Macedo [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FCAV/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias], Emails: douglas_unespfcav@yahoo.com.br, vidotti@netsite.com.bregerle@fcav.unesp.br; Dimitrov, Mauricio Rocha [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)], Email: mau_dimitrov@yahoo.com.br; Pereira, Rodrigo Matheus [EMBRAPARA Soybean - Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (EMBRAPA - Soja), Londrina, PR (Brazil)], Email: poetbr@gmail.com

    2010-05-15

    Diesel oil is a compound derived from petroleum, consisting primarily of hydrocarbons. Poor conditions in transportation and storage of this product can contribute significantly to accidental spills causing serious ecological problems in soil and water and affecting the diversity of the microbial environment. The cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is one of the molecular techniques that allows estimation and comparison of the microbial diversity in different environmental samples. The aim of this work was to estimate the diversity of microorganisms from the Bacteria domain in a consortium specialized in diesel oil degradation through partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. After the extraction of DNA metagenomics, the material was amplified by PCR reaction using specific oligonucleotide primers for the 16S rRNA gene. The PCR products were cloned into a pGEM-T-Easy vector (Promega), and Escherichia coli was used as the host cell for recombinant DNAs. The partial clone sequencing was obtained using universal oligonucleotide primers from the vector. The genetic library obtained generated 431 clones. All the sequenced clones presented similarity to phylum Proteobacteria, with Gammaproteobacteria the most present group (49.8 % of the clones), followed by Alphaproteobacteira (44.8 %) and Betaproteobacteria (5.4 %). The Pseudomonas genus was the most abundant in the metagenomics library, followed by the Parvibaculum and the Sphingobium genus, respectively. After partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA, the diversity of the bacterial consortium was estimated using DOTUR software. When comparing these sequences to the database from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), a strong correlation was found between the data generated by the software used and the data deposited in NCBI. (author)

  17. Ubiquity and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes in diverse marine environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuexia Jiang

    Full Text Available Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB. In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III. Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating

  18. Effects of complex life cycles on genetic diversity: cyclical parthenogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, R; Reichel, K; Malrieu, F; Masson, J P; Stoeckel, S

    2016-01-01

    Neutral patterns of population genetic diversity in species with complex life cycles are difficult to anticipate. Cyclical parthenogenesis (CP), in which organisms undergo several rounds of clonal reproduction followed by a sexual event, is one such life cycle. Many species, including crop pests (aphids), human parasites (trematodes) or models used in evolutionary science (Daphnia), are cyclical parthenogens. It is therefore crucial to understand the impact of such a life cycle on neutral genetic diversity. In this paper, we describe distributions of genetic diversity under conditions of CP with various clonal phase lengths. Using a Markov chain model of CP for a single locus and individual-based simulations for two loci, our analysis first demonstrates that strong departures from full sexuality are observed after only a few generations of clonality. The convergence towards predictions made under conditions of full clonality during the clonal phase depends on the balance between mutations and genetic drift. Second, the sexual event of CP usually resets the genetic diversity at a single locus towards predictions made under full sexuality. However, this single recombination event is insufficient to reshuffle gametic phases towards full-sexuality predictions. Finally, for similar levels of clonality, CP and acyclic partial clonality (wherein a fixed proportion of individuals are clonally produced within each generation) differentially affect the distribution of genetic diversity. Overall, this work provides solid predictions of neutral genetic diversity that may serve as a null model in detecting the action of common evolutionary or demographic processes in cyclical parthenogens (for example, selection or bottlenecks). PMID:27436524

  19. SSR Analysis of Genetic Diversity Among 192 Diploid Potato Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In potato breeding, it is difficult to improve the traits of interest at the tetraploid level due to the tetrasomic inheritance. A promising alternative is diploid breeding. Thus it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity of diploid potato germplasm for efficient exploration and deployment of desirable traits. In this study, we used SSR markers to evaluate the genetic diversity of diploid potato cultivars. To screen polymorphic SSR markers, 55 pairs of SSR primers were employed to amplify 39 cultivars with relatively distant genetic relationships. Among them, 12 SSR markers with high polymorphism located at 12 chromosomes were chosen to evaluate the genetic diversity of 192 diploid potato cultivars. The primers produced 6 to 18 bands with an average of 8.2 bands per primer. In total, 98 bands were amplified from 192 cultivars, and 97 of them were polymorphic. Cluster analysis using UPGMA showed the genetic relationships of all accessions tested: 186 of the 192 accessions could be distinguished by only 12 pairs of SSR primers, and the 192 diploid cultivars were divided into 11 groups, and 83.3% constituted the first group. Clustering results showed relatively low genetic diversity among 192 diploid cultivars, with closer relationship at the molecular level. The results can provide molecular basis for diploid potato breeding.

  20. Bacterial Diversity Patterns Differ in Soils Developing in Sub-tropical and Cool-Temperate Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Shankar G; Magbanua, Zenaida V; Williams, Mark A; Jangid, Kamlesh; Whitman, William B; Peterson, Daniel G; Kingery, William L

    2017-04-01

    Microbial diversity patterns have been surveyed in many different soils and ecosystems, but we are unaware of studies comparing similar soils developing from similar parent materials in contrasting climates. In 2008, developmental chronosequences with ages ranging from 105 to 500,000 years across Georgia (GA) and Michigan (MI) were studied to investigate how bacterial community composition and diversity change as a result of local environmental gradients that develop during pedogenesis. Geographic factors were studied between and within locations spanning two scales: (1) regionally between 0.1 and 50 and (2) ∼1700 km apart. The diversity was surveyed using high-throughput pyrosequencing, and variance partitioning was used to describe the effects of spatial, environmental, and spatio-environmental factors on bacterial community composition. At the local scale, variation in bacterial communities was most closely related to environmental factors (r M  = 0.59, p = 0.0001). There were differences in bacterial communities between the two locations, indicating spatial biogeography. Estimates of bacterial diversity were much greater in MI (numbers of OTU, ACE, and Chao1) and remained 2-3× greater in MI than GA after removing the effect of soil properties. The large differences in diversity between geographically separated bacterial communities in different climates need further investigation. It is not known if the rare members of the community, which contributed to greater bacterial diversity in GA relative to MI, play an important role in ecosystem function but has been hypothesized to play a role in ecosystem resiliency, resistance, and stability. Further research on the link between bacterial diversity and spatial variability related to climate needs further investigation.

  1. Genetic Diversity of Turf-Type Tall Fescue Using Diversity Arrays Technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baird, J. H.; Kopecký, David; Lukaszewski, A.J.; Green, R. J.; Bartoš, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2012), s. 408-412 ISSN 0011-183X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Festuca arundinacea * Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) * Low genetic polymorphism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.513, year: 2012

  2. Genetic diversity assessed by microsatellite markers in sweet corn cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Daniela Lopes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Information on genetic diversity is essential to the characterization and utilization of germplasm. The genetic diversity of twenty-two sweet corn cultivars (seventeen open-pollinated varieties, OPV, and five hybrids, H was investigated by applying simple sequence repeat markers. A total of 257 primers were tested, of which 160 were found to be usable in terms of high reproducibility for all the samples tested; 45 were polymorphic loci, of which 30 were used to assess the genetic diversity of sweet corn cultivars. We detected a total of 86 alleles using 30 microsatellite primers. The mean polymorphism was 82 %. The highest heterozygosity values (Ho = 0.20 were found in the PR030-Doce Flor da Serra and BR427 III OPVs, whereas the lowest values (0.14 were recorded in the MG161-Branco Doce and Doce Cubano OPVs. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.19 (Umc2319 to 0.71 (Umc2205. The analysis of molecular variance revealed that most of the genetic variability was concentrated within the cultivars of sweet corn (75 %, with less variability between them (25 %. The consensus tree derived from the neighbor-joining (NJ algorithm using 1,000 bootstrapping replicates revealed seven genetically different groups. Nei’s diversity values varied between 0.103 (Doce do Hawai × CNPH-1 cultivars and 0.645 (Amarelo Doce × Lili cultivars, indicating a narrow genetic basis. The Lili hybrid was the most distant cultivar, as revealed by Principal Coordinates Analysis and the NJ tree. This study on genetic diversity will be useful for planning future studies on sweet corn genetic resources and can complement the breeding programs for this crop.

  3. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  4. Genetic diversity and trait genomic prediction in a pea diversity panel

    OpenAIRE

    Burstin, Judith; Salloignon, Pauline; Chabert Martinello, Marianne; Magnin Robert, Jean-Bernard; Siol, Mathieu; Jacquin, Françoise; Chauveau, Aurelie; Pont, Caroline; Aubert, Gregoire; Delaitre, Catherine; Truntzer, Caroline; Duc, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Background Pea (Pisum sativum L.), a major pulse crop grown for its protein-rich seeds, is an important component of agroecological cropping systems in diverse regions of the world. New breeding challenges imposed by global climate change and new regulations urge pea breeders to undertake more efficient methods of selection and better take advantage of the large genetic diversity present in the Pisum sativum genepool. Diversity studies conducted so far in pea used Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR)...

  5. Genetic gain and gene diversity of seed orchard crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyu-Suk [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology

    2001-07-01

    Seed orchards are the major tool for deploying the improvement generated by breeding programs and assuring the consistent supply of genetically improved seed. Attainment of genetic gain and monitoring of gene diversity through selection and breeding were studied considering the factors: selection intensity; genetic value; coancestry; fertility variation; and pollen contamination. The optimum goal of a seed orchard is achieved when the orchard population is under an idealized situation, i.e., panmixis, equal gamete contributions from all parental genotypes, non-relatedness and no pollen contamination. In practice, however, due to relatedness among parents, variation in clonal fertility and ramet number, and gene migration from outside, the realized genetic gain and gene diversity deviate from the expectation. In the present study, the genetic value of seed orchard crops (genetic gain, G) could be increased by selective harvest, genetic thinning and/or both. Status number (N{sub S}) was used to monitor the loss of gene diversity in the process of forest tree domestication, and calculated to be reasonably high in most seed orchards. Fertility of parents was estimated based on the assessment of flowering or seed production, which was shown to be under strong genetic control. Variation in fertility among orchard parents was a general feature and reduced the predicted gene diversity of the orchard crop. Fertility variation among parents could be described by the sibling coefficient ({psi}). {psi} was estimated to be 2 (CV = 100% for fertility). In calculating {psi}, it was possible to consider, besides fertility variation, the phenotypic correlation between maternal and parental fertilities, and pollen contamination. Status number was increased by controlling parental fertility, e.g., equal seed harvest, mixing seed in equal proportions and balancing parental contribution. By equalizing female fertility among over-represented parents, it was possible to effect a

  6. Changes of Bacterial Diversity Depend on the Spoilage of Fresh Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hwan Lee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Almost 10~30% of vegetables were discarded by the spoilage from farms to tables. After harvest, vegetables are often spoiled by a wide variety of microorganisms including many bacterial and fungal species. This investigation was conducted to extent the knowledge of relationship the spoilage of vegetables and the diversity of microbes. The total aerobic bacterial numbers in fresh lettuce, perilla leaf, and chicory were 2.6~2.7×106, 4.6×105, 1.2×106 CFU/g of fresh weight, respectively. The most common bacterial species were Pseudomonas spp., Alysiella spp., and Burkholderia spp., and other 18 more genera were involved in. After one week of incubation of those vegetables at 28℃, the microbial diversity had been changed. The total aerobic bacterial numbers increased to 1.1~4.6×108, 4.9×107, and 7.6×108 CFU/g of fresh weight for lettuce, perilla leaf, and chicory that is about 102 times increased bacterial numbers than that before spoilage. However, the diversity of microbes isolated had been simplified and fewer bacterial species had been isolated. The most bacterial population (~48% was taken up by Pseudomonas spp., and followed by Arthrobacter spp. and Bacillus spp. The spoilage activity of individual bacterial isolates had been tested using axenic lettuce plants. Among tested isolates, Pseudomonas fluorescence and Pantoea agglomerans caused severe spoilage on lettuce.

  7. Risk Assessment and effect of Penicillin-G on bacterial diversity in drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Zhao, Xiaofei; Peng, Sen; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Xinhua

    2018-02-01

    Penicillin-G was detected in drinking water by LC-MS/MS and the bacterial diversity was investigated by PCR and high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that bacteria community structure in drinking water has undergone major changes when added different concentrations of penicillin-G. The diversity index of each sample was calculated. The results showed that the total number and abundance of bacterial community species in drinking water samples decreased significantly after the addition of penicillin-G. However, the number and abundance of community structure did not change with the concentration. Penicillin-G inhibits the activity of bacterial community in drinking water and can reduce the bacterial diversity in drinking water.

  8. Functional traits dominate the diversity-related selection of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Y.; Kuramae, E.E.; De Hollander, M.; Klinkhamer, P.G.L.; van Veen, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the impact of community diversity on the selection of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere by comparing the composition and the functional traits of these communities in soil and rhizosphere. Differences in diversity were established by inoculating into sterilized soils diluted

  9. Dolutegravir reshapes the genetic diversity of HIV-1 reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantner, Pierre; Lee, Guinevere Q; Rey, David; Mesplede, Thibault; Partisani, Marialuisa; Cheneau, Christine; Beck-Wirth, Geneviève; Faller, Jean-Pierre; Mohseni-Zadeh, Mahsa; Martinot, Martin; Wainberg, Mark A; Fafi-Kremer, Samira

    2018-04-01

    Better understanding of the dynamics of HIV reservoirs under ART is a critical step to achieve a functional HIV cure. Our objective was to assess the genetic diversity of archived HIV-1 DNA over 48 weeks in blood cells of individuals starting treatment with a dolutegravir-based regimen. Eighty blood samples were prospectively and longitudinally collected from 20 individuals (NCT02557997) including: acutely (n = 5) and chronically (n = 5) infected treatment-naive individuals, as well as treatment-experienced individuals who switched to a dolutegravir-based regimen and were either virologically suppressed (n = 5) or had experienced treatment failure (n = 5). The integrase and V3 loop regions of HIV-1 DNA isolated from PBMCs were analysed by pyrosequencing at baseline and weeks 4, 24 and 48. HIV-1 genetic diversity was calculated using Shannon entropy. All individuals achieved or maintained viral suppression throughout the study. A low and stable genetic diversity of archived HIV quasispecies was observed in individuals starting treatment during acute infection. A dramatic reduction of the genetic diversity was observed at week 4 of treatment in the other individuals. In these patients and despite virological suppression, a recovery of the genetic diversity of the reservoirs was observed up to 48 weeks. Viral variants bearing dolutegravir resistance-associated substitutions at integrase position 50, 124, 230 or 263 were detected in five individuals (n = 5/20, 25%) from all groups except those who were ART-failing at baseline. None of these substitutions led to virological failure. These data demonstrate that the genetic diversity of the HIV-1 reservoir is reshaped following the initiation of a dolutegravir-based regimen and strongly suggest that HIV-1 can continue to replicate despite successful treatment.

  10. Assessment of the bacterial diversity of human colostrum and screening of staphylococcal and enterococcal populations for potential virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Esther; Delgado, Susana; Fernández, Leonides; García, Natalia; Albújar, Mar; Gómez, Adolfo; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to breast milk, little is known about the bacterial composition of human colostrum. The objective of this work was to analyze the bacterial diversity of colostrum obtained from healthy women and to characterize the dominant bacterial species for the presence of possible virulence factors. Samples of colostrum obtained from 36 healthy women were inoculated into different culture media. Several isolates from each medium were selected and identified. Staphylococcal and enterococcal isolates were submitted to genetic profiling. One representative of each profile was included in a genetic and phenotypic characterization scheme, including detection of potential virulence traits/genes and sensitivity to antibiotics. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis were the dominant species, followed by Streptococcus mitis, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus lugdunensis. Among the 48 S. epidermidis isolates selected on the basis of their genetic profiles, the biofilm-related icaD gene and the mecA gene were detected in only 11 and six isolates, respectively. In parallel, 10 enterococcal isolates were also characterized and none of them contained the cylA, vanA, vanB, vanD, vanE and vanG genes. All of them were sensitive to vancomycin. There were no indications that the colostrum samples contained harmful bacteria.

  11. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ana Cecilia; Ortiz, Andres; Coello, Jorge; Sosa-Ochoa, Wilfredo; Torres, Rosa E Mejia; Banegas, Engels I; Jovel, Irina; Fontecha, Gustavo A

    2012-11-26

    Understanding the population structure of Plasmodium species through genetic diversity studies can assist in the design of more effective malaria control strategies, particularly in vaccine development. Central America is an area where malaria is a public health problem, but little is known about the genetic diversity of the parasite's circulating species. This study aimed to investigate the allelic frequency and molecular diversity of five surface antigens in field isolates from Honduras. Five molecular markers were analysed to determine the genotypes of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum from endemic areas in Honduras. Genetic diversity of ama-1, msp-1 and csp was investigated for P. vivax, and msp-1 and msp-2 for P. falciparum. Allelic frequencies were calculated and sequence analysis performed. A high genetic diversity was observed within Plasmodium isolates from Honduras. A different number of genotypes were elucidated: 41 (n = 77) for pvama-1; 23 (n = 84) for pvcsp; and 23 (n = 35) for pfmsp-1. Pvcsp sequences showed VK210 as the only subtype present in Honduran isolates. Pvmsp-1 (F2) was the most polymorphic marker for P. vivax isolates while pvama-1 was least variable. All three allelic families described for pfmsp-1 (n = 30) block 2 (K1, MAD20, and RO33), and both allelic families described for the central domain of pfmsp-2 (n = 11) (3D7 and FC27) were detected. However, K1 and 3D7 allelic families were predominant. All markers were randomly distributed across the country and no geographic correlation was found. To date, this is the most complete report on molecular characterization of P. vivax and P. falciparum field isolates in Honduras with regards to genetic diversity. These results indicate that P. vivax and P. falciparum parasite populations are highly diverse in Honduras despite the low level of transmission.

  12. Landscape, population structure and genetic diversity of Stomoxys calcitrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dsouli Aymes N.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate whether different landscapes could affect genetic diversity and structure of the cosmopolitan diptera Stomoxys calcitrans, populations from Gabon and southern France were studied using dominant amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP markers. Gabon is characterized by a forested closed landscape, and southern France by an open Mediterranean landscape. The genetic diversity between Gabon and France populations did not differ significantly (P > 0.05. Contrary to our expectation, this study shows a moderate level of genetic differentiation between these two distant countries (Fst = 0.0979 and a low genetic structure among Gabonese and French populations (Fst = 0.0291 and 0.0275 respectively. This result could indicate the capacities of S. calcitrans populations to sustain a high level of gene flow, despite geographic distance and isolation.

  13. Genetic diversity of Actinobacillus lignieresii isolates from different hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisgaard Magne

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic diversity detected by analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs of 54 Actinobacilus lignieresii isolates from different hosts and geographic localities is described. On the basis of variances in AFLP profiles, the strains were grouped in two major clusters; one comprising strains isolated from horses and infected wounds of humans bitten by horses and another consisting of strains isolated from bovine and ovine hosts. The present data indicate a comparatively higher degree of genetic diversity among strains isolated from equine hosts and confirm the existence of a separate genomospecies for A. lignieresi-like isolates from horses. Among the isolates from bovine and ovine hosts some clonal lines appear to be genetically stable over time and could be detected at very distant geographic localities. Although all ovine strains investigated grouped in a single cluster, the existence of distinct genetic lineages that have evolved specificity for ovine hosts is not obvious and needs to be confirmed in other studies.

  14. Bacterial diversity in agricultural soils during litter decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilly, O.; Bloem, J.; Vos, A.; Munch, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of amplified fragments of genes coding for 16S rRNA was used to study the development of bacterial communities during decomposition of crop residues in agricultural soils. Ten strains were tested, and eight of these strains produced a single band.

  15. Ortholog identification in genera of high genetic diversity and evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    In the era of high-throughput sequencing, comparative genomics is vastly used in the discovery of genetic diversity between species, but also in defining the core and pan genome of single species to whole genera. Current comparative approaches are implementing ortholog identification to establish...... genome annotations, gene or protein evolutions or defining functional features in individual species and groups.......In the era of high-throughput sequencing, comparative genomics is vastly used in the discovery of genetic diversity between species, but also in defining the core and pan genome of single species to whole genera. Current comparative approaches are implementing ortholog identification to establish...

  16. Hypothesis: Cryptosporidium genetic diversity mirrors national disease notification rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumi, Katsuhisa; Cacciò, Simone M; van der Giessen, Joke; Xiao, Lihua; Sprong, Hein

    2015-06-06

    Cryptosporidiosis is a gastrointestinal disease affecting many people worldwide. Disease incidence is often unknown and surveillance of human cryptosporidiosis is installed in only a handful of developed countries. A genetic marker that mirrors disease incidence is potentially a powerful tool for monitoring the two primary human infected species of Cryptosporidium. We used the molecular epidemiological database with Cryptosporidium isolates from ZoopNet, which currently contains more than 1400 records with their sampling nations, and the names of the host species from which the isolates were obtained. Based on 296 C. hominis and 195 C. parvum GP60 sequences from human origin, the genetic diversities of Cryptosporidium was estimated for several nations. Notified cases of human cryptosporidiosis were collected from statistics databases for only four nations. Genetic diversities of C. hominis were estimated in 10 nations in 5 continents, and that of C. parvum of human origin were estimated in 15 nations. Correlation with reported incidence of human cryptosporidiosis in four nations (the Netherlands, United States, United Kingdom and Australia) was positive and significant. A linear model for testing the relationship between the genetic diversity and incidence produced a significantly positive estimate for the slope (P-value mirrors notification rates of human cryptosporidiosis was not rejected based on the data presented. Genetic diversity of C. hominis and C. parvum may therefore be an independent and complementary measure for quantifying disease incidence, for which only a moderate number of stool samples from each nation are sufficient data input.

  17. Effects of inoculation with organic-phosphorus-mineralizing bacteria on soybean (Glycine max) growth and indigenous bacterial community diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Xun; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Li, Yang; Duan, Man-Li

    2017-05-01

    Three different organic-phosphorus-mineralizing bacteria (OPMB) strains were inoculated to soil planted with soybean (Glycine max), and their effects on soybean growth and indigenous bacterial community diversity were investigated. Inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescens Z4-1 and Brevibacillus agri L7-1 increased organic phosphorus degradation by 22% and 30%, respectively, compared with the control at the mature stage. Strains P. fluorescens Z4-1 and B. agri L7-1 significantly improved the soil alkaline phosphatase activity, average well color development, and the soybean root activity. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis demonstrated that P. fluorescens Z4-1 and B. agri L7-1 could persist in the soil at relative abundances of 2.0%-6.4% throughout soybean growth. Thus, P. fluorescens Z4-1 and B. agri L7-1 could potentially be used in organic-phosphorus-mineralizing biofertilizers. OPMB inoculation altered the genetic structure of the soil bacterial communities but had no apparent influence on the carbon source utilization profiles of the soil bacterial communities. Principal components analysis showed that the changes in the carbon source utilization profiles of bacterial community depended mainly on the plant growth stages rather than inoculation with OPMB. The results help to understand the evolution of the soil bacterial community after OPMB inoculation.

  18. Diversity and biological activities of the bacterial community associated with the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior (Porifera, Demospongiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, S; Carré-Mlouka, A; Descarrega, F; Ereskovsky, A; Longeon, A; Mouray, E; Florent, I; Bourguet-Kondracki, M L

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the cultivable microbiota of the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior frequently found in the Mediterranean Sea was investigated, and its potential as a source of antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiplasmodial compounds was evaluated. The cultivable bacterial community was studied by isolation, cultivation and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Twenty-three bacterial strains were isolated and identified in the Proteobacteria (α or γ classes) and Actinobacteria phyla. Furthermore, three different bacterial morphotypes localized extracellularly within the sponge tissues were revealed by microscopic observations. Bacterial strains were assigned to seven different genera, namely Vibrio, Photobacterium, Shewanella, Pseudomonas, Ruegeria, Pseudovibrio and Citricoccus. The strains affiliated to the same genus were differentiated according to their genetic dissimilarities using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. Eleven bacterial strains were selected for evaluation of their bioactivities. Three isolates Pseudovibrio P1Ma4, Vibrio P1MaNal1 and Citricoccus P1S7 revealed antimicrobial activity; Citricoccus P1S7 and Vibrio P1MaNal1 isolates also exhibited antiplasmodial activity, while two Vibrio isolates P1Ma8 and P1Ma5 displayed antioxidant activity. These data confirmed the importance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria associated with marine sponges as a reservoir of bioactive compounds. This study presents the first report on the diversity of the cultivable bacteria associated with the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior, frequently found in the Mediterranean Sea. Evaluation of the antiplasmodial, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the isolates has been investigated and allowed to select bacterial strains, confirming the importance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria as sources of bioactive compounds. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Genetic diversity of noroviruses in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Monassa Fioretti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Norovirus (NoV infections are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks around the world. In Brazil, the surveillance system for acute diarrhoea does not include the diagnosis of NoV, precluding the ability to assess its impact on public health. The present study assessed the circulation of NoV genotypes in different Brazilian states by partial nucleotide sequencing analysis of the genomic region coding for the major capsid viral protein. NoV genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4 was the prevalent (78% followed by GII.6, GII.7, GII.12, GII.16 and GII.17, demonstrating the great diversity of NoV genotypes circulating in Brazil. Thus, this paper highlights the importance of a virological surveillance system to detect and characterize emerging strains of NoV and their spreading potential.

  20. Natural Selection and Genetic Diversity in the Butterfly Heliconius melpomene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Simon H; Möst, Markus; Palmer, William J; Salazar, Camilo; McMillan, W Owen; Jiggins, Francis M; Jiggins, Chris D

    2016-05-01

    A combination of selective and neutral evolutionary forces shape patterns of genetic diversity in nature. Among the insects, most previous analyses of the roles of drift and selection in shaping variation across the genome have focused on the genus Drosophila A more complete understanding of these forces will come from analyzing other taxa that differ in population demography and other aspects of biology. We have analyzed diversity and signatures of selection in the neotropical Heliconius butterflies using resequenced genomes from 58 wild-caught individuals of Heliconius melpomene and another 21 resequenced genomes representing 11 related species. By comparing intraspecific diversity and interspecific divergence, we estimate that 31% of amino acid substitutions between Heliconius species are adaptive. Diversity at putatively neutral sites is negatively correlated with the local density of coding sites as well as nonsynonymous substitutions and positively correlated with recombination rate, indicating widespread linked selection. This process also manifests in significantly reduced diversity on longer chromosomes, consistent with lower recombination rates. Although hitchhiking around beneficial nonsynonymous mutations has significantly shaped genetic variation in H. melpomene, evidence for strong selective sweeps is limited overall. We did however identify two regions where distinct haplotypes have swept in different populations, leading to increased population differentiation. On the whole, our study suggests that positive selection is less pervasive in these butterflies as compared to fruit flies, a fact that curiously results in very similar levels of neutral diversity in these very different insects. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Diversity of bacterial communities on the facial skin of different age-group Thai males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Wilantho

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Skin microbiome varies from person to person due to a combination of various factors, including age, biogeography, sex, cosmetics and genetics. Many skin disorders appear to be related to the resident microflora, yet databases of facial skin microbiome of many biogeographies, including Thai, are limited. Methods Metagenomics derived B-RISA and 16S rRNA gene sequencing was utilized to identify the culture-independent bacterial diversity on Thai male faces (cheek and forehead areas. Skin samples were categorized (grouped into (i normal (teenage.hea and (ii acne-prone (teenage.acn young adults, and normal (iii middle-aged (middle.hea and (iv elderly (elderly.hea adults. Results The 16S rRNA gene sequencing was successful as the sequencing depth had an estimated >98% genus coverage of the true community. The major diversity was found between the young and elderly adults in both cheek and forehead areas, followed by that between normal and acne young adults. Detection of representative characteristics indicated that bacteria from the order Rhizobiales, genera Sphingomonas and Pseudoalteromonas, distinguished the elderly.hea microbiota, along the clinical features of wrinkles and pores. Prediction of the metabolic potential revealed reduced metabolic pathways involved in replication and repair, nucleotide metabolism and genetic translation in the elderly.hea compared with that in the teenage.hea. For young adults, some unique compositions such as abundance of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis, with a minor diversity between normal and acne skins, were detected. The metabolic potentials of the acne vs. normal young adults showed that teenage.acn was low in many cellular processes (e.g., cell motility and environmental adaptation, but high in carbohydrate metabolism, which could support acne growth. Moreover, comparison with the age-matched males from the US (Boulder, Colorado to gain insight into the diversity across

  2. A quantitative test of population genetics using spatiogenetic patterns in bacterial colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Kirill S; Xavier, João B; Nelson, David R; Foster, Kevin R

    2011-10-01

    It is widely accepted that population-genetics theory is the cornerstone of evolutionary analyses. Empirical tests of the theory, however, are challenging because of the complex relationships between space, dispersal, and evolution. Critically, we lack quantitative validation of the spatial models of population genetics. Here we combine analytics, on- and off-lattice simulations, and experiments with bacteria to perform quantitative tests of the theory. We study two bacterial species, the gut microbe Escherichia coli and the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and show that spatiogenetic patterns in colony biofilms of both species are accurately described by an extension of the one-dimensional stepping-stone model. We use one empirical measure, genetic diversity at the colony periphery, to parameterize our models and show that we can then accurately predict another key variable: the degree of short-range cell migration along an edge. Moreover, the model allows us to estimate other key parameters, including effective population size (density) at the expansion frontier. While our experimental system is a simplification of natural microbial community, we argue that it constitutes proof of principle that the spatial models of population genetics can quantitatively capture organismal evolution.

  3. Phenotypic and genetic diversity of the species Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    OpenAIRE

    Ceapa, C.D.

    2016-01-01

    The thesis explores the diversity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a species from which strains are studied for their anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, and diarrhea preventing effects. The work combines observations on the behavior of the bacteria in a simplified laboratory setting (use of carbohydrates, immune modulation effects, anti-pathogenic effects) with genomic information obtained by sequencing, with the aim to pinpoint genes that could be relevant for bacterial survival and metabolic capa...

  4. Molecular genetic diversity and genetic structure of Vietnamese indigenous pig populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, L. D.; Do, Duy Ngoc; Nam, L. Q.

    2014-01-01

    The study characterized genetic diversity and genetic structure of five indigenous pig populations (Ha Lang, Muong Te, Mong Cai, Lung and Lung Pu), two wild pig populations (Vietnamese and Thai wild pigs) and an exotic pig breed (Yorkshire) using FAO/ISAG recommended 16 microsatellite markers...... in 236 samples. All estimated loci were very polymorphic indicated by high values of polymorphism information content (from 0.76 in S0225 to 0.92 in Sw2410). Indigenous populations had very high level of genetic diversity (mean He = 0.75); of all indigenous breeds, Lung Pu showed highest mean number...... of alleles (MNA = 10.1), gene diversity (He = 0.82), allele richness (5.33) and number of private alleles (10). Thirteen percentage of the total genetic variation observed was due to differences among populations. The neighbour-joining dendrogram obtained from Nei's standard genetic distance differentiated...

  5. Gut bacterial communities across tadpole ecomorphs in two diverse tropical anuran faunas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vences, Miguel; Lyra, Mariana L.; Kueneman, Jordan G.; Bletz, Molly C.; Archer, Holly M.; Canitz, Julia; Handreck, Svenja; Randrianiaina, Roger-Daniel; Struck, Ulrich; Bhuju, Sabin; Jarek, Michael; Geffers, Robert; McKenzie, Valerie J.; Tebbe, Christoph C.; Haddad, Célio F. B.; Glos, Julian

    2016-04-01

    Animal-associated microbial communities can play major roles in the physiology, development, ecology, and evolution of their hosts, but the study of their diversity has yet focused on a limited number of host species. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of partial sequences of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to assess the diversity of the gut-inhabiting bacterial communities of 212 specimens of tropical anuran amphibians from Brazil and Madagascar. The core gut-associated bacterial communities among tadpoles from two different continents strongly overlapped, with eight highly represented operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in common. In contrast, the core communities of adults and tadpoles from Brazil were less similar with only one shared OTU. This suggests a community turnover at metamorphosis. Bacterial diversity was higher in tadpoles compared to adults. Distinct differences in composition and diversity occurred among gut bacterial communities of conspecific tadpoles from different water bodies and after experimental fasting for 8 days, demonstrating the influence of both environmental factors and food on the community structure. Communities from syntopic tadpoles clustered by host species both in Madagascar and Brazil, and the Malagasy tadpoles also had species-specific isotope signatures. We recommend future studies to analyze the turnover of anuran gut bacterial communities at metamorphosis, compare the tadpole core communities with those of other aquatic organisms, and assess the possible function of the gut microbiota as a reservoir for protective bacteria on the amphibian skin.

  6. Comparative approach to capture bacterial diversity in coastal waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Na, Hyunsoo; Kim, Ok-Sun; Yoon, Suk-hwan

    2011-01-01

    to investigate the bacterial community structure of coastal seawater collected from the Yellow Sea, Korea. For culture-independent studies, we used the latest model pyrosequencer, Roche/454 Genome Sequencer FLX Titanium. Pyrosequencing captured a total of 52 phyla including 27 candidate divisions from the water...... techniques available in microbial ecology. As different methods yielded different coverage, we suggest choosing the approach after carefully examining the scientific questions being asked....

  7. Bacterial diversity in the oral cavity of ten healthy individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Bik, Elisabeth M.; Long, Clara Davis; Armitage, Gary C.; Loomer, Peter; Emerson, Joanne; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Nelson, Karen E.; Gill, Steven R.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the oral microbiota from 10 individuals with healthy oral tissues was determined using culture-independent techniques. From each individual, 26 specimens, each from different oral sites at a single point in time, were collected and pooled. An eleventh pool was constructed using portions of the subgingival specimens from all 10 individuals. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified using broad-range bacterial primers, and clone libraries from the individual and subgingival pools were ...

  8. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis apparatus, export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of the resulting biofilm, which is particularly important for interactions of bacteria with higher organisms that lead to rhizosphere colonization and modulate virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. Here we review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operons found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode likely components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms formed by a variety of free-living and pathogenic bacteria and, for the latter, in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  9. Gene diversity and genetic variation in lung flukes (genus Paragonimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, David; Nawa, Yukifumi; Mitreva, Makedonka; Doanh, Pham Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    Paragonimiasis caused by lung flukes (genus Paragonimus) is a neglected disease occurring in Asia, Africa and the Americas. The genus is species-rich, ancient and widespread. Genetic diversity is likely to be considerable, but investigation of this remains confined to a few populations of a few species. In recent years, studies of genetic diversity have moved from isoenzyme analysis to molecular phylogenetic analysis based on selected DNA sequences. The former offered better resolution of questions relating to allelic diversity and gene flow, whereas the latter is more suitable for questions relating to molecular taxonomy and phylogeny. A picture is emerging of a highly diverse taxon of parasites, with the greatest diversity found in eastern and southern Asia where ongoing speciation might be indicated by the presence of several species complexes. Diversity of lung flukes in Africa and the Americas is very poorly sampled. Functional molecules that might be of value for immunodiagnosis, or as targets for medical intervention, are of great interest. Characterisation of these from Paragonimus species has been ongoing for a number of years. However, the imminent release of genomic and transcriptomic data for several species of Paragonimus will dramatically increase the rate of discovery of such molecules, and illuminate their diversity within and between species. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Defining the landscape of adaptive genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Andrew J; Dyer, Rodney J

    2012-06-01

    Whether they are used to describe fitness, genome architecture or the spatial distribution of environmental variables, the concept of a landscape has figured prominently in our collective reasoning. The tradition of landscapes in evolutionary biology is one of fitness mapped onto axes defined by phenotypes or molecular sequence states. The characteristics of these landscapes depend on natural selection, which is structured across both genomic and environmental landscapes, and thus, the bridge among differing uses of the landscape concept (i.e. metaphorically or literally) is that of an adaptive phenotype and its distribution across geographical landscapes in relation to selective pressures. One of the ultimate goals of evolutionary biology should thus be to construct fitness landscapes in geographical space. Natural plant populations are ideal systems with which to explore the feasibility of attaining this goal, because much is known about the quantitative genetic architecture of complex traits for many different plant species. What is less known are the molecular components of this architecture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Parchman et al. (2012) pioneer one of the first truly genome-wide association studies in a tree that moves us closer to this form of mechanistic understanding for an adaptive phenotype in natural populations of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.). © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Home life: factors structuring the bacterial diversity found within and between homes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert R Dunn

    Full Text Available Most of our time is spent indoors where we are exposed to a wide array of different microorganisms living on surfaces and in the air of our homes. Despite their ubiquity and abundance, we have a limited understanding of the microbial diversity found within homes and how the composition and diversity of microbial communities change across different locations within the home. Here we examined the diversity of bacterial communities found in nine distinct locations within each of forty homes in the Raleigh-Durham area of North Carolina, USA, using high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We found that each of the sampled locations harbored bacterial communities that were distinct from one another with surfaces that are regularly cleaned typically harboring lower levels of diversity than surfaces that are cleaned infrequently. These location-specific differences in bacterial communities could be directly related to usage patterns and differences in the likely sources of bacteria dispersed onto these locations. Finally, we examined whether the variability across homes in bacterial diversity could be attributed to outdoor environmental factors, indoor habitat structure, or the occupants of the home. We found that the presence of dogs had a significant effect on bacterial community composition in multiple locations within homes as the homes occupied by dogs harbored more diverse communities and higher relative abundances of dog-associated bacterial taxa. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the types of bacteria deposited on surfaces outside the home and those found inside the home, highlighting that microbes from outside the home can have a direct effect on the microbial communities living on surfaces within our homes. Together this work provides the first comprehensive analysis of the microbial communities found in the home and the factors that shape the structure of these communities both within and between homes.

  12. Landscape genetics, adaptive diversity and population structure in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Monica; Rau, Domenico; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Biagetti, Eleonora; Carboni, Andrea; Gepts, Paul; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto; Attene, Giovanna

    2016-03-01

    Here we studied the organization of genetic variation of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in its centres of domestication. We used 131 single nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate 417 wild common bean accessions and a representative sample of 160 domesticated genotypes, including Mesoamerican and Andean genotypes, for a total of 577 accessions. By analysing the genetic spatial patterns of the wild common bean, we documented the existence of several genetic groups and the occurrence of variable degrees of diversity in Mesoamerica and the Andes. Moreover, using a landscape genetics approach, we demonstrated that both demographic processes and selection for adaptation were responsible for the observed genetic structure. We showed that the study of correlations between markers and ecological variables at a continental scale can help in identifying local adaptation genes. We also located putative areas of common bean domestication in Mesoamerica, in the Oaxaca Valley, and the Andes, in southern Bolivia-northern Argentina. These observations are of paramount importance for the conservation and exploitation of the genetic diversity preserved within this species and other plant genetic resources. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Pathogenic and genetic diversity of Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Tika B; Gurung, Suraj; Hansen, Jana M; Bonman, J Michael

    2012-04-01

    Bacterial leaf streak (BLS), caused by Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa, has become more prevalent recently in North Dakota and neighboring states. From five locations in North Dakota, 226 strains of X. translucens pv. undulosa were collected and evaluated for pathogenicity and then selected strains were inoculated on a set of 12 wheat cultivars and other cereal hosts. The genetic diversity of all strains was determined using repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) and insertion sequence-based (IS)-PCR. Bacterial strains were pathogenic on wheat and barley but symptom severity was greatest on wheat. Strains varied greatly in aggressiveness, and wheat cultivars also showed differential responses to several strains. The 16S ribosomal DNA sequences of the strains were identical, and distinct from those of the other Xanthomonas pathovars. Combined rep-PCR and IS-PCR data produced 213 haplotypes. Similar haplotypes were detected in more than one location. Although diversity was greatest (≈92%) among individuals within a location, statistically significant (P ≤ 0.001 or 0.05) genetic differentiation among locations was estimated, indicating geographic differentiation between pathogen populations. The results of this study provide information on the pathogen diversity in North Dakota, which will be useful to better identify and characterize resistant germplasm.

  14. [Bacterial diversity within different sections of summer sea-ice samples from the Prydz Bay, Antarctica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jifei; Du, Zongjun; Luo, Wei; Yu, Yong; Zeng, Yixin; Chen, Bo; Li, Huirong

    2013-02-04

    In order to assess bacterial abundance and diversity within three different sections of summer sea-ice samples collected from the Prydz Bay, Antarctica. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to determine the proportions of Bacteria in sea-ice. Bacterial community composition within sea ice was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene clone library construction. Correlation analysis was performed between the physicochemical parameters and the bacterial diversity and abundance within sea ice. The result of fluorescence in situ hybridization shows that bacteria were abundant in the bottom section, and the concentration of total organic carbon, total organic nitrogen and phosphate may be the main factors for bacterial abundance. In bacterial 16S rRNA gene libraries of sea-ice, nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences were grouped into three distinct lineages of Bacteria (gamma-Proteobacteria, alpha-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes). Most clone sequences were related to cultured bacterial isolates from the marine environment, arctic and Antarctic sea-ice with high similarity. The member of Bacteroidetes was not detected in the bottom section of sea-ice. The bacterial communities within sea-ice were little heterogeneous at the genus-level between different sections, and the concentration of NH4+ may cause this distribution. The number of bacteria was abundant in the bottom section of sea-ice. Gamma-proteobacteria was the dominant bacterial lineage in sea-ice.

  15. Diversity of Bacterial Communities of Fitness Center Surfaces in a U.S. Metropolitan Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabanita Mukherjee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Public fitness centers and exercise facilities have been implicated as possible sources for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial community residing on the surfaces in these indoor environments is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the overall bacterial ecology of selected fitness centers in a metropolitan area (Memphis, TN, USA utilizing culture-independent pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were collected from the skin-contact surfaces (e.g., exercise instruments, floor mats, handrails, etc. within fitness centers. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Proteobacter and Actinobacteria, with a total of 17 bacterial families and 25 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human and environmental origin (including, air, dust, soil, and water. Additionally, we found the presence of some pathogenic or potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Klebsiella, and Micrococcus. Staphylococcus was found to be the most prevalent genus. Presence of viable forms of these pathogens elevates risk of exposure of any susceptible individuals. Several factors (including personal hygiene, surface cleaning and disinfection schedules of the facilities may be the reasons for the rich bacterial diversity found in this study. The current finding underscores the need to increase public awareness on the importance of personal hygiene and sanitation for public gym users.

  16. Diversity of bacterial communities of fitness center surfaces in a U.S. metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Nabanita; Dowd, Scot E; Wise, Andy; Kedia, Sapna; Vohra, Varun; Banerjee, Pratik

    2014-12-03

    Public fitness centers and exercise facilities have been implicated as possible sources for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial community residing on the surfaces in these indoor environments is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the overall bacterial ecology of selected fitness centers in a metropolitan area (Memphis, TN, USA) utilizing culture-independent pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were collected from the skin-contact surfaces (e.g., exercise instruments, floor mats, handrails, etc.) within fitness centers. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Proteobacter and Actinobacteria, with a total of 17 bacterial families and 25 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human and environmental origin (including, air, dust, soil, and water). Additionally, we found the presence of some pathogenic or potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Klebsiella, and Micrococcus. Staphylococcus was found to be the most prevalent genus. Presence of viable forms of these pathogens elevates risk of exposure of any susceptible individuals. Several factors (including personal hygiene, surface cleaning and disinfection schedules of the facilities) may be the reasons for the rich bacterial diversity found in this study. The current finding underscores the need to increase public awareness on the importance of personal hygiene and sanitation for public gym users.

  17. Bacterial diversity in snow on North Pole ice floes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauptmann, Aviaja Zenia Edna Lyberth; Stibal, Marek; Bælum, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    sites clustered together when compared to the underlying environments of sea ice and ocean water. The Shannon indices ranged from 2.226 to 3.758, and the Chao1 indices showed species richness between 293 and 353 for the three samples. The relatively low abundances and diversity found in the samples......The microbial abundance and diversity in snow on ice floes at three sites near the North Pole was assessed using quantitative PCR and 454 pyrosequencing. Abundance of 16S rRNA genes in the samples ranged between 43 and 248 gene copies per millilitre of melted snow. A total of 291,331 sequences were...... indicate a lower rate of microbial input to this snow habitat compared to snow in the proximity of terrestrial and anthropogenic sources of microorganisms. The differences in species composition and diversity between the sites show that apparently similar snow habitats contain a large variation...

  18. Genetic diversity and relationship analysis among accessions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and relationships between 55 accessions of genus Aegilops, including the species Aegilops triuncialis L. (UUCC), Aegilops geniculata Roth (MMUU), Aegilops cylindrica Host (CCDD) and Aegilops umbellulata Zhuk ...

  19. Genetic diversity in Balkhi, Hashtnagri and Michni sheep ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphological and genetic diversity among the three neighboring sheep breeds native to Central valley of Khyber Pukhtunkhwa (KP, Pakistan) was investigated. A total number of 138 non relative individuals of Balkhi (46), Hashtnagri (44) and Michni (48) was sampled for morphological as well as molecular characters ...

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity in Triticum spp. and Aegilops spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity among some wild relatives of wheat was estimated using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and morphological markers. Thirty one Triticum and Aegilops genotypes including twenty-four Triticum and Aegilops accessions belonging to five diploid (Triticum baeoticum, Triticum monococcum, ...

  1. Low genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans population in potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans is the most important disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum). This study reveals the genetic diversity of P. infestans population in north China. A total of 134 strains of P. infestans were isolated from different agricultural fields in Hebei, Liaoning, Jinlin and Heilongjiang Provinces ...

  2. Evaluation of genetic diversity in rice using simple sequence repeats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic diversity of 64 rice genotypes using 20 SSR primers on chromosome number 7-12 was investigated. DNA was extracted by modified cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method. The banding pattern was recorded in the form of 0-1 data sheet which was analyzed using unweighted pair group method with ...

  3. Genetic diversity and conservation of Mexican forest trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Wehenkel; S. Mariscal-Lucero; J.P. Jaramillo-Correa; C.A. López-Sánchez; J.J. Vargas Hernández; C. Sáenz-Romero

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 200 years, humans have impacted the genetic diversity of forest trees. Because of widespread deforestation and over-exploitation, about 9,000 tree species are listed worldwide as threatened with extinction, including more than half of the ~600 known conifer taxa. A comprehensive review of the floristic-taxonomic literature compiled a list of 4,331...

  4. Genetic diversity in coastal and inland desert populations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... This study compared the genetic diversity within and among six naturally growing coastal and inland populations of Peganum harmala by using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Seven primers generated a total of 63 RAPD bands (loci) of which 60 (95.24%) were polymorphic across.

  5. Assessment of genetic diversity of sweet potato in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand ...

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity in French bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAPD molecular markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity in the fourteen varieties of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) of three eco-geographical regions of Bangladesh. Out of the 20 primers only, 6 yielded polymorphic banding patterns. In total, 40 different DNA bands were reproducibly obtained, out of which ...

  7. Assessment of genetic diversity in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... RAPD molecular markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity in the fourteen varieties of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) of three eco-geographical regions of Bangladesh. Out of the 20 primers only,. 6 yielded polymorphic banding patterns. In total, 40 different DNA bands were reproducibly ...

  8. Analysis of genetic diversity of muga silkworm (Antheraea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-03-22

    Mar 22, 2010 ... Eleven populations of muga silkworm, Antheraea assamensis Helfer, the golden silk yarn producer of northeast India, was subjected to RAPD marker analysis in order to assess its genetic diversity. The genomic DNA extracted from muga silkworms were analysed using 50 random primers among which 36.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weerachai Saijuntha

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Indo-Chinese forest lizard; white-lipped lizard; agamid; gene flow; reptile; CO1 gene. although illegal, it is still massively hunted in several .... Genetic diversity of C. mystaceus. Figure 1. Minimum spanning haplotype network of C. mysteceus generated based on partial CO1 sequence corresponds to their.

  10. Genetic Diversity of Local and Introduced Sweet Potato [Ipomoea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was therefore conducted to estimate the genetic diversity of 114 Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] accessions obtained from Nigeria, Asia, Latin America and Local collections along with two improved varieties. Accessions were planted in 2012/13 cropping season at Haramaya University, eastern Ethiopia ...

  11. Genetic diversity of Fusarium wilt races of pigeonpea in major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fusarium wilt is a serious fungal disease in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) which causes severe yield loses (up to 90%). Genetic diversity in pigeonpea wilt pathogen [Fusarium udum (fud)] was characterised using 14 isolates collected from major pulse growing regions of India. Twenty four RAPD primers generated a total of ...

  12. Genetic diversity assessment of wild and cultivated varieties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study deals with evaluation of genetic diversity and pedigree analysis through RAPD analysis. A total number of 40 Jatropha curcas accessions collected from different geographical regions and 43 random decamer primers were screened to assess polymorphism. 10 primers were amplified and 94 polymorphic ...

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 diversity has an impact on vaccine efficacy and drug resistance. It is important to know the circulating genetic variants and associated drug-resistance mutations in the context of scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nigeria. The objective of this study was to ...

  14. Genetic diversity in two populations of Limicolaria aurora (Jay, 1839 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-06-22

    Jun 22, 2016 ... savannah) and Benin City (tropical rain forest) in Nigeria and possibly delimit the populations into sub species. A total of one hundred and ten specimens of L. aurora made up ..... Environmental stress such as drought could possibly have influenced genetic diversity in New Bussa with lower annual rainfall ...

  15. Evaluation of genetic diversity of Portuguese Pinus sylvestris L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    strategies and use of forest germplasm, as well as defini- tion of genetic relationships (Laurentin 2009). .... differentiation among populations in this pine species, given that RAPD produced a higher number of bands ... According to Tikhonova (2009) the strategy to conserve diversity of Scots pine from natural stands and ...

  16. Genetic diversity and chemical polymorphism of Tunisian Lavandula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population differentiation performed on combined data yielded similar to that shown using each marker separately. Conservation strategies should take into account the levels of genetic diversity and chemical variation in relation to population and bioclimate. Keywords: Lavandula multifida, Tunisia, natural populations, ...

  17. Genetic diversity of Annona senegalensis Pers. populations as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annona senegalensis Pers. is one of the wild fruit tree for domestication in southern Africa. An assessment of the genetic diversity in A. senegalensis would assist in planning for future germplasm collection, conservation and fruit domestication programmes. During 2004 to 2006 nine populations were collected from different ...

  18. Genetic Diversity and Relationships in the Turkey species of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ILHAN

    2011-11-16

    Nov 16, 2011 ... Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and relationships between 55 accessions of genus Aegilops, including the species Aegilops triuncialis L. (UUCC), Aegilops geniculata Roth (MMUU), Aegilops cylindrica Host (CCDD) and Aegilops.

  19. Hierarchical Approaches to the Analysis of Genetic Diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hierarchical Approaches to the Analysis of Genetic Diversity in Plants: A Systematic Overview. ME Osawaru, MC Ogwu, RO Aiwansoba. Abstract. Hierarchical analysis highlights the nature of relationship between and among type samples as outlined by standard descriptors. It produces an output called dendrogram, which ...

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity analysis in contrasting sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane is an important crop in the country economically, politically and sociologically. It is the second largest agro-industry next to textiles. The selection and combination of parents for crossing rely on an understanding of their genetic structures and molecular diversity. In the present study, 28 sugarcane genotypes were ...

  1. Analysis of genetic diversity and construction of core collection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of genetic diversity and construction of core collection of local mulberry varieties from Shanxi Province based on ISSR marker. ... By using stepwise clustering and random methods and the modified heuristic algorithm, 21 core collections were constructed and the ratio of core collection was 28.77%. The result of ...

  2. Genetic diversity of intensive cultured and wild tiger shrimp Penaeus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity of intensive cultured and wild tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (Fabricius) in Malaysia using six microsatellite markers (CSCUPmo1, CSCUPmo2, CSCUPmo3, CSCUPmo4, CSCUPmo6 and CSCUPmo7). The mean numbers of allele, observed heterozygosis, ...

  3. Genetic diversity of Przewalski's gazelle using noninvasive DNA and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cynthia

    2015-04-01

    Apr 1, 2015 ... The Przewalski's gazelle (Procapra przewalskii) is endemic to China and the total current population of the species is only about several hundred. In order to understand the genetic structure and diversity of the Przewalski's gazelle in China for the purpose of guiding conservation initiatives, we examined ...

  4. Estimation of genetic diversity of the Kenyan yam (Dioscorea spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MUTHAMIA

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... The botany, ethnobotany, use and possible future of yams in West Africa. Econ. Bot. 26:301-318. Beebe S, Sckroch PW, Tohme J, Duque MC, Pedraza F, Nienhuis J. (2000). Structure of genetic diversity among common bean landraces of Middle American origin based on correspondence analysis of. RAPD ...

  5. Evaluation of genetic diversity in the golden apple snail, Pomacea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic diversity of Pomacea canaliculata, collected from Los Banos (LB) in Philippines and Yuyao (YY), Taizhou (TZ), Fuzhou (FZ), Guangzhou (GZ), Nanning (NN), Kunming (KM) in China, was studied by using the inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) technique. A total of 498 loci from 140 individuals were amplified ...

  6. Estimate of genetic diversity in cassutinga ( Croton heliotropiifolius ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimate of genetic diversity in cassutinga (Croton heliotropiifolius) based on molecular markers. Tallita de Oliveira Rocha, Janaina Silva Freitas, Elisa Susilene Lisboa dos Santos, Murilo Marques Scaldaferri, Claudine Gonçalves de Oliveira, Carlos Bernard Moreno Cerqueira-Silva ...

  7. Genetic diversity studies and identification of SSR markers ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-13

    Aug 13, 2013 ... Abstract. Genetic diversity and identification of simple sequence repeat markers correlated with Fusarium wilt resistance was performed in a set of 36 elite cultivated pigeonpea genotypes differing in levels of resistance to Fusarium wilt. Twenty-four polymorphic sequence repeat markers were screened ...

  8. Genetic diversity of Actinobacillus lignieresii isolates from different hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotovic, Branko; Angen, Øystein; Bisgaard, Magne

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diversity detected by analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) of 54 Actinobacilus lignieresii isolates from different hosts and geographic localities is described. On the basis of variances in AFLP profiles, the strains were grouped in two major clusters; one comprisin...

  9. Analysis of the genetic diversity of four rabbit genotypes using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr.Ola

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... diseases or market conditions. A considerable number of genetic diversity studies for several livestock species have been carried out during recent years by research. *Corresponding author. E-mail: ola.galal@agr.kfs.edu.eg or olagalal2002@yahoo.com , Tel/Fax: +2-0479102930. Abbreviations: APRI ...

  10. Assessment of genetic diversity among maize accessions using inter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of genetic diversity among maize accessions using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers. AT do Amaral Júnior, EC de Oliveira, LSA Gonçalves, CA Scapim, LS Candido, TR da Conceição Silva, C Vittorazzi, KS da Cunha ...

  11. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in captive reptiles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Xiao, L.; Ryan, U. M.; Graczyk, T. K.; Limor, J.; Li, L.; Kombert, M.; Junge, R.; Sulaiman, I. M.; Zhou, L.; Arrowood, M. J.; Koudela, Břetislav; Modrý, David; Lal, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 2 (2004), s. 891-899 ISSN 0099-2240 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/00/P015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * reptiles * genetic diversity Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.810, year: 2004

  12. Genetic diversity and bottleneck studies in the Marwari horse breed

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    . 295. Genetic diversity and bottleneck studies in the Marwari horse breed. A. K. GUPTA 1 *, M. CHAUHAN 1 , S. N. TANDON 1 and SONIA 2. 1National Research Centre on Equines, Sirsa Road, Hisar 125 001, India. 2Guru Jambeshwar ...

  13. Genetic structure and diversity of the Neem Germplasm Bank from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Particular

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... The marker data indicated that GBN have three ... formulation of appropriate strategies for management and use of GBN. ..... Dhillon RS, Mohapatra T, Singh S, Boora KS, Singh, K (2007). Assessment of genetic diversity in Azadirachta indica based on DNA fingerprinting. Indian J. Biotech. 6:519-524.

  14. Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, we tested rice genotypes that included un(der)exploited landraces of Tamil Nadu along with indica and japonica test cultivars to ascertain their genetic diversity structure. Highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were used for generating marker segregation data. A novel measure, allele discrimination ...

  15. Appraisal of biochemical and genetic diversity of mango cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is one of the oldest fruit crops and is broadly cultivated worldwide. To determine the level of genetic diversity, a total of 13 mango genotypes have been collected from different farms of Fayoum oasis in Egypt and were analyzed using molecular (DNA) and biochemical (SDS-PAGE) markers ...

  16. Population genetic diversity of marble goby (Oxyeleotris marmoratus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cheng Zhao

    2017-12-08

    Dec 8, 2017 ... east Asia, especially in Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and. Vietnam (Inger ... cial culture of marble goby has suffered from germplasm ..... Southeast Asia. Through long-term artificial breeding, the genetic diversity of the cultured marble goby popula- tions were relatively low compared to Vietnam population.

  17. Genetic diversity and population structure of 10 Chinese indigenous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    times become extinct. This loss of genetic diversity within and among breeds is a negative trend, not only from the perspective of culture, but also with regard to utility. Traits, genotypes and alleles with possible economic interest are at risk of being lost. Further, breeds are exposed to a great loss of alleles and haplotypes as ...

  18. Genetic diversity, phylogeographic structure and effect of selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdulhakeem B. Ajibike

    2017-12-11

    Dec 11, 2017 ... Abstract. In this study, the maternal genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationship and effect of natural selection on indigenous chickens from Nigeria were assessed. A total of 397-bp fragment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region of 171 indigenous chickens from four populations of Nigeria and ...

  19. Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese honeybees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-28

    Feb 28, 2011 ... Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese honeybees (Apis cerana) under microsatellite markers. Ting Ji, Ling Yin and Guohong Chen*. College of Animal Science and Technology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009, China. Accepted 18 January, 2011. Using 21 microsatellite markers ...

  20. Evaluation of genetic diversity in rice using SSR markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hemant

    2012-10-18

    Oct 18, 2012 ... The polymorphism information content (PIC) value for the SSR loci ranged from 0.36 to. 0.98. Higher PIC values were associated ... Since each marker system has specific advantages and disadvantages, the choice of the marker ... The objective of current studies was to estimate the genetic diversity among ...

  1. Genetic diversity in Ethiopian mustard ( Bbrassica carinata a. braun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, genetic diversity in 60 Ethiopian mustard genotypes, collected from 16 regions of Ethiopia, were assessed using the techniques of cluster and ... for the majority of traits of interest: seed yield/plot, seed yield/plant, biomass/plot, biomass/plant, plant height, number of pods/plant, 1000 seeds' weight and oil content ...

  2. Genetic diversity of taraxacum germplasm revealed by sequence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) and morphological markers were employed to determine the genetic diversity and relations among 11 population of taraxacum in northeast of China. Data on 34 morphological traits were collected and analyzed. A total of 795 polymorphic SRAP's bands were scored with ...

  3. Genetic structure and diversity of East African taro [ Colocasia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taro [Colocasia esculenta (L) Schott] is mainly produced in Africa by small holder farmers and plays an important role in the livelihood of millions of poor people in less developed countries. The genetic diversity of East African taro has not been determined. This study utilizes six microsatellite primers to analyze five ...

  4. Some insights into the phenotypic and genetic diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deon

    objectives: to describe pig production systems, get a phenotypic description of the pigs and to characterize ... aimed at combining data on production systems, physical attributes and genetic diversity in order to build a .... condition scores of pigs and chemical composition of pig feed resources in a semi-arid smallholder.

  5. A study of patrilineal genetic diversity in Iranian indigenous horse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autosomal markers and mtDNA have been used in horse phylogenetic studies. These studies display evolutionary events that happened in both sexes or only in females. It is necessary to investigate genetic diversity in Y-specific markers for clarifying contribution of males in horse domestication. The Y chromosome ...

  6. Analysis of genetic diversity in mango ( Mangifera indica L.) using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, malate dehydrogenase and peroxidase analysis possessed 8, 10 and 7 zymotypes, respectively, and genotypes were grouped into different electrophoretic zymotypes which indicated higher level of genetic diversity of mango. For glutamate oxaloacetate transminase, G6 was the most ...

  7. Molecular genetic diversity study of Lepidium sativum population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vostro 2520

    Generally, Tigray and Amhara regions showed moderate to high diversity in ISSR analysis. ... other crops. The main purpose of its cultivation in. Ethiopia is to use it as a medicinal plant. It is used for human abdominal ache and diarrhea. Moreover, L. ... of 10 primers were obtained from the Genetic Research Laboratory.

  8. Genetic diversity and germplasm resource research on tung tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tung tree is an important woody oil-rich plant in the world. In order to determine the genetic diversity, germplasm resource and breeding method on tung tree, inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) was used to investigate the cultivars in China. Among the total 110 bands amplified with 12 primers, 90 were polymorphic.

  9. Assessing genetic diversity and phylogeographic structure of duck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the maternal genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of Nigerian duck populations were assessed. A total of 591 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region of 87 indigenous ducks from two populations in Nigeria were analyzed. Seven haplotypes and 70 polymorphic sites were ...

  10. Population genetic diversity of marble goby (Oxyeleotris marmoratus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cheng Zhao

    2017-12-08

    Dec 8, 2017 ... E-mail: yinshaowu@163.com. Cheng Zhao and Xiaoping Zhu contributed equally to this work. Keywords. marble goby; genetic diversity; mtDNA control region; microsatellite; population structure. mtDNA is highly polymorphic and it has 5–10 times rate of nucleotide substitution than nuclear DNA (Aquadro.

  11. Genetic diversity in Jatropha species from different regions of Brazil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity in Jatropha species from different regions of Brazil based on morphological characters and inters-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. ... There was no relation between similarity patterns and geographical origin of accesses in the group analysis. Average percentage of polymorphism found ...

  12. Genetic diversity among some blackberry cultivars and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... Key words: Blackberry, Boysenberry, raspberry, genetic diversity, AFLP markers. INTRODUCTION. Blackberries are fruiting-bearing species of genus Rubus subgenus Rubus of Rosaceae family (Clark et al., 2007). Germplasm Resources Information Network describes 13 subgenera for the genus Rubus ...

  13. Examination of genetic diversity in common bean (Phaseolus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    2015-02-11

    Feb 11, 2015 ... To study the pattern of genetic diversity in 45 genotypes of common bean, 19 RAPD primers were used. Of 253 bands produced, 236 bands (94.22%) were polymorphic in which maximum number (20 polymorphic bands) were observed in the profiles of the primer OPB-07. Highest PIC value (0.79) was.

  14. Genetic diversity among four Eucalyptus species (myrtaceae) based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicate that 16 positive and 13 negative markers were detected. The marker fragments size ranged between 175 to 630 bp for the negative markers and 235 to 945 bp for the positive markers. Key words: Eucalyptus, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), genetic diversity, DNA fingerprinting PCR, ...

  15. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of Elite-II synthetic hexaploid (SH) wheat by genome DNA fingerprinting as revealed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Ten decamer RAPD primers (OPG-1, OPG-2, OPG-3, OPG-4, OPG-5, OPA-3, OPA-4, OPA-5, OPA-8, and OPA-15) ...

  16. Genetic diversity in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] varieties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. presents phenotypical variabilities and in order to study the genetic diversity of cultivated Senegalese varieties, two experimental approaches were used. First, a physiological characterization based on nitrogen fixation was used to assess cowpea breeding lines. Inoculation with two ...

  17. The use of microsatellite markers for genetic diversity assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, gene diversity and genetic relationships among 30 genotypes of genus Hordeum from Kerman province (Iran) were assessed using 10 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers. Seven of these markers were highly polymorphic. A total of 96 alleles were detected. The number of alleles per microsatellite marker ...

  18. Genetic diversity and species delimitation in the opportunistic genus Fonsecaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Najafzadeh, M.J.; Gueidan, C.; Badali, H.; Gerrits Van Den Ende, A. H.; Xi, L.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic diversity and species delimitation were investigated among 39 isolates recovered from clinical and environmental sources in Central and South America, Africa, East Asia and Europe. All had been morphologically identified as Fonsecaea spp. Molecular analyses were based on sequences of the

  19. Assessment of genetic diversity of rice ( Oryza sativa ) cultivars using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A set of 36 polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers well distributed on all the 12 rice chromo-somes have been used to assess the genetic diversity among the rice varieties. A total of 98 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per locus across 39 genotypes. The number of alleles varied from two to ...

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity for some Iraqi date palms ( Phoenix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) were used to evaluate the genetic diversity between 18 date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) varieties (11 females and 7 males) collected from the center of Iraq. Six primer pairs were applied to detect polymorphism between varieties. A total of 83 polymorphic AFLP fragments ...

  1. Genetic diversity and relationship analysis of the Brassica napus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is an important oilseed crop worldwide. The objective of this research was to study the genetic diversity and relationships of B. napus accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR). A set of 217 genotypes was characterized using 37 SSR markers of mapping on the B. napus genome.

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure of Caragana microphylla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caragana microphylla Lam. is a long-lived shrub species in the semi-arid, arid and desert regions. To determine the genetic diversity and population structure of C. microphylla Lam., 17 wild populations from the central and eastern part of Inner Mongolia were analyzed by inter-simple sequence repeat. 18 primers produced ...

  3. Genetic diversity among selected genotypes of almond Prunus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Average polymorphic information content (PIC) value of 16 selected primers was 0.684 and maximum and minimum PIC value was 0.8687 and 0.2551 for primers S073 and S081, respectively. Cophenetic correlation was found to be 0.89. RAPD data on genetic diversity matched classification of studied genotypes based on ...

  4. Genetic diversity analysis of stress tolerant rice ( Oryza sativa L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity analysis of stress tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) A S M Faridul Islam, M Raihan Ali, Glenn B Gregorio, M Rafiqul Islam. Abstract. Fourteen rice genotypes, composed of six salt tolerant, three submergence tolerant, two drought tolerant genotypes along with three high yielding genotypes, released from ...

  5. Genetic diversity of two Tunisian sheep breeds using random ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to study genetic diversity and population structure in six sheep populations belonging to two native Tunisian breeds (the Barbarine and the Western thin tail). A total of 96 samples were typed using eight RAPD primers. 62 bands were scored, of which 44 ...

  6. Evaluation of genetic diversity in barley ( Hordeum vulgare L.) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to determine the genetic diversity and relationships among barley varieties (Hordeum vulgare L.) growing at Wollo Highland areas by using hordein and agro-morphological traits. Twenty (20) varieties were laid down in randomized complete block design (RCBD) design with three replications; they were ...

  7. Genetic diversity and in vitro antibiotic susceptibility profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We assessed the genetic diversity of forty Salmonella isolates obtained from selected domestic water and waste water sources in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa using DNA fingerprinting and antibiotic susceptibility profile as test indices. Restriction digests and SDS/PAGE as well as the DNA dendograms of the ...

  8. Molecular based assessment of genetic diversity of xoconostle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Xoconostle or acidic prickly pear is an important fruit in Mexico; it is produced by a group of Opuntia plants known for their nutritional qualities and adapted to harsh environmental conditions. In this study, we report for the first time the estimation of genetic diversity within a set of 24 xoconostle accessions ...

  9. Assessment of genetic diversity in Triticum spp. and Aegilops spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... polymorphism (AFLP) and morphological markers. Thirty one Triticum and Aegilops genotypes ..... modern breeding would go hand in hand with a large decrease in diversity, which could threaten ... Aegilops tauschii genepool and the evolution of hexaploid wheat. Theor. Appl. Genet. 97: 657–670. Friebe B ...

  10. Study of genetic diversity in finger millet (Eleusine coracana L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... Radioactive detection. Yes/No. No. Yes/No. No. Yes/No. Yes/No. Development costs. Medium. Low. Medium. Medium/High. High. Medium. Start-up costs. Medium/High. Low. Medium. High. High. Medium. Applications. Genetic diversity, polyploidy, hybridization, phylogeny, mating system. Fingerprinting,.

  11. Study of genetic diversity in Sudanese sesame (Sesamum indicum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to assess genetic diversity in Sesame indicum (L.). RAPD technique was carried out in a set of 10 sesame germplasm collected from different regions of Sudan. A total of 64 polymorphisms (6.4 polymorphic markers per primer) out of 75 reproducible ...

  12. Preliminary molecular analysis of the genetic diversity of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the arid and semi arid areas, salt bush (Atriplex) represents an important forage resource. The characterization of the genetic diversity of these species is useful for their classification, their conservation and their improvement. In this context, we used the random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction ...

  13. Genetic diversity of bottle gourd ( Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl.) is an important crop in rural communities in South Africa but it remains under-researched. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity present amongst bottle gourd landraces grown by smallholder farmers in South Africa using morphological traits and 11 ...

  14. Genetic diversity in coastal and inland desert populations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study compared the genetic diversity within and among six naturally growing coastal and inland populations of Peganum harmala by using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Seven primers generated a total of 63 RAPD bands (loci) of which 60 (95.24%) were polymorphic across all individuals.

  15. Assessment of genetic diversity in sorghum accessions using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uwerhiavwe

    3Agricultural Research Council - Grain Crops Institute, Private Bag X1251, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa. Accepted 21 February, 2013. Amplified ... the main areas of sorghum domestication (Deu et al.,. 1994). Assessment of sorghum ... characterise genetic diversity within and among crop species and these will help in ...

  16. Assessment of the genetic diversity of geographically unrelated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOHN

    2005-05-05

    May 5, 2005 ... for the identification of genetic diversity of geographical unrelated strains and analysis of M. aeruginosa strains. AFLPs seem to overcome the major pitfalls present in other PCR based methods, e.g. DAF or RAPD analysis, and appear to be as reproducible, heritable and intraspecific as RFLPs (Law et al., ...

  17. Genetic diversity in Zimbabwean Sanga cattle breeds using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zimbabwe's smallholder land-based livelihoods are dominated by the three local Sanga cattle breeds, namely Mashona, Tuli, and Nkone. A study was carried out to determine genetic diversity and differentiation among conservation populations of these breeds using 16 bovine-specific microsatellite markers. These markers ...

  18. Genetic diversity of important rice cultivars of Kashmir valley using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    27,RM-72, RM-107 and RM-154 were used to estimate the genetic diversity of eight indica rice cultivars significant for rice breeding programme in the temperate Kashmir Province of India. The SSR primers used, specific to five different ...

  19. Genetic diversity and population structure among isolates of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bipolaris oryzae, the rice brown spot fungus is one of the pathological threats to rice crop worldwide. The genetic diversity among the Indian isolates of brown spot pathogen was studied using inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR). Considerable intraspecific variability among the isolates of B. oryzae was revealed.

  20. Application of SRAP in the genetic diversity of Tricholoma matsutake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... Key words: Genetic diversity, Tricholoma matsutake, fungi, sequence related amplified polymorphism (SRAP). INTRODUCTION. The ectomycorrhizal fungus Tricholoma matsutake is one of the most delicious and valuable edible mushrooms in ... and one each from Korea, Japan, France, and Morocco,.

  1. Genetic diversity studies of Kherigarh cattle based on microsatellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report a genetic diversity study of Kherigarh cattle, a utility draught-purpose breed of India, currently declining at a startling rate, by use of microsatellite markers recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization. Microsatellite genotypes were derived, and allelic and genotypic frequencies, heterozygosities and ...

  2. Genetic diversity of maize genotypes on the basis of morpho ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this investigation, an attempt was made to assess the genetic diversity among 91 maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes using morpho-physiological and molecular markers. Variability was observed for six morpho-physiological traits namely, SPAD chlorophyll meter reading, canopy temperature, plant height, yield per plant, ...

  3. Original Paper Patterns of genetic structure and phenotypic diversity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diversity levels in ten local sorghum guinea varieties (25 panicles per variety) collected from different farms in ... results underline the role of farmer practices in phenotypic and genetic evolution of sorghum. This concept should be well considered ... varietal needs and preferences: applying research station-based breeding ...

  4. Genetic diversity of indigenous chicken ecotypes in Jordan | Al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA polymorphism of 4 indigenous chicken ecotypes was assessed in Jordan using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. 10 RAPD markers showed high genetic diversity values in the 4 ecotypes located in the northern, eastern, western and southern provinces of Jordan. The effective number of alleles per ...

  5. Analysis of genetic diversity and construction of core collection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-03

    Jun 3, 2011 ... Genetic diversity of 73 local mulberry varieties from Shanxi Province were screened using ISSR markers, with l5 primers combinations selected for their reproducibility and polymorphism. 129 bands were amplified, of which 115 bands showed polymorphism and the ratio of polymorphism bands was.

  6. Assessment of the genetic diversity conservation in three tall coconut

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of the genetic diversity conservation in three tall coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) accessions regenerated by controlled pollination, using microsatellite markers. Saraka Didier Martial Yao, Konan Jean Louis Konan, N'Da Désiré Pokou, Kouamé Jean Noel Konan, Auguste Emmanuel Issali, Raoul Sylvère Sie, Bi Irié ...

  7. Molecular based assessment of genetic diversity of xoconostle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xoconostle or acidic prickly pear is an important fruit in Mexico; it is produced by a group of Opuntia plants known for their nutritional qualities and adapted to harsh environmental conditions. In this study, we report for the first time the estimation of genetic diversity within a set of 24 xoconostle accessions using inter simple ...

  8. Assessment of genetic diversity in different clones of Dalbergia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity of forty (40) clones of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb was analyzed using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers by selecting 30 decamer primers, which were later reduced to 10 based on the preliminary PCR amplification. A total of 129 distinct DNA fragments (bands) were amplified, of which 104 ...

  9. Genetic diversity and historical demography of kuruma shrimp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two varieties (I and II) of kuruma shrimp (Penaeus japonicus) were found in the north of South China Sea (SCS) and Taiwan Strait (TS). To estimate the demographic history and genetic diversity of this species complex off China, 141 individuals were collected from the East China Sea (ECS), TS and SCS and 27 variety 2 ...

  10. Analysis of genetic diversity in pigeon pea germplasm using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANEESHA

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... Asia and Africa. It is normally considered to have a low degree of genetic diversity, an impediment in undertaking crop improvement programmes. ... of environmental conditions. ..... Th, Thailand; It, Italy; B, Barbados; Ta, Taiwan; J, Jamaica; V, Venezuela; UK, United Kingdom; My, Myanmar; U, Uganda; G,.

  11. Population structure and genetic diversity of Sudanese native chickens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of Sudanese native chicken breeds involved in a conservation program. Five Sudanese native chicken breeds were compared with populations studied previously, which included six purebred lines, six African populations and one ...

  12. DNA methylation and genetic diversity analysis of genus Cycas in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mallory

    2012-01-12

    Jan 12, 2012 ... Key words: Cycas, DNA methylation, genetic diversity, methylation sensitive amplification polymorphism .... Cliffs and steep slopes on Khao Chamao mountain (eastern. Thailand). C. clivicola subsp. clivicola (Cli). 7-9, 10-12. M, F. Limestone cliffs, sea shore, evergreen forest, dry ... cytosine at both strands.

  13. Genetic diversity analysis and subspecies classification of Thailand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity among 126 rice accessions, including 110 Thai landraces and 16 varieties used as subspecies reference, were evaluated by three types of DNA markers, InDel (Insertion/Deletion), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Twelve InDel primer pairs, based on DNA ...

  14. Assessment of genetic diversity in Sudanese maize ( Zea mays L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers were used to assess genetic diversity in 27 Sudanese maize genotypes. Ten primers were used, resulting in the amplification of 59 fragments, of which 53 (89.33) were polymorphic. The maximum number of fragment bands (10) were produced by the ...

  15. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mbarara, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: We determined the genetic diversity of mycobacteria isolated from tuberculosis patients in Mbarara Uganda, using region of difference (RD) analysis and spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping). Methods: Sputum samples were cultured on Lowenstein Jensen media. The isolates were characterized using ...

  16. Genetic diversity of Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inter-simple sequence repeats markers were used to estimate the genetic diversity of Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack. from Sichuan Province, Yunnan Province, Chongqing City and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in China. 100 primers were carried out on 22 wild populations, 14 could produce highly ...

  17. Genetic diversity of Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack. in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to estimate the genetic diversity of Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack. from Sichuan Province, Yunnan Province, Chongqing City and. Guangxi Zhuang autonomous Region in China. 10 primer combinations were carried out on 180 different individuals ...

  18. Assessment of genetic diversity among accessions of two traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of genetic diversity among accessions of two traditional leafy vegetables (Acmella uliginosa (L.) and Justicia tenella (Nees) T.) consumed in Benin using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. K Adéoti, A Rival, A Dansi, BS Ahohuendo, S Santoni, T Beule, A Nato, Y Henry, A Ahanchédé, ...

  19. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid wheat screened against Barley yellow dwarf virus. Huma Saffdar1 ... The history of cultiva- ted wheat and human .... and viewed under the UV light chamber using the computer pro- gram UVIPhotoMW.

  20. Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in cluster bean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pestle in a 1.5 mL conical micro-centrifuge tubes with liquid nitrogen. Dneasy. ® plant mini kit protocols ... products was drawn using unweighted pair group method us- ing arithmetic averages algorithm (UPGMA) .... Mignouna H. D., Ng N. Q., Ikea J. and Thotapilly G. 1998 Genetic diversity in cowpea as revealed by random ...

  1. Genetic diversity of Ascaris in southwestern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Nejsum, Peter; Llewellyn-Hughes, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ascariasis in southwestern Uganda, helminth control in the region has been limited. To gain further insights into the genetic diversity of Ascaris in this area, a parasitological survey in mothers (n=41) and children (n=74) living in two villages, Habutobere and M...

  2. Genetic diversity in green gram [Vigna radiata (L.)] landraces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green gram [Vigna radiata (L.)] landraces were collected from various localities of Southern Tamil Nadu, India, to determine the extent of genetic diversity at DNA level by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis using 20 decamer primers. All the primers produced polymorphic amplification products with some ...

  3. Genetic diversity and population structure of begomoviruses infecting sweet potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begomoviruses infecting sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) exhibit high genetic diversity, and approximately eight species including Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) have been described from different regions around the world. In this study, the complete genomic sequences of 17 geographically dist...

  4. Genetic diversity of Santalum album using random amplified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... Sandalwood is found distributed all over the country with over 90% of the area in Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. It is of great economic importance because of its fragrant heartwood and oil. In the present study Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used to accesses the genetic diversity ...

  5. Genetic Diversity Of Plukenetia Volubilis L. Assessed By ISSR Markers*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocelák M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and genetic relationships in 173 sacha inchi samples were analyzed using ISSR markers. Thirty ISSR primers were used, only 8 showed variability in tested samples. ISSR fragments ranged from 200 to 2500 bp. The mean number of bands per primer was 12 and the average number of polymorphic bands per primer was 11. The lowest percentages of polymorphic bands (27%, gene diversity (0.103, and Shannon’s information index (0.15 were exhibited by the Santa Lucia population, which was also geographically most distant. This fact may be attributed to a very small size of this group. In contrast, the Dos de Mayo population exhibited the highest percentage of polymorphic bands (78%, and the Santa Cruz population the highest Nei’s gene diversity index (0.238 and Shannon’s information index (0.357. The obtained level of genetic variability was 36% among tested populations and 64% within populations. Although the diversity indices were low, a cluster analysis revealed 8 clusters containing mainly samples belonging to individual populations. Principal coordinate analysis clearly distinguished Chumbaquihui, Pucallpa, Dos de Mayo, and Aguas de Oro populations, the others were intermixed. The obtained results indicated the level of genetic diversity present in this location of Peru, although it is influenced by anthropological aspects and independent on the geographical distances.

  6. Genetic diversity of Entamoeba: Novel ribosomal lineages from cockroaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Kawano

    Full Text Available Our current taxonomic perspective on Entamoeba is largely based on small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes (SSU rDNA from Entamoeba species identified in vertebrate hosts with minor exceptions such as E. moshkovskii from sewage water and E. marina from marine sediment. Other Entamoeba species have also been morphologically identified and described from non-vertebrate species such as insects; however, their genetic diversity remains unknown. In order to further disclose the diversity of the genus, we investigated Entamoeba spp. in the intestines of three cockroach species: Periplaneta americana, Blaptica dubia, and Gromphadorhina oblongonota. We obtained 134 Entamoeba SSU rDNA sequences from 186 cockroaches by direct nested PCR using the DNA extracts of intestines from cockroaches, followed by scrutinized BLASTn screening and phylogenetic analyses. All the sequences identified in this study were distinct from those reported from known Entamoeba species, and considered as novel Entamoeba ribosomal lineages. Furthermore, they were positioned at the base of the clade of known Entamoeba species and displayed remarkable degree of genetic diversity comprising nine major groups in the three cockroach species. This is the first report of the diversity of SSU rDNA sequences from Entamoeba in non-vertebrate host species, and should help to understand the genetic diversity of the genus Entamoeba.

  7. Genetic diversity of Entamoeba: Novel ribosomal lineages from cockroaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Tetsuro; Imada, Mihoko; Chamavit, Pennapa; Kobayashi, Seiki; Hashimoto, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Our current taxonomic perspective on Entamoeba is largely based on small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes (SSU rDNA) from Entamoeba species identified in vertebrate hosts with minor exceptions such as E. moshkovskii from sewage water and E. marina from marine sediment. Other Entamoeba species have also been morphologically identified and described from non-vertebrate species such as insects; however, their genetic diversity remains unknown. In order to further disclose the diversity of the genus, we investigated Entamoeba spp. in the intestines of three cockroach species: Periplaneta americana, Blaptica dubia, and Gromphadorhina oblongonota. We obtained 134 Entamoeba SSU rDNA sequences from 186 cockroaches by direct nested PCR using the DNA extracts of intestines from cockroaches, followed by scrutinized BLASTn screening and phylogenetic analyses. All the sequences identified in this study were distinct from those reported from known Entamoeba species, and considered as novel Entamoeba ribosomal lineages. Furthermore, they were positioned at the base of the clade of known Entamoeba species and displayed remarkable degree of genetic diversity comprising nine major groups in the three cockroach species. This is the first report of the diversity of SSU rDNA sequences from Entamoeba in non-vertebrate host species, and should help to understand the genetic diversity of the genus Entamoeba. PMID:28934335

  8. Determination of genetic diversity among some almond accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More recently the use of different molecular markers in fruit species to determine particularly genetic diversity, genetic relationships and cultivar identification has been gained more importance. In the study, 13 randomly amplified polimorfic DNA (RAPD and 4 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers were used to evaluate genetic relationships among 95 almong accessions (26 foreign cultivars and 69 national cultivars and selections. The all plant material found in Almond Germplasm Repository in Gaziantep, Turkey. Both RAPD and ISSR markers distinguished the almond cultivars and selections in various levels. 17 RAPD and ISSR markers yielded a total of 73 scorable bands, which 51 are polymorphic. The two marker system exhibited variation with regard to average band sizes and polymorphism ratio. The average polymorphism was higher in ISSR (88% compared to RAPD (74%. RAPD and ISSR marker systems were found to be useful for determining genetic diversity among almong genotypes and cultivars. Combining of two dendrograms obtained through these markers show different clustering of 96 almond specimens without geographical isolation. These results supported that almonds in Turkey indicated considerable genetic diversity.

  9. [Study on Genetic Diversity of Twelve Natural Zanthoxylum dissitum Populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Wang, Ping; Sun, Ji-kang; Zhou, Tao; Fe, Ming-liang

    2014-12-01

    The genetic diversity of twelve natural Zanthoxylum dissitum populations, which is a species of Chinese herbal medicines to four provinces of southwest China, has been investigated. By inter-simple sequence repeat markers (ISSR), the eight primers, which could amplify stable, clear and highly polymorphic bands, were screened from 100 candidate primers. 150 total ISSR discernible bands and 147 polymorphic were amplified by the eight checked primers. On one hand, the percentage of polymorphic bands was 98.0%, on the other hand, the population level the percent of polymorphic bands ranged from 26.0% to 62.0%. The Shannon's information index within species (Hsp) was 0.4175, while the values within population (Hpop) were ranged from 0.1328 to 0.3267. Analysis of molecular variance (ANOVA) revealed that the population genetic variation accounted for 47.98% but the intraspecific variation for 52.02%. The high level of genetic diversity exists not only in population but also in species. A high degree of genetic differentiation populations is approved to exist in Zanthoxylum dissitum. These results lay a theoretical foundation for genetic diversity analysis of Zanthoxylum dissitum.

  10. Thai pigs and cattle production, genetic diversity of livestock and strategies for preserving animal genetic resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesinee Gatphayak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current situation of livestock production in Thailand, genetic diversity and evaluation, as well as management strategies for animal genetic resources focusing on pigs and cattle. Sustainable conservation of indigenous livestock as a genetic resource and vital components within the agricultural biodiversity domain is a great challenge as well as an asset for the future development of livestock production in Thailand.

  11. Bacterial diversity is strongly associated with historical penguin activity in an Antarctic lake sediment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Renbin; Shi, Yu; Ma, Dawei; Wang, Can; Xu, Hua; Chu, Haiyan

    2015-11-25

    Current penguin activity in Antarctica affects the geochemistry of sediments and their microbial communities; the effects of historical penguin activity are less well understood. Here, bacterial diversity in ornithogenic sediment was investigated using high-throughput pyrosequencing. The relative abundances of dominant phyla were controlled by the amount of historical penguin guano deposition. Significant positive correlations were found between both the bacterial richness and diversity, and the relative penguin number (p penguin activity drove the vertical distribution of the bacterial communities. The lowest relative abundances of individual phyla corresponded to lowest number of penguin population at 1,800-2,300 yr BP during a drier and colder period; the opposite was observed during a moister and warmer climate (1,400-1,800 yr BP). This study shows that changes in the climate over millennia affected penguin populations and the outcomes of these changes affect the sediment bacterial community today.

  12. Bacterial diversity in snow on North Pole ice floes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauptmann, Aviaja Zenia Edna Lyberth; Stibal, Marek; Bælum, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The microbial abundance and diversity in snow on ice floes at three sites near the North Pole was assessed using quantitative PCR and 454 pyrosequencing. Abundance of 16S rRNA genes in the samples ranged between 43 and 248 gene copies per millilitre of melted snow. A total of 291,331 sequences we...

  13. Illumina-Based Analysis of Endophytic and Rhizosphere Bacterial Diversity of the Coastal Halophyte Messerschmidia sibirica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ying Tian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Halophytes play important roles in coastal ecosystems. However, few reports have described bacterial communities related to halophytes, and the distribution patterns of these bacteria in different plant tissues have been rarely compared. This paper mainly studied the diversity and community structure of endophytic and rhizosphere (Rh bacteria related to the halophyte Messerschmidia sibirica, a dominant species in the coastal zone of Shandong Peninsula, China. We collected leaf (Lf, stem (Sm, root (Rt, Rh, and bulk (Bl control soil samples, and sequenced the V5–V7 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using the Illumina HiSeq platform to identify bacterial communities originating from different plant habitats. We found that the bacterial richness and diversity in Rh were significantly higher than those in the leaves, Sm, and Rt, but lower than those of the Bl control soil. In total, 37 phyla and 438 genera were identified. Microbial-diversity analysis showed that Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the dominant phyla and that Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Sphingomonas, Streptomyces, Microbacterium, Rhizobium, and Nocardioides were the dominant genera. However, there were clear differences in community diversity and structure among the samples. Endophytic bacteria community in Lf, Sm, and Rt shared more similarity than those in Rh and Bl control soil. The numbers of operational taxonomic units exclusive to the Lf, stem, Rt, Rh, and Bl control soil samples were 51, 43, 122, 139, and 922, respectively, implying habitat-specific patterns. Principal coordinate analysis demonstrated differences were apparent in the bacterial communities associated with habitats. On the whole, M. sibirica affected bacterial diversity and structured the bacterial community. This study provides insight into the complex microbial compositions of coastal halophytes.

  14. Temporal and spatial diversity of bacterial communities in coastal waters of the South china sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jikun Du

    Full Text Available Bacteria are recognized as important drivers of biogeochemical processes in all aquatic ecosystems. Temporal and geographical patterns in ocean bacterial communities have been observed in many studies, but the temporal and spatial patterns in the bacterial communities from the South China Sea remained unexplored. To determine the spatiotemporal patterns, we generated 16S rRNA datasets for 15 samples collected from the five regularly distributed sites of the South China Sea in three seasons (spring, summer, winter. A total of 491 representative sequences were analyzed by MOTHUR, yielding 282 operational taxonomic units (OTUs grouped at 97% stringency. Significant temporal variations of bacterial diversity were observed. Richness and diversity indices indicated that summer samples were the most diverse. The main bacterial group in spring and summer samples was Alphaproteobacteria, followed by Cyanobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, whereas Cyanobacteria dominated the winter samples. Spatial patterns in the samples were observed that samples collected from the coastal (D151, D221 waters and offshore (D157, D1512, D224 waters clustered separately, the coastal samples harbored more diverse bacterial communities. However, the temporal pattern of the coastal site D151 was contrary to that of the coastal site D221. The LIBSHUFF statistics revealed noticeable differences among the spring, summer and winter libraries collected at five sites. The UPGMA tree showed there were temporal and spatial heterogeneity of bacterial community composition in coastal waters of the South China Sea. The water salinity (P=0.001 contributed significantly to the bacteria-environment relationship. Our results revealed that bacterial community structures were influenced by environmental factors and community-level changes in 16S-based diversity were better explained by spatial patterns than by temporal patterns.

  15. Recombinant biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose in genetically modified Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldum, Gizem; Bismarck, Alexander; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2018-02-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) exhibits unique properties such as high purity compared to plant-based cellulose; however, commercial production of BC has remained a challenge, primarily due to the strain properties of cellulose-producing bacteria. Herein, we developed a functional and stable BC production system in genetically modified (GM) Escherichia coli by recombinant expression of both the BC synthase operon (bcsABCD) and the upstream operon (cmcax, ccp Ax). BC production was achieved in GM HMS174 (DE3) and in GM C41 (DE3) by optimization of the culture temperature (22 °C, 30 °C, and 37 °C) and IPTG concentration. BC biosynthesis was detected much earlier in GM C41 (DE3) cultures (3 h after IPTG induction) than those of Gluconacetobacter hansenii. GM HMS174 (DE3) produced dense fibres having a length of approximately 1000-3000 μm and a diameter of 10-20 μm, which were remarkably larger than the fibres of BC typically produced by G. hansenii.

  16. [Genetic transformation and fate of heterological DNA in bacterial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowska, Mirosława

    2015-01-01

    Secretion of a metabolite enabling Streptococci to undergo genetic transformation was discovered. The metabolite combined with an optimization process were applied to increase the transformation yield about 20-fold. It was observed that large amounts of DNA exert a bactericidal effect, indicating the ability of at least 70% of cells to uptake the polymer. While studying the molecular mechanism of transformation of Bacillus subtilis it was shown that the uptaken DNA forms complexes with bacterial proteins, which hinders determination of its structure. A method was found to dissociate these complexes which enabled to determine the single-stranded structure of the uptaken DNA. Donor DNA fragments incorporated into the host DNA were of about 10 Da. Non-transforming DNA can be uptaken similarly but does not undergo incorporation into the host DNA. The selectivity of Bacillus subtilis receptors was determined towards DNA of phages containing modified bases: uracil, putrescinyl-thymine and its acetylated derivative, 5'-hydroxymethylcytosine and its glycosylated derivative and also towards double-stranded RNA of f2 phage. All these modifications were tolerated by the cellular receptors, with the exception of glycosylation and the 2'-OH group in RNA.

  17. Transferability of Cucurbita SSR markers for genetic diversity assessment of Turkish bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) genetic resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genetic diversity present in crop landraces represents a valuable genetic resource for breeding and genetic studies. Bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) landraces in Turkey are highly genetically diverse. However, the limited genomic resources available for this crop hinder the molecular characte...

  18. Diversity and abundance of the bacterial community of the red Macroalga Porphyra umbilicalis: did bacterial farmers produce macroalgae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth N Miranda

    Full Text Available Macroalgae harbor microbial communities whose bacterial biodiversity remains largely uncharacterized. The goals of this study were 1 to examine the composition of the bacterial community associated with Porphyra umbilicalis Kützing from Schoodic Point, ME, 2 determine whether there are seasonal trends in species diversity but a core group of bacteria that are always present, and 3 to determine how the microbial community associated with a laboratory strain (P.um.1 established in the presence of antibiotics has changed. P. umbilicalis blades (n = 5, fall 2010; n = 5, winter 2011; n = 2, clonal P.um.1 were analyzed by pyrosequencing over two variable regions of the 16 S rDNA (V5-V6 and V8; 147,880 total reads. The bacterial taxa present were classified at an 80% confidence threshold into eight phyla (Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, and the candidate division TM7. The Bacteroidetes comprised the majority of bacterial sequences on both field and lab blades, but the Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria were also abundant. Sphingobacteria (Bacteroidetes and Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes had inverse abundances on natural versus P.um.1 blades. Bacterial communities were richer and more diverse on blades sampled in fall compared to winter. Significant differences were observed between microbial communities among all three groups of blades examined. Only two OTUs were found on all 12 blades, and only one of these, belonging to the Saprospiraceae (Bacteroidetes, was abundant. Lewinella (as 66 OTUs was found on all field blades and was the most abundant genus. Bacteria from the Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes that are known to digest the galactan sulfates of red algal cell walls were well-represented. Some of these taxa likely provide essential morphogenetic and beneficial nutritive factors to P. umbilicalis and may have had

  19. Diversity and abundance of the bacterial community of the red Macroalga Porphyra umbilicalis: did bacterial farmers produce macroalgae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Lilibeth N; Hutchison, Keith; Grossman, Arthur R; Brawley, Susan H

    2013-01-01

    Macroalgae harbor microbial communities whose bacterial biodiversity remains largely uncharacterized. The goals of this study were 1) to examine the composition of the bacterial community associated with Porphyra umbilicalis Kützing from Schoodic Point, ME, 2) determine whether there are seasonal trends in species diversity but a core group of bacteria that are always present, and 3) to determine how the microbial community associated with a laboratory strain (P.um.1) established in the presence of antibiotics has changed. P. umbilicalis blades (n = 5, fall 2010; n = 5, winter 2011; n = 2, clonal P.um.1) were analyzed by pyrosequencing over two variable regions of the 16 S rDNA (V5-V6 and V8; 147,880 total reads). The bacterial taxa present were classified at an 80% confidence threshold into eight phyla (Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, and the candidate division TM7). The Bacteroidetes comprised the majority of bacterial sequences on both field and lab blades, but the Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria) were also abundant. Sphingobacteria (Bacteroidetes) and Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes) had inverse abundances on natural versus P.um.1 blades. Bacterial communities were richer and more diverse on blades sampled in fall compared to winter. Significant differences were observed between microbial communities among all three groups of blades examined. Only two OTUs were found on all 12 blades, and only one of these, belonging to the Saprospiraceae (Bacteroidetes), was abundant. Lewinella (as 66 OTUs) was found on all field blades and was the most abundant genus. Bacteria from the Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes that are known to digest the galactan sulfates of red algal cell walls were well-represented. Some of these taxa likely provide essential morphogenetic and beneficial nutritive factors to P. umbilicalis and may have had unexpected

  20. Functional traits dominate the diversity-related selection of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Kuramae, Eiko E; de Hollander, Mattias; Klinkhamer, Peter G L; van Veen, Johannes A

    2017-01-01

    We studied the impact of community diversity on the selection of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere by comparing the composition and the functional traits of these communities in soil and rhizosphere. Differences in diversity were established by inoculating into sterilized soils diluted suspensions of the same soil. We used 16S ribosomal RNA amplicon sequencing to determine the taxonomical structure of the bacterial communities and a shotgun metagenomics approach to investigate the potential functional diversity of the communities. By comparing the bacterial communities in soil and rhizosphere, the selective power of the plant was observed both at the taxonomic and functional level, although the diversity indices of soil and rhizosphere samples showed a highly variable, irregular pattern. Lesser variation, that is, more homogenization, was found for both the taxonomic structure and the functional profile of the rhizosphere communities as compared to the communities of the bulk soil. Network analysis revealed stronger interactions among bacterial operational taxonomic units in the rhizosphere than in the soil. The enrichment processes in the rhizosphere selected microbes with particular functional genes related to transporters, the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway and hydrogen metabolism. This selection was not random across bacteria with these functional traits, but it was species specific. Overall, this suggests that functional traits are a key to the assembly of bacterial rhizosphere communities.

  1. Bacterial human virulence genes across diverse habitats as assessed by In silico analysis of environmental metagenomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Ditte Andreasen; Hendriksen, Niels B.; Kilian, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of clinically relevant bacterial virulence genes across natural (non-human) environments is not well understood. We aimed to investigate the occurrence of homologs to bacterial human virulence genes in a variety of ecological niches to better understand the role...... of natural environments in the evolution of bacterial virulence. Twenty four bacterial virulence genes were analyzed in 46 diverse environmental metagenomic datasets, representing various soils, seawater, freshwater, marine sediments, hot springs, the deep-sea, hypersaline mats, microbialites, gutless worms...... and glacial ice. Homologs to 16 bacterial human virulence genes, involved in urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal diseases, skin diseases, and wound and systemic infections, showed global ubiquity. A principal component analysis did not demonstrate clear trends across the metagenomes with respect...

  2. Characteristics of phylogenetic diversity in airborne bacterial populations in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Zahra; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Martins, J. V.

    2011-05-01

    Considering their potential implications for human health, agricultural productivity, and ecosystem stability, surprisingly little is known about the composition or dynamics of the atmosphere's biological aerosols. The few studies that have examined phylogenetic diversity in China focused on a single sampling period, whereas this study spans 3 months and includes over 300 samples. The 300+ samples were categorized by month and direction of their back-trajectory. DNA extraction was carried out on the pooled samples in a quantitative manner to allow for comparison between the amount of extracted material and the amount of initial total aerosol mass. Within an individual month, samples originating from similar land types and approximately equidistant to the sampling location exhibited similar diversity, whereas samples originating from much greater distances and from different land types included phyla unique to that location. Phyla from the same origin also varied from one month to the next. The biological diversity found from the Phylochips reinforces the hypothesis that air samples carry a biological record of their history.

  3. Estimating intraspecific genetic diversity from community DNA metabarcoding data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Elbrecht

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background DNA metabarcoding is used to generate species composition data for entire communities. However, sequencing errors in high-throughput sequencing instruments are fairly common, usually requiring reads to be clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs, losing information on intraspecific diversity in the process. While Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI haplotype information is limited in resolving intraspecific diversity it is nevertheless often useful e.g. in a phylogeographic context, helping to formulate hypotheses on taxon distribution and dispersal. Methods This study combines sequence denoising strategies, normally applied in microbial research, with additional abundance-based filtering to extract haplotype information from freshwater macroinvertebrate metabarcoding datasets. This novel approach was added to the R package “JAMP” and can be applied to COI amplicon datasets. We tested our haplotyping method by sequencing (i a single-species mock community composed of 31 individuals with 15 different haplotypes spanning three orders of magnitude in biomass and (ii 18 monitoring samples each amplified with four different primer sets and two PCR replicates. Results We detected all 15 haplotypes of the single specimens in the mock community with relaxed filtering and denoising settings. However, up to 480 additional unexpected haplotypes remained in both replicates. Rigorous filtering removes most unexpected haplotypes, but also can discard expected haplotypes mainly from the small specimens. In the monitoring samples, the different primer sets detected 177–200 OTUs, each containing an average of 2.40–3.30 haplotypes per OTU. The derived intraspecific diversity data showed population structures that were consistent between replicates and similar between primer pairs but resolution depended on the primer length. A closer look at abundant taxa in the dataset revealed various population genetic patterns, e.g. the stonefly

  4. Investigation of bacterial diversity of hot springs of Odisha, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar Sahoo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available 16S rRNA deep sequencing analysis, targeting V3 region was performed using Illumina bar coded sequencing. Sediment samples from two hot springs (Atri and Taptapani were collected. Atri and Taptapani metagenomes were classified into 50 and 51 bacterial phyla. Proteobacteria (45.17% dominated the Taptapani sample metagenome followed by Bacteriodetes (23.43% and Cyanobacteria (10.48% while in the Atri sample, Chloroflexi (52.39%, Nitrospirae (10.93% and Proteobacteria (9.98% dominated. A large number of sequences remained taxonomically unresolved in both hot springs, indicating the presence of potentially novel microbes in these two unique habitats thus unraveling the importance of the current study. Metagenome sequence information is now available at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP057428.

  5. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman.

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    Salama Al-Hamidhi

    Full Text Available Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle.Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman.We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia. A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST' = 0.075,

  6. Genetic diversity in some local chicken breeds using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cassandro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic relationships among Veneto native breeds of chickens were studied on the basis of microsatellites polymorphisms. A total of 100 DNA samples from 2 local chicken breeds (45 Robusta Lionata and 43 Robusta Maculata and a commercial broiler line (12 Golden Comet were analyzed using 19 microsatellite markers. The average number of alleles per locus was 4.05 and the expected heterozigosity resulted lower for the local breeds than the broiler line. The Robusta Lionata breed and the broiler line showed a significant deficit and excess of heterozygotes, respectively, deviating from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Nei’s standard genetic distances corrected for bias due to sampling of individuals (Da, based on allele frequencies, were calculated among breeds. The local breeds resulted very similar confirming the same genetic origin. The results suggested that microsatellite markers are a useful tool for studying the genetic diversity among local chicken breeds.

  7. Genetic diversity of Bromeliaceae species from the Atlantic Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Y; Cunha-Machado, A S; Gontijo, A B P L; Favoreto, F C; Soares, T B C; Miranda, F D

    2017-04-20

    The Bromeliaceae family includes a range of species used for many purposes, including ornamental use and use as food, medicine, feed, and fiber. The state of Espírito Santo, Brazil is a center of diversity for this family in the Atlantic Forest. We evaluated the genetic diversity of five populations of the Bromeliaceae family, including specimens of the genera Aechmea, Billbergia (subfamily Bromelioideae), and Pitcairnia (subfamily Pitcairnioidea), all found in the Atlantic Forest and distributed in the state of Espírito Santo. The number of alleles per locus in populations ranged from two to six and the fixation index (F), estimated for some simple sequence repeats in bromeliad populations, was less than zero in all populations. All markers in the Pitcairnia flammea population were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.05). Moreover, significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed at some loci in populations of the five bromeliad species. In most cases, this can be attributed to the presence of inbreeding or the Wahlund effect. The genetic diversity indices of five species showed greater allelic richness in P. flammea (3.55). Therefore, we provide useful information for the characterization of genetic diversity in natural populations of Aechmea ramosa, Aechmea nudicaulis, Billbergia horrid, Billbergia euphemia, and P. flammea in Atlantic Forest remnants in the south of Espírito Santo state.

  8. Population genetic diversity and hybrid detection in captive zebras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hideyuki; Langenhorst, Tanya; Ogden, Rob; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2015-08-21

    Zebras are members of the horse family. There are three species of zebras: the plains zebra Equus quagga, the Grevy's zebra E. grevyi and the mountain zebra E. zebra. The Grevy's zebra and the mountain zebra are endangered, and hybridization between the Grevy's zebra and the plains zebra has been documented, leading to a requirement for conservation genetic management within and between the species. We characterized 28 microsatellite markers in Grevy's zebra and assessed cross-amplification in plains zebra and two of its subspecies, as well as mountain zebra. A range of standard indices were employed to examine population genetic diversity and hybrid populations between Grevy's and plains zebra were simulated to investigate subspecies and hybrid detection. Microsatellite marker polymorphism was conserved across species with sufficient variation to enable individual identification in all populations. Comparative diversity estimates indicated greater genetic variation in plains zebra and its subspecies than Grevy's zebra, despite potential ascertainment bias. Species and subspecies differentiation were clearly demonstrated and F1 and F2 hybrids were correctly identified. These findings provide insights into captive population genetic diversity in zebras and support the use of these markers for identifying hybrids, including the known hybrid issue in the endangered Grevy's zebra.

  9. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpy, David R.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S.

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee ( Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency ( m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6 ± 6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ≤ 7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e > 7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated.

  10. Effects of Dispersal and Initial Diversity on the Composition and Functional Performance of Bacterial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yinghua; Berga, Mercè; Comte, Jérôme; Langenheder, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Natural communities are open systems and consequently dispersal can play an important role for the diversity, composition and functioning of communities at the local scale. It is, however, still unclear how effects of dispersal differ depending on the initial diversity of local communities. Here we implemented an experiment where we manipulated the initial diversity of natural freshwater bacterioplankton communities using a dilution-to-extinction approach as well as dispersal from a regional species pool. The aim was further to test whether dispersal effects on bacterial abundance and functional parameters (average community growth rates, respiration rates, substrate utilisation ability) differ in dependence of the initial diversity of the communities. First of all, we found that both initial diversity and dispersal rates had an effect on the recruitment of taxa from a regional source, which was higher in communities with low initial diversity and at higher rates of dispersal. Higher initial diversity and dispersal also promoted higher levels of richness and evenness in local communities and affected, both, separately or interactively, the functional performance of communities. Our study therefore suggests that dispersal can influence the diversity, composition and functioning of bacterial communities and that this effect may be enhanced if the initial diversity of communities is depleted.

  11. Genetic Diversity of Aromatic Rice Germplasm Revealed By SSR Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Jasim Aljumaili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic rice cultivars constitute a small but special group of rice and are considered the best in terms of quality and aroma. Aroma is one of the most significant quality traits of rice, and variety with aroma has a higher price in the market. This research was carried out to study the genetic diversity among the 50 aromatic rice accessions from three regions (Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak with 3 released varieties as a control using the 32 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. The objectives of this research were to quantify the genetic divergence of aromatic rice accessions using SSR markers and to identify the potential accessions for introgression into the existing rice breeding program. Genetic diversity index among the three populations such as Shannon information index (I ranged from 0.25 in control to 0.98 in Sabah population. The mean numbers of effective alleles and Shannon’s information index were 0.36 and 64.90%, respectively. Similarly, the allelic diversity was very high with mean expected heterozygosity (He of 0.60 and mean Nei’s gene diversity index of 0.36. The dendrogram based on UPGMA and Nei’s genetic distance classified the 53 rice accessions into 10 clusters. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that 89% of the total variation observed in this germplasm came from within the populations, while 11% of the variation emanated among the populations. These results reflect the high genetic differentiation existing in this aromatic rice germplasm. Using all these criteria and indices, seven accessions (Acc9993, Acc6288, Acc6893, Acc7580, Acc6009, Acc9956, and Acc11816 from three populations have been identified and selected for further evaluation before introgression into the existing breeding program and for future aromatic rice varietal development.

  12. Bio-prospecting Bacterial Diversity of Hot Springs in Northern Himalayan Region of India for Laccases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vijaya; Gupta, Naveen; Capalash, Neena; Sharma, Prince

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial diversity of hot springs of northern Himalayan region of India was studied and explored for laccases, the multicopper enzymes applicable in a large number of industries due to their ability to utilize a wide range of substrates. 220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) out of 5551 sequence reads for bacterial diversity and 3 OTUs out of 19 sequence reads for Laccase like multicopper oxidases (LMCOs) diversity were generated. Bacteroidetes (74.28%) was the most abundant phylum including genus Paludibacter (66.96%), followed by phylum Proteobacteria (24.53%) including genera Chitinilyticum (7.55%) and Cellvibrio (6.14%). In case of laccase diversity, three LMCO sequences showed affiliation with proteobacteria and one with two domain laccase from uncultivable bacteroidetes. LMCO sequences belonged to H and N families.

  13. Intraspecific functional and genetic diversity ofPetriella setifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertile, Giorgia; Panek, Jacek; Oszust, Karolina; Siczek, Anna; Frąc, Magdalena

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was an analysis of the intraspecific genetic and functional diversity of the new isolated fungal strains of P. setifera . This is the first report concerning the genetic and metabolic diversity of Petriella setifera strains isolated from industrial compost and the first description of a protocol for AFLP fingerprinting analysis optimised for these fungal species. The results showed a significant degree of variability among the isolates, which was demonstrated by the clearly subdivision of all the isolates into two clusters with 51% and 62% similarity, respectively. For the metabolic diversity, the BIOLOG system was used and this analysis revealed clearly different patterns of carbon substrates utilization between the isolates resulting in a clear separation of the five isolates into three clusters with 0%, 42% and 54% of similarity, respectively. These results suggest that genetic diversity does not always match the level of functional diversity, which may be useful in discovering the importance of this fungus to ecosystem functioning. The results indicated that P. setifera strains were able to degrade substrates produced in the degradation of hemicellulose (D-Arabinose, L-Arabinose, D-Glucuronic Acid, Xylitol, γ-Amino-Butyric Acid, D-Mannose, D-Xylose and L-Rhamnose), cellulose (α-D-Glucose and D-Cellobiose) and the synthesis of lignin (Quinic Acid) at a high level, showing their importance in ecosystem services as a decomposer of carbon compounds and as organisms, which make a significant contribution to carbon cycling in the ecosystem.The results showed for the first time that the use of molecular biology techniques (such as AFLP and BIOLOG analyses) may allow for the identification of intraspecific diversity of as yet poorly investigated fungal species with favourable consequences for our understanding their ecosystem function.

  14. Genetic diversity among exotic cotton accessions as for qualitative and quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, L P; Farias, F J C; Rodrigues, J I S; Suassuna, N D; Teodoro, P E

    2017-02-08

    Studying genetic diversity among a group of genotypes is important in genetic breeding because identifying hybrid combinations of greater heterotic effect also increases the chance of obtaining plants with favorable allele combinations in an intra-population selection program. The objective of this study was to compare different types of long and extra-long staple cotton and their genetic diversity in relation to the fiber traits and some agronomic traits in order to grant breeding programs. Diversity analysis among 29 cotton accessions based on qualitative and quantitative traits and joint including qualitative and quantitative traits was performed. Analysis based on qualitative and quantitative traits and joint met the accessions in three, two, and three groups, respectively. The cross between genotypes Giza 59 and Pima unknown was the most promising to generate segregating populations, comprising simultaneously resistance (based on molecular markers) to blue disease and bacterial blight, partial resistance to root-knot nematode, smaller size, in addition to good fiber characteristics. These populations can be used in recurrent selection programs as donors of alleles for development of long-staple cotton genotypes.

  15. Genome-wide association analysis identifies resistance loci for bacterial blight in a diverse collection of indica rice germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Dingkuhn, Michael; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhou, Yong-Li; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial blight, which is caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. The development and use of disease-resistant cultivars have been the most effective strategy to control bacterial blight. Identifying the genes mediating bacterial blight resistance is a prerequisite for breeding cultivars with broad-spectrum and durable resistance. We herein describe a genome-wide association study involving 172 diverse Oryza sativa ssp. indica accessions to identify loci influencing the resistance to representative strains of six Xoo races. Twelve resistance loci containing 121 significantly associated signals were identified using 317,894 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which explained 13.3-59.9% of the variability in lesion length caused by Xoo races P1, P6, and P9a. Two hotspot regions (L11 and L12) were located within or nearby two cloned R genes (xa25 and Xa26) and one fine-mapped R gene (Xa4). Our results confirmed the relatively high resolution of genome-wide association studies. Moreover, we detected novel significant associations on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6-10. Haplotype analyses of xa25, the Xa26 paralog (MRKc; LOC_Os11g47290), and a Xa4 candidate gene (LOC_11g46870) revealed differences in bacterial blight resistance among indica subgroups. These differences were responsible for the observed variations in lesion lengths resulting from infections by Xoo races P1 and P9a. Our findings may be relevant for future studies involving bacterial blight resistance gene cloning, and provide insights into the genetic basis for bacterial blight resistance in indica rice, which may be useful for knowledge-based crop improvement.

  16. Genome-wide association analysis identifies resistance loci for bacterial blight in a diverse collection of indica rice germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Dingkuhn, Michael; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhou, Yong-Li; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial blight, which is caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. The development and use of disease-resistant cultivars have been the most effective strategy to control bacterial blight. Identifying the genes mediating bacterial blight resistance is a prerequisite for breeding cultivars with broad-spectrum and durable resistance. We herein describe a genome-wide association study involving 172 diverse Oryza sativa ssp. indica accessions to identify loci influencing the resistance to representative strains of six Xoo races. Twelve resistance loci containing 121 significantly associated signals were identified using 317,894 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which explained 13.3–59.9% of the variability in lesion length caused by Xoo races P1, P6, and P9a. Two hotspot regions (L11 and L12) were located within or nearby two cloned R genes (xa25 and Xa26) and one fine-mapped R gene (Xa4). Our results confirmed the relatively high resolution of genome-wide association studies. Moreover, we detected novel significant associations on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6–10. Haplotype analyses of xa25, the Xa26 paralog (MRKc; LOC_Os11g47290), and a Xa4 candidate gene (LOC_11g46870) revealed differences in bacterial blight resistance among indica subgroups. These differences were responsible for the observed variations in lesion lengths resulting from infections by Xoo races P1 and P9a. Our findings may be relevant for future studies involving bacterial blight resistance gene cloning, and provide insights into the genetic basis for bacterial blight resistance in indica rice, which may be useful for knowledge-based crop improvement. PMID:28355306

  17. Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity of Total (DNA) and Expressed (RNA) Bacterial Communities in Urban Green Infrastructure Bioswale Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Angela; McGuire, Krista L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT New York City (NYC) is pioneering green infrastructure with the use of bioswales and other engineered soil-based habitats to provide stormwater infiltration and other ecosystem functions. In addition to avoiding the environmental and financial costs of expanding traditional built infrastructure, green infrastructure is thought to generate cobenefits in the form of diverse ecological processes performed by its plant and microbial communities. Yet, although plant communities in these habitats are closely managed, we lack basic knowledge about how engineered ecosystems impact the distribution and functioning of soil bacteria. We sequenced amplicons of the 16S ribosomal subunit, as well as seven genes associated with functional pathways, generated from both total (DNA-based) and expressed (RNA) soil communities in the Bronx, NYC, NY, in order to test whether bioswale soils host characteristic bacterial communities with evidence for enriched microbial functioning, compared to nonengineered soils in park lawns and tree pits. Bioswales had distinct, phylogenetically diverse bacterial communities, including taxa associated with nutrient cycling and metabolism of hydrocarbons and other pollutants. Bioswale soils also had a significantly greater diversity of genes involved in several functional pathways, including carbon fixation (cbbL-R [cbbL gene, red-like subunit] and apsA), nitrogen cycling (noxZ and amoA), and contaminant degradation (bphA); conversely, no functional genes were significantly more abundant in nonengineered soils. These results provide preliminary evidence that urban land management can shape the diversity and activity of soil communities, with positive consequences for genetic resources underlying valuable ecological functions, including biogeochemical cycling and degradation of common urban pollutants. IMPORTANCE Management of urban soil biodiversity by favoring taxa associated with decontamination or other microbial metabolic processes is a

  18. Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity of Total (DNA) and Expressed (RNA) Bacterial Communities in Urban Green Infrastructure Bioswale Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Aman S; Lee, Angela; McGuire, Krista L

    2017-08-15

    New York City (NYC) is pioneering green infrastructure with the use of bioswales and other engineered soil-based habitats to provide stormwater infiltration and other ecosystem functions. In addition to avoiding the environmental and financial costs of expanding traditional built infrastructure, green infrastructure is thought to generate cobenefits in the form of diverse ecological processes performed by its plant and microbial communities. Yet, although plant communities in these habitats are closely managed, we lack basic knowledge about how engineered ecosystems impact the distribution and functioning of soil bacteria. We sequenced amplicons of the 16S ribosomal subunit, as well as seven genes associated with functional pathways, generated from both total (DNA-based) and expressed (RNA) soil communities in the Bronx, NYC, NY, in order to test whether bioswale soils host characteristic bacterial communities with evidence for enriched microbial functioning, compared to nonengineered soils in park lawns and tree pits. Bioswales had distinct, phylogenetically diverse bacterial communities, including taxa associated with nutrient cycling and metabolism of hydrocarbons and other pollutants. Bioswale soils also had a significantly greater diversity of genes involved in several functional pathways, including carbon fixation ( cbbL-R [ cbbL gene, red-like subunit] and apsA ), nitrogen cycling ( noxZ and amoA ), and contaminant degradation ( bphA ); conversely, no functional genes were significantly more abundant in nonengineered soils. These results provide preliminary evidence that urban land management can shape the diversity and activity of soil communities, with positive consequences for genetic resources underlying valuable ecological functions, including biogeochemical cycling and degradation of common urban pollutants. IMPORTANCE Management of urban soil biodiversity by favoring taxa associated with decontamination or other microbial metabolic processes is a

  19. [Genetic diversity of Sabina vulgaris populations at different succession stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yu; Wang, Lin-He; Zhang, Guosheng; Enhe, Bayaer; Liang, Xiaorong

    2006-11-01

    By means of random amplified polymorphic DNA markers, a molecular ecological study was made with Sabina vulgaris populations at 4 succession stages in Maowusu sandy grassland, aimed to reveal the relationships between molecular variation and succession stages. A total of 17 random primers were selected for amplification, and 190 repetitive loci were produced, of which, 173 were polymorphic. The data were analyzed by POPGENE 3. 2 Version 1. 31. The results showed that the genetic diversity of S. vulgaris populations was high, and changed with succession stages. The percentage of polymorphic loci in each S. vulgaris population ranged from 64.21% to 74.63%, with the highest in early succession stage Artemisia ordosica + S. vulgaris on semi-fixed sand dunes, and the lowest in sub-climax stage S. vulgaris on fixed dunes. The genetic differentiation among the populations was small (G(st) = 0.1761), and 82.39% of it was within the populations. Cluster analysis demonstrated that the populations at similar succession stage clustered together, suggesting that the genetic differentiation was closely related to succession stage. The genetic diversity indicated by Nei index ranged in 0. 2163 -0. 2564, and the gene flow (N(m) *) was 2.7972, indicating that more gene exchange occurred within the populations, which prevented the genetic differentiation among the populations at different succession stages.

  20. Genetic diversity and selection regulates evolution of infectious bronchitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Haroldo; van Santen, Vicky L; Jackwood, Mark W

    2012-09-01

    Conventional and molecular epidemiologic studies have confirmed the ability of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) to rapidly evolve and successfully circumvent extensive vaccination programs implemented since the early 1950s. IBV evolution has often been explained as variation in gene frequencies as if evolution were driven by genetic drift alone. However, the mechanisms regulating the evolution of IBV include both the generation of genetic diversity and the selection process. IBV's generation of genetic diversity has been extensively investigated and ultimately involves mutations and recombination events occurring during viral replication. The relevance of the selection process has been further understood more recently by identifying genetic and phenotypic differences between IBV populations prior to, and during, replication in the natural host. Accumulating evidence suggests that multiple environmental forces within the host, including immune responses (or lack thereof) and affinity for cell receptors, as well as physical and biochemical conditions, are responsible for the selection process. Some scientists have used or adopted the related quasispecies frame to explain IBV evolution. The quasispecies frame, while providing a distinct explanation of the dynamics of populations in which mutation is a frequent event, exhibits relevant limitations which are discussed herein. Instead, it seems that IBV populations evolving by the generation of genetic variability and selection on replicons follow the evolutionary mechanisms originally proposed by Darwin. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the evolution of IBV is of basic relevance and, without doubt, essential to appropriately control and prevent the disease.

  1. Turtle carapace anomalies: the roles of genetic diversity and environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Velo-Antón

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic anomalies are common in wild populations and multiple genetic, biotic and abiotic factors might contribute to their formation. Turtles are excellent models for the study of developmental instability because anomalies are easily detected in the form of malformations, additions, or reductions in the number of scutes or scales.In this study, we integrated field observations, manipulative experiments, and climatic and genetic approaches to investigate the origin of carapace scute anomalies across Iberian populations of the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis. The proportion of anomalous individuals varied from 3% to 69% in local populations, with increasing frequency of anomalies in northern regions. We found no significant effect of climatic and soil moisture, or climatic temperature on the occurrence of anomalies. However, lower genetic diversity and inbreeding were good predictors of the prevalence of scute anomalies among populations. Both decreasing genetic diversity and increasing proportion of anomalous individuals in northern parts of the Iberian distribution may be linked to recolonization events from the Southern Pleistocene refugium.Overall, our results suggest that developmental instability in turtle carapace formation might be caused, at least in part, by genetic factors, although the influence of environmental factors affecting the developmental stability of turtle carapace cannot be ruled out. Further studies of the effects of environmental factors, pollutants and heritability of anomalies would be useful to better understand the complex origin of anomalies in natural populations.

  2. Petroleum-influenced beach sediments of the campeche bank, Mexico: Diversity and bacterial community structure assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosano-Hernandez, M. C.; Ramirez-Saad, H.; Fernandez-Linares, L.; Xoconostle, B.

    2009-07-01

    In Mexican, either spilled or seeped out petroleum impacts nearly 300 km of the beach between Dos Bocas (Tabasco State) to Champoton town (Campeche State), where between 9 to exceptionally 9 to exceptionally 300 tonnes of oil as tar balls have been measured. This study was focused to explore, for the first time, the bacterial diversity and community structure ({alpha}-diversity)- in a kilometric scale on petroleum influenced sediments of 100 km of sandy beach. (Author)

  3. Petroleum-influenced beach sediments of the campeche bank, Mexico: Diversity and bacterial community structure assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosano-Hernandez, M. C.; Ramirez-Saad, H.; Fernandez-Linares, L.; Xoconostle, B.

    2009-01-01

    In Mexican, either spilled or seeped out petroleum impacts nearly 300 km of the beach between Dos Bocas (Tabasco State) to Champoton town (Campeche State), where between 9 to exceptionally 9 to exceptionally 300 tonnes of oil as tar balls have been measured. This study was focused to explore, for the first time, the bacterial diversity and community structure (α-diversity)- in a kilometric scale on petroleum influenced sediments of 100 km of sandy beach. (Author)

  4. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Korean Ginseng Field Soil Are Shifted by Cultivation Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Hoang, Van-An; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Kang, Jong-Pyo; Kang, Chang Ho; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Traditional molecular methods have been used to examine bacterial communities in ginseng-cultivated soil samples in a time-dependent manner. Despite these efforts, our understanding of the bacterial community is still inadequate. Therefore, in this study, a high-throughput sequencing approach was employed to investigate bacterial diversity in various ginseng field soil samples over cultivation times of 2, 4, and 6 years in the first and second rounds of cultivation. We used non-cultivated soil samples to perform a comparative study. Moreover, this study assessed changes in the bacterial community associated with soil depth and the health state of the ginseng. Bacterial richness decreased through years of cultivation. This study detected differences in relative abundance of bacterial populations between the first and second rounds of cultivation, years of cultivation, and health states of ginseng. These bacterial populations were mainly distributed in the classes Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteria. In addition, we found that pH, available phosphorus, and exchangeable Ca+ seemed to have high correlations with bacterial class in ginseng cultivated soil.

  5. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Korean Ginseng Field Soil Are Shifted by Cultivation Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van-An; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Kang, Jong-Pyo; Kang, Chang Ho; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Traditional molecular methods have been used to examine bacterial communities in ginseng-cultivated soil samples in a time-dependent manner. Despite these efforts, our understanding of the bacterial community is still inadequate. Therefore, in this study, a high-throughput sequencing approach was employed to investigate bacterial diversity in various ginseng field soil samples over cultivation times of 2, 4, and 6 years in the first and second rounds of cultivation. We used non-cultivated soil samples to perform a comparative study. Moreover, this study assessed changes in the bacterial community associated with soil depth and the health state of the ginseng. Bacterial richness decreased through years of cultivation. This study detected differences in relative abundance of bacterial populations between the first and second rounds of cultivation, years of cultivation, and health states of ginseng. These bacterial populations were mainly distributed in the classes Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteria. In addition, we found that pH, available phosphorus, and exchangeable Ca+ seemed to have high correlations with bacterial class in ginseng cultivated soil. PMID:27187071

  6. Bacterial diversity in oil-polluted marine coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-González, Alejandro; Marqués, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Marine environments harbour a persistent microbial seed which can be shaped by changes of the environmental conditions such as contamination by petroleum components. Oil spills, together with small but continuous discharges of oil from transportation and recreational activities, are important sources of hydrocarbon pollution within the marine realm. Consequently, prokaryotic communities have become well pre-adapted toward oil pollution, and many microorganisms that are exposed to its presence develop an active degradative response. The natural attenuation of oil pollutants, as has been demonstrated in many sites, is modulated according to the intrinsic environmental properties such as the availability of terminal electron acceptors and elemental nutrients, together with the degree of pollution and the type of hydrocarbon fractions present. Whilst dynamics in the bacterial communities in the aerobic zones of coastal sediments are well characterized and the key players in hydrocarbon biodegradation have been identified, the subtidal ecology of the anaerobic community is still not well understood. However, current data suggest common patterns of response in these ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial flagellar capping proteins adopt diverse oligomeric states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postel, Sandra; Deredge, Daniel; Bonsor, Daniel A.; Yu, Xiong; Diederichs, Kay; Helmsing, Saskia; Vromen, Aviv; Friedler, Assaf; Hust, Michael; Egelman, Edward H.; Beckett, Dorothy; Wintrode, Patrick L.; Sundberg, Eric J. (UV); (Braunschweig); (Maryland-MED); (Konstanz); (Maryland); (Hebrew)

    2016-09-24

    Flagella are crucial for bacterial motility and pathogenesis. The flagellar capping protein (FliD) regulates filament assembly by chaperoning and sorting flagellin (FliC) proteins after they traverse the hollow filament and exit the growing flagellum tip. In the absence of FliD, flagella are not formed, resulting in impaired motility and infectivity. Here, we report the 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of FliD fromPseudomonas aeruginosa, the first high-resolution structure of any FliD protein from any bacterium. Using this evidence in combination with a multitude of biophysical and functional analyses, we find thatPseudomonasFliD exhibits unexpected structural similarity to other flagellar proteins at the domain level, adopts a unique hexameric oligomeric state, and depends on flexible determinants for oligomerization. Considering that the flagellin filaments on which FliD oligomers are affixed vary in protofilament number between bacteria, our results suggest that FliD oligomer stoichiometries vary across bacteria to complement their filament assemblies.

  8. Genetic diversity and genetic structure of the Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) populations from Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Sun; Markov, Nickolay; Voloshina, Inna; Argunov, Alexander; Bayarlkhagva, Damdingiin; Oh, Jang Geun; Park, Yong-Su; Min, Mi-Sook; Lee, Hang; Kim, Kyung Seok

    2015-08-18

    The roe deer, Capreolus sp., is one of the most widespread meso-mammals of Palearctic distribution, and includes two species, the European roe deer, C. capreolus inhabiting mainly Europe, and the Siberian roe deer, C. pygargus, distributed throughout continental Asia. Although there are a number of genetic studies concerning European roe deer, the Siberian roe deer has been studied less, and none of these studies use microsatellite markers. Natural processes have led to genetic structuring in wild populations. To understand how these factors have affected genetic structure and connectivity of Siberian roe deer, we investigated variability at 12 microsatellite loci for Siberian roe deer from ten localities in Asia. Moderate levels of genetic diversity (H(E) = 0.522 to 0.628) were found in all populations except in Jeju Island, South Korea, where the diversity was lowest (H(E) = 0.386). Western populations showed relatively low genetic diversity and higher degrees of genetic differentiation compared with eastern populations (mean Ar = 3.54 (east), 2.81 (west), mean F(ST) = 0.122). Bayesian-based clustering analysis revealed the existence of three genetically distinct groups (clusters) for Siberian roe deer, which comprise of the Southeastern group (Mainland Korea, Russian Far East, Trans-Baikal region and Northern part of Mongolia), Northwestern group (Western Siberia and Ural in Russia) and Jeju Island population. Genetic analyses including AMOVA (F(RT) = 0.200), Barrier and PCA also supported genetic differentiation among regions separated primarily by major mountain ridges, suggesting that mountains played a role in the genetic differentiation of Siberian roe deer. On the other hand, genetic evidence also suggests an ongoing migration that may facilitate genetic admixture at the border areas between two groups. Our results reveal an apparent pattern of genetic differentiation among populations inhabiting Asia, showing moderate levels of genetic diversity with an

  9. A Molecular Genetic Basis Explaining Altered Bacterial Behavior in Space

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Bacterial behavior has been observed to change during spaceflight. Higher final cell counts enhanced biofilm formation increased virulence and reduced susceptibility...

  10. The strains recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471) can be certified as non-genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Yamada, Masami; Awogi, Takumi; Hakura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial reverse mutation test, commonly called Ames test, is used worldwide. In Japan, the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are regulated under the Cartagena Domestic Law, and organisms obtained by self-cloning and/or natural occurrence would be exempted from the law case by case. The strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471), have been considered as non-GMOs because they can be constructed by self-cloning or naturally occurring bacterial strains, or do not disturb the biological diversity. The present article explains the reasons why these tester strains should be classified as non-GMOs.

  11. Response of phytoplankton and bacterial biomass during a wastewater effluent diversion into nearshore coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, David A.; Gellene, Alyssa G.; Smith, Jayme; Seubert, Erica L.; Campbell, Victoria; Sukhatme, Gaurav S.; Seegers, Bridget; Jones, Burton H.; Lie, Alle A. Y.; Terrado, Ramon; Howard, Meredith D. A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Hayashi, Kendra; Ryan, John; Birch, James; Demir-Hilton, Elif; Yamahara, Kevan; Scholin, Chris; Mengel, Michael; Robertson, George

    2017-02-01

    A 3-week diversion of the Orange County Sanitation District effluent discharge into nearshore waters off Newport Beach, CA constituted a considerable injection of secondarily-treated effluent into the coastal ecosystem. The location ≈1.6 km from shore, shallow water depth (≈16 m), volume and nutrient content of the discharge (≈5.3 × 108 L day-1 of effluent with inorganic nitrogen concentration >2 mM) during the diversion raised concerns regarding the potential for stimulating phytoplankton blooms and, in particular, blooms of toxic species. Remarkably, phytoplankton standing stocks during the event and shortly thereafter did not reach values associated even with minor blooms historically observed in the region (generally community composition were observed. Diatom abundances increased early during the diversion, dinoflagellates, phototrophic picoplanktonic eukaryotes and other algae increased mid-diversion, and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus) increased near the end of the diversion. Concentrations of domoic acid (a phycotoxin commonly present in the area) remained near or below detection throughout the diversion, and abundances of potentially-harmful algal species were unresponsive. Bacterial biomass increased during the diversion, and equaled or exceeded total phytoplankton biomass in most samples. Abundances of microbial grazers were also elevated during the diversion. We speculate that nutrient uptake by the bacterial biomass, acting in concert with or a response to a negative effect of disinfection byproducts associated with chlorination on phytoplankton physiology, played a significant role in muting the response of the phytoplankton to nutrients released in the effluent.

  12. Bacterial diversity and composition in the fluid of pitcher plants of the genus Nepenthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yayoi; Chaffron, Samuel; Salcher, Michaela M; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Kobayashi, Masaki J; Diway, Bibian; von Mering, Christian; Pernthaler, Jakob; Shimizu, Kentaro K

    2015-07-01

    Pitchers are modified leaves used by carnivorous plants for trapping prey. Their fluids contain digestive enzymes from the plant and they harbor abundant microbes. In this study, the diversity of bacterial communities was assessed in Nepenthes pitcher fluids and the composition of the bacterial community was compared to that in other environments, including the phyllosphere of Arabidopsis, animal guts and another pitcher plant, Sarracenia. Diversity was measured by 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. A total of 232,823 sequences were obtained after chimera and singleton removal that clustered into 3260 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (3% dissimilarity), which were taxonomically distributed over 17 phyla, 25 classes, 45 orders, 100 families, and 195 genera. Pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization yielded similar estimates of community composition. Most pitchers contained high proportions of unique OTUs, and only 22 OTUs (<0.6%) were shared by ≥14/16 samples, suggesting a unique bacterial assemblage in each pitcher at the OTU level. Diversity analysis at the class level revealed that the bacterial communities of both opened and unopened pitchers were most similar to that of Sarracenia and to that in the phyllosphere. Therefore, the bacterial community in pitchers may be formed by environmental filtering and/or by phyllosphere bacteria. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  13. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN GENETIC DIVERSITY AND ANTHROPOGENIC DISTURBANCE IN MIDWESTERN STREAM-DWELLING MINNOWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthropogenic disturbances may leave imprints on patterns of intraspecific genetic diversity through their effects on population size, adaptation, migration, and mutation. We examined patterns of genetic diversity for a stream-dwelling minnow (the central stoneroller, Campostoma...

  14. Nephelium lappaceum L. genetic diversity by morphological and molecular characterization

    OpenAIRE

    De Andrade, Renata Aparecida [UNESP; Wickert, Ester [UNESP; Martins, Antonio Baldo Geraldo [UNESP; De Andrade, Mariana Macedo Costa [UNESP; De Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes [UNESP

    2011-01-01

    The rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) is an exotic fruit with great market potential in Brazil. However, there are few available informations about plants with potential for cultivation, because great morphologic variation is observed among plants and for consequence, little uniformity in the orchards and in the fruits. This research had for objective to evaluate the genetic diversity of a collection of rambutan plants obtained by seeds through morfo-chemical analyses of plants and fruits and by...

  15. Ecological immunology and genetic diversity of the endangered Mauritius parakeet

    OpenAIRE

    Tollington, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Studies of avian ecological immunology attempt to describe the biotic and abiotic factors which explain natural variation in immune function within and among free-living bird species. Understanding this variation and the trade-offs associated with maintaining appropriate immune defences and individual life history variables has important implications for the conservation of endangered species, many of which are characterised by small population size and reduced genetic diversity. Such species...

  16. Female promiscuity and genetic diversity in passerine birds

    OpenAIRE

    Gohli, Jostein

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation is about female promiscuity in passerine birds. By using comparative analytical approaches, I have tried to determine why there is such variation in the frequency of this behaviour. I have found that promiscuous species/populations have higher genetic diversity both at neutral loci and at loci directly involved in the recognition of pathogens. These observations may point to benefits from heterozygosity-fitness correlation or increased immunocompetence in offspring. The corr...

  17. (SSR) markers for analysis of genetic diversity in African rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bonny Oloka

    2015-05-06

    May 6, 2015 ... 161/161. 194/196. 32 WAC 116. AfricaRice. 116/122. 121/121. 182/182. 146/146. 217/217. 210/210. 157/189. 231/257. 157/157. 174/177. 33 AER-75 ..... Life Technologies Inc., USA. Table 3. Estimated genetic diversity parameters obtained at each locus across 99 genotypes. Marker. No. of Alleles. He. Ho.

  18. Sphagnum mosses harbour highly specific bacterial diversity during their whole lifecycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragina, Anastasia; Berg, Christian; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Shcherbakov, Andrey; Chebotar, Vladimir; Berg, Gabriele

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge about Sphagnum-associated microbial communities, their structure and their origin is important to understand and maintain climate-relevant Sphagnum-dominated bog ecosystems. We studied bacterial communities of two cosmopolitan Sphagnum species, which are well adapted to different abiotic parameters (Sphagnum magellanicum, which are strongly acidic and ombrotrophic, and Sphagnum fallax, which are weakly acidic and mesotrophic), in three Alpine bogs in Austria by a multifaceted approach. Great differences between bacterial fingerprints of both Sphagna were found independently from the site. This remarkable specificity was confirmed by a cloning and a deep sequencing approach. Besides the common Alphaproteobacteria, we found a discriminative spectrum of bacteria; although Gammaproteobacteria dominated S. magellanicum, S. fallax was mainly colonised by Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes. Using this information for fluorescent in situ hybridisation analyses, corresponding colonisation patterns for Alphaproteobacteria and Planctomycetes were detected. Bacterial colonies were found in high abundances inside the dead big hyalocytes, but they were always connected with the living chlorocytes. Using multivariate statistical analysis, the abiotic factors nutrient richness and pH were identified to modulate the composition of Sphagnum-specific bacterial communities. Interestingly, we found that the immense bacterial diversity was transferred via the sporophyte to the gametophyte, which can explain the high specificity of Sphagnum-associated bacteria over long distances. In contrast to higher plants, which acquire their bacteria mainly from the environment, mosses as the phylogenetically oldest land plants maintain their bacterial diversity within the whole lifecycle.

  19. Influence of long-term land application of class B biosolids on soil bacterial diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated the influence of annual land applications of Class B biosolids on soil bacterial diversity monitored over a 20 year period. Each annual land application was followed by a cotton crop. The study was initiated in 1986 at the University of Arizona Marana Agricultural Center, 21 m...

  20. Study of fecal bacterial diversity in Yunnan snub-nosed monkey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    probably had some link with human obesity (Ley et al.,. 2006). J272 and J278 had 94 and 93% similarity, respectively, with the uncultured bacteria isolated from ... in the microbiota of R. bieti, it reflects the fecal bacterial diversity of R. bieti to a large extent by the use of fecal analysis based on molecular scatology. Analysis of ...